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Sample records for tipping-bucket rain gauges

  1. A comparative assessment of R. M. Young and tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman E.

    1992-01-01

    Rain rates as derived from standard tipping bucket rain gauges have variable integration times corresponding to the interval between bucket tips. For example, the integration time for the Weathertronics rain gauge is given by delta(T) = 15.24/R (min), where R is the rain rate expressed in mm/h and delta(T) is the time between tips expressed in minutes. It is apparent that a rain rate of 1 mm/h has an integration time in excess of 15 minutes. Rain rates larger than 15.24 mm/h will have integration times smaller than 1 minute. The integration time is dictated by the time it takes to fill a small tipping bucket where each tip gives rise to 0.254 mm of rainfall. Hence, a uniform rain rate of 1 mm/h over a 15 minute period will give rise to the same rain rate as 0 mm/h rainfall over the first 14 minutes and 15 mm/h between 14 to 15 minutes from the reference tip. Hence, the rain intensity fluctuations may not be captured with the tipping bucket rain gauge for highly variable rates encompassing lower and higher values over a given integration time. The objective of this effort is to provide an assessment of the features of the R. M. Young capacitive gauge and to compare these features with those of the standard tipping bucket rain gauge. A number of rain rate-time series derived from measurements with approximately co-located gauges are examined.

  2. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and Λ, from an exponential fit betweenmore » drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.« less

  3. A new method for automated dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphrey, M.D.; Istok, J.D.; Lee, J.Y.; Hevesi, J.A.; Flint, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Existing methods for dynamic calibration of tipping-bucket rain gauges (TBRs) can be time consuming and labor intensive. A new automated dynamic calibration system has been developed to calibrate TBRs with minimal effort. The system consists of a programmable pump, datalogger, digital balance, and computer. Calibration is performed in two steps: 1) pump calibration and 2) rain gauge calibration. Pump calibration ensures precise control of water flow rates delivered to the rain gauge funnel; rain gauge calibration ensures precise conversion of bucket tip times to actual rainfall rates. Calibration of the pump and one rain gauge for 10 selected pump rates typically requires about 8 h. Data files generated during rain gauge calibration are used to compute rainfall intensities and amounts from a record of bucket tip times collected in the field. The system was tested using 5 types of commercial TBRs (15.2-, 20.3-, and 30.5-cm diameters; 0.1-, 0.2-, and 1.0-mm resolutions) and using 14 TBRs of a single type (20.3-cm diameter; 0.1-mm resolution). Ten pump rates ranging from 3 to 154 mL min-1 were used to calibrate the TBRs and represented rainfall rates between 6 and 254 mm h-1 depending on the rain gauge diameter. All pump calibration results were very linear with R2 values greater than 0.99. All rain gauges exhibited large nonlinear underestimation errors (between 5% and 29%) that decreased with increasing rain gauge resolution and increased with increasing rainfall rate, especially for rates greater than 50 mm h-1. Calibration curves of bucket tip time against the reciprocal of the true pump rate for all rain gauges also were linear with R2 values of 0.99. Calibration data for the 14 rain gauges of the same type were very similar, as indicated by slope values that were within 14% of each other and ranged from about 367 to 417 s mm h-1. The developed system can calibrate TBRs efficiently, accurately, and virtually unattended and could be modified for use with other

  4. BOREAS HYD-9 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouwen, Nick; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Soulis, Ric; Jenkinson, Wayne; Graham, Allyson; Neff, Todd; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS HYD-9 team collected several data sets containing precipitation and strearnflow measurements over the BOREAS study areas. This data set contains the measurements from the tipping bucket rain gauges at the BOREAS NSA and SSA. These measurements were submitted in 15-minute and 1-hour intervals. Only the 15-minute interval data set was loaded into the data base tables. Data were collected from the tipping bucket gauges from mid-April until mid-October in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  6. Performance of post-processing algorithms for rainfall intensity using measurements from tipping-bucket rain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagnaro, Mattia; Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca Giovanni; Chan, Pak Wai

    2016-11-01

    Eight rainfall events recorded from May to September 2013 at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) have been selected to investigate the performance of post-processing algorithms used to calculate the rainfall intensity (RI) from tipping-bucket rain gauges (TBRGs). We assumed a drop-counter catching-type gauge as a working reference and compared rainfall intensity measurements with two calibrated TBRGs operated at a time resolution of 1 min. The two TBRGs differ in their internal mechanics, one being a traditional single-layer dual-bucket assembly, while the other has two layers of buckets. The drop-counter gauge operates at a time resolution of 10 s, while the time of tipping is recorded for the two TBRGs. The post-processing algorithms employed for the two TBRGs are based on the assumption that the tip volume is uniformly distributed over the inter-tip period. A series of data of an ideal TBRG is reconstructed using the virtual time of tipping derived from the drop-counter data. From the comparison between the ideal gauge and the measurements from the two real TBRGs, the performances of different post-processing and correction algorithms are statistically evaluated over the set of recorded rain events. The improvement obtained by adopting the inter-tip time algorithm in the calculation of the RI is confirmed. However, by comparing the performance of the real and ideal TBRGs, the beneficial effect of the inter-tip algorithm is shown to be relevant for the mid-low range (6-50 mmh-1) of rainfall intensity values (where the sampling errors prevail), while its role vanishes with increasing RI in the range where the mechanical errors prevail.

  7. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm.h-1 to 250 mm.h-1) and three di...

  8. A Robust, Microwave Rain Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansheim, T. J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.

    2008-12-01

    Researchers at The University of Iowa have developed an all-electronic rain gauge that uses microwave sensors operating at either 10 GHz or 23 GHz, and measures the Doppler shift caused by falling raindrops. It is straightforward to interface these sensors with conventional data loggers, or integrate them into a wireless sensor network. A disadvantage of these microwave rain gauges is that they consume significant power when they are operating. However, this may be partially negated by using data loggers' or sensors networks' sleep-wake-sleep mechanism. Advantages of the microwave rain gauges are that one can make them very robust, they cannot clog, they don't have mechanical parts that wear out, and they don't have to be perfectly level. Prototype microwave rain gauges were collocated with tipping-bucket rain gauges, and data were collected for two seasons. At higher rain rates, microwave rain gauge measurements compare well with tipping-bucket measurements. At lower rain rates, the microwave rain gauges provide more detailed information than tipping buckets, which quantize measurement typically in 1 tip per 0.01 inch, or 1 tip per mm of rainfall.

  9. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  10. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedekar, Vinayak S.; King, Kevin W.; Fausey, Norman R.; Soboyejo, Alfred B. O.; Harmel, R. Daren; Brown, Larry C.

    2016-09-01

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd.), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm·h- 1 to 250 mm·h- 1) and three different volumetric settings. Instantaneous and cumulative values of simulated rainfall were recorded at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20-min intervals. All three TBR models showed a substantial deviation (α = 0.05) in measurements from actual rainfall depths, with increasing underestimation errors at greater rainfall intensities. Simple linear regression equations were developed for each TBR to correct the TBR readings based on measured intensities (R2 > 0.98). Additionally, two dynamic calibration techniques, viz. quadratic model (R2 > 0.7) and T vs. 1/Q model (R2 = > 0.98), were tested and found to be useful in situations when the volumetric settings of TBRs are unknown. The correction models were successfully applied to correct field-collected rainfall data from respective TBR models. The calibration parameters of correction models were found to be highly sensitive to changes in volumetric calibration of TBRs. Overall, the HS-TB3 model (with a better protected tipping bucket mechanism, and consistent measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) was found to be the most reliable and consistent for rainfall measurements, followed by the ISCO-674 (with susceptibility to clogging and relatively smaller measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) and the TR-525 (with high susceptibility to clogging and frequent changes in volumetric calibration, and highly intensity-dependent measurement errors). The study demonstrated that corrections based on dynamic and volumetric calibration can only help minimize-but not completely eliminate the measurement errors. The findings from this study will be useful for correcting field data from TBRs; and may have major

  11. Measurement accuracy of weighing and tipping-bucket rainfall intensity gauges under dynamic laboratory testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, M.; Lanza, L. G.; La Barbera, P.; Chan, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The contribution of any single uncertainty factor in the resulting performance of infield rain gauge measurements still has to be comprehensively assessed due to the high number of real world error sources involved, such as the intrinsic variability of rainfall intensity (RI), wind effects, wetting losses, the ambient temperature, etc. In recent years the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) addressed these issues by fostering dedicated investigations, which revealed further difficulties in assessing the actual reference rainfall intensity in the field. This work reports on an extensive assessment of the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauge accuracy when measuring rainfall intensity under laboratory dynamic conditions (time varying reference flow rates). The results obtained from the weighing rain gauge (WG) were also compared with a MTX tipping-bucket rain gauge (TBR) under the same test conditions. Tests were carried out by simulating various artificial precipitation events, with unsteady rainfall intensity, using a suitable dynamic rainfall generator. Real world rainfall data measured by an Ogawa catching-type drop counter at a field test site located within the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) were used as a reference for the artificial rain generation system. Results demonstrate that the differences observed between the laboratory and field performance of catching-type gauges are only partially attributable to the weather and operational conditions in the field. The dynamics of real world precipitation events is responsible for a large part of the measurement errors, which can be accurately assessed in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. This allows for new testing methodologies and the development of instruments with enhanced performance in the field.

  12. Rain rate duration statistics derived from the Mid-Atlantic coast rain gauge network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    A rain gauge network comprised of 10 tipping bucket rain gauges located in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States has been in continuous operation since June 1, 1986. Rain rate distributions and estimated slant path fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz covering the first five year period were derived from the gauge network measurements, and these results were described by Goldhirsh. In this effort, rain rate time duration statistics are presented. The rain duration statistics are of interest for better understanding the physical nature of precipitation and to present a data base which may be used by modelers to convert to slant path fade duration statistics. Such statistics are important for better assessing optimal coding procedures over defined bandwidths.

  13. Rain gauge calibration and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, John

    1994-01-01

    Prior to the Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE), 42 Model 100 series optical gauges were tested in the rain simulator facility at Wallops Island before shipment to the field. Baseline measurements at several rain rates were made simultaneously with collector cans, tipping bucket, and a precision weighing gauge and held for post-COARE evaluation with a repeat set of measurements that were to be recorded after the instruments were returned. This was done as a means of detecting any calibration changes that might have occurred while deployed. Although it was known that the artificial rain in the simulator did not contain the required exponential distribution for accurate optical rain gauge rate measurements, use of the facility was necessary because it was the only means available for taking controlled observations with instruments that were received, tested, and shipped out in groups over a period of months. At that point, it was believed that these measurements would be adequately precise for detecting performance changes over time. However, analysis of the data by STI now indicates that this may not be true. Further study of the data will be undertaken to resolve this.

  14. The impact of a windshield in a tipping bucket rain gauge on the reduction of losses in precipitation measurements during snowfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buisan, Samuel T.; Collado, Jose Luis; Alastrue, Javier

    2016-04-01

    The amount of snow available controls the ecology and hydrological response of mountainous areas and cold regions and affects economic activities including winter tourism, hydropower generation, floods and water supply. An accurate measurement of snowfall accumulation amount is critical and source of error for a better evaluation and verification of numerical weather forecast, hydrological and climate models. It is well known that the undercatch of solid precipitation resulting from wind-induced updrafts at the gauge orifice is the main factor affecting the quality and accuracy of the amount of snowfall precipitation. This effect can be reduced by the use of different windshields. Overall, Tipping Bucket Rain Gauges (TPBRG) provide a large percentage of the precipitation amount measurements, in all climate regimes, estimated at about 80% of the total of observations by automatic instruments. In the frame of the WMO-SPICE project, we compared at the Formigal-Sarrios station (Spanish Pyrenees, 1800 m a.s.l.) the measured precipitation in two heated TPBRGs, one of them protected with a single alter windshield in order to reduce the wind bias. Results were contrasted with measured precipitation using the SPICE reference gauge (Pluvio2 OTT) in a Double Fence Intercomparison Reference (DFIR). Results reported that shielded reduces undercatch up to 40% when wind speed exceeds 6 m/s. The differences when compared with the reference gauge reached values higher than 70%. The inaccuracy of these measurements showed a significant impact in nowcasting operations and climatology in Spain, especially during some heavy snowfall episodes. Also, hydrological models showed a better agreement with the observed rivers flow when including the precipitation not accounted during these snowfall events. The conclusions of this experiment will be used to take decisions on the suitability of the installation of windshields in stations characterized by a large quantity of snowfalls during the

  15. Results of APL rain gauge network measurements in mid-Atlantic coast region and comparisons of distributions with CCIR models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman; Rowland, John

    1988-01-01

    In this effort are described cumulative rain rate distributions for a network of nine tipping bucket rain gauge systems located in the mid-Atlantic coast region in the vicinity of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. The rain gauges are situated within a gridded region of dimensions of 47 km east-west by 70 km north-south. Distributions are presented for the individual site measurements and the network average for the year period June 1, 1986 through May 31, 1987. A previous six year average distribution derived from measurements at one of the site locations is also presented. Comparisons are given of the network average, the CCIR (International Radio Consultative Committee) climatic zone, and the CCIR functional model distributions, the latter of which approximates a log normal at the lower rain rate and a gamma function at the higher rates.

  16. Comparison of Imerg Half Hourly Final GPM data with Rain Gauge for Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekeli, E.; Dönmez, S.

    2016-12-01

    Being launched in 1997 with the main goal of measuring moderate to heavy rainfall, TRMM enabled invaluable service to remote sensing and hydrology community with data more than 17 years. Based on TRMM experience, GPM was launched in 2014. GPM with increased radar sensitivity and higher spatial resolutions, is expected to enable better light rain and snowfall detection. In here, light rainfall detection capacity of IMERG Half hourly final GPM (IFHH) product is investigated for Riyadh City in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A tipping bucket rain gauge located on the roof of King Saud University Civil Engineering Department provided rainfall measurements in 10 minute intervals from 22 November 2014 till 11 Jun 2015. Obtained rain gauge data indicated 72 light rain (rain rate [rr] ≤2.5mm/h) 5 medium rain (2.5mm/hPreliminary results indicate that IFHH overestimate most of the light rain. For the medium and heavy rain rates, IFHH showed under estimations. As one of the major goals of GPM is accurate light rain detection, similar studies should be continued and databases should be formed.

  17. Techniques for analyzing and utilizing the rain gauges at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. [Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System ground station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalagher, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Ten tipping bucket rain gauges have been installed at the NASA WSTF for the purpose of determining rainfall characteristics in this area which may affect the performance of the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. A plan is presented for analyzing and utilizing the data which will be obtained during the course of this experiment. Also included is a description of a computer program which has been written to aid in the analysis.

  18. On Utilization of NEXRAD Scan Strategy Information to Infer Discrepancies Associated With Radar and Rain Gauge Surface Volumetric Rainfall Accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Datta, Saswati; Jones, W. Linwood; Kasparis, Takis; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) monthly Ground Validation (GV) rain map, 42 quality controlled tipping bucket rain gauge data (1 minute interpolated rain rates) were utilized. We have compared the gauge data to the surface volumetric rainfall accumulation of NEXRAD reflectivity field, (converting to rain rates using a 0.5 dB resolution smooth Z-R table). The comparison was carried out from data collected at Melbourne, Florida during the month of July 98. GV operational level 3 (L3 monthly) accumulation algorithm was used to obtain surface volumetric accumulations for the radar. The gauge records were accumulated using the 1 minute interpolated rain rates while the radar Volume Scan (VOS) intervals remain less than or equal to 75 minutes. The correlation coefficient for the radar and gauge totals for the monthly time-scale remain at 0.93, however, a large difference was noted between the gauge and radar derived rain accumulation when the radar data interval is either 9 minute, or 10 minute. This difference in radar and gauge accumulation is being explained in terms of the radar scan strategy information. The discrepancy in terms of the Volume Coverage Pattern (VCP) of the NEXRAD is being reported where VCP mode is ascertained using the radar tilt angle information. Hourly radar and gauge accumulations have been computed using the present operational L3 method supplemented with a threshold period of +/- 5 minutes (based on a sensitivity analysis). These radar and gauge accumulations are subsequently improved using a radar hourly scan weighting factor (taking ratio of the radar scan frequency within a time bin to the 7436 total radar scans for the month). This GV procedure is further being improved by introducing a spatial smoothing method to yield reasonable bulk radar to gauge ratio for the hourly and daily scales.

  19. High resolution radar-rain gauge data merging for urban hydrology: current practice and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Rodriguez, Susana; Wang, Li-Pen; Bailey, Andy; Willems, Patrick; Onof, Christian

    2017-04-01

    In this work a thorough test is conducted of radar-rain gauge merging techniques at urban scales, under different climatological conditions and rain gauge density scenarios. The aim is to provide guidance regarding the suitability and application of merging methods at urban scales, which is lacking at present. The test is conducted based upon two pilot locations, i.e. the cities of Edinburgh (254 km^2) and Birmingham (431 km^2), for which a total of 96 and 84 tipping bucket rain gauges were respectively available, alongside radar QPEs, dense runoff records and urban drainage models. Three merging techniques, namely Mean Field Bias (MFB) adjustment, kriging with external (KED) and Bayesian (BAY) combination, were selected for testing on grounds of performance and common use. They were initially tested as they were originally formulated and as they are reportedly commonly applied using typically available radar and rain gauge data. Afterwards, they were tested in combination with two special treatments which were identified as having the potential to improve merging applicability for urban hydrology: (1) reduction of temporal sampling errors in radar QPEs through temporal interpolation and (2) singularity-based decomposition of radar QPEs prior to merging. These treatments ultimately aim at improving the consistency between radar and rain gauge records, which has been identified as the chief factor affecting merging performance and is particularly challenging at the fine spatial-temporal resolutions required for urban applications. The main findings of this study are the following: - All merging methods were found to improve the applicability of radar QPEs for urban hydrological applications, but the degree of improvement they provide and the added value of radar information vary for each merging method and are also a function of climatological conditions and rain gauge density scenarios. - Overall, KED displayed the best performance, with BAY being a close second

  20. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOEpatents

    Willett, Fred Thomas; Itzel, Gary Michael; Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Plemmons, Larry Wayne; Plemmons, Helen M.; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

  1. Evaluation and correction of uncertainty due to Gaussian approximation in radar - rain gauge merging using kriging with external drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecinati, F.; Wani, O.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    It is widely recognised that merging radar rainfall estimates (RRE) with rain gauge data can improve the RRE and provide areal and temporal coverage that rain gauges cannot offer. Many methods to merge radar and rain gauge data are based on kriging and require an assumption of Gaussianity on the variable of interest. In particular, this work looks at kriging with external drift (KED), because it is an efficient, widely used, and well performing merging method. Rainfall, especially at finer temporal scale, does not have a normal distribution and presents a bi-modal skewed distribution. In some applications a Gaussianity assumption is made, without any correction. In other cases, variables are transformed in order to obtain a distribution closer to Gaussian. This work has two objectives: 1) compare different transformation methods in merging applications; 2) evaluate the uncertainty arising when untransformed rainfall data is used in KED. The comparison of transformation methods is addressed under two points of view. On the one hand, the ability to reproduce the original probability distribution after back-transformation of merged products is evaluated with qq-plots, on the other hand the rainfall estimates are compared with an independent set of rain gauge measurements. The tested methods are 1) no transformation, 2) Box-Cox transformations with parameter equal to λ=0.5 (square root), 3) λ=0.25 (square root - square root), and 4) λ=0.1 (almost logarithmic), 5) normal quantile transformation, and 6) singularity analysis. The uncertainty associated with the use of non-transformed data in KED is evaluated in comparison with the best performing product. The methods are tested on a case study in Northern England, using hourly data from 211 tipping bucket rain gauges from the Environment Agency and radar rainfall data at 1 km/5-min resolutions from the UK Met Office. In addition, 25 independent rain gauges from the UK Met Office were used to assess the merged products.

  2. Distributed Disdrometer and Rain Gauge Measurement Infrastructure Developed for GPM Ground Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Bringi, V. N.; Gatlin, Patrick; Phillips, Dustin; Schwaller, Mathew; Tokay, Ali; Wingo, Mathew; Wolff, David

    2010-01-01

    Global Precipitation Mission (GPM)retrieval algorithm validation requires datasets characterizing the 4-D structure, variability, and correlation properties of hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSD) and accumulations over satellite fields of view (FOV;<10 km). Collection of this data provides a means to assess retrieval errors related to beam filling and algorithm PSD assumptions. Hence, GPM Ground Validation is developing a deployable network of precipitation gauges and disdrometers to provide fine-scale measurements of PSD and precipitation accumulation variability. These observations will be combined with dual-frequency, polarimetric, and profiling radar data in a bootstrapping fashion to extend validated PSD measurements to a large coverage domain. Accordingly, a total of 24 Parsivel disdrometers(PD), 5 3rd-generation 2D Video Disdrometers (2DVD), 70 tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRG),9 weighing gauges, 7 Hot-Plate precipitation sensors (HP), and 3 Micro Rain Radars (MRR) have been procured. In liquid precipitation the suite of TBRG, PD and 2DVD instruments will quantify a broad spectrum of rain rate and PSD variability at sub-kilometer scales. In the envisioned network configuration 5 2DVDs will act as reference points for 16 collocated PD and TBRG measurements. We find that PD measurements provide similar measures of the rain PSD as observed with collocated 2DVDs (e.g., D0, Nw) for rain rates less than 15 mm/hr. For heavier rain rates we will rely on 2DVDs for PSD information. For snowfall we will combine point-redundant observations of SWER distributed over three or more locations within a FOV. Each location will contain at least one fenced weighing gauge, one HP, two PDs, and a 2DVD. MRRs will also be located at each site to extend the measurement to the column. By collecting SWER measurements using different instrument types that employ different measurement techniques our objective is to separate measurement uncertainty from natural variability in

  3. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  4. Evaluation of TRMM Ground-Validation Radar-Rain Errors Using Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground-validation (GV) radar-rain products are often utilized for validation of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spaced-based rain estimates, and hence, quantitative evaluation of the GV radar-rain product error characteristics is vital. This study uses quality-controlled gauge data to compare with TRMM GV radar rain rates in an effort to provide such error characteristics. The results show that significant differences of concurrent radar-gauge rain rates exist at various time scales ranging from 5 min to 1 day, despite lower overall long-term bias. However, the differences between the radar area-averaged rain rates and gauge point rain rates cannot be explained as due to radar error only. The error variance separation method is adapted to partition the variance of radar-gauge differences into the gauge area-point error variance and radar rain estimation error variance. The results provide relatively reliable quantitative uncertainty evaluation of TRMM GV radar rain estimates at various times scales, and are helpful to better understand the differences between measured radar and gauge rain rates. It is envisaged that this study will contribute to better utilization of GV radar rain products to validate versatile spaced-based rain estimates from TRMM, as well as the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement, and other satellites.

  5. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-01-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  6. Development of a method of robust rain gauge network optimization based on intensity-duration-frequency results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebbi, A.; Bargaoui, Z. K.; da Conceição Cunha, M.

    2012-12-01

    Based on rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, a robust optimization approach is proposed to identify the best locations to install new rain gauges. The advantage of robust optimization is that the resulting design solutions yield networks which behave acceptably under hydrological variability. Robust optimisation can overcome the problem of selecting representative rainfall events when building the optimization process. This paper reports an original approach based on Montana IDF model parameters. The latter are assumed to be geostatistical variables and their spatial interdependence is taken into account through the adoption of cross-variograms in the kriging process. The problem of optimally locating a fixed number of new monitoring stations based on an existing rain gauge network is addressed. The objective function is based on the mean spatial kriging variance and rainfall variogram structure using a variance-reduction method. Hydrological variability was taken into account by considering and implementing several return periods to define the robust objective function. Variance minimization is performed using a simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, knowledge of the time horizon is needed for the computation of the robust objective function. A short and a long term horizon were studied, and optimal networks are identified for each. The method developed is applied to north Tunisia (area = 21 000 km2). Data inputs for the variogram analysis were IDF curves provided by the hydrological bureau and available for 14 tipping bucket type rain gauges. The recording period was from 1962 to 2001, depending on the station. The study concerns an imaginary network augmentation based on the network configuration in 1973, which is a very significant year in Tunisia because there was an exceptional regional flood event in March 1973. This network consisted of 13 stations and did not meet World Meteorological Organization (WMO) recommendations for the minimum

  7. A laboratory evaluation of the influence of weighing gauges performance on extreme events statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca

    2014-05-01

    The effects of inaccurate ground based rainfall measurements on the information derived from rain records is yet not much documented in the literature. La Barbera et al. (2002) investigated the propagation of the systematic mechanic errors of tipping bucket type rain gauges (TBR) into the most common statistics of rainfall extremes, e.g. in the assessment of the return period T (or the related non-exceedance probability) of short-duration/high intensity events. Colli et al. (2012) and Lanza et al. (2012) extended the analysis to a 22-years long precipitation data set obtained from a virtual weighing type gauge (WG). The artificial WG time series was obtained basing on real precipitation data measured at the meteo-station of the University of Genova and modelling the weighing gauge output as a linear dynamic system. This approximation was previously validated with dedicated laboratory experiments and is based on the evidence that the accuracy of WG measurements under real world/time varying rainfall conditions is mainly affected by the dynamic response of the gauge (as revealed during the last WMO Field Intercomparison of Rainfall Intensity Gauges). The investigation is now completed by analyzing actual measurements performed by two common weighing gauges, the OTT Pluvio2 load-cell gauge and the GEONOR T-200 vibrating-wire gauge, since both these instruments demonstrated very good performance under previous constant flow rate calibration efforts. A laboratory dynamic rainfall generation system has been arranged and validated in order to simulate a number of precipitation events with variable reference intensities. Such artificial events were generated basing on real world rainfall intensity (RI) records obtained from the meteo-station of the University of Genova so that the statistical structure of the time series is preserved. The influence of the WG RI measurements accuracy on the associated extreme events statistics is analyzed by comparing the original intensity

  8. Optical Rain Gauge Performance: Second Workshop on Optical Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A. (Editor); Thiele, Otto W. (Editor); Mcphaden, Michael J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The primary focus of the workshop was on the performance and reliability of STi mini-Optical Rain Gauges in a number of environments, including deployments on ships and buoys in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean during the TOGA/COARE field experiment, deployments on buoys in U.S. coastal waters, and comparisons with other types of rain gauges on the Virginia coast and in Florida. The workshop was attended by 20 investigators, representing 10 different institutions, who gathered to present new results obtained since the first workshop (April 1993), to discuss problems, to consider solutions, and to chart future directions. Post-TOGA/COARE calibration studies were also presented.

