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Sample records for thrombocytopenic purpura targeting

  1. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Simeon-Aznar, C P; Cuenca-Luque, R; Fonollosa-Pla, V; Bosch-Gil, J A

    1992-01-01

    The case of a patient admitted with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura nine years after developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reported. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with SLE has been described on other occasions, but in most patients the diagnosis of SLE precedes that of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The unusual sequence and the chronological separation of the two diseases is emphasised. PMID:1575591

  3. Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, W. G.; Allan, N. C.; Perry, D. J.; Stockdill, G.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a 23-year-old male is reported. This is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's disease having been previously described in only two cases. PMID:6541338

  4. Autoimmune Hepatitis Associated with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akihiro; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Fujimori, Kazuya; Morita, Susumu; Shigeno, Takashi; Maejima, Toshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Although autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is frequently complicated with chronic thyroiditis or other autoimmune disorders, reports on its association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are scarce. We herein describe a case of AIH associated with ITP. A 75-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital due to increased aminotransferase levels and severe thrombocytopenia. Elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected, and tests for platelet-associated IgG and anti-nuclear antibody were positive. Following the diagnosis of AIH-associated ITP, prednisolone treatment of 0.6 mg/kg/day resulted in a decrease in the aminotransferase levels and an increased platelet count. PMID:28090042

  5. A rare combination of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viner, Maya; Murakhovskaya, Irina

    2016-11-24

    Thrombocytopenia, in the setting of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombotic events, is characteristic of both thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish between these two syndromes. We present a 41-year-old woman with chronic, relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. She had clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome without meeting laboratory criteria of the Sydney classification system. In the literature, there have only been nine cases of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Seven of the nine cases suffered from one or multiple strokes, a common feature in antiphospholipid syndrome, but an uncommon finding in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We introduce the possibility of an association between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Systematic testing of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies in patients who present with neurological symptoms and thrombocytopenia, in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, may help with the diagnosis of the rare thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-antiphospholipid syndrome combination.

  6. [Pregnancy and labor in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Tampakoudis, P; Billi, H; Tantanassis, T; Kalachanis, I; Garipidou, B; Sinakos, Z; Mantalenakis, S

    1995-10-01

    Clinical data from eight pregnant women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were retrospectively analyses. The mean age of the women was 28.2 years. Five women underwent splenectomy during childhood. The lowest maternal platelet count observed ranged from 8000 to 88000/mm3. Genital bleeding occurred in only one case. Treatment was based on administration of corticosteroids with or without human-pooled immunoglobulins. Caesarian section was performed in all cases. Six newborns were healthy and had a successful subsequent course. Two infants died, one in utero because of abruptio placentae and the other one 1 month post partum because of a cerebral haematoma. After a mean follow-up of eighteen months, thrombocytopenia is still present in two women, despite the continuous treatment. In conclusion, ITP rather rarely coincides with pregnancy. Treatment is usually successful for the mother but the risk for the fetus remains considerably high.

  7. Platelet antibodies in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Veenhoven, W A; Van der Schans, G S; Nieweg, H O

    1980-01-01

    An immunofluorescence (IF) technique for the detection of antibodies was applied to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Serum platelet antibodies were found in thirteen out of twenty-two patients (59 percent) with active disease, but in only four out of fifteen patients (27 percent) who had attained remission. Direct tests for platelet-associated IgG were positive in 36 and 44 percent of these patients respectively. In two cases IgM was observed on the patients' platelet membranes. C3 was not detedted on patients' platelets. Platelet-associated IgG was also found in several other disorders and its occurrence is not therefore diagnostic of ITP. In addition, serum platelet antibodies do not indicate specifically ITP as they may also be due to previous isoimmunization. Antibodies in the sera of patients with ITP generally did not fix Clq and in most cases bound to platelets only in the presence of EDTA. In contrast, isoantibodies often fixed Clq and they had equal affinity for platelets suspended in ACD or EDTA plasma. This was confirmed by quantitative data on IgG binding by platelets obtained by measuring 125-I-labelled protein A uptake. The simplicity of the IF technique permits its routine application and the technique may give useful information with respect to the nature of the antibodies. It must, however, be considered of limited value in the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:6991171

  8. How I treat refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sayani, Farzana A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is characterized by thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) without an obvious cause, and may include fever, mild renal failure, and neurologic deficits. It is characterized by a deficiency of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving enzyme, ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase, with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13), resulting in formation of microthrombi in the high sheer environment of the microvasculature. This causes microvascular occlusion, MAHA, and organ ischemia. Diagnosis is based on the presence of clinical symptoms, laboratory aberrations consistent with MAHA, decreased ADAMTS13 activity, and possibly presence of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. Upfront treatment of acute TTP includes plasma exchange and corticosteroids. A significant number of patients are refractory to this treatment and will require further interventions. There are limited data and consensus on the management of the refractory TTP patient. Management involves simultaneously ruling out other causes of thrombocytopenia and MAHA, while also considering other treatments. In this article, we describe our management of the patient with refractory TTP, and discuss use of rituximab, increased plasma exchange, splenectomy, and immunosuppressive options, including cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cyclosporine. We also review recent evidence for the potential roles of bortezomib and N-acetylcysteine, and explore new therapeutic approaches, including recombinant ADAMTS13 and anti-VWF therapy. PMID:25784681

  9. Therapeutic splenectomy in immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Wani, N A; Parray, F Q

    2000-01-01

    The effects of splenectomy in 41 patients managed from 1982 to 1995 at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir), India, were studied. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was the main indication for therapeutic splenectomy among all the hematologic disorders. The mean age was 30 years (range 7-64), and the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. The mean platelet count in the preoperative period was 31,751/mm(3) (range 4000-85,000). All patients presented with thrombocytopenia, i.e., platelet count of <100,000/mm(3). In addition, 5 patients presented with anemia, i.e., Hb <10 g%. Among the patients with thrombocytopenia, 30 patients presented with counts <50,000/mm(3) and 11 patients presented with counts between 50,000-100,000/mm(3). None of the patients presented with leukopenia. The morbidity observed was 15% and mortality was 2%. The response to splenectomy was complete for thrombocytopenia in 3 patients and partial in 5 patients; 4 patients failed to show any response. In anemic patients, 4 patients showed complete response and 1 patient showed no response. The prognosis was excellent in patients with platelet count >50,000/mm(3), age <50 years, no concomitant disease, and disease of shorter duration.

  10. Pulmonary Endarterectomy in a Patient with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yıldızeli, Bedrettin; Yanartaş, Mehmed; Keskin, Sibel; Atagündüz, Işık; Altınay, Ece

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients are at high risk for bleeding complications regarding surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. We report an ITP patient with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent uncomplicated pulmonary endarterectomy with receiving postoperative intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The positive outcome of this case may suggest that pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is performed safely for ITP patients. PMID:26090264

  11. Genetics Home Reference: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... purpura also results from a reduction in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity; however, people with the acquired form do not ... activity of the enzyme. A lack of ADAMTS13 enzyme activity disrupts the usual balance between bleeding and clotting. ...

  12. Multivessel Coronary Thrombosis in a Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yagmur, Julide; Cansel, Mehmet; Acikgoz, Nusret; Yagmur, Murat; Eyupkoca, Ferhat; Ermis, Necip; Akturk, Erdal

    2012-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was admitted to our hospital with severe chest pain. Electrocardiography revealed inferolateral myocardial infarction. The patient underwent immediate coronary angiography, which revealed thrombi in the left coronary system. Percutaneous intervention was not indicated, because the thrombi had occluded the distal segments of multiple coronary arteries. Administration of tirofiban satisfactorily dissolved the thrombi. PMID:23304046

  13. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-03-01

    Little research focuses on the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. This study investigated whether immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using data of individuals enrolled in Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5472 subjects aged 1-84 years with a new diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the purpura group since 1998-2010 and 21,887 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected subjects without immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the non-purpura group. The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. We used the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to measure the hazard ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The overall incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.47-fold higher in the purpura group than that in the non-purpura group (3.78 vs. 0.58 per 10,000 person-years, 95 % CI 5.83-7.18). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted HR of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.3 (95 % CI 2.58-15.4) for the purpura group, as compared with the non-purpura group. We conclude that individuals with immune thrombocytopenic purpura are 6.47-fold more likely to have human immunodeficiency virus infection than those without immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We suggest not all patients, but only those who have risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection should receive testing for undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection when they develop immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  14. Helicobacter pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Garofano, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2012-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori has a well-demonstrated role in several gastroduodenal diseases, including peptic ulcer disease, chronic active gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. In addition, more recently, several studies have focused on the possible causal role of H. pylori in various extragastric disorders, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, skin, and autoimmune conditions. The current status of the research on the pathogenesis, clinical and therapeutic aspects of H. pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults and children will be addressed in this narrative review.

  15. Immunodeficiency-associated thrombocytopenic purpura (IDTP). Response to splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P A; Abrams, D I; Rayner, A A; Hohn, D C

    1987-10-01

    Immunodeficiency-associated thrombocytopenic purpura (IDTP) is a feature of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome--related complex. Current therapeutic modalities for IDTP include splenectomy and the administration of corticosteroids or other agents. Empiric treatment of IDTP has been analogous to that for immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present report reviews 15 patients who underwent splenectomy for IDTP, demonstrates the successful use of surgical therapy, and defines our indications for splenectomy in the treatment of this disorder. Thirteen of 15 patients had initially failed to respond to steroid therapy. Fourteen patients (93%) initially responded to splenectomy, with platelet counts increasing to 150 X 10(9)/L (150,000/mm3) or greater. A continuing complete response was achieved in nine patients (60%) following splenectomy. After postsurgical adjunctive therapy, durable remission was achieved in 73% (11/15) of the patients. Complications occurred in three patients, and there were no deaths. The mean follow-up was 12.4 months. Splenectomy may be performed in the treatment of IDTP with acceptable morbidity and likelihood of response.

  16. Consensus on the standardization of terminology in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Scully, M; Cataland, S; Coppo, P; de la Rubia, J; Friedman, K D; Kremer Hovinga, J; Lämmle, B; Matsumoto, M; Pavenski, K; Sadler, E; Sarode, R; Wu, H

    2017-02-01

    Essentials An international collaboration provides a consensus for clinical definitions. This concerns thrombotic microangiopathies and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The consensus defines diagnosis, disease monitoring and response to treatment. Requirements for ADAMTS-13 are given.

  17. Rapid encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Golla, Sunitha; Horkan, Clare; Dogaru, Grigore; Teske, Thomas E; Christopher, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rho (D) immune globulin intravenous (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment is infrequently noted. A single case of irreversible encephalopathy following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a second case of encephalopathy following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  18. A Case of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Secondary to Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Nayak, Sachidananda; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The haematological abnormalities associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis were known to human beings since decades but Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis have been reported only in a couple of instances. We report a 27 year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with fever, shortness of breath, haematuria, epistaxis and generalized petechiae. The sputum positivity for Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) and chest X-ray reports were suggestive of active pulmonary tuberculosis in our patient. Clinical and laboratory parameters including bone marrow aspiration cytology diagnosed the case to be ITP. Patient was put on Directly Observed Treatment and Short course (DOTS) category-1 Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy (ATT) and prednisone following which thrombocytopenia was corrected and there was complete recovery of the patient without recurrence of thrombocytopenia. PMID:27891382

  19. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: three peripartum cases and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ab Rahman, Wan Suriana Wan; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ahmed, Suhair Abbas; Hassan, Mohd Nazri; Husin, Azlan

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a medical emergency characterized by occlusive microangiopathy due to intravascular platelet aggregation. This event results in damage to the red blood cells (RBCs) known as microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). Schistocytes are circulating fragments of damaged RBCs that have different morphological features including keratocytes, helmet cells, and spherocytes. It is critical to report even a small number of these abnormal RBCs in the peripheral blood and to be alert for the possible diagnosis of TTP, especially in unexplained anemia and thrombocytopenia. The application of pentad criteria in the diagnosis has been reviewed, and the challenges still remained on the hematologic evidence of this disorder. In the 3 cases discussed here, the red cell morphological diagnosis gave an impact on TTP diagnosis, but overdiagnosis might be encountered in obstetrical patients due to nonspecific diagnostic criteria.

  20. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a syndrome of intravascular platelet consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Neame, P. B.; Hirsh, J.; Browman, G.; Denburg, J.; D'Souza, T. J.; Gallus, A.; Brain, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    In four of five patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in whom serial tests of hemostatic function were performed, severe thrombocytopenia, normal plasma fibrinogen concentrations and mildly increased concentrations of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Widespread platelet thrombi were found in arterioles and capillaries. Fibrin could be seen around some of the platelet clumps and was the main component in a small number of the thrombi in two patients. The observations show that TTP is a disorder in which intravascular platelet consumption results in disseminated platelet thrombosis. The coagulation system is apparently activated secondarily to platelet aggregation and variable quantities of fibrin are incorporated into the thrombi. Clinical improvement resulted from combined therapy with corticosteroids, heparin and drugs that suppress platelet function. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1084215

  1. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Three Peripartum Cases and Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ab Rahman, Wan Suriana Wan; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ahmed, Suhair Abbas; Hassan, Mohd Nazri; Husin, Azlan

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a medical emergency characterized by occlusive microangiopathy due to intravascular platelet aggregation. This event results in damage to the red blood cells (RBCs) known as microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). Schistocytes are circulating fragments of damaged RBCs that have different morphological features including keratocytes, helmet cells, and spherocytes. It is critical to report even a small number of these abnormal RBCs in the peripheral blood and to be alert for the possible diagnosis of TTP, especially in unexplained anemia and thrombocytopenia. The application of pentad criteria in the diagnosis has been reviewed, and the challenges still remained on the hematologic evidence of this disorder. In the 3 cases discussed here, the red cell morphological diagnosis gave an impact on TTP diagnosis, but overdiagnosis might be encountered in obstetrical patients due to nonspecific diagnostic criteria. PMID:24093001

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: diagnosis, pathogenesis and modern therapy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    1998-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon multisystem disorder, sometimes associated with predisposing conditions such as pregnancy, cancer, exposure to certain drugs, bone marrow transplantation and HIV-1 infection. An abnormal interaction between the vascular endothelium and platelets which occurs in certain organs leads to thrombosis, endothelial proliferation, minimal inflammation and micro-angiopathic haemolysis. Recent studies suggest that endothelial cell perturbation and apoptosis caused by an as yet unknown plasma factor(s) may lead to the release of abnormal von Willebrand factor which facilitates the deposition of platelet microthrombi. Exchange transfusions of plasma or plasma-cryosupernatant remain the cornerstone of the treatment of TTP along with corticosteroids, platelet inhibitor drugs, vincristine and splenectomy. In most cases remissions can be attained, and cures are now common-although approximately one-half of the patients will relapse. While relapses are usually milder, they still carry a significant mortality and preventive therapies are not always effective.

  3. [Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura --Pathophysiology and Assays of ADAMTS13 Activity].

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder classified with a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). TTP is caused by a deficiency of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease called ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin type1 motif 13). Low ADAMTS13 levels result in increased ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers (UL-VWFM), which induce platelet adhesion and thrombosis. Congenital TTP (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome: USS) is an inherited disorder of ADAMTS13, and the other more commonly is an acquired TTP caused by autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. This article reviews the progress of ADAMTS13 activity measurement and the resulting changes in the diagnosis and treatment of TTP.

  4. ADAMTS13 and von Willebrand factor in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was a mystery for over half a century until the discovery of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 is primarily synthesized in the liver, and its main function is to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF) anchored on the endothelial surface, in circulation, and at the sites of vascular injury. Deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) resulting from mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene or autoantibodies against ADAMTS13 causes hereditary or acquired (idiopathic) TTP. ADAMTS13 activity is usually normal or modestly reduced (>20%) in other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation, infection, and disseminated malignancy or in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Plasma infusion or exchange remains the initial treatment of choice to date, but novel therapeutics such as recombinant ADAMTS13 and gene therapy are under development. Moreover, ADAMTS13 deficiency has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of myocardial infarction, stroke, cerebral malaria, and preeclampsia.

  5. [A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yayoi; Mukai, Masaya; Gotoh, Hideki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takada, Akio; Takenouchi, Toshinao

    2006-10-01

    We described a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A-60-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, disconsciousness, and general fatigue. 32 years ago, she was diagnosed as SLE with Raynaud's phenomenon, rash, photosensitivity, arthritis, lymphocytopenia, and ANA. Her SLE was well controlled with 10 mg predonisolone as a maintance dose until several weeks ago. On admission, severe thrombocytopenia (0.7x10(4)/microl) and other laboratory data revealed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and renal dysfunction, Immediately after diagnosed as TTP, plasma exchange and corticosteroid therapy started. In spite of the treatment, disconsciousness progressed and systemic convulsion occurred and died 4 days after admission. Autopsied examination revealed diffuse microvascular hyalinized thrombi in heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and pancreas. Some microvascular thrombi were detected in lymph nodes, bone marrow, intestine. Pathological diagnosis of TTP was made on microvascular hyalinized platelet thrombi in organs. Von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (VWF-CP) activity in plasma on set is less than 0.5 percent of normal and inhibitor for VWF-CP was detected. We here report a valuable case for analysis of pathogenesis in SLE-TTP.

  6. Changes in splenic microcirculatory pathways in chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E E; MacDonald, I C; Groom, A C

    1991-09-15

    The spleen plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP); it produces massive quantities of antiplatelet antibodies, leading to accelerated phagocytosis of platelets. Lymphoid hyperplasia typically occurs in the spleen, characterized by large numbers of lymphatic nodules with active germinal centers. Whether changes in splenic microcirculatory pathways also occur is not known. We have studied this question by scanning electron microscopy of corrosion casts, comparing spleens removed from patients with ITP with normal spleens obtained from organ transplant donors. The casts demonstrate two major changes in microcirculatory pathways in ITP. Firstly, a striking proliferation of arterioles and capillaries is found in the white pulp and marginal zone (MZ), seen as extensive vascularization in 92.3% of lymphatic nodules (n = 191) versus 0.6% (n = 224) in normal spleens. Secondly, the marginal sinus, a series of flattened, anastomosing vascular spaces between the white pulp and MZ, is absent in 89.4% of lymphatic nodules versus 4.9% in normal spleens. The cause of these microcirculatory changes, which may not be exclusive to ITP, is presently unknown. Absence of the marginal sinus may affect distribution of blood flow through the MZ such that platelets spend increased amounts of time in the proximity of macrophages. In the presence of antiplatelet antibodies found in ITP spleens, this delayed transit would lead to greatly increased platelet destruction.

  7. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: from platelet aggregates to plasma.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marisa B; Mayfield, Charles A; Blackall, Douglas P

    2004-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a syndrome of severe thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without an alternative explanation. Although some patients also have a combination of fever and neurologic and/or renal manifestations, these are not required for the diagnosis. Thus, plasmapheresis should start as soon as TTP is placed high in the differential diagnosis to prevent significant mortality. Histopathologically, TTP is characterized by widespread platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. Ultralarge von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimers found in the patient's plasma are the basis for the platelet thrombi. Recent evidence has linked the abnormal fragments of vWf with deficiency of a plasma enzyme named vWf-cleaving protease, or ADAMTS-13. While a small percentage of patients with TTP have a constitutional defect in this enzyme, many with the acute idiopathic form have an antibody to ADAMTS-13, affecting its ability to cleave vWf. The determination of the enzyme activity and the presence of its inhibitor have emerged as a potential tool in the diagnosis and prognosis of TTP. Furthermore, it helps to differentiate TTP from the hemolytic uremic syndrome, in which the level of ADAMTS-13 is expected to be normal or only slightly decreased.

  8. Platelet antibody in prolonged remission of childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Kinney, T.R.; Rosse, W.

    1985-11-01

    Evaluations were performed in 20 patients with childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who remained in remission longer than 12 months. The mean duration of follow-up from diagnosis was 39 months (range 17 to 87 months). Eleven patients (four girls) in group 1 had an acute course of ITP, defined as platelet count greater than 150 X 10(9)/L within 6 months of diagnosis. Nine patients (five girls) in group 2 had a chronic course, defined as platelet count less than 150 X 10(9)/L for greater than or equal to 1 year or requiring splenectomy in an attempt to control hemorrhagic symptoms. Platelet count and serum (indirect) platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) levels were normal in all 20 patients at follow-up. Both direct and indirect PAIgG levels were measured using a SVI-monoclonal anti-IgG antiglobulin assay. All had normal direct PAIgG levels, except for one patient in group 1 who had a borderline elevated value of 1209 molecules per platelet. These data suggest that the prevalence of elevated platelet antibodies is low during sustained remission without medication in patients with a history of childhood ITP. These data may be relevant for pregnant women with a history of childhood ITP, with regard to the risk of delivering an infant with thrombocytopenia secondary to transplacental passage of maternal platelet antibody.

  9. Platelet antibody in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombocytopenias

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    Platelet-associated immunoglobulin was measured by the use of fluorescent anti-1gG antibody. The method is simple, rapid, and sensitive and provides a precise quantitive assay of bound (direct) and free (indirect) 1gG with platelet specificity. We have evaluated this test in 30 normal volunteers and in 50 patients with immune and nonimmune, treated and untreated thrombocytopenias. All patients with immune thrombocytopenias (acute and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus) having platelet counts < 100,000/..mu..l had elevated levels of platelet-bound 1gG and 86% had also positive results in the indirect assay. All patients with nonimmunological thrombocytopenias showed normal results in the direct and indirect assay of platelet-associated immunoglobulin. In patients studied repeatedly during the course of their illness, an inverse relation was found between platelet count and level of platelet-bound 1gG. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presented clear exceptions to this rule. Investigations of the absorbability of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies showed that this assay can readily differentiate between these two antibody species and can also identify specificities of alloantibodies.

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding a lupus diagnosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, F; Demosthenous, S; Braimi, M; Tsitskari, T; Psarelis, S

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a rare stress-related cardiomyopathy, has been observed in a few cases secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we report an unusual case where a postmenopausal woman presented initially with Takotsubo syndrome, later developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and cerebrovascular events, initially without clinical or laboratory features of SLE. During the course of her illness, she was found to satisfy four of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for a SLE diagnosis. This unique presentation of our patient, initially with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the development of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and cerebrovascular events preceding the diagnosis of SLE illustrates the importance of clinical observation and follow-up.

  11. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64-15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59-27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications.

  12. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  13. Platelet-associated complement C3 in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1982-05-01

    Platelet-associated C3 (PA-C3) was measured with a quantitative immunofluorescence assay. With this assay, PA-C3 levels were determined for 78 normal volunteers, 30 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and 20 patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias. Platelet-associatd IgG (PA-lgG) levels were also measured with our standard quantitative immunofluorescence assay. All patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias and ITP in remission had normal PA-C3 levels. Twenty-four patients with active ITP wre classified into 3 groups: 9 (38%) with increased PA-IgG and normal PA-C3 levels, 10 (42%) with elevated PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels, and 5 (20%) with increased PA-C3 values only. A direct correlation was found between PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels. PA-IgG levels were higher in the group of patients with elevated PA-C3 levels than in those with normal values. Platelet survival studies showed reduced survival times of 1.5-2.5 days for the 5 patients with elevated PA-C3 levels only. Elevated PA-C3 levels returned to normal in 7 ITP patients whose platelet counts increased in response to corticosteriod therapy or to splenectomy. Therefore, PA-C3 and PA-IgG assays can be used to identify patients with ITP, to follow their response to therapy, and to classify them into immunologic subgroups similar to red cell classifiation by Coombs' testing in immune hemolytic anemia.

  14. Hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iwase, K; Higaki, J; Yoon, H E; Mikata, S; Tanaka, Y; Takahashi, T; Hatanaka, K; Tamaki, T; Hori, S; Mitsuda, N; Kamiike, W

    2001-02-01

    A successful case of a hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum for autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient at 23 weeks' gestation is reported. Preoperative splenic arterial embolization was performed on the same day as the operation using painless contour embolic material and super-absorbent polymer microspheres. The abdominal wall retraction method first was applied to avoid the effects of pneumoperitoneum on systemic hemodynamic alterations. However, a sufficient surgical view could not be obtained, as the intra-abdominal organs were elevated because of the enlarged uterus. A surgical view with 4 to 6-mm Hg pneumoperitoneum was available for the hand-assisted splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient vaginally delivered a healthy infant. A hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum after splenic arterial embolization would be feasible for patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura during a relatively advanced pregnancy.

  15. Cerebral venous thrombosis after immune thrombocytopenic purpura and anti-D immune globulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayyali, Husam R; Abdelmoity, Ahmed T; Morriss, M Craig; Graf, William D

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis has multiple etiologies and a wide variety of clinical manifestations. This article reports on a young girl who developed cerebral venous thrombosis after intravenous anti-D immune globulin therapy for immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In this case, venous infarction was manifested by an unusual pattern of restricted diffusion limited to the corpus callosum. The cause of cerebral venous thrombosis in this patient may be related to both immune thrombocytopenia and immunoglobulin therapy.

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with the use of ecstasy

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Kayar, Nuket Bayram; Gangarapu, Venkatanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Ecstasy is a drug, which causes serious side effects and sometimes it can be lethal. These effects are due to idiosyncratic reactions as a result of various stimulations in adrenergic receptors. Here we present a case of a 36-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with the use of ecstasy. Plasmapheresis along with methylprednisolone treatment restores patient condition to normal. PMID:25878432

  17. Differentiation between severe HELLP syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other imitators.

    PubMed

    Pourrat, O; Coudroy, R; Pierre, F

    2015-06-01

    Pre-eclampsia complicated by severe HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count) syndrome is a multi-organ disease, and can be difficult to differentiate from thrombotic microangiopathy (appearing as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic uremic syndrome), acute fatty liver, systemic erythematous lupus, antiphospholipid syndrome and severe sepsis. Many papers have highlighted the risks of misdiagnosis resulting in severe consequences for maternal health, and this can be fatal when thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is misdiagnosed as severe HELLP syndrome. The aim of this paper is to propose relevant markers to differentiate pre-eclampsia complicated by severe HELLP syndrome from its imitators, even in the worrying situation of apparently indistinguishable conditions, and thereby assist clinical decision-making regarding whether or not to commence plasma exchange. Relevant identifiers to establish the most accurate diagnosis include the frequency of each disease and anamnestic data. Frank hemolysis, need for dialysis, neurological involvement and absence of disseminated intravascular coagulation are indicative of thrombotic microangiopathy. The definitive marker for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is undetectable ADAMTS 13 activity.

  18. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m2 (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×109 platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient’s glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin. PMID:27026836

  19. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Culquichicón-Sánchez, Carlos; Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-02-24

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m(2) (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×10(9) platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient's glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin.

  20. Plateletpheresis for postsplenectomy rebound thrombocytosis in a patient with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura on romiplostim.

    PubMed

    Raval, Jay S; Redner, Robert L; Kiss, Joseph E

    2013-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease in which IgG-coated platelets are removed from circulation by the spleen, and platelet production is impaired due to increased thrombopoietin (TPO) clearance. Romiplostim, a novel TPO-mimetic agent, is approved for patients with ITP that are unresponsive to traditional treatments. However, there is little experience when using this drug before splenectomy. We describe herein the case of a young female with chronic ITP who was treated with romiplostim, underwent splenectomy shortly thereafter, and required plateletpheresis for postoperative rebound thrombocytosis with concomitant neurologic symptoms.

  1. Severe Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Brucellosis: Case Presentation and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Perogiannaki, Aikaterini; Chaliasos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is still endemic and a significant public health problem in many Mediterranean countries, including Greece. It is a multisystemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations including hematological disorders, such as anemia, pancytopenia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is usually moderate and attributed to bone marrow suppression or hypersplenism. Rarely, autoimmune stimulation can cause severe thrombocytopenia with clinically significant hemorrhagic manifestations. We present the case of a girl with severe thrombocytopenic purpura as one of the presenting symptoms of Brucella melitensis infection. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the appropriate antimicrobial agents promptly resolved the thrombocyte counts. A review of similar published cases is also presented. PMID:28127481

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: successful management with plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Carr, D J; Kramer, B S; Dragonetti, D E

    1986-04-01

    A patient with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma had progressive microangiopathic red blood cell changes, thrombocytopenia with increased marrow megakaryocytes, bleeding, altered mentation, and seizure. Coagulation parameters were inconsistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation; a clinical diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was made. Plasmapheresis resulted in improvement on two separate occasions. The diagnosis of tumor-associated TTP should be considered in cancer patients. Plasmapheresis may be more effective than plasma transfusion alone in this syndrome, perhaps via removal of tumor-induced immune complexes from the circulation. Aggressive management of this complication seems justified in cancer patients for whom effective chemotherapy exists.

  3. Stroke due to typical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated successfully with intravenous thrombolysis and therapeutic plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Boattini, Matteo; Procaccianti, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old man with expressive aphasia due to occlusion of the temporal stem of the left middle cerebral artery. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was diagnosed, and thrombolytic therapy (TT) with alteplase followed by therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) were performed with complete resolution of symptoms. The gold standard TTP treatment is TPE, and its delay can be lethal. The use of TT in TTP is controversial and has potential risks. This case shows a successful TT in a patient with typical TTP presenting as a stroke due to a large cerebral artery occlusion. PMID:23362068

  4. Clopidogrel-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura following Endovascular Treatment of Spontaneous Carotid Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rubano, Jerry A.; Chen, Kwan; Sullivan, Brianne; Vosswinkel, James A.; Jawa, Randeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening multisystem disease secondary to platelet aggregation. We present a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia and anemia 8 days following initiation of therapy with clopidogrel after stent placement for carotid artery dissection. She did not have a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin domain 13 (ADAMTS 13) deficiency. Management included steroids and therapeutic plasma exchange. Clopidogrel has rarely been associated with TTP. Unlike other causes of acquired TTP, the diagnosis of early clopidogrel-associated TTP is largely clinical given the infrequent reduction in ADAMTS 13 activity. PMID:26623244

  5. [Protocol for the study and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP-2010].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Fernández-Delgado, R; Sastre, A; Toll, T; Llort, A; Molina, J; Astigarraga, I; Dasí, M A; Cervera, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), formerly known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is a disease in which clinical and therapeutic management has always been controversial. The ITP working group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology has updated its guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ITP in children based on current guidelines, literature review, clinical trials and member consensus. The primary objective was to lessen clinical variability in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in order to obtain best clinical results with minimal adverse events and good quality of life.

  6. Regulatory T Cells in Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Akyol Erikçi, Alev; Karagöz, Bülent; Bilgi, Oğuz

    2016-06-05

    Amaç: İmmün trombositopenik purpura (İTP) trombositlerin otoantikorlar tarafından opsonize edildiği ve retiküloendotelyal sistem tarafından Fc reseptör aracılı fagositoz ile dalakta yıkıldığı immün kaynaklı bir kanama bozukluğudur. Bu bozukluğun patogenezinde otoimmün süreçler de sorumlu tutulmaktadır. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatuvar T (Treg) hücreleri ve CD8+CD28- Treg hücreler otoimmün hastalıklarda rol oynamaktadır. Çalışmamızda İTP’li hastalarda bu regülatuvar hücreleri araştırdık. Gereç ve Yöntemler: İTP’li 22 hasta ile yaş uyumlu 16 sağlıklı birey dahil edildi. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg hücreler ve CD8+CD28- hücreler üç renkli akım sitometri ile çalışıldı. Bu hücre popülasyonunun tüm lenfositlere oranı hesaplanmıştır. İstatiktiksel değerlendirmede Mann-Whitney U testi kullanılmıştır. Bulgular: CD4+CD25+ Treg hücreler İTP’de ve kontrol grubunda %9,69±3,70 ve %12,99±5,58 saptandılar. CD4+CD25 yüksek FoxP3+ hücreler ise İTP’de ve kontrol grubunda %27,72±19,74 ve %27,55±23,9 olarak saptandı. Her iki hücre tipi de kontrol grubu ile karşılaştırıldığında istatiktiksel olarak anlamlı bulunmamıştır. Sonuç: Lenfositlerdeki CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg hücreler ve CD8+CD28- T hücrelerdeki oranlarında fark bulamadık. Biz çalışmamızda İTP’de dolaşan regulatuvar hücrelerde fark bulamadık ama daha geniş kapsamlı çalışmalara ihtiyaç vardır.

  7. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-10-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequently, the clinical features of ITP children with or without rotavirus infection were compared. The results indicated that ITP children with rotavirus infection were significantly younger, showed significantly decreased mean platelet volume (MPV) levels and presented a significantly higher frequency of bleeding score of 3 against ITP children without rotavirus infection. In conclusion, these findings suggest that rotavirus serves a causative role in ITP.

  8. [Treatment of a pregnant patient after multiple trauma: rare combination with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Haffner, E; Pietsch, U; Fösel, T; Lindemann, W

    2013-02-01

    Multiple trauma during pregnancy is a relatively rare situation which poses a great challenge for the team in charge of treatment. A concomitant disease, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytic coagulopathy increases the complexity of the treatment problems. This article describes the case of a 36-year-old pregnant woman referred to this hospital suffering from multiple trauma with severe liver rupture. Stabilization was achieved after an emergency Caesarean section and packing of the liver. Recurrent massive bleeding from the liver occurred after depacking and was treated successfully with recombinant factor VIIa. The concomitant TTP was treated by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma and corticosteroids. Rapid initiation of therapy was the goal to achieve hemostasis and prevent aggravation of the coagulation disorder and an unfavourable outcome despite severe thrombocytopenia.

  9. Spontaneous bilateral peripapillary, subhyaloid and vitreous hemorrhage with only minor platelet deficit in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Wan-Wei, Loo; Tengku-Norina, Tuan-Jaffar; Azma-Azalina, Ahmad-Alwi; Zulkifli, Abdul-Ghani; Zunaina, Embong

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with underlying idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) complained of acute onset of reduced vision and floaters, in both eyes, for 3 weeks. Visual acuity was 6/36 and 6/60 in the right eye and left eye, respectively. Ophthalmoscopy showed bilateral peripapillary, subhyaloid and vitreous hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed moderate anemia (hemoglobin: 93 g/L) and mild thrombocytopenia (platelets: 120×10(9)/L). She was co-managed by a hematologist and ophthalmologists; she was treated medically. Follow-up care during the next 6 weeks revealed spontaneous, partially resolving hemorrhage, with improvement of visual acuity. The purpose of this case report is to highlight ophthalmic involvement of ITP in this patient, despite her only-mild thrombocytopenia, and her spontaneous recovery, despite her receiving only medical treatment.

  10. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis.

  11. Clopidogrel-induced refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Sara; Castro, Miguel; McNamara, Colin; Chaulagain, Chakra P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by microvascular aggregation of platelets and fibrin strands causing thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction. TTP can develop as a result of a deficiency in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity due to either a genetic defect or, more commonly, the development of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. TTP can also be associated with pregnancy, organ transplant, lupus, infections, and drugs. Here, we present a case of TTP that developed shortly after the start of clopidogrel treatment for acute ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction, and describe the clinical presentation, refractory course of the disease, and successful induction of remission through the use of rituximab in a setting of pre-existing autoimmune diseases.

  12. Eculizumab refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura secondary to post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis in a patient

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Faizan; Ali, Naveed; Ahsan, Irfan; Ghani, Ali Raza; Fidler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare multisystem microvascular disorder, which is characterized by pentad of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction due to occlusive thrombi. The proposed pathophysiology involves an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Acute pancreatitis is a well-described consequence of TTP, but TTP secondary to acute pancreatitis is a rare phenomenon. We present a patient who developed TTP due to post-ERCP pancreatitis with hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal complications and is the first case of this kind. Despite early initiation of therapy, the patient did not recover making it among the 10% of cases of TTP that prove fatal despite appropriate therapy. PMID:27987277

  13. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura as an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus with acquired ADAMTS 13 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Changcharoen, Bhisit; Bolger, Dennis Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient presenting with headache, fatigue, ecchymoses and recent, excessive vaginal bleeding. Prompt review of the peripheral blood smear showed evidence of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange and corticosteroids were started urgently. The patient responded favourably to the treatment. Subsequently, positive serological markers returned and were compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs, member 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity was remarkably low with a positive inhibitory ADAMTS 13 antibody. Mycophenolate and hydroxychloroquine were started along with a prolonged course and taper of corticosteroids. These medications have been maintained with an excellent response in 14 months of follow-up. PMID:25701834

  14. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome successfully treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Cottler-Fox, Michele; Motwani, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening disease with a mortality of up to 90%, if not promptly recognized and treated. We report a 64-year-old woman with this condition who presented with left-sided weakness and seizure-like activity preceded by headache and easy bruising. She did not achieve optimal response to plasma exchange, corticosteroids, rituximab, and vincristine. We initiated treatment with eculizumab, following which she had durable remission that continued for 30 months after discontinuation of the drug. We later found that our patient has homozygous deletion in two closely related genes, complement factor H–related 1 and complement factor H–related 3.

  15. Serum thrombopoietin levels in relation to disease status in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kappers-Klunne, M C; de Haan, M; Struijk, P C; van Vliet, H H

    2001-12-01

    Pre- and post-treatment serum thrombopoietin (TPO) concentration was measured in 35 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Mean post-treatment levels were significantly lower (P = 0.02) than pretreatment and not different for treatment modality. No significant correlation between pre- or post-treatment TPO and platelet counts was demonstrable (R = -0.325, P = 0.056 and R = -0.227, P = 0.190 respectively). In patients with very low platelet counts (< or =20 x 10(9)/l), pretreatment serum TPO was significantly higher than in patients with higher counts (P = 0.033). The logarithm of the platelet turnover rate, measured in 15 patients, correlated with pretreatment TPO levels (R = 0.64). These findings suggest a contributory role for TPO in the mechanism of ITP.

  16. High-dose intravenous therapy with immune globulin before delivery for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, R. J.; Rogers, P. C.; Shaw, D.; Wadsworth, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a 9-year history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura resistant to high-dose steroid therapy and to splenectomy was admitted to hospital at 35 weeks' gestation with a platelet count of 10 X 10(9)/L. The bleeding time was normal, and measures of platelet aggregation were nearly so. Treatment with high intravenous doses of polyvalent immune globulin led to a rise in the platelet count to more than 110 X 10(9)/L within 5 days. An elective cesarean section was performed through the lower uterine segment with good hemostasis. After delivery the platelet count fell to its former level, but no postpartum bleeding occurred. There was a brief episode of thrombocytopenia in the infant, with some petechiae but no other hemorrhagic manifestations. No untoward effects of the immune globulin infusion were observed in either mother or daughter. PMID:6423252

  17. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M.; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  18. Peliosis hepatis presenting with massive hepatomegaly in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Bean; Kim, Do Kyung; Byun, Sun Jeong; Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Young Nyun; Kim, Do Young

    2015-12-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare condition that can cause hepatic hemorrhage, rupture, and ultimately liver failure. Several authors have reported that peliosis hepatis develops in association with chronic wasting disease or prolonged use of anabolic steroids or oral contraceptives. In this report we describe a case in which discontinuation of steroid therapy improved the condition of a patient with peliosis hepatis. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman with a history of long-term steroid treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura . Her symptoms included abdominal pain and weight loss; the only finding of a physical examination was hepatomegaly. We performed computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver and a liver biopsy. Based on these findings plus clinical observations, she was diagnosed with peliosis hepatis and her steroid treatment was terminated. The patient recovered completely 3 months after steroid discontinuation, and remained stable over the following 6 months.

  19. Role of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Recovery in Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sheema, Khan; Arshi, Naz; Farah, Naz; Imran, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder in which the immune system destroys native platelets. In this condition an autoantibody is generated against a platelet antigen. ITP affects women more often than men and is more common in children than adults. Objective. To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy (HPET) on platelet count in Helicobacter pylori associated chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (chronic ITP) in adult. Materials and Methods. It is an interventional prospective study conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, from 2014 to 2015. A set of 85 patients diagnosed with chronic ITP were included in the study via convenient sampling. Patients with platelets count < 100 × 109/L for >3 months were selected. They were posed to first-line investigations which comprised complete blood count (CBC) and peripheral blood smear examination followed by second-line tests including bone marrow examination and Helicobacter pylori stool specific antigen (HpSA-EIA). Standard H. pylori eradication therapy was offered and the patients were assessed at regular intervals for 6 months. Results. Of the 85 study patients, 32 (37.6%) were male and 53 (62.3%) were female. Mean ages of H. pylori positive and negative subjects were 43.89 ± 7.06 and 44.75 ± 7.91 years, respectively. Bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis and excluded other related BM disorders. H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) was detected in 34 (40%) patients and hence regarded as H. pylori positive; the rest were negative. Treatment with eradication therapy significantly improved the mean platelet counts from 48.56 ± 21.7 × 109/l to 94.2 ± 26.8 × 109/l. Conclusion. We concluded that the anti-H. pylori eradication therapy improves blood platelet counts in chronic immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:28194178

  20. Importance of immature platelet fraction as predictor of immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Arshi; Mukry, Samina Naz; Shaikh, Mahwish Rauf; Bukhari, Ali Raza; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a clinical syndrome in which a decreased number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopenia) manifests as a bleeding tendency, easy bruising (purpura) or extravasation of blood from capillaries into skin and mucous membranes (petechiae). The diagnosis of ITP can be made clinically on the basis of symptoms, we need to see if ITP can be confirmed in patients by quantification of residual RNA containing immature platelets (megakaryocytic mass) or immature platelets fraction (IPF) using automated hematology analyzers (Sysmex XE-2100). Methods: In order to check the efficacy of IPF% parameter of Sysmex XE-2100 a total of 231 patients of thrombocytopenia were included in this study. Complete blood count (CBC) was estimated. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: About 62 patients were diagnosed as ITP and 169 patients were diagnosed as non ITP on the basis of clinical history. The mean IPF % value of ITP patients was 16.39% and the IPF % value of Non ITP patients was ~7.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in IPF% values with respect to time between sampling and acquisition of complete blood count. The diagnostic sensitivity of IPF% as biomarker for ITP and non-ITP was 85.71% (95%CI: 84.04% to 85.96%) and 41.76% (95% CI: 39.87% to 43.65%). Conclusion: The mean IPF % value by Sysmex XE-2100 can be used to predict ITP. PMID:27375692

  1. Hemorrhagic Stroke in an Adolescent Female with HIV-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Wong, Edward CC; Davis, Jeremiah C; Ray, Patricio E

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can trigger acute episodes of Idiopathic Thrombocytoponic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), particularly in populations with advanced disease and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). These diseases should be distinguished because they respond to different treatments. Previous studies done in adults with HIV-TTP have recommended the prompt initiation or re-initiation of ART in parallel with plasma exchange therapy to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. Here, we describe a case of HIV-TTP resulting in an acute hemorrhagic stroke in a 16 year old female with perinatally acquired HIV infection and non-adherence to ART, who presented with severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a past medical history of HIV-ITP. Both differential diagnosis and treatments for HIV-ITP and HIV-TTP were considered simultaneously. A decrease in plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<5%) without detectable inhibitory antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of HIV-TTP. Re-initiation of ART and plasma exchange resulted in a marked decrease in the HIV-RNA viral load, recovery of the platelet count, and complete recovery was achieved with sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25429351

  2. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely.

  3. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Hemoglobin H Disease Early Misdiagnosed as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Series of Unfortunate Events.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Stamatia; Pasakiotou, Marily; Arapoglou, Stergios; Gigi, Eleni; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Vlachaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    We herein would like to report an interesting case of a patient who presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia combined with high serum Lactic Dehydrogenase where Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura was originally considered. As indicated a central venous catheter was inserted in his subclavian vein which led to mediastinal hematoma and finally intubation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization. After further examination patient was finally diagnosed with B12 deficiency in a setting of H hemoglobinopathy. There have been previous reports where pernicious anemia was originally diagnosed and treated as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura but there has been none to our knowledge that was implicated with hemothorax and ICU hospitalization or correlated with thalassemia and we discuss the significance of accurate diagnosis in order to avoid adverse reactions and therapy implications.