  9. Computational analysis of Pelton bucket tip erosion using digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Bim Prasad; Gautam, Bijaya; Bajracharya, Tri Ratna

    2008-03-01

    Erosion of hydro turbine components through sand laden river is one of the biggest problems in Himalayas. Even with sediment trapping systems, complete removal of fine sediment from water is impossible and uneconomical; hence most of the turbine components in Himalayan Rivers are exposed to sand laden water and subject to erode. Pelton bucket which are being wildly used in different hydropower generation plant undergoes erosion on the continuous presence of sand particles in water. The subsequent erosion causes increase in splitter thickness, which is supposed to be theoretically zero. This increase in splitter thickness gives rise to back hitting of water followed by decrease in turbine efficiency. This paper describes the process of measurement of sharp edges like bucket tip using digital image processing. Image of each bucket is captured and allowed to run for 72 hours; sand concentration in water hitting the bucket is closely controlled and monitored. Later, the image of the test bucket is taken in the same condition. The process is repeated for 10 times. In this paper digital image processing which encompasses processes that performs image enhancement in both spatial and frequency domain. In addition, the processes that extract attributes from images, up to and including the measurement of splitter's tip. Processing of image has been done in MATLAB 6.5 platform. The result shows that quantitative measurement of edge erosion of sharp edges could accurately be detected and the erosion profile could be generated using image processing technique.

  10. Development of a method of robust rain gauge network optimization based on intensity-duration-frequency results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebbi, A.; Bargaoui, Z. K.; da Conceição Cunha, M.

    2013-10-01

    Based on rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves, fitted in several locations of a given area, a robust optimization approach is proposed to identify the best locations to install new rain gauges. The advantage of robust optimization is that the resulting design solutions yield networks which behave acceptably under hydrological variability. Robust optimization can overcome the problem of selecting representative rainfall events when building the optimization process. This paper reports an original approach based on Montana IDF model parameters. The latter are assumed to be geostatistical variables, and their spatial interdependence is taken into account through the adoption of cross-variograms in the kriging process. The problem of optimally locating a fixed number of new monitoring stations based on an existing rain gauge network is addressed. The objective function is based on the mean spatial kriging variance and rainfall variogram structure using a variance-reduction method. Hydrological variability was taken into account by considering and implementing several return periods to define the robust objective function. Variance minimization is performed using a simulated annealing algorithm. In addition, knowledge of the time horizon is needed for the computation of the robust objective function. A short- and a long-term horizon were studied, and optimal networks are identified for each. The method developed is applied to north Tunisia (area = 21 000 km2). Data inputs for the variogram analysis were IDF curves provided by the hydrological bureau and available for 14 tipping bucket type rain gauges. The recording period was from 1962 to 2001, depending on the station. The study concerns an imaginary network augmentation based on the network configuration in 1973, which is a very significant year in Tunisia because there was an exceptional regional flood event in March 1973. This network consisted of 13 stations and did not meet World Meteorological

  11. Urban Rain Gauge Siting Selection Based on Gis-Multicriteria Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanli; Jing, Changfeng; Du, Mingyi

    2016-06-01

    With the increasingly rapid growth of urbanization and climate change, urban rainfall monitoring as well as urban waterlogging has widely been paid attention. In the light of conventional siting selection methods do not take into consideration of geographic surroundings and spatial-temporal scale for the urban rain gauge site selection, this paper primarily aims at finding the appropriate siting selection rules and methods for rain gauge in urban area. Additionally, for optimization gauge location, a spatial decision support system (DSS) aided by geographical information system (GIS) has been developed. In terms of a series of criteria, the rain gauge optimal site-search problem can be addressed by a multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). A series of spatial analytical techniques are required for MCDA to identify the prospective sites. With the platform of GIS, using spatial kernel density analysis can reflect the population density; GIS buffer analysis is used to optimize the location with the rain gauge signal transmission character. Experiment results show that the rules and the proposed method are proper for the rain gauge site selection in urban areas, which is significant for the siting selection of urban hydrological facilities and infrastructure, such as water gauge.

  12. Algorithm for Identifying Erroneous Rain-Gauge Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm analyzes rain-gauge data to identify statistical outliers that could be deemed to be erroneous readings. Heretofore, analyses of this type have been performed in burdensome manual procedures that have involved subjective judgements. Sometimes, the analyses have included computational assistance for detecting values falling outside of arbitrary limits. The analyses have been performed without statistically valid knowledge of the spatial and temporal variations of precipitation within rain events. In contrast, the present algorithm makes it possible to automate such an analysis, makes the analysis objective, takes account of the spatial distribution of rain gauges in conjunction with the statistical nature of spatial variations in rainfall readings, and minimizes the use of arbitrary criteria. The algorithm implements an iterative process that involves nonparametric statistics.

  13. Investigation clogging dynamic of permeable pavement systems using embedded sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghmanesh, Mostafa; Borst, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Permeable pavement is a stormwater control measure commonly selected in both new and retrofit applications. However, there is limited information about the clogging mechanism of these systems that effects the infiltration. A permeable pavement site located at the Seitz Elementary School, on Fort Riley, Kansas was selected for this study. An 80-space parking lot was built behind the school as part of an EPA collaboration with the U.S. Army. The parking lot design includes a permeable interlocking concrete pavement section along the downgradient edge. This study monitored the clogging progress of the pavement section using twelve water content reflectometers and three buried tipping bucket rain gauges. This clogging dynamic investigation was divided into three stages namely pre-clogged, transitional, and clogged. Recorded initial relative water content of all three stages were significantly and negatively correlated to antecedent dry weather periods with stronger correlations during clogged conditions. The peak relative water content correlation with peak rainfall 10-min intensity was significant for the water content reflectometers located on the western edge away from the eastern edge; this correlation was strongest during transition stage. Once clogged, rainfall measurements no longer correlated with the buried tipping bucket rain gauges. Both water content reflectometers and buried tipping bucket rain gauges showed the progress of surface clogging. For every 6 mm of rain, clogging advanced 1 mm across the surface. The results generally support the hypothesis that the clogging progresses from the upgradient to the downgradient edge. The magnitude of the contributing drainage area and rainfall characteristics are effective factors on rate and progression of clogging.

  14. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Jasoni, Richard L; Larsen, Jessica D; Lyles, Brad F.

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ETmore » and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 310±13.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 347±15.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges

  15. Comparing Satellite Rainfall Estimates with Rain-Gauge Data: Optimal Strategies Suggested by a Spectral Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Kundu, Prasun K.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Validation of satellite remote-sensing methods for estimating rainfall against rain-gauge data is attractive because of the direct nature of the rain-gauge measurements. Comparisons of satellite estimates to rain-gauge data are difficult, however, because of the extreme variability of rain and the fact that satellites view large areas over a short time while rain gauges monitor small areas continuously. In this paper, a statistical model of rainfall variability developed for studies of sampling error in averages of satellite data is used to examine the impact of spatial and temporal averaging of satellite and gauge data on intercomparison results. The model parameters were derived from radar observations of rain, but the model appears to capture many of the characteristics of rain-gauge data as well. The model predicts that many months of data from areas containing a few gauges are required to validate satellite estimates over the areas, and that the areas should be of the order of several hundred km in diameter. Over gauge arrays of sufficiently high density, the optimal areas and averaging times are reduced. The possibility of using time-weighted averages of gauge data is explored.

  16. Description and preliminary results of a 100 square meter rain gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Salvatore; Petroselli, Andrea; Baldini, Luca; Gorgucci, Eugenio

    2018-01-01

    Rainfall is one of the most crucial processes in hydrology, and the direct and indirect rainfall measurement methods are constantly being updated and improved. The standard instrument used to measure rainfall rate and accumulation is the rain gauge, which provides direct observations. Though the small dimension of the orifice allows rain gauges to be installed anywhere, it also causes errors due to the splash and wind effects. To investigate the role of the orifice dimension, this study, for the first time, introduces and demonstrates an apparatus for observing rainfall called a giant-rain gauge that is characterised by a collecting surface of 100 m2. To discuss the new instrument and its technical details, a preliminary analysis of 26 rainfall events is provided. The results suggest that there are significant differences between the standard and proposed rain gauges. Specifically, major discrepancies are evident for low time aggregation scale (5, 10, and 15 min) and for high rainfall intensity values.

  17. Real-Time Rain Rate Evaluation via Satellite Downlink Signal Attenuation Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Reggiannini, Ruggero; Moretti, Marco; Adirosi, Elisa; Baldini, Luca; Facheris, Luca; Melani, Samantha; Bacci, Giacomo; Petrolino, Antonio; Vaccaro, Attilio

    2017-01-01

    We present the NEFOCAST project (named by the contraction of “Nefele”, which is the Italian spelling for the mythological cloud nymph Nephele, and “forecast”), funded by the Tuscany Region, about the feasibility of a system for the detection and monitoring of precipitation fields over the regional territory based on the use of a widespread network of new-generation Eutelsat “SmartLNB” (smart low-noise block converter) domestic terminals. Though primarily intended for interactive satellite services, these devices can also be used as weather sensors, as they have the capability of measuring the rain-induced attenuation incurred by the downlink signal and relaying it on an auxiliary return channel. We illustrate the NEFOCAST system architecture, consisting of the network of ground sensor terminals, the space segment, and the service center, which has the task of processing the information relayed by the terminals for generating rain field maps. We discuss a few methods that allow the conversion of a rain attenuation measurement into an instantaneous rainfall rate. Specifically, we discuss an exponential model relating the specific rain attenuation to the rainfall rate, whose coefficients were obtained from extensive experimental data. The above model permits the inferring of the rainfall rate from the total signal attenuation provided by the SmartLNB and from the link geometry knowledge. Some preliminary results obtained from a SmartLNB installed in Pisa are presented and compared with the output of a conventional tipping bucket rain gauge. It is shown that the NEFOCAST sensor is able to track the fast-varying rainfall rate accurately with no delay, as opposed to a conventional gauge. PMID:28805692

  18. Effect of rain gauge density over the accuracy of rainfall: a case study over Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anoop Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Rainfall is an extremely variable parameter in both space and time. Rain gauge density is very crucial in order to quantify the rainfall amount over a region. The level of rainfall accuracy is highly dependent on density and distribution of rain gauge stations over a region. Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) have installed a number of Automatic Weather Station (AWS) rain gauges over Indian region to study rainfall. In this paper, the effect of rain gauge density over daily accumulated rainfall is analyzed using ISRO AWS gauge observations. A region of 50 km × 50 km box over southern part of Indian region (Bangalore) with good density of rain gauges is identified for this purpose. Rain gauge numbers are varied from 1-8 in 50 km box to study the variation in the daily accumulated rainfall. Rainfall rates from the neighbouring stations are also compared in this study. Change in the rainfall as a function of gauge spacing is studied. Use of gauge calibrated satellite observations to fill the gauge station value is also studied. It is found that correlation coefficients (CC) decrease from 82% to 21% as gauge spacing increases from 5 km to 40 km while root mean square error (RMSE) increases from 8.29 mm to 51.27 mm with increase in gauge spacing from 5 km to 40 km. Considering 8 rain gauges as a standard representative of rainfall over the region, absolute error increases from 15% to 64% as gauge numbers are decreased from 7 to 1. Small errors are reported while considering 4 to 7 rain gauges to represent 50 km area. However, reduction to 3 or less rain gauges resulted in significant error. It is also observed that use of gauge calibrated satellite observations significantly improved the rainfall estimation over the region with very few rain gauge observations.

  19. Can salt on an optical rain gauge lens affect performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.

    1994-01-01

    The optical rain gauge (ORG) by ScTI is designed to be tolerant to reduction of infrared beam intensity due to a dirty lens. Recently there is interest in long term use of optical gauges onboard buoys at sea. Because of logistics, these systems are serviced infrequently, i.e., every several months. Due to the proximity of the gauges to the sea surface, salt can be expected to be deposited on the lens. To obtain an indication of the potential for dirty lens to affect the ORG calibration, two simple experiments were conducted. In the control experiment, a sample ORG was compared to three other ORG's during natural rain events. Next a translucent mask was placed on the transmitter lens of the sample ORG and again data were collected under natural rain conditions. The mask reduced the gain of the perturbed ORG by about 30%. The perturbed ORG operated rather well in that the mask only causes a change in the gain and does not cause data drop out at low rain rates. However, the reduced gain would seriously impact an assessment of rain statistics.

  20. So, how much of the Earth's surface is covered by rain gauges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Huffman, George; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Joe, Paul; Muller, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of global precipitation, both rainfall and snowfall, is of critical importance to a wide range of users and applications. The fundamental means of measuring precipitation is the rain gauge. Although rain gauges have many drawbacks (including not measuring snowfall well), they remain the de facto source of precipitation information across the Earth surface for hydro-meteorological purposes. While the accuracy and representative of each gauge can be assessed and monitored, a key limitation of rain and snow gauges is in their distribution across the globe. Gauges tend to be limited to the land surface where their distribution and density is very variable, while over the oceans very few gauges are available and measurements available at island locations may not truly represent those of the surrounding oceans. The total numbers of gauges across the Earth, as noted in the literature, varies greatly primarily due to temporal sampling resolutions, periods of operation, the latency of the data and the availability of the data. These numbers range from a few thousand which are available in near real time, to an estimated hundreds of thousands if one includes all available 'official' gauges (this number might swell more if all amateur gauges are included, with crowdsourcing capable of providing even more). Considering those gauges that are routinely used in the generation of global precipitation products (i.e. those available and of reasonable quality), the physical area covered by rain gauges varies by a factor of about 25. Calculations suggest that if all available rain gauges are included, they would cover between 120 and 3,000 m2. For comparison, equivalent areas range from 267 m2 for the centre circle of a football (soccer) pitch, or about 260 m2 for a tennis court to about 3,000 m2 for half a football pitch. Each gauge should represent more than just the orifice of the gauge itself, however, observations and modelling suggest that the correlation

  1. Narrow Angle Diversity using ACTS Ka-band Signal with Two USAT Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, A.; Emrich, C.; Ventre, J.; Wilson, W.; Acosta, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two ultra small aperture terminal (USAT) ground stations, separated by 1.2 km in a narrow angle diversity configuration, received a continuous Ka-band tone sent from Cleveland Link Evaluation Terminal (LET). The signal was transmitted to the USAT ground stations via NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) steerable beam. Received signal power at the two sites was measured and analyzed. A dedicated datalogger at each site recorded time-of-tip data from tipping bucket rain gauges, providing rain amount and instantaneous rain rate. WSR-88D data was also obtained for the collection period. Eleven events with ground-to-satellite slant-path precipitation and resultant signal attenuation were observed during the data collection period. Fade magnitude and duration were compared at the two sites and diversity gain was calculated. These results exceeded standard diversity gain model predictions by several decibels. Rain statistics from tipping bucket data and from radar data were also compared to signal attenuation. The nature of Florida's subtropical rainfall, specifically its impact on signal attenuation at the sites, was addressed.

  2. Silt fences: An economical technique for measuring hillslope soil erosion

    Treesearch

    Peter R. Robichaud; Robert E. Brown

    2002-01-01

    Measuring hillslope erosion has historically been a costly, time-consuming practice. An easy to install low-cost technique using silt fences (geotextile fabric) and tipping bucket rain gauges to measure onsite hillslope erosion was developed and tested. Equipment requirements, installation procedures, statistical design, and analysis methods for measuring hillslope...

  3. Impact Disdrometers Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility has been collecting observations of the drop size spectra of rain events since early in 2006. Impact disdrometers were the initial choice due to their reliability, ease of maintenance, and relatively low cost. Each of the two units deployed was accompanied by a nearby tipping bucket. In 2010, the tipping buckets were replaced by weighing buckets rain gauges. Five video disdrometers were subsequently purchased and are described in ARM’s VDIS Handbook.1 As of April 2011, three ofmore » the weighing bucket instruments were deployed, one was to travel with the second ARM Mobile Facility, and the fifth was a spare. Two of the video disdrometers were deployed, a third was to be deployed later in the spring of 2011, one was to travel with the second ARM Mobile Facility, and the last was a spare. Detailed descriptions of impact disdrometers and their datastreams are provided in this document.« less

  4. A High Precision $3.50 Open Source 3D Printed Rain Gauge Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Alcala, J. M.; Udell, C.; Selker, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Currently available rain gauge calibrators tend to be designed for specific rain gauges, are expensive, employ low-precision water reservoirs, and do not offer the flexibility needed to test the ever more popular small-aperture rain gauges. The objective of this project was to develop and validate a freely downloadable, open-source, 3D printed rain gauge calibrator that can be adjusted for a wide range of gauges. The proposed calibrator provides for applying low, medium, and high intensity flow, and allows the user to modify the design to conform to unique system specifications based on parametric design, which may be modified and printed using CAD software. To overcome the fact that different 3D printers yield different print qualities, we devised a simple post-printing step that controlled critical dimensions to assure robust performance. Specifically, the three orifices of the calibrator are drilled to reach the three target flow rates. Laboratory tests showed that flow rates were consistent between prints, and between trials of each part, while the total applied water was precisely controlled by the use of a volumetric flask as the reservoir.

  5. Measuring water and sediment discharge from a road plot with a settling basin and tipping bucket

    Treesearch

    Thomas A. Black; Charles H. Luce

    2013-01-01

    A simple empirical method quantifies water and sediment production from a forest road surface, and is well suited for calibration and validation of road sediment models. To apply this quantitative method, the hydrologic technician installs bordered plots on existing typical road segments and measures coarse sediment production in a settling tank. When a tipping bucket...

  6. Use of NEXRAD radar-based observations for quality control of in-situ rain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. R.; Prat, O.; Leeper, R.

    2017-12-01

    Rain gauge quality control is an often over looked important step in the archive of historical precipitation estimates. We investigate the possibilities that exist for using ground based radar networks for quality control of rain gauge measurements. This process includes the point to pixel comparisons of the rain gauge measurements with NEXRAD observations. There are two NEXRAD based data sets used for reference; the NCEP stage IV and the NWS MRMS gridded data sets. The NCEP stage IV data set is available at 4km hourly for the period 2002-present and includes the radar-gauge bias adjusted precipitation estimate. The NWS MRMS data set includes several different variables such as reflectivity, radar-only estimates, precipitation flag, and radar-gauge bias adjusted precipitation estimates. The latter product provides for much more information to apply quality control such as identification of precipitation type, identification of storm type and Z-R relation. In addition, some of the variables are available at 5-minute scale. The rain gauge networks that are investigated are the Climate Reference Network (CRN), the Fischer-Porter Hourly Precipitation Database (HPD), and the Hydrometeorological Automated Data System (HADS). The CRN network is available at the 5-minute scale, the HPD network is available at the 15-minute and hourly scale, and HADS is available at the hourly scale. The varying scales present challenges for comparisons. However given the higher resolution radar-based products we identify an optimal combination of rain gauge observations that can be compared to the radar-based information. The quality control process focuses on identifying faulty gauges in direct comparison while a deeper investigation focuses on event-based differences from light rain to extreme storms.

  7. A Computational Fluid-Dynamics Assessment of the Improved Performance of Aerodynamic Rain Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Pollock, Michael; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca G.; Dutton, Mark; O'Connell, Enda

    2018-02-01

    The airflow surrounding any catching-type rain gauge when impacted by wind is deformed by the presence of the gauge body, resulting in the acceleration of wind above the orifice of the gauge, which deflects raindrops and snowflakes away from the collector (the wind-induced undercatch). The method of mounting a gauge with the collector at or below the level of the ground, or the use of windshields to mitigate this effect, is often not practicable. The physical shape of a gauge has a significant impact on its collection efficiency. In this study, we show that appropriate "aerodynamic" shapes are able to reduce the deformation of the airflow, which can reduce undercatch. We have employed computational fluid-dynamic simulations to evaluate the time-averaged airflow realized around "aerodynamic" rain gauge shapes when impacted by wind. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for two standard "conventional" rain gauge shapes. The simulations have been run for different wind speeds and are based on a time-averaged Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes model. The shape of the aerodynamic gauges is shown to have a positive impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns observed around the orifice compared to the conventional shapes. Furthermore, the turbulent air velocity fields for the aerodynamic shapes present "recirculating" structures, which may improve the particle-catching capabilities of the gauge collector.

  8. Tracking rainfall impulses through progressively larger drainage basins in steep forested terrain

    Treesearch

    R. R. Ziemer; R. M. Rice

    1990-01-01

    Abstract - The precision of timing devices in modern electronic data loggers makes it possible to study the routing of water through small drainage basins having rapid responses to hydrologic impulses. Storm hyetographs were measured using digital tipping bucket rain gauges and their routing was observed at headwater piezometers located mid-slope, above a swale, and...

  9. Standard Fog Collector Measurements Along the Central and Northern California Coast During the 2014 and 2015 Fog Seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, D.; Torregrosa, A.; Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Mairs, A. A.; Wilson, S.; Bowman, M.; Barkley, T.; Gravelle, M.; Oliphant, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2014 an extensive network of standard fog collectors has been deployed along the coast of California, from as far south as southern Big Sur (36.1° N) to as far north as Arcata (40.8° N) at over a dozen sites that contain a total of several dozen of the fog collecting devices. This research is being done in conjunction with the Fognet Project that is looking at the levels of monomethyl mercury in fog water. Data collected reveal a fascinating variability in the amount of fog water collected across different scales of distance, elevation, time and location. In addition, a number of different types of mesh have been deployed and co-located to examine the variation in their fog water collecting capability in identical conditions. Mesh variations exhibit smaller variability across mesh type than had previously been expected. This study documents results found thus far across the network and also discusses the quantification of the errors associated with tipping bucket rain gauge measurements of water volumes and thus the importance of tipping bucket rain gauge calibration.

  10. 9-year distributions of rain intensities measured in Prague and their utilization in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvicera, V.; Grabner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental research in the Department of Frequency Engineering of the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) in Prague, the Czech Republic, is focused on stability of received signals on terrestrial radio and optical communication paths. Hydrometeors (rain, snow, fog, hails) can cause serious attenuation of electromagnetic waves in the frequency bands above 10 GHz and the availability performances of terrestrial radio communication systems are seriously affected by heavy hydrometeors events. The rain intensity data is usually used for the calculations of attenuation due to rain on terrestrial radio links in accordance with either the relevant ITU-R Recommendation or other methods. Therefore, our experimental research is also focused on our own meteorological measurements in the vicinity of experimental radio and optical paths. The heated tipping-bucket rain gauge with the collector area of 500 cm2 and the rain amount per tip of 0.1 mm is used at CMI for the measurements of intensities of hydrometeors. The time of tips is recorded with uncertainty of 1 second. Hydrometeors intensity data obtained from January 2003 to December 2011 (9 years of observation) was statistically processed over the individual years. All the recorded individual hydrometeor events were compared with the concurrent meteorological conditions and were carefully categorized according to the types of individual hydrometeors, i.e. rain, rain with snow, rain with hails, snow, fog, fog with rain, fog with snow, and fog with rain and snow. The obtained cumulative distributions (CDs) of intensities of individual hydrometeors over 9 years of observation will be presented and compared with the CD of intensities of all hydrometeors together. The rain amounts were examined too. The obtained rain amounts for individual years and the average rain amounts for individual months over the 9-year period will be given. The obtained CD of average 1-minute rain intensities for the average year over the 9-year period of

  11. Near-Millimeter Wave Technology Base Study: Volume I. Propagation and Target/Background Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    diameter test cell used for laser propagation measurements is Path length-84 m to 2.0 km available and has been designed for circulating aerosols or...36- and 110-GHz and found an attenuation ratio of comparison measurements along a 4-km path with rain rate measured near the receiver end. a *02 They...time. Tipping-bucket systems . gauges are reliable, but become increasingly in- accurate at high rates . Flow gauges which The direct field measurement

  12. Evaluation of SEVIRI-Derived Rain Rates and Accumulated Rainfall with TRMM-TMI and Rain Gauge Data over West-Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, E. L. A.; Roebeling, R. A.; Stammes, P.; Wang, P.; Ali, A.; Brissebrat, G.

    2009-11-01

    Clouds are of paramount importance to the hydrological cycle, as they influence the surface energy balance, thereby constraining the amount of energy available for evaporation, and their contribution through precipitation. Especially in regions where water availability is critical, such as in West-Africa, accurate determination of various terms of the hydrological cycle is warranted. At the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), an algorithm to retrieve Cloud Physical Properties (CPP) from mainly visible and near-infrared spectral channel radiances from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat-8 and -9 has been developed. Recently, this algorithm as been extended with a rain rate retrieval method. Evaluation of this geophysical quantity has been done with rain radar data over the Netherlands. This paper presents the first results of this rain rate retrieval over West-Africa for June 2006. In addition, the added value of the high temporal and spatial resolution of the SEVIRI instrument is shown. Over land, retrievals are compared with rain gauge observations performed during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) project and with a kriged dataset of the Comite Inter-Estate pour la Lutte contre la Secheresse au Sahel (CILSS) rain gauge network, whereas rain rate retrievals over ocean are evaluated using Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) data.

  13. Rain-rate data base development and rain-rate climate analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    The single-year rain-rate distribution data available within the archives of Consultative Committee for International Radio (CCIR) Study Group 5 were compiled into a data base for use in rain-rate climate modeling and for the preparation of predictions of attenuation statistics. The four year set of tip-time sequences provided by J. Goldhirsh for locations near Wallops Island were processed to compile monthly and annual distributions of rain rate and of event durations for intervals above and below preset thresholds. A four-year data set of tropical rain-rate tip-time sequences were acquired from the NASA TRMM program for 30 gauges near Darwin, Australia. They were also processed for inclusion in the CCIR data base and the expanded data base for monthly observations at the University of Oklahoma. The empirical rain-rate distributions (edfs) accepted for inclusion in the CCIR data base were used to estimate parameters for several rain-rate distribution models: the lognormal model, the Crane two-component model, and the three parameter model proposed by Moupfuma. The intent of this segment of the study is to obtain a limited set of parameters that can be mapped globally for use in rain attenuation predictions. If the form of the distribution can be established, then perhaps available climatological data can be used to estimate the parameters rather than requiring years of rain-rate observations to set the parameters. The two-component model provided the best fit to the Wallops Island data but the Moupfuma model provided the best fit to the Darwin data.

  14. Evaluating the catching performance of aerodynamic rain gauges through field comparisons and CFD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Lanza, Luca; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda

    2016-04-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement is a fundamental requirement in a broad range of applications including flood risk and water resource management. The most widely used method of measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, which is often also considered to be the most accurate. In the context of hydrological modelling, measurements from rain gauges are interpolated to produce an areal representation, which forms an important input to drive hydrological models and calibrate rainfall radars. In each stage of this process another layer of uncertainty is introduced. The initial measurement errors are propagated through the chain, compounding the overall uncertainty. This study looks at the fundamental source of error, in the rainfall measurement itself; and specifically addresses the largest of these, the systematic 'wind-induced' error. Snowfall is outside the scope. The shape of a precipitation gauge significantly affects its collection efficiency (CE), with respect to a reference measurement. This is due to the airflow around the gauge, which causes a deflection in the trajectories of the raindrops near the gauge orifice. Computational Fluid-Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to evaluate the time-averaged airflows realized around the EML ARG100, EML SBS500 and EML Kalyx-RG rain gauges, when impacted by wind. These gauges have a similar aerodynamic profile - a shape comparable to that of a champagne flute - and they are used globally. The funnel diameter of each gauge, respectively, is 252mm, 254mm and 127mm. The SBS500 is used by the UK Met Office and the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency. Terms of comparison are provided by the results obtained for standard rain gauge shapes manufactured by Casella and OTT which, respectively, have a uniform and a tapered cylindrical shape. The simulations were executed for five different wind speeds; 2, 5, 7, 10 and 18 ms-1. Results indicate that aerodynamic gauges have a different impact on the time-averaged airflow patterns

  15. Radar-rain-gauge rainfall estimation for hydrological applications in small catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Salvatore; Chiaravalloti, Francesco; Procopio, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    The accurate evaluation of the precipitation's time-spatial structure is a critical step for rainfall-runoff modelling. Particularly for small catchments, the variability of rainfall can lead to mismatched results. Large errors in flow evaluation may occur during convective storms, responsible for most of the flash floods in small catchments in the Mediterranean area. During such events, we may expect large spatial and temporal variability. Therefore, using rain-gauge measurements only can be insufficient in order to adequately depict extreme rainfall events. In this work, a double-level information approach, based on rain gauges and weather radar measurements, is used to improve areal rainfall estimations for hydrological applications. In order to highlight the effect that precipitation fields with different level of spatial details have on hydrological modelling, two kinds of spatial rainfall fields were computed for precipitation data collected during 2015, considering both rain gauges only and their merging with radar information. The differences produced by these two precipitation fields in the computation of the areal mean rainfall accumulation were evaluated considering 999 basins of the region Calabria, southern Italy. Moreover, both of the two precipitation fields were used to carry out rainfall-runoff simulations at catchment scale for main precipitation events that occurred during 2015 and the differences between the scenarios obtained in the two cases were analysed. A representative case study is presented in detail.

  16. Statistical approaches for the definition of landslide rainfall thresholds and their uncertainty using rain gauge and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Luciani, S.; Valigi, D.; Kirschbaum, D.; Brunetti, M. T.; Peruccacci, S.; Guzzetti, F.

    2017-05-01

    Models for forecasting rainfall-induced landslides are mostly based on the identification of empirical rainfall thresholds obtained exploiting rain gauge data. Despite their increased availability, satellite rainfall estimates are scarcely used for this purpose. Satellite data should be useful in ungauged and remote areas, or should provide a significant spatial and temporal reference in gauged areas. In this paper, the analysis of the reliability of rainfall thresholds based on rainfall remote sensed and rain gauge data for the prediction of landslide occurrence is carried out. To date, the estimation of the uncertainty associated with the empirical rainfall thresholds is mostly based on a bootstrap resampling of the rainfall duration and the cumulated event rainfall pairs (D,E) characterizing rainfall events responsible for past failures. This estimation does not consider the measurement uncertainty associated with D and E. In the paper, we propose (i) a new automated procedure to reconstruct ED conditions responsible for the landslide triggering and their uncertainties, and (ii) three new methods to identify rainfall threshold for the possible landslide occurrence, exploiting rain gauge and satellite data. In particular, the proposed methods are based on Least Square (LS), Quantile Regression (QR) and Nonlinear Least Square (NLS) statistical approaches. We applied the new procedure and methods to define empirical rainfall thresholds and their associated uncertainties in the Umbria region (central Italy) using both rain-gauge measurements and satellite estimates. We finally validated the thresholds and tested the effectiveness of the different threshold definition methods with independent landslide information. The NLS method among the others performed better in calculating thresholds in the full range of rainfall durations. We found that the thresholds obtained from satellite data are lower than those obtained from rain gauge measurements. This is in agreement

  17. Statistical Approaches for the Definition of Landslide Rainfall Thresholds and their Uncertainty Using Rain Gauge and Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, M.; Luciani, S.; Valigi, D.; Kirschbaum, D.; Brunetti, M. T.; Peruccacci, S.; Guzzetti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Models for forecasting rainfall-induced landslides are mostly based on the identification of empirical rainfall thresholds obtained exploiting rain gauge data. Despite their increased availability, satellite rainfall estimates are scarcely used for this purpose. Satellite data should be useful in ungauged and remote areas, or should provide a significant spatial and temporal reference in gauged areas. In this paper, the analysis of the reliability of rainfall thresholds based on rainfall remote sensed and rain gauge data for the prediction of landslide occurrence is carried out. To date, the estimation of the uncertainty associated with the empirical rainfall thresholds is mostly based on a bootstrap resampling of the rainfall duration and the cumulated event rainfall pairs (D,E) characterizing rainfall events responsible for past failures. This estimation does not consider the measurement uncertainty associated with D and E. In the paper, we propose (i) a new automated procedure to reconstruct ED conditions responsible for the landslide triggering and their uncertainties, and (ii) three new methods to identify rainfall threshold for the possible landslide occurrence, exploiting rain gauge and satellite data. In particular, the proposed methods are based on Least Square (LS), Quantile Regression (QR) and Nonlinear Least Square (NLS) statistical approaches. We applied the new procedure and methods to define empirical rainfall thresholds and their associated uncertainties in the Umbria region (central Italy) using both rain-gauge measurements and satellite estimates. We finally validated the thresholds and tested the effectiveness of the different threshold definition methods with independent landslide information. The NLS method among the others performed better in calculating thresholds in the full range of rainfall durations. We found that the thresholds obtained from satellite data are lower than those obtained from rain gauge measurements. This is in agreement

  18. A Dynamic Optimization Technique for Siting the NASA-Clark Atlanta Urban Rain Gauge Network (NCURN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Taylor, Layi

    2003-01-01

    NASA satellites and ground instruments have indicated that cities like Atlanta, Georgia may create or alter rainfall. Scientists speculate that the urban heat island caused by man-made surfaces in cities impact the heat and wind patterns that form clouds and rainfall. However, more conclusive evidence is required to substantiate findings from satellites. NASA, along with scientists at Clark Atlanta University, are implementing a dense, urban rain gauge network in the metropolitan Atlanta area to support a satellite validation program called Studies of PRecipitation Anomalies from Widespread Urban Landuse (SPRAWL). SPRAWL will be conducted during the summer of 2003 to further identify and understand the impact of urban Atlanta on precipitation variability. The paper provides an. overview of SPRAWL, which represents one of the more comprehensive efforts in recent years to focus exclusively on urban-impacted rainfall. The paper also introduces a novel technique for deploying rain gauges for SPRAWL. The deployment of the dense Atlanta network is unique because it utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Decision Support Systems (DSS) to optimize deployment of the rain gauges. These computer aided systems consider access to roads, drainage systems, tree cover, and other factors in guiding the deployment of the gauge network. GIS and DSS also provide decision-makers with additional resources and flexibility to make informed decisions while considering numerous factors. Also, the new Atlanta network and SPRAWL provide a unique opportunity to merge the high-resolution, urban rain gauge network with satellite-derived rainfall products to understand how cities are changing rainfall patterns, and possibly climate.

  19. Validation of the H-SAF precipitation product H03 over Greece using rain gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feidas, H.; Porcu, F.; Puca, S.; Rinollo, A.; Lagouvardos, C.; Kotroni, V.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive validation of the combined infrared/microwave H-SAF (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Support to Operational Hydrology and Water Management) precipitation product H03, for a 1-year period, using gauge observations from a relatively dense network of 233 stations over Greece. First, the quality of the interpolated data used to validate the precipitation product is assessed and a quality index is constructed based on parameters such as the density of the station network and the orography. Then, a validation analysis is conducted based on comparisons of satellite (H03) with interpolated rain gauge data to produce continuous and multi-categorical statistics at monthly and annual timescales by taking into account the different geophysical characteristics of the terrain (land, coast, sea, elevation). Finally, the impact of the quality of interpolated data on the validation statistics is examined in terms of different configurations of the interpolation model and the rain gauge network characteristics used in the interpolation. The possibility of using a quality index of the interpolated data as a filter in the validation procedure is also investigated. The continuous validation statistics show yearly root mean squared error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) corresponding to the 225 and 105 % of the mean rain rate, respectively. Mean error (ME) indicates a slight overall tendency for underestimation of the rain gauge rates, which takes large values for the high rain rates. In general, the H03 algorithm cannot retrieve very well the light (< 1 mm/h) and the convective type (>10 mm/h) precipitation. The poor correlation between satellite and gauge data points to algorithm problems in co-locating precipitation patterns. Seasonal comparison shows that retrieval errors are lower for cold months than in the summer months of the year. The multi-categorical statistics indicate that the H03 algorithm is able to discriminate efficiently

  20. A laboratory assessment of the measurement accuracy of weighing type rainfall intensity gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, M.; Chan, P. W.; Lanza, L. G.; La Barbera, P.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years the WMO Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation (CIMO) fostered noticeable advancements in the accuracy of precipitation measurement issue by providing recommendations on the standardization of equipment and exposure, instrument calibration and data correction as a consequence of various comparative campaigns involving manufacturers and national meteorological services from the participating countries (Lanza et al., 2005; Vuerich et al., 2009). Extreme events analysis is proven to be highly affected by the on-site RI measurement accuracy (see e.g. Molini et al., 2004) and the time resolution of the available RI series certainly constitutes another key-factor in constructing hyetographs that are representative of real rain events. The OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauge (WG) and the GEONOR T-200 vibrating-wire precipitation gauge demonstrated very good performance under previous constant flow rate calibration efforts (Lanza et al., 2005). Although WGs do provide better performance than more traditional Tipping Bucket Rain gauges (TBR) under continuous and constant reference intensity, dynamic effects seem to affect the accuracy of WG measurements under real world/time varying rainfall conditions (Vuerich et al., 2009). The most relevant is due to the response time of the acquisition system and the derived systematic delay of the instrument in assessing the exact weight of the bin containing cumulated precipitation. This delay assumes a relevant role in case high resolution rain intensity time series are sought from the instrument, as is the case of many hydrologic and meteo-climatic applications. This work reports the laboratory evaluation of Pluvio2 and T-200 rainfall intensity measurements accuracy. Tests are carried out by simulating different artificial precipitation events, namely non-stationary rainfall intensity, using a highly accurate dynamic rainfall generator. Time series measured by an Ogawa drop counter (DC) at a field test site

  1. Evaluation and design of a rain gauge network using a statistical optimization method in a severe hydro-geological hazard prone area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoruso, Grazia; Longobardi, Antonia; Pizzuti, Alfredo; Molinara, Mario; Marocco, Claudio; De Vito, Saverio; Tortorella, Francesco; Di Francia, Girolamo

    2017-06-01

    Rainfall data collection gathered in continuous by a distributed rain gauge network is instrumental to more effective hydro-geological risk forecasting and management services though the input estimated rainfall fields suffer from prediction uncertainty. Optimal rain gauge networks can generate accurate estimated rainfall fields. In this research work, a methodology has been investigated for evaluating an optimal rain gauges network aimed at robust hydrogeological hazard investigations. The rain gauges of the Sarno River basin (Southern Italy) has been evaluated by optimizing a two-objective function that maximizes the estimated accuracy and minimizes the total metering cost through the variance reduction algorithm along with the climatological variogram (time-invariant). This problem has been solved by using an enumerative search algorithm, evaluating the exact Pareto-front by an efficient computational time.

  2. Effective application of optical sensing technology for sustainable liquid level sensing and rainfall measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Muhammad Hassan Bin

    2015-05-01

    Rainfall measurement is performed on regular basis to facilitate effectively the weather stations and local inhabitants. Different types of rain gauges are available with different measuring principle for rainfall measurement. In this research work, a novel optical rain sensor is designed, which precisely calculate the rainfall level according to rainfall intensity. This proposed optical rain sensor model introduced in this paper, which is basically designed for remote sensing of rainfall and it designated as R-ORMS (Remote Optical Rainfall Measurement sensor). This sensor is combination of some improved method of tipping bucket rain gauge and most of the optical hydreon rain sensor's principle. This optical sensor can detect the starting time and ending time of rain, rain intensity and rainfall level. An infrared beam from Light Emitting Diode (LED) through powerful convex lens can accurately determines the diameter of each rain drops by total internal reflection principle. Calculations of these accumulative results determine the rain intensity and rainfall level. Accurate rainfall level is determined by internal optical LED based sensor which is embedded in bucket wall. This internal sensor is also following the total internal reflection (TIR) principle and the Fresnel's law. This is an entirely novel design of optical sensing principle based rain sensor and also suitable for remote sensing rainfall level. The performance of this proposed sensor has been comprehensively compared with other sensors with similar attributes and it showed better and sustainable result. Future related works have been proposed at the end of this paper, to provide improved and enhanced performance of proposed novel rain sensor.

  3. An evaluation of the uncertainty of extreme events statistics at the WMO/CIMO Lead Centre on precipitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, M.; Lanza, L. G.; La Barbera, P.

    2012-12-01

    Improving the quality of point-scale rainfall measurements is a crucial issue fostered in recent years by the WMO Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation (CIMO) by providing recommendations on the standardization of equipment and exposure, instrument calibration and data correction as a consequence of various comparative campaigns involving manufacturers and national meteorological services from the participating countries. The WMO/CIMO Lead Centre on Precipitation Intensity (LC) was recently constituted, in a joint effort between the Dep. of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering of the University of Genova and the Italian Air Force Met Service, gathering the considerable asset of data and information achieved by the past infield and laboratory campaigns with the aim of researching novel methodologies for improving the accuracy of rainfall intensity (RI) measurement techniques. Among the ongoing experimental activities carried out by the LC laboratory particular attention is paid to the reliability evaluation of extreme rainfall events statistics , a common tool in the engineering practice for urban and non urban drainage system design, based on real world observations obtained from weighing gauges. Extreme events statistics were proven already to be highly affected by the traditional tipping-bucket rain gauge RI measurement inaccuracy (La Barbera et al., 2002) and the time resolution of the available RI series certainly constitutes another key-factor in the reliability of the derived hyetographs. The present work reports the LC laboratory efforts in assembling a rainfall simulation system to reproduce the inner temporal structure of the rainfall process by means of dedicated calibration and validation tests. This allowed testing of catching type rain gauges under non-steady flow conditions and quantifying, in a first instance, the dynamic behaviour of the investigated instruments. Considerations about the influence of the dynamic response on

  4. BOREAS HYD-9 Belfort Rain Gauge Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Kouwen, Nick; Soulis, Ric; Jenkinson, Wayne; Graham, Allyson; Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-6 team collected several data sets related to the moisture content of soil and overlying humus layers. This data set contains water content measurements of the moss/humus layer, where it existed. These data were collected along various flight lines in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA) during 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The HYD-9 Belfort rain gauge data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Optical Extinction Measurements of Laser Side-Scatter During Tropical Storm Colin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip; Michaelides, Silas

    2017-01-01

    A side-scatter imaging (SSI) technique using a 447 nm, 500 mW laser and a Nikon D80 camera was tested at Kennedy Space Center, Florida during the passing of a rain band associated with Tropical Storm Colin. The June 6, 2016, 22:00 GMT rain event was intense but short-lived owing to the strong west-to-east advection of the rain band. An effort to validate the optical extinction measurement was conducted by setting up a line of three tipping rain gauges along an 80 m east-west path and below the laser beam. Differences between tipping bucket measurements were correlated to the extinction coefficient profile along the lasers path, as determined by the SSI measurement. In order to compare the tipping bucket to the optical extinction data, a Marshall-Palmer DSD model was assumed. Since this was a daytime event, the laser beam was difficult to detect in the camera images, pointing out an important limitation of SSI measurements: the practical limit of DSD density that can be effectively detected and analyzed under daylight conditions using this laser and camera, corresponds to a fairly moderate rainfall rate on the order of 20 mmh (night measurements achieve a much improved sensitivity). The SSI analysis model under test produced promising results, but in order to use the SSI method for routine meteorological studies, improvements to the math model will be required.

  6. Testing geostatistical methods to combine radar and rain gauges for precipitation mapping in a mountainous region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdin, R.; Frei, C.; Sideris, I.; Kuensch, H.-R.

    2010-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for accurate mapping of precipitation at a spatial resolution of kilometers. Radar and rain gauges - the two main precipitation measurement systems - exhibit complementary strengths and weaknesses. Radar offers high spatial and temporal resolution but lacks accuracy of absolute values, whereas rain gauges provide accurate values at their specific point location but suffer from poor spatial representativeness. Methods of geostatistical mapping have been proposed to combine radar and rain gauge data for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). The aim is to combine the respective strengths and compensate for the respective weaknesses of the two observation platforms. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of these methods over topography of moderate complexity, but their performance remains unclear for high-mountain regions where rainfall patterns are complex, the representativeness of rain gauge measurements is limited and radar observations are obstructed. In this study we examine the potential and limitations of two frequently used geostatistical mapping methods for the territory of Switzerland, where the mountain chain of the Alps poses particular challenges to QPE. The two geostatistical methods explored are kriging with external drift (KED) using radar as drift variable and ordinary kriging of radar errors (OKRE). The radar data is a composite from three C-band radars using a constant Z-R relationship, advanced correction processings for visibility, ground clutter and beam shielding and a climatological bias adjustment. The rain gauge data originates from an automatic network with a typical inter-station distance of 25 km. Both combination methods are applied to a set of case examples representing typical rainfall situations in the Alps with their inherent challenges at daily and hourly time resolution. The quality of precipitation estimates is assessed by several skill scores calculated from cross validation errors at

  7. Turbine bucket for use in gas turbine engines and methods for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-06-03

    A turbine bucket for use with a turbine engine. The turbine bucket includes an airfoil that extends between a root end and a tip end. The airfoil includes an outer wall that defines a cavity that extends from the root end to the tip end. The outer wall includes a first ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrate that extends a first distance from the root end to the tip end. An inner wall is positioned within the cavity. The inner wall includes a second CMC substrate that extends a second distance from the root end towards the tip end that is different than the first distance.

  8. Quality-control of an hourly rainfall dataset and climatology of extremes for the UK.

    PubMed

    Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lewis, Elizabeth; Chan, Steven C; Fowler, Hayley J

    2017-02-01

    Sub-daily rainfall extremes may be associated with flash flooding, particularly in urban areas but, compared with extremes on daily timescales, have been relatively little studied in many regions. This paper describes a new, hourly rainfall dataset for the UK based on ∼1600 rain gauges from three different data sources. This includes tipping bucket rain gauge data from the UK Environment Agency (EA), which has been collected for operational purposes, principally flood forecasting. Significant problems in the use of such data for the analysis of extreme events include the recording of accumulated totals, high frequency bucket tips, rain gauge recording errors and the non-operation of gauges. Given the prospect of an intensification of short-duration rainfall in a warming climate, the identification of such errors is essential if sub-daily datasets are to be used to better understand extreme events. We therefore first describe a series of procedures developed to quality control this new dataset. We then analyse ∼380 gauges with near-complete hourly records for 1992-2011 and map the seasonal climatology of intense rainfall based on UK hourly extremes using annual maxima, n-largest events and fixed threshold approaches. We find that the highest frequencies and intensities of hourly extreme rainfall occur during summer when the usual orographically defined pattern of extreme rainfall is replaced by a weaker, north-south pattern. A strong diurnal cycle in hourly extremes, peaking in late afternoon to early evening, is also identified in summer and, for some areas, in spring. This likely reflects the different mechanisms that generate sub-daily rainfall, with convection dominating during summer. The resulting quality-controlled hourly rainfall dataset will provide considerable value in several contexts, including the development of standard, globally applicable quality-control procedures for sub-daily data, the validation of the new generation of very high

  9. Quality‐control of an hourly rainfall dataset and climatology of extremes for the UK

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Chan, Steven C.; Fowler, Hayley J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sub‐daily rainfall extremes may be associated with flash flooding, particularly in urban areas but, compared with extremes on daily timescales, have been relatively little studied in many regions. This paper describes a new, hourly rainfall dataset for the UK based on ∼1600 rain gauges from three different data sources. This includes tipping bucket rain gauge data from the UK Environment Agency (EA), which has been collected for operational purposes, principally flood forecasting. Significant problems in the use of such data for the analysis of extreme events include the recording of accumulated totals, high frequency bucket tips, rain gauge recording errors and the non‐operation of gauges. Given the prospect of an intensification of short‐duration rainfall in a warming climate, the identification of such errors is essential if sub‐daily datasets are to be used to better understand extreme events. We therefore first describe a series of procedures developed to quality control this new dataset. We then analyse ∼380 gauges with near‐complete hourly records for 1992–2011 and map the seasonal climatology of intense rainfall based on UK hourly extremes using annual maxima, n‐largest events and fixed threshold approaches. We find that the highest frequencies and intensities of hourly extreme rainfall occur during summer when the usual orographically defined pattern of extreme rainfall is replaced by a weaker, north–south pattern. A strong diurnal cycle in hourly extremes, peaking in late afternoon to early evening, is also identified in summer and, for some areas, in spring. This likely reflects the different mechanisms that generate sub‐daily rainfall, with convection dominating during summer. The resulting quality‐controlled hourly rainfall dataset will provide considerable value in several contexts, including the development of standard, globally applicable quality‐control procedures for sub‐daily data, the validation of the new

  10. Climatological Characterization of Three-Dimensional Storm Structure from Operational Radar and Rain Gauge Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Matthias; Houze, Robert A., Jr.; Yuter, Sandra E.