  4. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Hemoglobin H Disease Early Misdiagnosed as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Series of Unfortunate Events

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Stamatia; Pasakiotou, Marily; Arapoglou, Stergios; Gigi, Eleni; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Vlachaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    We herein would like to report an interesting case of a patient who presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia combined with high serum Lactic Dehydrogenase where Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura was originally considered. As indicated a central venous catheter was inserted in his subclavian vein which led to mediastinal hematoma and finally intubation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization. After further examination patient was finally diagnosed with B12 deficiency in a setting of H hemoglobinopathy. There have been previous reports where pernicious anemia was originally diagnosed and treated as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura but there has been none to our knowledge that was implicated with hemothorax and ICU hospitalization or correlated with thalassemia and we discuss the significance of accurate diagnosis in order to avoid adverse reactions and therapy implications. PMID:26609455

  5. Two novel heterozygote missense mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene in a child with recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rossio, Raffaella; Ferrari, Barbara; Cairo, Andrea; Mancini, Ilaria; Pisapia, Giovanni; Palazzo, Giulia; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare, life-threatening disease characterised by microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and symptoms related to organ ischaemia, mainly involving the brain and the kidney. It is associated with a deficiency of ADAMTS13, a plasma metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor. The congenital form (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) is rare and is associated with mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene on chromosome 9q34. The clinical symptoms of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are variable, with some patients developing their first episode during the neonatal period or childhood and others becoming symptomatic in adulthood. Materials and methods We describe a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, who presented to our attention with a relapsing form of the disease: the first episode occurred at the age of 13 months. Phenotype and genotype tests were performed in the patient and his family. Results The undetectable level of ADAMTS13 in the patient was caused by two novel heterozygote missense mutations on the ADAMTS13 gene: one mutation is c.788C > T (p.Ser263Phe) on exon 7 and the second is c.3251G > A (p.Cys1084Tyr) on exon 25 of the ADAMTS13 gene. All the relatives who have been investigated were found to carry one of these missense mutations in a heterozygous state. Discussion Although Upshaw-Schulman syndrome is a rare disease, it should be considered in all children with thrombocytopenia and jaundice in the neonatal period. In fact, once a child is confirmed to carry mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene causing early thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, prophylactic treatment should be started to avoid recurrence of symptoms. Genotype tests of relatives would also be important for those women in the family who could be carriers of ADAMTS13 mutations, particularly during pregnancy. PMID:23058857

  6. Case of twin pregnancy complicated by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with intravenous immunoglobulin: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W X; Yang, X F; Lin, J H

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired thrombocytopenia without other clear cause of thrombocytopenia. It is not common in a singleton pregnancy and less common in twin pregnancy. We report a 33-year-old ITP pluripara whose first pregnancy was uneventful. She carried twin pregnancy, complicated by recurrent very low platelets, and gave birth to preterm twins. This patient received multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and showed a significant platelet count improvement with IVIG therapy.

  7. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with vaccinations: a review of reported cases.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Nesher, Gideon; Borella, Elisabetta; Odeh, Qasim; Conti, Fabrizio; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Valesini, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune condition characterized by low platelet count with mucocutaneous and other bleedings. Clinical manifestations may range from spontaneous formation of purpura and petechiae, especially on the extremities, to epistaxis, bleeding at the gums or menorrhagia, any of which occur usually if the platelet count is below 20,000 per μl. A very low count may result in the spontaneous formation of hematomas in the mouth or on other mucous membranes. Fatal complications, including subarachnoid or intracerebral, lower gastrointestinal or other internal bleeding can arise due to an extremely low count. Vaccines may induce ITP by several mechanisms. Vaccine-associated autoimmunity may stem not only from the antigen-mediated responses but also from other constituents of the vaccine, such as yeast proteins, adjuvants, and preservatives diluents. The most likely is through virally induced molecular mimicry. The binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to platelet and megakaryocytes may cause thrombocytopenia by different mechanisms, such as opsonization, direct activation of complement, or apoptotic pathways. The autoantibodies hypothesis is not sufficient to explain all ITP cases: In the anti-platelet antibody-negative cases, a complementary mechanism based on T cell immune-mediated mechanism has been suggested. In particular, T cell subsets seem dysregulated with an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as IFN-γ and TNF, and chemokines, as CXCL10. Vaccines are one of the most striking discoveries in human history that changed dramatically life expectancy. Nonetheless, the occurrence of adverse events and autoimmune phenomena has been described following vaccination, and ITP may represent one of this.

  8. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  9. DNMT3B promoter polymorphism and risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in pediatric Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Abukhalil, Reham E; Ali, Dina K; Afifi, Rasha A

    2012-10-01

    Idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a heterogeneous clinical disorder characterized by immune-mediated platelet destruction. Epigenetic changes in gene expression, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, might contribute to autoimmunity. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter of DNMT3B gene and the risk for ITP in pediatric Egyptians. DNMT3B SNP was genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 71 pediatric ITP patients and 82 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The C/C wild genotype was not detected in ITP patients or in the controls. The frequencies of the T/T and C/T genotypes were 93.9 and 6.1% in the controls and 91.5 and 6.1% in ITP patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in either genotypes or allelic distribution between ITP patients and the controls. In conclusion, this polymorphism was almost equally distributed between ITP patients and the controls. These results demonstrated that this SNP may not be used as a stratification marker to predict the susceptibility to childhood ITP in Egypt.

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs.

  11. Long-term salvage therapy with cyclosporin A in refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Morselli, Monica; Luppi, Mario; Longo, Giuseppe; Marasca, Roberto; Gandini, Giovanna; Ferrara, Leonardo; D'Apollo, Nicola; Potenza, Leonardo; Bertesi, Marcello; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2002-02-15

    Treatment of severe, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) refractory to most usual therapies is a difficult challenge. Little information exists on the clinical use of cyclosporin A (CyA) in the treatment of ITP. This report describes long-term treatment with CyA (median, 40 months) and follow-up (median, 36.8 months) in 12 adult patients with resistant ITP. CyA used in relatively low doses (2.5-3 mg/kg of body weight per day) led to a clinical improvement in 10 patients (83.3%). Five had a complete response (41.1%), 4 a complete response to maintenance therapy (33.3%), and one a partial response (8.3%). Two patients had no response. Most patients with a response (60%) had a long-term remission (mean, 28.6 months) after discontinuation of CyA. One patient had a relapse of ITP 4 years after CyA therapy was stopped. Side effects were moderate and transient, even in patients dependent on continued CyA treatment. CyA seems to represent reasonable salvage treatment in severe, potentially life-threatening, refractory ITP.

  12. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Maghbool, Maryam; Maghbool, Masood; Shahriari, Mehdi; Karimi, Mehran

    2009-06-08

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10-15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years). A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150×10(9)/L) or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150×10(9)/L). We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients.

  13. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population. PMID:27383202

  14. [Treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in Pediatrics. Therapeutic efficacy of a regional intravenous immunoglobulin G].

    PubMed

    Buteler, C; Colombo, H; Gabosi, G; Manfredi, M J; Montero, S; Pasquali, M A; Rougier, C; Sisti, A M

    2001-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder characterized by accelerated splenic removal of platelets opsonized with autoantibodies. Several different treatments have been tried in acute ITP patients, including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The aim of this paper was to assess the therapeutic efficacy, clinical tolerance and viral safety of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC, manufactured by Laboratorio de Hemoderivados, Cordoba National University, in the treatment of acute ITP patients. A prospective longitudinal study was carried out on 8 children, who were admitted to the Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, from July 1998 to June 1999. A dose of 1 g/Kg/day of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC was administered to those children whose platelet values remained < or = 20,000/mm3, 21 days after the first IVIG cycle. The observed results led us to conclude that Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC is well tolerated and therapeutically effective in the treatment of acute ITP in children, with platelet values recovery, similar to those obtained with other IVIG. Moreover, it proved to be virally safe since the 8 patients were non reactive for viral markers of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency, 12 months after ending the treatment.

  15. Bleeding tendency and platelet function during treatment with romiplostim in children with severe immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Suntsova, Elena V; Demina, Irina M; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Ershov, Nikolay M; Trubina, Natalia M; Dobrynina, Juliya; Serkova, Irina V; Supik, Zhanna S; Orekhova, Ekaterina V; Hachatryan, Lili A; Kotskaya, Natalia N; Pshonkin, Aleksey V; Maschan, Aleksey A; Novichkova, Galina A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2017-03-07

    It has been suggested that platelet function in chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) may be abnormal. Thrombopoietin mimetics used for treatment can affect it, but the data remain limited. We investigated platelet function of 20 children diagnosed with severe ITP (aged 1-16 years, 12 females and eight males). Platelet functional activity in whole blood was characterized by flow cytometry before and after stimulation with SFLLRN plus collagen-related peptide. Levels of CD42b, PAC1, and CD62P, but not CD61 or annexin V, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in resting platelets of patients before treatment compared with healthy donors. On average, PAC1 and CD62P in patients after activation were also significantly elevated, although some patients failed to activate integrins. Romiplostim (1-15 μg/kg/week s.c.) was prescribed to seven patients, with clinical improvement in six. Interestingly, one patient had clinical improvement without platelet count increase. Eltrombopag (25-75 mg/day p.o.) was given to four patients, with positive response in one. Others switched to romiplostim, with one stable positive response, one unstable positive response, and one non-responding. Platelet quality improved with romiplostim treatment, and their parameters approached the normal values. Our results suggest that platelets in children with severe ITP are pre-activated and abnormal, but improve with treatment.

  16. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryu; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Tajima, Yumi; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Onishi, Yasushi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Naruhiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), and hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels, and a low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome display common symptoms that include microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between them because their treatments vary: however, the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. We report a 32-year-old woman who was referred to our department for further examination of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a slightly elevated serum creatinine level with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome in the early puerperal period. TTP, SRC, and HELLP syndrome were considered in the differential diagnosis, but the measurement of a disintegrin-like metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity and its inhibitor level led to the diagnosis of TTP. She was successfully treated by plasma exchange and high-dose prednisolone and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. If microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are observed in perinatal women or patients with signs of systemic sclerosis, the measurement of ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor level are essential for diagnosis and therapeutic choice.

  17. [Successful rituximab treatment for acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura complicated with Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akari; Fujimi, Akihito; Kanisawa, Yuji; Matsuno, Teppei; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Doi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Kazuma; Uemura, Naoki; Tomaru, Utano

    2013-06-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura (AATP) is a rare disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia associated with total absence or a selective decrease in bone marrow megakaryocytes. A 67-year-old male presented with a 2-month bleeding tendency. He was referred to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy showed complete absence of megakaryocytes without dysplasia in cells of the myeloid and erythroid lineages. AATP was diagnosed. In addition, mild normocytic normochromic anemia and reticulocytosis were also observed and haptoglobin was below the detectable level. Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed based on the high titer of RBC-bound IgG and negative direct and indirect coombs test results. He was first treated with cyclosporine 200 mg per day and subsequently with prednisolone but only slight temporary improvement was achieved. Administration of eight doses of rituximab 375 mg/m(2) per week ameliorated both thrombocytopenia and anemia. AATP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia, and immunosuppressive therapy is a potential first-line treatment. This is the first case report of AATP accompanied by AIHA successfully treated with rituximab.

  18. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kalayoğlu Beşışık, Sevgi; Yenerel, Mustafa; Diz Küçükkaya, Reyhan; Çalışkan, Yaşar; Sargın, Deniz

    2004-12-05

    Alveolar hemorrhage is an early complication after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and often associated with inflammatory pulmonary processes. We present a case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with BMT associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (BMT-TTP). An 18-years-old man with acute myeloid leukaemia (FAB; M5) underwent ABO incompatible BMT from his HLA-identical sister. On the 37th day of BMT, BMT-TTP was diagnosed with the occurrence of red cell fragmentation and rise in serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level with severe sudden decrease in hemoglobin and platelet levels. Cyclosporine A (CsA) was ceased and plasma infusion with plasma exchange was started. On the 42nd day of BMT, the diagnosis of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage was made by the clinical, bronchoscopic and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid findings. Alveolar hemorrhage among patients with BMT-TTP has been scarce reported. These two complications may be regarded as related, as small vessel injury is a central feature in both and they may share aetiological and pathogenetic factors.

  19. Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with primary Sjogren syndrome treated with rituximab: a case report.

    PubMed

    Toumeh, Anis; Josh, Navpreet; Narwal, Rawan; Assaly, Ragheb

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon, serious disease that involves multiple organs and is rapidly fatal if left untreated. TTP is associated with multisystem symptoms, such as thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal impairment, central nervous system involvement, and fever. TTP is idiopathic in about 37% of the cases and can be associated with autoimmune diseases in 13% of the cases. Autoimmune disease-associated TTP can be refractory to plasma exchange and requires immunosuppressive therapy. We report a case of a previously healthy 55-year-old African American female who presented with shortness of breath, hemolytic anemia, renal impairment, and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of TTP was made, and plasmapheresis was initiated. However, recurrence happened 48 hours after plasmapheresis was stopped. Autoimmune workup for refractory TTP revealed positive antinuclear antibodies, Anti-SSA, and Anti-SSB. Lip biopsy revealed findings consistent with Sjogren syndrome. Treatment with Rituximab was started, and significant clinical and laboratory response was achieved. The patient remained asymptomatic thereafter. A high clinical suspicion of autoimmune diseases is important as TTP tends to be refractory to plasma exchange in these cases, and immunosuppressive therapy is a key.

  20. Interactions of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand disease and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-01-01

    The function of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a huge multimeric protein and a key factor in platelet dependent primary haemostasis, is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. The ADAMTS13 dependent degradation of VWF to its proteolytic fragments can be visualized as a characteristic so-called triplet structure of individual VWF oligomers by multimer analysis. Lack of VWF high molecular weight multimers (VWF-HMWM) or their pathologically enhanced degradation underlies a particular type of von Willebrand disease, VWD type 2A with a significant bleeding tendency, and may also be observed in acquired von Willebrand syndrome due to cardiovascular disease. In these conditions multimer analysis is an obligatory and powerful tool for diagnosis of VWD. The opposite condition, the persistence of ultralarge VWF (UL-VWF) multimers may cause the microangiopathic life-threatening disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). During the course of active TTP, UL-VWF is consumed in the hyaline thrombi formed in the microvasculature which will ultimately result in the loss of UL-VWF and VWF-HMWM. Therefore, VWF multimer analysis is not a valid tool to diagnose TTP in the active phase of disease but may be helpful for the diagnosis of TTP patients in remission.

  1. Life-Threatening Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Idhiopatic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Successful Selective Splenic Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Matteo; Massaro, Fulvio; Annechini, Giorgia; Baldacci, Erminia; D’Elia, Gianna Maria; Rosati, Riccardo; Trisolini, Silvia Maria; Volpicelli, Paola; Foà, Robin; Capria, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE) is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy. PMID:27158433

  2. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by new compound heterozygous mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; Lämmle, Bernhard; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Nielsen, Ove Juul

    2014-02-01

    Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS) is due to severe congenital deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 domains, nr 13) activity resulting in the presence of unusually large forms of VWF in the circulation, causing intravascular platelet clumping and thrombotic microangiopathy. Our patient, a 26-year-old man, had attacks of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytopenia and a urine dipstick positive for hemoglobin (4+), often as the only sign of hemolytic activity. He had ADAMTS13 activity of <1% of normal plasma without the presence of inhibitors of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 deficiency was caused by two new mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene: a deletion of a single nucleotide in exon17 (c. 2042 delA) leading to a frameshift (K681C fs X16), and a missense mutation in exon 25 (c.3368G>A) leading to p.R1123H. This case report confirms the importance of the analysis of the ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor in patients who have episodes of TTP, with a very low platelet count and sometimes without the classic biochemical signs of hemolysis.

  3. Platelet-delivered ADAMTS13 inhibits arterial thrombosis and prevents thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in murine models.

    PubMed

    Pickens, Brandy; Mao, Yingying; Li, Dengju; Siegel, Don L; Poncz, Mortimer; Cines, Douglas B; Zheng, X Long

    2015-05-21

    ADAMTS13 metalloprotease cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF), thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation and arterial thrombosis. An inability to cleave ultralarge VWF resulting from hereditary or acquired deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity leads to a potentially fatal syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Plasma exchange is the most effective initial therapy for TTP to date. Here, we report characterization of transgenic mice expressing recombinant human ADAMTS13 (rADAMTS13) in platelets and its efficacy in inhibiting arterial thrombosis and preventing hereditary and acquired antibody-mediated TTP in murine models. Western blotting and fluorescent resonance energy transfer assay detect full-length rADAMTS13 protein and its proteolytic activity, respectively, in transgenic (Adamts13(-/-)Plt(A13)), but not in wild-type and Adamts13(-/-), platelets. The expressed rADAMTS13 is released on stimulation with thrombin and collagen, but less with 2MesADP. Platelet-delivered rADAMTS13 is able to inhibit arterial thrombosis after vascular injury and prevent the onset and progression of Shigatoxin-2 or recombinant murine VWF-induced TTP syndrome in mice despite a lack of plasma ADAMTS13 activity resulting from the ADAMTS13 gene deletion or the antibody-mediated inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity. These findings provide a proof of concept that platelet-delivered ADAMTS13 may be explored as a novel treatment of arterial thrombotic disorders, including hereditary and acquired TTP, in the presence of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies.

  4. Defective circulating CD25 regulatory T cells in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Heck, Susanne; Patel, Vivek; Levan, Jared; Yu, Yu; Bussel, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies as a result of loss of tolerance. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Decreased levels of peripheral Tregs in patients with ITP have been reported. To test whether inefficient production or reduced immunosuppressive activity of Tregs contributes to loss of tolerance in patients with chronic ITP, we investigated the frequency and function of their circulating CD4+CD25hi Tregs. We found a com-parable frequency of circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs in patients and controls (n = 16, P > .05). However, sorted CD4+CD25hi cells from patients with chronic ITP (n = 13) had a 2-fold reduction of in vitro immunosuppressive activity compared with controls (n = 10, P < .05). The impaired suppression was specific to Tregs as shown by cross-mixing experiments with T cells from controls. These data suggest that functional defects in Tregs contribute to breakdown of self-tolerance in patients with chronic ITP. PMID:18420827

  5. Platelet antibodies of the IgM class in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Wilson, S.B.; Tomaski, A.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and response to therapy of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not completely determined by the level of IgG present on the platelet surface. It is possible that antibodies of other immunoglobulin classes also play a role in platelet destruction in some of these patients. Therefore, the authors studied 175 patients with ITP for the presence of IgM anti-platelet antibodies using radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM. They observed that 57% of patients with clinical ITP had increased levels of IgM on their platelets, compared with normal controls and patients with thrombocytopenia who did not have ITP. They obtained similar results using either radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM, reagents whose integrity was first characterized using erythrocytes coated with defined amounts of IgM antibody. Among patients with increased platelet-IgM there was a significant correlation both with the presence of increased platelet-C3 as well as the amount of platelet-C3. The authors demonstrated the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in the plasma of two of these patients who were further studied. These studies demonstrate the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in some patients with ITP. They suggest that the binding of complement to platelets by IgM antibodies may initiate platelet clearance as well as enhance the effect of IgG antibodies in ITP.

  6. Balancing Therapy with Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists and Splenectomy in Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case of Postsplenectomy Thrombocytosis Requiring Plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn; Norsworthy, Kelly J; Brodsky, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) causes thrombocytopenia through the autoimmune destruction of platelets. Corticosteroids remain the first line of therapy, and traditionally splenectomy has been the second. While the availability of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) has expanded treatment options, there is little data for the ideal management of these agents in preparation for splenectomy. Thrombocytosis has been reported after splenectomy in patients treated with TPO-RA preoperatively, with one prior case requiring plateletpheresis for symptomatic thrombocytosis. We present a case report and review of the literature pertaining to this complication and provide recommendations for preventing postsplenectomy thrombocytosis in ITP patients on TPO-RAs.

  7. Balancing Therapy with Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists and Splenectomy in Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case of Postsplenectomy Thrombocytosis Requiring Plateletpheresis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn; Norsworthy, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) causes thrombocytopenia through the autoimmune destruction of platelets. Corticosteroids remain the first line of therapy, and traditionally splenectomy has been the second. While the availability of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) has expanded treatment options, there is little data for the ideal management of these agents in preparation for splenectomy. Thrombocytosis has been reported after splenectomy in patients treated with TPO-RA preoperatively, with one prior case requiring plateletpheresis for symptomatic thrombocytosis. We present a case report and review of the literature pertaining to this complication and provide recommendations for preventing postsplenectomy thrombocytosis in ITP patients on TPO-RAs. PMID:27812394

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome concomitant with immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans syndrome).

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Bugdaci, Mehmet Sait; Temel, Tuncer; Dagli, Mehmet; Karabagli, Pinar

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) associated with Evans syndrome; combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 53-year-old patient who presented with weakness, myalgia, arthralgia, shortness of breath and purpura. Initial laboratory investigations revealed liver dysfunction, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-nuclear (ANA) and antimitochondrial M2 (AMA M2) antibodies were positive. Diagnose of PBC-AIH overlap was made by clinical, serological and histological investigations. AIHA and ITP was identified with clinical-laboratory findings and bone marrow puncture. She was treated with IVIG followed by prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid. Hemoglobin-thrombocytes increased rapidly and transaminases improved at day 8. We have reported the first case in the literature with AIH-PBC overlap syndrome concurrent by ITP and AIHA which suggest the presence of shared genetic susceptibility factors in multiple autoimmune conditions including AIH, PBC, ITP and AIHA.

  9. Detection of expression of IL-18 and its binding protein in Egyptian pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Botros, Shahira K A; Morgan, Dalia S

    2014-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by dysfunctional cellular immunity including the presence of activated platelet specific autoreactive T cells that recognize and respond to autologous platelet antigens. Autoreactive T cells drive the generation of platelet reactive autoantibodies by B cells as well as T-cytotoxic cell-mediated lysis of platelets. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a mediator of T helper type 1 cell responses synergistically with IL-12 that initiate and promote host defense and inflammation. IL-18 has a specific binding protein (IL-18BP) which belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. In the present study, serum level and messenger RNA( mRNA) expression of IL-18 as well as IL-18BP mRNA expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of 100 Egyptian pediatric patients with ITP (70 acute and 30 chronic). In addition to this, we recruited 80 healthy volunteers in order to investigate the possible association between the imbalance of IL-18 and IL-18 BP expressions and the pathogenesis of ITP. IL-18 serum level and mRNA expression were not elevated in cases more than in the control group, but IL-18 mRNA was higher in chronic cases when compared to the acute ones (p=0.031) and there was a good negative correlation between the platelet count and serum IL-18. IL-18 BP m-RNA was slightly elevated in cases more than in the control group (95% Confidence interval=1.15-2.01). Our results were not supportive for previous findings of elevated IL18/BP mRNA ratio in ITP patients. This could be referred to the fact that autoimmune diseases are complex genetic disorders, therefore further studies on polymorphisms affecting IL-18 gene expression as well as kinetics of IL-18 expression are required to evaluate the role of interleukin 18 and its binding protein in the pathogenesis of ITP.

  10. Two Types of Renovascular Lesions in Lupus Nephritis with Clinical Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Akinari; Hasegawa, Eiko; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ohashi, Kenichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Renovascular lesions of lupus nephritis (LN) were classified into five categories by D'Agati in Heptinstall's Pathology of the Kidney, with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and clinical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) being combined. We encountered 2 cases with histological LN (class III and lass V), and they presented with clinical features of TTP, such as acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, fever, and central neurologic symptoms. Immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis was performed in both patients. Case 1 progressed to end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis and died, while case 2 responded to treatment. In case 1, small renal arteries showed positive mural staining for IgG and C3, while intraluminal material was negative for IgG and C3 [although it was positive for phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin (PTAH), indicating fibrin deposition]. In case 2, small renal arteries showed mural staining for IgG, C1q, and C3, with the intraluminal material also being positive for these immunoglobulins, but negative for PTAH. These cases suggest that immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis can control LN when intravascular thrombosis is related to immune complexes associated with activation of the early complement components C1q and C3. In contrast, immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis may not be effective when intravascular thrombosis is unrelated to these factors and involves fibrin deposition. Accordingly, in LN patients with clinical features of TTP, we report two types of renovascular lesions, in addition to typical vascular change of TMA with no immune deposits seen in nonlupus patients.

  11. Ribosomal and immune transcripts associate with relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Contessa E; Terrell, Deirdra R; Vesely, Sara K; Wren, Jonathan D; Dozmorov, Igor M; Niewold, Timothy B; Brown, Michael; Zhou, Fang; Frank, Mark Barton; Merrill, Joan T; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Lämmle, Bernhard; James, Judith A; George, James N; Farris, A Darise

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 40% of patients who survive acute episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency experience one or more relapses. Risk factors for relapse other than severe ADAMTS13 deficiency and ADAMTS13 autoantibodies are unknown. ADAMTS13 autoantibodies, TTP episodes following infection or type I interferon treatment and reported ensuing systemic lupus erythematosus in some patients suggest immune dysregulation. This cross-sectional study asked whether autoantibodies against RNA-binding proteins or peripheral blood gene expression profiles measured during remission are associated with history of prior relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient TTP. Peripheral blood from 38 well-characterized patients with autoimmune ADAMTS13-deficient TTP in remission was examined for autoantibodies and global gene expression. A subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24%) exhibited a peripheral blood gene signature composed of elevated ribosomal transcripts that associated with prior relapse. A non-overlapping subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24%) displayed a peripheral blood type I interferon gene signature that associated with autoantibodies to RNA-binding proteins but not with history of relapse. Patients who had relapsed bimodally expressed higher HLA transcript levels independently of ribosomal transcripts. Presence of any one potential risk factor (ribosomal gene signature, elevated HLA-DRB1, elevated HLA-DRB5) associated with relapse (OR = 38.4; p = 0.0002) more closely than any factor alone or all factors together. Levels of immune transcripts typical of natural killer (NK) and T lymphocytes positively correlated with ribosomal gene expression and number of prior episodes but not with time since the most recent episode. Flow cytometry confirmed elevated expression of cell surface markers encoded by these transcripts on T and/or NK cell subsets of patients who had relapsed. These data associate elevated ribosomal and

  12. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for the treatment of steroid-resistant idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chunqing; Qin, Ping; Zhao, Chuanli; Ji, Xuebin; Wang, Xueyong; Zhang, Maohong

    2003-06-01

    The treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is difficult in those unresponsive to corticosteroids and/or splenectomy. We attempted to induce durable response in 21 patients with refractory ITP by applying mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (1.5-2.0 g/d), a novel immunosuppressive agent. Overall response rate was 62% (13 of 21), including 24% (five of 21) in complete response (CR), 29% (six of 21) in partial response (PR), and 10% (two of 21) in minor response (MR). The response rates for non-splenectomized and splenectomized ITP patients were 64% (nine of 14) and 57% (four of seven), respectively (P > 0.05). 39% (five of 13) responders relapsed as a result of dose reduction or withdraw of MMF, and 61% (eight of 13) responders maintained their effectiveness for a median of 24 wk. Sustained response was observed in three patients in whom MMF was withdrawn. MMF was well tolerated with only slight nausea and diarrhea recorded in 3 of 21 cases. No premature withdrawal was found in this study. CD3+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CD19+ PBMC were significantly reduced 12 wk after MMF administration in the responders. Platelet-associated antibodies against glycoproteins GPIIb/IIIa were detected in 13 of 21 (62%) patients before MMF treatment, and antibody levels were significantly decreased in responders 12 wk after MMF administration. This suggested that MMF might correct the immunologic abnormalities underlying the destruction of circulating platelets in ITP. We conclude that MMF could be used as a second-line agent for the treatment of steroid-resistant ITP before or after splenectomy and thereby is worth of further evaluation in randomized studies.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state.

  14. Splenectomy: Does it still play a role in the management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luc; Gray, Daryl K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasma exchange is first-line therapy for patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Splenectomy is often indicated for patients with relapsing or refractory disease. Concerns exist about its efficacy and safety in these patients. We describe a series of patients whose TTP was treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. We also reviewed the literature in order to describe the use and safety of splenectomy for refractory or relapsing TTP. Methods We reviewed the charts of consecutive patients with TTP referred for splenectomy and searched MEDLINE for studies describing outcomes following splenectomy for relapsing or refractory TTP. Results In all, 5 patients were referred for relapsing TTP and underwent uneventful laparoscopic splenectomy. All 5 were in remission after more than 40 months of follow-up. We found 18 studies (87 patients) reporting the results of splenectomy for relapsing TTP and 15 studies (74 patients) involving patients who underwent splenectomy for refractory TTP. The aggregate complication (6% v. 10%) and mortality rates (1.2% v. 5%) were lower for patients who received treatment for relapsing versus refractory TTP. The rate of postsplenectomy relapse among patients with relapsing disease was 17%, whereas the nonresponse rate was 8% for patients with refractory TTP. There were no complications among the 22 laparoscopic cases reported. Conclusion Although the data supporting splenectomy for treatment of TTP are limited to case series with no control groups, they suggest that splenectomy is an option for patients with refractory or relapsing disease. When performed laparoscopically in patients with relapsing disease, splenectomy is associated with minimal morbidity and mortality. PMID:20858382

  15. Opana ER abuse and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like illness: a rising risk factor in illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Kapila, Aaysha; Chhabra, Lovely; Chaubey, Vinod K; Summers, Jeffery

    2014-03-03

    We report the case of a 22 year-old-woman who presented with upper extremity cellulitis secondary to an infiltration of illicit intravenous drug use. She confessed to the intravenous use of Opana ER (an extended release oral formulation of oxymorphone) which is an opioid drug approved only for oral use. She was found to have clinical evidence of profound thrombotic microangiopathy which resulted due to the intravenous use of Opana ER. She showed full clinical improvement after withholding drug and supportive clinical care. Recent report of Opana ER intravenous abuse was published from Tennessee county and has now been increasingly recognised as one of the causes of thrombocytopenia which mimicks clinically as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Physicians should be aware of this association as the lack of familiarity to this can pose serious management dilemmas for our patients (especially the polysubstance abusers).

  16. Multidrug resistance-1 in T lymphocytes and natural killer cells of adults with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: effect of prednisone treatment.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Graue, Gerardo; Crespo-Solís, Erick; Piedras, Josefa

    2008-07-01

    High P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance-1 (P-gp/MDR1) activity in lymphocytes from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients may affect disease outcome. ITP treatment includes glucocorticoids that are substrates of P-gp; hence, P-gp functional activity and antigenic expression were assessed by flow cytometry in T and natural killer (NK) cells from ITP patients before and after prednisone therapy. Herein, patients' T and NK cells did not show increased MDR1 functional activity, whereas P-gp antigenic expression was significantly enhanced in both therapy-free and prednisone-treated patients. Prednisone treatment did not significantly modify the function and expression of MDR1 in T and NK cells of ITP patients.

  17. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura with Reversible Neurological Features: Brain Diffusion MRI with ADC Map, Spect and EEG Findings. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yerdelen, D; Göksel, B K; Yıldırım, T; Karataş, M; Karaca, S; Reyhan, M; Ozdoğu, H

    2006-11-30

    Although nervous system involvement is common in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), abnormalities on computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography are not encountered so frequently and if present, these abnormalities are often reversible. We describe a 39-year-old woman with recurring transient focal neurological findings found to have laboratory findings consistent with TTP. In cerebral diffusion weighted images (DWI), diffuse cortical hyperintensity was noted in right frontal lobe, but the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) map was normal. Electroencephalography demonstrated lateralized slowing and repeated DWI showed diffuse cortical hyperintensity in the right hemisphere. SPECT showed luxury perfusion in the right hemisphere areas. The patient's condition resolved with plasmapheresis. Our patient illustrates that diffuse hemispheric involvement can be seen in DWI and EEG, and SPECT may show luxury perfusion after resolution of neurological findings in TTP cases. To our knowledge, this is the first TTP case in which the ADC map was normal.

  18. Low-dose vincristine in the treatment of corticosteroid-refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in non-splenectomized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, F.; Montserrat, E.; Rozman, C.; Diumenjo, C.; Feliu, E.; Grañena, A.

    1980-01-01

    Eight non-splenectomized patients with corticosteroid-refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were treated with low-dose vincristine (1 mg/week up to a total dose of 4 mg). Complete remission was achieved in 2 cases and partial remission in 3. Bleeding stopped in one patient who failed to remit. No statistical relationship was found between the response to vincristine and the duration of the disease or the corticosteroid-therapy. Side effects were only observed in one patient. By comparing these results with those reported in the literature, it can be inferred that low-dose vincristine may be useful in the management of corticosteroid-refractory ITP. PMID:7194478

  19. Simultaneous reactivation of herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, A F; Frère, P; Rakic, L; Fassotte, M; Evrard, B; De Mol, P; Piérard, G E

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous reactivation of distinct Herpesviridae with development of clinical manifestations is exceptional. We report a 48-year-old woman suffering from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. As the disease remained refractory to corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and splenectomy, a cure of vinblastine was administered. An atypical stomatitis developed few days later. Immunohistochemistry on a Tzanck smear and a biopsy evidenced a Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The patient presented simultaneously a single necrotic lesion on the abdomen. Immunohistochemistry on a skin biopsy revealed the presence of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gE, gB and IE63 proteins. Intravenous aciclovir was initiated. The present case of simultaneous clinical infections by HSV-I and VZV underlines the importance of complementary viral identification testing in the event of unusual clinical presentations.

  20. ADAMTS13 and anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - current perspectives and new treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Tersteeg, Claudia; Verhenne, Sebastien; Roose, Elien; Schelpe, An-Sofie; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A deficiency in ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type-1 repeats, member 13) is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Congenital TTP is caused by a defect in the ADAMTS13 gene resulting in decreased or absent enzyme activity; acquired TTP results from autoantibodies that either inhibit the activity or increase the clearance of ADAMTS13. Despite major progress in recent years in our understanding of the disease, many aspects around the pathophysiology of TTP are still unclear. Newer studies expanded the TTP field from ADAMTS13 and inhibitory antibodies to immune complexes, cloned autoantibodies, and a possible involvement of other proteases. Additionally, several new treatment strategies supplementing plasma-exchange and infusion are under investigation for a better and more specific treatment of TTP patients. In this review, we discuss the recent insights in TTP pathophysiology and describe upcoming therapeutic opportunities.

  1. Adult-onset congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Johannes G; Kemna, Evelien W M; Strunk, Annuska L M; Jobse, Pieter A; Kramer, P A; Dikkeschei, L D; van den Heuvel, L P W J; Fijnheer, Rob; Verdonck, Leo F

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia, resulting in neurologic and/or renal abnormalities. We report a 49-year-old patient with a history of thrombotic events, renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. Blood analysis demonstrated no ADAMTS13 activity in the absence of antibodies against ADAMTS13. The complete ADAMTS13 gene was sequenced, and two mutations were identified: one mutation on exon 24 (Arg1060Asp), which had previously been described, and a mutation on exon 27 (Met1260IlefsX34), which has not been reported. For these mutations, compound heterozygosity appears to be necessary to cause TTP, as family members of the patient display only one of the mutations and all displayed normal ADAMTS13 activity.

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TPP) successfully rescued by plasma exchange in the ICU: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, XIULI; WU, TIEJUN; ZHANG, XIHONG; QU, AIJUN; TIAN, SUOCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder, which is characterized by thrombus formation in small blood vessels. The present study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from two patients with severe TTP, who were treated successfully in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Liaocheng People's Hospital in 2013. Comprehensive therapies were administered to the patients, including plasma exchange (PE), mechanical ventilation (case 1 only), steroid therapy, blood transfusion and anti-inflammatory treatment (case 2 only). The two patients returned to a stable state and were transferred back to the hematology department following PE. The positive outcome achieved for these patients suggests that early intervention involving bedside PE in the ICU may reduce the mortality rate of patients with severe TTP who have concurrent respiratory or circulatory failure and cannot be treated in the dialysis unit. PMID:27347058

  3. Treatment of plasmapheresis refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with double-filtration membrane plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Volkan; Deveci, Burak; Kurtoğlu, Erdal

    2013-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder. Without plasma exchange treatment (PET) the mortality rate is quite high. Double-filtration plasmapheresis is an alternative opportunity for TTP patients refractory to PET. Here we report our experience in a refractory TTP patient who was successfully treated by means of double-filtration plasmapheresis therapy.

  4. DNMT3B 579G>T promoter polymorphism and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Du, Weiting; Gu, Dongsheng; Wang, Donghai; Xue, Feng; Ge, Jing; Sui, Tao; Yang, Renchi

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics may influence the expression of numerous genes, which might contribute to autoimmune diseases. DNA methylation is mediated by DNA methyltransferases, especially DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). Polymorphisms of the DNMT3B gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between DNMT3B 579G>T and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The DNMT3B 579G>T polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. There was no significant difference in genotype and allele distribution between the ITP patient and the controls (p = 0.722 and 0.667, respectively). Similar results were observed between the 2 groups when stratified by age and disease course, including acute in childhood, chronic in childhood, acute in adult and chronic in adult. Importantly, this study showed a statistical difference in the distribution of SNP of DNMT3B between Chinese and Koreans or Americans. It is shown that the SNP of DNMT3B 579G>T may not be used on its own as a marker to predict the susceptibility to ITP in a Chinese population and that DNMT3B 579G>T promoter SNP varies from one ethnic population to another.

  5. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  6. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: do the time of diagnosis and delivery route affect pregnancy outcome in parturients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Yuce, T; Acar, D; Kalafat, E; Alkilic, A; Cetindag, E; Soylemez, F

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the determining effects of diagnosis time on pregnancy outcomes in a population of pregnant women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Records of all the pregnant women with thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Those with a confirmed diagnosis of ITP were included in the study. Main outcome measures were antenatal thrombocyte count, postpartum haemorrhage rate, and route of delivery. Foetal outcomes such as foetal thrombocyte count, haemorrhage, and birth weight were also reported as secondary outcome measures. Time of diagnosis either antenatal or preconception did not significantly alter the investigated parameters. Delivery route had no impact on complication rates. Time of diagnosis also did not affect treatment modality. ITP is rare disorder accounting for less than 5 % of all pregnant thrombocytopenias. Time of diagnosis does not affect maternal-foetal outcomes or treatment modality unless diagnosis is made during labour. Compared to gestational thrombocytopenia, treatment rates may differ but treatment modalities remain the same and the effort put into making the differential should be weighed against maternal stress factors for lengthy laboratory evaluation as long as the thrombocytopenia is of pure nature without any systemic involvement.

  7. Idiopathic Relapsing Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura with Persistent ADAMTS13 Inhibitor Activity Treated Sequentially with Plasmapheresis, Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide and Splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Musa, Faisal; Baidas, Said

    2015-01-01

    We here describe a patient with an idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) secondary to an ADAMTS13 inhibitor that continued to be dependent on plasmapheresis until the patient was treated with rituximab. TTP manifestations subsided with rituximab treatment in spite of a persistently low ADAMTS13 activity and continued a detectable inhibitor activity until the patient developed an intolerance to rituximab due to an allergic reaction when cyclophosphamide was added; this resulted in a normalization of ADAMTS13 activity and the disappearance of the inhibitor. Later, the patient developed an intolerance to rituximab due to a severe allergic reaction. Soon after stopping rituximab, the ADAMTS13 activity level dipped below 5% in addition to the appearance of the ADAMTS13 inhibitor. The patient had a splenectomy after rituximab and cyclophosphamide treatment; the medication was stopped based on several case reports of a complete remission of TTP after splenectomy. We believe that the reason TTP went into remission in our patient was because of rituximab treatment, in spite of both persistently low ADAMTS13 activity and a detectable inhibitor activity due to reducing the release of von Willebrand factor large multimers from the endothelial cells. We found that ADAMTS13 activity normalized and the inhibitor activity became undetectable when cyclophosphamide was added to rituximab. We suggest adding cyclophosphamide to rituximab for the treatment of patients with persistent ADAMTS13 inhibitors in order to prolong the remission period and lower the rate of relapse.

  8. The splenic autoimmune response to ADAMTS13 in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura contains recurrent antigen-binding CDR3 motifs.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Monica; Vogel, Monique; Kentouche, Karim; Lämmle, Bernhard; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A

    2014-11-27

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is the consequence of a severe ADAMTS13 deficiency resulting from autoantibodies inhibiting ADAMTS13 or accelerating its clearance. Despite the success of plasma exchange the risk of relapse is high. From 2 patients (A and B), splenectomized for recurrent episodes of acquired TTP, the splenic B-cell response against ADAMTS13 was characterized through generation of human monoclonal anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies (mAbs) by cloning an immunoglobulin G (IgG)4κ- and IgG4λ-Fab library using phage display technology and by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of switched memory B cells (CD19+/CD27+/IgG+). Sequence analysis of the anti-ADAMTS13 IgGs of both patients revealed that the VH gene use was limited in our patients to VH1-3 (55%), VH1-69 (17%), VH3-30 (7%), and VH4-28 (21%) and contained 8 unique and thus far not reported heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 motifs, of which 4 were shared by the 2 patients. The discovery of several highly similar anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies in 2 unrelated TTP patients suggests that the autoimmune response is antigen driven, because the probability that such similar immunoglobulin rearrangements happen by chance is very low (< 10(-9)).

  9. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Primary Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Hospitalized Children Under 2-Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Farhangi, H; Ghasemi, A; Banihashem, A; Badiei, Z; Jarahi, L; Eslami, G; Langaee, T

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most prevalent cause of thrombocytopenia in children. Despite the importance of ITP in children under 2-years old, only a few publications are available in the literature.ITP usually presents itself as isolated thrombocytopenia and mucocutaneous bleeding. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on 187 under 2-year-old children diagnosed with ITP and treated at Dr. Sheikh Hospital from 2004 to 2011.In this retrospective study, clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, history of viral infections, vaccination history, and treatment efficacy in children under 2-years old with ITP were investigated.Patients were followed for one year after being discharged from the hospital. Results The risk of the disease developing into chronic form was higher in older children (0.001). ITP in children under 3-months old was significantly associated with vaccination (p=0.007). There was no significant differences between male and female patients in regards to newly diagnosed ITP, persistent, and chronic disease status (p = 0.21). No significant difference in bleeding symptoms was observed between patients under 3-months old and 3 to 24-months old (p=0.18). Conclusion Infantile ITP respond favorably to treatment. The risk of the disease developing into chronic form is higher in 3-to-24-month-old children compared to under-three-month olds. PMID:27222699

  10. New developments in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP): cooperative, prospective studies by the Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group.

    PubMed

    Imbach, Paul; Kühne, Thomas; Zimmerman, Sherri

    2003-12-01

    Based on 6 years of experience with worldwide cooperation of investigators in the field of hematology, the International Childhood ITP Study Group (ICIS) has provided a long-term concept for prospective studies and new, evidence-based definitions of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Structured interactions between the cooperating investigators, the ICIS board, the writing committees, an expert panel, and the central operative office are summarized in the Rules of the ICIS. Preliminary experience shows high acceptance of the activities of the ICIS by participants from many countries. There is good cooperation, resulting in analyses and publication of results. New areas of focus for ICIS include the formation of an expert panel, regular meetings, and publication of results from current studies. Long-term financial resources must be found. ICIS is looking back on 6 constructive years of international cooperation resulting in new or confirmatory evidence regarding the demographics, diagnosis, natural history, and management of childhood ITP. New structures and cooperation must be identified to continue this productive endeavor.

  11. Dysplastic changes in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and the effect of corticosteroids to increase dysplasia and cause hyperdiploid macropolycytes.

    PubMed

    Olcay, L; Yetgin, S; Okur, H; Erekul, S; Tuncer, M

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluates the dysplastic hematological changes in nine patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in 11 attacks, before and after corticosteroid treatment. The pretreatment blood smears of patients with ITP, displayed more neutrophils with bizarre nuclei (P < 0.001), Döhle or Döhle-like inclusions (P < 0. 01), irregular distribution of granules (P < 0.05), hypo-agranulation (P < 0.05), pseudo-Pelger-Huet-like cells (P < 0. 01), and nuclei with chromatine clumping (P < 0.01) than the normal children. The eosinophils of ITP patients were also dysplastic, before treatment. The pretreatment diameter of the neutrophils and the percentage of macropolycytes were greater than those of the patients with viral infections and normal group (P < 0.05 for all). The percentage of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei and nuclei with chromatine clumping and the diameter of neutrophils and macropolycyte percentage increased with corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.01, < 0.01, < 0.01, and < 0.05, respectively). The neutrophil diameter, percentage of macropolycytes, and number of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei decreased within 1-4 weeks after the therapy was stopped. In the neutrophils of two patients, diploidy and hyperdiploidy were established before and on the last day of therapy, respectively, and diploidy reversed after therapy was stopped. In conclusion, ITP patients display dysplastic findings in both neutrophils and eosinophils before treatment and corticosteroids cause transient significant increase in some of the dysplastic changes in neutrophils.

  12. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  13. Level of IL-16 and Reticulated Platelets Percentage during the Clinical Course of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Children.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Glil, Reem R; Assar, Effat H

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired disease with transient or persistent decrease of thrombocytes number in the blood. Cytokines play important roles in the immune regulation and are known to be deregulated in autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to investigate serum IL-16 levels in relation to reticulated platelets in children with ITP and platelet count. Twenty six children with ITP (11 with newly diagnosed ITP, 9 with persistent ITP and 6 with chronic ITP) and 12 age-matched healthy children controls were studied. Serum level of IL-16 and reticulated platelets count were assessed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry respectively. Serum IL-16 levels were significantly higher in patients as compared to controls (P < 0.001). Within patients, the levels were higher in newly diagnosed compared to persistent and chronic ITP (P < 0.01) and (P < 0.001) respectively. IL-16 levels were also significantly higher in persistent ITP compared to chronic ITP (P < 0.001). Reticulated platelets were also elevated in patients compared to controls and the increase was significant in newly diagnosed group (P < 0.05). Negative correlation was found between IL-16 level and reticulated platelets and platelets counts (r = -0.284, P = 0.028, r = 0.274 P = 0.25) respectively. It is concluded that IL-16 may be valuable in predicting the clinical course of pediatrics ITP. Measurement of reticulated platelets may provide significant information about thrombopoietic activity during the clinical course of ITP in children.