    1995-09-01

    Three algorithms extract information on precipitation type, structure, and amount from operational radar and rain gauge data. Tests on one month of data from one site show that the algorithms perform accurately and provide products that characterize the essential features of the precipitation climatology. Input to the algorithms are the operationally executed volume scans of a radar and the data from a surrounding rain gauge network. The algorithms separate the radar echoes into convective and stratiform regions, statistically summarize the vertical structure of the radar echoes, and determine precipitation rates and amounts on high spatial resolution.The convective and stratiform regions are separated on the basis of the intensity and sharpness of the peaks of echo intensity. The peaks indicate the centers of the convective region. Precipitation not identified as convective is stratiform. This method avoids the problem of underestimating the stratiform precipitation. The separation criteria are applied in exactly the same way throughout the observational domain and the product generated by the algorithm can be compared directly to model output. An independent test of the algorithm on data for which high-resolution dual-Doppler observations are available shows that the convective stratiform separation algorithm is consistent with the physical definitions of convective and stratiform precipitation.The vertical structure algorithm presents the frequency distribution of radar reflectivity as a function of height and thus summarizes in a single plot the vertical structure of all the radar echoes observed during a month (or any other time period). Separate plots reveal the essential differences in structure between the convective and stratiform echoes.Tests yield similar results (within less than 10%) for monthly rain statistics regardless of the technique used for estimating the precipitation, as long as the radar reflectivity values are adjusted to agree with monthly

  11. 25-Gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of glass and other intraocular foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Kumar, Abiraj; Gupta, Vishali; Dogra, Mangat R

    2016-04-01

    To describe the use of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip in removal of intraocular foreign bodies, including glass. Retrospective, noncomparative, interventional study. Eleven eyes of 11 patients who underwent the procedure between January 2013 and April 2015. The study included 10 males and 1 female with a mean age of 31.27 ± 9.64 years (range 12-45 years). All eyes in which 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of intraocular foreign body (IOFB) was done in a sutureless vitrectomy setup, irrespective of the nature of IOFB, were included. We excluded the participants with less than 6 months of postoperative follow-up. The primary outcome of the study was to assess the feasibility and reproducibility of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal of IOFB. The secondary outcome measures included change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and intraoperative and postoperative complications. There were iron (6), glass (2), wooden (1), pellet (1), and stone (1) IOFBs, for which 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip-assisted removal was done successfully. The mean BCVA in Snellen's decimal equivalent improved significantly from 0.14 ± 0.16 to 0.34 ± 0.36 with a mean follow-up of 12 months (range 6-24 months). Intraoperatively, drop of IOFB because of loss of vacuum was observed in 2 eyes. Postoperatively, cystoid macular edema with epiretinal membrane was seen in 1 eye. There were no other intraoperative and postoperative complications. Use of 25-gauge active aspiration silicon tip to assist removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic IOFBs is a feasible and reproducible procedure, and required instrumentation is readily available in present-day vitrectomy era. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of NEXRAD multisensor precipitation estimates to rain gage observations in and near DuPage County, Illinois, 2002–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spies, Ryan R.; Over, Thomas M.; Ortel, Terry W.

    2018-05-21

    In this report, precipitation data from 2002 to 2012 from the hourly gridded Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD)-based Multisensor Precipitation Estimate (MPE) precipitation product are compared to precipitation data from two rain gage networks—an automated tipping bucket network of 25 rain gages operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and 51 rain gages from the volunteer-operated Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow (CoCoRaHS) network—in and near DuPage County, Illinois, at a daily time step to test for long-term differences in space, time, and distribution. The NEXRAD–MPE data that are used are from the fifty 2.5-mile grid cells overlying the rain gages from the other networks. Because of the challenges of measuring of frozen precipitation, the analysis period is separated between days with or without the chance of freezing conditions. The NEXRAD–MPE and tipping-bucket rain gage precipitation data are adjusted to account for undercatch by multiplying by a previously determined factor of 1.14. Under nonfreezing conditions, the three precipitation datasets are broadly similar in cumulative depth and distribution of daily values when the data are combined spatially across the networks. However, the NEXRAD–MPE data indicate a significant trend relative to both rain gage networks as a function of distance from the NEXRAD radar just south of the study area. During freezing conditions, of the USGS network rain gages only the heated gages were considered, and these gages indicate substantial mean undercatch of 50 and 61 percent compared to the NEXRAD–MPE and the CoCoRaHS gages, respectively. The heated USGS rain gages also indicate substantially lower quantile values during freezing conditions, except during the most extreme (highest) events. Because NEXRAD precipitation products are continually evolving, the report concludes with a discussion of recent changes in those products and their potential for improved precipitation estimation. An appendix

  13. Development of a low-budget, remote, solar powered, and self-operating rain gauge for spatial rainfall real time data monitoring in pristine and urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiei Shiva, J.; Chandler, D. G.; Nucera, K. J.; Valinski, N.

    2016-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the main components of the hydrological cycle and simulations and it is generally stated as an average value for the study area. However, due to high spatial variability of precipitation in some situations, more precise local data is required. In order to acquire the precipitation data, interpolation of neighbor gauged precipitation data is used which is the most affordable technique for a watershed scale study. Moreover, novel spatial rain measurements such as Doppler radars and satellite image processing have been widely used in recent studies. Although, due to impediments in the radar data processing and the effect of the local setting on the accuracy of the interpolated data, the local measurement of the precipitation remains as one of the most reliable approaches in attaining rain data. In this regard, development of a low-budget, remote, solar powered, and self-operating rain gauge for spatial rainfall real time data monitoring for pristine and urban areas has been presented in this research. The proposed rain gauge consists of two main parts: (a) hydraulic instruments and (b) electrical devices. The hydraulic instruments will collect the rain fall and store it in a PVC container which is connected to the high sensitivity pressure transducer systems. These electrical devices will transmit the data via cellphone networks which will be available for further analysis in less than one minute, after processing. The above-mentioned real time rain fall data can be employed in the precipitation measurement and the evaporation estimation. Due to the installed solar panel for battery recharging and designed siphon system for draining cumulative rain, this device is considered as a self-operating rain gauge. At this time, more than ten rain gauges are built and installed in the urban area of Syracuse, NY. Furthermore, these data are also useful for calibration and validation of data obtained by other rain gauging devices and estimation techniques

  14. An Experimental Study of the Rainfall Variability Within TRMM/GPM Precipitation Radar and Microwave Sensor Instantaneous Field of View During MC3E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Petersen, Arthur; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Dual tipping bucket gauges were operated at 16 sites in support of ground based precipitation measurements during Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The experiment is conducted in North Central Oklahoma from April 22 through June 6, 2011. The gauge sites were distributed around Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research facility where the minimum and maximum separation distances ranged from 1 to 12 km. This study investigates the rainfall variability by employing the stretched exponential function. It will focus on the quantitative assessment of the partial beam of the experiment area in both convective and stratiform rain. The parameters of the exponential function will also be determined for various events. This study is unique for two reasons. First is the existing gauge setup and the second is the highly convective nature of the events with rain rates well above 100 mm h-1 for 20 minutes. We will compare the findings with previous studies.

  15. An Experimental Study of the Rainfall Variability Within TRMM/GPM Precipitation Radar and Microwave Sensor Instantaneous Field of View During MC3E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Petersen, Walter Arthur; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matt; Wolff, David B.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Dual tipping bucket gauges were operated at 16 sites in support of ground based precipitation measurements during Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The experiment is conducted in North Central Oklahoma from April 22 through June 6, 2011. The gauge sites were distributed around Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research facility where the minimum and maximum separation distances ranged from 1 to 12 km. This study investigates the rainfall variability by employing the stretched exponential function. It will focus on the quantitative assessment of the partial beam of the experiment area in both convective and stratiform rain. The parameters of the exponential function will also be determined for various events. This study is unique for two reasons. First is the existing gauge setup and the second is the highly convective nature of the events with rain rates well above 100 mm/h for 20 minutes. We will compare the findings with previous studies.

  16. So, How Much of the Earth's Surface Is Covered by Rain Gauges?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Chris; Becker, Andreas; Huffman, George J.; Muller, Catherine L.; Joe, Paul; Jackson, Gail; Kirschbaum, Dalia

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of global precipitation, both rainfall and snowfall, is critical to a wide range of users and applications. Rain gauges are indispensable in the measurement of precipitation, remaining the de facto standard for precipitation information across Earths surface for hydrometeorological purposes. However, their distribution across the globe is limited: over land their distribution and density is variable, while over oceans very few gauges exist and where measurements are made, they may not adequately reflect the rainfall amounts of the broader area. Critically, the number of gauges available, or appropriate for a particular study, varies greatly across the Earth owing to temporal sampling resolutions, periods of operation, data latency, and data access. Numbers of gauges range from a few thousand available in nearreal time to about 100,000 for all official gauges, and to possibly hundreds of thousands if all possible gauges are included. Gauges routinely used in the generation of global precipitation products cover an equivalent area of between about 250 and 3,000 m2. For comparison, the center circle of a soccer pitch or tennis court is about 260 m2. Although each gauge should represent more than just the gauge orifice, autocorrelation distances of precipitation vary greatly with regime and the integration period. Assuming each Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC)available gauge is independent and represents a surrounding area of 5-km radius, this represents only about 1 of Earths surface. The situation is further confounded for snowfall, which has a greater measurement uncertainty.

  17. So, How Much of the Earth's Surface Is Covered by Rain Gauges?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Chris; Becker, Andreas; Huffman, George J.; Muller, Catherine L.; Joe, Paul; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kirschbaum, Dalia B.

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of global precipitation, both rainfall and snowfall, is critical to a wide range of users and applications. Rain gauges are indispensable in the measurement of precipitation, remaining the de facto standard for precipitation information across Earths surface for hydrometeorological purposes. However, their distribution across the globe is limited: over land their distribution and density is variable, while over oceans very few gauges exist and where measurements are made, they may not adequately reflect the rainfall amounts of the broader area. Critically, the number of gauges available, or appropriate for a particular study, varies greatly across the Earth owing to temporal sampling resolutions, periods of operation, data latency, and data access. Numbers of gauges range from a few thousand available in near real time to about 100,000 for all official gauges, and to possibly hundreds of thousands if all possible gauges are included. Gauges routinely used in the generation of global precipitation products cover an equivalent area of between about 250 and 3,000 sq m. For comparison, the center circle of a soccer pitch or tennis court is about 260 sq m. Although each gauge should represent more than just the gauge orifice, autocorrelation distances of precipitation vary greatly with regime and the integration period. Assuming each Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) available gauge is independent and represents a surrounding area of 5-km radius, this represents only about 1% of Earths surface. The situation is further confounded for snowfall, which has a greater measurement uncertainty.

  18. A real-time automated quality control of rain gauge data based on multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    qi, Y.; Zhang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most important meteorological and hydrological variables. Automated rain gauge networks provide direct measurements of precipitation and have been used for numerous applications such as generating regional and national precipitation maps, calibrating remote sensing data, and validating hydrological and meteorological model predictions. Automated gauge observations are prone to a variety of error sources (instrument malfunction, transmission errors, format changes), and require careful quality controls (QC). Many previous gauge QC techniques were based on neighborhood checks within the gauge network itself and the effectiveness is dependent on gauge densities and precipitation regimes. The current study takes advantage of the multi-sensor data sources in the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor QPE (NMQ/Q2) system and developes an automated gauge QC scheme based the consistency of radar hourly QPEs and gauge observations. Error characteristics of radar and gauge as a function of the radar sampling geometry, precipitation regimes, and the freezing level height are considered. The new scheme was evaluated by comparing an NMQ national gauge-based precipitation product with independent manual gauge observations. Twelve heavy rainfall events from different seasons and areas of the United States are selected for the evaluation, and the results show that the new NMQ product with QC'ed gauges has a more physically spatial distribution than the old product. And the new product agrees much better statistically with the independent gauges.

  19. Dynamic gauge adjustment of high-resolution X-band radar data for convective rain storms: Model-based evaluation against measured combined sewer overflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borup, Morten; Grum, Morten; Linde, Jens Jørgen; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that radar rainfall estimates need to be adjusted against rain gauge measurements in order to be useful for hydrological modelling. In the current study we investigate if adjustment can improve radar rainfall estimates to the point where they can be used for modelling overflows from urban drainage systems, and we furthermore investigate the importance of the aggregation period of the adjustment scheme. This is done by continuously adjusting X-band radar data based on the previous 5-30 min of rain data recorded by multiple rain gauges and propagating the rainfall estimates through a hydraulic urban drainage model. The model is built entirely from physical data, without any calibration, to avoid bias towards any specific type of rainfall estimate. The performance is assessed by comparing measured and modelled water levels at a weir downstream of a highly impermeable, well defined, 64 ha urban catchment, for nine overflow generating rain events. The dynamically adjusted radar data perform best when the aggregation period is as small as 10-20 min, in which case it performs much better than static adjusted radar data and data from rain gauges situated 2-3 km away.

  20. Correction of electronic record for weighing bucket precipitation gauge measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electronic sensors generate valuable streams of forcing and validation data for hydrologic models, but are often subject to noise, which must be removed as part of model input and testing database development. We developed Automated Precipitation Correction Program (APCP) for weighting bucket preci...

  1. A Student-Centered Field Project Comparing NEXRAD and Rain Gauge Precipitation Values in Mountainous Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltemade, Christopher J.; Stanitski-Martin, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduate students compared Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) estimates of storm total precipitation to measurements from a network of 20 rain gauges. Student researchers gained valuable experience in field data collection, global positioning systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), Internet data access and downloading,…

  2. Comparison Of Quantitative Precipitation Estimates Derived From Rain Gauge And Radar Derived Algorithms For Operational Flash Flood Support.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, D. P.; Kodama, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide continuous flash flood situational awareness and to better differentiate severity of ongoing individual precipitation events, the National Weather Service Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM) is being implemented over Hawaii and Alaska. In the implementation process of RDHM, three gridded precipitation analyses are used as forcing. The first analysis is a radar only precipitation estimate derived from WSR-88D digital hybrid reflectivity, a Z-R relationship and aggregated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid. The second analysis is derived from a rain gauge network and interpolated into an hourly ¼ HRAP grid using PRISM climatology. The third analysis is derived from a rain gauge network where rain gauges are assigned static pre-determined weights to derive a uniform mean areal precipitation that is applied over a catchment on a ¼ HRAP grid. To assess the effect of different QPE analyses on the accuracy of RDHM simulations and to potentially identify a preferred analysis for operational use, each QPE was used to force RDHM to simulate stream flow for 20 USGS peak flow events. An evaluation of the RDHM simulations was focused on peak flow magnitude, peak flow timing, and event volume accuracy to be most relevant for operational use. Results showed RDHM simulations based on the observed rain gauge amounts were more accurate in simulating peak flow magnitude and event volume relative to the radar derived analysis. However this result was not consistent for all 20 events nor was it consistent for a few of the rainfall events where an annual peak flow was recorded at more than one USGS gage. Implications of this indicate that a more robust QPE forcing with the inclusion of uncertainty derived from the three analyses may provide a better input for simulating extreme peak flow events.

  3. Suitability of standard rain-gauge networks for recording maximum intensity of rainstorms. Examples from the Mediterranean area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Salvatore; Gariano, Stefano Luigi; Iovine, Giulio; Mondini, Alessandro; Terranova, Oreste

    2014-05-01

    Heavy rainstorms often cause natural disasters with damage to the built up environment, injures and victims, strongly hampering social and economic development in the Mediterranean area. Accuracy in space and time of rainfall measurements is a pre-requisite for any attempt of hydrological modelling. Unfortunately, except for a few areas subject to experimentation, rain gauge networks are generally inadequate to describe the spatial distribution of the rainfall. Pluviometric data have hence to be integrated by considering other types of sources. Thanks to its characteristics, mainly in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, the METEOSAT of second generation (MSG) allows for an accurate observation of clouds, and then of the rainstorms, over the entire European territory. More in detail, origin and development of clouds associated to extreme events can be monitored, and the peculiar structures of severe convective rainstorms can be characterized. By the way, several studies pointed out correlations among physical parameters obtained from satellite images and rainstorm intensities. In the Mediterranean area, short rainstorm events are usually associated to cumulonimbus that exhibit a high vertical development. Their top may reach the stratosphere, at 12-13 km above the ground, where the the clouds diverge horizontally to form the typical "anvil". Such notable spreading of the anvil testifies a strong divergence, i.e. upwelling of the air, due to convection. Moreover, due to the limited size of the rainstorm cells (generally, in the order of few tens of km), the maximum intensity can only rarely be recorded by traditional rain gauge networks. Hydrological analyses commonly point out wrong return periods estimations, especially for highly localized and spatially variable events. Despite the huge amount of data, available computer power and storage capacity allow to include in a GIS environment all territorial information, including those derived from satellite images

  4. Validation of Satellite Precipitation Products Using Local Rain Gauges to Support Water Assessment in Cochabamba, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, O.

    2017-12-01

    The metropolitan region of Cochabamba has been struggling for a consistent water supply master plan for years. The limited precipitation intensities and growing water demand have led to severe water conflicts since 2000 when the fight for water had international visibility. A new dam has just placed into operation, located at the mountain range north of the city, which is the hope to fulfill partially water demand in the region. Looking for feasible water sources and projects are essential to fulfill demand. However, the limited monitoring network composed by conventional rain gauges are not enough to come up with the proper aerial precipitation patterns. This study explores the capabilities of GSMaP-GPM satellite products combined with local rain gauge network to obtain an enhanced product with spatial and temporal resolution. A simple methodology based on penalty factors is proposed to adjust GSMaP-GPM intensities on grid-by-grid basis. The distance of an evaluated grid to the surrounding rain gauges was taken into account. The final correcting factors were obtained by iteration, at this particular case of study four iterations were enough to reduce the relative error. A distributed hydrological model was forced with the enhanced precipitation product to simulate the inflow to the new operating dam. Once the model parameters were calibrated and validated, forecast simulations were run. For the short term, the precipitation trend was projected using exponential equation. As for the long term projection, precipitation and temperature from the hadGEM2 and MIROC global circulation model outputs were used where the last one was found in closer agreement of predictions in the past. Overall, we found out that the amount of 1000 l/s for water supply to the region should be possible to fulfill till 2030. Beyond this year, the intake of two neighboring basins should be constructed to increase the stored volume. This is study was found particularly useful to forecast river

  5. DAPAGLOCO - A global daily precipitation dataset from satellite and rain-gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangehl, T.; Danielczok, A.; Dietzsch, F.; Andersson, A.; Schroeder, M.; Fennig, K.; Ziese, M.; Becker, A.

    2017-12-01

    The BMBF funded project framework MiKlip(Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen) develops a global climate forecast system on decadal time scales for operational applications. Herein, the DAPAGLOCO project (Daily Precipitation Analysis for the validation of Global medium-range Climate predictions Operationalized) provides a global precipitation dataset as a combination of microwave-based satellite measurements over ocean and rain gauge measurements over land on daily scale. The DAPAGLOCO dataset is created for the evaluation of the MiKlip forecast system in the first place. The HOAPS dataset (Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameter and Fluxes from Satellite data) is used for the derivation of precipitation rates over ocean and is extended by the use of measurements from TMI, GMI, and AMSR-E, in addition to measurements from SSM/I and SSMIS. A 1D-Var retrieval scheme is developed to retrieve rain rates from microwave imager data, which also allows for the determination of uncertainty estimates. Over land, the GPCC (Global Precipitation Climatology Center) Full Data Daily product is used. It consists of rain gauge measurements that are interpolated on a regular grid by ordinary Kriging. The currently available dataset is based on a neuronal network approach, consists of 21 years of data from 1988 to 2008 and is currently extended until 2015 using the 1D-Var scheme and with improved sampling. Three different spatial resolved dataset versions are available with 1° and 2.5° global, and 0.5° for Europe. The evaluation of the MiKlip forecast system by DAPAGLOCO is based on ETCCDI (Expert Team on Climate Change and Detection Indices). Hindcasts are used for the index-based comparison between model and observations. These indices allow for the evaluation of precipitation extremes, their spatial and temporal distribution as well as for the duration of dry and wet spells, average precipitation amounts and percentiles on global scale. Besides, an ETCCDI-based climatology of the DAPAGLOCO

  6. A non-parametric automatic blending methodology to estimate rainfall fields from rain gauge and radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Forero, Carlos A.; Sempere-Torres, Daniel; Cassiraga, Eduardo F.; Jaime Gómez-Hernández, J.

    2009-07-01

    Quantitative estimation of rainfall fields has been a crucial objective from early studies of the hydrological applications of weather radar. Previous studies have suggested that flow estimations are improved when radar and rain gauge data are combined to estimate input rainfall fields. This paper reports new research carried out in this field. Classical approaches for the selection and fitting of a theoretical correlogram (or semivariogram) model (needed to apply geostatistical estimators) are avoided in this study. Instead, a non-parametric technique based on FFT is used to obtain two-dimensional positive-definite correlograms directly from radar observations, dealing with both the natural anisotropy and the temporal variation of the spatial structure of the rainfall in the estimated fields. Because these correlation maps can be automatically obtained at each time step of a given rainfall event, this technique might easily be used in operational (real-time) applications. This paper describes the development of the non-parametric estimator exploiting the advantages of FFT for the automatic computation of correlograms and provides examples of its application on a case study using six rainfall events. This methodology is applied to three different alternatives to incorporate the radar information (as a secondary variable), and a comparison of performances is provided. In particular, their ability to reproduce in estimated rainfall fields (i) the rain gauge observations (in a cross-validation analysis) and (ii) the spatial patterns of radar fields are analyzed. Results seem to indicate that the methodology of kriging with external drift [KED], in combination with the technique of automatically computing 2-D spatial correlograms, provides merged rainfall fields with good agreement with rain gauges and with the most accurate approach to the spatial tendencies observed in the radar rainfall fields, when compared with other alternatives analyzed.

  7. Testing and development of transfer functions for weighing precipitation gauges in WMO-SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, John; Nitu, Rodica; Wolff, Mareile; Mekis, Eva; Rasmussen, Roy; Baker, Bruce; Earle, Michael E.; Reverdin, Audrey; Wong, Kai; Smith, Craig D.; Yang, Daqing; Roulet, Yves-Alain; Meyers, Tilden; Buisan, Samuel; Isaksen, Ketil; Brækkan, Ragnar; Landolt, Scott; Jachcik, Al

    2018-02-01

    Weighing precipitation gauges are used widely for the measurement of all forms of precipitation, and are typically more accurate than tipping-bucket precipitation gauges. This is especially true for the measurement of solid precipitation; however, weighing precipitation gauge measurements must still be adjusted for undercatch in snowy, windy conditions. In WMO-SPICE (World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment), different types of weighing precipitation gauges and shields were compared, and adjustments were determined for the undercatch of solid precipitation caused by wind. For the various combinations of gauges and shields, adjustments using both new and previously existing transfer functions were evaluated. For most of the gauge and shield combinations, previously derived transfer functions were found to perform as well as those more recently derived. This indicates that wind shield type (or lack thereof) is more important in determining the magnitude of wind-induced undercatch than the type of weighing precipitation gauge. It also demonstrates the potential for widespread use of the previously developed transfer functions. Another overarching result was that, in general, the more effective shields, which were associated with smaller unadjusted errors, also produced more accurate measurements after adjustment. This indicates that although transfer functions can effectively reduce measurement biases, effective wind shielding is still required for the most accurate measurement of solid precipitation.

  8. Merging Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPEs) from the High-resolution NEXRAD Reanalysis over CONUS with Rain-gauge Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.; Stevens, S. E.; Nickl, E.; Seo, D. J.; Kim, B.; Zhang, J.; Qi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The processing of radar-only precipitation via the reanalysis from the National Mosaic and Multi-Sensor Quantitative (NMQ/Q2) based on the WSR-88D Next-generation Radar (Nexrad) network over the Continental United States (CONUS) is completed for the period covering from 2002 to 2011. While this constitutes a unique opportunity to study precipitation processes at higher resolution than conventionally possible (1-km, 5-min), the long-term radar-only product needs to be merged with in-situ information in order to be suitable for hydrological, meteorological and climatological applications. The radar-gauge merging is performed by using rain gauge information at daily (Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily: GHCN-D), hourly (Hydrometeorological Automated Data System: HADS), and 5-min (Automated Surface Observing Systems: ASOS; Climate Reference Network: CRN) resolution. The challenges related to incorporating differing resolution and quality networks to generate long-term large-scale gridded estimates of precipitation are enormous. In that perspective, we are implementing techniques for merging the rain gauge datasets and the radar-only estimates such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Simple Kriging (SK), Ordinary Kriging (OK), and Conditional Bias-Penalized Kriging (CBPK). An evaluation of the different radar-gauge merging techniques is presented and we provide an estimate of uncertainty for the gridded estimates. In addition, comparisons with a suite of lower resolution QPEs derived from ground based radar measurements (Stage IV) are provided in order to give a detailed picture of the improvements and remaining challenges.

  9. Global precipitation estimates based on a technique for combining satellite-based estimates, rain gauge analysis, and NWP model precipitation information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Rudolf, Bruno; Schneider, Udo; Keehn, Peter R.

    1995-01-01

    The 'satellite-gauge model' (SGM) technique is described for combining precipitation estimates from microwave satellite data, infrared satellite data, rain gauge analyses, and numerical weather prediction models into improved estimates of global precipitation. Throughout, monthly estimates on a 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees lat-long grid are employed. First, a multisatellite product is developed using a combination of low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous-orbit infrared data in the latitude range 40 degrees N - 40 degrees S (the adjusted geosynchronous precipitation index) and low-orbit microwave data alone at higher latitudes. Then the rain gauge analysis is brougth in, weighting each field by its inverse relative error variance to produce a nearly global, observationally based precipitation estimate. To produce a complete global estimate, the numerical model results are used to fill data voids in the combined satellite-gauge estimate. Our sequential approach to combining estimates allows a user to select the multisatellite estimate, the satellite-gauge estimate, or the full SGM estimate (observationally based estimates plus the model information). The primary limitation in the method is imperfections in the estimation of relative error for the individual fields. The SGM results for one year of data (July 1987 to June 1988) show important differences from the individual estimates, including model estimates as well as climatological estimates. In general, the SGM results are drier in the subtropics than the model and climatological results, reflecting the relatively dry microwave estimates that dominate the SGM in oceanic regions.

  10. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  11. Modelling Hydrologic Processes in the Mekong River Basin Using a Distributed Model Driven by Satellite Precipitation and Rain Gauge Observations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; Yang, Dawen; Sothea, Khem; Jiao, Yang; Gao, Bin; Peng, Xueting; Pang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The Mekong River is the most important river in Southeast Asia. It has increasingly suffered from water-related problems due to economic development, population growth and climate change in the surrounding areas. In this study, we built a distributed Geomorphology-Based Hydrological Model (GBHM) of the Mekong River using remote sensing data and other publicly available data. Two numerical experiments were conducted using different rainfall data sets as model inputs. The data sets included rain gauge data from the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and remote sensing rainfall data from the Tropic Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B42V7). Model calibration and validation were conducted for the two rainfall data sets. Compared to the observed discharge, both the gauge simulation and TRMM simulation performed well during the calibration period (1998-2001). However, the performance of the gauge simulation was worse than that of the TRMM simulation during the validation period (2002-2012). The TRMM simulation is more stable and reliable at different scales. Moreover, the calibration period was changed to 2, 4, and 8 years to test the impact of the calibration period length on the two simulations. The results suggest that longer calibration periods improved the GBHM performance during validation periods. In addition, the TRMM simulation is more stable and less sensitive to the calibration period length than is the gauge simulation. Further analysis reveals that the uneven distribution of rain gauges makes the input rainfall data less representative and more heterogeneous, worsening the simulation performance. Our results indicate that remotely sensed rainfall data may be more suitable for driving distributed hydrologic models, especially in basins with poor data quality or limited gauge availability.

  12. Modelling Hydrologic Processes in the Mekong River Basin Using a Distributed Model Driven by Satellite Precipitation and Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; Yang, Dawen; Sothea, Khem; Jiao, Yang; Gao, Bin; Peng, Xueting; Pang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The Mekong River is the most important river in Southeast Asia. It has increasingly suffered from water-related problems due to economic development, population growth and climate change in the surrounding areas. In this study, we built a distributed Geomorphology-Based Hydrological Model (GBHM) of the Mekong River using remote sensing data and other publicly available data. Two numerical experiments were conducted using different rainfall data sets as model inputs. The data sets included rain gauge data from the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and remote sensing rainfall data from the Tropic Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM 3B42V7). Model calibration and validation were conducted for the two rainfall data sets. Compared to the observed discharge, both the gauge simulation and TRMM simulation performed well during the calibration period (1998–2001). However, the performance of the gauge simulation was worse than that of the TRMM simulation during the validation period (2002–2012). The TRMM simulation is more stable and reliable at different scales. Moreover, the calibration period was changed to 2, 4, and 8 years to test the impact of the calibration period length on the two simulations. The results suggest that longer calibration periods improved the GBHM performance during validation periods. In addition, the TRMM simulation is more stable and less sensitive to the calibration period length than is the gauge simulation. Further analysis reveals that the uneven distribution of rain gauges makes the input rainfall data less representative and more heterogeneous, worsening the simulation performance. Our results indicate that remotely sensed rainfall data may be more suitable for driving distributed hydrologic models, especially in basins with poor data quality or limited gauge availability. PMID:27010692

  13. A study of the threshold method utilizing raingage data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Wolff, David B.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Atlas, David

    1993-01-01

    The threshold method for estimation of area-average rain rate relies on determination of the fractional area where rain rate exceeds a preset level of intensity. Previous studies have shown that the optimal threshold level depends on the climatological rain-rate distribution (RRD). It has also been noted, however, that the climatological RRD may be composed of an aggregate of distributions, one for each of several distinctly different synoptic conditions, each having its own optimal threshold. In this study, the impact of RRD variations on the threshold method is shown in an analysis of 1-min rainrate data from a network of tipping-bucket gauges in Darwin, Australia. Data are analyzed for two distinct regimes: the premonsoon environment, having isolated intense thunderstorms, and the active monsoon rains, having organized convective cell clusters that generate large areas of stratiform rain. It is found that a threshold of 10 mm/h results in the same threshold coefficient for both regimes, suggesting an alternative definition of optimal threshold as that which is least sensitive to distribution variations. The observed behavior of the threshold coefficient is well simulated by assumption of lognormal distributions with different scale parameters and same shape parameters.

  14. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOEpatents

    Willett, Fred Thomas

    2004-07-13

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine airfoil and associated tip shroud includes a first group of cooling holes internal to the airfoil and extending in a radially outward direction generally along a leading edge of the airfoil; a second group of cooling holes internal to the airfoil and extending in a radially outward direction generally along a trailing edge of the airfoil. A common plenum is formed in the tip shroud in direct communication with the first and second group of cooling holes, but a second plenum may be provided for the second group of radial holes. A plurality of exhaust holes extends from the plenum(s), through the tip shroud and opening along a peripheral edge of the tip shroud.

  15. Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Jacala, Ariel C. P.

    2002-01-01

    A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

  16. Return period curves for extreme 5-min rainfall amounts at the Barcelona urban network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lana, X.; Casas-Castillo, M. C.; Serra, C.; Rodríguez-Solà, R.; Redaño, A.; Burgueño, A.; Martínez, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Heavy rainfall episodes are relatively common in the conurbation of Barcelona and neighbouring cities (NE Spain), usually due to storms generated by convective phenomena in summer and eastern and south-eastern advections in autumn. Prevention of local flood episodes and right design of urban drainage have to take into account the rainfall intensity spread instead of a simple evaluation of daily rainfall amounts. The database comes from 5-min rain amounts recorded by tipping buckets in the Barcelona urban network along the years 1994-2009. From these data, extreme 5-min rain amounts are selected applying the peaks-over-threshold method for thresholds derived from both 95% percentile and the mean excess plot. The return period curves are derived from their statistical distribution for every gauge, describing with detail expected extreme 5-min rain amounts across the urban network. These curves are compared with those derived from annual extreme time series. In this way, areas in Barcelona submitted to different levels of flood risk from the point of view of rainfall intensity are detected. Additionally, global time trends on extreme 5-min rain amounts are quantified for the whole network and found as not statistically significant.

  17. Merging gauge and satellite rainfall with specification of associated uncertainty across Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldemeskel, Fitsum M.; Sivakumar, Bellie; Sharma, Ashish

    2013-08-01

    Accurate estimation of spatial rainfall is crucial for modelling hydrological systems and planning and management of water resources. While spatial rainfall can be estimated either using rain gauge-based measurements or using satellite-based measurements, such estimates are subject to uncertainties due to various sources of errors in either case, including interpolation and retrieval errors. The purpose of the present study is twofold: (1) to investigate the benefit of merging rain gauge measurements and satellite rainfall data for Australian conditions and (2) to produce a database of retrospective rainfall along with a new uncertainty metric for each grid location at any timestep. The analysis involves four steps: First, a comparison of rain gauge measurements and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42 data at such rain gauge locations is carried out. Second, gridded monthly rain gauge rainfall is determined using thin plate smoothing splines (TPSS) and modified inverse distance weight (MIDW) method. Third, the gridded rain gauge rainfall is merged with the monthly accumulated TRMM 3B42 using a linearised weighting procedure, the weights at each grid being calculated based on the error variances of each dataset. Finally, cross validation (CV) errors at rain gauge locations and standard errors at gridded locations for each timestep are estimated. The CV error statistics indicate that merging of the two datasets improves the estimation of spatial rainfall, and more so where the rain gauge network is sparse. The provision of spatio-temporal standard errors with the retrospective dataset is particularly useful for subsequent modelling applications where input error knowledge can help reduce the uncertainty associated with modelling outcomes.

  18. General probability-matched relations between radar reflectivity and rain rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wolff, David B.; Atlas, David

    1993-01-01

    An improved method for transforming radar-observed reflectivities Ze into rain rate R is presented. The method is based on a formulation of a Ze-R function constrained such that (1) the radar-retrieved pdf of R and all of its moments are identical to those determined from the gauges over a sufficiently large domain, and (2) the fraction of the time that it is raining above a low but still has an accurately measurable rain intensity is identical for both the radar and for simultaneous measurements of collocated gauges on average. Data measured by a 1.65-deg beamwidth C-band radar and 22 gauges located in the vicinity of Darwin, Australia, are used. The resultant Ze-R functions show a strong range dependence, especially for the rain regimes characterized by strong reflectivity gradients and substantial attenuation. The application of these novel Ze-R functions to the radar data produces excellent matches to the gauge measurements without any systematic bias.

  19. Comparisons of Rain Estimates from Ground Radar and Satellite Over Mountainous Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Kidd, Chris; Tao, Jing; Barros, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A high-resolution rainfall product merging surface radar and an enhanced gauge network is used as a reference to examine two operational surface radar rainfall products over mountain areas. The two operational rainfall products include radar-only and conventional-gauge-corrected radar rainfall products. Statistics of rain occurrence and rain amount including their geographical, seasonal, and diurnal variations are examined using 3-year data. It is found that the three surface radar rainfall products in general agree well with one another over mountainous regions in terms of horizontal mean distributions of rain occurrence and rain amount. Frequency of rain occurrence and fraction of rain amount also indicate similar distribution patterns as a function of rain intensity. The diurnal signals of precipitation over mountain ridges are well captured and joint distributions of coincident raining samples indicate reasonable correlations during both summer and winter. Factors including undetected low-level precipitation, limited availability of gauges for correcting the Z-R relationship over the mountains, and radar beam blocking by mountains are clearly noticed in the two conventional radar rainfall products. Both radar-only and conventional-gauge-corrected radar rainfall products underestimate the rain occurrence and fraction of rain amount at intermediate and heavy rain intensities. Comparison of PR and TMI against a surface radar-only rainfall product indicates that the PR performs equally well with the high-resolution radar-only rainfall product over complex terrains at intermediate and heavy rain intensities during the summer and winter. TMI, on the other hand, requires improvement to retrieve wintertime precipitation over mountain areas.

  20. Inexpensive Open-Source Data Logging in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    I present a general-purpose open-source field-capable data logger, which provides a mechanism to develop dense networks of inexpensive environmental sensors. This data logger was developed as a low-power variant of the Arduino open-source development system, and is named the ALog ("Arduino Logger") BottleLogger (it is slim enough to fit inside a Nalgene water bottle) version 1.0. It features an integrated high-precision real-time clock, SD card slot for high-volume data storage, and integrated power switching. The ALog can interface with sensors via six analog/digital pins, two digital pins, and one digital interrupt pin that can read event-based inputs, such as those from a tipping-bucket rain gauge. We have successfully tested the ALog BottleLogger with ultrasonic rangefinders (for water stage and snow accumulation and melt), temperature sensors, tipping-bucket rain gauges, soil moisture and water potential sensors, resistance-based tools to measure frost heave, and cameras that it triggers based on events. The source code for the ALog, including functions to interface with a a range of commercially-available sensors, is provided as an Arduino C++ library with example implementations. All schematics, circuit board layouts, and source code files are open-source and freely available under GNU GPL v3.0 and Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported licenses. Through this work, we hope to foster a community-driven movement to collect field environmental data on a budget that permits citizen-scientists and researchers from low-income countries to collect the same high-quality data as researchers in wealthy countries. These data can provide information about global change to managers, governments, scientists, and interested citizens worldwide. Watertight box with ALog BottleLogger data logger on the left and battery pack with 3 D cells on the right. Data can be collected for 3-5 years on one set of batteries.

  1. Vibration (?) spikes during natural rain events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Limited analysis of optical rain gauge (ORG) data from shipboard and ground based sensors has shown the existence of spikes, possibly attributable to sensor vibration, while rain is occurring. An extreme example of this behavior was noted aboard the PRC#5 on the evening of December 24, 1992 as the ship began repositioning during a rain event in the TOGA/COARE IFA. The spikes are readily evident in the one-second resolution data, but may be indistinguishable from natural rain rate fluctuations in subsampled or averaged data. Such spikes result in increased rainfall totals.

  2. National Scale Rainfall Map Based on Linearly Interpolated Data from Automated Weather Stations and Rain Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alconis, Jenalyn; Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Lester Saddi, Ivan; Mongaya, Candeze; Figueroa, Kathleen Gay

    2014-05-01

    In response to the slew of disasters that devastates the Philippines on a regular basis, the national government put in place a program to address this problem. The Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards, or Project NOAH, consolidates the diverse scientific research being done and pushes the knowledge gained to the forefront of disaster risk reduction and management. Current activities of the project include installing rain gauges and water level sensors, conducting LIDAR surveys of critical river basins, geo-hazard mapping, and running information education campaigns. Approximately 700 automated weather stations and rain gauges installed in strategic locations in the Philippines hold the groundwork for the rainfall visualization system in the Project NOAH web portal at http://noah.dost.gov.ph. The system uses near real-time data from these stations installed in critical river basins. The sensors record the amount of rainfall in a particular area as point data updated every 10 to 15 minutes. The sensor sends the data to a central server either via GSM network or satellite data transfer for redundancy. The web portal displays the sensors as a placemarks layer on a map. When a placemark is clicked, it displays a graph of the rainfall data for the past 24 hours. The rainfall data is harvested by batch determined by a one-hour time frame. The program uses linear interpolation as the methodology implemented to visually represent a near real-time rainfall map. The algorithm allows very fast processing which is essential in near real-time systems. As more sensors are installed, precision is improved. This visualized dataset enables users to quickly discern where heavy rainfall is concentrated. It has proven invaluable on numerous occasions, such as last August 2013 when intense to torrential rains brought about by the enhanced Southwest Monsoon caused massive flooding in Metro Manila. Coupled with observations from Doppler imagery and water level sensors along the

  3. Developing hydrological monitoring networks with Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Vega, Andres; Villacis, Marcos; Moulds, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The open source hardware platform Arduino is very cost-effective and versatile for the development of sensor networks. Here we report on experiments on the use of Arduino-related technologies to develop and implement hydrological monitoring networks. Arduino Uno boards were coupled to a variety of commercially available hydrological sensors and programmed for automatic data collection. Tested sensors include water level, temperature, humidity, radiation, and precipitation. Our experiments show that most of the tested analogue sensors are quite straightforward to couple to Arduino based data loggers, especially if the electronic characteristics of the sensor are available. However, some sensors have internal digital interfaces, which are more challenging to connect. Lastly, tipping bucket rain gauges prove the most challenging because of the very specific methodology, i.e. registration of bucket tips instead of measurements at regular intervals. The typically low data generation rate of hydrological instruments is very compatible with available technologies for wireless data transmission. Mesh networks such as Xbee prove very convenient and robust for dispersed networks, while wifi is also an option for shorter distances and particular topographies. Lastly, the GSM shield of the Arduino can be used to transfer data to centralized databases. In regions where no mobile internet (i.e. 3G) connection is available, data transmission via text messages may be an option, depending on the bandwidth requirements.

  4. Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; Norton, Paul Francis; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena

    2002-01-01

    A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

  5. Virtual Rain and Stream Gauge Information Service to Support Effective Decision Making in Lower Mekong Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnayake, S. B.; Jayasinghe, S.; Apirumanekul, C.; Pudashine, J.; Anderson, E.; Cutter, P. G.; Ganz, D.; Towashiraporn, P.

    2016-12-01

    During 1995-2015, about 47% of all weather related disasters affected 2.3 billion people, and the majority (95%) of them were from Asia. About 89% of the deaths due to storms were reported in lower and middle income courtiers even though they only experienced about 26% of all storms. In most of the developing countries, decision making processes are hampered by sparse hydro-meteorological observation networks. Thus, the virtual rain and stream gauge information service is designed and developed by SERVIR-Mekong of Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC) to support effective decision making in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam. The information service contains four remotely sensed data streams with regional and country specific sub setting features for easy access in limited internet bandwidths conditions. It provides rainfall data from near real time GPM IMERG (6 hours latency) with 30 minutes and 0.1X0.1 degree resolutions; TRMM daily data of 0.25X0.25 degree resolution from 1998; and CHIRPS daily data of 0.05X0.05 degree resolution since 1981 with the latency of one month. Satellite altimetry-based Jason 2 Interim Geophysical Data Record virtual stream gauge data (water body height) is provided with 12 days latency for 15 identified locations in 5 countries since 2008. To regionalize and further promote uptake of these data, TRMM monthly data has been bias corrected for Myanmar as a pilot study with spatially interpolated 18-year average (1998-2015) observed monthly rainfall data using Standard Deviation (SD) Ratio method. The results encourage to use SD ratio method for monthly bias corrections. Gamma distribution method will be tested for correcting biases of daily rainfall data with the notion that it has some limitations of capturing extreme rainfalls. The virtual rain and stream gauge information service is publically accessible through a web-based user interface hosted at SERVIR-Mekong of ADPC. Usage of the information service by partner

  6. Merging of rain gauge and radar data for urban hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Christian; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Urban hydrological processes are generally characterised by short response times and therefore rainfall data with a high resolution in space and time are required for their modelling. In many smaller towns, no recordings of rainfall data exist within the urban catchment. Precipitation radar helps to provide extensive rainfall data with a temporal resolution of five minutes, but the rainfall amounts can be highly biased and hence the data should not be used directly as a model input. However, scientists proposed several methods for adjusting radar data to station measurements. This work tries to evaluate rainfall inputs for a hydrological model regarding the following two different applications: Dimensioning of urban drainage systems and analysis of single event flow. The input data used for this analysis can be divided into two groups: Methods, which rely on station data only (Nearest Neighbour Interpolation, Ordinary Kriging), and methods, which incorporate station as well as radar information (Conditional Merging, Bias correction of radar data based on quantile mapping with rain gauge recordings). Additionally, rainfall intensities that were directly obtained from radar reflectivities are used. A model of the urban catchment of the city of Brunswick (Lower Saxony, Germany) is utilised for the evaluation. First results show that radar data cannot help with the dimensioning task of sewer systems since rainfall amounts of convective events are often overestimated. Gauges in catchment proximity can provide more reliable rainfall extremes. Whether radar data can be helpful to simulate single event flow depends strongly on the data quality and thus on the selected event. Ordinary Kriging is often not suitable for the interpolation of rainfall data in urban hydrology. This technique induces a strong smoothing of rainfall fields and therefore a severe underestimation of rainfall intensities for convective events.

  7. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power driven fire pump by § 181.300 must have at least three 9.5 liter (21/2 gallon) buckets, with an attached... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST...

  8. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power driven fire pump by § 181.300 must have at least three 9.5 liter (21/2 gallon) buckets, with an attached... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST...

  9. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power driven fire pump by § 181.300 must have at least three 9.5 liter (21/2 gallon) buckets, with an attached... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST...

  10. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power driven fire pump by § 181.300 must have at least three 9.5 liter (21/2 gallon) buckets, with an attached... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST...

  11. Rainfall estimates for hydrological models: Comparing rain gauge, radar and microwave link data as input for the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Several rainfall measurement techniques are available for hydrological applications, each with its own spatial and temporal resolution. We investigated the effect of differences in rainfall estimates on discharge simulations in a lowland catchment by forcing a novel rainfall-runoff model (WALRUS) with rainfall data from gauges, radars and microwave links. The hydrological model used for this analysis is the recently developed Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS). WALRUS is a rainfall-runoff model accounting for hydrological processes relevant to areas with shallow groundwater (e.g. groundwater-surface water feedback). Here, we used WALRUS for case studies in the Hupsel Brook catchment. We used two automatic rain gauges with hourly resolution, located inside the catchment (the base run) and 30 km northeast. Operational (real-time) and climatological (gauge-adjusted) C-band radar products and country-wide rainfall maps derived from microwave link data from a cellular telecommunication network were also used. Discharges simulated with these different inputs were compared to observations. Traditionally, the precipitation research community places emphasis on quantifying spatial errors and uncertainty, but for hydrological applications, temporal errors and uncertainty should be quantified as well. Its memory makes the hydrologic system sensitive to missed or badly timed rainfall events, but also emphasizes the effect of a bias in rainfall estimates. Systematic underestimation of rainfall by the uncorrected operational radar product leads to very dry model states and an increasing underestimation of discharge. Using the rain gauge 30 km northeast of the catchment yields good results for climatological studies, but not for forecasting individual floods. Simulating discharge using the maps derived from microwave link data and the gauge-adjusted radar product yields good results for both events and climatological studies. This indicates that these products can be

  12. Evaluation of the dynamic behavior of a Pelton runner based on strain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Reiner; Probst, Christian

    2016-11-01

    A reliable mechanical design of Pelton runners is very important in the layout of new installations and modernizations. Especially in horizontal machines, where the housing is not embedded into concrete, a rupture of a runner bucket can have severe consequences. Even if a crack in the runner is detected on time, the outage time that follows the malfunction of the runner is shortening the return of investment. It is a fact that stresses caused by the runner rotation and the jet forces are superposed by high frequent dynamic stresses. In case of resonance it even can be the dominating effect that is limiting the lifetime of a runner. Therefore a clear understanding of the dynamic mechanisms is essential for a safe runner design. This paper describes the evaluation of the dynamic behavior of a Pelton runner installed in a model turbine based on strain gauge measurements. Equipped with strain gauges at the root area of the buckets, the time responses of the strains under the influence of various operational parameters were measured. As a result basic theories for the jet bucket excitation were verified and the influence of the water mass was detected by evaluating the frequency shift in case of resonance. Furthermore, the influence of the individual bucket masses onto the dynamic behaviour for different mode shapes got measured.

  13. Evaluation of the New Version of the Laser-Optical Disdrometer, OTT Parsivel2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; Wolff, David B.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of raindrop size distribution measurements has been conducted at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center where the focus was to evaluate the performance of the upgraded laser-optical OTT Particle Size Velocity (Parsivel2; P2) disdrometer. The experimental setup included a collocated pair of tipping-bucket rain gauges, OTT Parsivel (P1) and P2 disdrometers, and Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometers. Excellent agreement between the two collocated rain gauges enabled their use as a relative reference for event rain totals. A comparison of event total showed that the P2 had a 6%absolute bias with respect to the reference gauges, considerably lower than the P1 and JW disdrometers. Good agreement was also evident between the JW and P2 in hourly raindrop spectra for drop diameters between 0.5 and 4 mm. The P2 drop concentrations mostly increased toward small sizes, and the peak concentrations were mostly observed in the first three measurable size bins. The P1, on the other hand, underestimated small drops and overestimated the large drops, particularly in heavy rain rates. From the analysis performed, it appears that the P2 is an improvement over the P1 model for both drop size and rainfall measurements. P2 mean fall velocities follow accepted terminal fall speed relationships at drop sizes less than 1 mm. As a caveat, the P2 had approximately 1ms21 slower mean fall speed with respect to the terminal fall speed near 1 mm, and the difference between the mean measured and terminal fall speeds reduced with increasing drop size. This caveat was recognized as a software bug by the manufacturer and is currently being investigated.

  14. Erosion of Pelton buckets and changes in turbine efficiency measured in the HPP Fieschertal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgottspon, A.; Staubli, T.; Felix, D.

    2016-11-01

    Geometrical changes and material loss of Pelton turbine runners as well as changes in turbine efficiency were measured at HPP Fieschertal in Valais, Switzerland. The HPP is equipped with two horizontal axis Pelton units, with each 32 MW nominal power, 7.5 m3/s design discharge, 515 m head and two injectors. The injectors and the buckets are hard-coated. Hydro-abrasive erosion was quantified based on repeated measurements on two runner buckets using (i) 3d-scanning and (ii) a coating thickness gauge. Changes in efficiency were measured by applying the sliding needle procedure. In addition to these periodically performed measurements, efficiency was also continuously monitored. The highest erosion rate was measured during the first half of the sediment season 2012 including a major sediment transport event. Because the runner was not fully reconditioned at the beginning of this season, progressive damages occurred. After the event, a splitter width of 10 mm was measured, corresponding to 1.5 % of the inner bucket width. The cut-outs were eroded by up to 9 mm towards the axis. The efficiency reductions ranged from 1 % in the year with the major sediment transport event to insignificant differences in 2014, when the sediment load was small and only little hydro-abrasive erosion occurred.

  15. Buckets: Smart Objects for Digital Libraries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Current discussion of digital libraries (DLs) is often dominated by the merits of the respective storage, search and retrieval functionality of archives, repositories, search engines, search interfaces and database systems. While these technologies are necessary for information management, the information content is more important than the systems used for its storage and retrieval. Digital information should have the same long-term survivability prospects as traditional hardcopy information and should be protected to the extent possible from evolving search engine technologies and vendor vagaries in database management systems. Information content and information retrieval systems should progress on independent paths and make limited assumptions about the status or capabilities of the other. Digital information can achieve independence from archives and DL systems through the use of buckets. Buckets are an aggregative, intelligent construct for publishing in DLs. Buckets allow the decoupling of information content from information storage and retrieval. Buckets exist within the Smart Objects and Dumb Archives model for DLs in that many of the functionalities and responsibilities traditionally associated with archives are pushed down (making the archives dumber) into the buckets (making them smarter). Some of the responsibilities imbued to buckets are the enforcement of their terms and conditions, and maintenance and display of their contents.