  14. Rituximab therapy for chonic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a long-term follow-up analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Chavez, Jaime; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Esparza, Miriam García-Ruiz; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term response to rituximab in patients with chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Adults with ITP fail to respond to conventional therapies in almost 30% of cases, developing a refractory disease. Rituximab has been successfully used in these patients. We used rituximab at 375 mg/m2, IV, weekly for a total of four doses in 18 adult patients. Complete remission (CR) was considered if the platelet count was >100 × 109/l, partial remission (PR) if platelets were >50 × 109/l, minimal response (MR) if the platelet count was >30 × 109/l and <50 × 109/l, and no response if platelet count remained unchanged. Response was classified as sustained (SR) when it was stable for a minimum of 6 months. Median age was 43.5 years (range, 17 to 70). Median platelet count at baseline was 12.5 × 109/l (range, 3.0 to 26.3). CR was achieved in five patients (28%), PR in five (28%), MR in four (22%), and two patients were classified as therapeutic failures (11%). Two additional patients were lost to follow-up. The median time between rituximab therapy and response was 14 weeks (range, 4 to 32). SR was achieved in 12 patients (67%). There were no severe adverse events during rituximab therapy. During follow-up (median, 26 months; range, 12 to 59), no other immunosuppressive drugs were used. In conclusion, rituximab therapy is effective and safe in adult patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Overall response rate achieved is high, long term, and with no risk of adverse events. PMID:17874322

  15. Association of interleukin-(IL)10 haplotypes and serum IL-10 levels in the progression of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Tesse, Riccardina; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; De Mattia, Domenico; Sangerardi, Maria; Valente, Federica; Giordano, Paola

    2012-08-15

    Derangement of genetic and immunological factors seems to have a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We investigated interleukin(IL)-10 genetically determined expression in children with an acute progression of ITP (n=41) compared to young patients with chronic ITP (n=44) and healthy controls (n=60), and attempted to correlate IL-10 production with the course of the disease. We genotyped our study population for three single nucleotide polymorphisms at positions -1082 (A/G), -819 (C/T) and -592 (C/A) in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene. IL-10 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The IL-10 production in our study population was significantly higher in patients carrying the GCC haplotype than those bearing ACC and ATA haplotypes (6.9 ± 1.5 vs 3.6 ± 0.8 vs 3.3 ± 0.3, p=0.03). The serum concentration of IL-10 was significantly higher in patients with an acute course of their disease, who mainly carried the GCC haplotype (92%), compared to chronic subjects, bearing the non-GCC haplotypes, and controls [17 pg/mL (1.7-18) vs 3.5 pg/mL (0.6-11) vs 3 pg/mL (1-7), p<0.01)]. Our findings show that patients carrying the GCC-high producer IL-10 haplotype have an acute development of ITP and that IL-10 levels might represent a useful predictive biomarker of the disease course.

  16. FRETS-VWF73 rather than CBA assay reflects ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura patients.

    PubMed

    Mancini, I; Valsecchi, C; Lotta, L A; Deforche, L; Pontiggia, S; Bajetta, M; Palla, R; Vanhoorelbeke, K; Peyvandi, F

    2014-08-01

    Collagen-binding activity (CBA) and FRETS-VWF73 assays are widely adopted methods for the measurement of the plasmatic activity of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving-protease. Accurately assessing the severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 is important in the management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, non-concordant results between the two assays have been reported in a small but relevant percentage of TTP cases. We investigated whether CBA or FRETS-VWF73 assay reflects ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity in acquired TTP patients with non-concordant measurements. Twenty plasma samples with non-concordant ADAMTS13 activity results, <10% using FRETS-VWF73 and ≥20% using CBA, and 11 samples with concordant results, <10% using either FRETS-VWF73 and CBA assays, were analysed. FRETS-VWF73 was performed in the presence of 1.5 M urea. ADAMTS13 activities were also measured under flow conditions and the VWF multimer pattern was defined in order to verify the presence of ultra-large VWF due to ADAMTS13 deficiency. In FRETS-VWF73 assay with 1.5 M urea, ADAMTS13 activity significantly increased in roughly 50% of the samples with non-concordant results, whereas it remained undetectable in all samples with concordant measurements. Under flow conditions, all tested samples showed reduced ADAMTS13 activity. Finally, samples with non-concordant results showed a ratio of high molecular weight VWF multimers higher than normal. Our results support the use of FRETS-VWF73 over CBA assay for the assessment of ADAMTS13 severe deficiency and indicate urea as one cause of the observed differences.

  17. Analysis of clinical effects and mechanism of recombinant human interleukin-11 with glucocorticoids for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xifeng; Wang, Lijuan; Sun, Lin; Li, Tantan; Ran, Xuehong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of recombinant human interleukin-11 (IL-11) with glucocorticoids for treatment of adult idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and the regulatory effect on immune mechanisms. A total of 80 patients with initial diagnosis of ITP admitted to our hospital were selected. Patients were randomly divided into the control group and observation group, with 40 cases each. The control group received glucocorticoids treatment, and the observation group received IL-11 and glucocorticoids. The treatment effects were compared. The total effective rate and effective degree of the observation group was higher than in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05); comparing the incidence of complications of the two groups, there was no statistical difference (P>0.05). In the observation group, onset time was reduced, platelet recovery level increased and platelet antibody positive rate decreased, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The total treatment course was shorter and recurrence rate was lower in the observation group compared with the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells decreased in the two groups after treatment, and was more pronounced in the observation group. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, IL-11 with glucocorticoids for the treatment of adult ITP is safe and effective, and may be associated with decreased percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. PMID:28352325

  18. Role of ADAMTS13 in the management of thrombotic microangiopathies including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP).

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil; Rutherford, Cynthia; Matevosyan, Karen; Shen, Yu-Min; Sarode, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    The clinical presentation of thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP) and other thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) can often be similar. The role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13) in diagnosing TTP is accepted by most researchers but continues to be debated in a few studies. We report the experience of our single-centre academic institution, where ADAMTS13 is used to diagnose TTP and guide plasma exchange (PLEX). Patients presenting to our institution with thrombotic microangiopathy (60 patients) between January 2006 and December 2012 were divided into two groups based on ADAMTS13 activity and clinical history. Patients with ADAMTS13 activity <10% were included in the TTP (n = 30) cohort while patients with activity >11% were classified as 'other microangiopathies' (TMA, n = 30). PLEX was only initiated in patients with a high likelihood of TTP and discontinued when the baseline ADAMTS13 activity was >11%. Patients with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency (TTP group) showed significant presenting differences: lower platelet counts, less renal dysfunction, higher presence of neurological abnormalities, and greater haemolysis markers as compared to non-deficient patients (TMA group). Most importantly, patients without severe ADAMTS13 deficiency were safely managed without increased mortality despite receiving no PLEX or discontinuing PLEX after a short course (upon availability of ADAMTS13 results). In conclusion, ADAMTS13 can be used to diagnose TTP and guide appropriate PLEX therapy.

  19. A single-institution, 20-year prospective experience with an affordable Fc-receptor blockade method to treat patients with chronic, refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Roberto; Vargas-Castro, Olga; Oropeza-Borges, Mabel; González-Carrillo, Martha L; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2007-01-01

    In a 20-year period in a single institution, 34 patients with chronic, refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura were prospectively treated with ex vivo anti-D opsonized autologous red blood cells. All patients had received previous treatment with steroids and/or immunosuppressive agents, and 11 had been splenectomized. Twenty one patients had an increase in the platelet count; in five cases, the increase was more than 50 x 10(9)/L platelets and in 16 the increase was more than 100 x 10(9)/L platelets. Early responses were observed in 20 patients and late responses in seven, whereas seven patients (20%) did not respond at all. Nine of the 20 individuals who achieved an ER had a subsequent drop in the platelet count; however, only three had a drop below 50 x 10(9)/L. When last censored, of the 34 patients, 24 (70%) had a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L. The 84-month thrombocytopenia-free (over 50 x 10(9)/L platelets) status of the whole group is 70%, whereas the 84-month complete remission (over 100 x 10(9)/L platelets) status of the whole group is 50%. It is concluded that the use of ex vivo anti-D opsonized red blood cells may represent another, substantially cheaper treatment of patients with chronic, refractory, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  20. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68–90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  1. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68-90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease.

  2. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Refractory Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Diagnostic and Management Challenge. A Case Report and Concise Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hishmeh, Mohammad; Sattar, Alamgir; Zarlasht, Fnu; Ramadan, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Aisha; Hinson, Shante; Hwang, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Symptoms: Fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Plasma exchange Specialty: Rheumatology • Hematology and Critical Care Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathic (TMA) syndromes, caused by severely reduced activity of the vWF-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), on the other hand, is an autoimmune disease that affects various organs in the body, including the hematopoietic system. SLE can present with TMA, and differentiating between SLE and TTP in those cases can be very challenging, particularly in patients with no prior history of SLE. Furthermore, an association between these 2 diseases has been described in the literature, with most of the TTP cases occurring after the diagnosis of SLE. In rare cases, TTP may precede the diagnosis of SLE or occur concurrently. Case Report: We present a case of a previously healthy 34-year-old female who presented with dizziness and flu-like symptoms and was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and schistocytes in the peripheral smear. She was subsequently diagnosed with TTP and started on plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids, but without a sustained response. A diagnosis of refractory TTP was made, and she was transferred to our facility for further management. Initially, the patient was started on rituximab, but her condition continued to deteriorate, with worsening thrombocytopenia. Later, she also fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for diagnosis of SLE. Treatment of TTP in SLE patients is generally similar to that in the general population, but in refractory cases there are few reports in the literature that show the efficacy of cyclophosphamide. We started our patient on cyclophosphamide and noticed a sustained improvement in the platelet

  3. The TITAN trial--assessing the efficacy and safety of an anti-von Willebrand factor Nanobody in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Holz, Josefin-Beate

    2012-06-01

    The Phase II TITAN trial is designed to assess the efficacy and safety of an anti-von Willebrand factor (vWF) Nanobody in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Nanobodies are a novel class of therapeutic proteins and are based on the smallest functional fragments of single-chain antibodies that occur naturally in the Camelidae family (Nanobody® and Nanobodies® are registered trademarks of Ablynx NV). With vWF implicated in the thrombotic process underlying TTP, an anti-vWF Nanobody may hold significant promise as adjunctive therapy to plasma exchange. Recruitment is currently ongoing, and aims to include a total of 110 patients from countries in Europe, the Middle East, Australia and Northern America.

  4. Renal thrombotic microangiopathies/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome complicated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tomohiro; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Kawakami, Atsushi; Furusu, Akira; Taguchi, Takashi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA)/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but potentially lethal condition requiring rapid recognition, diagnosis, and initiation of therapy. We experienced a case of a 61-year-old woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) complicated with severe renal TMA/TTP following IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). She was admitted to our hospital for further evaluation of hypergammaglobulinema, acute renal failure, and severe thrombocytopenia. She had been diagnosed with pSS 13 years prior to admission. Histological examination of her kidney revealed fibrin thrombi in the glomeruli and arterioles, a finding that is consistent with TMA/TTP. The patient was subsequently treated with plasma exchange, which resulted in a successful outcome without any complications. This rare case suggests that it is important to make a therapeutic decision based on appropriate and prompt pathological diagnosis.

  5. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to antibody-mediated ADAMTS13 deficiency precipitated by a localized Castleman's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Thais Celi Lopes; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Colella, Marina Pereira; Percout, Priscila de Oliveira; Moura, Muriel Silva; Dias, Maria Almeida; Lins, Betina Diniz; Paula, Erich Vinicius de; Vassallo, Jose; Annichino-Bizzachi, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor causing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) may be precipitated by some infections, inflammatory diseases or neoplasia. We reported a case of refractory TTP precipitated by a newly diagnosed localized Castleman's disease (CD). TTP was initially treated with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids; however the treatment failed to promote sustained response. During hospitalization, an abdominal tumor was diagnosed and resected; the histological analysis revealed a CD of hyaline-vascular variant rich stroma. After tumor removal, the patient achieved a long-lasting clinical remission and normalized ADAMTS13 activity. This clinical case describes a novel association of acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor and CD. The antibody to ADAMTS13 developed along with the systemic manifestation of CD and promptly disappeared after the resection of the tumor. There are reports of neoplasia-associated thrombotic microangiopathy however direct evidence of CD-dependent ADAMTS13 inhibitor had not yet been reported.

  6. Citrate anticoagulation during plasma exchange in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: short heparin-free hemodialysis helps to attenuate citrate load.

    PubMed

    Buturović-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Pernat, Andreja Marn; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2005-06-01

    The treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura requires plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma as a replacement solution once or even twice daily. If citrate anticoagulation is needed, the citrate load (both from fresh frozen plasma and citrate as an anticoagulant) can be significant, causing metabolic complications. The aim of our report is to present our experience with citrate anticoagulation in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with daily membrane plasma exchange. Twenty-six plasma exchange procedures were performed during 20 days of treatment in a 46-year-old female. The blood flow was 98 +/- 8 mL/min; 4% trisodium citrate was infused into the arterial line (134 +/- 11 mL/h) and 1 M CaCl2 into the venous line (11.4 +/- 1.8 mL/h). Fresh frozen plasma (first 7 procedures) or cryo-poor plasma (19 procedures) were used as a replacement solution, 3176 +/- 536 mL per procedure. A total of 88,930 mL of plasma was exchanged. No serious side-effects occurred. iCa before plasma exchange was significantly higher than afterwards (1.23 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.12 +/- 0.12, P = 0.0047). Significant alkalosis occurred after three plasma exchanges (pH 7.64, bicarbonate 36.2 mmol/L), and was corrected by 3-h heparin-free hemodialysis with dialysate as follows: K 4.0 mmol/L, calcium 1.5 mmol/L, and bicarbonate set to 24 mmol/L. After dialysis, pH was 7.45 and bicarbonate 29.4 mmol/L. Another (2-h) heparin-free hemodialysis procedure was repeated after six plasma exchanges. Citrate anticoagulation can be safely performed in patients treated with plasma exchange once or twice daily. Periodically performed short heparin-free hemodialysis can correct metabolic alkalosis and attenuate the citrate load.

  7. Treatment with liposome-encapsulated clodronate as a new strategic approach in the management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alves-Rosa, F; Stanganelli, C; Cabrera, J; van Rooijen, N; Palermo, M S; Isturiz, M A

    2000-10-15

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease related to the presence of elevated levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin, or autoantibodies. In recent years the importance of macrophage Fc gamma receptors in the uptake of platelets in ITP has been confirmed. Although in patients with ITP the platelet destruction occurs in liver and spleen, in this present experimental mouse model the liver was the principal organ of sequestration of sensitized platelets. The uptake in the spleen, bone marrow, lung, and kidneys was negligible and not different from that in control animals. In addition, the trapped platelets did not return to circulation, and new cells derived from the platelet-storage pool or new thrombocytogenesis were necessary to restore the platelet count. The depletion of splenic and hepatic murine macrophages by liposome-encapsulated clodronate (lip-clod) was studied as a new strategy for ITP treatment. Lip-clod inhibits, in a dose-dependent manner, the antibody-induced thrombocytopenia. Moreover, lip-clod treatment rapidly restored (24 hours) the platelet count in thrombocytopenic animals to hematologic safe values, and despite additional antiplatelet antiserum treatment, mice were able to maintain this level of platelets at least up to 48 hours. The bleeding times in lip-clod-treated animals was not different from those in controls, demonstrating that the hemostasis was well controlled in these animals. The results presented in this study demonstrate that lip-clod treatment can be effective in the management of experimental ITP. (Blood. 2000;96:2834-2840)

  8. Comparison of intravenous immune globulin and high dose anti-D immune globulin as initial therapy for childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ian; Ragucci, Dominic; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Bussel, James; Kalpatthi, Ram

    2010-04-01

    This report documents our experience with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) (1 g/kg, iv) and high-dose, anti-D immune globulin (anti-D) (75 microg/kg) as initial treatment for childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The medical records of children diagnosed with ITP at a single institution between January 2003 and May 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Participants received either IVIG or high-dose anti-D immune globulin as their initial treatment for ITP. For the 53 patients included for analysis, there was no statistical difference in efficacy between each group; however, patients who received anti-D experienced a higher rate of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), particularly chills and rigours, and 2 of 24 patients in the anti-D group developed severe anaemia requiring medical intervention. Patients who presented with mucosal bleeding had higher rates of treatment failure (32%) compared to those who presented with dry purpura (6%), regardless of treatment. Both IVIG and high-dose anti-D are effective first-line therapies for childhood ITP. However, we observed increased ADRs in the high-dose anti-D group in contrast to previously published reports. Further studies are needed to evaluate safety and premedications for high-dose anti-D and to determine the utility of using the presence of mucosal bleeding to predict treatment failure.

  9. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests will be done to check your platelet count . A bone marrow aspiration or biopsy may also be done. ... the disease usually goes away without treatment. Some children ... the platelet count in about half of people. However, other drug ...

  10. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... make a normal ADAMTS13 enzyme. As a result, enzyme activity is lacking or changed. Acquired TTP is the ... the body makes antibodies (proteins) that block the activity of the ADAMTS13 enzyme. It's not clear what triggers inherited and acquired ...

  11. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... level Mucus membrane biopsy Platelet count Urinalysis Von Willebrand factor assay Treatment You may have a treatment ... recover completely. But some people die of this disease, especially if it is not diagnosed right away. ...

  12. Association of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells with natural course of childhood chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Son, Bo Ra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in the peripheral blood of patients with childhood chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) exhibiting thrombocytopenia and spontaneous remission. The findings of this study indicate the possibility of predicting spontaneous recovery and pathogenesis of childhood chronic ITP. Methods Eleven children with chronic ITP (seven thrombocytopenic and four spontaneous remission cases; mean age, 8.8 years; range, 1.7-14.9 years) were enrolled in this study. Five healthy children and eight healthy adults were included as controls. The frequency of Treg was evaluated by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood. Results In this study, four patients (36%) achieved spontaneous remission within 2.8 years (mean year; range, 1.0-4.4 years). The frequency of Treg was significantly lower in patients with persisting thrombocytopenia (0.13%±0.09%, P<0.05), than that in the patients with spontaneous remission (0.30%±0.02%), healthy adults controls (0.55%±0.44%), and healthy children controls (0.46%±0.26%). A significantly positive correlation was found between the frequency of Treg and the platelet count in children. Conclusion These data suggest that a lower frequency of Treg contributes to the breakdown of self-tolerance, and may form the basis for future development of specific immunomodulatory therapies. Furthermore, Treg frequency has prognostic implication toward the natural course and long-term outcomes of childhood chronic ITP. PMID:26124848

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Refractory Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Diagnostic and Management Challenge. A Case Report and Concise Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hishmeh, Mohammad; Sattar, Alamgir; Zarlasht, Fnu; Ramadan, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Aisha; Hinson, Shante; Hwang, Caroline

    2016-10-25

    BACKGROUND Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathic (TMA) syndromes, caused by severely reduced activity of the vWF-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), on the other hand, is an autoimmune disease that affects various organs in the body, including the hematopoietic system. SLE can present with TMA, and differentiating between SLE and TTP in those cases can be very challenging, particularly in patients with no prior history of SLE. Furthermore, an association between these 2 diseases has been described in the literature, with most of the TTP cases occurring after the diagnosis of SLE. In rare cases, TTP may precede the diagnosis of SLE or occur concurrently. CASE REPORT We present a case of a previously healthy 34-year-old female who presented with dizziness and flu-like symptoms and was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and schistocytes in the peripheral smear. She was subsequently diagnosed with TTP and started on plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids, but without a sustained response. A diagnosis of refractory TTP was made, and she was transferred to our facility for further management. Initially, the patient was started on rituximab, but her condition continued to deteriorate, with worsening thrombocytopenia. Later, she also fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for diagnosis of SLE. Treatment of TTP in SLE patients is generally similar to that in the general population, but in refractory cases there are few reports in the literature that show the efficacy of cyclophosphamide. We started our patient on cyclophosphamide and noticed a sustained improvement in the platelet count in the following weeks. CONCLUSIONS Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening hematological emergency which must be diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Refractory cases of TTP have been described in the literature, but without clear evidence

  14. Efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with suboptimal response to standard treatment: Results of a phase II, multicenter noncomparative study.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Ygal; Paintaud, Gilles; Azoulay, Elie; Poullin, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Desvignes, Céline; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Peltier, Julie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Pène, Frédéric; Presne, Claire; Saheb, Samir; Deligny, Christophe; Rousseau, Alexandra; Féger, Frédéric; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The standard four-rituximab infusions treatment in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) remains empirical. Peripheral B cell depletion is correlated with the decrease in serum concentrations of anti-ADAMTS13 and associated with clinical response. To assess the efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion, 24 TTP patients were enrolled in this prospective multicentre single arm phase II study and then compared to patients from a previous study. Patients with a suboptimal response to a plasma exchange-based regimen received two infusions of rituximab 375 mg m(-2) within 4 days, and a third dose at day +15 of the first infusion if peripheral B cells were still detectable. Primary endpoint was the assessment of the time required to platelet count recovery from the first plasma exchange. Three patients died after the first rituximab administration. In the remaining patients, the B cell-driven treatment hastened remission and ADAMTS13 activity recovery as a result of rapid anti-ADAMTS13 depletion in a similar manner to the standard four-rituximab infusions schedule. The 1-year relapse-free survival was also comparable between both groups. A rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion is feasible and provides comparable results than with the four-rituximab infusions schedule. This regimen could represent a new standard in TTP. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00907751). Am. J. Hematol. 91:1246-1251, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of immunoglobulin G (IgG) interchain disulfide bond cleavage on efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    PubMed

    Machino, Y; Ohta, H; Suzuki, E; Higurashi, S; Tezuka, T; Nagashima, H; Kohroki, J; Masuho, Y

    2010-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used widely to treat immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), but the mechanisms of its action remain unclear. We investigated the affinity for Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) and the thrombocytopenia-ameliorating effect of S-sulfonated gammaglobulin (SGG) and S-alkylated gammaglobulin (AGG), in comparison with unmodified gammaglobulin (GG), in a mouse ITP model. Cleavage of immunoglobulin (Ig)G interchain disulfide bonds by either S-sulfonation or S-alkylation did not decrease the affinity for FcγRIIA (CD32A) and FcγRIIB (CD32B), but did decrease the affinity for FcγRIA (CD64A) and FcγRIIIA (CD16A), presumably because of changes in H-chain configuration. The interchain disulfide bond cleavage decreased the affinity much more for mouse FcγRIV than for mouse FcγRIIB. The ability of AGG to ameliorate ITP was greatly diminished, while SGG, whose disulfide bonds are reconstituted in vivo, was as effective as GG. These results suggest that the interchain disulfide bonds are important for therapeutic effect. It is also suggested that the interaction of IVIG with the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB is insufficient for effective amelioration of ITP and that, at least in this model, direct binding of IVIG to FcγRIIIA is also required.

  16. Standardization of terminology, definitions and outcome criteria in immune thrombocytopenic purpura of adults and children: report from an international working group.

    PubMed

    Rodeghiero, Francesco; Stasi, Roberto; Gernsheimer, Terry; Michel, Marc; Provan, Drew; Arnold, Donald M; Bussel, James B; Cines, Douglas B; Chong, Beng H; Cooper, Nichola; Godeau, Bertrand; Lechner, Klaus; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; McMillan, Robert; Sanz, Miguel A; Imbach, Paul; Blanchette, Victor; Kühne, Thomas; Ruggeri, Marco; George, James N

    2009-03-12

    Diagnosis and management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remain largely dependent on clinical expertise and observations more than on evidence derived from clinical trials of high scientific quality. One major obstacle to the implementation of such studies and in producing reliable meta-analyses of existing data is a lack of consensus on standardized critical definitions, outcome criteria, and terminology. Moreover, the demand for comparative clinical trials has dramatically increased since the introduction of new classes of therapeutic agents, such as thrombopoietin receptor agonists, and innovative treatment modalities, such as anti-CD 20 antibodies. To overcome the present heterogeneity, an International Working Group of recognized expert clinicians convened a 2-day structured meeting (the Vicenza Consensus Conference) to define standard terminology and definitions for primary ITP and its different phases and criteria for the grading of severity, and clinically meaningful outcomes and response. These consensus criteria and definitions could be used by investigational clinical trials or cohort studies. Adoption of these recommendations would serve to improve communication among investigators, to enhance comparability among clinical trials, to facilitate meta-analyses and development of therapeutic guidelines, and to provide a standardized framework for regulatory agencies.

  17. Molecular mimicry by Helicobacter pylori CagA protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Shinohara, Kenji; Inoue, Yusuke; Sato, Yutaka; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Okubo, Masashi; Zaitsu, Yuzuru; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Nakamura, Yukinori; Nawata, Ryouhei; Oka, Yoshitomo; Shirai, Mutsunori; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori often leads to platelet recovery in patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (cITP). Although this clinical observation suggests the involvement of H. pylori, little is known about the pathogenesis of cITP. We initially examined the effect of H. pylori eradication on platelet counts in 20 adult Japanese cITP patients. Then, using platelet eluates as the probe in immunoblot analyses, we examined the role of molecular mimicry in the pathogenesis of cITP. Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 75% (15 of 20) of cITP patients. Eradication was achieved in 13 (87%) of the H. pylori-positive patients, seven (54%) of which showed increased platelet counts within the 4 months following treatment. Completely responsive patients also showed significant declines in platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) levels. Platelet eluates from 12 (nine H. pylori-positive and three H. pylori-negative) patients recognized H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein, and in three completely responsive patients, levels of anti-CagA antibody in platelet eluates declined after eradication therapy. Cross-reactivity between PAIgG and H. pylori CagA protein suggests that molecular mimicry by CagA plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a subset of cITP patients.

  18. Micromegakaryocytes in a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and chronic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Gangarossa, S.; Mattina, T.; Romano, V.; Milana, G.; Mollica, F.; Schiliro, G.

    1996-03-15

    Thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia is frequently reported in patients with partial 11q deletion but there are no reports on bone marrow morphology of these patients. We report on a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and its classical clinical manifestations including chronic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom micromegakaryocytes were found in the bone marrow aspirate. This is the first report of the presence of micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow of a patient with 11q deletion. Accurate examination of the bone marrow of other patients with the 11q deletion may clarify whether the observation of micromegakaryocytes is common in these patients. Micromegakaryocytes may indicate a defect of development. Two genes for two DNA binding proteins that are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis map in the 11q region: Ets-1, that maps to 11q24, close to D11S912, and the nuclear-factor-related-kB gene that maps to 11q24-q25. It is possible that these genes, when present in only one copy, result in thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia as observed in this patient. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  20. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - analysis of clinical features, laboratory characteristics and therapeutic outcome of 24 patients treated at a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Zaidi, Syed Z. A.; Motabi, Ibraheem H; Alshehry, Nawal Faiez; AlGhamdi, Mubarak S.; Tailor, Imran Khan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease. The primary aim was overall response rate (ORR) assessment in the treated patients Methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients treated during 2006-2015. TTP patients with microangiopathic hemolysis (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia were included. We analyzed clinical features, laboratory characteristics and treatment outcomes of 24 TTP patients treated at our tertiary care center (KFMC). Results: Twenty-four TTP patients (18 females; 6 males) had a mean age of 33.5±13.9 years; 22(91%) had neurologic features, 7(29%) fever, 10(42%) renal impairment; 4(20.83%) cardiac manifestations; 22(91.7%) had triad with additional neurologic abnormalities; only 2(8.2%) had pentad of TTP. Majority (54.16%) had idiopathic TTP. All patients received therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); 23(95.8%) received adjunctive corticosteroids and 13(54.2%) received rituximab either due to refractoriness to TPE on ~day7, or earlier. Twenty-one out of 24 (87.5%) achieved complete remission (CR) without any subsequent relapse. At 22 months (median, range 1-113), 20 patients (83.3%) are alive at the time of report. Three patients died during acute episode because of sever disease or delayed treatment and one died in CR. Conclusion: TPE, steroids and or rituximab was very effective in preventing high risk of mortality and achieving durable CR in 87.5% of patients. More awareness is needed for early diagnosis and early referral to centers with appropriate tertiary care facilities.. PMID:28083052

  1. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura misdiagnosed as autoimmune cytopenia: Causes of diagnostic errors and consequence on outcome. Experience of the French thrombotic microangiopathies reference centre.

    PubMed

    Grall, Maximilien; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Provôt, François; Wynckel, Alain; Poullin, Pascale; Grange, Steven; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Lautrette, Alexandre; Delmas, Yahsou; Presne, Claire; Hamidou, Mohamed; Girault, Stéphane; Pène, Frédéric; Perez, Pierre; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Chauveau, Dominique; Ojeda-Uribe, Mario; Barbay, Virginie; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul; Benhamou, Ygal

    2017-04-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has a devastating prognosis without adapted management. Sources of misdiagnosis need to be identified to avoid delayed treatment. We studied 84 patients with a final diagnosis of severe (<10%) acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency-associated TTP from our National database that included 423 patients, who had an initial misdiagnosis (20% of all TTP). Main diagnostic errors were attributed to autoimmune thrombocytopenia, associated (51%) or not (37%) with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. At admission, misdiagnosed patients were more frequently females (P = .034) with a history of autoimmune disorder (P = .017) and had organ involvement in 67% of cases; they had more frequently antinuclear antibodies (P = .035), a low/undetectable schistocyte count (P = .001), a less profound anemia (P = .008), and a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) (P = .008). In multivariate analysis, female gender (P = .022), hemoglobin level (P = .028), a positive DAT (P = .004), and a low schistocytes count on diagnosis (P < .001) were retained as risk factors of misdiagnosis. Platelet count recovery was significantly longer in the misdiagnosed group (P = .041) without consequence on mortality, exacerbation and relapse. However, patients in the misdiagnosed group had a less severe disease than those in the accurately diagnosed group, as evidenced by less organ involvement at TTP diagnosis (P = .006). TTP is frequently misdiagnosed with autoimmune cytopenias. A low schistocyte count and a positive DAT should not systematically rule out TTP, especially when associated with organ failure.

  2. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients. Results: In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. Results showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient’s self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life. PMID:27252807

  3. The European Medicines Agency review of eltrombopag (Revolade) for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Maria; Calvo, Gonzalo; Hudson, Ian; Feldschreiber, Peter; Brown, David; Lee, Ching Cheng; Lay, Geoffrey; Valeri, Anna; Abadie, Eric; Thomas, Angela; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    On 11th March 2010, the European Commission issued a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for Revolade for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura. Revolade is an orphan medicinal product indicated for splenectomized patients with immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura who are refractory to other treatments (e.g. corticosteroids, immunoglobulins) and as second-line treatment for non-splenectomized patients where surgery is contraindicated. The active substance of Revolade is eltrombopag (ATC code B02BX05). Eltrombopag increases platelet production through activation of the thrombopoietin receptor. The recommended oral dose is 50 mg once daily to achieve and maintain a platelet count of the 50×109/L or more necessary to reduce or prevent the risk of bleeding. The benefit of Revolade is a durable response in maintaining platelet levels. The most common side effects include headache, nausea, hepatobiliary toxicity, diarrhea, fatigue, paresthesia, constipation, rash, pruritus, cataract, arthralgia and myalgia. The decision to grant the marketing authorization was based on the favorable recommendation of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency. The objective of this paper is to describe the data submitted to the European Medicines Agency and to summarize the scientific review of the application. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21712542

  4. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Methods We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. Results In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831–308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93–6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66–4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257–US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033–US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%–24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55–8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94–7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044–US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353–US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%–12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%–11.77%). Conclusion Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population. PMID:28176930

  5. Rituximab and intermediate-purity plasma-derived factor VIII concentrate (Koate®) as adjuncts to therapeutic plasma exchange for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in patients with an ADAMTS13 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Soumya; Nakagawa, Mayumi; Rosenbaum, Eric R; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Hutchins, Laura F; Makhoul, Issam; Milojkovic, Natasha; Cottler-Fox, Michele

    2015-02-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) results from a congenital or acquired deficiency of the von Willebrand factor (vWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. The disease can be fatal and hence treatment should be initiated promptly. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) remains the standard treatment along with adjunct therapies including steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. Addition of rituximab to TPE has been shown to be beneficial in refractory/relapsing TTP; however, TPE results in removal of rituximab from the circulation requiring more frequent dosing of rituximab to achieve a favorable outcome. The intermediate-purity plasma-derived Factor VIII concentrate (FVIII) Koate® contains the highest amount of ADAMTS13 activity yet reported and has been used successfully in treating congenital TTP. Here we report our experience with addition of this FVIII concentrate to rituximab, corticosteroids and TPE in three TTP patients with an ADAMTS13 inhibitor to permit withholding TPE for 48 h after rituximab infusion.

  6. What Causes Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is involved in blood clotting. Not having enough enzyme activity causes overactive blood clotting. In TTP, blood clots ... make a normal ADAMTS13 enzyme. As a result, enzyme activity is lacking or changed. "Inherited" means that the ...

  7. Octaploidy in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, R. N.; Chowdhry, Mohit; Mishra, Manoj; Srivastava, Priyanka; Fauzdar, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of an elderly 68-year-old male who presented in our hospital with chief complaints of petechial rashes and ecchymosis over extremities and bleeding from the oral cavity since 3–4 days prior to hospitalization. He saw a physician before coming to our hospital and received one dose of IV methylprednisolone and oral wysolone. He had come to our hospital for further management. Bone marrow karyotyping was done and chromosomal analysis revealed two cell lines. Eighty percent of the cells analyzed revealed apparently normal male karyotype. However, 20% cells analyzed revealed a total of 184 chromosomes, suggesting octaploidy. PMID:22346001

  8. Living with Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin causes petechiae. Paleness or jaundice (a yellowish color of the skin or whites of the eyes). Fatigue (feeling very tired and weak). Fever. A fast heart rate or shortness of breath. Headache, speech changes, confusion, coma, stroke , or seizure. A low amount ...

  9. Expression of the 60 kDa and 71 kDa heat shock proteins and presence of antibodies against the 71 kDa heat shock protein in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Yuan, Mingchun; Ding, Fuyue; Yang, Dongliang; Wang, Ruibo; Li, Jianxin; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by platelet destruction resulting from autoantibodies against platelet proteins, particularly platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) have been shown to be major antigenic determinants in some autoimmune diseases. Antibodies to Hsps have also been reported to be associated with a number of pathological states. Methods Using western blot, we measured the levels of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) and of the inducible 71 kDa member of the Hsp70 family (Hsp71) in lymphocytes and the presence of antibodies against these hsps in plasma of 29 pediatric patients with ITP before the treatment and in 6 other patients before and after treatment. Results Interestingly only one out of 29 patients showed detectable Hsp60 in lymphocytes while this heat shock protein was detected in the 30 control children. Hsp71 levels were slightly lower in lymphocytes of patients with ITP than in controls (1567.8 ± 753.2 via 1763.2 ± 641.8 integrated optical density (IOD) units). There was a small increase of Hsp71 after recovery from ITP. The titers of plasma antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp71 were also examined. Antibodies against Hsp71 were more common in ITP patients (15/29) than in control children (5/30). The titer of anti-Hsp71 was also higher in children patients with ITP. The prevalence of ITP children with antibodies against Hsp71 (51.7%) was as high as those with antibodies against platelet membrane glycoproteins (58.3%). Conclusions In summary, pediatric patients with ITP showed no detectable expression of Hsp60 in lymphocytes and a high prevalence of antibody against Hsp71 in plasma. These changes add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP and may be important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of ITP. PMID:15070425

  10. Negative regulation of human megakaryocytopoiesis by human platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin: comparative analysis in bone marrow cultures from normal individuals and patients with essential thrombocythaemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Han, Z C; Bellucci, S; Tenza, D; Caen, J P

    1990-04-01

    The effect of human platelet factor 4 (PF4) and beta-thromboglobulin (BTG) on megakaryocyte colony formation in normal subjects as well as in essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was studied. Both PF4 and BTG were found to be capable of inhibiting the development of isolated megakaryocytes and their colonies in normal marrow cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. A significant 50% inhibition was seen at a PF4 or BTG concentration of 1-2.5 micrograms/ml, and complete inhibition in the range of 5-10 micrograms PF4 or BTG/ml. The two platelet proteins had similar effects on megakaryocyte development. A combination of PF4 and BTG resulted in an additive effect. Antibodies against PF4 or BTG could effectively neutralize the inhibitory effect of PF4 or BTG respectively. In ET and ITP, in vitro megakaryocyte development was also inhibited by PF4 and BTG in a similar way to that seen in normal subjects, suggesting that the responsiveness of megakaryocyte progenitors to PF4 and BTG is normal in these two disorders. PF4 and BTG did not affect the growth of colony forming units granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) except at very high concentration (greater than or equal to 10 micrograms/ml) but they did inhibit erythroid colony formation by normal and ET burst forming units erythroid (BFU-E). However, the inhibition of BFU-E by PF4 and BTG was dose-related, and a 50% inhibition required a PF4 or BTG dose ranging from 5 to 10 micrograms/ml. These results indicate that PF4 and BTG are involved in negative regulation of normal and pathologic megakaryocytopoiesis and that their inhibition acts predominantly on the megakaryocytic lineage.

  11. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  12. Helicobacter pylori eradication shifts monocyte Fcγ receptor balance toward inhibitory FcγRIIB in immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Atsuko; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Okazaki, Yuka; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ikeda, Yasuo; Kuwana, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder in which platelet-specific autoantibodies cause a loss of platelets. In a subset of patients with ITP and infected with Helicobacter pylori, the number of platelets recovers after eradication of H. pylori. To examine the role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of ITP, the response of 34 ITP patients to treatment with a standard H. pylori eradication regimen, irrespective of whether they were infected with H. pylori, was evaluated. Eradication of H. pylori was achieved in all H. pylori–positive patients, and a significant increase in platelets was observed in 61% of these patients. By contrast, none of the H. pylori–negative patients showed increased platelets. At baseline, monocytes from the H. pylori–positive patients exhibited an enhanced phagocytic capacity and low levels of the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB). One week after starting the H. pylori eradication regimen, this activated monocyte phenotype was suppressed and improvements in autoimmune and platelet kinetic parameters followed. Modulation of monocyte FcγR balance was also found in association with H. pylori infection in individuals who did not have ITP and in mice. Our findings strongly suggest that the recovery in platelet numbers observed in ITP patients after H. pylori eradication is mediated through a change in FcγR balance toward the inhibitory FcγRIIB. PMID:18654664

  13. How Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... specializes in diagnosing and treating blood disorders. Medical History Your doctor will ask about factors that may affect TTP. For example, he or she may ask whether you: Have certain diseases or conditions, such as cancer, HIV, lupus, or infections (or whether you're pregnant). Have ...

  14. How Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and surgery. Treatments are done in a hospital. Plasma Therapy Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It ... nutrients to your body. TTP is treated with plasma therapy. This includes: Fresh frozen plasma for people ...

  15. Psychogenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sharmila; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Nath, Saswati

    2013-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura, also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome, is a rare, distinctive, localized cutaneous reaction pattern mostly affecting psychologically disturbed adult women. Repeated crops of tender, ill-defined ecchymotic lesions on the extremities and external bleeding from other sites characterize the condition. We report here a case of psychogenic purpura because of the rarity of the condition and to emphasize the importance of consideration of this entity during evaluation of a patient with recurrent ecchymoses. Early diagnosis of this condition will not only minimize the cost of the medical evaluation but will also benefit the patient. PMID:23825859

  16. Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Sandeep K; Lee, Edwin; Fox, John; Rachko, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare. We describe a case of AMI in patient with ITP. An 81-year-old woman presented with acute inferoposterior MI with low platelet count on admission (34,000/µl). Coronary angiography revealed significant mid right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis with thrombus, subsequently underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In some patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura and acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention is a therapeutic option.

  17. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) in Pediatric Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  18. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura--possibilities of treatment and results.

    PubMed

    Gasparović, V; Mejić, S; Pisl, Z; Radonić, R; Radman, I

    2001-01-01

    Results of treatment of 13 patients fulfilling the criteria for TTP are presented. Thrombocytopenia was present in all patients (100%). Eleven of 13 patients (84.6%) had conciousness disorder, and seven of 13 patients (53.8%) had renal impairment. Immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis and replacement of removed volume with fresh frozen plasma in a dosage of 25 ml/kg body weight resulted in statistically significant increase of platelet count (p = 0.0033), and significant improvement of consciousness as defined by increased Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) (p = 0.0524). In two patients, renal function recovered and, in one patient, hemodialysis was no longer needed. This improvement in a small patient group has no statistical significance.

  19. [Clinical analysis of 200 cases of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    García-Stivalet, Lilia Adela; Muñoz-Flores, Aarón; Montiel-Jarquín, Alvaro José; Barragán-Hervella, Rodolfo Gregorio; Bejarano-Huertas, Ruth; García-Carrasco, Mario; López-Colombo, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la púrpura trombocitopénica idiopática se caracteriza por la extravasación de sangre en el tejido subcutáneo, membranas, mucosas o piel, que puede generar manifestaciones clínicas de sangrado como lesiones equimóticas, petequias de aparición brusca, epistaxis, gingivorragia y complicaciones graves como hemorragia intracraneal, debido a destrucción plaquetaria mediada por anticuerpos dirigidos contra la superficie de las plaquetas. El objetivo de este informe es presentar las características clínicas de los pacientes con púrpura trombocitopénica idiopática en un hospital de tercer nivel de atención, con la finalidad de tener estadísticas para estudios analíticos posteriores. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de 200 pacientes atendidos en el servicio de hematología con diagnóstico de púrpura trombocitopénica idiopática. Se describen sus manifestaciones clínicas, el diagnóstico y el tratamiento médico y quirúrgico empleados.

  20. The clinical implications of adult-onset henoch-schonelin purpura

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition. It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. Pathologically, it can be considered a form of immune complex-mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) involving the skin and other organs. Though it primarily affects children (over 90% of cases), the occurrence in adults has been rarely reported. Management often involves the use of immunomodulatory or immune-suppressive regimens. PMID:21619657

  1. Henoch Schonlein purpura associated with bee sting: case report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Olortegui, José; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita; Durand-Vergara, Juan; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Gálvez-Olortegui, Tomas; Armas-Ramírez, Indira; Hilario-Vargas, Julio

    2015-10-30

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common childhood vasculitis, characterized by a non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura and systemic features. It can be triggered by conditions like infections and insect bites. We present the case of a six-year-old girl with palpable maculopapular lesions on the lower limbs, itching, mild pain, swelling of feet, limitation of limb mobility, and a history of bee sting. Thigh skin biopsy was performed, with a report of leucocytoclastic vasculitis, and was diagnosed as HSP. She was prescribed bed rest, and was given oral hydration. The patient outcome was favorable and was discharged after five days. This is the fifth report of a HSP case associated with a bee sting with an uncomplicated course, which is in contrast to previous case reports.

  2. Targeting reservoirs to control human infections – a one health approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis and potentially fatal extraintestinal sequelae, such as the hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, in humans. Currently, treatment of human STEC disease is only symptomatic and supportive. Antibioti...

  3. Thrombocytopenic syndromes in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Matthew; Malinowski, Ann K

    2015-01-01

    The physiological changes in pregnancy result in platelet counts that are lower than in nonpregnant women. Consequently, thrombocytopenia is a common finding occurring in 7–12% of pregnant women. Gestational thrombocytopenia, the most common cause of low platelet counts, tends to be mild in most women and does not affect maternal, fetal or neonatal outcomes. Gestational thrombocytopenia needs to be distinguished from other less common causes of isolated thrombocytopenia, such as immune thrombocytopenia, which affects approximately 3% of thrombocytopenic pregnant women and can lead to neonatal thrombocytopenia. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies are both associated with thrombocytopenia. They share a considerable number of similar characteristics and are associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and rarely mortality. Accurate identification of the aetiology of thrombocytopenia and appropriate management are integral to optimizing the pregnancy, delivery and neonatal outcomes of this population. Clinical cases are described to illustrate the various aetiologies of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy and their treatment. PMID:27512485

  4. Henoch-Schonlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... microscopic hallmark of HSP is the deposition of IgA (an antibody found in blood, saliva, tears, etc.) ... skin biopsy and the consequent failure to detect IgA. Treatment and Course of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura NSAIDs ...