  16. SciTech Connect

    Joe, Paul; Scott, Bill; Doyle, Chris

    Abstract—An innovative monitoring network was implemented to support the operational and science programs for the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. It consisted of in situ weather stations on custom-designed platforms. The sensors included an HMP45C for temperature, humidity and pressure, a tipping bucket rain gauge, an acoustic snow depth sensor, a Pluvio 1 precipitation gauge and an anemometer placed at gauge height and at 10 m height. Modifications to commercial automated precipitation gauges were necessary for the heavy snowfall conditions. Advanced or emerging technologies were deployed to support scientific and nowcasting studies into precipitation intensity, typing, visibility and wind. The sensorsmore » included an FD12P visibility and precipitation sensor, a precipitation occurrence sensing system (POSS) present weather sensor, a Hotplate precipitation sensor and a Parsivel disdrometer. Data were collected at 1 min sampling intervals. A Doppler weather radar was deployed in a valley location and provided critical detailed low-level data. An X-band dual-polarized radar was deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to monitor Vancouver and Cypress Mountain. Three remote sensing stations for vertical profiling were established. At the base of Whistler Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a 22-channel radiometer, a ceilometer, a Parsivel and a POSS were installed. At the base of Cypress Mountain, a micro-rain radar, a ceilometer, a low cost rain sensor (LCR by ATTEX) and a POSS were installed. At Squamish, a wind profiler and a POSS were installed. Weather sensors were mounted on the Whistler Village Gondola and on the Peak to Peak gondola. Sites were established along the Whistler Mountain slope and at other key locations. The combination of sites and instruments formed a comprehensive network to provide observations appropriate for nowcasting in winter complex terrain and investigate precipitation, visibility and wind processes. The

  17. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of evaporation on precipitation measurements have been understood to bias total precipitation lower. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants with frequent observations. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Collocated Geonor gauges with (nonEvap) and without (evap) an evaporative suppressant were compared to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. However, the impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to calculation methods. In general, methods that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise were more sensitive to gauge (-4.6% bias with respect to control) evaporation than methods computing depth change without smoothing (< +1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates computational methods can influence the magnitude of evaporation bias on precipitation measurements. It is hoped this study will advance QA techniques that mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements from other automated networks.

  18. Exploration of discrepancy between radar and gauge rainfall estimates driven by wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiang; Han, Dawei

    2014-11-01

    Due to the fact that weather radar is prone to several sources of errors, it is acknowledged that adjustment against ground observations such as rain gauges is crucial for radar measurement. Spatial matching of precipitation patterns between radar and rain gauge is a significant premise in radar bias corrections. It is a conventional way to construct radar-gauge pairs based on their vertical locations. However, due to the wind effects, the raindrops observed by the radar do not always fall vertically to the ground, and the raindrops arriving at the ground may not all be caught by the rain gauge. This study proposes a fully formulated scheme to numerically simulate the movement of raindrops in a three-dimensional wind field in order to adjust the wind-induced errors. The Brue catchment (135 km2) in Southwest England covering 28 radar pixels and 49 rain gauges is an experimental catchment, where the radar central beam height varies between 500 and 700 m. The 20 typical events (with durations of 6-36 h) are chosen to assess the correlation between hourly radar and gauge rainfall surfaces. It is found that for most events, the improved rates of correlation coefficients are greater than 10%, and nearly half of the events increase by 20%. With the proposed method, except four events, all the event-averaged correlation values are greater than 0.5. This work is the first study to tackle both wind effects on radar and rain gauges, which could be considered as one of the essential components in processing radar observational data in its hydrometeorological applications.

  19. Impact of rain gauge quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation: an application to the Warwick catchment, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulun; Li, Yuan; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2017-12-01

    Rain gauges are widely used to obtain temporally continuous point rainfall records, which are then interpolated into spatially continuous data to force hydrological models. However, rainfall measurements and interpolation procedure are subject to various uncertainties, which can be reduced by applying quality control and selecting appropriate spatial interpolation approaches. Consequently, the integrated impact of rainfall quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation has attracted increased attention but not been fully addressed. This study applies a quality control procedure to the hourly rainfall measurements obtained in the Warwick catchment in eastern Australia. The grid-based daily precipitation from the Australian Water Availability Project was used as a reference. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the daily accumulation of gauged rainfall and the reference data was used to eliminate gauges with significant quality issues. The unrealistic outliers were censored based on a comparison between gauged rainfall and the reference. Four interpolation methods, including the inverse distance weighting (IDW), nearest neighbors (NN), linear spline (LN), and ordinary Kriging (OK), were implemented. The four methods were firstly assessed through a cross-validation using the quality-controlled rainfall data. The impacts of the quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation were then evaluated through a semi-distributed hydrological model. The results showed that the Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE) and Bias of the streamflow simulations were significantly improved after quality control. In the cross-validation, the IDW and OK methods resulted in good interpolation rainfall, while the NN led to the worst result. In term of the impact on hydrological prediction, the IDW led to the most consistent streamflow predictions with the observations, according to the validation at five streamflow-gauged locations. The OK method

  20. Impact of rain gauge quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation: an application to the Warwick catchment, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulun; Li, Yuan; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    2018-01-01

    Rain gauges are widely used to obtain temporally continuous point rainfall records, which are then interpolated into spatially continuous data to force hydrological models. However, rainfall measurements and interpolation procedure are subject to various uncertainties, which can be reduced by applying quality control and selecting appropriate spatial interpolation approaches. Consequently, the integrated impact of rainfall quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation has attracted increased attention but not been fully addressed. This study applies a quality control procedure to the hourly rainfall measurements obtained in the Warwick catchment in eastern Australia. The grid-based daily precipitation from the Australian Water Availability Project was used as a reference. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the daily accumulation of gauged rainfall and the reference data was used to eliminate gauges with significant quality issues. The unrealistic outliers were censored based on a comparison between gauged rainfall and the reference. Four interpolation methods, including the inverse distance weighting (IDW), nearest neighbors (NN), linear spline (LN), and ordinary Kriging (OK), were implemented. The four methods were firstly assessed through a cross-validation using the quality-controlled rainfall data. The impacts of the quality control and interpolation on streamflow simulation were then evaluated through a semi-distributed hydrological model. The results showed that the Nash–Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE) and Bias of the streamflow simulations were significantly improved after quality control. In the cross-validation, the IDW and OK methods resulted in good interpolation rainfall, while the NN led to the worst result. In term of the impact on hydrological prediction, the IDW led to the most consistent streamflow predictions with the observations, according to the validation at five streamflow-gauged locations. The OK method

  1. An Event-based Assessment of Uncertainty in Measurements Between Multiple Precipitation Sensors During the North American Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, M. A.; Keefer, T.; Demaria, E. M.; Goodrich, D. C.; Hazenberg, P.; Petersen, W. A.; Wingo, M. T.; Smith, J.

    2017-12-01

    The USDA - Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) Long-Term Agroecosystem Research network (LTAR) is a partnership between 18 long-term research sites across the United States. As part of the program, LTAR aims to assemble a network of common sensors and measurements of hydrological, meteorological, and biophysical variables to accompany the legacy datasets of individual LTAR sites. Uncertainty remains as to how the common sensor-based measurements will compare to those measured with existing sensors at each site. The USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center (SWRC) operated Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) represents the semiarid grazing lands located in southeastern Arizona in the LTAR network. The bimodal precipitation regime of this region is characterized by large-scale frontal precipitation in the winter and isolated, high-intensity, convective thunderstorms in the summer during the North American Monsoon (NAM). SWRC maintains a network of 90 rain gauges across the 150 km2 WGEW and surrounding area, with measurements dating back to the 1950's. The high intensity and isolated nature of the summer storms has historically made it difficult to quantify compared to other regimes in the US. This study assesses the uncertainty of measurement between the common LTAR Belfort All Weather Precipitation Gauge (AEPG 600) and the legacy WGEW weighing-type raingage. Additionally, in a collaboration with NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) and the University of Arizona a dense array of precipitation measuring sensors was installed at WGEW within a 10 meter radius for observation during the NAM, July through October 2017. In addition to two WGEW weighing-type gauges, the array includes: an AEPG 600, a tipping bucket, a weighing-bucket installed with orifice at ground level, an OTT Pluvio2 rain gauge, a Two-Dimensional Video Disdrometer (2DVD), and three OTT Parsivel2 disdrometers. An event-based comparison was made between precipitation sensors

  2. Estimation of Rain Intensity Spectra over the Continental US Using Ground Radar-Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution surface rainfall product is used to estimate rain characteristics over the continental US as a function of rain intensity. By defining each data at 4-km horizontal resolutions and 1-h temporal resolutions as an individual precipitating/nonprecipitating sample, statistics of rain occurrence and rain volume including their geographical and seasonal variations are documented. Quantitative estimations are also conducted to evaluate the impact of missing light rain events due to satellite sensors' detection capabilities. It is found that statistics of rain characteristics have large seasonal and geographical variations across the continental US. Although heavy rain events (> 10 mm/hr.) only occupy 2.6% of total rain occurrence, they may contribute to 27% of total rain volume. Light rain events (< 1.0 mm/hr.), occurring much more frequently (65%) than heavy rain events, can also make important contributions (15%) to the total rain volume. For minimum detectable rain rates setting at 0.5 and 0.2 mm/hr which are close to sensitivities of the current and future space-borne precipitation radars, there are about 43% and 11% of total rain occurrence below these thresholds, and they respectively represent 7% and 0.8% of total rain volume. For passive microwave sensors with their rain pixel sizes ranging from 14 to 16 km and the minimum detectable rain rates around 1 mm/hr., the missed light rain events may account for 70% of train occurrence and 16% of rain volume. Statistics of rain characteristics are also examined on domains with different temporal and spatial resolutions. Current issues in estimates of rain characteristics from satellite measurements and model outputs are discussed.

  3. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation from a precipitation gauge can cause errors in the amount of measured precipitation. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants and frequent observations to limit these biases. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Two Geonor gauges were collocated, with one gauge using an evaporative suppressant (referred to as Geonor-NonEvap) and the other with no suppressant (referred to as Geonor-Evap) to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the Geonor-Evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. The impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to the choice of calculation method. In general, the pairwise method that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise was more sensitive to gauge evaporation (-4.6% bias with respect to control) than the weighted-average method that calculated depth change over a smaller window (<+1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates, computational methods also influence the magnitude of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. This study can be used to advance quality insurance (QA) techniques used in other automated networks to mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements.

  4. 30 CFR 56.19050 - Bucket requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Conveyances § 56.19050 Bucket requirements. Buckets used to hoist persons during vertical shaft sinking...

  5. 30 CFR 57.19050 - Bucket requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Conveyances § 57.19050 Bucket requirements. Buckets used to hoist persons during vertical shaft sinking...

  6. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  7. A 47-Year Daily Gridded Precipitation Dataset for Asia Based on a Dense Network of Rain Gauges -APHRODITE project-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, A. I.; Yasutomi, N.; Hamada, A.; Kamiguchi, K.; Arakawa, O.

    2009-12-01

    A daily gridded precipitation dataset for 1961-2007 is created by collecting rain gauge observation data across Asia through the activities of the Asian Precipitation--Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE) project. We have already released APHRODITE’s daily gridded precipitation (APHRO_V0902) product for 1961-2004 (Yatagai et al., 2009), and our number of valid stations was between 5000 and 12,000, representing 2.3 to 4.5 times the data available through the Global Telecommunication System network, which were used for most daily grid precipitation products. APHRO_V0902 is the only long-term (1961 onward) continental-scale daily product that contains a dense network of daily rain gauge data for Asia including the Himalayas and mountainous areas in the Middle East. The product has already contributed to studies such as the evaluation of Asian water resources, diagnosis of climate change, statistical downscaling, and verification of numerical model simulation and high-resolution precipitation estimates using satellites. We are currently improving quality control (QC) schemes and interpolation algorithms, and make continuous efforts in data collection. In addition, we have undertaken capacity building activities, such as training seminars by inviting researchers/programmers from some Asian meteorological organizations who provided the observation data for us. Furthermore, we feed the errata (QC) information back to the above organizations and/or data centers. The next version of the algorithm will be fixed in December 2009 (APHRO_V0912), and we will update the product up to 2007. Our progress and advantage of the next products will be shown at the AGU fall meeting in 2009.

  8. Laser Calibration of an Impact Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip T.; Jones, W. Linwood

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach to developing an operational low-cost disdrometer hinges on implementing an effective in situ adaptive calibration strategy. This calibration strategy lowers the cost of the device and provides a method to guarantee continued automatic calibration. In previous work, a collocated tipping bucket rain gauge was utilized to provide a calibration signal to the disdrometer's digital signal processing software. Rainfall rate is proportional to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (a 7/2 moment can also be assumed, depending on the choice of terminal velocity relationship). In the previous case, the disdrometer calibration was characterized and weighted to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (DSD). Optical extinction by rainfall is proportional to the 2nd moment of the DSD. Using visible laser light as a means to focus and generate an auxiliary calibration signal, the adaptive calibration processing is significantly improved.

  9. Numerical analysis of the bucket surface roughness effects in Pelton turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. X.; Zeng, C. J.; Zhang, J.; Yan, Z. G.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    The internal flow of a Pelton turbine is quite complex. It is difficult to analyse the unsteady free water sheet flow in the rotating bucket owing to the lack of a sound theory. Affected by manufacturing technique and silt abrasion during the operation, the bucket surface roughness of Pelton turbine may be too great, and thereby influence unit performance. To investigate the effect of bucket roughness on Pelton turbine performance, this paper presents the numerical simulation of the interaction between the jet and the bucket in a Pelton turbine. The unsteady three-dimensional numerical simulations were performed with CFX code by using the SST turbulence model coupling the two-phase flow volume of fluid method. Different magnitude orders of bucket surface roughness were analysed and compared. Unsteady numerical results of the free water sheet flow patterns on bucket surface, torque and unit performance for each bucket surface roughness were generated. The total pressure distribution on bucket surface is used to show the free water sheet flow pattern on bucket surface. By comparing the variation of water sheet flow patterns on bucket surface with different roughness, this paper qualitatively analyses how the bucket surface roughness magnitude influences the impeding effect on free water sheet flow. Comparison of the torque variation of different bucket surface roughness highlighted the effect of the bucket surface roughness on the Pelton turbine output capacity. To further investigate the effect of bucket surface roughness on Pelton turbine performance, the relation between the relative efficiency loss rate and bucket surface roughness magnitude is quantitatively analysed. The result can be used to predict and evaluate the Pelton turbine performance.

  10. 46 CFR 181.610 - Fire bucket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire bucket. 181.610 Section 181.610 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Additional Equipment § 181.610 Fire bucket. A vessel not required to have a power driven...

  11. Airborne radar and radiometer experiment for quantitative remote measurements of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozu, Toshiaki; Meneghini, Robert; Boncyk, Wayne; Wilheit, Thomas T.; Nakamura, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    An aircraft experiment has been conducted with a dual-frequency (10 GHz and 35 GHz) radar/radiometer system and an 18-GHz radiometer to test various rain-rate retrieval algorithms from space. In the experiment, which took place in the fall of 1988 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, VA, both stratiform and convective storms were observed. A ground-based radar and rain gauges were also used to obtain truth data. An external radar calibration is made with rain gauge data, thereby enabling quantitative reflectivity measurements. Comparisons between path attenuations derived from the surface return and from the radar reflectivity profile are made to test the feasibility of a technique to estimate the raindrop size distribution from simultaneous radar and path-attenuation measurements.

  12. Buckets, Clusters and Dienst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing "buckets." We have extended the Dienst protocol, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to "cluster" independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The concept of "buckets" provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information. We show that the overhead for these additional capabilities is minimal to both the author and the user when compared to the equivalent process within NCSTRL.

  13. Throughfall in a Puerto Rican lower montane rain forest: A comparison of sampling strategies

    Treesearch

    F. Holwerda; F.N. Scatena; L.A. Bruijnzeel

    2006-01-01

    During a one-year period, the variability of throughfall and the standard errors of the means associated with different gauge arrangements were studied in a lower montane rain forest in Puerto Rico. The following gauge arrangements were used: (1) 60 fixed gauges, (2) 30 fixed gauges, and (3) 30 roving gauges. Stemflow was measured on 22 trees of four different species...

  14. Tubing vs. buckets: a cost comparison

    Treesearch

    Neil K. Huyler

    1975-01-01

    Equipment investment for tubing-vacuum systems was significantly less than that for bucket systems. Tubing-vacuum systems required about 22 percent less labor input, the major labor input being completed before sap-flow periods. Annual cost of operation was less for tubing-vacuum than the bucket system. Small tubing-vacuum operations showed more profit potential than...

  15. Voronoi Diagrams and Spring Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham, Arnold E.; Perham, Faustine L.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this geometry project is to use Voronoi diagrams, a powerful modeling tool across disciplines, and the integration of technology to analyze spring rainfall from rain gauge data over a region. In their investigation, students use familiar equipment from their mathematical toolbox: triangles and other polygons, circumcenters and…

  16. A Stochastic Fractional Dynamics Model of Space-time Variability of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Travis, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Rainfall varies in space and time in a highly irregular manner and is described naturally in terms of a stochastic process. A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they depend strongly on the space-time scales over which rain data are averaged. A spectral model of precipitation has been developed based on a stochastic differential equation of fractional order for the point rain rate, that allows a concise description of the second moment statistics of rain at any prescribed space-time averaging scale. The model is thus capable of providing a unified description of the statistics of both radar and rain gauge data. The underlying dynamical equation can be expressed in terms of space-time derivatives of fractional orders that are adjusted together with other model parameters to fit the data. The form of the resulting spectrum gives the model adequate flexibility to capture the subtle interplay between the spatial and temporal scales of variability of rain but strongly constrains the predicted statistical behavior as a function of the averaging length and times scales. We test the model with radar and gauge data collected contemporaneously at the NASA TRMM ground validation sites located near Melbourne, Florida and in Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands in the tropical Pacific. We estimate the parameters by tuning them to the second moment statistics of radar data. The model predictions are then found to fit the second moment statistics of the gauge data reasonably well without any further adjustment.

  17. Comparison between Pludix and impact/optical disdrometers during rainfall measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Clelia; Prodi, Franco; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2006-11-01

    The performances of two couples of disdrometers based on different measuring principles are compared: a classical Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer and a recently developed device, called the Pludix tested in Ferrara, Italy, and Pludix and the two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) tested in Cabauw, The Netherlands. First, the measuring principles of the different instruments are presented and compared. Secondly, the performances of the two pairs of disdrometers are analysed by comparing their rain amounts with nearby tipping bucket rain gauges and the inferred drop size distributions. The most important rainfall integral parameters (e.g. rain rate and radar reflectivity) and drop size distribution parameters are also analysed and compared. The data set for Ferrara comprises 13 rainfall events, with a total of 20 mm of rainfall and a maximum rain rate of 4 mm h - 1 . The data set for Cabauw consists of 9 events, with 25-50 mm of rainfall and a maximum rain rate of 20-40 mm h - 1 . The Pludix tends to underestimate slightly the bulk rainfall variables in less intense events, whereas it tends to overestimate with respect to the other instruments in heavier events. The correspondence of the inferred drop size distributions with those measured by the other disdrometers is reasonable, particularly with the Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer. Considering that the Pludix is still in a calibration and testing phase, the reported results are encouraging. A new signal inversion algorithm, which will allow the detection of rain drops throughout the entire diameter interval between 0.3 and 7.0 mm, is under development.

  18. Evaluation of precipitation estimates over CONUS derived from satellite, radar, and rain gauge datasets (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.

    2014-10-01

    We use a suite of quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) derived from satellite, radar, and surface observations to derive precipitation characteristics over CONUS for the period 2002-2012. This comparison effort includes satellite multi-sensor datasets (bias-adjusted TMPA 3B42, near-real time 3B42RT), radar estimates (NCEP Stage IV), and rain gauge observations. Remotely sensed precipitation datasets are compared with surface observations from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN-Daily) and from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model). The comparisons are performed at the annual, seasonal, and daily scales over the River Forecast Centers (RFCs) for CONUS. Annual average rain rates present a satisfying agreement with GHCN-D for all products over CONUS (± 6%). However, differences at the RFC are more important in particular for near-real time 3B42RT precipitation estimates (-33 to +49%). At annual and seasonal scales, the bias-adjusted 3B42 presented important improvement when compared to its near real time counterpart 3B42RT. However, large biases remained for 3B42 over the Western US for higher average accumulation (≥ 5 mm day-1) with respect to GHCN-D surface observations. At the daily scale, 3B42RT performed poorly in capturing extreme daily precipitation (> 4 in day-1) over the Northwest. Furthermore, the conditional analysis and the contingency analysis conducted illustrated the challenge of retrieving extreme precipitation from remote sensing estimates.

  19. Gauge Adjusted Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMAP_GAUGE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, T.; Ushio, T.; Yoshida, S.; Kawasaki, Z.; Kubota, T.; Kachi, M.; Aonashi, K.; Shige, S.

    2013-12-01

    precipitation instantaneously, while the ground based rain gauges collects precipitation particles for one hour at a certain point. This discrepancy can cause the mismatch between the two estimates, and we need to fill the gap of the precipitation estimates between the satellite and rain gauge attributable to the spatial and temporal resolution difference. To that end, the gauge adjusted product named as GSMaP_Gauge has been developed. In this product, the CPC global gauge data analysis by Xie et al. (2007) and Chen et al. (2008) is used for the adjustment of the GSMaP_MVK data. In this presentation, the algorithm concept, examples of the product, and some validation results are presented.

  20. Use of buckets as tools by Western lowland gorillas.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Susan W; Steele, Gary R; Kleinfelder, Raymond E

    2012-01-01

    While all great apes have been documented to use tools, gorillas are arguably the least proficient tool users. In 2009, a Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the Buffalo Zoo was observed using a bucket, which had been provided as part of normal enrichment, as a tool to collect water. We conducted a brief, ad libitum investigation to confirm the validity of the initial observation. We then carried out a systematic investigation of the behavior in 2010. We collected 72 hr of videotaped data and tested the null hypothesis that the gorillas did not differ in their prevalence of engaging in bucket-use behaviors. We documented that all four adult gorillas in the group used buckets as drinking tools; however, there was significant individual variation in frequency and type of use of buckets. Four of the eight behaviors showed significant variation among individuals. The silverback male and the youngest adult female contacted and held the bucket significantly more than the remaining two adult females. The young female carried and drank from the bucket significantly more than any other individual. Furthermore, she was observed to fill the bucket with water four of the six times during which this behavior was observed. These data provide evidence of the ability of gorillas to utilize tools, given the appropriate environmental conditions. We continue to explore the abilities of gorillas to recognize the functionality of buckets as tools. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  2. Fixing the Hole in My Bucket

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitkewicz, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Like many people, the author has spent the better part of his life fashioning a list of places he wanted to go and things he wanted to do. Because he is a typical American male, his "Bucket List" is mostly populated by sporting venues he wants to visit and sporting events he wants to witness. Sharing his "Bucket List" with his son would be a gift…

  3. The extent of wind-induced undercatch in the UK winter storms of 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Michael; Colli, Matteo; Stagnaro, Mattia; Quinn, Paul; Dutton, Mark; O'Donnell, Greg; Wilkinson, Mark; Black, Andrew; O'Connell, Enda; Lanza, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The most widely used device for measuring rainfall is the rain gauge, of which the tipping bucket (TBR) is the most prevalent type. Rain gauges are considered by many to be the most accurate method currently available. The data they produce are used in flood-forecasting and flood risk management, water resource management, hydrological modelling and evaluating impacts on climate change; to name but a few. Rain gauges may provide the most accurate measurement of rainfall at a point in space and time, but they are subject to errors - and some gauges are more prone than others. The most significant error is the 'wind-induced undercatch'. This is caused by the gauge itself contributing to an acceleration of the wind speed near the orifice, which disturbs and distorts the airflow. The trajectories of precipitation particles are affected, resulting in an undercatch. Results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations, presented herein, describe in detail the physical processes contributing to this. High resolution field measurements of rainfall and wind are collected at four field research stations in the UK. Each site is equipped with juxtaposed rain gauges with different funnel profiles, in addition to a WMO reference pit rain gauge measurement. These data describe the rainfall measurement uncertainty. The sites were selected to represent the prevalent rainfall regimes observed in the UK. Two research stations are on the west coast; which is prone to frontal weather systems and storms swept in from the Atlantic, often enhanced by orography. Two are located in the east. Rural lowland and upland areas are represented, both in the west and the east. Urban sites will also have significant undercatch problems but are outside the scope of this study. Data from the four research stations are analysed for the 2015 winter storms which caused devastating flooding in the west of the UK, particularly Cumbria and the Scottish Borders, where two of the sites are located. An

  4. A field evaluation of a satellite microwave rainfall sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, Andrea; Caviglia, Daniele D.; Colli, Matteo; Delucchi, Alessandro; Federici, Bianca; Lanza, Luca G.; Pastorino, Matteo; Randazzo, Andrea; Sguerso, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    An innovative environmental monitoring system - Smart Rainfall System (SRS) - that estimates rainfall in real-time by means of the analysis of the attenuation of satellite signals (DVB-S in the microwave Ku band) is presented. Such a system consists in a set of peripheral microwave sensors placed on the field of interest, and connected to a central processing and analysis node. It has been developed jointly by the University of Genoa, with its departments DITEN and DICCA and the Genoese SME "Darts Engineering Srl". This work discusses the rainfall intensity measurements accuracy and sensitivity performance of SRS, based on preliminary results from a field comparison experiment at the urban scale. The test-bed is composed by a set of preliminary measurement sites established from Autumn 2016 in the Genoa (Italy) municipality and the data collected from the sensors during a selection of rainfall events is studied. The availability of point-scale rainfall intensity measurements made by traditional tipping-bucket rain gauges and radar areal observations allows a comparative analysis of the SRS performance. The calibration of the reference rain gauges has been carried out at the laboratories of DICCA using a rainfall simulator and the measurements have been processed taking advantage of advanced algorithms to reduce counting errors. The experimental set-up allows a fine tuning of the retrieval algorithm and a full characterization of the accuracy of the rainfall intensity estimates from the microwave signal attenuation as a function of different precipitation regimes.