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura: a refractory case without lupus activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia Boyero, Raimundo; Mas Esteve, Eva; Mas Esteve, Maria; Millá Perseguer, M Magdalena; Marco Buades, Josefa; Beltran Fabregat, Juan; Cañigral Ferrando, Guillermo; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been infrequently reported. Usually, patients with TTP have more SLE activity and frequent renal involvement. Here we present a case of TTP associated to low-activity SLE. The absence of renal and major organ involvement increased the difficulty in making the initial diagnosis. ADAMTS13 activity in plasma in this patient was very low, as seen in other similar cases. The evolution of the patient was poor, needing plasma exchanges and immunosuppressive therapy, including the use of rituximab.

  6. Posttransfusion purpura associated with alloantibody specific for the platelet antigen, Pen(a).

    PubMed

    Simon, T L; Collins, J; Kunicki, T J; Furihata, K; Smith, K J; Aster, R H

    1988-09-01

    Posttransfusion purpura (PTP) and severe thrombocytopenia occurred 9 days after transfusion of red blood cells to a 48-year-old, multiparous Navajo woman. The platelet count rose to hemostatic levels after treatment with prednisone and three plasma exchange transfusions. Serologic studies showed that the patient's serum contained the potent antibody reactive with platelets from nearly all normal subjects, but nonreactive with autologous platelets obtained after recovery. This antibody was found to be specific for a high-frequency, platelet-specific antigen, designated Pen(a),implicated previously as an immunogen in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. An exchange of serum showed that Pena is identical with an alloantigen designated Yuk(b) by Japanese workers. We conclude that PTP can occur in association with alloimmunization against Pen(a) (Yuk(b).

  7. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  8. Powerlifter's purpura: a valsalva-associated phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Joseph C; Suh, Philip S

    2002-08-01

    The causes of purpura can be classified into intravascular, vascular, and extravascular mechanisms. We describe a case of cervicofacial purpura in a powerlifter attributed to the accompanying Valsalva-associated increased arterial pressure. Powerlifting should be added to the list of activities that may cause purpura.

  9. Purpura-associated congenital lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Berti, Samantha; Pieri, Alessandro; Lotti, Torello; Duranti, Alberto; Panelos, John; De Martino, Maurizio; Moretti, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl referred to our Department for a two-month worsening of congenital primary lymphedema of the lower limb and for the appearance of several purpuric lesions on the right thigh and knee. We diagnosed a lichenoid pigmented purpura of Gougerot and Blum in a patient with Milroy disease, complicated by an insufficiency of anterior saphena. We treated the patient with topical steroids and compression stockings, until surgical intervention of phlebectomy. We report this case for the rarity of the disease, for the even more rare association with lichenoid pigmented purpura and for cutaneous immunopathological findings.

  10. Angioma serpiginosum: a simulator of purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, N. H.; Paterson, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    We describe two patients with angioma serpiginosum who had both undergone a variety of haematological tests for investigation of purpura, but in whom careful examination of the skin demonstrated abnormal blood vessels rather than extravasated blood. Recognition of vascular disorders which simulate purpura may avoid unnecessary investigations. Images Figure 1 PMID:1800966

  11. Primary Splenic Angiosarcoma Presenting as Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg-Sandau, Anna; Roy, Darshan; Sandau, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of the spleen is a rare malignancy that arises from vascular endothelial origin. This neoplasm is highly malignant and diagnosis is often delayed due to the vague presentation of clinical symptoms. A case report and concise review of the current diagnostic criteria and surgical treatment are provided to aid in the detection and treatment of this malignancy. We present a case of a 56-year-old female who presented with massive splenomegaly secondary to angiosarcoma of the spleen. The patient suffered from longstanding symptomatic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Diagnosis of a splenic angiosarcoma can be difficult due to the vague presentation and lack of concrete risk factors. Early identification and splenectomy are paramount. However, it is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. We reviewed the literature of the current diagnostic and surgical treatment of primary splenic angiosarcoma. PMID:27651973

  12. Scleroderma renal crisis or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: seeing through the masquerade.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Emily; Fioravanti, Gloria; Samuel, Bensson; Longo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    SCLERODERMA: renal crisis (SRC), a somewhat rare but serious complication of systemic scleroderma, is one of only a few known rheumatologic emergencies; it presents in as many as 10% of patients with scleroderma. Before the use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to treat SRC, the mortality rate for SRC was extremely high-as much as 90% after 1 year. However, the mortality rate has significantly improved with the early and aggressive use of ACE inhibitors. SRC typically includes acute renal failure and accelerated hypertension. Patients may report headache, changes in vision, fever, dyspnea, and encephalopathy. Laboratory study results can show elevated creatinine levels, thrombocytopenia, and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) with schistocytes on blood smear. Given this clinical and laboratory presentation, SRC can easily be mistaken for TTP in clinical practice, as we demonstrate in 2 presentations of similar cases of SRC, the first in a 36-year-old Caucasian woman and the second in a 54-year-old Caucasian woman. In both cases, SRC masqueraded as TTP, and both patients were almost mistakenly treated for TTP until the clinical picture changed and certain laboratory test and kidney biopsy results confirmed otherwise.

  13. Autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in partial DiGeorge syndrome: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Nieto, Leticia; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Lieberman-Hernández, Esther; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2011-08-01

    The absence of an appropriate central tolerance in primary immunodeficiencies favors proliferation of autoreactive lymphocyte clones, causing a greater incidence of autoimmunity. Del 22q11.2 syndrome presents an increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune diseases. One of the most relevant and frequent immune manifestations is autoimmune thrombocytopenia. We present the case of a pediatric patient with autoimmune thrombocytopenia due to the immunological dysregulation observed in partial DiGeorge syndrome.

  14. Idiopathic thromobocytopenic purpura in two mothers of children with DiGeorge sequence: A new component manifestation of deletion 22q11?

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.; Philip, N.; Michel, G.

    1997-04-14

    The phenotypic spectrum caused by the microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 region is known to be variable. Nearly all patients with DiGeorge sequence (DGS) and approximately 60% of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome exhibit the deletion. Recent papers have reported various congenital defects in patients with 22q11 deletions. Conversely, some patients have minimal clinical expression. Ten to 25% of parents of patients with DGS exhibit the deletion and are nearly asymptomatic. Two female patients carrying a 22q11 microdeletion and presenting with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are reported. Both had children with typical manifestations of DGS. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Zinc deficiency in senile purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Haboubi, N Y; Haboubi, N A; Gyde, O H; Small, N A; Barford, A V

    1985-01-01

    Fasting plasma zinc concentrations were lower in elderly people with senile purpura than in a control group matched for age. No significant difference was found in the mean serum concentration of albumin, which is the main binder of zinc. No other clinical or laboratory findings differentiated the two groups. As the cause of the low plasma zinc values has not been found it is suggested that further studies of the related factors including input, output, and binding should be made before a therapeutic trial is launched. PMID:4056071

  16. Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... St. Geme J, Schor N, Behrman RE, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Schöenlein purpura. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  17. An improbable and unusual case of thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaymon; Patel, Preeti; Ahmed, Zohair

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening medical emergency which may be difficult to recognize given the wide spectrum in which it presents. A delay in treatment may be catastrophic as untreated cases of TTP have a mortality rate exceeding 90%. Given the high fatality rate of untreated TTP and its range of presenting symptoms, we present our unusual case of TTP in a post-splenectomy patient with early treatment and positive outcome. This case describes a 54-year-old female who presented with hematuria and gingival bleeding, followed by the development of a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Her past medical history was significant for multiple episodes of TTP, the last of which resulted in a splenectomy and a 20-year history of remission thereafter. On exam, she was alert, well appearing, and neurologically intact. Her only significant finding was a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Laboratory studies revealed mild anemia and thrombocytopenia, an elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and a decreased haptoglobin. Peripheral smear showed poikilocytosis, helmet cells, and schistocytes. Corticosteroid therapy was promptly initiated, her platelets were monitored closely, and she underwent urgent therapeutic plasma exchange. Due to the risk of significant morbidity and mortality that may result from delayed treatment of TTP as well as the significant variations of presentation, TTP requires a consistently high index of suspicion. Our patient suffered multiple relapses of TTP within a 30-year span, underwent splenectomy in early adulthood, and presented with atypical symptoms during her most recent relapse illustrating how persistent TTP can be as well as how unusually it may present. Providers should be aware of the vast spectrum of presentation and remember that TTP may recur following splenectomy despite prolonged remission. PMID:27609730

  18. Factitious purpura in a 10-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kayo; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Mari; Miyagawa, Sachiko; Yoshioka, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 10-year-old girl who presented with bizarre purpura. Both congenital and autoimmune hemorrhagic disorders were excluded based on her past medical history and physical and laboratory findings. Child abuse was also ruled out as purpura continued to develop after child-family separation. Histologic examination of the skin lesions revealed disruption of collagen fiber bundles. This finding indicated application of external force, leading to a definitive diagnosis of factitious purpura. Although it is very rare in school-age children, the diagnosis of factitious purpura should be included in the differential diagnosis of purpura in children. Histologic analysis of skin biopsies may aid in establishing the diagnosis.

  19. Psychogenic Purpura (Gardner-Diamond Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura, also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome or autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, is a rare condition characterized by spontaneous development of painful edematous skin lesions progressing to ecchymosis over the next 24 hours. Severe stress and emotional trauma always precede the skin lesions. The condition is most commonly seen in women, but isolated cases have been reported in adolescents and in males. Psychodermatologic evaluation and dermatology and psychiatry liaison have been successful in the treatment of these patients. This report provides an overview of psychogenic purpura and presents the case of a 15-year-old girl. PMID:26137346

  20. Idiopathic purpura fulminans in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Karunatilaka, D H; De Silva, J R S; Ranatunga, P K; Gunasekara, T Mr; Faizal, M Am; Malavige, G N

    2007-08-01

    Purpura fulminans is a rapidly progressive thrombotic disease that has been described during both severe bacterial and viral infections. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), antiphospholipid antibodies and acquired or congenital C and S protein deficiency are thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. Here we report the case of a 4-year-old girl who developed gangrene of all her fingers and toes following dengue shock syndrome complicated by DIC and also discuss its management.

  1. Hyperglobulinemic purpura in the course of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Shalit, M; Bar-Sela, S; Leviatan, A; Naparstek, Y

    1980-01-01

    Secondary hyperglobulinemic purpura of Waldenström is characterized by polyclonal gammopathy associated mainly with autoimmune diseases. Its occurrence with multiple myeloma is very rare. We described a patient who developed characteristic lesions of hyperglobulinemic purpura in the course of IgA myeloma. Skin biopsy revealed deposition of IgA in the blood vessels.

  2. [Duodenal complications of rheumatoid purpura. Endoscopic aspects].

    PubMed

    Chapoy, P; Guidon, M J; Louchet, E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the endoscopic features and clinical outcome of the duodenal complications in anaphylactoid purpura. Over a 3-year period, 20 patients were hospitalized in our unit because of purpura rheumatica. Duodenal complications occurred in 5 cases warranting endoscopic assessment. All patients had bilious vomiting and epigastric pain, constantly associated with low-grade purpuric rash. Plasma factor XIII concentrations were always decreased. The duodenal complication was suspected radiologically in 2 cases when "thumbprint" impressions were seen. Petechiae, oedema and intramural hematoma with superficial erosions were present endoscopically in 3 cases. The lesions were severe and extensive, involving the entire duodenum in 3 cases and the jejunum in one case. In one patient, there was a stricture of the upper part of the second duodenum. Treatment consisted of parenteral nutrition (using a central catheter: 3 cases, or a peripheral vein: 2 cases) and cimetidine (30 mg/kg.bw). The clinical outcome was favorable in 4 patients; the symptoms vanished and the endoscopic lesions were reversible (including the stricture) with restitutio ad integrum after 10 days. The last patient died the 8th day of treatment, 3 days after digestive improvement; the cause of death was probably iatrogenic and related to accidental migration of the central catheter. These results suggest that endoscopic examination should be performed in all patients with anaphylactoid purpura presenting with bilious vomiting. Endoscopy seems to be of great value in deciding if parenteral nutrition is indicated--or not--and perhaps in order to contraindicate the use of steroid therapy in the case of ulcerated hematomas.

  3. Acute infectious purpura fulminans due to probable spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kundavaram, A; Francis, N R; Jude, A P J; Varghese, G N

    2014-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is associated with several infections, most notably with meningococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus infections. However, there are few reports of association of this entity with spotted fever from India. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with fever, headache, and myalgia. On the seventh day of fever he developed nonblanching purple hemorrhagic purpura on the trunk and most prominently on the extremities consistent with purpura fulminans. Immunofluorescent assay confirmed the diagnosis of spotted fever. PF though common with rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is rarely seen in association with Indian tick typhus, the usual cause of spotted fever in India.

  4. [Schoenlein-Henoch purpura with intestinal involvement].

    PubMed

    Blöchinger, M; Schmitt, W; Beer, M; Seib, H J

    1997-11-01

    A 51-year-old male patient admitted to the hospital because of colic-like abdominal pain, paralytic ileus, anal bleeding and microhaematuria with proteinuria, developed an intestinal ischemia with a serum lactate level of 6.3 mmol/l. An occlusion of the large vessels was excluded angiographically. Perfusion disorders were detected both endoscopically and histologically in the upper gastrointestinal tract and in the terminal ileum. When after two days a palpable purpura appeared on the anterior of both feet, a vasculitis type Schoenlein-Henoch was suspected and treated with high doses of steroids, resulting in decreasing symptoms. From the point of admittance, a nephritic urinary sediment had been apparent, and the renal affliction developed into a nephrotic syndrome without notable reduction in the glomerular filtration rate. On the 13th day of treatment the patient-being on a reduced dose of steroids-suffered from a severe relapse; however, this responded favorably to an increase of the dosage. The kidneys required approximately one year for complete recovery. Based on this case, the Schoenlein-Henoch purpura syndrome and its differential diagnosis are presented, particularly with respect to gastrointestinal symptoms and in view of the pertinent literature.

  5. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  6. Endoscopy in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle C; Tadros, Micheal; Vaziri, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of endoscopic procedures in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a literature search for English language studies in which patients with neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia underwent endoscopy. Studies were included if endoscopic procedures were used as part of the evaluation of neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients, yielding 13 studies. Two studies in which endoscopy was not a primary evaluation tool were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified by two independent reviewers on PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid databases. RESULTS: Most of the studies had high diagnostic yield with relatively low complication rates. Therapeutic endoscopic interventions were performed in more than half the studies, including high-risk procedures, such as sclerotherapy. Platelet transfusion was given if counts were less than 50000/mm3 in four studies and less than 10000/mm3 in one study. Other thrombocytopenic precautions included withholding of biopsy if platelet count was less than 30000/mm3 in one study and less than 20000/mm3 in another study. Two of the ten studies which examined thrombocytopenic patient populations reported bleeding complications related to endoscopy, none of which caused major morbidity or mortality. All febrile neutropenic patients received prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics in the studies reviewed. Regarding afebrile neutropenic patients, prophylactic antibiotics were given if absolute neutrophil count was less than 1000/mm3 in one study, if the patient was undergoing colonoscopy and had a high inflammatory condition without clear definition of significance in another study, and if the patient was in an aplastic phase in a third study. Endoscopy was also withheld in one study for severe pancytopenia. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy can be safely performed in patients with thrombocytopenia/neutropenia. Prophylactic platelet transfusion and/or antibiotic administration prior to endoscopy may be

  7. DRESS syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura: are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Zahrae; Alirhayim, Zaid; Khoulani, Dania; Hassan, Syed

    2012-01-01

    A middle-aged man diagnosed with a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome, secondary to phenytoin use, subsequently developed thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura. The patient improved with steroids and plasmapheresis. Their diagnosis can be challenging, and an early recognition and treatment are critical owing to their high mortality rates. Both diseases are thought to be of an autoimmune origin, and a potential relationship between them led to the consideration of the DRESS syndrome as an aetiology for thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura in this case. We concluded that two possibilities exist: some type of antibody developed during the clinical presentation of DRESS syndrome and subsequently resulted in an inhibition of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type-1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13) leading to thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura, or perhaps this patient's autoimmune predisposition to thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura contributed to the drug reaction. PMID:23152183

  8. Characterization of pneumococcal purpura-producing principle.

    PubMed

    Chetty, C; Kreger, A

    1980-07-01

    Purpura was grossly observable in albino mice 6 to 8 h after the intraperitoneal injection of sterile, deoxyribonuclease-treated, cell-free extracts prepared by sodium deoxycholate-induced lysis, sonic disruption, Parr bomb treatment, autolysis without sodium deoxycholate, or alternate freezing and thawing of washed suspensions of Streptococcus pneumoniae type I. Cell-free extracts obtained from sonically disrupted, heat-killed cells (100 degrees C for 20 min) did not contain purpurogenic activity. The reaction was maximal at approximately 24 h postinjection, started to fade slowly after 24 to 48 h, and usually was not grossly observable by 4 to 6 days postinjection. The purpura-producing principle (PPP) in the cell-free extract was purified by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, protamine sulfate precipitation, Sepharose 6B gel filtration, wheat germ lectin-Sepharose 6MB affinity chromatography, ribonuclease and trypsin treatment, and a second Sepharose 6B gel filtration step. The final preparation (i) contained glucosamine (5.6%), muramic acid (8.0%), neutral carbohydrate (12.8%), phosphate (8.0%), orcinol-reactive material (6.0%), and Lowry-reactive material (1.6%), and (ii) was free of detectable amounts of deoxyribonucleic acid, capsular polysaccharide, neuraminidase, cytolysin, and hyaluronidase. The isoelectric point and molecular size of the PPP were approximately pI 3.0 and several million daltons, respectively, and the activity remained in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation for 1 day at 105,000 x g. PPP activity was destroyed by incubation with egg white lysozyme and sodium metaperiodate but was resistant to trypsin, pronase, alpha-amylase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, alkaline phosphatase, pancreatic lipase, 7% trichloroacetic acid, 6 M urea, autoclaving (121 degrees C) for 30 min, and mild acid and alkali exposure. Our observations indicate that the PPP requires intact beta-1,4-glucosidic linkages for activity and support the working

  9. Sepsis-induced purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lisa; Oliveira, Nelson; Cássio, Isabel; Costa, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted with a cutaneous rash associated with septic shock and multiorganic failure, 6 days after a dog bite. He was started on empiric antibiotherapy and supportive measures. The patient's condition aggravated, with need for invasive mechanical ventilation and intermittent haemodialysis, and evolution from a petechiae-like rash to purpura and gangrene, culminating in bilateral lower limb amputation. The blood cultures revealed only Pasteurella multocida, after 10 days of incubation. P multocida infection is a rare cause of soft tissue infection that subsides with oral antibiotherapy. Infections causing sepsis are rare and appear in immunocompromised patients. Purpura fulminans induced by sepsis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This syndrome should be recognised promptly, so early treatment is instituted. We found no case reports of purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella infections in our literature review. PMID:24554680

  10. [Henoch-Schonlein purpura involving the penis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Croche Santander, Borja; Campos, Elena; Sánchez, Adela; Marcos, Laura; Díaz, Isabel; Toro, Cristóbal

    2016-08-01

    Schonlein-Henoch purpura accounts for the majority of cases of systemic vasculitis in children. Classical presentation is characterized by palpable purpura, glomerulonephritis, arthralgias and abdominal pain. Although genitourinary manifestations, in form of testicular and scrotal involvement, have been widely described, penile involvement remains an extremely rare complication. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with purpuric rash on the glans, prepuce and penile shaft, with painful edema in the penile region. He also had a 3-days history of fever, palpable purpuric rash on the buttocks and lower extremities along with right wrist pain. He was admitted with the diagnosis of Schonlein-Henoch purpura with penile involvement. After 2 days on oral steroids therapy (prednisone) a marked improvement was observed.

  11. Danazol: An Effective Option in Acquired Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Mulroy, E.; Gleeson, S.; Chiruka, S.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopaenic purpura (AATP) is a rare haematological condition characterised by isolated thrombocytopaenia with normal other cell lines. It is often initially misdiagnosed as immune thrombocytopaenic purpura but has characteristic bone marrow findings of reduced megakaryocyte numbers. The optimal treatment of AATP is not clearly defined but revolves around immunosuppressive therapies. We report a case of successful treatment of AATP with danazol, an antioestrogenic medication. We also review the aetiologies and pathogenesis of the disorder and suggest that danazol should be considered as an effective alternative to potent immunosuppression in AATP. PMID:25945269

  12. Brucellosis mimicking Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Massasso, David; Gibson, Kathryn

    2007-06-04

    A young male immigrant from Syria with a vasculitic-appearing leg rash, asymmetrical polyarthritis, microscopic haematuria, and raised inflammatory markers was provisionally diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Low-grade fevers persisted despite non-steroidal anti-inflammatory therapy, and Brucella sp. was subsequently grown from both blood and synovial fluid aspirates. Further tests gave positive results for B. abortus, and triple antibiotic therapy produced a rapid clinical response. Cutaneous vasculitis has rarely been described in brucellosis, and this is the first report in the English medical literature of brucellosis mimicking Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

  13. Successful Corticosteroid Treatment for Purpura Fulminans Associated with Quinolone

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Ikue; Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Katsurada, Yuka; Sato, Ken; Ikeda, Takashi; Kimura, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a life-threatening syndrome comprising progressive hemorrhagic necrosis due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and dermal vascular thrombosis that leads to purpura and tissue necrosis. Various therapies have been used to arrest the progression of this disease, however, there is no established treatment because of the variety of underlying causes. We herein present an adult case of PF associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis triggered by antibiotic (levofloxacin) intake. As a result of our rapid and accurate identification of the underlying cause, corticosteroid therapy successfully repressed the inflammatory process. As far as we know, this is the first report of levofloxacin-associated PF. PMID:27746448

  14. [Possible correlations of Berger's disease and Schonlein-Henoch purpura].

    PubMed

    Maffei, S; Stefanelli, M; Germini, G; Bragetti, P; Riommi, R; Cesarini, A R; Rufini, S; Castellucci, G

    1989-01-01

    A case of IgA nephropathy is described. The patient had only an attack of Henoch-Schonlein purpura without renal involvement when she was 7 years old. After 6 years of normal urinalysis she developed repeated bouts of gross hematuria and proteinuria. In renal biopsy typical features of Berger's disease were found. This particular case permits to debate whether the two diseases suffered by our patient were related or quite different.

  15. Purpura and dermal thinning associated with high dose inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, S; Reynolds, S; Shuttleworth, D; Edwards, C; Finlay, A Y

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of high dose inhaled corticosteroids on skin. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of patients receiving treatment for chest diseases. SETTING--Outpatient chest clinic in a teaching hospital. PATIENTS--68 Patients divided into four groups of similar age--namely, 15 receiving long term oral prednisolone, 21 receiving high dose inhaled corticosteroids, 15 receiving low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and 17 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Skin thickness at three sites measured by A scan ultrasound and clinical assessment of purpura. RESULTS--Compared with controls patients in both the oral prednisolone treated group and the high dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group had significantly thinner skin at all three sites (group median thicknesses: prednisolone treated group 28-33% less than controls; high dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group 15-19% less than controls). Differences in skin thicknesses between the low dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group and the controls were trivial. The prevalence of purpura was significantly greater in patients receiving oral prednisolone (12/15 patients) and high dose inhaled corticosteroids (10/21) than in controls (2/17). CONCLUSION--Skin thinning and purpura represent further evidence of systemic effects of high dose inhaled corticosteroids. PMID:2372620

  16. [Rheumatoid purpura and Berger's disease in the same patient. 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Cotton, J B; Parchoux, B; Vincent, C; Ladreyt, J P; Rekawek, J

    1991-01-01

    The two patients reported experienced initially typical Henoch Schönlein purpura, and Berger disease some years later. Same cases are described in the literature pleading for the relationship between the two entities; Berger disease may be considered as a symptomatic form of anaphylactoïd purpura.

  17. /sup 111/In-oxine platelet survivals in thrombocytopenic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, V.; Coates, G.; Kelton, J.G.; Andrew, M.

    1987-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence (20%) in sick neonates, but the causes have not been well studied. In this report we demonstrate that thrombocytopenia in the neonate is characterized by increased platelet destruction as shown by shortened homologous /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelet life spans. Thirty-one prospectively studied thrombocytopenic neonates were investigated by measuring the /sup 111/In-labeled platelet life span, platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG), and coagulation screening tests. In every infant, the thrombocytopenia was shown to have a destructive component since the mean platelet life span was significantly shortened to 65 +/- 6 (mean +/- SEM) hours with a range of one to 128 hours compared with adult values (212 +/- 8; range, 140 to 260; gamma function analysis). The platelet survival was directly related to the lowest platelet count and inversely related to both the highest mean platelet volume and duration of the thrombocytopenia. In 22 infants the percent recovery of the radiolabeled platelets was less than 50%, which suggested that increased sequestration also contributed to the thrombocytopenia. Infants with laboratory evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (n = 8) or immune platelet destruction evidenced by elevated levels of PAIgG (n = 13) had even shorter platelet survivals and a more severe thrombocytopenia compared with the ten infants in whom an underlying cause for the thrombocytopenia was not apparent. Full-body scintigraphic images obtained in 11 infants showed an increased uptake in the spleen and liver, with a spleen-to-liver ratio of 3:1. This study indicates that thrombocytopenia in sick neonates is primarily destructive, with a subgroup having evidence of increased platelet sequestration.

  18. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  19. Synchronous Occurrence of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma of the Duodenum and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Ileum in a Patient with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tohru; Maruyama, Yumiko; Saitoh, Mayuko; Itoh, Hideto; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Nakayama, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A 64 year-old woman with steroid-dependent immune thrombocytopenia developed anemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed the presence of a tumor, which was diagnosed to be diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, in the second portion of the duodenum. 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography showed an increased uptake mass in the pelvic cavity as well as in the duodenum. Though the duodenal tumor disappeared after 4 cycles of chemotherapy, the pelvic mass did not shrink in size. As a result, laparoscopic resection of the pelvic tumor was performed and the tumor was histologically diagnosed to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Subsequently, the patient was treated with 2 more cycles of the chemotherapy. Eventually, thrombocytopenia completely resolved. PMID:27746431

  20. High dose Intravenous Anti-D Immune Globulin is More Effective and Safe in Indian Paediatric Patients of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Swain, Kali Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) is characterised by an autoimmune antibody-mediated destruction of platelets and impaired platelet production. Few controlled trials exist to guide management of patients with ITP in Indian scenario for which patients require an individualized approach. Anti-D (Rho (D) immune globulin) at a higher dose can prove to be a cost effective and safe alternative for Indian patients with ITP. Aim To compare the safety and efficacy of higher dose (75μg/kg) intravenous Anti-D immune globulin against the standard dose of 50μg/kg for the management of ITP in Indian patients. Materials and Methods One hundred and sixty four children with newly diagnosed ITP between 4-14 years were randomly selected for inclusion and were treated with 50μg/kg (standard dose) or 75μg /kg (higher dose) of Anti-D to compare the efficacy and safety of higher dose intravenous anti-D immune globulin. Efficacy of Anti-D was measured in terms of rate of response and median time to response for increase in platelet counts. Any adverse event was noted. A decrease in haemoglobin concentration suggested accompanying haemolysis. Results Seventy one out of 84 patients treated with Anti-D at 75μg/kg produced complete response (85%) with median time of response being 2.5 days. On the contrary, 45 patients (70%) patients treated with 50μg/kg had complete response. However, there was no significant increase in haemolysis with higher dose. A significant correlation was found between dose and peak increase in platelet count measured at 7th day following administration. However, there was no relationship between the decrease in haemoglobin and the dose given, or between the increase in platelet count and fall in haemoglobin. Conclusion A 75μg/kg dose of Anti-D is more effective with acceptable side effect in comparison to 50μg dose for treatment of newly diagnosed Indian patients of ITP. PMID:28208873

  1. Successful treatment of an elderly frail patient with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura under close monitoring of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Sano, Keigo; Yagi, Hideo; Hanamoto, Hitoshi; Fujita, Mariko; Iizuka, Takashi; Yamazaki, Keiko; Tsubaki, Kazuo

    2014-04-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted to the regional hospital because of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neurological abnormalities including unconsciousness. One week before admission, she suffered from diarrhea and subsequently passed out and hit her face on the ground. She was suspected of having TTP and was transferred to our hospital. We performed the assays of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers, and confirmed the diagnosis of acquired idiopathic TTP with total deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity with its inhibitor. She was initially treated with plasma exchange combined with corticosteroids, however, we were forced to substitute plasma exchange with fresh frozen plasma infusion due to procedure-associated complications. The infusion of fresh frozen plasma was known as less effective and more likely to boost inhibitor titers compared to plasma exchange. In this circumstance, we could successfully switch the plasma therapy under close monitoring of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody titers which precisely revealed the disease status of TTP in our patient, and eventually she achieved complete remission with normal level of ADAMTS13 activity and no inhibitor. Our experience suggested that the measurement of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor titer might be valuable not only for making the diagnosis but also for guiding treatment decisions by precise evaluating of disease status in patients with the acquired form of TTP.

  2. Multiple myeloma developing during long-term clinical course of refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yao, Han; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lidan; Chen, Guo; Wu, Sha; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an acquired, immune-mediated disease that is characterized by increased destruction of platelets by autoantibodies. Although the onset of the disease and clinical course are highly variable, the disease typically has a benign course. ITP associated with multiple myeloma (MM) has been rarely reported; it is even rarer for MM to develop during a long-term ITP (almost 20 years). Here, we first report on a case with a 20-year long clinical course of refractory ITP followed by newly diagnosed MM.

  3. Intracellular signaling as a potential target for antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Andre, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Three classes of inhibitors of platelet aggregation have demonstrated substantial clinical benfits. Aspirin acts by irreversibly inhibiting COX-1 and therefore blocking the synthesis of proaggregatory thromboxane A (2) (TxA(2)). The indirect acting (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel) and the direct acting (ticagrelor) antagonists of P2Y(12) block the thrombus stabilizing activity of ADP. Parenteral GP IIb-IIIa inhibitors directly block platelet-platelet interactions. Despite well-established benefits, all antiplatelet agents have important limitations: increased bleeding and gastrointestinal toxicities (aspirin), high incidence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (ticlopidine), potentially nonresponders (clopidogrel), severe bleeding (prasugrel, GP IIb-IIIa antagonists) and "complicated" relationships with aspirin ticagrelor). In this chapter, we present the genetic and pharmacological evidence that supports the development and expectations associated with novel antiplatelet strategies directed at intrasignaling pathways.

  4. Purpura fulminans associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in an asplenic pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Konda, S; Zell, D; Milikowski, C; Alonso-Llamazares, J

    2013-09-01

    Purpura fulminans is a rapidly progressive syndrome of small-vessel thrombosis and hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation. We describe a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in an asplenic 5-year-old boy on oral tacrolimus, with a past medical history of multivisceral organ transplantation and subsequent development of purpura fulminans on his chest and distal extremities. The acute infectious form of purpura fulminans is usually caused by gram-negative bacteria. Cases secondary to gram-positive encapsulated bacteria usually occur when individuals are immuno-suppressed or have anatomic or functional asplenia. Our patient had both, which likely increased his susceptibility, and he responded well to antimicrobial therapy in addition to prophylactic coverage in the setting of his immunosuppression. We review the literature for similar cases due to S. pneumoniae in the pediatric population and discuss the etiology and treatment of purpura fulminans.

  5. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with c-ANCA antibody in an adult*

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Pedro de Freitas Silva; de Castro, Bruna Corrêa; Hans Filho, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the vasculitis associated with deposits of immunoglobulin A in small vessels. Its association with cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is possible, but rare. This vasculitis is uncommon in adults and the main clinic manifestations are purpuric lesions in lower limbs with gastrointestinal symptoms and renal involvement. The present work describes a rare case of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an adult with cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. PMID:27828648

  6. [Management of chicken pox purpura fulminans: a pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Domergue, S; Rodiere, M; Bigorre, M; Guye, E; Captier, G

    2006-06-01

    The authors report a case of a 4 years old girl who had presented a chicken-pox purpura fulminans. Lesions appeared 5 days after chicken-pox start and were quickly evoluted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous necrosis on external side of thighs and behind side of right calf. A medical management was done with fresh plasma, blood, antithrombine 3, and fibrin. Specifics treatments were done: heparin and activated C protein. Surgical treatment was realised 5 weeks later. It consisted of clean necrosis areas and put a thin skin graft witch was took on the scalp. The evolution was fast good. The follow-up is 3 years without big esthetic and functional consequences. Some cases of this pathology were described in literature with serious lesions. The management should be multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment should be realised when lesions are stabilized. Scalp is a donor site for skin graft very interesting because of big quantity of skin and not esthetic consequence.

  7. Prognostic factors of severe infectious purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, F; Beuscart, R; Guillois, B; Diependaele, J F; Krim, G; Devictor, D; Bompard, Y; van Albada, T

    1985-01-01

    The French Club of Pediatric Intensive Care has prospectively studied 90 cases of infectious purpura which were hospitalized in 1981; the purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors. The statistical study (X2 test) of all these cases is in agreement with data in the literature and shows that the mortality is significantly higher when there is: shock (p less than 0.001), coma (p less than 0.05), ecchymotic or necrotic purpura (p less than 0.01), temperature less than 36 degrees C (p less than 0.05), no clinical meningism (p less than 0.001), white cell count less than 10,000/mm3 (p less than 0.05), thrombocytopenia less than 100,000 (p less than 0.01), fibrinogen less than 1.5 g/l (p less than 0.001), kalemia greater than 5 mEq/l (p less than 0.01), spinal fluid cell count less than 20/mm3 (p less than 0.01). Because shock is one of the main prognostic factors (23 deaths in 55 shocked patients, versus 2 in 35 non-shocked) we have performed another statistical study (with the Benzecri method) to determine a prognostic index for patients in shock. For its determination, five initial parameters are used: age, kalemia, white cell count, clinical meningism, platelet count. The predictive value for survival is 91%. The predictive value for death is 87%. The score was applied on the patients hospitalized in shock in 1982: the predictive value for survival is 75%, the predictive value for death is 61%.

  8. Relapses in patients with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Hernández, José Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; González-Vela, Maria C.; González-Lamuño, Domingo; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To further investigate into the relapses of Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), we analyzed the frequency, clinical features, and predictors of relapses in series of 417 unselected patients from a single center. After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range [IQR]: 2–38) years, almost one-third of the 417 patients (n = 133; 32%; 85 men/48 women) had experienced at least 1 relapse. At the time of disease diagnosis, patients who later experienced relapses had less commonly infections than those who never suffered flares (30.8% vs 41.9%; P = 0.03). In contrast, patients who experienced relapses had a longer duration of the first episode of palpable purpura than those without relapses (palpable purpura lasting >7 days; 80.0% vs 68.1%; P = 0.04). Abdominal pain (72.3% vs 62.3%; P = 0.03) and joint manifestations (27.8% vs 15.5%; P = 0.005) were also more common in patients who later developed relapses. In contrast, patients who never suffered relapses had a slightly higher frequency of fever at the time of disease diagnosis (9.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.06). At the time of disease diagnosis, corticosteroids were more frequently given to patients who later had relapses of the disease (44% vs 32% in nonrelapsing patients; P = 0.03). Relapses generally occurred soon after the first episode of vasculitis. The median time from the diagnosis of HSP to the first relapse was 1 (IQR: 1–2) month. The median number of relapses was 1 (IQR 1–3). The main clinical features at the time of the relapse were cutaneous (88.7%), gastrointestinal (27.1%), renal (24.8%), and joint (16.5%) manifestations. After a mean ± standard deviation follow-up of 18.9 ± 9.8 years, complete recovery was observed in 110 (82.7%) of the 133 patients who had relapses. Renal sequelae (persistent renal involvement) was found in 11 (8.3%) of the patients with relapses. The best predictive factors for relapse were joint and gastrointestinal manifestations at HSP diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2

  9. Pneumatosis intestinalis associated with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Ayesha; Gibson, Donald Paul

    2014-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common vasculitis in children. It is a disorder of the inflammatory cascade leading to immunoglobulin A deposition and leukocytoclastic vasculitis of small vessels of skin, kidneys, joints, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A wide variety of GI manifestations are seen in ∼50% to 75% of patients with HSP. Diffuse colicky abdominal pain is the most common GI symptom. The small bowel is the most frequently involved GI site. Intussusception is rare but is the most common surgical complication. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl with a 5-day history of abdominal pain followed by a palpable purpuric rash. Her urinalysis, complete blood cell count, and tests of renal function were normal. An acute abdominal series was unremarkable initially, and abdominal ultrasound imaging showed ascites and thickened small bowel loops. She was diagnosed with HSP. The abdominal pain worsened, and an abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated distal small bowel wall thickening and pneumatosis intestinalis in the descending colon. She was started on total parenteral nutrition and antibiotics and placed on bowel rest. She was given 2 mg/kg of intravenous immunoglobulin. Her abdominal pain gradually improved over the next week, and a repeat computed tomography scan showed significant improvement of the small bowel wall thickening and pneumatosis. The purpuric rash improved, and her abdominal pain resolved. We report a case of HSP and pneumatosis intestinalis, an association that has not been reported previously.

  10. IgA nephropathy: Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Berger's disease in one patient.

    PubMed

    Thorner, P S; Farine, M; Arbus, G S; Poucell, S; Baumal, R

    1986-01-01

    A patient is described who had an attack of Henoch-Schönlein purpura with no renal dysfunction at 4 years of age. She recovered with conservative management. There were no further episodes of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and her urinalysis remained normal for the next 11 years. At age 15, she developed repeated bouts of gross hematuria and proteinuria, and a renal biopsy was performed 3 years later. Light microscopy showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with granular, mesangial deposits of IgA by immunofluorescence and numerous, electron-dense deposits in mesangial regions by electron microscopy. These findings were consistent with a diagnosis of Berger's disease. The occurrence of Henoch-Schönlein purpura at 4 years and Berger's disease at 15 years in the same patient suggests that these two conditions are related.

  11. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    PubMed

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  12. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Natalya; Bernstein, Gregory R; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-10-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis.

  13. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  14. Severe myalgia of the lower extremities as the first clinical feature of meningococcal purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alexandre Leite; Sztajnbok, Jaques; Salgado, Maristela Marques; Romano, Carla C; Alkmin, Maria das Graças Adelino; Duarte, Alberto J S; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2007-10-01

    In patients with meningococcal infection, devastating presentations, such as purpura fulminans, which can progress to extensive tissue necrosis of the limbs and digits, have a significant social impact. The case presented herein illustrates such a phenomenon in a patient who developed bilateral necrosis of the lower extremities as a result of infection with Neisseria meningitis. We emphasize that severe myalgia was the first clinical manifestation of meningococcal purpura fulminans in our case. However, myalgia has typically been overlooked and undervalued as an early clinical feature of meningococcal sepsis. Early recognition and prompt initial antibiotic therapy continue to be the cornerstones of the successful management of this dramatic disease, reducing morbidity and mortality.

  15. Gastrointestinal manifestations of Henoch-Schonlein purpura: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Prathiba Rajalakshmi, Parameswaran; Srinivasan, Kalyanasundaram

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis mediated by type III hypersensitivity with deposition of IgA immune complex in the walls of vessels. It is a multi-system disorder characterized by palpable purpura, arthritis, glomerulonephritis and gastrointestinal manifestations and commonly occurs in children and young adults. The patients with gastrointestinal involvement usually present with colicky abdominal pain, vomiting and melena. The imaging findings include multifocal bowel thickening with mucosal hyperenhancement, presence of skip areas, mesenteric vascular engorgement, with involvement of unusual sites like stomach, duodenum and rectum. These imaging findings in a child or young adult with appropriate clinical findings could suggest HSP. PMID:25825636

  16. A Case of Henoch-Schonlein Purpura Associated with Rotavirus Infection in an Elderly Asian Male and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chen; Scaramangas-Plumley, Daphne; Nast, Cynthia C.; Mosenifar, Zab; Edelstein, Marc A.; Weisman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) Symptoms: Abdominal pain • bloating • blood in stool • nausea • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: EGD • colonoscopy • kidney biopsy • skin biopsy • arthrocentesis Specialty: Rheumatology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), a small vessel vasculitis mediated by deposition of immune-complexes containing IgA in the skin, gut, and glomeruli, often presents with abdominal pain, purpuric rash in the lower extremities and buttocks, joint pain, and hematuria. The disease most commonly targets children but can affect adults who tend to have a worse prognosis. Case Report: We discuss a case of HSP in an elderly Chinese male who presented with severe proximal bowel inflammation, vasculitic rash, and proteinuria; he was found to have positive stool rotavirus and giardia. He improved significantly with high dose steroids. We believe rotavirus may have been a triggering event in this patient. A brief review of the literature is also presented. Conclusions: This is the first case report describing a classic presentation of HSP in an adult following a rotavirus infection. HSP can cause significant morbidity and mortality in adult patients predominantly from progressive renal failure; therefore careful management and monitoring is important. GI infections seem to be a common trigger for HSP and this case report suggests that rotavirus may be part of the spectrum. PMID:28174414

  17. Aquaporin-4 positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders secondary to thrombopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Gong, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Mingqin; Lu, Chao; Sun, Li; Feng, Jiachun; Zhang, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) is considered as an immune-mediated disorder in the central nervous system (CNS). Numerous autoimmune diseases are frequently complicated with NMOSD and distinct clinical characteristics are noted in NMOSD patients with other autoimmune diseases. However, to our best knowledge, co-occurrence of NMOSD and thrombopenic purpura is rarely identified. Patient concerns: We presented a rare case of a 72-year-old female with 6-year history of thrombopenic purpura, and 1-month history of blurred vision as well as chest zonethesia. Anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies was positive in the serum of the patient. Diagnoses: With the addition of laboratory findings, iconography findings and physical examination results, the diagnosis of NMOSD was established according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. Interventions and outcomes: With the treatment of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), the patient felt better at discharge without changing of expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score. Lessons: The case indicates that NMOSD could co-occur with thrombopenic purpura. The disturbance of immune system balance may explain this overlap. Further studies are warranted to reveal the mechanism and to explore whether patients with NMOSD with and without thrombopenic purpura have distinct clinical feature, drug responsiveness or prognosis. PMID:28079804

  18. [Psychogenic purpura with hematuria and sexual pain disorder: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ozyildirim, Ilker; Yücel, Başak; Aktan, Melih

    2010-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura (Gardner-Diamond syndrome) is the occurrence and spontaneous recurrence of painful ecchymosis following emotional stress and minor trauma. Although the exact mechanism of this syndrome remains unknown, apart from skin lesions, different types of hemorrhaging have been reported, such as epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and bleeding from the ear canals and eyes. We report a psychogenic purpura case that presented with hematuria in addition to skin lesions. Based on the psychiatric evaluation she was diagnosed with major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Additionally, sexual pain disorder accompanied these disorders. With the help of antidepressant and supportive psychotherapy, the patient's ecchymosis and bleeding disappeared. During 8 months of follow-up the symptoms did not return. Vaginismus has not been reported in patients with psychogenic purpura. The presence of vaginismus, which is seen more frequently in eastern cultures and is thought to be related to sociocultural determinants, suggests that some cultural factors may be common to both psychogenic purpura and vaginismus. The aim of this case report was to call attention to a syndrome that is rarely seen and diagnosed, and to discuss its relationship to psychosocial factors. This syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of not only ecchymotic lesions, but also various types of bleeding, including hematuria. Despite the fact that its etiology and treatment are not clearly understood, it should be noted that psychological factors play a role in this disease and therefore, psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches can be effective.

  19. A Case of Fulminant Varicella Infection with Purpura Fulminans, Hepatitis, and Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, A S; Bilgili, S G; Calka, O; Çeçen, İ; Akbayram, S

    2012-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus causes varicella which is a common disease. Generally it is self-limiting, and treatment is often unnecessary, but severe or life-threatening complications are rarely seen. We report a case of fulminant varicella complicating with purpura fulminans, hepatitis, and probable rhabdomyolysis in a previously healthy child. PMID:23248376

  20. Ibuprofen-induced Henoch–Schönlein purpura nephritis: First reported case

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Christopher Lim Thiam; Shanmuganathan, Malini

    2016-01-01

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is used widely in treating pain, fever, and inflammation. Its side effects are mainly due to acute renal impairment and gastric discomfort. We hereby report a rare case of Henoch–Schönlein purpura nephritis secondary to ibuprofen consumption which has not been reported in literature before. PMID:28066119

  1. [Purpura pigmentosa progressiva in type III cryoglobulinemia and tartrazine intolerance. A follow-up over 20 years].

    PubMed

    Kalinke, D U; Wüthrich, B

    1999-01-01

    A 58 year old patient with hepatitis virus C (HCV) infection had a secondary polyclonal IgG-IgM cryoglobulinemia with a benign 20 year course. Clinically the patient suffered from progressive pigmented purpura (PPP). Histologic evaluation revealed a lymphocytic vasculitis. Food containing tartrazine triggered flares of the PPP, as demonstrated with controlled oral provocation testing. In most of the previously described cases of HCV and type III cryoglobulinemia, the typical cutaneous finding was palpable purpura with leukocytoclastic vasculitis.

  2. Antigenic complementarity in the origins of autoimmunity: a general theory illustrated with a case study of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Couturier, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    We describe a novel, testable theory of autoimmunity, outline novel predictions made by the theory, and illustrate its application to unravelling the possible causes of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP). Pairs of stereochemically complementary antigens induce complementary immune responses (antibody or T-cell) that create loss of regulation and civil war within the immune system itself. Antibodies attack antibodies creating circulating immune complexes; T-cells attack T-cells creating perivascular cuffing. This immunological civil war abrogates the self-nonself distinction. If at least one of the complementary antigens mimics a self antigen, then this unregulated immune response will target host tissues as well. Data demonstrating that complementary antigens are found in some animal models of autoimmunity and may be present in various human diseases, especially ITP, are reviewed. Specific mechanisms for preventing autoimmunity or suppressing existing autoimmunity are derived from the theory, and critical tests proposed. Finally, we argue that Koch's postulates are inadequate for establishing disease causation for multiple-antigen diseases and discuss the possibility that current research has failed to elucidate the causes of human autoimmune diseases because we are using the wrong criteria.

  3. Antigenic Complementarity in the Origins of Autoimmunity: A General Theory Illustrated With a Case Study of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Couturier, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel, testable theory of autoimmunity, outline novel predictions made by the theory, and illustrate its application to unravelling the possible causes of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP). Pairs of stereochemically complementary antigens induce complementary immune responses (antibody or T-cell) that create loss of regulation and civil war within the immune system itself. Antibodies attack antibodies creating circulating immune complexes; T-cells attack T-cells creating perivascular cuffing. This immunological civil war abrogates the self-nonself distinction. If at least one of the complementary antigens mimics a self antigen, then this unregulated immune response will target host tissues as well. Data demonstrating that complementary antigens are found in some animal models of autoimmunity and may be present in various human diseases, especially ITP, are reviewed. Specific mechanisms for preventing autoimmunity or suppressing existing autoimmunity are derived from the theory, and critical tests proposed. Finally, we argue that Koch's postulates are inadequate for establishing disease causation for multiple-antigen diseases and discuss the possibility that current research has failed to elucidate the causes of human autoimmune diseases because we are using the wrong criteria. PMID:16603444

  4. Combined diagnostic imaging of intestinal involvement in Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Fabio; Minordi, Laura Maria; Macis, Giuseppe; Vecchioli, Amorino

    2003-01-01

    The case of a 39-year-old male patient with symptoms of persistent abdominal pain and melena, affected by Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is reported. Abdominal CT was requested. The examination was justified by the fact that symptoms could be correlated with other pathological conditions (volvulus, neoplasms, Chron's disease, etc.) which had to be excluded. For optimum study of the abdominal wall, correct preparation and the use of oral contrast agents were required. From the analysis of CT findings, in particular loop thickening with stratified density, the increased density of mesenteric fat and the presence of fluid among loops led to the radiological diagnosis of intestinal involvement in Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Other imaging procedures (double contrast enema, sonography, Doppler US, MRI) now used in the study of intestinal loops, are examined.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  6. Petechiae and purpura: the ominous and the not-so-obvious?

    PubMed

    Block, Stan L

    2014-08-01

    Petechiae and purpura are among the most alarming findings a pediatrician will commonly observe in the office. Severity of illness can range from a temper tantrum, to common viral infections, to the most deadly infections and diseases. To avoid many of the pitfalls in diagnosis, practitioners will need to be thorough in history taking, assessing fever and immunization status, and physical examination. In addition, a few simple laboratory tests will usually be needed and possibly a manual differential.

  7. Henoch-Schönlein purpura due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia from central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Uggeri, Simona; Fabbian, Fabio; Catizone, Luigi

    2008-06-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital because of myocardial infarction. A central venous catheter (CVC) for infusive therapy was inserted. After two weeks he developed fever, purpura, and knee arthralgia. Hemoculture yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Subsequently, oliguric renal failure, hematuria, and nephrotic range proteinuria were recorded. Renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferation and crescent formation. In an immunofluorescence study, IgA, IgG, and C3 deposition in the mesangium and along arteriolar walls were observed. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with infection caused by CVC was made. After administration of antibiotic and steroid therapy, proteinuria was markedly reduced, renal function improved, and purpura disappeared. The association of HSP with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has frequently been reported in the literature. We present here a case of HSP in association with MSSA bacteremia from central venous catheterization, a finding not reported previously.

  8. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  9. Empiric treatment of protracted idiopathic purpura fulminans in an infant: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic purpura fulminans is a cutaneous thrombotic disorder usually caused by autoimmune-mediated protein C or S deficiency. This disorder typically presents with purpura and petechiae that eventually slowly or rapidly coalesce into extensive, necrotic eschars on the extremities. We present the first known case of idiopathic purpura fulminans consistent with prior clinical presentations in the setting of a prothrombotic genetic mutation, but without hallmark biochemical evidence of protein C or protein S deficiency. Another novel feature of our patient's presentation is that discontinuation of anti-coagulation has invariably led to recurrence and formation of new lesions, which is unexpected in idiopathic purpura fulminans because clearance of autoimmune factors should be followed by restoration of anti-coagulant function. Although this disease is rare, infants with suspected idiopathic purpura fulminans should be rapidly diagnosed and immediately anti-coagulated to prevent adverse catastrophic outcomes such as amputation and significant developmental delay. Case presentation A six-month-old Caucasian boy was brought to our pediatric hospital service with a low-grade fever and subacute, symmetric, serpiginous, stellate, necrotic eschars on his forearms, legs and feet that eventually spread non-contiguously to his toes, thighs and buttocks. In contrast to his impressive clinical presentation, his serologic evaluation was normal, and he was not responsive to corticosteroids and antibiotics. Full-thickness skin biopsies revealed dermal vessel thrombosis, leading to a diagnosis of idiopathic purpura fulminans and successful treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin, which was transitioned to warfarin. Long-term management has included chronic anti-coagulation because of recurrence of lesions with discontinuation of treatment. Conclusion In infants with necrotic eschars, it is important to first consider infectious, inflammatory and hematologic

  10. Rapid improvement of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Turgay; Tursun, Irfan; Dal, Mehmet Sinan; Eren, Mehmet Ali; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are one of the most common bacterial infections, seen in humans, worldwide and their possible relationships to different diseases are a focus of attention nowadays. H. pylori may cause some extra intestinal manifestations some of which are dermatological conditions, including Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis. We describe a 49-year-old man who presented with HSP triggered by gastric H. pylori infection. Treatment of H. Pylori infection was accompanied by prompt resolution of the gastrointestinal manifestations and purpuric rashes. These findings suggest a causative role for H. pylori in the occurrence of HSP. PMID:23833587

  11. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as a complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in a seven-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Daiane; Langer, Felipe Welter; Dos Santos, Tatiane; Rafael Tronco Alves, Giordano; Feiten, Marisa; Teixeira de Paula Neto, Walter

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a multisystem small vessel vasculitis. Neurologic manifestations are uncommon. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a rare complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura with typical clinical and neuroimaging findings that occurs most commonly in the setting of severe hypertension and renal injury. Case presentation A seven-year-old girl was admitted to our institution presenting with clinical and laboratory findings suggestive of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Glucocorticoid therapy was initiated, but five days following her admission, she developed altered consciousness, seizures, arterial hypertension, and cortical blindness. Brain MRI scan revealed areas of vasogenic oedema in parieto-occipital lobes, consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. She was immediately initiated on antihypertensives and antiepileptics, which successfully improved her neurologic symptoms. Further laboratory work-up disclosed a rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis secondary to Henoch-Schönlein purpura that was the likely cause of her sudden blood pressure elevation. Immunosuppressive therapy was undertaken, and at one-year follow-up, the patient exhibited complete renal and neurologic recovery. Conclusion Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a severe complication of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. If promptly diagnosed and treated, children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura presenting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome usually have a good prognosis. Clinicians should be familiar with the characteristic presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and be aware that hypertension and renal injury may predispose Henoch-Schönlein purpura patients to developing this complication.

  12. Central Nervous System Involvement in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Ivan S.; Stefanova, Krastina; Chepisheva, Elena; Chochkova, Lyubov; Grozeva, Dafina; Stoyanova, Angelina; Milenkov, Stojan; Stefanova, Penka; Petrova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is rare but poses diagnostic difficulties. The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of CNS involvement in HSP, to analyze its clinical characteristics and do a literature review. Medical files of patients with HSP admitted at the Department of Pediatrics, Plovdiv, were studied retrospectively for a five-year period (2009–2013). Diagnosis was based on the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Out of 112 children with HSP 1 case (0.9%) had CNS involvement presenting as Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES), which may be a result of CNS vasculitis or arterial hypertension. It was an 8-year-old girl with atypical HSP which started with abdominal pain requiring surgery. On the third day after the operation a transient macular rash and arterial hypertension appeared, followed by visual disturbances, hemiconvulsive epileptic seizures, postictal hemiparesis, and confusion. Head CT showed occipital hypodense lesions and MRT-T2 hyperintense lesion in the left occipital lobe. The patient experienced a second similar episode after 2 weeks when palpable purpura had also appeared. Neurological symptoms and MRI resolved completely. HSP can be an etiological factor for PRES in childhood. Although PRES is a rare complication of HSP, clinicians must be aware of it and avoid diagnostic and therapeutic delays. PMID:28316855

  13. Glomerular membranopathy in children with IgA nephropathy and Henoch Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Vogler, C; Eliason, S C; Wood, E G

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated renal biopsies from 34 children with IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schönlein purpura to further characterize the ultrastructural features of the glomerular membranopathy that occurs in these disorders. Focal glomerular basement membrane damage was identified in 29 children and was severe in 4 of the children. Alterations included focal and segmental attenuation, splitting, duplications, and spike-like subepithelial protrusions of the lamina densa, along with saccular glomerular microaneurysms arising at the paramesangium. Those cases with extensive glomerular basement membrane lesions had either moderate or severe glomerular alterations apparent by light microscopy. Over half of the cases with glomerular membranopathy had immunohistological or ultrastructural evidence of focal peripheral glomerular capillary wall immune deposits and electron-dense deposits occurred at sites of glomerular basement membrane splitting. Despite the focal attenuation of the glomerular basement membrane, we did not identify any biopsy with findings of thin basement membrane disease. The glomerular basement membrane ultrastructural findings we describe are characteristic of IgA nephropathy and Henoch Schönlein purpura, are common in children with these disorders, and are similar to the ultrastructural alterations of the basement membrane that occur in other glomerulonephritides. These basement membrane injuries may be inflammatory cell or immune mediated but their pathogenesis requires further study.

  14. A rare presentation of Henoch–Schönlein purpura and myocardial infarction at the 5th decade of life

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Peter K.; Govindan, Vijayaraghavan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch–Schönlein purpura is an IgA-mediated, autoimmune, hypersensitivity vasculitis of childhood that results in a triad of symptoms, including a purpuric rash occurring on the lower extremities, abdominal pain or renal involvement, and arthritis. However, any of the triad may be absent, which often leads to a confusion in diagnosing the condition. Although the cause is unknown, Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP) is often associated with infectious agents, such as group A streptococci and mycoplasma. It has also been associated with food reactions, exposure to cold, insect bites, and drug allergies. The treatment is supportive and needs close followup of renal status. This report describes a rare presentation of Henoch–Schönlein purpura with coronary vasculitis which leads to myocardial infarction at the age of 53. Henoch–Schönlein purpura was diagnosed on the basis of no infection, accelerated ESR (35 mm/h), normal platelet count, positive skin biopsy, proteinuria, and negative searches for rheumatoid factor (RF), antinuclear antibody (ANA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), and anti-dsDNA. PMID:24265897

  15. Henoch Schonlein Purpura as a Cause of Renal Failure in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Vimalachandran, Pradeepa; Kunadharaju, Rajesh; Mehta, Vishisht; Colanta, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is an immune mediated disease associated Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition within the affected organs. While the disease is commonly seen in the pediatric age group, it is rarely seen in adults. We report the case of a 93-year-old Caucasian lady who presented with nonthrombocytopenic purpuric rash and acute kidney injury after an episode of bronchitis. Rapid and progressive deterioration of renal function prompted a kidney biopsy, which showed findings consistent with IgA nephropathy confirming the diagnosis of HSP. The patient was treated with high dose intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral prednisone; however, her kidney disease progressed to end stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. HSP is usually a self-limiting disease in children. However, adults are at an increased risk of severe renal involvement including end stage renal disease. Purpuric skin rash with renal involvement should raise suspicion for HSP. This is the oldest known patient with HSP. PMID:27672395

  16. Association of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Podder, Sidhertha; Cervates, Jose; Dey, Bimalangshu R

    2015-10-13

    Pernicious anaemia is an autoimmune disease caused by intrinsic factor antibody; it leads to vitamin B12 deficiency and is marked by ineffective erythropoiesis. Haematological features reveal macrocytosis, hyperchromasia and hypersegmented neutrophils. Schistocytes are typically seen in microangiopathy, such as in thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP)/haemolytic uraemic syndrome or disseminated intravascular haemolysis (DIC). We report a case of a patient with severe anaemia who presented to the emergency room. Peripheral smear revealed macrocytosis, hypersegmented neutrophils and marked schistocytosis. The patient also had high reticulocyte count with high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated D-dimer, low fibrinogen and low haptoglobin. Vitamin B12 level came back low and the presence of intrinsic factor antibody confirmed pernicious anaemia. ADAMTS13 level was noted to be mildly reduced, which raised the suspicion of the association of acquired TTP with pernicious anaemia. Acquired TTP is another autoimmune disorder and its association with pernicious anaemia needs further evaluation.

  17. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  18. An 11-year and 10-month-old girl with purpura and chest pain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Lu, Meng-Yao; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2014-10-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma) is a type of B-cell lymphoma. Case reports of childhood thymic MALToma and its association with vasculitis are rarely found in the related literature. Herein, we present a report of an 11-year and 10-month-old girl who was initially diagnosed with cutaneous vasculitis characterized by nonthrombocytopenic palpable purpura, positive antinuclear antibody and anti-SSA (Ro) antibody. Eight months later, a thymic mediastinal mass was found. Surgical excision was performed and results of pathological analysis revealed an extranodal marginal zone CD20(+) B-cell MALToma. Benign response to the chemotherapeutic regimen of Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster group NHL-BFM 90 R2 without relapse was noted in 2 years of follow-up. For the first time, our case demonstrated some clinical evidence of the association between vasculitis and childhood MALToma.

  19. Terminal Ileitis as a Feature of Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Masquerading as Crohn Disease in Adults.

    PubMed

    Sampat, Hemal N; McAllister, Brian P; Gaines, Darryl D; Ostrov, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), more recently termed immunoglobulin A (IgA) vasculitis, is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis characterized by perivascular IgA deposition. This disease manifests clinically as palpable purpura, arthralgia, gastrointestinal symptoms, and renal dysfunction. Although ileitis can be seen in HSP, terminal ileitis is virtually pathognomonic for Crohn disease. We present a comprehensive review of the literature on this association, including 2 cases of our own, to demonstrate the importance of considering HSP in the differential diagnosis of ileitis suggestive of Crohn disease. We review the growing body of literature suggesting a pathophysiologic link between the conditions, possibly through an IgA-mediated mechanism.

  20. Lifetime cost of meningococcal disease in France: Scenarios of severe meningitis and septicemia with purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Stève; Wright, Claire; Voisine, Jimmy; Olivier, Catherine W; Gaudelus, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is life-threatening and can result in severe sequelae. In France, no data have been published on the costs of severe IMD cases. Two realistic scenarios were developed with national experts (clinicians and social workers): a 6-year-old child with purpura fulminans with amputation of both legs below the knee (case A) and a 3-year-old with meningitis and severe neurological sequelae (case B). Additional scenarios included other typical sequelae of IMD such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), profound deafness and epilepsy. Data on healthcare, disability, educational and other resource use were obtained from experts and families of patients with similar sequelae. Unit costs (2013) were mainly obtained from the literature and the National Health Insurance (NHI). Time horizon was based on life expectancies of patients (77 and 55 years, respectively). A 4% discount rate decreasing to 2% after 30 years was applied. Costs are presented from the perspective of the NHI, publicly funded organizations and patients' families or their private health insurances. purpura fulminans with amputations is associated with a lifelong discounted cost of €768,875. Adding CKD doubles the amount (€1,480,545). Meningitis with severe neuro-cognitive sequelae results in a lifelong discounted cost of €1,924,475. Adding profound deafness and epilepsy slightly increases the total cost (€2,267,251). The first year is the most expensive in both scenarios (€166,890 and €160,647 respectively). The main cost drivers for each scenario are prostheses and child/adult stays in healthcare facilities, respectively. Overall, patients' families or his private insurance had to pay around 13% of total cost (101,833€ and 258,817€, respectively). This study fills a gap in the body of knowledge on IMD sequelae care and lifetime costs in France. The potentially high economic burden of IMD, in addition to its physical, psychological and social burden, reinforces the

  1. A Lower Proportion of Regulatory B Cells in Patients with Henoch–Schoenlein Purpura Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhihui; Zhao, Songchen; Zhang, Li; Li, Man; Sun, Xiguang; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Background Henoch—Schoenlein purpura is the one of most common types of systemic vasculitis that involves impaired renal function and Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis (HSPN). The diagnosis of this condition is largely based on immunohistologic detection of immunoglobulin A1-containing immune complex in the glomerular deposits of mesangium. Despite clinical advances, the etiopathogenesis of HSPN is still largely unknown. Methods In this study, we enrolled 25 newly diagnosed HSPN patients and 14 healthy controls. Then, fractions of B cell subtypes were determined in venous blood using flow cytometry. The serum interleukin (IL)-10 concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Compared to those in healthy controls, the numbers of CD38+CD19+, CD86+CD19+, CD38+CD86+CD19+, and CD95+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood were significantly higher in HSPN patients. In contrast, the numbers of CD5+CD19+, IL-10+CD19+, CD5+CD1d+CD19+, and IL-10+CD5+CD1d+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration were significantly lower in HSPN patients. Following treatment, the numbers of CD38+CD19+ and CD86+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood were significantly reduced in HSPN patients. However, the numbers of CD5+CD1d+CD19+, CD5+CD1d+IL-10+CD19+, and IL-10+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration were significantly increased in HSPN patients following treatment. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was negatively correlated with the number of CD38+CD19+ B cells but positively correlated with the numbers of IL-10+CD19+, CD1d+CD5+CD19+, and IL-10+CD1d+CD5+CD19+B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration. The 24-h urinary protein concentration was positively correlated with the number of CD38+CD19+B cells but negatively correlated with the numbers of IL-10+CD19+, CD1d+CD5+CD19+, and IL-10+CD1d+CD5+CD19+B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration

  2. Immune thrombocytopaenic purpura: an autoimmune cross-link between infections and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, M; Perricone, C; Ortega-Hernandez, O-D; Perricone, R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2014-05-01

    Immune thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune systemic disease detectable by the presence of low blood platelets count (<10(5)/µl) and the production of autoantibodies against glycoproteins expressed on the platelet surface. The clinical course is often acute, and life-threatening events may occur especially in children, with 52% of paediatric patients recovering either spontaneously or after treatment. A chronic ITP evolution is observed in 64% of adults, of whom 12% will develop an overlapping autoimmune disease. Several microbial agents such as CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori or Candida albicans and a number of viruses including CMV, EBV or HIV can potentially trigger ITP through molecular mimicry. Moreover, ITP improves after treatment of the underlying infection. Similarly, vaccines such as MMR may prompt ITP (IRR 5.48, 1.61-18.64, p < 0.006). Early recognition of the underlying microbial trigger and the removal of modifiable aetiopathogenetic factors should be integrated as a complementary treatment strategy in all patients who do not readily improve with standard ITP care.

  3. Self-organizing phenomena induced by LLLT in Henoch-Schoenlein purpura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailioaie, Laura; Ailioaie, C.

    2001-06-01

    Henoch-Schoenlein purpura is characterized by vasculitis of small vessels, particularly those of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney. Patients have characteristic purpuric skin rash plus all or some of the following: migratory polyarthralgias or polyarthritis, colicky abdominal pain, nephritis. Because until now there is no satisfactory treatment, we applied low level laser therapy (LLLT) in order to compare it with the classical therapy. Twenty-three children (2-15 years of age) have been treated at debut of the disease. They were randomly divided: group A (11 children) received LLLT; group B (12 children) was administrated classical therapy. Two GaAlAs diode lasers (670 nm and 830 nm) were used. The density of energy (4-8 J/cm2), irradiating frequency (2.4 Hz) was applied one session daily, using scanning technique under a special treatment protocol on cutaneous purpuric areas (20 sessions). The best results were obtained in laser group. Despite the complex medication, some patients from group B fell back into the former state after apparent improvement, and two children developed nephritis. The results could be explained by self-organization. LLLT is acting as a trigger factor causing certain systemic effects through circulating blood and a response of the entire immune system, by way of synergetic mechanisms.

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fidan, Kibriya; Kandur, Yasar; Ucar, Murat; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Soylemezoglu, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological syndrome, composed of symptoms such as headache, seizures, visual disturbances, lethargy, confusion, stupor, focal neurologic findings and radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities suggestive of edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. PRES is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if it is not expeditiously recognized. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) represents the most sensitive imaging technique for recognizing PRES. PRES has been seen in various clinical settings including renal disorders such as acute glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and drug usage such as calcineurin inhibitors. We aimed to present two study cases for such clinical setting. In this report, we present two patients with PRES in whom the primary diagnosis was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Both of them were treated with anticonvulsant and proper antihypertensive drugs. A repeated MRI scan of the head, an ophthalmologic assessment, and a follow-up electroencephalogram produced normal results with no sequelae. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate the appropriate treatment, so that intensive treatment should be performed as soon as possible to avoid neurological sequelae. PMID:27298664

  5. Increased serum IgD concentrations in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Saulsbury, F T

    1998-05-01

    Serum IgD concentrations were measured in 39 children with Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) and 40 control children by means of radial immunodiffusion. Serum IgG, IgA and IgM concentrations in the HSP patients were measured by nephelometry. The geometric mean IgD concentration in children with HSP (16.7 microg/ml) was significantly higher than in control children (9.1 microg/ml; P=0.03). Serial testing in 10 HSP patients revealed no significant change in IgD concentrations over periods ranging from 1 to 12 months. There was no relationship between IgD and IgA concentrations in the HSP patients. Nineteen of the 39 HSP patients (49%) had nephritis. The mean IgD concentration in patients with nephritis (10.7 microg/ml) did not differ from control values, but was significantly lower than the mean IgD level in the remaining 20 patients who did not have nephritis (25.4 microg/ml; P=0.02). These results indicate that serum IgD levels are increased in children with HSP who did not have nephritis. IgD concentrations in patients with nephritis were similar to levels in control children.

  6. Lumbar Swelling as the Unusual Presentation of Henoch-Schonlein Purpura in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Mehmet Ali; Duru, Nilgün Selçuk; Çalışkan, Bahar; Sandıkçı, Hale; Çengel, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP) is a systemic hypersensitivity disease of unknown cause that is characterized by a purpuric rash and systemic manifestations, such as colicky abdominal pain, polyarthralgia, and acute glomerulonephritis. Common complications of HSP that lead to surgical intervention include intussusception, perforation, necrosis, and massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Unusual clinical manifestations of HSP may include edema of the scrotum and eyes. Lumbar swelling is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. Case Report: A four-year-old boy was admitted to our emergency room with a 7 day history of increasing abdominal pain. Within 48 hours of admission, erythematous macules and palpable purpuric lesions developed on the lower extremities. On the third day of hospitalization, sudden onset of severe back pain, swelling on the lumbar region and refusal to walk were seen. On the fifth day, lumbosacral edema and pain resolved but facial edema developed. He was diagnosed clinically with HSP. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, only a few cases of HSP with lumbar edema have been reported so far. If the first clinical symptoms of HSP are atypical, clinical progress can be atypical, too. PMID:27308084

  7. Purpura fulminans as clinical manifestation of atypical SLE with antiphospholipid antibodies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gamba, G; Montani, N; Montecucco, C M; Caporali, R; Ascari, E

    1991-01-01

    Purpura Fulminans and DIC were the main clinical manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome observed in a 62-year-old man. The patient was well until 44 years of age when he began to suffer from recurrent thrombophlebitis, without other symptoms suggestive of immune disease. At the time of hospital admission the pt. appeared acutely ill, showing high fever, severe anemia, massive urinary blood loss, multiple purpuric patches evolving to hemorrhagic bullae and gangrene rapidly spreading over about 30% of the total body area. No signs of neurological involvement or of visceral thrombotic occlusions were present. Clotting tests were consistent with a diagnosis of DIC, further confirmed by skin biopsy showing the presence of thrombi in dermal arterioles. The autoantibody research was positive as follows: Waaler-Rose 1:40, Anti-DNA 1:80; ANF 1:640, aCA IgG 100 GPL. LA was diagnosed according to standard criteria: prolonged KCT and RVVT not corrected by a mixture of normal plasma and abnormal TTI. Plasma exchange in association with heparin and prednisone was effective in arresting the progression of the skin lesion; nevertheless the patient died ten days after hospital admission for sepsi and acute renal failure.

  8. A perspective on the measurement of ADAMTS13 in thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Pimanda, John E; Chesterman, Colin N; Hogg, Philip J

    2003-04-01

    The recent discovery of the von Willebrand Factor (vWF) cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) and the association of its deficiency with thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP) has generated both enormous interest and considerable confusion. Ultra large von Willebrand Factor (UL vWF) multimers are present in the plasmas of patients with chronic relapsing TTP in remission but disappear during an attack. This observation led to the recognition that UL vWF multimers precipitate the thrombotic occlusion of arterioles, a feature that characterizes TTP. Multiple mutations in ADAMTS13 are associated with congenital TTP and neutralizing autoantibodies have been demonstrated in the acquired TTP syndrome. Although a number of functional assays for this enzyme have been described, the more rigorously evaluated assays are difficult to perform outside a research laboratory. There is also an enduring uncertainty about the specificity of ADAMTS13 deficiency for the diagnosis of acquired TTP and a perception that the result does not alter patient management. The cloning of the ADAMTS13 gene has also raised the prospect of recombinant enzyme therapy for the treatment of TTP, and this has heightened the need for a simple assay. In this review, we evaluate the value of measuring this enzyme in the management of TTP.

  9. Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with a neuroblastoma: Report of one case and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiaoli; Cao, Shanshan; Zhang, Hongwen; Geng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Summary Malignancies such as solid tumors and hematologic malignancies can often induce or be associated with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in older males but not in children. Described here is the case of a 5-year-old boy who clinically presented with HSP. An imaging study of the abdomen revealed a right retroperitoneal neoplasm that histopathology postoperatively confirmed to be a neuroblastoma. Malignancies are sometimes associated with HSP mostly in older males, though children are affected, albeit rarely. Thus, all patients with HSP must be carefully examined to identify or exclude an underlying disease. PMID:25343092

  10. HLA-B35, a common genetic trait, in a familial case of Henoch-Schoenlein purpura and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, M C; Matarazzo, L; Neri, E; Pennesi, M; Crovella, S

    2014-04-08

    Nephritis characterized by IgA mesangial depositions has been described both in Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) and in Berger's disease (BD), but common genetic traits are still uncertain. We report here the case of two brothers, the first affected by HSP with persistent nephritis and the second by BD, accidentally discovered as silent microhematuria 1 year after HSP onset in the first brother. HLA genotyping demonstrated the presence of HLA-B35 in both patients. Our findings reinforce the need to screen for urinary abnormalities in family members of patients affected by HSP nephritis to identify a silent IgA nephropathy.

  11. The first case of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with rosuvastatin: colonic involvement coexisting with small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun; Erfan, Gamze; Oznur, Meltem; Erdogan, Cuneyt

    2014-03-19

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small vessels. It is the most common systemic vasculitis in children, and is rare in adults. Serious gastrointestinal complications are more common in childhood. Infections and drugs are the most prominent factors in the aetiology. Wall thickening in segments of the small intestine is commonly seen in imaging studies in gastrointestinal system (GIS) involvement. Simultaneous involvement of small intestine and colon is rare. An HSP case involving small intestine and colon in an adult patient due to the use of rosuvastatin, an antihyperlipidaemic agent, is presented, and is first of its kind reported in the literature.

  12. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  13. Henoch-Schönlein purpura from vasculitis to intestinal perforation: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Saisawat, Pawaree; Thanachatchairattana, Pornsri; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is generally a self-limited vasculitis disease and has a good prognosis. We report a 4-year-old Thai boy who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal colicky pain, seizure, and eventually developed intestinal ischemia and perforation despite adequate treatment, including corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, could not detect intestinal ischemia prior to perforation. In this patient, we also postulated that vasculitis-induced mucosal ischemia was a cause of the ulcer, leading to intestinal perforation, and high-dose corticosteroid could have been a contributing factor since the histopathology revealed depletion of lymphoid follicles. Intestinal perforation in HSP is rare, but life-threatening. Close monitoring and thorough clinical evaluation are essential to detect bowel ischemia before perforation, particularly in HSP patients who have hematochezia, persistent localized abdominal tenderness and guarding. In highly suspicious cases, exploratory laparotomy may be needed for the definite diagnosis and prevention of further complications. PMID:27468201

  14. Multicentric Castleman's disease associated with IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) responding well to tocilizumab: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yoichi; Hoshino, Junichi; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hayami, Noriko; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Sekine, Akinari; Ueno, Toshiharu; Mizuno, Hiroki; Yabuuchi, Junko; Imafuku, Aya; Kawada, Masahiro; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Hasegawa, Eiko; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Fujii, Takeshi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG 2898 mg/dL and IgA 587 mg/dL), inflammation (CRP 6.7 mg/dL and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) 15.1 ng/L), and anemia (Hb 10.9 mg/dL). Castleman's disease (CD) was diagnosed by axillary lymph node biopsy. Five months later, painful purpura (multiple palpable 5 mm lesions) developed on his legs, gradually spreading to the upper limbs, thighs, and trunk, accompanied by arthralgia of the wrists, ankles, and knees. Skin biopsy revealed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with IgA deposits in dermal vessels. Accordingly, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was diagnosed. Tocilizumab (an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) was administered intravenously at 8 mg/kg and treatment was repeated at monthly intervals. His purpura and clinical findings specific to CD improved rapidly. CD is well known to cause various skin lesions. The findings in this case indicate that overproduction of IL-6 contributes to IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) as well as to the pathogenesis of CD.

  15. Risk Factors Associated with Renal Involvement in Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Han; Tang, Yan-Ling; Lv, Xiao-Hang; Zhang, Gao-Fu; Wang, Mo; Yang, Hai-Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is an important cause of chronic kidney disease in children. This meta-analysis identified risk factors associated with renal involvement in childhood HSP. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. The quality of all eligible studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale criteria. An analysis of possible risk factors was conducted to report the odds ratio (OR) and weighted mean difference (WMD). Results Thirteen studies (2398 children) revealed 20 possible and 13 significant risk factors associated with renal involvement in HSP, with the following meta-analysis estimates of OR and WMD, with 95% confidence intervals: older age (0.90, 0.61–1.19); age > 10 y (3.13, 1.39–7.07); male gender (1.36, 1.07–1.74); abdominal pain (1.94,1.24–3.04); gastrointestinal bleeding (1.86, 1.30–2.65); severe bowel angina (3.38, 1.17–9.80); persistent purpura (4.02, 1.22–13.25); relapse (4.70, 2.42–9.14); WBC > 15 × 109/L (2.42, 1.39–4.22); platelets > 500 × 109/L (2.98, 1.22–7.25); elevated antistreptolysin O (ASO) (2.17, 1.29–3.64); and decreased complement component 3 (C3) (3.13, 1.62–6.05). Factors not significantly associated with renal involvement were: blood pressure; orchitis; elevated C-reactive protein; elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); and elevated serum IgA/IgE or IgG. Arthritis/arthralgia may be a risk factor according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (1.41, 1.01–1.96). Conclusion The following are associated with renal involvement in pediatric HSP: male gender; > 10 y old; severe gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and severe bowel angina); arthritis/arthralgia; persistent purpura or relapse; WBC > 15 × 109/L; platelets > 500 × 109/L; elevated ASO; and low C3. Relevant clinical interventions for these risk factors may exert positive effects on the prevention of kidney disease during the early

  16. Thrombocytopenic coagulopathy (Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon) is associated with Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and not with common infantile hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, M; Mulliken, J B; Kozakewich, H P; Robertson, R L; Burrows, P E

    1997-11-01

    Children with a large vascular tumor and associated Kasabach-Merritt coagulopathy respond inconsistently to therapy and have a high mortality rate. For this reason, we undertook a retrospective study of 21 such patients, and focused on clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features. The male to female ratio was 1:1.6. Tumor was noted at birth in 50 percent of patients; the remainder appeared throughout infancy. The location was cervicofacial (n = 2), shoulder/upper limb (n = 4), trunk including retroperitoneum (n = 11), and lower limb (n = 4). These tumors grew rapidly to large size and were characterized by cutaneous purpura, edema, and an advancing ecchymotic margin. In contrast to common hemangioma, magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse enhancement with ill-defined margins, cutaneous thickening, stranding of subcutaneous fat, hemosiderin deposits, and small feeding and draining vessels. All tumors were Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE); none were infantile hemangioma. Light microscopy showed irregular lobules or sheets of poorly formed, small vascular channels infiltrating and entrapping normal tissues. Characteristic features included spindle-shaped endothelial cells, diminished pericytes and mast cells, microthrombi, and hemosiderin deposits. Wide endothelial intercellular gaps and incomplete basement membranes were seen by electron microscopy. Dilated, hyperplastic, lymphaticoid channels were prominent in one tumor. KHE in 14 infants was treated with interferon alpha-2a: 6 had accelerated regression; 2 had stabilization of growth; and 6 evidenced no response. The mortality rate was 24 percent (5 of 21); this included three infants with retroperitoneal KHE. Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon does not occur with common hemangioma. Rather it is associated with the more aggressive KHE and rarely with other vascular neoplasms. Variable response to current pharmacologic therapy underscores our inadequate knowledge of the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in

  17. Joint effusions and purpura in multiply-transfused adult beta-thalassemia- clinical pointers to diagnosis of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Pandey, A K

    2013-01-01

    Periodic transfusions and effective chelation have ensured that thalassemics survive in to adulthood but their life is punctuated by peculiar problems in adulthood. Three cases of scurvy are being reported presenting uniquely as purpura, right hip joint effusion and right knee joint effusion with haemorrhage in prepatellar and retropatellar bursae, respectively over an 18 month period (2009-2010). The first two cases did give a history of gum bleed. None had any coagulation disturbance or transfusion-transmitted infections or connective tissue disorder. All the three cases responded dramatically to vitamin C supplementation. It is imperative to keep in mind that recurrent blood transfusions are associated with a state of subclinical vitamin C deficiency and overt scurvy may manifest as cumulative number of transfusions increase, as in adult thalassemics.

  18. Clinical features and outcomes of diffuse endocapillary proliferation Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haidong; Mao, Jianhua; Xu, Yanping; Gu, Weizhong; Zhu, Xiujuan; Liu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the outcomes of childhood diffuse endocapillary proliferation Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (DEP-HSPN) in response to early diagnosis and prompt treatment. METHODS: Eleven cases of DEP-HSPN in children were investigated in comparison to HSPN without diffuse endocapillary proliferation (non-DEP-HSPN). RESULTS: DEP-HSPN had a higher prevalence of nephrotic syndrome but a lower prevalence of hematuria compared to non-DEP-HSPN. IgA, IgG and IgM antibody deposition was found in DEP-HSPN by histopathological examination. Proteinuria cleared in all 11 cases through treatment with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. However, half of the DEP-HSPN patients continuously had hematuria after treatment. CONCLUSION: The early diagnosis and prompt initiation of immunosuppressive treatment based on renal biopsy are important for achieving favorable outcomes. PMID:27652838

  19. A case of isotretinoin-induced purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and review of substance-induced pigmented purpuric dermatosis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Rachel; Meehan, Shane A; Leger, Marie

    2014-02-01

    IMPORTANCE Medications as well as chemical and food exposures have been causally linked to the development of pigmented purpuric dermatosis (PPD). We describe herein what is to our knowledge the first reported case of isotretinoin-induced PPD. OBSERVATIONS A woman in her 30s presented with purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi on the lower extremities 2 months after initiating isotretinoin for the treatment of refractory nodulocystic acne. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE We believe isotretinoin was the most likely causative agent in this case because the lesions began after initiation of isotretinoin treatment and resolved shortly after its termination, and the pathologic findings were consistent with other described cases of drug-induced PPD. The lesions have continued to fade, and no new lesions have developed in a 3-month follow-up period. Drug-induced PPD is distinct from idiopathic PPD, and it is important to consider isotretinoin as a potential inciting agent.

  20. A higher frequency of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T follicular helper cells in patients with newly diagnosed Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihui; Zhao, Songchen; Zhang, Li; Crew, Rebecca; Zhang, Nan; Sun, Xiguang; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-03-01

    T follicular helper (TFH) cells play an important role in the humoral immune responses. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of different subsets of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells and B cells in patients with new-onset Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN). The numbers of different subsets of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells, B cells and the constituents of serum cytokines were detected in a total of 25 patients with newly diagnosed HSPN before and after treatment, and in 14 healthy controls (HC). The potential connection of these cells with the clinical characteristics in HSPN patients was analyzed. The numbers of circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+), CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) and CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells, CD86(+)CD19(+), CD38(+)CD19(+) B cells and serum IL-2, IL-4, IL-17A, IL-21 and IFN-γ were significantly higher in HSPN patients (p<0.05) than in HC. Before and after treatment the numbers of CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells were negatively correlated with the values of eGFR (r=-0.7162, p<0.05; r=-0.732, p<0.05, respectively). Similarly the numbers of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) TFH cells were negatively correlated with 24-h urinary proteins (r=-0.4013, p<0.05; r=-0.7857, p<0.05, respectively), and the numbers of CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) TFH cells were positively correlated with the levels of serum IL-21 (r=0.5186, p<0.05; r=0.8503, p<0.05, respectively) and 24-h urinary protein (r=0.6045, p<0.05; r=0.833, p<0.05, respectively) in these patients, regardless of treatment. Following treatment the numbers of CD4(+)CXCR5(+), CD4(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+), and CD4(+)CXCR5(+)ICOS(+) TFH cells, as well as serum levels of IL-21 were significantly reduced, however IL-4 levels were noticeably increased (p<0.05). A higher frequency of circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) TFH cells existed in patients with HSPN and may be a viable therapeutic target.

  1. A novel mutation c.1048A>T at codon 350(Lys>Stop) in PROC gene causing neonatal purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakhi; T, Leenath; Chandran, Jolly; Jayandharan, Giridhara R; Palle, Arpana; Moses, Prabhakar D

    2013-12-01

    Purpura fulminans in the neonatal period due to severe congenital protein C deficiency (protein C activity <1 IU/dl) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. If untreated, it is fatal. Early identification of such patients may be lifesaving. Acquired deficiency of protein C caused by increased consumption as overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and severe infection creates a diagnostic dilemma. Mutation analysis plays a critical role in confirming the diagnosis of the disease and offering prenatal diagnosis. In this report, we describe a newborn who presented with purpura fulminans and DIC, molecular analysis showed a novel c.1048A>T transversion in a homozygous state at codon 350 (Lys>Stop) of protein C (PROC) gene. Prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancy was done which revealed the affected fetus had the same mutation in homozygous form.

  2. Immunoreactions involving platelets. III. Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination, inhibition of clot retraction, and other reactions caused by the antibody of quinidine purpura.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, N R

    1958-05-01

    Quantitative aspects of platelet agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction by the antibody of quinidine purpura were described. The reactions appeared to depend on formation of types of antibody-quinidine-platelet complexes which could fix complement but complement was not necessary for these reactions. Complement fixation was at least 10 times more sensitive than platelet agglutination or inhibition of clot retraction for measurement and detection of antibody activity. Although it has been considered that antibodies of drug purpura act as platelet lysins in the presence of complement and that direct lysis of platelets accounts for development of thrombocytopenia in drug purpura, the present study suggests that attachment of antibody produces a change in platelets which is manifested in vitro only by increased susceptibility to non-specific factors which can alter the stability of platelets in the absence of antibody. The attachment of antibody to platelets in vivo may only indirectly affect platelet survival. In contrast to human platelets, dog, rabbit, and guinea pig platelets, and normal or trypsin-treated human red cells did not agglutinate, fix complement, or adsorb antibody; and intact human endothelial cells did not fix complement or adsorb antibody. Rhesus monkey platelets were not agglutinated by the antibody but did adsorb antibody and fix complement although their activity in these reactions differed quantitatively from that of human platelets. Cinchonine could be substituted for quinidine in agglutination and inhibition of clot retraction reactions but quinine and cinchonidine could not. Attempts to cause passive anaphylaxis in guinea pigs with the antibody of quinidine purpura were not successful.

  3. The accuracy of platelet counting in thrombocytopenic blood samples distributed by the UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme for General Haematology.

    PubMed

    De la Salle, Barbara J; McTaggart, Paul N; Briggs, Carol; Harrison, Paul; Doré, Caroline J; Longair, Ian; Machin, Samuel J; Hyde, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A knowledge of the limitations of automated platelet counting is essential for the effective care of thrombocytopenic patients and management of platelet stocks for transfusion. For this study, 29 external quality assessment specimen pools with platelet counts between 5 and 64 × 10(9)/L were distributed to more than 1,100 users of 23 different hematology analyzer models. The same specimen pools were analyzed by the international reference method (IRM) for platelet counting at 3 reference centers. The IRM values were on average lower than the all-methods median values returned by the automated analyzers. The majority (~67%) of the automated analyzer results overestimated the platelet count compared with the IRM, with significant differences in 16.5% of cases. Performance differed between analyzer models. The observed differences may depend in part on the nature of the survey material and analyzer technology, but the findings have implications for the interpretation of platelet counts at levels of clinical decision making.

  4. VWF excess and ADAMTS13 deficiency: a unifying pathomechanism linking inflammation to thrombosis in DIC, malaria, and TTP.

    PubMed

    Schwameis, Michael; Schörgenhofer, Christian; Assinger, Alice; Steiner, Margarete M; Jilma, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Absent or severely diminished activity of ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with a ThromboSpondin type 1 motif, member 13) resulting in the intravascular persistence and accumulation of highly thrombogenic ultra large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers is the pathophysiological mechanism underlying thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Reduced VWF-cleaving protease levels, however, are not uniquely restricted to primary thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), e. g. thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, but also occur in other life-threatening thrombocytopenic conditions: severely decreased ADAMTS13 activity is seen in severe sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and complicated malarial infection. The clinical relevance of these secondary thrombotic microangiopathies is increasingly recognised, but its therapeutic implications have not yet been determined. The presence of a secondary TMA in certain diseases may define patient groups which possibly could benefit from ADAMTS13 replacement or a VWF-targeting therapy. This short-review focuses on the role of UL-VWF multimers in secondary TMA and discusses the potential of investigational therapies as candidates for the treatment of TTP. In conclusion, prospective clinical trials on the effectiveness of protease replacementin vivo seem reasonable. Carefully selected patients with secondary TMA may benefit from therapies primarily intended for the use in patients with TTP.

  5. [Immune thrombocytopenia and HIV-1 infection. Response to splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Planells Roig, M V; Pallas Regueria, J A; Carbonell Tatay, F; Sancho Fornos, S

    1990-03-01

    We present a case of thrombocytopenic purpura associated to acquired immunodeficiency; this disease is very infrequently associated to AIDS; the clinical characteristics are similar to the classical Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, including the response to splenectomy. We discuss the therapeutic approach of this condition and review the literature, adding this new case of a patient with AIDS, Walter and Reed's stage II, who responded to splenectomy.

  6. Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to Dermal Vessels Leads to Local Vascular Damage and Purpura in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Melican, Keira; Michea Veloso, Paula; Martin, Tiffany; Bruneval, Patrick; Duménil, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Septic shock caused by Neisseria meningitidis is typically rapidly evolving and often fatal despite antibiotic therapy. Further understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease is necessary to reduce fatality rates. Postmortem samples from the characteristic purpuric rashes of the infection show bacterial aggregates in close association with microvessel endothelium but the species specificity of N. meningitidis has previously hindered the development of an in vivo model to study the role of adhesion on disease progression. Here we introduced human dermal microvessels into SCID/Beige mice by xenografting human skin. Bacteria injected intravenously exclusively associated with the human vessel endothelium in the skin graft. Infection was accompanied by a potent inflammatory response with the secretion of human inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of inflammatory cells. Importantly, infection also led to local vascular damage with hemostasis, thrombosis, vascular leakage and finally purpura in the grafted skin, replicating the clinical presentation for the first time in an animal model. The adhesive properties of the type IV pili of N. meningitidis were found to be the main mediator of association with the dermal microvessels in vivo. Bacterial mutants with altered type IV pili function also did not trigger inflammation or lead to vascular damage. This work demonstrates that local type IV pili mediated adhesion of N. meningitidis to the vascular wall, as opposed to circulating bacteria, determines vascular dysfunction in meningococcemia. PMID:23359320

  7. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-03-17

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion.