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TRAM BUCKET FRAME, SHOWING CLAMPING MECHANISM,WITHOUT ORE BUCKET AND WHEELS. THE FRAME IS LYING ON ITS SIDE. THE ORE BUCKET WAS ATTACHED TO THE LEFT SIDE, AND TWO WHEELS WERE ATTACHED TO THE SPINDLE ON THE RIGHT. THE FRAME AND BUCKET ARE SUSPENDED FROM THE STATIONARY CABLE BY THE TWO WHEELS, WITH THE ORE BUCKET HANGING BELOW. THE WHEEL AND LEVER AT CENTER WERE ACTIVATED BY THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS ON THE TRAM TERMINALS TO LOCK OR RELEASE THE BUCKET ONTO THE MOVING CABLE THAT RAN THROUGH THE SQUARE BLOCK AT CENTER. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  6. A stochastic fractional dynamics model of space-time variability of rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Travis, James E.

    2013-09-01

    varies in space and time in a highly irregular manner and is described naturally in terms of a stochastic process. A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they depend strongly on the space-time scales over which rain data are averaged. A spectral model of precipitation has been developed based on a stochastic differential equation of fractional order for the point rain rate, which allows a concise description of the second moment statistics of rain at any prescribed space-time averaging scale. The model is thus capable of providing a unified description of the statistics of both radar and rain gauge data. The underlying dynamical equation can be expressed in terms of space-time derivatives of fractional orders that are adjusted together with other model parameters to fit the data. The form of the resulting spectrum gives the model adequate flexibility to capture the subtle interplay between the spatial and temporal scales of variability of rain but strongly constrains the predicted statistical behavior as a function of the averaging length and time scales. We test the model with radar and gauge data collected contemporaneously at the NASA TRMM ground validation sites located near Melbourne, Florida and on the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands in the tropical Pacific. We estimate the parameters by tuning them to fit the second moment statistics of radar data at the smaller spatiotemporal scales. The model predictions are then found to fit the second moment statistics of the gauge data reasonably well at these scales without any further adjustment.

  7. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Numerical simulation of cavitation flow characteristic on Pelton turbine bucket surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C. J.; Xiao, Y. X.; Zhu, W.; Yao, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    The internal flow in the rotating bucket of Pelton turbine is free water sheet flow with moving boundary. The runner operates under atmospheric and the cavitation in the bucket is still a controversial problem. While more and more field practice proved that there exists cavitation in the Pelton turbine bucket and the cavitation erosion may occur at the worst which will damage the bucket. So a well prediction about the cavitation flow on the bucket surface of Pelton turbine and the followed cavitation erosion characteristic can effectively guide the optimization of Pelton runner bucket and the stable operation of unit. This paper will investigate the appropriate numerical model and method for the unsteady 3D water-air-vapour multiphase cavitation flow which may occur on the Pelton bucket surface. The computational domain will include the nozzle pipe flow, semi-free surface jet and runner domain. Via comparing the numerical results of different turbulence, cavity and multiphase models, this paper will determine the suitable numerical model and method for the simulation of cavitation on the Pelton bucket surface. In order to investigate the conditions corresponding to the cavitation phenomena on the bucket surface, this paper will adopt the suitable model to simulate the various operational conditions of different water head and needle travel. Then, the characteristics of cavitation flow the development process of cavitation will be analysed in in great detail.

  9. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    DOEpatents

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  10. Patterns of precipitation: Fine-scale rain dynamics in the South of England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    The consensus in the climate change community is that one of the (many) effects of climate change will be that the nature of rain events will change, and in all likelihood, they will become more extreme. Currently, most long-term rain rate data sets are hourly (or longer) rain accumulations, so investigating the rain events that occur for less than 0.01% (52.5 minutes) of a year is not possible. Rain datasets do exist with smaller temporal resolution, but these are either not continuous, or simply have not been in operation long enough to investigate any trends in climate change. The Chilbolton Observatory in the south of England is one of the world's most advanced meteorological radar experimental facilities, and is home to the world's largest fully steerable meteorological radar, the Chilbolton Advanced Meteorological Radar (CAMRa). It also hosts a wide range of meteorological and atmospheric sensing instruments, including cameras, lidars, radiometers and a wide selection of different types of rain gauges. The UK atmospheric science, hydrology and Earth Observation communities use the instruments located at Chilbolton to conduct research in weather, flooding and climate. This often involves observations of meteorological phenomena operating below the current resolution of (forecasting and climate) models and work on their effective parameterisation. The Chilbolton datasets contain a continuous drop counting rain gauge time series at 10 seconds integration time, spanning from January 2001 to the present. Though the length of the time series is not sufficient to confidently identify any effects of climate change, the time resolution is sufficient to investigate the differences in the extreme values of rain events over the nine years of the dataset, characterising the inter-annual and seasonal variability. Changes in the occurrence of different rain events have also been investigated by looking at event and inter-event durations to determine if there is any change

  11. Preserving the Pyramid of STI Using Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The product of research projects is information. Through the life cycle of a project, information comes from many sources and takes many forms. Traditionally, this body of information is summarized in a formal publication, typically a journal article. While formal publications enjoy the benefits of peer review and technical editing, they are also often compromises in media format and length. As such, we consider a formal publication to represent an abstract to a larger body of work: a pyramid of scientific and technical information (STI). While this abstract may be sufficient for some applications, an in-depth use or analysis is likely to require the supporting layers from the pyramid. We have developed buckets to preserve this pyramid of STI. Buckets provide an archive- and protocol-independent container construct in which all related information objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services. Buckets are an implementation of the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) DL model. In SODA, data objects are more important than the archives that hold them. Much of the functionality traditionally associated with archives is pushed down into the objects, such as enforcing terms and conditions, negotiating display, and content maintenance. In this paper, we discuss the motivation, design, and implication of bucket use in DLs with respect to grey literature.

  12. An investigation of tip planform influence on the aerodynamic load characteristics of semispan, upswept wing and wing-tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanaken, Johannes M.

    1986-01-01

    A semi-span wing, equipped with an interchangeable tip, which was varied in planform and size was examined. Total wing aerodynamic loading was obtained from the wind tunnel scale system. The wing tip was mounted on a separate six-component strain gauge balance, which provided the aerodynamic loads on the tip. The tests were accomplished in the NASA Ames 7X10-Foot Wind Tunnel at a Mach number of 0.178. The aerodynamic load characteristics of the wing and of the tip were presented with the tip at several incidence angles relative to the wing inboard section.

  13. Measurements of DSD Second Moment Based on Laser Extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Jones, Linwood; Kasparis, Takis C.; Metzger, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Using a technique recently developed for estimating the density of surface dust dispersed during a rocket landing, measuring the extinction of a laser passing through rain (or dust in the rocket case) yields an estimate of the 2nd moment of the particle cloud, and rainfall drop size distribution (DSD) in the terrestrial meteorological case. With the exception of disdrometers, instruments that measure rainfall make in direct measurements of the DSD. Most common of these instruments are the rainfall rate gauge measuring the 1 1/3 th moment, (when using a D(exp 2/3) dependency on terminal velocity). Instruments that scatter microwaves off of hydrometeors, such as the WSR-880, vertical wind profilers, and microwave disdrometers, measure the 6th moment of the DSD. By projecting a laser onto a target, changes in brightness of the laser spot against the target background during rain, yield a measurement of the DSD 2nd moment, using the Beer-Lambert law. In order to detect the laser attenuation within the 8-bit resolution of most camera image arrays, a minimum path length is required, depending on the intensity of the rainfall rate. For moderate to heavy rainfall, a laser path length of 100 m is sufficient to measure variations in optical extinction using a digital camera. A photo-detector could replace the camera, for automated installations. In order to spatially correlate the 2nd moment measurements to a collocated disdrometer or tipping bucket, the laser's beam path can be reflected multiple times using mirrors to restrict the spatial extent of the measurement. In cases where a disdrometer is not available, complete DSD estimates can be produced by parametric fitting of DSD model to the 2nd moment data in conjunction with tipping bucket data. In cases where a disdrometer is collocated, the laser extinction technique may yield a significant improvement to insitu disdrometer validation and calibration strategies

  14. Unsteady CFD simulation for bucket design optimization of Pelton turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KUMASHIRO, Takashi; FUKUHARA, Haruki; TANI, Kiyohito

    2016-11-01

    To investigate flow patterns on the bucket of Pelton turbine runners is one of the important issues to improve the turbine performance. By studying the mechanism of loss generation on the flow around the bucket, it becomes possible to optimize the design of inner and outer bucket shape. For making it into study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is quite an effective method. It is normally used to simulate the flow in turbines and to expect the turbine performances in the development for many kind of water turbine including Pelton type. Especially in the bucket development, the numerical investigations are more useful than observations and measurements obtained in the model test to understand the transient flow patterns. In this paper, a numerical study on two different design buckets is introduced. The simplified analysis domain with consideration for reduction of computational load is also introduced. Furthermore the model tests of two buckets are also performed by using the same test equipment. As the results of the model test, a difference of turbine efficiency is clearly confirmed. The trend of calculated efficiencies on both buckets agrees with the experiment. To investigate the causes of that, the difference of unsteady flow patterns between two buckets is discussed based on the results of numerical analysis.

  15. Comparison of Diurnal Characteristics of GPM-IMERG Precipitation Products with Hourly Rain Gauge Observations and TRMM-TMPA Products over Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Wang, K.; QI, D.

    2017-12-01

    The next generation global high resolutions precipitation products, the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG) provide new insights into the global hydrometeorology studies. Although there are some previous works to evaluate it on daily scale or above, its performance on sub-daily scale is still limited. This study evaluates the diurnal characteristics of the half-hourly IMERG product with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data and the hourly rain gauge data from approximately 50000 automatic weather station (AWS) in China during 2014-2016. The results show that IMERG can roughly capture the diurnal cycle of precipitation amount with serial correlation for eight sub-regions ranging from 0.63 to 0.97, but less agreed in frequency (from 0.21 to 0.90) and intensity (from -0.22 to 0.83). IMERG can generally capture the nocturnal and early morning peak of amount, frequency and intensity, which it's a known issue unsolved by TMPA, partly due to the better detection of light rain in the morning. However as for the afternoon precipitation, overestimation of amount and frequency and underestimation of intensity still exist in IMERG product, which probably result from the overestimation of light and moderate rain. IMERG shows large bias in late morning (0900-1100 Beijing Time) and mid evening (2000-2200 Beijing Time). All these results highlight the cautions when using the IMERG sub-daily product and indicate the necessity of improved retrieval algorithm in the future.

  16. Dengue and Chikungunya Vector Control Pocket Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    mosquito eggs, larvae, or pupae. Examples of such items are tarps, discarded bottles, flower pot saucers, and rain gauges. In areas where there...coconut husks, (4) tires, (5) barrels, (6) water storage tanks, (7) bromeliads and axils of banana trees, (8) obstructed roof gutters, (9) plant pot...regularly Store under roof Fill with sand Throw Away/ Recycle Buckets X X X Flower Pot Saucers X X Roof Gutters X Discarded

  17. Buckets: Aggregative, Intelligent Agents for Publishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    Buckets are an aggregative, intelligent construct for publishing in digital libraries. The goal of research projects is to produce information. This information is often instantiated in several forms, differentiated by semantic types (report, software, video, datasets, etc.). A given semantic type can be further differentiated by syntactic representations as well (PostScript version, PDF version, Word version, etc.). Although the information was created together and subtle relationships can exist between them, different semantic instantiations are generally segregated along currently obsolete media boundaries. Reports are placed in report archives, software might go into a software archive, but most of the data and supporting materials are likely to be kept in informal personal archives or discarded altogether. Buckets provide an archive-independent container construct in which all related semantic and syntactic data types and objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services.

  18. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  19. Interception of rainfall and surface runoff in the Brazilian Cerrado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarso Oliveira, Paulo; Wendland, Edson; Nearing, Mark; Perea Martins, João

    2014-05-01

    The Brazilian Cerrado plays a fundamental role in water resources dynamics because it distributes fresh water to the largest basins in Brazil and South America. In recent decades, the native Cerrado vegetation has increasingly been replaced by agricultural crops and pasture. These land cover and land use changes have altered the hydrological processes. Meanwhile, little is known about the components of the water balance in the Brazilian Cerrado, mainly because the experimental field studies in this region are scarce or nonexistent. The objective of this study was to evaluate two hydrological processes under native Cerrado vegetation, the canopy interception (CI) and the surface runoff (R). The Cerrado physiognomy was classified as "cerrado sensu stricto denso" with an absolute density of 15,278 trees ha-1, and a basal area of 11.44 m2 ha-1. We measured the gross rainfall (P) from an automated tipping bucket rain gauge (model TB4) located in a tower with 11 m of height on the Cerrado. Throughfall (TF) was obtained from 15 automated tipping bucket rain gauges (model Davis) spread below the Cerrado vegetation and randomly relocated every month during the wet season. Stemflow (SF) was measured on 12 trees using a plastic hose wrapped around the trees trunks, sealed with neutral silicone sealant, and a bucket to store the water. The canopy interception was computed by the difference between P and the sum of TF and SF. Surface runoff under undisturbed Cerrado was collected in three plots of 100 m2(5 x 20 m) in size and slope steepness of approximately 0.09 m m-1. The experimental study was conducted between January 2012 and November 2013. We found TF of 81.0% of P and SF of 1.6% of P, i.e. the canopy interception was calculated at 17.4% of P. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between gross rainfall and TF, SF, and CI with correlation coefficients r > 0.8. Our results suggest that the rainfall intensity, the characteristics of the trees trunks

  20. Precipitation Data for the Mount St. Helens Area, Washington--1981-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    This report is a compilation of precipitation data from U.S. Geological Survey telemetered 'Early Flood Warning' sites near Mount St. Helens, Washington, and from telemetered hydrologic data sites in the Toutle River and Muddy River basins for the years 1981-86. It also includes precipitation data for 1981-86 from non-telemetered recording rain gages established near the debris-avalanche blockages of Spirit Lake, Coldwater Lake, and Castle Lake. Daily values (midnight to midnight) are listed by station and calendar year for 32 sites. Hourly data, where available, are presented for the storm that generated the highest peak discharge in the North Fork Toutle River each water year. Instrumentation includes 25 tipping-bucket, and 7 weighing-bucket rain gages all without windshields. The seven sites with weighing-bucket gages were the only U.S. Geological Survey sites at which snowfall was measured. Additional snowfall measurements for the same time period in the Mount St. Helens area were collected by the National Weather Service, the U.s. Soil Conservation Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and also are presented in this report.

  1. Ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Jian; Yin, Rao; Wang, Tong-Biao; Liao, Qing-Hua; Li, Hong-Guo; Liao, Qinghong; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection in which three types of illuminating sources are applied: (a) pseudo-thermal light source; (b) amplitude modulated true thermal light source; (c) amplitude modulated laser source. Experimental results show that the quality of ghost images reconstructed with true thermal light or laser beam is insensitive to the usage of bucket or point detector, however, the quality of ghost images reconstructed with pseudo-thermal light in bucket detector case is better than that in point detector case. Our theoretical analysis shows that the reason for this is due to the first order transverse coherence of the illuminating source.

  2. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  3. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not exceed...

  4. 30 CFR 56.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not exceed...

  5. 30 CFR 57.19076 - Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets... NONMETAL MINES Personnel Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19076 Maximum speeds for hoisting persons in buckets. When persons are hoisted in buckets, speeds shall not exceed 500 feet per minute and shall not...

  6. The depth-dependence of rain noise in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Barclay, David R; Buckingham, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    During the Philippine Sea experiment in May 2009, Deep Sound, a free-falling instrument platform, descended to a depth of 5.1 km and then returned to the surface. Two vertically aligned hydrophones monitored the ambient noise continuously throughout the descent and ascent. A heavy rainstorm passed over the area during the deployment, the noise from which was recorded over a frequency band from 5 Hz to 40 kHz. Eight kilometers from the deployment site, a rain gauge on board the R/V Kilo Moana provided estimates of the rainfall rate. The power spectral density of the rain noise shows two peaks around 5 and 30 kHz, elevated by as much as 20 dB above the background level, even at depths as great as 5 km. Periods of high noise intensity in the acoustic data correlate well with the rainfall rates recovered from the rain gauge. The vertical coherence function of the rain noise has well-defined zeros between 1 and 20 kHz, which are characteristic of a localized source on the sea surface. A curve-fitting procedure yields the vertical directional density function of the noise, which is sharply peaked, accurately tracking the storm as it passed over the sensor station.

  7. Plausibility check of a redesigned rain-on-snow simulator (RASA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Ole; Probst, Sabine; Weingartner, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Rain-on-snow events are fascinating but still not completely understood processes. Although, several studies and equations have been published since decades that describe past events and theoretical descriptions, empirical data of what is happening in the snow cover is far less available. A way to fill this gap of empirical data, rain-on-snow-simulators might be of help. In 2013, Juras et al. published their inspiring idea of a portable rain-on-snow simulator. The huge advantage of this devise - in contrast to other purely field-based experiments - are their fixed, and mostly standardized conditions and the possibility to measure all required data to monitor the water fluxes and melting processes at a time. Mounted in a convenient location, a large number of experiments are relatively easy conductible. We applied and further developed the original device and plausified the results of this redesigned version, called RASA. The principal design was borrowed from the original version being a frame with a sprinkler on top and a snow sample in a box at the bottom, from which the outflow is measured with a tipping gauge. We added a moving sprinkling plate to ensure a uniform distribution of raindrops on the snow, and - most importantly - we suspended the watered snow sampled on weighting cells. The latter enables to continuous measurement of the snow sample throughout the experiment and thus the indirect quantification of liquid water saturation, water holding capacity, and snowmelt amount via balance equations. As it is remains unclear if this device is capable to reproduce known processes, a hypothesis based plausibility check was accomplished. Thus, eight hypothesizes were derived from literature and tested in 28 experiments with the RASA mounted at 2000 m elevation. In general, we were able to reproduce most of the hypotheses. The RASA proved to be a very valuable device that can generate suitable results and has the potential to extend the empirical-experimental data

  8. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOEpatents

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  9. UC Irvine CHRS iRain - An Integrated System for Global Real-time Precipitation Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H.; Nguyen, P.; Huynh, P.; Palacios, T.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.

    2016-12-01

    CHRS iRain developed by the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS), University of California, Irvine is an integrated system for global real-time rainfall observation and visualization using multiple data sources from satellites, radars, gauges, and crowd sourcing. Its backbone is the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS, Hong et al. 2004). Apart from using traditional PERSIANN technique (Hsu et al. 1997), the PERSIANN-CCS also applies image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which significantly improve its accuracy as well as its temporal and spatial resolution (in hourly and 4 km x 4 km respectively). Although satellite-based precipitation products are developing fast, they are still relatively new compared with other precipitation observations by traditional measuring methods, such as radar or rain gauges. CHRS iRain also provides hourly precipitation information from NCEP Stage IV multi-sensor (radar + gauges) products and gauges with over 2000 NOAA River Forecast Center stations. On the website, users can retrieve data of the most recent 72 hour precipitation over different spatial regions regarding their own interests such as grid coordinate, rectangle, watershed, basin, political division, and country. CHRS iRain is a useful tool that provides important global rainfall information for water resources management and decision making for natural disasters such as flash floods, urban flooding, and river flooding. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSWe would like to acknowledge NASA, NOAA Office of Hydrologic Development (OHD) National Weather Service (NWS), Cooperative Institue for Climate and Satellites (CICS), Army Research Office (ARO), ICIWaRM, and UNESCO for supporting this research.

  10. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  11. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  12. Physical Validation of TRMM TMI and PR Monthly Rain Products Over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Brad L.

    2004-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) provides monthly rainfall estimates using data collected by the TRMM satellite. These estimates cover a substantial fraction of the earth's surface. The physical validation of TRMM estimates involves corroborating the accuracy of spaceborne estimates of areal rainfall by inferring errors and biases from ground-based rain estimates. The TRMM error budget consists of two major sources of error: retrieval and sampling. Sampling errors are intrinsic to the process of estimating monthly rainfall and occur because the satellite extrapolates monthly rainfall from a small subset of measurements collected only during satellite overpasses. Retrieval errors, on the other hand, are related to the process of collecting measurements while the satellite is overhead. One of the big challenges confronting the TRMM validation effort is how to best estimate these two main components of the TRMM error budget, which are not easily decoupled. This four-year study computed bulk sampling and retrieval errors for the TRMM microwave imager (TMI) and the precipitation radar (PR) by applying a technique that sub-samples gauge data at TRMM overpass times. Gridded monthly rain estimates are then computed from the monthly bulk statistics of the collected samples, providing a sensor-dependent gauge rain estimate that is assumed to include a TRMM equivalent sampling error. The sub-sampled gauge rain estimates are then used in conjunction with the monthly satellite and gauge (without sub- sampling) estimates to decouple retrieval and sampling errors. The computed mean sampling errors for the TMI and PR were 5.9% and 7.796, respectively, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The PR year-to-year retrieval biases exceeded corresponding TMI biases, but it was found that these differences were partially due to negative TMI biases during cold months and positive TMI biases during warm months.

  13. Wallops Island natural rain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, TING-I.

    1994-01-01

    ScTI has performed a detailed analysis of four optical rain gauge ORG-105 sensors tested by Wallops Island on 8 May 1992. The four ORG's tested were S/N 2236, 2237, 2239, and 2241. Shown is a 30 minute time series of the individual ORG's, the ORG average, and the weighing gauge. The sensors tracked well with rainrates (RR) up to 45 mm/hr for the period. Also shown is a plot of accumulated rainfall over the same period. It can be seen that even though the ORG's tracked well, some ORG's tended to read higher and some read lower during the event.

  14. Real-Time Tracking of the Extreme Rainfall of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria using UCI CHRS's iRain System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, E. J.; Nguyen, P.; Ombadi, M.; Palacios, T.; Huynh, P.; Furman, D.; Tran, H.; Braithwaite, D.; Hsu, K. L.; Sorooshian, S.; Logan, W. S.

    2017-12-01

    During the 2017 hurricane season, three major hurricanes-Harvey, Irma, and Maria-devastated the Atlantic coast of the US and the Caribbean Islands. Harvey set the record for the rainiest storm in continental US history, Irma was the longest-lived powerful hurricane ever observed, and Maria was the costliest storm in Puerto Rican history. The recorded maximum precipitation totals for these storms were 65, 16, and 20 inches respectively. These events provided the Center for Hydrometeorology and Remote Sensing (CHRS) an opportunity to test its global real-time satellite precipitation observation system, iRain, for extreme storm events. The iRain system has been under development through a collaboration between CHRS at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) and UNESCO's International Hydrological Program (IHP). iRain provides near real-time high resolution (0.04°, approx. 4km) global (60°N - 60°S) satellite precipitation data estimated by the PERSIANN-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) algorithm developed by the scientists at CHRS. The user-interactive and web-accessible iRain system allows users to visualize and download real-time global satellite precipitation estimates and track the development and path of the current 50 largest storms globally from data generated by the PERSIANN-CCS algorithm. iRain continuously proves to be an effective tool for measuring real-time precipitation amounts of extreme storms-especially in locations that do not have extensive rain gauge or radar coverage. Such areas include large portions of the world's oceans and over continents such as Africa and Asia. CHRS also created a mobile app version of the system named "iRain UCI", available for iOS and Android devices. During these storms, real-time rainfall data generated by PERSIANN-CCS was consistently comparable to radar and rain gauge data. This presentation evaluates iRain's efficiency as a tool for extreme precipitation monitoring and provides an evaluation of the

  15. The Effectiveness of Using Limited Gauge Measurements for Bias Adjustment of Satellite-Based Precipitation Estimation over Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Raied; Hsu, Kuolin; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Braithwaite, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Precipitation is a key input variable for hydrological and climate studies. Rain gauges are capable of providing reliable precipitation measurements at point scale. However, the uncertainty of rain measurements increases when the rain gauge network is sparse. Satellite -based precipitation estimations appear to be an alternative source of precipitation measurements, but they are influenced by systematic bias. In this study, a method for removing the bias from the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) over a region where the rain gauge is sparse is investigated. The method consists of monthly empirical quantile mapping, climate classification, and inverse-weighted distance method. Daily PERSIANN-CCS is selected to test the capability of the method for removing the bias over Saudi Arabia during the period of 2010 to 2016. The first six years (2010 - 2015) are calibrated years and 2016 is used for validation. The results show that the yearly correlation coefficient was enhanced by 12%, the yearly mean bias was reduced by 93% during validated year. Root mean square error was reduced by 73% during validated year. The correlation coefficient, the mean bias, and the root mean square error show that the proposed method removes the bias on PERSIANN-CCS effectively that the method can be applied to other regions where the rain gauge network is sparse.