  8. Using the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy to predict long-term outcomes of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Ho; Lim, Beom Jin; Bae, Yoon Sung; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Yung Ly; Nam, Ki Heon; Park, Kyoung Sook; An, Seong Yeong; Koo, Hyang Mo; Doh, Fa Mee; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Jeong, Hyun Joo; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2014-07-01

    Recently, there has been emerging concern that crescents, the main histologic feature of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis, merely reflect active inflammation, and may not be useful in predicting long-term outcomes. We therefore conducted a single-center retrospective study to evaluate whether the new Oxford classification of immunoglobulin A nephropathy can be used to predict long-term outcome in patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis. We included 61 biopsy-proven patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis between January 1991 and August 2010. In addition to the International Study of Kidney Disease in Children classification, pathologic findings were also evaluated by the Oxford classification. Primary outcomes were defined as either the onset of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) with ≥30% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline or end-stage renal disease. During a median follow-up of 49.3 months, 13 (21%) patients reached the primary end point. A Kaplan-Meier plot showed that renal event-free survival was significantly longer in patients with <50% crescents than in those with crescents in ≥50% of glomeruli (P=0.003). Among the components of the Oxford classification, patients with endocapillary hypercellularity (E1; P=0.016) and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T1/T2; P=0.018) had lower renal survival rates than those with E0 and T0. In a multivariate Cox model adjusted for clinical and pathologic factors, E1 (hazard ratio=8.91; 95% confidence interval=1.47-53.88; P=0.017) and T1/T2 (hazard ratio=8.74; 95% confidence interval=1.40-54.38; P=0.020) were independently associated with reaching a primary outcome, whereas the extent of crescentic lesions was not. Our findings suggest that the Oxford classification can be used in predicting long-term outcomes of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

  9. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  10. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Presenting as Severe Gastrointestinal and Renal Involvement with Mixed Outcomes in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Raj; Vollmar, Alexis; Harrell, Amanda; Van Trump, Richard; Masoud, Amgad

    2017-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is typically seen as a self-limiting disease in children, but can present more severely in adults, especially when there is renal involvement. Management of HSP in adults also remains a controversial topic with very few studies evaluating available therapies. In this case, HSP presenting as a combination of severe gastrointestinal involvement and a rapid decline in renal function in an adult patient directed our therapy. The patient was a 48-year-old Caucasian male with no known past medical history, who presented with a combination of purpuric rash over the lower extremities, severe abdominal pain with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and a rapidly increasing serum creatinine, with hematuria. He initially underwent a skin biopsy, along with investigation for other possible causes, including autoimmune and infectious etiologies, which were negative. He was started on therapy for presumed HSP with intravenous methylprednisolone. The skin biopsy, however, was not conclusive, and the patient had no improvement in his clinical status. He then underwent a kidney biopsy that was consistent with HSP nephritis (immunoglobulin A (IgA) predominant glomerulonephritis with crescents), and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) that showed mucosal inflammation, ulcerations, and stigmata of bleeding—findings that were consistent with ischemia. Cyclophosphamide was added to the regimen at this time. However, he had worsening abdominal pain, continued gastrointestinal bleeding, now with hematochezia, and also worsening renal function that required dialysis. Plasmapheresis was then initiated on days alternating with dialysis. This resulted in the improvement of his gastrointestinal symptoms, but no recovery was seen of his renal function, and the patient required outpatient dialysis. This case report exhibits the unique presentation of severe gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations and rapid progression to renal failure in an adult patient with partial

  11. Abnormal urinalysis on day 7 in patients with IgA vasculitis (Henoch–Schönlein purpura)

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Nozomu; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Nishikado, Yuichi; Kitase, Yuma; Ito, Sanae; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sato, Yoshiaki; Kato, Taichi; Natsume, Jun; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rare progression to renal failure imposes a burden on children with IgA vasculitis (Henoch–Schönlein purpura, HSP). An abnormal urinalysis on day 7 (7d-UA) may be a surrogate marker for persistent nephritis, but this has not been established. We retrospectively analyzed the risk factors for persistent nephritis in a cohort of 138 children. Of 35 children with abnormal 7d-UA, 24 (69%) had an abnormal urinalysis 6 months after the diagnosis of HSP, which was significantly more than 6 of 103 children (6%) with normal 7d-UA (P < 0.0001). The negative predictive values for normal urinalysis and negative proteinuria 6 months after diagnosis were 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90–0.97) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95–0.99), respectively. When children with abnormal urinalysis 6 months after diagnosis were compared with those without, the following factors were significantly associated: age at diagnosis, abnormal urinalysis at diagnosis, abnormal 7d-UA, complement C3, steroid treatment, and presence of abdominal pain. However, multivariate analysis revealed that abnormal 7d-UA was the only significant risk factor for abnormal urinalysis 6 months after diagnosis (odds ratio 54.3, 95% CI 15.3–275, P = 1.89 × 10−6). Abnormal 7d-UA may be an independent risk factor for persistent nephritis, but this should be confirmed in a prospective study. PMID:28008191

  12. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  13. [Detection, diagnosis and analysis of the first case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura associated with anti-HPA-5b in China].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhong, Zhou-Lin; Li, Li-Lan; Shen, Wei-Dong; Wu, Guo-Guang

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the detection and diagnosis of the neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura (NAITP) caused by anti-HPA-5b antibody. The platelet count and clinical manifestation in the newborn were examined. The HPA-1-21bw genotypes of the newborn and her parents were detected by multiple-PCR and DNA sequencing. The HPA-specific antibody in the sera of newborn and her mother were detected and identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). The results indicated that the clinical manifestations of the newborn were lighter. The HPA genotyping showed that the genotype of the newborn was HPA-5ab, while that of her mother and father were HPA-5aa and HPA-5ab, respectively. The antibody against the platelet of newborn's father existed in the newborn's mother sera. The HPA antibody of the mother was identified as anti-HPA-5b. It is concluded that the newborn with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura was caused by the antibody against HPA-5b.

  14. Evaluation of TGF-β1 and MCP-1 expression and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and IgA nephropathy: A clinical correlation

    PubMed Central

    Shuiai, Zhao; Huijun, Shen; Weizhong, Gu; Aimin, Liu; Jianhua, Mao

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and immunoglobulin A nephropathy are two diseases with similar clinical presentations but very different prognoses. Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 have been associated with the development of tissue fibrosis. We examined the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and its relationship with Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in these patients. METHODS: Renal tissue samples were collected by renal biopsy from 50 children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and 50 children with immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome-stained tissues were examined using light microscopy. Tubulointerstitial fibrosis was graded using the method described by Bohle et al. 1. The immunohistochemical detection of Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression was correlated with the tubulointerstitial fibrosis grade. Clinical Trial registration number: ZJCH-2012-0105. RESULTS: Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in the renal tissues was significantly greater in the patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy than in the patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (both p<0.001). The immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients had a higher tubulointerstitial fibrosis grade than the Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis patients (p<0.001). The tubulointerstitial fibrosis grade was in accordance with the Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression levels in both diseases (both p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Transforming growth factor β1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression was associated with the development of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis. Further studies are needed to better evaluate this association. PMID:28273242

  15. Antigen and substrate withdrawal in the management of autoimmune thrombotic disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCrae, Keith R.; Zheng, X. Long; Sachais, Bruce S.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Siegel, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    Prevailing approaches to manage autoimmune thrombotic disorders, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, include immunosuppression and systemic anticoagulation, though neither provides optimal outcome for many patients. A different approach is suggested by the concurrence of autoantibodies and their antigenic targets in the absence of clinical disease, such as platelet factor 4 in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and β2-glycoprotein-I (β2GPI) in antiphospholipid syndrome. The presence of autoantibodies in the absence of disease suggests that conformational changes or other alterations in endogenous protein autoantigens are required for recognition by pathogenic autoantibodies. In thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the clinical impact of ADAMTS13 deficiency caused by autoantibodies likely depends on the balance between residual antigen, that is, enzyme activity, and demand imposed by local genesis of ultralarge multimers of von Willebrand factor. A corollary of these concepts is that disrupting platelet factor 4 and β2GPI conformation (or ultralarge multimer of von Willebrand factor oligomerization or function) might provide a disease-targeted approach to prevent thrombosis without systemic anticoagulation or immunosuppression. Validation of this approach requires a deeper understanding of how seemingly normal host proteins become antigenic or undergo changes that increase antibody avidity, and how they can be altered to retain adaptive functions while shedding epitopes prone to elicit harmful autoimmunity. PMID:22966172

  16. Giant electron-dense chains, clusters and granules in megakaryocytes and platelets with normal dense bodies: an inherited thrombocytopenic disorder.

    PubMed

    White, James G

    2003-03-01

    A woman and her male child were referred because of life-long thrombocytopenia, moderately increased platelet size, and absence of laboratory findings suggesting immune thrombocytopenia or defective platelet function. Evaluation of their platelets in the electron microscope revealed the presence of large organelles never seen before in human platelets. Examination of bone marrow from the mother and her son in an earlier study revealed that the giant platelet organelles originated in megakaryocytes. The present study has focused on the continuing development of the aberrant organelles in circulating platelets. The smallest subunits were electron-dense fragments and hollow-cored bodies observed in the dense tubular system (DTS). The dense fragments formed chains that became thicker, resulting in clusters, and clusters formed the large electron opaque bodies. Hollow-cored, almost hexagonal subunits also formed chains that interacted with each other to form target-like organelles. The multi-layered target organelles tended to become completely electron dense and difficult to distinguish from the opaque bodies. How two different types of aberrant organelles can develop in the same megakaryocyte/platelet system and both originate from channels of the DTS is unknown. Partial clarification stemming from analytical electron microscopy and ultrastructural cytochemistry will be presented in a subsequent report.

  17. [Treatment of thoracic and abdominal cavity perforation complicated by Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis in a patient with high-voltage electric burn].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Wei-guo; Min, Wei-xiong; Wang, De-yun; Zhang, Jia; Wan, Shi-yong

    2013-10-01

    A 55-year-old male patient suffered from severe high-voltage electric burn with an area of 20%TBSA full-thickness injury. The injury involved the distal end of left upper limb, right trunk, and whole abdominal wall. Fracture of the 7th-10th ribs was found in the right side of chest, with perforation of abdominal cavity, and bilateral pleural effusion was found. Part of the small intestine was necrotic and exposed. At the early stage, xeno-acellular dermal matrix was grafted after debridement of abdominal wound; peritoneal lavage was performed; negative pressure drainage was performed in orificium fistula of intestine for promoting the adhesion between perforated intestine and abdominal scar. Two orificium fistulas formed after closure of abdominal granulation wound by autologous skin grafting. Eschar of chest wall and denatured ribs were retained. The risk of infection of thoracic cavity was decreased by promoting the adhesion between lung tissue and chest wall. During the treatment, the patient was diagnosed with Henoch-Schonlein purpura nephritis by renal biopsy, with the symptoms of purpura in the lower limbs, heavy proteinuria, severe hypoalbuminemia, edema, etc. After control of kidney damage by immunosuppressive treatment instead of glucocorticoid, alleviation of the levels of proteinuria and blood albumin, free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was excised to repair chest wall, and free skin graft was excised to repair intestinal fistula. After all the wounds were successfully covered, the patient was treated with glucocorticoid combined with immunosuppressants for more than 1 year. The patient was followed up for 3 years, and his renal function was completely recovered with satisfactory clinical outcome.

  18. Henoch-Schonlein Purpura in Children Hospitalized at a Tertiary Hospital during 2004-2015 in Korea: Epidemiology and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Hee; Kim, Yu Bin; Koo, Ja Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, investigations and management, and prognosis of patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Methods We performed a retrospective review of 212 HSP patients under the age of 18 years who were admitted to Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital between 2004 and 2015. Results The mean age of the HSP patients was 6.93 years, and the ratio of boys to girls was 1.23:1. HSP occurred most frequently in the winter (33.0%) and least frequently in the summer (11.3%). Palpable purpura spots were found in 208 patients (98.1%), and gastrointestinal (GI) and joint symptoms were observed in 159 (75.0%) and 148 (69.8%) patients, respectively. There were 57 patients (26.9%) with renal involvement and 10 patients (4.7%) with nephrotic syndrome. The incidence of renal involvement and nephrotic syndrome was significantly higher in patients with severe GI symptoms and in those over 7 years old. The majority of patients (88.7%) were treated with steroids. There was no significant difference in the incidence of renal involvement or nephrotic syndrome among patients receiving different doses of steroids. Conclusion In this study, the epidemiologic features of HSP in children were similar to those described in previous studies, but GI and joint symptoms manifested more frequently. It is essential to carefully monitor renal involvement and progression to chronic renal disease in patients ≥7 years old and in patients affected by severe GI symptoms. It can be assumed that there is no direct association between early doses of steroids and prognosis. PMID:27738599

  19. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... About Tanning 4/24/2013 Sun Safety IQ Online Surveys ... Osteopathic Association. The AOCD now oversees 32 dermatology residency programs that are currently training 163 residents ...

  20. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  1. Human protein C concentrate in the treatment of purpura fulminans: a retrospective analysis of safety and outcome in 94 pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Purpura fulminans (PF) is a devastating complication of uncontrolled systemic inflammation, associated with high incidence of amputations, skin grafts and death. In this study, we aimed to clarify the clinical profile of pediatric patients with PF who improved with protein C (PC) treatment, explore treatment effects and safety, and to refine the prognostic significance of protein C plasma levels. Methods In Germany, patients receiving protein C concentrate (Ceprotin®, Baxter AG, Vienna, Austria) are registered. The database was used to locate all pediatric patients with PF treated with PC from 2002 to 2005 for this national, retrospective, multi-centered study. Results Complete datasets were acquired in 94 patients, treated in 46 centers with human, non-activated protein C concentrate for purpura fulminans. PC was given for 2 days (median, range 1-24 days) with a median daily dose of 100 IU/kg. Plasma protein C levels increased from a median of 27% to a median of 71% under treatment. 22.3% of patients died, 77.7% survived to discharge. Skin grafts were required in 9.6%, amputations in 5.3%. PF recovered or improved in 79.8%, remained unchanged in 13.8% and deteriorated in 6.4%. Four adverse events occurred in 3 patients, none classified as severe. Non-survivors had lower protein C plasma levels (P < 0.05) and higher prevalence of coagulopathy at admission (P < 0.01). Time between admission and start of PC substitution was longer in patients who died compared to survivors (P = 0.03). Conclusions This retrospective dataset shows that, compared to historic controls, only few pediatric patients with PF under PC substitution needed dermatoplasty and/or amputations. Apart from epistaxis, no bleeding was observed. Although the data comes from a retrospective study, the evidence we present suggests that PC had a beneficial impact on the need for dermatoplasty and amputations, pointing to the potential value of carrying out a prospective randomised controlled

  2. Elevated levels of antibodies against phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex and/or cardiolipin associated with infection and recurrent purpura in a child: a forme fruste of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuri; Mayumi, Nobuko; Inaba, Motoyuki; Igarashi, Touru; Katagiri, Ichigen; Kawana, Seiji

    2015-07-15

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of venous and arterial thrombosis, as well as morbidity in pregnancy, in the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies. The diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome is usually established based on clinical and laboratory findings by strictly following the 2006 Sapporo classification. However, the diagnosis remains challenging owing to the ongoing debates on the serological criteria. We report a case we describe as forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome in which these criteria were not fulfilled. Purpura appeared repeatedly in a female infant starting from the age of 6 months and following episodes of upper respiratory infections and vaccinations. The levels of anti-cardiolipin IgG antibodies and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex antibodies were elevated in accordance with these events. Histopathological evaluation revealed multiple small vessel thrombi in the dermis and adipose tissue. After 2 weeks of treatment with aspirin and heparin, the cutaneous symptoms subsided. Infection has long been associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, and anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies are considered a new marker for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome. Forme fruste antiphospholipid syndrome should be considered even if the antiphospholipid syndrome diagnostic criteria are not completely fulfilled, especially in the presence of elevated levels of anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibodies and known preceding infections.

  3. Characterization of the complications associated with plasma exchange for thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura and related thrombotic microangiopathic anaemias: a single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    McGuckin, S; Westwood, J-P; Webster, H; Collier, D; Leverett, D; Scully, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma exchange (PEX) is a life-saving therapeutic procedure in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP) and other thrombotic microangiopathic anaemias (TMAs). However, it may be associated with significant complications, exacerbating the morbidity and mortality in this patient group. Study Design and Methods We reviewed all PEX procedures over a 72-month period, following the exclusive introduction of solvent–detergent double viral-inactivated plasma in high-volume users, such as TTP, in the United Kingdom (UK). We documented allergic reactions to plasma, citrate reactions, complications relating to central venous access insertion and venous thrombotic events (VTE) in 155 patient episodes and >2000 PEX procedures. Results The overall complication rate was low. Allergic plasma reactions occurred in 6·45% of the cohort with only one episode of acute anaphylaxis. Similarly, VTEs were 6·45%, not significantly greater than in medical patients receiving thromboprophylaxis, despite added potential risk factors in TTP. Citrate reactions were the most frequent complication documented, but toxicity was significantly reduced by administration of further calcium infusions during the PEX procedure. There were no serious central line infections and no catheter thrombosis. Conclusion Our data confirms that PEX continues to be a life-saving procedure in the acute TTP setting and, the procedure was not associated with an increased mortality and limited morbidity. PMID:24117855

  4. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  5. Childhood Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and IgA nephropathy: one disease entity?--A clinico-pathologically comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhua; Huang, Aixia; Liu, Tonglin; Kuang, Yujiu

    2005-01-01

    In order to characterize their relationship through clinicopathological comparison between IgA nephropathy and Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN), 31 children with IgA nephropathy aged between 3 to 15 years and 120 children with HSPN aged between 4 to 15 years were compared with each other in clinical manifestation, blood biochemistry, serum immunology and follow-up study. Renal pathological findings under light microscope, immunofluorescence and electronic microscope were analyzed and also compared between 31 children with IgA nephropathy and 32 biopsied children with HSPN. The results showed that the onset age was over 12 years in 25.8% children with IgA nephropathy, but only 10% in HSPN (P < 0.05). The clinical patterns of IgA nephropathy and HSPN were similar, but extra-renal manifestations were more often in HSPN, all of them had skin purpura, 59% had gastrointestinal symptoms and 47% suffered from arthralgia, compared with only abdominal pain in 3.2% children with IgA nephropathy. The renal pathological investigation showed global sclerosis in 35.5% of IgA nephropathy and 3.1% of HSPN, mesangial sclerosis in 41.9% of IgA nephropathy and 6.3% of HSPN, but endothelial proliferation in 65.6% of HSPN and 29% of IgA nephropathy (all P < 0.01). Thin basement membrane nephropathy was only found in 6.5% children with IgA nephropathy, no in HSPN. The electronic dense deposits in HSPN were sparse, loose and wildly spread in glomerular mesangium, subendothelial area and even intra basement membrane, but it was dense, lumpy and mostly limited in mesangium and paramesangium in IgA nephropathy. Predominant IgA deposits were found in 81.2% of HSPN, and overwhelming IgG deposits in 12.5% of HSPN with relatively weak IgA deposits, moreover 6.3% of HSPN showed linear IgG deposits in glomerular capillary. Totally 71.9% of HSPN had IgG deposits in glomeruli and only 19.4% of IgA nephropathy showed glomerular IgG deposits (P < 0.01). No IgG deposit was observed in 81

  6. Purpura thrombopénique amégacaryocytaire acquis: penser au lupus érythémateux systémique

    PubMed Central

    Ernestho-ghoud, Indretsy Mahavivola; Rahamefy, Odilon; Ranaivo, Irina Mamisoa; Andrianarison, Malalaniaina; Ramarozatovo, Lala Soavina; Rabenja, Fahafahantsoa Rapelanoro

    2015-01-01

    L'amegacaryocytose acquise est exceptionnellement décrite au cours d'un Lupus Erythémateux Systémique (LES) à Madagascar. Nous rapportons la première observation d'un Purpura Thrombopénique Amegacaryocytaire Acquis (PTAA) simulant un Purpura Thrombopénique Idiopathique (PTI) révélateur d'un LES. Il s'agissait d'une femme de 24 ans, sans antécédents particuliers. Elle présentait un syndrome hémorragique avec une thrombopénie à 10 000/mm3. Le diagnostic de PTI était retenu avant l'hospitalisation. Elle avait reçu une corticothérapie mais ceci n’était pas suivi d'amélioration. A l'unité de Dermatologie, elle se plaignait d'une baisse de l'acuité visuelle. Elle était en bon état général. On retrouvait une tachycardie à 110 bpm, un érythème malaire en verspertilio typique et une pâleur cutanéo-muqueuse. Une hémorragie oculaire bilatérale était objectivée à l'examen ophtalmologique. Les examens paracliniques montraient une thrombopénie à 31000/mm3, une anémie microcytaire à 48g/dL. Les examens immunologiques étaient non réalisés. Un LES avec atteinte cutanée et hématologique était retenu. Un bolus de corticothérapie était administrée associée à une transfusion sanguine. L’évolution était marquée par l'apparition d'un signe d'engagement cérébral faisant suspecter un neurolupus. Le scanner cérébral révélait une hémorragie cérébrale avec une hydrocéphalie aigue traitée par un inhibiteur de l'anhydrase carbonique mais le neurolupus n’était pas écarté. L'anémie disparaissait par contre la thrombopénie s'aggravait à 16000/mm3. Le médullogramme montrait l'absence des mégacaryocytes. L’évolution était favorable à huit mois de suivi après un relais per os de la corticothérapie par la dose de 1 mg/kg/j à dose dégressive à huit mois de suivi. Les atteintes neurologiques, ophtalmologiques et hématologiques étaient compatible avec le diagnostic d'un LES. La persistance d'une thrombopénie doit

  7. Tackling Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document is designed to help British training and enterprise councils (TECs) and further education (FE) colleges develop and implement strategies for achieving the National Targets for Education and Training (NTET), which were developed by the Confederation of British Industry in 1992 and endorsed by the British government. The findings from…

  8. On Target.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbalich, Andrea

    1991-01-01

    Campus public relations professionals offer advice for improving the effectiveness of public relations efforts by (1) setting behavioral goals; (2) targeting audiences carefully; (3) focusing appeals by making messages explicit; (4) connecting the public relations message with larger societal issues; and (5) reaching internal as well as external…

  9. Target assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  10. Association between HLA-A and -B polymorphisms and susceptibility to Henoch-Schönlein purpura in Han and Mongolian children from Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Ren, S M; Yang, G L; Liu, C Z; Zhang, C X; Shou, Q H; Yu, S F; Li, W C; Su, X L

    2012-02-03

    We examined a possible association between HLA-A and -B polymorphisms and susceptibility to Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in Han and Mongolian children in Inner Mongolia, through a case-control study. Two hundred and sixty-eight unrelated children were enrolled, including 56 Mongolian and 50 Han children with HSP, 66 healthy Mongolian and 96 healthy Han children as a control group. HLA-A and -B alleles were indentified by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide analysis and were further analyzed by PCR-sequencing-based typing (SBT). Frequencies of HLA-A*11, HLA-B*15 in Mongolian patients and HLA-A*26, HLA-B*35, HLA-B*52 in Han patients were higher than those in the corresponding control group (P < 0.05), while frequencies of HLA-B*07 and -B*40 in Mongolian HSP patients were lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Further analysis using PCR-SBT showed that all HLA-A*11 were HLA-A*1101, and most HLA-B*15 were HLA-B*1501 in Mongolian HSP patients. All HLA-A*26 were HLA-A*2601 and HLA-B*35 were mostly HLA-B*3503 in Han patients. There were more Han patients with severe manifestations than Mongolian patients (P < 0.05). Frequencies of HLA-A*26, HLA-B*35 and HLA-B*52 in Han patients were higher than in Mongolian patients (P < 0.05). We conclude that HLA-A*11(*1101) and -B*15(*1501) are associated with susceptibility to HSP in Mongolian children and HLA-A*26(*2601), HLA-B*35(*3503) and HLA-B*52 are associated with susceptibility to HSP in Han children. HLA-B*07 and -B*40 may be protective genes in Mongolian children. The different frequencies of HLA-A and -B in Mongolian and Han children may be responsible for the different manifestations in these two ethnic groups.

  11. Effect of CD40/CD40L signaling on IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in Chinese children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baohui; Tan, Xiongjun; Xiong, Xiao; Wu, Daoqi; Zhang, Gaofu; Wang, Mo; Dong, Shifang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Haiping; Li, Qiu

    2016-11-11

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role and mechanism of interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B cells (B10 cells) in the pathogenesis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN). We examined the percentage of B10 cells, CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells, CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) B cells, Th17 cells, and T regulatory (Treg) cells within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) population in healthy subjects and HSP/HSPN patients. The percentage of B10 cells and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells was reduced in HSPN patients and that of CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD27(+) B cells was decreased only in HSPN patients with hematuria and proteinuria or massive proteinuria. The expression of IL-10 by B10 cells and their subsets was decreased in HSPN patients and returned to normal levels in HSP/HSPN patients in remission. B10 cells and their subsets negatively correlated with the Th17/Treg ratio. There was no difference in B10pro + B10 cells, Th17 cells, Treg cells, and the Th17/Treg ratio between children with HSP/HSPN and healthy controls after CD40L stimulation. On the other hand, the level of IL-10 expressed by CD19(+)CD40(+) B cells was decreased in HSPN, and the percentage of B10pro + B10 cells and Treg cells was reduced and that of Th17 cell was increased in the presence of anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody (mAb). Thus, decreased B10 cells and CD19(+)CD24(hi)CD38(hi) B cells may function as an early marker of renal impairment in HSPN. The dysfunction of B10 cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of HSPN by regulating the Th17/Treg balance. Moreover, the CD40/CD40L signaling pathway may play a role in B10 cell differentiation and functional maturation.

  12. The Interaction between Circulating Complement Proteins and Cutaneous Microvascular Endothelial Cells in the Development of Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Tsai, I-Jung; Chang, Chun-Jung; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Hsu, Hui-Yao; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Objective In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C)3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP. Methods Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR), C5a receptor (CD88), E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), C3, C5, interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d) was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA. Results At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001), C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001), and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001), but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels. PMID:25760949

  13. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  14. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  15. Targeting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Ferenczi, Emily; Deisseroth, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Current optogenetic methodology enables precise inhibition or excitation of neural circuits, spanning timescales as needed from the acute (milliseconds) to the chronic (many days or more), for experimental modulation of network activity and animal behavior. Such broad temporal versatility, unique to optogenetic control, is particularly powerful when combined with brain activity measurements that span both acute and chronic timescales as well. This enables, for instance, the study of adaptive circuit dynamics across the intact brain, and tuning interventions to match activity patterns naturally observed during behavior in the same individual. Although the impact of this approach has been greater on basic research than on clinical translation, it is natural to ask if specific neural circuit activity patterns discovered to be involved in controlling adaptive or maladaptive behaviors could become targets for treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here we consider the landscape of such ideas related to therapeutic targeting of circuit dynamics, taking note of developments not only in optical but also in ultrasonic, magnetic, and thermal methods. We note the recent emergence of first-in-kind optogenetically-guided clinical outcomes, as well as opportunities related to the integration of interventions and readouts spanning diverse circuit-physiology, molecular, and behavioral modalities. PMID:27104976

  16. Giant electron-dense chains, clusters and granules in megakaryocytes and platelets with normal dense bodies: an inherited thrombocytopenic disorder I. Megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    White, James G

    2003-02-01

    A woman and her male child were referred because of life-long thrombocytopenia, moderately increased platelet size, and absence of laboratory findings suggesting immune thrombocytopenia or defective platelet function. Evaluation of their platelets in the electron microscope revealed the presence of organelles never seen before in human cells. The present study has focused on megakaryocyte pathology to be sure the aberrant platelet organelles originated in the parent cell. There were two different types of organelles developing in megakaryocytes from our patients unrelated to the formed organelles in the large cells. No relationship could be identified between the aberrant structures and alpha granules, lysosomes or dense bodies. One of the large organelles was intensely electron opaque and appeared to arise from small dense fragments forming in segments of endoplasmic reticulum. The second, target-like organelle also appeared to develop in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its smallest precursors were hexagonal fragments with a granular layer inside a more electron-dense outer layer. Fusion of these elements resulted in formation of typical target-like organelles. Ultimately the target-like organelles became electron opaque and difficult to distinguish from the large dense bodies. Other features of these unusual structures were identified in platelets from the two patients and will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  17. Acute kidney injury in a patient with hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Michael; Lalama, Miguel; Rivard, Gabrielle; Kashiwagi, Deanne; Cornell, Lynn

    2016-11-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is clinically difficult to distinguish from HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Atypical HUS results from dysregulation of complement activation causing thrombotic microangiopathy affecting multiple organ systems. Atypical HUS is associated with high morbidity and mortality, making early recognition and appropriate therapy necessary to improve patient outcomes.

  18. Thrombocytosis following thrombocytopenia in man

    PubMed Central

    Ogston, D.; Dawson, Audrey A.

    1969-01-01

    Observations are presented on the changes in the platelet count of patients during the treatment of Addisonian pernicious anaemia with vitamin B12, of thrombocytopenic purpura with prednisone, and of malignant disease with methotrexate. In each of these clinical situations, thrombocytopenia was succeeded, after a delay of a number of days, by a phase of thrombocytosis. PMID:5392350

  19. HUS AND TTP

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This review will describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation, clinical causes, treatment, and long-term prognosis of pediatric patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). The focus will be on hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), the most common phenotypes of TMA. PMID:24237985

  20. Students' Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03648 Ascraeus Mons

    After examining numerous THEMIS images and using the JMars targeting software, eighth grade students from Charleston Middle School in Charleston, IL, selected the location of -8.37N and 276.66E for capture by the THEMIS visible camera during Mars Odyssey's sixth orbit of Mars on Nov. 22, 2005. The students are investigating relationships between channels, craters, and basins on Mars. The Charleston Middle School students participated in the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP) and submitted a proposal to use the THEMIS visible camera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.8S, Longitude 279.6E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Giant electron dense chains, clusters and granules in megakaryocytes and platelets with normal dense bodies: an inherited thrombocytopenic disorder IV. Ultrastructural cytochemistry and analytical electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Ahlstrand, Gilbert G

    2003-08-01

    Platelets from a mother and son with prolonged thrombocytopenia were shown in previous studies to contain giant organelles that developed in megakaryocytes and continued to evolve in circulating cells. Whole mount platelet preparations revealed that the large organelles were electron opaque like the serotonin-rich dense bodies in normal and patient platelets, and analytical electron microscopy revealed they contained large amounts of calcium and phosphorous in a ratio close to that found in normal platelet dense bodies. However, differences in physiology, biochemistry and morphology indicated the large opaque bodies and target-organelles in patient platelets were not aberrant dense bodies. The present study has shown that the giant organelles contain peroxidase activity like primary lysosomes in polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes. Further, the giant organelles in patient platelets contain acid phosphatase activity. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that cerium, the capture ion for the acid phosphatase reaction product, was present in the opaque organelles with calcium and phosphorous, but not present in their normal dense bodies. Since normal sized lysosomes appeared to be reduced in patient platelets, it was concluded that the large structures were abnormal lysosomes, or fused with normal platelet lysosomes during their development. Similar giant lysosomes were not present in other patient blood cells. As a result the disorder can be considered a unique lysosomal disease of platelets.

  2. Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Targeted therapy is a type of cancer treatment that targets the changes in cancer cells that help them grow, divide, and spread. Learn how targeted therapy works against cancer and about side effects that may occur.

  3. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  4. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  5. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  6. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  7. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  8. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  9. Targeted Cancer Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... targets is to determine whether cancer cells produce mutant (altered) proteins that drive cancer progression . For example, ... V600E) in many melanomas . Vemurafenib (Zelboraf®) targets this mutant form of the BRAF protein and is approved ...

  10. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  11. [Familial cases of Berger's disease or of Berger's disease and rheumatoid purpura. Cooperative study of the Société Française de Néphrologie].

    PubMed

    Levy, M

    1989-01-01

    Several instances of familial Berger's disease have been reported and suggested the possible role of genetic factors in the etiology of the disease. In order to show that familial cases are not a rare finding, a french cooperative study was initiated. It revealed 34 families with 2 or 3 relatives with biopsy-proven Berger's disease. The male predominance (77%) as well as the severity of the evolution (12 out of 69 patients in terminal renal failure) in this series of familial cases are similar to those found in isolated cases. However, the young age at onset (47% being 16 years old or less) deserves to be noted. The number of familial cases is perhaps higher since 90 other families with one patient with Berger's disease and relatives either having urinary abnormalities or terminal renal failure were collected. Although in many of these last patients, clinicians strongly suspected Berger's disease, this diagnosis could not be proven in the absence of immunofluorescent study. This cooperative study has shown that two different glomerular diseases could be encountered in the same family. The association of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and Berger's disease was noted in 4 of these 34 families as well in 11 other and may represent a supplementary argument in favor of a relationship between the two diseases. However, the multiple occurrence of cases in a family may be due to chance or may be the consequence of common environmental factors and does not demonstrate the presence of genetic factors. The use of genetic markers in the families would be helpful to prove the role of these factors in Berger's disease.

  12. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  13. An actionable climate target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geden, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Paris Agreement introduced three mitigation targets. In the future, the main focus should not be on temperature targets such as 2 or 1.5 °C, but on the target with the greatest potential to effectively guide policy: net zero emissions.

  14. Adaptive infrared target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Jonah C.; Stevens, Mark R.; Eaton, Ross S.; Snorrason, Magnus S.

    2004-09-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are extremely sensitive to differences between the operating conditions under which they are trained and the extended operating conditions (EOCs) in which the fielded algorithms are tested. These extended operating conditions can cause a target's signature to be drastically different from training exemplars/models. For example, a target's signature can be influenced by: the time of day, the time of year, the weather, atmospheric conditions, position of the sun or other illumination sources, the target surface and material properties, the target composition, the target geometry, sensor characteristics, sensor viewing angle and range, the target surroundings and environment, and the target and scene temperature. Recognition rates degrade if an ATR is not trained for a particular EOC. Most infrared target detection techniques are based on a very simple probabilistic theory. This theory states that a pixel should be assigned the label of "target" if a set of measurements (features) is more likely to have come from an assumed (or learned) distribution of target features than from the distribution of background features. However, most detection systems treat these learned distributions as static and they are not adapted to changing EOCs. In this paper, we present an algorithm for assigning a pixel the label of target or background based on a statistical comparison of the distributions of measurements surrounding that pixel in the image. This method provides a feature-level adaptation to changing EOCs. Results are demonstrated on infrared imagery containing several military vehicles.

  15. Petechial rash in children: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Barnetson, Laura; Heaton, Paul Anthony; Palmer, Sarah; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-05-01

    Children with a petechial rash commonly present to emergency departments. The rash can be associated with serious illnesses, such as invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), but is usually associated with less severe conditions. This article discusses the common and important causes of petechial rash, including IMD, viral illnesses, trauma, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. It also analyses the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) ( 2014 ) pathway for management of petechial rash in children and examines treatment of the various causes. The article includes two relevant case studies and discusses the role of emergency nurses.

  16. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  17. Targeting Notch to target cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pannuti, Antonio; Foreman, Kimberly; Rizzo, Paola; Osipo, Clodia; Golde, Todd; Osborne, Barbara; Miele, Lucio

    2010-06-15

    The cellular heterogeneity of neoplasms has been at the center of considerable interest since the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", originally formulated for hematologic malignancies, was extended to solid tumors. The origins of cancer "stem" cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; henceforth referred to as CSCs) and the methods to identify them are hotly debated topics. Nevertheless, the existence of subpopulations of tumor cells with stem-like characteristics has significant therapeutic implications. The stem-like phenotype includes indefinite self-replication, pluripotency, and, importantly, resistance to chemotherapeutics. Thus, it is plausible that CSCs, regardless of their origin, may escape standard therapies and cause disease recurrences and/or metastasis after apparently complete remissions. Consequently, the idea of selectively targeting CSCs with novel therapeutics is gaining considerable interest. The Notch pathway is one of the most intensively studied putative therapeutic targets in CSC, and several investigational Notch inhibitors are being developed. However, successful targeting of Notch signaling in CSC will require a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to prove safe and effective. Additionally, to determine which patients are most likely to benefit from treatment with Notch-targeting therapeutics, reliable biomarkers to measure pathway activity in CSC from specific tumors will have to be identified and validated. This article summarizes the most recent developments in the field of Notch-targeted cancer therapeutics, with emphasis on CSC.

  18. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  19. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0381 TITLE: Antibodies Targeting EMT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vaughn Smider CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Scripps...REPORT DATE October 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Antibodies Targeting EMT 5a. CONTRACT ...ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies are drugs that can specifically bind targets present on tumor cells. The highly aggressive triple-negative subtype of

  20. Target Window Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2016-02-11

    The target window design implemented and tested in experiments at ANL have performed without failure for the available beam of 6 mm FWHM on a 12 mm diameter target. However, scaling that design to a 25 mm diameter target size for a 12 mm FWHM beam has proven problematic. Combined thermal and mechanical (pressure induced) stresses and strains are too high to maintain the small coolant gaps and provide adequate fatigue lifetime.

  1. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  2. Infrared target array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. A.

    1980-04-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (USAYPG) was requested to develop and acquire a series of infrared targets with controllable thermal signatures to support the test and evaluation of the Target Acquisition Designation System/Pilot Night Vision System (TADS/PNVS) subsystems of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) Fire Control System. Prior to this development effort, no capability beyond the use of real-scene targets existed at USAYPG to provide thermally active targets with characteristic signatures in the infrared band. Three targets were acquired: (1) a detection target; (2) a recognition target; and (3) a laser scoring board. It is concluded that design goals were met and the system was delivered in time to perform its function. The system provides sufficient thermal realism and has advanced the state-of-the-art of infrared imaging system test and evaluation. It is recommended that the Field Equivalent Bar Target (FEBT) system be validated as a potential test standard and that environmentally 'hardened' targets be acquired for continued thermal sight testing.

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  4. Potassium targets from KI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, G.

    1982-09-01

    Targets of potassium iodide (KI) on thin carbon backings have been prepared. Potassium isotopes are supplied as chlorides, and the chlorine is, in certain experiments, an unwanted contaminant. Target peeparation involves conversion of KCl to KI and subsequent vacuum evaporation of the iodide. Targets of both 39K and 41K in the thickness range of 60 to 100 μg/cm 2 of potassium have been prepared. These targets contain less than 0.5 μg/cm 2 of chlorine impurity and are stable in α-beams of 25 MeV.

  5. GWAS and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may be leveraged by network information to discover known and new drug targets. Results We find that only a very small fraction of drug targets are directly detected in the relevant GWAS studies. We investigate two possible explanations for this observation. First, we find evidence of negative selection acting on drug target genes as a consequence of strong coupling with the disease phenotype, so reducing the incidence of SNPs linked to the disease. Second, we find that GWAS genes are substantially longer on average than drug targets and than all genes, suggesting there is a length related bias in GWAS results. In spite of the low direct relationship between drug targets and GWAS reported genes, we found these two sets of genes are closely coupled in the human protein network. As a consequence, machine-learning methods are able to recover known drug targets based on network context and the set of GWAS reported genes for the same disease. We show the approach is potentially useful for identifying drug repurposing opportunities. Conclusions Although GWA studies do not directly identify most existing drug targets, there are several reasons to expect that new targets will nevertheless be discovered using these data. Initial results on drug repurposing studies using network analysis are encouraging and suggest directions for future development. PMID:25057111

  6. Targeted anti bacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2007-09-01

    The increasing development of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has reached alarming levels, thus necessitating a strong need to develop new antimicrobial agents. These new antimicrobials should possess novel modes of action and/or different cellular targets compared with the existing antibiotics. As a result, new classes of compounds designed to avoid defined resistance mechanisms are undergoing pre clinical and clinical evaluation. Microbial and phage genomic sequencing are now being used to find previously unidentified genes and their corresponding proteins. In both traditional and newly developed antibiotics, the target selectivity lies in the drug itself, in its ability to affect a mechanism that is unique to prokaryotes. As a result, a vast number of potent agents that, due to low selectivity, in addition to the pathogen also affect the eukaryote host have been excluded from use as therapeutics. Such compounds could be re-considered for clinical use if applied as part of a targeted delivery platform where the drug selectivity is replaced by target-selectivity borne by the targeting moiety. With a large number of antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates already approved or near approval as cancer therapeutics, targeted therapy is becoming increasingly attractive and additional potential targeting moieties that are non-antibody based, such as peptides, non-antibody ligand-binding proteins and even carbohydrates are receiving increasing attention. Still, targeted therapy is mostly focused on cancer, with targeted anti bacterial therapies being suggested only very recently. This review will focus in the various methods of antimicrobial targeting, by systemic and local application of targeted antimicrobial substances.

  7. Matching target dose to target organ

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Desmond I.; Williams, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro assays have become a mainstay of modern approaches to toxicology with the promise of replacing or reducing the number of in vivo tests required to establish benchmark doses, as well as increasing mechanistic understanding. However, matching target dose to target organ is an often overlooked aspect of in vitro assays, and the calibration of in vitro exposure against in vivo benchmark doses is often ignored, inadvertently or otherwise.  An example of this was recently published in Environmental Health Perspectives by Wagner et al., where neural stems cells were used to model the molecular toxicity of lead.  On closer examination of the in vitro work, the doses used in media reflected in vivo lead doses that would be at the highest end of lead toxicity, perhaps even lethal.  Here we discuss the doses used and suggest more realistic doses for future work with stem cells or other neuronal cell lines. PMID:28163899

  8. Segmented Target Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merhi, Abdul Rahman; Frank, Nathan; Gueye, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A proposed segmented target would improve decay energy measurements of neutron-unbound nuclei. Experiments like this have been performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) located at Michigan State University. Many different nuclei are produced in such experiments, some of which immediately decay into a charged particle and neutron. The charged particles are bent by a large magnet and measured by a suite of charged particle detectors. The neutrons are measured by the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and Large Multi-Institutional Scintillation Array (LISA). With the current target setup, a nucleus in a neutron-unbound state is produced with a radioactive beam impinged upon a beryllium target. The resolution of these measurements is very dependent on the target thickness since the nuclear interaction point is unknown. In a segmented target using alternating layers of silicon detectors and Be-targets, the Be-target in which the nuclear reaction takes place would be determined. Thus the experimental resolution would improve. This poster will describe the improvement over the current target along with the status of the design. Work supported by Augustana College and the National Science Foundation grant #0969173.

  9. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... disables the cancer cells so they cannot spread. How Does Targeted Therapy Work? Targeted therapy drugs work in a few different ways. They may: Turn off the process in cancer cells that causes them to grow and spread Trigger cancer cells to die on their own Kill cancer cells directly People ...

  10. Validation of the absolute renal risk of dialysis/death in adults with IgA nephropathy secondary to Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a monocentric cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We established earlier the absolute renal risk (ARR) of dialysis/death (D/D) in primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) which permitted accurate prospective prediction of final prognosis. This ARR was based on the potential presence at initial diagnosis of three major, independent, and equipotent risk factors such as hypertension, quantitative proteinuria ≥ 1 g per day, and severe pathological lesions appreciated by our local classification scoring ≥ 8 (range 0–20). We studied the validity of this ARR concept in secondary IgAN to predict future outcome and focused on Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) nephritis. Methods Our cohort of adults IgAN concerned 1064 patients with 101 secondary IgAN and was focused on 74 HSP (59 men) with a mean age of 38.6 at initial diagnosis and a mean follow-up of 11.8 years. Three major risk factors: hypertension, proteinuria ≥1 g/d, and severe pathological lesions appreciated by our global optical score ≥8 (GOS integrated all elementary histological lesions), were studied at biopsy-proven diagnosis and their presence defined the ARR scoring: 0 for none present, 3 for all present, 1 or 2 for the presence of any 1 or 2 risk factors. The primary end-point was composite with occurrence of dialysis or death before (D/D). We used classical statistics and both time-dependent Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival curve methods. Results The cumulative rate of D/D at 10 and 20 years post-onset was respectively 0 and 14% for ARR = 0 (23 patients); 10 and 23% for ARR = 1 (N = 19); 27 and 33% for ARR = 2 (N = 24); and 81 and 100% (before 20 y) in the 8 patients with ARR = 3 (P = 0.0007). Prediction at time of diagnosis (time zero) of 10y cumulative rate of D/D event was 0% for ARR = 0, 10% for ARR = 1, 33% for ARR = 2, and 100% by 8.5y for ARR = 3 (P = 0.0003) in this adequately treated cohort. Conclusion This study clearly validates the Absolute Renal Risk of Dialysis

  11. Advanced Targeted Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Arachchige, Mohan C M; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has been the major topic in drug formulation and delivery. As nanomedicine emerges to create nano scale therapeutics and diagnostics, it is still essential to embed targeting capability to these novel systems to make them useful. Here we discuss various targeting approaches for delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic nano materials in view of search for more universal methods to target diseased tissues. Many diseases are accompanied with hypoxia and acidosis. Coating nanoparticles with pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) increases efficiency of targeting acidic diseased tissues. It has been showing promising results to create future nanotheranostics for cancer and other diseases which are dominating in the present world. PMID:25615945

  12. Nuclear target development

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces thin foil targets needed for experiments performed at the ATLAS and Dynamitron accelerators. Targets are not only produced for the Physics Division but also for other divisions and occasionally for other laboratories and universities. In the past year, numerous targets were fabricated by vacuum evaporation either as self-supporting foils or on various substrates. Targets produced included Ag, Au, {sup 10,11}B, {sup 138}Ba, Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 155,160}Gd, {sup 76}Ge, In, LID, {sup 6}LiH, Melamine, Mg, {sup 142,150}Nd, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 206,208}Pb, {sup 194}Pt, {sup 28}Si, {sup 144,148}Sm, {sup 120,122,124}Sn, Ta, {sup 130}Te, ThF{sub 4}, {sup 46,50}Ti, TiH, U, UF{sub 4}, {sup 182}W and {sup 170}Yb. Polypropylene and aluminized polypropylene, along with metallized Mylar were produced for experiments at ATLAS. A number of targets of {sup 11}B of various thickness were made for the DEP 2-MeV Van de Graff accelerator. An increased output of foils fabricated using our small rolling mill included targets of Au, C, {sup 50}Cr, Cu, {sup 155,160}Gd, Mg, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 105,110}Pd. Sc, Ti, and {sup 64,66}Zn.

  13. Mitomycin-C-Induced TTP/HUS Treated Successfully with Rituximab: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yamin, Hanah; Smith, Hedy

    2013-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), thrombocytopenia, fever, renal failure, and neurologic symptoms comprise the cardinal features of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Etiologies can include medications, infections, cancers, or transplantation. We present a patient with a history of rectal cancer treated with mitomycin-C who developed MAHA, acute kidney injury, and thrombocytopenia 6 months after completing therapy and to did not respond the plasmapheresis or steroids. She was treated with four weekly doses of rituximab with full recovery. PMID:23762670

  14. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  15. Laboratory evaluation of a bleeding patient.

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, R O

    1989-01-01

    Most causes of abnormal bleeding can be determined from a complete blood count including platelet count and bleeding, prothrombin, activated partial thromboplastin, and thrombin times. Occasionally, further evaluation is necessary, such as tests of factor XIII function, fibrinolysis, and vascular integrity. Possible diagnoses include disseminated intravascular coagulation, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, vitamin K deficiency, von Willebrand's disease, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, acquired inhibitors of factor VIII, lupus anticoagulants, and coagulation disorders related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:2660407

  16. Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in systemic lupus erythematosus: an autopsy case report of a young woman.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, R; Fujimoto, S; Fujimoto, T; Nishino, T; Shiiki, H; Hashimoto, T; Nakamura, S; Dohi, K

    2000-10-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) is a severe variant of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) characterized by disseminated microangiopathy that results in multiorgan failure. CAPS mainly occurs in association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinically, CAPS mimics disseminated SLE vasculitis, intravascular coagulation (DIC), and particularly thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). We describe an autopsy case of young woman with CAPS in SLE, which is difficult to differentiate from TTP secondary to SLE.

  17. Hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Legionella pneumophila in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-C; Tan, C-K; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-04-01

    The Legionella species is an important cause of communityand hospital-acquired pneumonia. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila is rarely reported. We describe the first reported case of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by L. pneumophila from Taiwan in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who received steroid treatment. The patient was successfully treated with ceftazidime and clindamycin initially, followed by ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The blood isolate was further confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  18. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  19. Internal polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.R.; Coulter, K.; Gilman, R.; Holt, R.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.; Napolitano, J.; Potterveld, D.H.; Young, L. ); Mishnev, S.I.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Popov, S.G.; Rachek, I.A.; Temnykh, A.B.; Toporkov, D.K.; Tsentalovich, E.P.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B. . Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1989-01-01

    Internal polarized targets offer a number of advantages over external targets. After a brief review of the basic motivation and principles behind internal polarized targets, the technical aspects of the atomic storage cell will be discussed in particular. Sources of depolarization and the means by which their effects can be ameliorated will be described, especially depolarization by the intense magnetic fields arising from the circulating particle beam. The experience of the Argonne Novosibirsk collaboration with the use of a storage cell in a 2 GeV electron storage ring will be the focus of this technical discussion. 17 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Targeting drugs to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heller, Anne; Brockhoff, Gero; Goepferich, Achim

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria are of an increasing interest in pharmaceutical and medical research since it has been reported that dysfunction of these organelles contributes to several diseases with a great diversity of clinical appearance. By the fact that mitochondria are located inside the cell and, in turn, origins of mitochondrial diseases or targets of drugs are located inside mitochondria, a drug molecule has to cross several barriers. This is a severe drawback for the selective accumulation of drug molecules in mitochondria. Therefore, targeting strategies such as direct drug modification or encapsulation into nanocarriers have to be applied to achieve an accumulation of drug molecules in these organelles. In this review, it will be demonstrated how properties and dysfunctions of mitochondria are generating a need for the development of mitochondria specific therapies. Furthermore, intracellular targets of mitochondrial diseases, strategies to utilize mitochondrial specificities and targeting approaches will be discussed. Finally, techniques to investigate mitochondrial characteristics and functionality are reviewed.

  1. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... try exercising within the upper range of your target zone. (If just beginning an exercise program, consult your doctor first.) Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ... Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side ...

  2. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  3. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0382 TITLE: Antibodies Targeting EMT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brunhilde H Felding CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The... CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0382 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Vaughn Smider, Brunhilde Felding 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...14. ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies are drugs that can specifically bind targets present on tumor cells. The highly aggressive triple-negative subtype

  4. Targeting: The Joint Targeting Process and Procedures for Targeting Time-Critical Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    680-3153 COMM (757) 727-3153 Marine Corps Commanding General US Marine Corps Combat Development Command ATTN: C42 3300 Russell Road Quantico VA...Plans Division) - Boblingen, GE Marine Corps Combat Development Command, C42 - Quantico VA Marine Corps Combat Development Command, MSTP - Quantico VA...as the target reference point ( TRP ) concept, that are used to quickly identify a target off of a known geographic point. (a) Bullseye Design

  5. Targeting Organizations: Centralized or Decentralized

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    target group to �be responsible for all headquarters target analysis functions, provide headquarters data and information on selected targets...them.�42 Forming a joint target group could result in a significant economy of targeting personnel as well as an established procedure for the...analysis of strategic targets, thus reducing the confusion and lack of unity of purpose. In addition, a consolidated target group could ensure all

  6. Targeted α-Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a viable strategy for the delivery of therapeutic, particle emitting radionuclides specifically to tumor cells to either augment anti-tumor action of the native antibodies or to solely take advantage of their action as targeting vectors. Proper and rational selection of radionuclide and antibody combinations is critical to making radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a standard therapeutic modality due to the fundamental and significant differences in the emission of either α- and β-particles. The α-particle has a short path length (50-80 μm) that is characterized by high linear energy transfer (∼100 keV/μm). Actively targeted α-therapy potentially offers a more specific tumor cell killing action with less collateral damage to the surrounding normal tissues than ß-emitters. These properties make targeted α-therapy appropriate therapies to eliminate of minimal residual or micrometastatic disease. RIT using α-emitters such as 213Bi, 211At, 225Ac, and others has demonstrated significant activity in both in vitro and in vivo model systems. Limited numbers of clinical trials have progressed to demonstrate safety, feasibility, and therapeutic activity of targeted α-therapy, despite having to traverse complex obstacles. Further advances may require more potent isotopes, additional sources and more efficient means of isotope production. Refinements in chelation and/or radiolabeling chemistry combined with rational improvements of isotope delivery, targeting vectors, molecular targets, and identification of appropriate clinical applications remains as active areas of research. Ultimately, randomized trials comparing targeted α-therapy combined with integration into existing standard of care treatment regimens will determine the clinical utility of this modality. PMID:17992276

  7. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  8. The Sinuous Target

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the concept for a target material comprised of a multitude of interlaced wires of small dimension. This target material concept is primarily directed at high-power neutrino targets where the thermal shock is large due to small beam sizes and short durations; it also has applications to other high-power targets, particularly where the energy deposition is great or a high surface area is preferred. This approach ameliorates the problem of thermal shock by engineering a material with high strength on the micro-scale, but a very low modulus of elasticity on the meso-scale. The low modulus of elasticity is achieved by constructing the material of spring-like wire segments much smaller than the beam dimension. The intrinsic bends of the wires will allow them to absorb the strain of thermal shock with minimal stress. Furthermore, the interlaced nature of the wires provides containment of any segment that might become loose. We will discuss the progress on studies of analogue materials and fabrication techniques for sinuous target materials.

  9. Production Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.  The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.  The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.  The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).  The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.  This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  10. Burglar Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Michael; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both environment- and offender-level factors on residential burglary placement in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Combining cleared burglary data from all study regions in a single statistical model, we make statistical comparisons between environments. Results: In all three study regions, the likelihood an offender selects an area for burglary is positively influenced by proximity to their home, the proportion of easily accessible targets, and the total number of targets available. Furthermore, in two of the three study regions, juvenile offenders under the legal driving age are significantly more influenced by target proximity than adult offenders. Post hoc tests indicate the magnitudes of these impacts vary significantly between study regions. Conclusions: While burglary target selection strategies are consistent with opportunity-based explanations of offending, the impact of environmental context is significant. As such, the approach undertaken in combining observations from multiple study regions may aid criminology scholars in assessing the generalizability of observed findings across multiple environments. PMID:25866418

  11. Setting reference targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    Reference Targets are used to represent virtual quantities like the magnetic axis of a magnet or the definition of a coordinate system. To explain the function of reference targets in the sequence of the alignment process, this paper will first briefly discuss the geometry of the trajectory design space and of the surveying space, then continue with an overview of a typical alignment process. This is followed by a discussion on magnet fiducialization. While the magnetic measurement methods to determine the magnetic centerline are only listed (they will be discussed in detail in a subsequent talk), emphasis is given to the optical/mechanical methods and to the task of transferring the centerline position to reference targets.

  12. Phoenix Color Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  14. Penetration of concrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Cargile, J.D.; Tzou, R.D.Y.

    1993-08-01

    We developed penetration equations for ogive-nosed projectiles that penetrated concrete targets after normal impact. Our penetration equations predict axial force on the projectile nose, rigid-body motion, and final penetration depth. For target constitutive models, we conducted triaxial material experiments to confining pressures of 600 MPa and curve-fit these data with a linear pressure-volumetric strain relation and with a linear Mohr-Coulomb, shear strength-pressure relation. To verify our penetration equations, we conducted eleven penetration experiments with 0.90 kg, 26.9-mm-diameter, ogive-nosed projectiles into 1.37-m-diameter concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths between 32-40 MPa. Predictions from our penetration equation are compared with final penetration depth measurements for striking velocities between 280--800 m/s.

  15. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  16. Integrin Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Melissa; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that function as mechanosensors, adhesion molecules and signal transduction platforms in a multitude of biological processes. As such, integrins are central to the etiology and pathology of many disease states. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of integrins is of great interest for the treatment and prevention of disease. In the last two decades several integrin-targeted drugs have made their way into clinical use, many others are in clinical trials and still more are showing promise as they advance through preclinical development. Herein, this review examines and evaluates the various drugs and compounds targeting integrins and the disease states in which they are implicated. PMID:21547158

  17. Targeting the right journal.

    PubMed

    Piterman, L; McCall, L

    1999-07-01

    While research is scientific, publication is a mixture of science and political pragmatism. Targeting the right journal is influenced by the following factors: the discipline that best represents the subject; the purpose of the message; the audience who are to be recipients of the message; the realities of geographic parochialism; the desire of authors to maximise personal and professional opportunities. If the originally targeted journal rejects the article, authors should have alternative publication strategies that give them professional recognition without requiring them to compromise the message or their ethics.

  18. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Janse, Daniel M.

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  19. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  20. Correlation of TLR2 and TLR4 expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Th1- and Th2-type immune responses in children with henoch-schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Zhang, Qiu-Ye; Lin, Yi; Cheng, Na; Zhang, Shou-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We discussed the correlation of TLR2 (Toll-like receptor) and TLR4 expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to Th1- and Th2-type immune responses in children with Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP). The role of TLR2 and TLR4 in the pathogenesis of HSP was analyzed. Sixty-four HSP children treated at our hospital from October 2011 to November 2012 were enrolled and divided into NHSPN group (complicated by renal impairment, 36 cases) and HSPN group (not complicated by renal impairment, 28 cases). In the meantime, 30 normal children receiving physical examination at our hospital were recruited as controls. Peripheral blood T cell subgroups and TLR2 and TLR4 expressions in PBMCs were detected by using flow cytometry; relative expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA in PBMCs by real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, and plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-6 by ELISA method. Relative expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNAs in PBMCs and TLR2 and TLR4 protein expressions in children with HSP were significantly higher than those of the controls (P<0.01). The relative expression levels of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNAs in PBMCs and TLR2 and TLR4 protein expressions in HSPN group were obviously higher than those in NHSPN group (P<0.05; P<0.01; P<0.01; P<0.01); CD3(+) T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells in HSP group were significantly decreased, while CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells and CD3(+)HLADR(+) T activated cells were considerably increased (P<0.01); The plasma levels of IL-4 and IL-6 in HSP group were significantly higher than those of the normal controls (P<0.01, P<0.01); IFN-γ level in the former was much lower than in the control group (P<0.05); IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio in the former was also lower than that in the control (P<0.01); TLR2 and TLR4 expressions in HSP group showed significantly positive correlation with the plasma levels of IL-4 and IL-6 (P<0.01, P<0.05; P<0.01, P<0.01) and significantly negative correlation with IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio (P<0.01; P<0.01). TLR2 and TLR4

  1. Impaired activation of the fibrinolytic system in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura: beneficial effect of hydrocortisone plus Sigma-aminocaproic acid therapy on disappearance rate of cutaneous vasculitis and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Prandota, J; Pankow-Prandota, L; Kotecki, L

    2001-01-01

    Systemic vasculitis is a predominant clinical symptom in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP), and some studies suggested that decreased blood fibrinolytic activity, as well as blood platelets, is of importance in the development of cutaneous vasculitis. Although patients with HSP have normal blood coagulation, little is known about the fibrinolytic system. On the other hand, it is known that the focus of Sigma-aminocaproic acid (EACA) activity in vivo is probably the blood platelet-vessel wall interaction or a vascular component alone. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system as well as the effect of hydrocortisone (H) plus EACA therapy (Group I) on plasma antithrombin-III (AT-III), alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), alpha2-antiplasmin (alpha2-A), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M) activity, fibrinogen and plasminogen concentrations in plasma, euglobulin clot lysis time (ELT), and disappearance rate of cutaneous vasculitis in 14 children with HSP aged 7.6 +/- 3.1 (SD) years. Ten patients (8.6 +/- 2.5 years old) were treated with H alone (Group II), and 8 healthy, age-matched children served as controls. Plasma proteinase inhibitor activity was estimated with the kinetic method using Boehringer chromozyme tests before administration of H (9.2 +/- 3.3 mg/kg/d, i.v.) plus EACA (140 +/- 52 mg/kg/d, p.o.) for 5.93 +/- 2.05 days, and 24 hours after the last dose of EACA, as well as before and after treatment with H alone (8.25 +/- 1.74 mg/kg/24 h, i.v.) for 7.1 +/- 1.2 days. It was found that patients with HSP had the initial fibrinogen and plasminogen plasma concentrations significantly increased compared with the controls (Group I: 3.93 +/- 1.3 g/L and 124 +/- 38%; Group II: 4.24 +/- 0.89 g/L and 134 +/- 42% vs. 2.96 +/- 0.34 g/L, and 90 +/- 14%, respectively). Also, there was a marked decrease of the initial plasma alpha2-A activity in Group II compared with the controls (0.69 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.94 +/- 0.11 IU

  2. Target Chamber Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantillo, Anthony; Watson, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    A system has been developed to allow remote actuation of sensors in a high vacuum target chamber used with a particle accelerator. Typically, sensors of various types are placed into the target chamber at specific radial and angular positions relative to the beam line and target. The chamber is then evacuated and the experiments are performed for those sensor positions. Then, the chamber is opened, the sensors are repositioned to new angles or radii, and the process is repeated, with a separate pump-down cycle for each set of sensor positions. The new sensor positioning system allows scientists to pre-set the radii of up to a dozen sensors, and then remotely actuate their angular positions without breaking the vacuum of the target chamber. This reduces the time required to reposition sensors from 6 hours to 1 minute. The sensors are placed into one of two tracks that are separately actuated using vacuum-grade stepping motors. The positions of the sensors are verified using absolute optical rotary encoders, and the positions are accurate to 0.5 degrees. The positions of the sensors are electronically recorded and time-stamped after every change. User control is through a GUI using LabVIEW.

  3. Right on Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Target Community and Educational Services program, a salaried arrangement that allows students at McDaniel College to complete their studies while living with, and managing, clients with developmental disabilities. In what is believed to be the only arrangement of its kind in the U.S., full-time graduate students agree to…

  4. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Lower Your Sodium in 21 Days! Learn how you can lower your sodium and change your salty ways in 21 Days! Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  5. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  6. Target-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Target marketing is defining school enrollment goals and then developing a strategic plan to accomplish those goals through the use of specific communication vehicles and community focus. It is critical to reach the right audience, with the right message, at the right time, for the right cost. In this brief article, the author describes several…

  7. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  8. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  9. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  10. Microenvironmental Targets in Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ehnman, Monika; Larsson, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting all age groups. They are typically classified according to their resemblance to corresponding normal tissue. Their heterogeneous features, for example, in terms of disease-driving genetic aberrations and body location, complicate both disease classification and development of novel treatment regimens. Many years of failure of improved patient outcome in clinical trials has led to the conclusion that novel targeted therapies are likely needed in combination with current multimodality regimens. Sarcomas have not, in contrast to the common carcinomas, been the subject of larger systematic studies on how tumor behavior relates to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. There is consequently an urgent need for identifying suitable molecular targets, not only in tumor cells but also in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses preclinical and clinical data about potential molecular targets in sarcomas. Studies on targeted therapies involving the tumor microenvironment are prioritized. A greater understanding of the biological context is expected to facilitate more successful design of future clinical trials in sarcoma. PMID:26583076

  11. Targeted Therapy for Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Thomas; Moore, Herbert

    2016-12-05

    The research project entitled,” Targeted Therapy for Melanoma,” was focused on investigating the use of kidney protection measures to lower the non-specific kidney uptake of the radiolabeled Pb-DOTA-ReCCMSH peptide. Previous published work demonstrated that the kidney exhibited the highest non-target tissue uptake of the 212Pb/203Pb radiolabeled melanoma targeting peptide DOTA-ReCCMSH. The radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptide analog DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH, which binds the melanocortin-1 receptor over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells, has shown promise as a PRRT agent in pre-clinical studies. High tumor uptake of 212Pb labeled DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH resulted in tumor reduction or eradication in melanoma therapy studies. Of particular note was the 20-50% cure rate observed when melanoma mice were treated with alpha particle emitter 212Pb. However, as with most PRRT agents, high radiation doses to the kidneys where observed. To optimize tumor treatment efficacy and reduce nephrotoxicity, the tumor to kidney uptake ratio must be improved. Strategies to reduce kidney retention of the radiolabeled peptide, while not effecting tumor uptake and retention, can be broken into several categories including modification of the targeting peptide sequence and reducing proximal tubule reabsorption.

  12. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  13. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  14. Development of an underwater target classifier using target specific features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, M. H.; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2003-04-01

    In Sonar, the detection and estimation functions are performed by signal processors, which involve the computation of various statistics, for enhancing the overall performance of the system. This also takes into account all the undesirable propagation effects caused by the underwater channel. Underwater targets can be classified by using certain target specific features such as target strength, target dynamics, and the signatures of the noise generated by the targets. Rough identification of the targets is carried out with target strength values at known aspects while for precise identification, classification clues from target dynamics and target signatures are generated. Databases for the engine noise spectra of various underwater targets, propeller noises, machinery noises and cavitation noises, speed-noise characteristics, etc., have been developed. The signal energy estimated within a finite-time interval is compared with the earlier detection/estimation decisions, which are stored in the target data record and the relevant target data are updated. The algorithm for identification of target from the most matching signature patterns in the database will generate the classification clues, which will help in target identification. Salient highlights of an underwater target classifier using the above-discussed target specific features are presented in this paper.

  15. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD What If ... risk for high blood pressure and proteinuria during pregnancy. How is HSP diagnosed? A diagnosis of HSP is suspected when a person has ...

  16. Children: a soft target.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, M

    1998-02-08

    The inability to resist the ease with which they can be enticed and the absence of possible pregnancy complications make children easy targets for sexual assaults in India. According to the Indian crime statistics, 25% of the 10,000 reported rape cases in 1990 involve children under 16 years old. During a public hearing on minor rape conducted by the India Democratic Women's Association, several incidents of child rape came into the open as parents recalled the incidents before the jury and the public. Commenting on the common trends observed on the revealed cases, the district secretary, Sarasam Jayaraj, noted that the rapist was invariably a familiar person and that the defenseless daily wage earners were the common targets. Considering the seriousness of this problem, the issue has to be a priority in welfare and women's organizations in their national campaigns. This crime also demands an urgent response from the government and sociopolitical systems.

  17. Targeted adenoviral vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Joanne T.

    The practical implementation of gene therapy in the clinical setting mandates gene delivery vehicles, or vectors, capable of efficient gene delivery selectively to the target disease cells. The utility of adenoviral vectors for gene therapy is restricted by their dependence on the native adenoviral primary cellular receptor for cell entry. Therefore, a number of strategies have been developed to allow CAR-independent infection of specific cell types, including the use of bispecific conjugates and genetic modifications to the adenoviral capsid proteins, in particular the fibre protein. These targeted adenoviral vectors have demonstrated efficient gene transfer in vitro , correlating with a therapeutic benefit in preclinical animal models. Such vectors are predicted to possess enhanced efficacy in human clinical studies, although anatomical barriers to their use must be circumvented.

  18. Foucault on targets.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to gain an insight into the behavior of a large NHS trust, in its attempt to meet a 90 percent patient access target, in a week long national audit in March 2003. Why did individuals act in dramatically different ways to their norm over this period. The work of Michel Foucault is used to explore these issues. The discourses of power, knowledge, discipline and governmentality are identified as key foucaudian themes that offer an alternative interpretation of how individuals behave in their place of work. The importance of the historical context of discourse within the NHS cannot be underestimated in shaping the behavior of individuals and groups today. Power and knowledge permeate NHS organizations through disciplinary practices and dressage. Governmentality seeks to maintain the status quo through disciplinary processes such as national healthcare targets. The natural response of NHS organizations is therefore, to seek order and conformity rather than disorder and conflict.

  19. Exploring Terrorist Targeting Preferences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    consider assaults that create a level of fear disproportionate to the actual cost in human life. Repeated low-level attacks on the U.S. food supply ...strike targets that will disrupt consumer patterns and produce ripple effects. Assaults against the food chain or shopping malls could be instrumen...communications and supplies (Jehl, 2005) Tawfiq bin Attash (killed), deputy operational leader (“Bush Hails Capture of Top al Qaeda Operative,” 2003

  20. Targeting biodefense markets.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Gene Garrard

    2009-10-01

    The "World Vaccine Congress 2009" held in Washington D.C. (April 20-23, 2009) sponsored several sessions focused on the vaccine market targeting biodefense. On day one of the congress, a panel discussion outlined the federal progress in medical countermeasure preparedness that included emerging infections, influenza, and biodefense focuses. The second day, a session focused on the biodefense vaccine market with both government and industry members discussing the opportunities and challenges associated with the budding market.

  1. Leaders as Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-16

    military commanders, when they plan the use of mili- tary power in crisis resolution. Belligerents in modern history have generally balked at... political structures cul- tivated their view that “. . . by 1632 a collective understanding was emerging that the ‘appropriate and legitimate’ means...13 Moreover, “during peacetime, the targeted killing of any individual, whether a combatant or not, is generally considered an assassination and is

  2. CDTI target selection criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L.; Davis, C. M.; Jackson, C. B.; Mcclellan, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    A Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) is a cockpit instrument which provides information to the aircrew on the relative location of aircraft traffic in the vicinity of their aircraft (township). In addition, the CDTI may provide information to assist in navigation and in aircraft control. It is usually anticipated that the CDTI will be integrated with a horizontal situation indicator used for navigational purposes and/or with a weather radar display. In this study, several sets of aircraft traffic data are analyzed to determine statistics on the number of targets that will be displayed on a CDTI using various target selection criteria. Traffic data were obtained from an Atlanta Terminal Area Simulation and from radar tapes recorded at the Atlanta and Miami terminal areas. Results are given in the form of plots showing the average percentage of time (or probability) that an aircraft equipped with a CDTI would observe from 0 to 10 other aircraft on the display for range settings on the CDTI up to 30 n. mi. and using various target discrimination techniques.

  3. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  4. Implementing Target Value Design.

    PubMed

    Alves, Thais da C L; Lichtig, Will; Rybkowski, Zofia K

    2017-04-01

    An alternative to the traditional way of designing projects is the process of target value design (TVD), which takes different departure points to start the design process. The TVD process starts with the client defining an allowable cost that needs to be met by the design and construction teams. An expected cost in the TVD process is defined through multiple interactions between multiple stakeholders who define wishes and others who define ways of achieving these wishes. Finally, a target cost is defined based on the expected profit the design and construction teams are expecting to make. TVD follows a series of continuous improvement efforts aimed at reaching the desired goals for the project and its associated target value cost. The process takes advantage of rapid cycles of suggestions, analyses, and implementation that starts with the definition of value for the client. In the traditional design process, the goal is to identify user preferences and find solutions that meet the needs of the client's expressed preferences. In the lean design process, the goal is to educate users about their values and advocate for a better facility over the long run; this way owners can help contractors and designers to identify better solutions. This article aims to inform the healthcare community about tools and techniques commonly used during the TVD process and how they can be used to educate and support project participants in developing better solutions to meet their needs now as well as in the future.

  5. Bromodomains as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Susanne; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Knapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification with broad relevance to cellular signalling and disease biology. Enzymes that ‘write’ (histone acetyltransferases, HATs) and ‘erase’ (histone deacetylases, HDACs) acetylation sites are an area of extensive research in current drug development, but very few potent inhibitors that modulate the ‘reading process’ mediated by acetyl lysines have been described. The principal readers of ɛ-N-acetyl lysine (Kac) marks are bromodomains (BRDs), which are a diverse family of evolutionary conserved protein-interaction modules. The conserved BRD fold contains a deep, largely hydrophobic acetyl lysine binding site, which represents an attractive pocket for the development of small, pharmaceutically active molecules. Proteins that contain BRDs have been implicated in the development of a large variety of diseases. Recently, two highly potent and selective inhibitors that target BRDs of the BET (bromodomains and extra-terminal) family provided compelling data supporting targeting of these BRDs in inflammation and in an aggressive type of squamous cell carcinoma. It is likely that BRDs will emerge alongside HATs and HDACs as interesting targets for drug development for the large number of diseases that are caused by aberrant acetylation of lysine residues. PMID:21933453

  6. Follicular penetration and targeting.

    PubMed

    Lademann, Jürgen; Otberg, Nina; Jacobi, Ute; Hoffman, Robert M; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    In the past, intercellular penetration was assumed to be the most important penetration pathway of topically applied substances. First hints that follicular penetration needs to be taken into consideration were confirmed by recent investigations, presented during the workshop "Follicular Penetration and Targeting" at the 4th Intercontinental Meeting of Hair Research Societies", in Berlin 2004. Hair follicles represent an efficient reservoir for the penetration of topically applied substances with subsequent targeting of distinct cell populations, e.g., nestin-expressing follicular bulge cells. The volume of this reservoir can be determined by differential stripping technology. The follicular penetration processes are significantly influenced by the state of the follicular infundibulum; recent experimental investigations could demonstrate that it is essential to distinguish between open and closed hair follicles. Topically applied substances can only penetrate into open hair follicle. Knowledge of follicular penetration is of high clinical relevance for functional targeting of distinct follicular regions. Human hair follicles show a hair-cycle-dependent variation of the dense neuronal and vascular network. Moreover, during hair follicle cycling with initiation of anagen, newly formed vessels occur. Thus, the potential of nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells to form neurons and blood vessels was investigated.

  7. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  8. Method for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  9. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  10. Polarimetric laser radar target classification.

    PubMed

    Chun, Cornell S L; Sadjadi, Firooz A

    2005-07-15

    Imaging laser radar (ladar) systems have been developed for automatic target identification in surveillance systems. Ladar uses the range value at the target pixels to estimate the target's 3-D shape and identify the target. For targets in clutter and partially hidden targets, there are ambiguities in determining which pixels are on target that lead to uncertainties in determining the target's 3-D shape. An improvement is to use the polarization components of the reflected light. We describe the operation and preliminary evaluation of a polarization diverse imaging ladar system. Using a combination of intensity, range, and degree of polarization, we are better able to identify and distinguish the target from other objects of the same class.

  11. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  12. Pharmacologic agents targeting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Vakifahmetoglu-Norberg, Helin; Xia, Hong-guang; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic mechanism critically involved in regulating tissue homeostasis. The implication of autophagy in human diseases and the need to understand its regulatory mechanisms in mammalian cells have stimulated research efforts that led to the development of high-throughput screening protocols and small-molecule modulators that can activate or inhibit autophagy. Herein we review the current landscape in the development of screening technology as well as the molecules and pharmacologic agents targeting the regulatory mechanisms of autophagy. We also evaluate the potential therapeutic application of these compounds in different human pathologies. PMID:25654545

  13. Target Mass Corrections Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    W. Melnitchouk; F. Steffens

    2006-03-07

    We propose a new implementation of target mass corrections to nucleon structure functions which, unlike existing treatments, has the correct kinematic threshold behavior at finite Q{sup 2} in the x {yields} 1 limit. We illustrate the differences between the new approach and existing prescriptions by considering specific examples for the F{sub 2} and F{sub L} structure functions, and discuss the broader implications of our results, which call into question the notion of universal parton distribution at finite Q{sup 2}.

  14. Shuttle target measurements program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vann, F. M.; Carpenter, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A Space Shuttle vehicle will provide the U.S. Army's Ballistic Missile Defense Advanced Technology Center with a cost effective platform with which to acquire comprehensive exoatmospheric optical sensor data. The data requiring minimum interface with the Shuttle, will be collected through experiments, recorded, and then analyzed upon return. The system will occupy a portion of a commercial pallet and is suitable for early flight consideration. Several block diagrams illustrate the selected hardware configuration designed to provide information on trajectories and vehicle dynamics, signature data from scaled targets, contamination data of the Space Shuttle environment, and other background data. The proposed sensor is a Mosaic Optical Sensor Technology Testbed.

  15. Targeting the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Terence W; Ryan, Charles J

    2012-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR)-mediated signaling is critical to the growth and survival of prostate cancer. Although medical castration and antiandrogen therapy can decrease AR activity and lower PSA, castration resistance eventually develops. Recent work exploring the molecular structure and evolution of AR in response to hormonal therapies has revealed novel mechanisms of progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer and yielded new targets for drug development. This review focuses on understanding the mechanisms of persistent AR signaling in the castrate environment, and highlights new therapies either currently available or in clinical trials, including androgen synthesis inhibitors and novel direct AR inhibitors.

  16. Open Targets: a platform for therapeutic target identification and validation

    PubMed Central

    Koscielny, Gautier; An, Peter; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cham, Jennifer A.; Fumis, Luca; Gasparyan, Rippa; Hasan, Samiul; Karamanis, Nikiforos; Maguire, Michael; Papa, Eliseo; Pierleoni, Andrea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Platt, Theo; Rowland, Francis; Wankar, Priyanka; Bento, A. Patrícia; Burdett, Tony; Fabregat, Antonio; Forbes, Simon; Gaulton, Anna; Gonzalez, Cristina Yenyxe; Hermjakob, Henning; Hersey, Anne; Jupe, Steven; Kafkas, Şenay; Keays, Maria; Leroy, Catherine; Lopez, Francisco-Javier; Magarinos, Maria Paula; Malone, James; McEntyre, Johanna; Munoz-Pomer Fuentes, Alfonso; O'Donovan, Claire; Papatheodorou, Irene; Parkinson, Helen; Palka, Barbara; Paschall, Justin; Petryszak, Robert; Pratanwanich, Naruemon; Sarntivijal, Sirarat; Saunders, Gary; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Smith, Thomas; Sondka, Zbyslaw; Stegle, Oliver; Tang, Y. Amy; Turner, Edward; Vaughan, Brendan; Vrousgou, Olga; Watkins, Xavier; Martin, Maria-Jesus; Sanseau, Philippe; Vamathevan, Jessica; Birney, Ewan; Barrett, Jeffrey; Dunham, Ian

    2017-01-01

    We have designed and developed a data integration and visualization platform that provides evidence about the association of known and potential drug targets with diseases. The platform is designed to support identification and prioritization of biological targets for follow-up. Each drug target is linked to a disease using integrated genome-wide data from a broad range of data sources. The platform provides either a target-centric workflow to identify diseases that may be associated with a specific target, or a disease-centric workflow to identify targets that may be associated with a specific disease. Users can easily transition between these target- and disease-centric workflows. The Open Targets Validation Platform is accessible at https://www.targetvalidation.org. PMID:27899665

  17. Quantum state targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2004-11-01

    We introduce a primitive for quantum cryptography that we term 'state targeting'. We show that increasing one's probability of success in this task above a minimum amount implies an unavoidable increase in the probability of a particular kind of failure. This is analogous to the unavoidable disturbance to a quantum state that results from gaining information about its identity, and can be shown to be a purely quantum effect. We solve various optimization problems for state targeting that are useful for the security analysis of two-party cryptographic tasks implemented between remote antagonistic parties. Although we focus on weak coin flipping, the results are significant for other two-party protocols, such as strong coin flipping, partially binding and concealing bit commitment, and bit escrow. Furthermore, the results have significance not only for the traditional notion of security in cryptography, that of restricting a cheater's ability to bias the outcome of the protocol, but also for a different notion of security that arises only in the quantum context, that of cheat sensitivity. Finally, our analysis leads to some interesting secondary results, namely, a generalization of Uhlmann's theorem and an operational interpretation of the fidelity between two mixed states.

  18. TARGETED THERAPY IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the emergence of targeted therapies that have led to significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy and completed or ongoing clinical trials of novel agents for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer. Methods The literature was systematically reviewed, based on clinical experience and the use of technologies that improved our understanding of carcinogenesis. Results Genomics and model systems have enabled the validation of novel therapeutic strategies. Tumor molecular profiling has enabled the reclassification of cancer, and elucidated some mechanisms of disease progression or resistance to treatment, the heterogeneity between primary and metastatic tumors, and the dynamic changes of tumor molecular profiling over time. Despite the notable technologic advances, there is a gap between the plethora of preclinical data and the lack of effective therapies, which is attributed to suboptimal drug development for “driver” alterations of human cancer, the high cost of clinical trials and available drugs, and limited access of patients to clinical trials. Bioinformatic analyses of complex data to characterize tumor biology, function, and the dynamic tumor changes in time and space may improve cancer diagnosis. The application of discoveries in cancer biology in clinic holds the promise to improve the clinical outcomes in a large scale of patients with cancer. Increased harmonization between discoveries, policies, and practices will expedite the development of anticancer drugs and will accelerate the implementation of precision medicine. Conclusions Combinations of targeted, immunomodulating, antiangiogenic, or chemotherapeutic agents are in clinical development. Innovative adaptive study design is used to expedite effective drug development. PMID:26391154

  19. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  20. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  1. Target Housing Material Options

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert

    2016-02-11

    With gas cooling, heat transfer coefficients are low compared to water. The benefit of gas from a heat transfer point of view is that there is really no upper temperature limit for the coolant, as compared to water, which is limited ultimately by the critical point, and in practice the critical heat flux. In our case with parallel flow channels, water is limited to even lower operating limits by nucleate boiling. So gas can get as hot as the containment material will allow, but to get the density and heat transfer up to something reasonable, we must also increase pressure, thus increasing stress on the containment, namely the front and back faces. We are designing to ASME BPVC, which, for most materials allows a maximum stress of UTS/3. So we want the highest possible UTS. For reference, the front face stress in the 12 mm target at 300 psi was about 90 MPa. The inconel 718 allowable stress at 900°C is 1/3 of 517 or 172 MPa. So we are in a very safe place, but the uTS is dropping rapidly with temperature above 900°C. As we increase target diameter, the challenge will be to keep the stress down. We are probably looking at keeping the allowable at or above the present value, and at as high a temperature as possible.

  2. Targeted therapy in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Smalley, Keiran S M; Glass, L Frank; Trimble, James S; Sondak, Vernon K

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. We review the latest developments in our understanding of the role of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling in melanoma, and the development of inhibitors of this pathway. We also explore alternative mutations seen in melanoma, such as NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, and the drug development that is ongoing based on this biology. Strategies for the management of the vexing clinical problem of BRAF inhibitor resistance, primarily via combination therapy, are outlined. With the recent approval of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib for stage IV metastatic melanoma, use of this agent is expanding in the United States. Thus, management of the skin toxicities of this agent, such as squamous cell carcinomas, "acneiform" eruptions, hand-foot syndrome, and panniculitis, will be a growing problem facing dermatologists today. We discuss the toxicities of targeted agents in use for melanoma, in particular the dermatologic effects and the management of these skin toxicities.

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  4. Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  5. Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Rennich, Mark J; Crawford, Roy K; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Janney, Jim G

    2010-01-01

    A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

  6. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  7. The optimal target hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Ritz, E; Schwenger, V

    2000-07-01

    There is still controversy concerning the optimal target hemoglobin during treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Some evidence suggests that hemoglobin concentrations higher than currently recommended lead to improvements in cognitive function, physical performance, and rehabilitation. At least in patients with advanced cardiac disease, however, one controlled trial failed to show a benefit from normalizing predialysis hemoglobin concentrations. In contrast, preliminary observations in three additional studies (albeit with limited statistical power) failed to show adverse cardiovascular effects from normalization of hemoglobin, but definite benefit with respect to quality of life, physical performance, and cardiac geometry. These observations are consistent with the notion that hemoglobin concentrations higher than those recommended by the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative Anemia Work Group are beneficial, at least in patients without advanced cardiac disease.

  8. Targeting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Curiel, Tyler; Faget, Julien; Manuel, Manuarii; Caux, Christophe; Zou, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    Cancers express tumor-associated antigens that should elicit immune response to antagonize the tumor growth, but spontaneous immune rejection of established cancer is rare, suggesting an immunosuppressive environment hindering host antitumor immunity. Among the specific and active tumor-mediated mechanisms, CD4(+)CD25(high) T regulatory cells (Treg) are important mediators of active immune evasion in cancer. In this review, we will discuss Treg subpopulations and the mechanisms of their suppressive functions. Treg depletion improves endogenous antitumor immunity and the efficacy of active immunotherapy in animal models for cancer, suggesting that inhibiting Treg function could also improve the limited successes of human cancer immunotherapy. We will also discuss specific strategies for devising effective cancer immunotherapy targeting Treg.

  9. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  10. [Targeted therapies for melanoma].

    PubMed

    Leiter, U; Meier, F; Garbe, C

    2014-07-01

    Since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF oncogene and also stimulation of immune mediated antitumor response in melanoma, there has been remarkable progress in the development of targeted therapies for unresectable and metastatic melanoma. This article addresses the latest developments of BRAF/MEK/ERK pathway signaling. In addition, the development of drugs to attack alternative mutations in melanoma, such as NRAS and KIT is described. Strategies for the management of BRAF inhibitor resistance, such as with combination therapy, are outlined. Antitumor immune therapies with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab which acts by promoting T-cell activation or antibody blockade of programmed death-1 (PD-1) led to a long term response in metastatic melanoma. Results of latest clinical studies including the toxicity profile are described. Due to selective kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockade, the therapy of unresectable metastatic melanoma has greatly improved and long-term survival of patients with metastatic melanoma seems a real possibility.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Targeting Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.; Almeida, Ana S.; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria present two key roles on cellular functioning: (i) cell metabolism, being the main cellular source of energy and (ii) modulation of cell death, by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenously produced gaseoustransmitter, which presents several biological functions and is involved in maintaining cell homeostasis and cytoprotection. Herein, mitochondrion is approached as the main cellular target of carbon monoxide (CO). In this paper, two main perspectives concerning CO modulation of mitochondrial functioning are evaluated. First, the role of CO on cellular metabolism, in particular oxidative phosphorylation, is discussed, namely, on: cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial respiration, oxygen consumption, mitochondrial biogenesis, and general cellular energetic status. Second, the mitochondrial pathways involved in cell death inhibition by CO are assessed, in particular the control of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. PMID:22536507

  12. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  13. Polarized tritium target development

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Work began on the development of a completely sealed polarized tritium target for experiments at CEBAF. Because of the similarities between optical pumping of tritium and hydrogen, all prototype work is done with hydrogen. We constructed a test station for filling glassware with hydrogen, where we can dissociate molecular hydrogen and monitor the purity of the gas. A simple two-cell glass system was constructed, consisting of a region in which the molecular hydrogen is dissociated with an RF discharge and a region where the atoms can be optically pumped. So far, a clean discharge was obtained in the glassware. With this system, we plan to investigate ways to eliminate the discharge from the optical pumping region and test the quality of the discharge once the pumping cell is coated with drifilm.

  14. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  15. Saying goodbye to targets.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses India's shift from target-driven family planning services to reproductive health services in accordance with the recommendations of the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo. This Ministry of Health and Welfare policy marks a shift away from population control towards a Reproductive and Child Health program that will include the prevention of unwanted pregnancy; prenatal, delivery, and postpartum services; child survival; safe motherhood; and management of reproductive tract infections (RTIs) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The project will cost about $400 million, and some donor support is expected from the European Union and the World Bank. The official Manual on a Target Free Approach in the Family Welfare Programme describes the new approach and the operational changes and management of a client-oriented and demand-driven quality service program. It is expected that program changes will be gradual due to the population size of India and the status quo nature of program functions over a 50-year period. The program will be based on a decentralized primary health care (PHC) model that uses "bottom up" methods. In 1997, 21,000 PHCs conducted their own Needs Assessment Exercise. The PHC plan will cover all family welfare activities, materials, and supplies. Plans are being coordinated at the district, state, and country levels. Panchayats will eventually be involved. Each worker in the PHC system will have prescribed duties. State officials from the 32 states will undergo 2 days of training in RCH management. Each of the 466 administrators in districts will receive similar training that will be used for training in 5886 community development blocks. The integrated approach will require much more funding than applied for and greater priority in areas with the greatest need.

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation broadening its application beyond intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng-Que; Cao, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Shan; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Yan, Fang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-01-07

    Intestinal dysbiosis is now known to be a complication in a myriad of diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), as a microbiota-target therapy, is arguably very effective for curing Clostridium difficile infection and has good outcomes in other intestinal diseases. New insights have raised an interest in FMT for the management of extra-intestinal disorders associated with gut microbiota. This review shows that it is an exciting time in the burgeoning science of FMT application in previously unexpected areas, including metabolic diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders, and tumors. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on FMT in metabolic syndrome by infusing microbiota from lean donors or from self-collected feces, with the resultant findings showing that the lean donor feces group displayed increased insulin sensitivity, along with increased levels of butyrate-producing intestinal microbiota. Case reports of FMT have also shown favorable outcomes in Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, myoclonus dystonia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. FMT is a promising approach in the manipulation of the intestinal microbiota and has potential applications in a variety of extra-intestinal conditions associated with intestinal dysbiosis.

  17. Peptibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shimamoto, Grant; Gegg, Colin; Boone, Tom; Quéva, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Peptibodies or peptide-Fc fusions are an attractive alternative therapeutic format to monoclonal antibodies. They consist of biologically active peptides grafted onto an Fc domain. This approach retains certain desirable features of antibodies, notably an increased apparent affinity through the avidity conferred by the dimerization of two Fcs and a long plasma residency time. Peptibodies can be made in E. coli using recombinant technology. The manufacturing process involves fermentation and downstream processing, including refolding and multiple column chromatographic steps, that result in overall yields and quality suitable for commercial development. Romiplostim, marketed under the brand name Nplate®, is the first peptibody to be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and is indicated for the treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. AMG 386, a peptibody antagonist to angiopoietins 1 and 2, is being evaluated in Phase 3 clinical testing in combination with chemotherapy in women with ovarian cancer. AMG 819, a peptibody targeting nerve growth factor for pain has also progressed to clinical trials. These peptibodies illustrate the versatility of the modality. PMID:22820181

  18. Detection of Intracellular ADAMTS13, a Secreted Zinc-metalloprotease, via Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    S., Geetha; Allen, Courtni E.; Hunt, Ryan; Plum, Elizabeth; Garfield, Susan; Friedman, Scott L.; Soejima, Kenji; Sauna, Zuben E.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2009-01-01

    Background ADAMTS13 is a secreted metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand Factor multimers and maintains proper homeostasis. A severe deficiency in ADAMTS13 triggers a disorder known as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). At present, ADAMTS13 expression levels are determined by immunoblotting. Methods We established a flow cytometry methodology to detect intracellular ADAMTS13 in liver and kidney cells using a polyclonal antibody, BL154G, and several monoclonal antibodies previously used to detect ADAMTS13 by immunoblotting. Results were validated using confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and an activity assay (FRETS-VWF73). Results We show that labeling ADAMTS13 with specific antibodies and detection by flow cytometry yields results that are comparable to previously established methods for ADAMTS13 detection. Specifically, we compared the endogenous expression levels of ADAMTS13 in various liver cell lines using flow cytometry and obtained results that parallel immunoblot analysis. Knock-down of ADAMTS13 expression via targeted siRNA resulted in significantly reduced median signal, displaying the sensitivity of this detection method. A further analysis of reliability and specificity was achieved through plasmid DNA and transfection reagent dose response studies. Conclusions The flow cytometry method described here is useful in determining the expression of both endogenous and recombinant forms of intracellular ADAMTS13. Flow cytometry is a convenient, efficient and cost effective way to measure the expression levels of ADAMTS13. PMID:19526483

  19. Clinical Application of Partial Splenic Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong-Song; Hu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Partial splenic embolization (PSE) is one of the intra-arterial therapeutic approaches of diseases. With the development of interventional radiology, the applications of PSE in clinical practice are greatly extended, while various materials are developed for embolization use. Common indications of PSE include hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, splenic trauma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, splenic hemangioma, and liver cancer. It is also performed to exclude splenic artery aneurysms from the parent vessel lumen and prevent aneurysm rupture, to treat splenic artery steal syndrome and improve liver perfusion in liver transplant recipients, and to administer targeted treatment to areas of neoplastic disease in the splenic parenchyma. Indicators of the therapeutic effect evaluation of PSE comprise blood routine test, changes in hemodynamics and in splenic volume. Major complications of PSE include the pulmonary complications, severe infection, damages of renal and liver function, and portal vein thrombosis. The limitations of PSE exist mainly in the difficulties in selecting the arteries to embolize and in evaluating the embolized volume. PMID:25538966

  20. Role of Siglec-7 in Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Palle, Sabine; Anselme-Bertrand, Isabelle; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Chavarin, Patricia; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets participate in tissue repair and innate immune responses. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are well-characterized I-type lectins, which control apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the expression of Siglec-7 in human platelets isolated from healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Siglec-7 is primarily expressed on α granular membranes and colocalized with CD62P. Siglec-7 expression was increased upon platelet activation and correlated closely with CD62P expression. Cross-linking Siglec-7 with its ligand, ganglioside, resulted in platelet apoptosis without any significant effects on activation, aggregation, cell morphology by electron microscopy analysis or secretion. We show that ganglioside triggered four key pathways leading to apoptosis in human platelets: (i) mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) depolarization; (ii) elevated expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins with reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein; (iii) phosphatidylserine exposure and (iv), microparticle formation. Inhibition of NAPDH oxidase, PI3K, or PKC rescued platelets from apoptosis induced by Siglec-7 recruitment, suggesting that the platelet receptors P2Y1 and GPIIbIIIa are essential for ganglioside-induced platelet apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance The present work characterizes the role of Siglec-7 and platelet receptors in regulating apoptosis and death. Because some platelet pathology involves apoptosis (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and possibly storage lesions), Siglec-7 might be a molecular target for therapeutic intervention/prevention. PMID:25230315

  1. Fecal microbiota transplantation broadening its application beyond intestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng-Que; Cao, Hai-Long; Wang, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Shan; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Yan, Fang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis is now known to be a complication in a myriad of diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), as a microbiota-target therapy, is arguably very effective for curing Clostridium difficile infection and has good outcomes in other intestinal diseases. New insights have raised an interest in FMT for the management of extra-intestinal disorders associated with gut microbiota. This review shows that it is an exciting time in the burgeoning science of FMT application in previously unexpected areas, including metabolic diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders, and tumors. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on FMT in metabolic syndrome by infusing microbiota from lean donors or from self-collected feces, with the resultant findings showing that the lean donor feces group displayed increased insulin sensitivity, along with increased levels of butyrate-producing intestinal microbiota. Case reports of FMT have also shown favorable outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, myoclonus dystonia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. FMT is a promising approach in the manipulation of the intestinal microbiota and has potential applications in a variety of extra-intestinal conditions associated with intestinal dysbiosis. PMID:25574083

  2. Keeping von Willebrand Factor under Control: Alternatives for ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Tersteeg, Claudia; Fijnheer, Rob; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Groot, Philip G; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; de Maat, Steven; Maas, Coen

    2016-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is one of the most important proteins of the hemostatic system. Its multimeric state is essential for its natural function to guide platelets to sites of injury. ADAMTS13 is the key protease that regulates the multimeric state of VWF. Without ADAMTS13, VWF multimers can grow to pathologically large sizes. This is a risk factor for the life-threatening condition thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). In this condition, VWF-rich thrombi occlude the microvasculature of various tissues. Intriguingly, a complete ADAMTS13 deficiency does not cause continuous TTP, either in patients or genetically targeted mice. Instead, TTP occurs in episodes of disease, separated by extended periods of remission. This indicates that regulating factors beyond ADAMTS13 are likely involved in this pathologic cascade of events. This raises the question of what really happens when ADAMTS13 is (temporarily) unavailable. In this review, we explore the possible role of complementary mechanisms that are capable of modifying the thrombogenic potential of VWF.

  3. Acquired TTP: ADAMTS13 meets the immune system.

    PubMed

    Verbij, Fabian C; Fijnheer, Rob; Voorberg, Jan; Sorvillo, Nicoletta

    2014-11-01

    The majority of the patients affected by acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) develop autoantibodies directed towards ADAMTS13 that interfere with its von Willebrand Factor (VWF) processing activity. B cell responses have been shown to primarily target the spacer domain of ADAMTS13 thereby prohibiting the binding of ADAMTS13 to the VWF A2 domain. In this review we summarize recent knowledge gained on the immune recognition and processing of ADAMTS13 by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). HLA-DRB1*11 has been identified as a risk factor for acquired TTP. Analysis of MHC class II/peptide complexes of ADAMTS13 pulsed dendritic cells have shown that the CUB2 domain derived peptide FINVAPHAR is preferentially presented on HLA-DRB1*11. Based on these findings we propose a model for the initiation of the autoimmune reactivity against ADAMTS13 in previously healthy individuals. We hypothesize that mimicry between a pathogen-derived peptide and the CUB2 derived FINVAPHAR-peptide might contribute to the onset of acquired TTP.

  4. Unintended events following immunization with MMR: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Tom; Price, Deirdre; Demicheli, Vittorio; Bianco, Elvira

    2003-09-08

    Public debate over the safety of the trivalent measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the drop in vaccination rates in several countries persists despite its almost universal use and accepted effectiveness. We carried out a systematic review to assess the evidence of unintended effects (beneficial or harmful) associated with MMR and the applicability of systematic reviewing methods to the field of safety evaluation. Eligible studies were comparative prospective or retrospective on healthy individuals up to 15 years of age, carried out or published by 2003. We identified 120 articles satisfying our inclusion criteria and included 22. MMR is associated with a lower incidence of upper respiratory tract infections, a higher incidence of irritability, similar incidence of other adverse effects compared to placebo and is likely to be associated with benign thrombocytopenic purpura (TP), parotitis, joint and limb complaints and aseptic meningitis (mumps Urabe strain-containing MMR). Exposure to MMR is unlikely to be associated with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, autism or aseptic meningitis (mumps Jeryl-Lynn strain-containing MMR). The design and reporting of safety outcomes in MMR vaccine studies, both pre- and post-marketing, are largely inadequate. The evidence of adverse events following immunization with MMR cannot be separated from its role in preventing the target diseases.

  5. Design of ligand-targeted nanoparticles for enhanced cancer targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanick, Jared F.

    Ligand-targeted nanoparticles are increasingly used as drug delivery vehicles for cancer therapy, yet have not consistently produced successful clinical outcomes. Although these inconsistencies may arise from differences in disease models and target receptors, nanoparticle design parameters can significantly influence therapeutic efficacy. By employing a multifaceted synthetic strategy to prepare peptide-targeted nanoparticles with high purity, reproducibility, and precisely controlled stoichiometry of functionalities, this work evaluates the roles of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, ethylene glycol (EG) peptide-linker length, peptide hydrophilicity, peptide density, and nanoparticle size on tumor targeting in a systematic manner. These parameters were analyzed in multiple disease models by targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in breast cancer and very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) in multiple myeloma to demonstrate the widespread applicability of this approach. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the targeting peptide sequence and simultaneously optimizing the EG peptide-linker length, the in vitro cellular uptake of targeted liposomes was significantly enhanced. Specifically, including a short oligolysine chain adjacent to the targeting peptide sequence effectively increased cellular uptake ~80-fold using an EG6 peptide-linker compared to ~10-fold using an EG45 linker. In vivo, targeted liposomes prepared in a traditional manner lacking the oligolysine chain demonstrated similar biodistribution and tumor uptake to non-targeted liposomes. However, by including the oligolysine chain, targeted liposomes using an EG45 linker significantly improved tumor uptake ~8-fold over non-targeted liposomes, while the use of an EG6 linker decreased tumor accumulation and uptake, owing to differences in cellular uptake kinetics, clearance mechanisms, and binding site barrier effects. To further improve tumor targeting and enhance the selectivity of targeted

  6. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  7. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20,000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines.

  8. HTLV-1-targeted immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Youko

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a HTLV-1 induced T-cell malignancy with an extremely poor prognosis. There is a long latency period between HTLV-1 infection and the onset of ATL, which indicates the existence of multistep mechanisms of leukemogenesis in the infected cells. Tax, which is encoded by the HTLV-1 pX region, plays a crucial role in HTLV-1 leukemogenesis and is a major target of CTL. We developed an anti-ATL therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells that is pulsed with Tax peptides (Tax-DC). The vaccination protocol was completed with three injections at a 2-week interval, within one month. Good quality of life and long-term treatment-free survival were observed for more than 3 years in two of the three patients enrolled in the pilot study. Furthermore, the proviral load remained mostly around the carrier level, with minor fluctuation, after vaccination. Tax-specific proliferative CTL responses were observed in all cases and sporadically augmented responses were also subsequently detected. The Tax-DC vaccine might be a well-tolerated and long-lasting maintenance therapy that is acceptable even for elderly patients. Based on the encouraging results, we are now conducting a clinical trial of Tax-DC vaccine combined with anti-CCR4 antibody to enhance the efficacy of the vaccine as next-generation immunotherapy.

  9. Using the Nova target chamber for high-yield targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-09-28

    The existing 2.2-m-radius Nova aluminum target chamber, coated and lined with boron-seeded carbon shields, is proposed for use with 1000-MJ-yield targets in the next laser facility. The laser beam and diagnostic holes in the target chamber are left open and the desired 10/sup -2/ Torr vacuum is maintained both inside and outside the target chamber; a larger target chamber room is the vacuum barrier to the atmosphere. The hole area available is three times that necessary to maintain a maximum fluence below 12 J/cm/sup 2/ on optics placed at a radius of 10 m. Maximum stress in the target chamber wall is 73 MPa, which complies with the intent of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code. However, shock waves passing through the inner carbon shield could cause it to comminute. We propose tests and analyses to ensure that the inner carbon shield survives the environment. 13 refs.

  10. Cooperative Target-capturing with Incomplete Target Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    performance of the proposed strategy is verified through simulations. Keywords Formation control · Sliding mode control · Consensus M. Kothari Research...to derive a target-centric formation controller . We use the sliding mode control to handle uncertainty of a target motion and show that the...the problem, and in Section 3, we derive the target-centric formation controller using consensus and sliding mode control . We discuss numerical results

  11. Target repurposing for neglected diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pollastri, Michael P; Campbell, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    Infectious diseases are an enormous burden to global health and since drug discovery is costly, those infectious diseases that affect the developing world are often not pursued by commercial drug-discovery efforts. Therefore, pragmatic means by which new therapeutics can be discovered are needed. One such approach is target repurposing, where pathogen targets are matched with homologous human targets that have been pursued for drug discovery for other indications. In many cases, the medicinal chemistry, structural biology and biochemistry knowledge around these human targets can be directly repurposed to launch and accelerate new drug-discovery efforts against the pathogen targets. This article describes the overarching strategy of target repurposing as a tool for initiating and prosecuting neglected disease drug-discovery programs, highlighting this approach with three case studies. PMID:21859304

  12. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  13. Identifying Targets from Filtering Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    Introduction Considering a radar (or sonar) target as more than a simple point scatterer brings up the possibility of identifying the target based on the...2000. [8] M. Vespe, C. J. Baker, and H. D. Griffiths , "Automatic target regognition using multi-diversity radar," Radar, Sonar \\& Navigation, IET, vol...A. Taflove and S. C. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics : The Finite Difference Time Domain Method. Norwood, MA: Artech House, 2005.

  14. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  15. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  16. Targeted Nanotechnology for Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Randall; Bauer, Lisa; Hoimes, Christopher; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle imaging agents provide many benefits and new opportunities to facilitate accurate diagnosis of cancer and significantly impact patient outcome. Due to the highly engineerable nature of nanotechnology, targeted nanoparticles exhibit significant advantages including increased contrast sensitivity, binding avidity and targeting specificity. Considering the various nanoparticle designs and their adjustable ability to target a specific site and generate detectable signals, nanoparticles can be optimally designed in terms of biophysical interactions (i.e., intravascular and interstitial transport) and biochemical interactions (i.e., targeting avidity towards cancer-related biomarkers) for site-specific detection of very distinct microenvironments. This review seeks to illustrate that the design of a nanoparticle dictates its in vivo journey and targeting of hard-to-reach cancer sites, facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and interrogation of the most aggressive forms of cancer. We will report various targeted nanoparticles for cancer imaging using X-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging and optical imaging. Finally, to realize the full potential of targeted nanotechnology for cancer imaging, we will describe the challenges and opportunities for the clinical translation and widespread adaptation of targeted nanoparticles imaging agents. PMID:25116445

  17. Guidance system for laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Porter, Gary D.; Bogdanoff, Anatoly

    1978-01-01

    A system for guiding charged laser targets to a predetermined focal spot of a laser along generally arbitrary, and especially horizontal, directions which comprises a series of electrostatic sensors which provide inputs to a computer for real time calculation of position, velocity, and direction of the target along an initial injection trajectory, and a set of electrostatic deflection means, energized according to a calculated output of said computer, to change the target trajectory to intercept the focal spot of the laser which is triggered so as to illuminate the target of the focal spot.

  18. Data Mining for Target Marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Nissan; Zahavi, Jacob

    Targeting is the core of marketing management. It is concerned with offering the right product/service to the customer at the right time and using the proper channel. In this chapter we discuss how Data Mining modeling and analysis can support targeting applications. We focus on three types of targeting models: continuous-choice models, discrete-choice models and in-market timing models, discussing alternative modeling for each application and decision making. We also discuss a range of pitfalls that one needs to be aware of in implementing a data mining solution for a targeting problem.

  19. Target engagement in lead generation.

    PubMed

    Durham, Timothy B; Blanco, Maria-Jesus

    2015-03-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is currently facing multiple challenges, in particular the low number of new drug approvals in spite of the high level of R&D investment. In order to improve target selection and assess properly the clinical hypothesis, it is important to start building an integrated drug discovery approach during Lead Generation. This should include special emphasis on evaluating target engagement in the target tissue and linking preclinical to clinical readouts. In this review, we would like to illustrate several strategies and technologies for assessing target engagement and the value of its application to medicinal chemistry efforts.

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  1. Spinning targets for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, D.E.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Several techniques for spinning the ICF targets up prior to or in the course of their compression are suggested. Interference of the rotational shear flow with Rayleigh-Taylor instability is briefly discussed and possible consequences for the target performance are pointed out.

  2. Manpower Targets and Educational Investments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritzen, Jo M.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the use of quadratic programming to calculate the optimal distribution of educational investments required to closely approach manpower targets when financial resources are insufficient to meet manpower targets completely. Demonstrates use of the quadratic programming approach by applying it to the training of supervisory technicians in…

  3. DSTO Landmine Detection Test Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    countermeasures program. The targets were developed to simulate specific landmines or to emulate classes of landmines by providing signatures equivalent to...details the landmine detection test targets developed by, and available at DSTO Edinburgh, Weapons System Division. Also described are the equivalent ...of TM62P3-S surrogate landmine (Part B)......................... 31 Figure 23: DSTO (NVESD equivalent ) simulant landmine inserts

  4. STIS CCD Target Acquisition Workout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Ron

    1997-07-01

    Following update of STIS flight acquisitions and acq/peak software, redemonstrate the capability to perform point source and peakup acquisitions of a bright target. Then demonstrate ability of the STIS FSW to locate targets more typical of those in the science program.

  5. Targeted marketing and public health.

    PubMed

    Grier, Sonya A; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2010-01-01

    Targeted marketing techniques, which identify consumers who share common needs or characteristics and position products or services to appeal to and reach these consumers, are now the core of all marketing and facilitate its effectiveness. However, targeted marketing, particularly of products with proven or potential adverse effects (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, entertainment violence, or unhealthful foods) to consumer segments defined as vulnerable raises complex concerns for public health. It is critical that practitioners, academics, and policy makers in marketing, public health, and other fields recognize and understand targeted marketing as a specific contextual influence on the health of children and adolescents and, for different reasons, ethnic minority populations and other populations who may benefit from public health protections. For beneficial products, such understanding can foster more socially productive targeting. For potentially harmful products, understanding the nature and scope of targeted marketing influences will support identification and implementation of corrective policies.

  6. Targeting ion transport in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, E; Gillies, R J

    2014-03-19

    The metabolism of cancer cells differs substantially from normal cells, including ion transport. Although this phenomenon has been long recognized, ion transporters have not been viewed as suitable therapeutic targets. However, the acidic pH values present in tumours which are well outside of normal limits are now becoming recognized as an important therapeutic target. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is fundamental to tumour pH regulation. CAIX is commonly expressed in cancer, but lowly expressed in normal tissues and that presents an attractive target. Here, we discuss the possibilities of exploiting the acidic, hypoxic tumour environment as possible target for therapy. Additionally, clinical experience with CAIX targeting in cancer patients is discussed.

  7. Aided targeting system simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaio, Joe; Becker, Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Simulation research was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility on the effectiveness and ease of use of three targeting systems. A manual system required the aviator to scan a target array area with a simulated second generation forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, locate and categorize targets, and construct a target hand-off list. The interface between the aviator and the system was like that of an advanced scout helicopter (manual mode). Two aided systems detected and categorized targets automatically. One system used only the FLIR sensor and the second used FLIR fused with Longbow radar. The interface for both was like that of an advanced scout helicopter aided mode. Exposure time while performing the task was reduced substantially with the aided systems, with no loss of target hand-off list accuracy. The fused sensor system showed lower time to construct the target hand-off list and a slightly lower false alarm rate than the other systems. A number of issues regarding system sensitivity and criterion, and operator interface design are discussed.

  8. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  9. Ocular toxicity of targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Daniel J; Velazquez-Martin, Juan P; Simpson, Rand; Siu, Lillian L; Bedard, Philippe L

    2012-09-10

    Molecularly targeted agents are commonly used in oncology practice, and many new targeted agents are currently being tested in clinical trials. Although these agents are thought to be more specific and less toxic then traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, they are associated with a variety of toxicities, including ocular toxicity. Many of the molecules targeted by anticancer agents are also expressed in ocular tissues. We reviewed the literature for described ocular toxicities associated with both approved and investigational molecularly targeted agents. Ocular toxicity has been described with numerous approved targeted agents and also seems to be associated with several classes of agents currently being tested in early-phase clinical trials. We discuss the proposed pathogenesis, monitoring guidelines, and management recommendations. It is important for oncologists to be aware of the potential for ocular toxicity, with prompt recognition of symptoms that require referral to an ophthalmologist. Ongoing collaboration between oncologists and ocular disease specialists is critical as the use of molecularly targeted agents continues to expand and novel targeted drug combinations are developed.

  10. Backlighting prospects for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.; Matthews, D.; Ahlstrom, H.; Attwood, D.; Price, R.; Coleman, L.; Manes, K.; Slivinsky, V.

    1981-01-01

    High energy x-ray backlighters are necessary to diagnose the implosion symmetry and stability of intermediate and high density targets. Synchronization requirements between the target irradiating pulse and the radiograph place severe constraints on the type of x-ray sources which can be used and favors laser irradiated backlighters. Data gathered on line emitters as a function of laser pulselength, wavelength and intensity in the 5 to 10 keV region are used to determine which diagnostic instruments will be feasible for ICF target experiments, and the requirements for backlighter irradiation.

  11. Versatile cold atom target apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Hofmann, Christoph S.; Litsch, Dominic; DePaola, Brett D.; Weidemueller, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    We report on a compact and transportable apparatus that consists of a cold atomic target at the center of a high resolution recoil ion momentum spectrometer. Cold rubidium atoms serve as a target which can be operated in three different modes: in continuous mode, consisting of a cold atom beam generated by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, in normal mode in which the atoms from the beam are trapped in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT), and in high density mode in which the 3D MOT is operated in dark spontaneous optical trap configuration. The targets are characterized using photoionization.

  12. Targeting ubiquitination for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John Kenneth; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Sun, Shao-Cong; Zhang, Shuxing

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination, the structured degradation and turnover of cellular proteins, is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). Most proteins that are critical for cellular regulations and functions are targets of the process. Ubiquitination is comprised of a sequence of three enzymatic steps, and aberrations in the pathway can lead to tumor development and progression as observed in many cancer types. Recent evidence indicates that targeting the UPS is effective for certain cancer treatment, but many more potential targets might have been previously overlooked. In this review, we will discuss the current state of small molecules that target various elements of ubiquitination. Special attention will be given to novel inhibitors of E3 ubiquitin ligases, especially those in the SCF family. PMID:26630263

  13. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-08-10

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere.

  14. Targeting the Teaching of Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Charles W.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that six target areas in the teaching of theory and musicianship need more attention and emphasis: listening, analysis, music reading, creativity, music writing, and keyboard harmony. Discusses content and sequence in music theory and presents two sample applications. (SJL)

  15. Strategically targeting MYC in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    MYC is a major driver of cancer cell growth and mediates a transcriptional program spanning cell growth, the cell cycle, metabolism, and cell survival. Many efforts have been made to deliberately target MYC for cancer therapy. A variety of compounds have been generated to inhibit MYC function or stability, either directly or indirectly. The most direct inhibitors target the interaction between MYC and MAX, which is required for DNA binding. Unfortunately, these compounds do not have the desired pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for in vivo application. Recent studies report the indirect inhibition of MYC through the development of two compounds, JQ1 and THZ1, which target factors involved in unique stages of transcription. These compounds appear to have significant therapeutic value for cancers with high levels of MYC, although some effects are MYC-independent. These approaches serve as a foundation for developing novel compounds to pharmacologically target MYC-driven cancers. PMID:27081479

  16. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  17. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  18. Space Telescope moving target tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strikwerda, T. E.; Strohbehn, K.; Fowler, K. R.; Skillman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper formulates a Space Telescope (ST) moving target tracking algorithm and evaluates a practical implementation. The algorithm is shown to be satisfactory for tracking such moving objects as the moons of Mars.

  19. [Molecular targets in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Borner, M M

    2006-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in Switzerland. The nihilism that dominated the treatment of these patients for decades has been replaced by a measure of enthusiasm, given recent therapeutic advances. New anticancer drugs such as irinotecan and oxaliplatin have changed the standard chemotherapy treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. However, the real hype has come from molecular targeted therapy. Identification of cellular processes characteristic of colon cancer has permitted therapeutic targeting with favorable therapeutic index. Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor in the clinic has provided proof of principle that interruption of signal transduction cascades in patients has therapeutic potential. Angiogenesis, especially the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway, has been proven to be another highly successful molecular target. In this article, we will review molecular targets, which are under active clinical investigation in colon cancer.

  20. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  1. Cavitation in a Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  2. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  3. Novel Aptamers to Target Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-1-0154 TITLE: Novel Aptamers To Target Metastasis...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Aptamers to Target Metastasis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER . 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0154 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...problems. Aptamers , which have proven clinical efficacy for non-neoplastic disease and are generally more specific and stable than antibodies, may have

  4. Nanotechnology of emerging targeting systems

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the design and testing of complex nanoscale payload-carrying systems (i.e. systems with payloads that do not exceed 100 nm in size) are the focus of this brief review. Emerging systems include targeted single-walled nanotubes, viral capsids, dendrimers, gold nanoparticles, milled boron carbide nanoparticles, and protein nucleic acid assemblies. Significant advances are emerging with each of these bionanotechnological approaches to cellular targeting. PMID:21687833

  5. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  6. Target identification using laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, J.; Baker, M.; Barrett, J.; Ellis, B.N.; Kacerek, J.; Yee, J.

    1994-12-31

    Solid state lasers have been utilized for many varied applications. This application describes how the high peak power, short pulse capability of an alexandrite laser, in combination with a generation 3 image intensified receiver can solve the problem of very long range target identification. Applications have relevance to both commercial and military uses where day/night all weather imaging is required. Wavelength diversity provides single and multispectral system capability, therefore allowing discrimination of targets against varied backgrounds.

  7. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  8. The JLab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C. D.

    2009-08-04

    A polarized, frozen spin target has been designed and constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol are polarized via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to approximately 90% using microwaves and an external, 5 T solenoid magnet. The target sample is then cooled to approximately 30 mK while an internal 0.56 T superconducting magnet is used to maintain the polarization. Relaxation times in excess of 3500 hours have been observed.

  9. Targeting Microtubules for Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Charafeddine, Rabab A.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Sharp, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fast and seamless healing is essential for both deep and chronic wounds to restore the skin and protect the body from harmful pathogens. Thus, finding new targets that can both expedite and enhance the repair process without altering the upstream signaling milieu and causing serious side effects can improve the way we treat wounds. Since cell migration is key during the different stages of wound healing, it presents an ideal process and intracellular structural machineries to target. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is rising as an important structural and functional regulator of wound healing. MTs have been reported to play different roles in the migration of the various cell types involved in wound healing. Specific microtubule regulatory proteins (MRPs) can be targeted to alter a section or subtype of the MT cytoskeleton and boost or hinder cell motility. However, inhibiting intracellular components can be challenging in vivo, especially using unstable molecules, such as small interfering RNA. Nanoparticles can be used to protect these unstable molecules and topically deliver them to the wound. Utilizing this approach, we recently showed that fidgetin-like 2, an uncharacterized MRP, can be targeted to enhance cell migration and wound healing. Future Directions: To harness the full potential of the current MRP therapeutic targets, studies should test them with different delivery platforms, dosages, and skin models. Screening for new MT effectors that boost cell migration in vivo would also help find new targets for skin repair. PMID:27785378

  10. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-06-25

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro.

  11. Radiation target analysis of RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Benstein, S L; Kempner, E

    1996-01-01

    Ribozymes are polynucleotide molecules with intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. Large RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. Frozen RNAs were irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. The amount of intact RNA remaining was determined from the same irradiated samples by scanning the RNA band following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 kDa and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity versus structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. We concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule. Radiation target analysis should be a useful technique for evaluating local RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions in vitro. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8692828

  12. Antibiotics that target protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa S; Xie, Yun; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    The key role of the bacterial ribosome makes it an important target for antibacterial agents. Indeed, a large number of clinically useful antibiotics target this complex translational ribonucleoprotein machinery. The majority of these compounds, mostly of natural origin, bind to one of the three key ribosomal sites: the decoding (or A-site) on the 30S, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the 50S, and the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S. Antibiotics that bind the A-site, such as the aminoglycosides, interfere with codon recognition and translocation. Peptide bond formation is inhibited when small molecules like oxazolidinones bind at the PTC. Finally, macrolides tend to block the growth of the amino acid chain at the peptide exit tunnel. In this article, the major classes of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome are discussed and classified according to their respective target. Notably, most antibiotics solely interact with the RNA components of the bacterial ribosome. The surge seen in the appearance of resistant bacteria has not been met by a parallel development of effective and broad-spectrum new antibiotics, as evident by the introduction of only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and lipopeptides, in the past decades. Nevertheless, this significant health threat has revitalized the search for new antibacterial agents and novel targets. High resolution structural data of many ribosome-bound antibiotics provide unprecedented insight into their molecular contacts and mode of action and inspire the design and synthesis of new candidate drugs that target this fascinating molecular machine.

  13. Unification of automatic target tracking and automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachter, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    The subject being addressed is how an automatic target tracker (ATT) and an automatic target recognizer (ATR) can be fused together so tightly and so well that their distinctiveness becomes lost in the merger. This has historically not been the case outside of biology and a few academic papers. The biological model of ATT∪ATR arises from dynamic patterns of activity distributed across many neural circuits and structures (including retina). The information that the brain receives from the eyes is "old news" at the time that it receives it. The eyes and brain forecast a tracked object's future position, rather than relying on received retinal position. Anticipation of the next moment - building up a consistent perception - is accomplished under difficult conditions: motion (eyes, head, body, scene background, target) and processing limitations (neural noise, delays, eye jitter, distractions). Not only does the human vision system surmount these problems, but it has innate mechanisms to exploit motion in support of target detection and classification. Biological vision doesn't normally operate on snapshots. Feature extraction, detection and recognition are spatiotemporal. When vision is viewed as a spatiotemporal process, target detection, recognition, tracking, event detection and activity recognition, do not seem as distinct as they are in current ATT and ATR designs. They appear as similar mechanism taking place at varying time scales. A framework is provided for unifying ATT and ATR.

  14. Chemical Structural Novelty: On-Targets and Off-Targets

    PubMed Central

    Yera, Emmanuel R.; Cleves, Ann. E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Drug structures may be quantitatively compared based on 2D topological structural considerations and based on 3D characteristics directly related to binding. A framework for combining multiple similarity computations is presented along with its systematic application to 358 drugs with overlapping pharmacology. Given a new molecule along with a set of molecules sharing some biological effect, a single score based on comparison to the known set is produced, reflecting either 2D similarity, 3D similarity, or their combination. For prediction of primary targets, the benefit of 3D over 2D was relatively small, but for prediction of off-targets, the added benefit was large. In addition to assessing prediction, the relationship between chemical similarity and pharmacological novelty was studied. Drug pairs that shared high 3D similarity but low 2D similarity (i.e. a novel scaffold) were shown to be much more likely to exhibit pharmacologically relevant differences in terms of specific protein target modulation. PMID:21916467

  15. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    DOEpatents

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  16. Targeted nanosystems: Advances in targeted dendrimers for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers possess discrete highly compact nanostructures constituted of successive branched layers. Soon after the inception of dendrimers, recognition of their tunable structures and biologically favorable properties provoked a great enthusiasm in delving deeply into the utility of dendrimers for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. One of the most important nanotechnology applications is the development of nanomedicines for targeted cancer therapies. Tremendous success in targeted therapies has been achieved with the use of dendrimer-based nanomedicines. This article provides a concise review on latest advances in the utility of dendrimers in immunotherapies and hormone therapies. PMID:26706410

  17. Targeted alpha therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Elgqvist, Jorgen

    2011-07-01

    The possibility of pinpointing biological targets, and thereby potentially targeting and eradicating small tumors or even single cancer cells, is a tantalizing concept that has been discussed since the magic-bullet concept was first presented by Paul Erlich in the beginning of the 20th century in connection with his work on tissue staining for histological examinations and the work by Kohler and Milstein on antibody production published in 1975. This concept now seems feasible through the use of highly specific targeting constructs, chemical labeling of radioactive substances to these targeting constructs that results in high specific activities, radioimmunocomplexes with good stability even after injection, and the use of radionuclides emitting alpha( α)-particles having exceedingly high ionizing density and, therefore, a high probability of killing cells along its track in tissue. The short range of the emitted α-particles makes them even more interesting by minimizing unwanted irradiation of normal tissue surrounding the targeted cancer cells of interest, assuming high specificity of the targeting construct and good stability of the chemical bonds between the targeting construct and the α-particle emitter. Targeted Alpha Therapy (TAT), in which an α-particle emitting radionuclide is specifically directed to the biological target, is gaining more attention as new targets, targeting constructs, chemical labeling techniques, and α-particle emitters are, respectively, identified, constructed, developed, and made available. Results and improvements are now being published at an increasing rate and the number of conceivable applications is expanding, especially in the field of cancer treatment. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to provide an overview of the overall progress in the research field of TAT on a regular basis. However, problems such as limited or delayed diffusion of the α-radioimmunocomplex and inhomogeneous activity distributions in the

  18. Vaccine targets against Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dabin; Pichichero, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Moraxella catarrhalis is a prominent pathogen that causes acute otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults, resulting in a significant socioeconomic burden on healthcare systems globally. No vaccine is currently available for M. catarrhalis. Promising M. catarrhalis target antigens have been characterized in animal models and should soon enter human clinical trials. Areas covered This review discusses the detailed features and research status of current candidate target antigens for an M. catarrhalis vaccine. The approaches for assessing M. catarrhalis vaccine efficacy are also discussed. Expert opinion Targeting the key molecules contributing to serum resistance may be a viable strategy to identify effective vaccine targets among M. catarrhalis antigens. Elucidating the role and mechanisms of the serum and mucosal immune responses to M. catarrhalis is significant for vaccine target selection, testing and evaluation. Developing animal models closely simulating M. catarrhalis-caused human respiratory diseases is of great benefit in better understanding pathogenesis and evaluating vaccine efficacy. Carrying out clinical trials will be a landmark in the progress of M. catarrhalis vaccine research. Combined multicomponent vaccines will be a focus of future M. catarrhalis vaccine studies. PMID:26565427

  19. Neuroinflammation: a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jeffrey M; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2005-10-01

    The increased appreciation of the importance of glial cell-propagated inflammation (termed 'neuroinflammation') in the progression of pathophysiology for diverse neurodegenerative diseases, has heightened interest in the rapid discovery of neuroinflammation-targeted therapeutics. Efforts include searches among existing drugs approved for other uses, as well as development of novel synthetic compounds that selectively downregulate neuroinflammatory responses. The use of existing drugs to target neuroinflammation has largely met with failure due to lack of efficacy or untoward side effects. However, the de novo development of new classes of therapeutics based on targeting selective aspects of glia activation pathways and glia-mediated pathophysiologies, versus targeting pathways of quantitative importance in non-CNS inflammatory responses, is yielding promising results in preclinical animal models. The authors briefly review selected clinical and preclinical data that reflect the prevailing approaches targeting neuroinflammation as a pathophysiological process contributing to onset or progression of neurodegenerative diseases. The authors conclude with opinions based on recent experimental proofs of concept using preclinical animal models of pathophysiology. The focus is on Alzheimer's disease, but the concepts are transferrable to other neurodegenerative disorders with an inflammatory component.

  20. Targeted protein degradation by PROTACs.

    PubMed

    Neklesa, Taavi K; Winkler, James D; Crews, Craig M

    2017-02-14

    Targeted protein degradation using the PROTAC technology is emerging as a novel therapeutic method to address diseases driven by the aberrant expression of a disease-causing protein. PROTAC molecules are bifunctional small molecules that simultaneously bind a target protein and an E3-ubiquitin ligase, thus causing ubiquitination and degradation of the target protein by the proteasome. Like small molecules, PROTAC molecules possess good tissue distribution and the ability to target intracellular proteins. Herein, we highlight the advantages of protein degradation using PROTACs, and provide specific examples where degradation offers therapeutic benefit over classical enzyme inhibition. Foremost, PROTACs can degrade proteins regardless of their function. This includes the currently "undruggable" proteome, which comprises approximately 85% of all human proteins. Other beneficial aspects of protein degradation include the ability to target overexpressed and mutated proteins, as well as the potential to demonstrate prolonged pharmacodynamics effect beyond drug exposure. Lastly, due to their catalytic nature and the pre-requisite ubiquitination step, an exquisitely potent molecules with a high degree of degradation selectivity can be designed. Impressive preclinical in vitro and in vivo PROTAC data have been published, and these data have propelled the development of clinically viable PROTACs. With the molecular weight falling in the 700-1000Da range, the delivery and bioavailability of PROTACs remain the largest hurdles on the way to the clinic. Solving these issues and demonstrating proof of concept clinical data will be the focus of many labs over the next few years.

  1. 3-Bromopyruvate: targets and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Maria C

    2012-02-01

    The pyruvate mimetic 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is generally presented as an inhibitor of glycolysis and has shown remarkable efficacy in not only preventing tumor growth, but even eradicating existant tumors in animal studies. We here review reported molecular targets of 3-BP and suggest that the very range of possible targets, which pertain to the altered energy metabolism of tumor cells, contributes both to the efficacy and the tumor specificity of the drug. Its in vivo efficacy is suggested to be due to a combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial targets, as well as to secondary effects affecting the tumor microenvironment. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP is less due to pyruvate mimicry than to alkylation of, e.g., key thiols. Alkylation of DNA/RNA has not been reported. More research is warranted to better understand the pharmacokinetics of 3-BP, and its potential toxic effects to normal cells, in particular those that are highly ATP-/mitochondrion-dependent.

  2. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  3. Thermal Targets for Satellite Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2001-01-10

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is currently calibrating the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite sponsored by the Department of Energy. The MTI imager is a research and development project with 15 wavebands in the visible, near-infrared, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared and long-wave infrared spectral regions. A plethora of targets with known temperatures such as power plant heated lakes, volcano lava vents, desert playas and aluminized Mylar tarps are being used in the validation of the five thermal bands of the MTI satellite. SRTC efforts in the production of ''cold targets'' with aluminized Mylar tarps will be described. Visible and thermal imagery and wavelength dependent radiance measurements of the calibration targets will be presented.

  4. Targeting retroviral and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, V; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    2003-01-01

    Retroviral vectors capable of efficient in vivo gene delivery to specific target cell types or to specific locations of disease pathology would greatly facilitate many gene therapy applications. The surface glycoproteins of membrane-enveloped viruses stand among the choice candidates to control the target cell receptor recognition and host range of retroviral vectors onto which they are incorporated. This can be achieved in many ways, such as the exchange of glycoprotein by pseudotyping, their biochemical modifications, their conjugation with virus-cell bridging agents or their structural modifications. Understanding the fundamental properties of the viral glycoproteins and the molecular mechanism of virus entry into cells has been instrumental in the functional alteration of their tropism. Here we briefly review the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral envelope glycoproteins and we discuss the emerging targeting strategies based on retroviral and lentiviral vector systems.

  5. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  6. Antiproton stopping in atomic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. J.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2015-08-01

    Stopping powers of antiprotons in H, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe targets are calculated using a semiclassical time-dependent convergent close-coupling method. The helium target is treated using both frozen-core and multiconfiguration approximations. The electron-electron correlation of the target is fully accounted for in both cases. Double ionization and ionization with excitation channels are taken into account using an independent-event model. The Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atom wave functions are described in a model of six p -shell electrons above a frozen Hartree-Fock core with only one-electron excitations from the outer p shell allowed. Results obtained for helium in the multiconfiguration treatment are in better agreement with experimental measurements than other theories.

  7. STIS Target Acquisitions During SMOV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanis, Rocio M.; Downes, Ron; Hartig, George; Kraemer, Steve

    1997-07-01

    We summarize the first results on the analysis of in-flight STIS target acquisition (ACQ and ACQ/PEAK). These results show that the STIS target acquisition (ACQ) is working very accurately for point sources (within 0.5 pixels = 0.025 arcseconds), about 4 times better than specified in the Instrument Handbook. As a result of the accuracy of the ACQ algorithm, we are no longer recommending to perform ACQ/PEAKs for the 0.2 arcsecond wide slits. For diffuse acquisitions the accuracy varies with target size. Although analysis of ACQ/PEAK data is hampered by a flight software problem, we anticipate that peakups will be accurate to roughly ±5% of the slit width (instead of the ±15% pr eviously advertised). We are implementing several enhancements to the flight software that will take effect by mid- August to improve the quality of the acquisitions.

  8. Observations of Spacecraft Targets, Unusual Asteroids, and Targets of Opportunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Obtain physical and astrometric observations of: (1) spacecraft targets to support mission operations; (2) known asteroids with unusual orbits to help determine their origin; and (3) newly discovered minor planets (including both asteroids and comets) that represent a particular opportunity to add significant new knowledge of the Solar System.

  9. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  10. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H. B. Jr.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R. Jr.

    1995-09-15

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  11. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, H. B.; Iyer, N. C.; Louthan, M. R.

    1995-09-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from, the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. The model assumed that tritium atoms, formed by the 6Li(n,a)3He reaction, were produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly became supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes

  12. [Biotherapy targeting the immune system].

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibody targeted therapy has changed the management of several diseases, including in hematology and immunology. The panel of the present available biotherapies allows a specific action at various stages of the immune response. Indeed, some of these molecules can target the naive T cell at the immunological synapse or the way of TH1, TH17 and regulatory T cell. Others may be more specific for the B cell and immunoglobulin. Some will even be active on both B and T cells.

  13. Dynamics of aerial target pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.

    2015-12-01

    During pursuit and predation, aerial species engage in multitasking behavior that involve simultaneous target detection, tracking, decision-making, approach and capture. The mobility of the pursuer and the target in a three dimensional environment during predation makes the capture task highly complex. Many researchers have studied and analyzed prey capture dynamics in different aerial species such as insects and bats. This article focuses on reviewing the capture strategies adopted by these species while relying on different sensory variables (vision and acoustics) for navigation. In conclusion, the neural basis of these capture strategies and some applications of these strategies in bio-inspired navigation and control of engineered systems are discussed.

  14. Apparatus for producing laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, T.R.; Baker, W.R.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to an apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25u to 75u diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection. (auth)

  15. Method for producing laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Baker, William R.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25.mu. to 75.mu. diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection.

  16. Targeting cancer using cholesterol conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Radwan, Awwad A.; Alanazi, Fares K.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugation of cholesterol moiety to active compounds for either cancer treatment or diagnosis is an attractive approach. Cholesterol derivatives are widely studied as cancer diagnostic agents and as anticancer derivatives either in vitro or in vivo using animal models. In largely growing studies, anticancer agents have been chemically conjugated to cholesterol molecules, to enhance their pharmacokinetic behavior, cellular uptake, target specificity, and safety. To efficiently deliver anticancer agents to the target cells and tissues, many different cholesterol–anticancer conjugates were synthesized and characterized, and their anticancer efficiencies were tested in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24493968

  17. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  18. Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hedhli, Nadia; Russell, Kerry S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity of molecularly targeted cancer agents is increasingly recognized as a significant side effect of chemotherapy. These new potent therapies may not only affect the survival of cancer cells, but have the potential to adversely impact normal cardiac and vascular function. Unraveling the mechanisms by which these therapies affect the heart and vasculature is crucial for improving drug design and finding alternative therapies to protect patients predisposed to cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the classification and side effects of currently approved molecularly targeted chemotherapeutics. PMID:22758623

  19. The Smart Targeting of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam D.; Claypool, Sarah E.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge in nanomedicine is how to selectively deliver nanoparticles to diseased tissues. Nanoparticle delivery system requires targeting for specific delivery to pathogenic sites when enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) is not suitable or inefficient. Functionalizing nanoparticles is a widely-used technique that allows for conjugation with targeting ligands, which possess inherent ability to direct selective binding to cell types or states and, therefore, confer “smartness” to nanoparticles. This review illustrates methods of ligand-nanoparticle functionalization, provides a cross-section of various ligand classes, including small molecules, peptides, antibodies, engineered proteins, or nucleic acid aptamers, and discusses some unconventional approaches currently under investigation. PMID:23470005

  20. Novel targets for mitochondrial medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria—classically viewed as the powerhouses of the cell—have taken center stage in disease pathogenesis and resolution. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which originates from primary defects within the organelle or is induced by environmental stresses, plays a critical role in human disease. Despite their central role in human health and disease, there are no approved drugs that directly target mitochondria. We present possible new druggable targets in mitochondrial biology, including protein modification, calcium ion (Ca2+) transport, and dynamics, as we move into a new era of mitochondrial medicine. PMID:26888432