  16. Development of one-minute rain-rate and rain-attenuation contour maps for satellite propagation system planning in a subtropical country: South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Owolawi, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    Millimeter and microwave system design at higher frequencies require as input a 1-min rain-rate cumulative distribution function for estimating the level of degradation that can be encountered at such frequency bands. Owing to the lack of 1-min rain-rate data in South Africa and the availability of 5-min and hourly rainfall data, we have used rain-rate conversion models and the refined Moupfouma model to convert the available data into 1-min rain-rate statistics. The attenuation caused by these rain rates was predicted using the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) recommendations model. The Kriging interpolation method was used to draw contour maps over different percentages of time for spatial interpolation of rain-rate values into a regular grid in order to obtain a highly consistent and predictable inter-gauge rain-rate variation over South Africa. The present results will be useful for system designers of modern broadband wireless access (BWA) and high-density cell-based Ku/Ka, Q/V band satellite systems, over the desired area of coverage in order to determine the appropriate effective isotropically radiated power (EIRP) and receiver characteristics of this region.

  17. Investigating the Seasonal and Diurnal Evolution of Fog and its Effect on the Hydrometeorological Regime in the Southern Appalachian Mountains Using a Mobile Observing Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. M.; Barros, A.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate, high resolution observations of fog and low clouds in regions of complex terrain are largely unavailable, due to a lack of existing in situ observations and obstacles to satellite observations such as ground clutter. For the past year, a mobile observing platform including a ground-based passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe (PCASP-X2), an optical disdrometer (PARSIVEL-2), a tipping bucket rain gauge, and a Vaisala weather station, collocated with a Micro Rain Radar, has been recording observations in valley locations in the inner mountain region of the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). In 2014, the SAM hosted a Global Precipitation Mission field campaign (the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment), and during this experiment the platform was also collocated at various times with a microwave radiometer, W- and X- band radars, a Pluvio weighing rain gauge, a 2D video disdrometer, among other instruments. These observations will be discussed in the context of previous findings based on observations and model results (stochastic column model and the Advanced Research Weather and Forecasting Model (WRF)). Specifically, in previous work, seeder-feeder processes have been found to govern the enhancement of light rainfall in the SAM through increased coalescence efficiency in stratiform rainfall due to the interactions with low level clouds and topography modulated fog. This presentation will focus on measurements made by the platform and collocated instruments, as well as observations made by fog collectors on ridges, with the aim of developing a process-based understanding of the characteristics of low cloud and fog through describing the diurnal cycle of microphysical and dynamical processes and properties in the region. The overarching goal is to employ observations of the formation and evolution of the "feeder" clouds and fog to further understand the magnitude and function of their contribution to the local hydrometeorological regime.

  18. US Hybrid Bucket Truck APM Phase I Final Scientific Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarzi, Abas

    Presently, there are approximately 166,000 medium- and heavy-duty (MD/HD) bucket trucks operating in the United States, the majority of which are diesel powered. These vehicles spend a significant amount of time idling at the work site to power the truck’s hydraulic boom, lights, auxiliary equipment, and cabin heating and cooling. Nationally, bucket trucks use 0.5 billion gallons of diesel fuel annually, representing 1.5 percent of the U.S.’s total diesel fuel consumption [ ]. Increasing fuel costs and environmental concerns are driving efforts to develop cleaner, quieter, more productive, and more energy efficient bucket trucks. The emissions of the bucket truckmore » have a direct effect on public health. Bucket trucks operation mode imposes heavy loads on the powertrain and results in very poor fuel efficiency and high emissions. Electric powertrains perform well in such conditions, and in recent years, a number of initiatives have been launched to explore the potential of fuel cell electric systems for bucket truck propulsion. The proposed fuel cell powered ePTO offers the best ROI and compatibility with the existing vehicles and operation and also minimized the infrastructure need. To address these problems, US Hybrid Corporation has teamed with Hawaii Center for Advanced Transportation Technologies (HCATT) and Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) to perform a Phase I analysis on the development and deployment of a fuel cell powered bucket truck (FCBT) for operation by HECO within the City and County of Honolulu. Based on preliminary modeling of a typical bucket truck operation, it is anticipated that the fuel cell powertrain will provide a 200% fuel economy improvement with zero emissions job-site operation and lower operating noise. The zero-emission ePTO bucket truck will also support the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission goals set forth by the federal government as well as the State of Hawaii. The operators within

  19. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2014-05-01

    The accurate control of the gap between static and rotating components is vital to preserve the mechanical integrity and ensure a correct functioning of any rotating machinery. Moreover, tip leakage above the airfoil tip results in relevant aerodynamic losses. One way to measure and to monitor blade tip gaps is by the so-called Blade Tip Clearance (BTC) technique. Another fundamental phenomenon to control in the turbomachines is the vibration of the blades. For more than half a century, this has been performed by installing strain gauges on the blades and using telemetry to transmit the signals. The Blade Tip Timing (BTT) technique, (i.e. measuring the blade time of arrival from the casing at different angular locations with proximity sensors) is currently being adopted by all manufacturers as a replacement for the classical strain gauge technique because of its non-intrusive character. This paper presents a novel magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance systems, which offers high temporal and high spatial resolution simultaneously. The sensing element adopted is a Wheatstone bridge of Permalloy elements. The principle of the sensor is based on the variation of magnetic field at the passage of ferromagnetic objects. Two different configurations have been realized, a digital and an analogue sensor. Measurements of tip clearance have been performed in an high speed compressor and the calibration curve is reported. Measurements of blade vibration have been carried out in a dedicated calibration bench; results are presented and discussed. The magnetoresistive sensor is characterized by high repeatability, low manufacturing costs and measurement accuracy in line with the main probes used in turbomachinery testing. The novel sensor has great potential and is capable of fulfilling the requirements for a simultaneous BTC and BTT measurement system.

  20. Evaluation of High-Resolution Precipitation Estimates from Satellites during July 2012 Beijing Flood Event Using Dense Rain Gauge Observations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing. PMID:24691358

  1. Evaluation of high-resolution precipitation estimates from satellites during July 2012 Beijing flood event using dense rain gauge observations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Liu, Huijuan; You, Yalei; Mullens, Esther; Hu, Junjun; Yuan, Ye; Huang, Mengyu; He, Li; Luo, Yongming; Zeng, Xingji; Tang, Guoqiang; Hong, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based precipitation estimates products, CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS, were evaluated with a dense rain gauge network over Beijing and adjacent regions for an extremely heavy precipitation event on July 21 2012. CMORPH and PEERSIANN-CSS misplaced the region of greatest rainfall accumulation, and failed to capture the spatial pattern of precipitation, evidenced by a low spatial correlation coefficient (CC). CMORPH overestimated the daily accumulated rainfall by 22.84% while PERSIANN-CCS underestimated by 72.75%. In the rainfall center, both CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS failed to capture the temporal variation of the rainfall, and underestimated rainfall amounts by 43.43% and 87.26%, respectively. Based on our results, caution should be exercised when using CMORPH and PERSIANN-CCS as input for monitoring and forecasting floods in Beijing urban areas, and the potential for landslides in the mountainous zones west and north of Beijing.

  2. Evaluation of the TMPA-3B42 precipitation product using a high-density rain gauge network over complex terrain in northeastern Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.; Lopez-Moreno, Juan I.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA)-3B42 version 7 product is assessed over north-eastern Iberia, a region with considerable topographical gradients and complexity. Precipitation characteristics from a dense network of 656 rain gauges, spanning the period from 1998 to 2009, are used to evaluate TMPA-3B42 estimates on a daily scale. A set of accuracy estimators, including the relative bias, mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and Spearman coefficient was used to evaluate the results. The assessment indicates that TMPA-3B42 product is capable of describing the seasonal characteristics of the observed precipitation over most of the study domain. In particular, TMPA-3B42 precipitation agrees well with in situ measurements, with MAE less than 2.5 mm.day- 1, RMSE of 6.4 mm.day- 1 and Spearman correlation coefficients generally above 0.6. TMPA-3B42 provides improved accuracies in winter and summer, whereas it performs much worse in spring and autumn. Spatially, the retrieval errors show a consistent trend, with a general overestimation in regions of low altitude and underestimation in regions of heterogeneous terrain. TMPA-3B42 generally performs well over inland areas, while showing less skill in the coastal regions. A set of skill metrics, including a false alarm ratio [FAR], frequency bias index [FBI], the probability of detection [POD] and threat score [TS], is also used to evaluate TMPA performance under different precipitation thresholds (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mm.day- 1). The results suggest that TMPA-3B42 retrievals perform well in specifying moderate rain events (5-25 mm.day- 1), but show noticeably less skill in producing both light (< 1 mm.day- 1) and heavy rainfall thresholds (more than 50 mm.day- 1). Given the complexity of the terrain and the associated high spatial variability of precipitation in north-eastern Iberia, the results reveal that TMPA-3B42 data provide

  3. A note on the temporal behavior of bucket hydrologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a "canopy' bucket to more accurately represent evapotranspiration over land surfaces is explained. The temporal behavior of the traditional bucket model is compared with one that mimics the effects of interception loss. Results are presented in terms of the spectral response of the parameterization to a hypothetical white noise forcing.

  4. New fire-fighting water bucket is lifted by helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter lifts a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket that will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, the 324-gallon container will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  5. Rain Check Application: Mobile tool to monitor rainfall in remote parts of Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Baird, J.; Chiu, M. T.; Morelli, R.; de Lanerolle, T. R.; Gourley, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Rainfall observations performed uniformly and continuously over a period of time are valuable inputs in developing climate models and predicting events such as floods and droughts. Rain-Check is a mobile application developed in Google App Inventor Platform, for android based smart phones, to allow field researchers to monitor various rain gauges distributed though out remote regions of Haiti and send daily readings via SMS messages for further analysis and long term trending. Rainfall rate and quantity interact with many other factors to influence erosion, vegetative cover, groundwater recharge, stream water chemistry and runoff into streams impacting agriculture and livestock. Rainfall observation from various sites is especially significant in Haiti with over 80% of the country is mountainous terrain. Data sets from global models and limited number of ground stations do not capture the fine-scale rainfall patterns necessary to describe local climate. Placement and reading of rain gauges are critical to accurate measurement of rainfall.

  6. Assessment of spill flow emissions on the basis of measured precipitation and waste water data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochedlinger, Martin; Gruber, Günter; Kainz, Harald

    2005-09-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are substantial contributors to the total emissions into surface water bodies. The emitted pollution results from dry-weather waste water loads, surface runoff pollution and from the remobilisation of sewer deposits and sewer slime during storm events. One possibility to estimate overflow loads is a calculation with load quantification models. Input data for these models are pollution concentrations, e.g. Total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD tot), Total Suspended Solids (TSS) or Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD sol), rainfall series and flow measurements for model calibration and validation. It is important for the result of overflow loads to model with reliable input data, otherwise this inevitably leads to bad results. In this paper the correction of precipitation measurements and the sewer online-measurements are presented to satisfy the load quantification model requirements already described. The main focus is on tipping bucket gauge measurements and their corrections. The results evidence the importance of their corrections due the effects on load quantification modelling and show the difference between corrected and not corrected data of storm events with high rain intensities.

  7. Torrential Rain in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Concentric ovals of red, orange, yellow, and green are draped over southern China, showing rainfall totals for the week of June 4 through June 11, 2007. The rainfall totals are from the Goddard Space Flight Center Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis, which is based on rainfall measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Though seasonal rains are not unexpected in the area, the rain that fell during the week was torrential and relentless. As the image shows, a broad stretch of China received up to 200 millimeters (8 inches) of rain, and some areas were inundated with up to 500 millimeters (20 inches). Floods and landslides resulted, destroying crops and forcing some 643,000 people from their homes, reported the Xinhua News Agency on ReliefWeb. As of June 11, 71 people had died and 13 were missing. The most affected area was the southern coast, where rainfall totals are highest in this image. Heavy tropical rains combined with steep mountains make southeastern China prone to devastating landslides. Monitoring landslide-producing conditions typically requires extensive networks of ground-based rain gauges and weather instruments. But many developing countries in high-risk areas lack the resources to maintain such systems; heavy rains and flooding often wash away ground-based instruments. Robert Adler, a senior scientist in the Laboratory for Atmospheres at Goddard Space Flight Center, and Yang Hong, a research scientist at Goddard Earth Sciences Technology Center, are confronting the problem by developing a satellite-based system for predicting landslides. The system relies on TRMM data to predict when rainfall in different areas has reached a landslide-triggering threshold. The system makes data available on the Internet just a few hours after the satellite makes its observations. To read more about the landslide-monitoring system, please read the feature article Satellite Monitors Rains That Trigger Landslides, http

  8. New fire-fighting water bucket is filled for demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    - A NASA helicopter hovers over the water while a high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket fills. The 324-gallon container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  9. [Research Programs Conducted by the University of Virginia]. Part 1; Aquarius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuentes, Jose; Garstang, Michael; Macko, Stephen; Swap, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The hydrological cycle and the source of water vapor within the Amazon River Basin have important implications on questions of global thermal transport and regional ecological and socioeconomic sustainability. A three tiered approach taking advantage of satellite imagery, tipping buckets, and isotopic storm sampling at three basin sites was used to examine different aspects of regional meteoric water. By combining these techniques, it was possible to correlate observed storm structure with rain rates and intrastorm variations.

  10. 62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END OF LAUNCH PAD. FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. SOUTH FACE OF MST IS IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. 23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION 48 IN SLC-3W MST. NOTE REMOVABLE METAL PLANKS BELOW LAUNCHER AND ROPE NET OVER FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. Numerical and Experimental Investigations of the Flow in a Stationary Pelton Bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yuji; Fujii, Tsuneaki; Kawaguchi, Sho

    A numerical code based on one of mesh-free particle methods, a Moving-Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) Method has been used for the simulation of free surface flows in a bucket of Pelton turbines so far. In this study, the flow in a stationary bucket is investigated by MPS simulation and experiment to validate the numerical code. The free surface flow dependent on the angular position of the bucket and the corresponding pressure distribution on the bucket computed by the numerical code are compared with that obtained experimentally. The comparison shows that numerical code based on MPS method is useful as a tool to gain an insight into the free surface flows in Pelton turbines.

  13. Electromyographic assessment of apple bucket intervention designed to reduce back strain.

    PubMed

    Earle-Richardson, Giulia; Jenkins, Paul L; Strogatz, David; Bell, Erin M; Freivalds, Andris; Sorensen, Julie A; May, John J

    2008-06-01

    The authors previously developed an apple bucket that was modified by use of a hip belt to reduce muscle fatigue. The intervention of belt use was accepted by workers and shown not to interfere with productivity. However, use of this intervention did not appear to reduce muscle fatigue when measured by tests of voluntary muscle strength. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the intervention's effect on muscle fatigue employing surface electromyographic (EMG) amplitude. Amplitude measurements on 15 muscles were taken from 10 laboratory volunteers who were carrying a full bucket of apples, once while wearing the intervention belt and once without the intervention. These measurements were taken for seven different postures (four angles of trunk flexion (0 degrees , 20 degrees , 45 degrees , 90 degrees ) and three raised-arm positions (both up, dominant up, non-dominant up)) common to apple harvest work. Participants were measured in these conditions both with the bucket carried in front and with the bucket carried to the side. Significant reductions in amplitude favouring the intervention were seen for 11 of the 15 muscles in models considering the four body flexion angles. Ten of these were of the middle and lower back. These control/intervention differences were seen with both bucket-carrying positions (front vs. side) and tended to increase with increasing flexion angle. In contrast, no significant intervention effects were observed in models considering treatment by arm-raised position. One significant main effect (upper trapezius, side bucket) showed an amplitude reduction in the treatment condition. Another main effect showing increased amplitude in the intervention condition use was observed in the dominant levator scapulae (side bucket). Thus, the use of the intervention belt reduces EMG amplitude among a number of mid- and lower-back muscles. This is suggestive of a protective effect against back strain.

  14. Soft Water Level Sensors for Characterizing the Hydrological Behaviour of Agricultural Catchments

    PubMed Central

    Crabit, Armand; Colin, François; Bailly, Jean Stéphane; Ayroles, Hervé; Garnier, François

    2011-01-01

    An innovative soft water level sensor is proposed to characterize the hydrological behaviour of agricultural catchments by measuring rainfall and stream flows. This sensor works as a capacitor coupled with a capacitance to frequency converter and measures water level at an adjustable time step acquisition. It was designed to be handy, minimally invasive and optimized in terms of energy consumption and low-cost fabrication so as to multiply its use on several catchments under natural conditions. It was used as a stage recorder to measure water level dynamics in a channel during a runoff event and as a rain gauge to measure rainfall amount and intensity. Based on the Manning equation, a method allowed estimation of water discharge with a given uncertainty and hence runoff volume at an event or annual scale. The sensor was tested under controlled conditions in the laboratory and under real conditions in the field. Comparisons of the sensor to reference devices (tipping bucket rain gauge, hydrostatic pressure transmitter limnimeter, Venturi channels…) showed accurate results: rainfall intensities and dynamic responses were accurately reproduced and discharges were estimated with an uncertainty usually acceptable in hydrology. Hence, it was used to monitor eleven small agricultural catchments located in the Mediterranean region. Both catchment reactivity and water budget have been calculated. Dynamic response of the catchments has been studied at the event scale through the rising time determination and at the annual scale by calculating the frequency of occurrence of runoff events. It provided significant insight into catchment hydrological behaviour which could be useful for agricultural management perspectives involving pollutant transport, flooding event and global water balance. PMID:22163868

  15. On the robustness of bucket brigade quantum RAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Srinivasan; Gheorghiu, Vlad; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Mosca, Michele; Varshinee Srinivasan, Priyaa

    2015-12-01

    We study the robustness of the bucket brigade quantum random access memory model introduced by Giovannetti et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett.100 160501). Due to a result of Regev and Schiff (ICALP ’08 733), we show that for a class of error models the error rate per gate in the bucket brigade quantum memory has to be of order o({2}-n/2) (where N={2}n is the size of the memory) whenever the memory is used as an oracle for the quantum searching problem. We conjecture that this is the case for any realistic error model that will be encountered in practice, and that for algorithms with super-polynomially many oracle queries the error rate must be super-polynomially small, which further motivates the need for quantum error correction. By contrast, for algorithms such as matrix inversion Harrow et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett.103 150502) or quantum machine learning Rebentrost et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett.113 130503) that only require a polynomial number of queries, the error rate only needs to be polynomially small and quantum error correction may not be required. We introduce a circuit model for the quantum bucket brigade architecture and argue that quantum error correction for the circuit causes the quantum bucket brigade architecture to lose its primary advantage of a small number of ‘active’ gates, since all components have to be actively error corrected.

  16. New fire-fighting water bucket is readied for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers attach a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket to a NASA helicopter. Holding 324 gallons of water, it will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  17. Comparison of GPCP Monthly and Daily Precipitation Estimates with High-Latitude Gauge Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolvin, David T.; Adler, Robert G.; Nelkin, Eric J.; Poutiainen, Jani

    2008-01-01

    It is very important to know how much rain and snow falls around the world for uses that range from crop forecasting to disaster response, drought monitoring to flood forecasting, and weather analysis to climate research. Precipitation is usually measured with rain gauges, but rain gauges don t exist in areas that are sparsely populated, which tends to be a good portion of the globe. To overcome this, meteorologists use satellite data to estimate global precipitation. However, it is difficult to estimate rain and especially snow in cold climates using most current satellites. The satellite sensors are often "confused" by a snowy or frozen surface and therefore cannot distinguish precipitation. One commonly used satellite-based precipitation data set, the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data, overcomes this frozen-surface problem through the innovative use of two sources of satellite data, the Television Infrared Observation Satellite Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Though the GPCP estimates are generally considered a very reliable source of precipitation, it has been difficult to assess the quality of these estimates in cold climates due to the lack of gauges. Recently, the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has provided a 12-year span of high-quality daily rain gauge observations, covering all of Finland, that can be used to compare with the GPCP data to determine how well the satellites estimate cold-climate precipitation. Comparison of the monthly GPCP satellite-based estimates and the FMI gauge observations shows remarkably good agreement, with the GPCP estimates being 6% lower in the amount of precipitation than the FMI observations. Furthermore, the month-to-month correlation between the GPCP and FMI is very high at 0.95 (1.0 is perfect). The daily GPCP estimates replicate the FMI daily occurrences of precipitation with a correlation of 0.55 in the summer and 0.45 in the winter. The winter

  18. Phacoemulsification tip vacuum pressure: Comparison of 4 devices.

    PubMed

    Payne, Marielle; Georgescu, Dan; Waite, Aaron N; Olson, Randall J

    2006-08-01

    To determine the vacuum pressure generated by 4 phacoemulsification devices measured at the phacoemulsification tip. University ophthalmology department. The effective vacuum pressures generated by the Sovereign (AMO), Millennium (Bausch & Lomb), Legacy AdvanTec (Alcon Laboratories), and Infiniti (Alcon Laboratories) phacoemulsification machines were measured with a device that isolated the phacoemulsification tip in a chamber connected to a pressure gauge. The 4 machines were tested at multiple vacuum limit settings, and the values were recorded after the foot pedal was fully depressed and the pressure had stabilized. The AdvanTec and Infiniti machines were tested with and without occlusion of the Aspiration Bypass System (ABS) side port (Alcon Laboratories). The Millennium machine was tested using venturi and peristaltic pumps. The machines generated pressures close to the expected at maximum vacuum settings between 100 mm Hg and 500 mm Hg with few intermachine variations. There was no significant difference between pressures generated using 19- or 20-gauge tips (Millennium and Sovereign). The addition of an ABS side port decreased vacuum by a mean of 12.1% (P < .0001). Although there were some variations in vacuum pressures among phacoemulsification machines, particularly when an aspiration bypass tip was used, these discrepancies are probably not clinically significant.

  19. Rain in the U.S. Midwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The powerful storms that moved across the U.S. Midwest during the first week of May 2007 brought wind, hail, tornadoes, and drenching rain. This image shows rainfall totals over parts of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska between May 1 and May 8, based in part on measurements made by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. More than 400 millimeters (15.7 inches) of rain fell over some regions, corresponding with locations where the National Weather Service reported severe weather. A wide swath of red and orange (between 240 and 400 millimeters of rain) arcs in a clockwise direction from western Oklahoma, through central Kansas, and into southeastern Nebraska. The reddish-orange bull's-eye over southeastern Louisiana is evidence of the torrential rains that pounded visitors to the annual New Orleans Jazz Festival. South-central Texas' Edward Plateau was soaked with more than 240 millimeters of rain during the period, as well. From May 4 to May 8, the National Weather Service received approximately 683 reports of severe weather, 140 of which were reports of tornadoes, including the massive F5 tornado that devastated the city of Greensburg, Kansas. Beyond the damaging winds and tornadoes, the torrential rain triggered extensive flooding throughout the Central Plains. On the evening of May 7, flood warnings were in effect from South Dakota to southern Texas, and by May 8, the Hydrologic Information Center reported moderate to major flooding at 53 stream gauge sites in South Dakota, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, and Arkansas. The floods could be as severe as the 1993 flood, one of the costliest floods in U.S. history, reported the Associated Press.

  20. First-stage high pressure turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Theresa A.; Ahmadi, Majid; Clemens, Eugene; Perry, II, Jacob C.; Holiday, Allyn K.; Delehanty, Richard A.; Jacala, Ariel Caesar

    2004-05-25

    The first-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  1. Surface Runoff Estimation Using SMOS Observations, Rain-gauge Measurements and Satellite Precipitation Estimations. Comparison with Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Leal, Julio A.; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Khodayar, Samiro; Estrela, Teodoro; Fidalgo, Arancha; Gabaldo, Onofre; Kuligowski, Robert; Herrera, Eddy

    Surface runoff is defined as the amount of water that originates from precipitation, does not infiltrates due to soil saturation and therefore circulates over the surface. A good estimation of runoff is useful for the design of draining systems, structures for flood control and soil utilisation. For runoff estimation there exist different methods such as (i) rational method, (ii) isochrone method, (iii) triangular hydrograph, (iv) non-dimensional SCS hydrograph, (v) Temez hydrograph, (vi) kinematic wave model, represented by the dynamics and kinematics equations for a uniforme precipitation regime, and (vii) SCS-CN (Soil Conservation Service Curve Number) model. This work presents a way of estimating precipitation runoff through the SCS-CN model, using SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission soil moisture observations and rain-gauge measurements, as well as satellite precipitation estimations. The area of application is the Jucar River Basin Authority area where one of the objectives is to develop the SCS-CN model in a spatial way. The results were compared to simulations performed with the 7-km COSMO-CLM (COnsortium for Small-scale MOdelling, COSMO model in CLimate Mode) model. The use of SMOS soil moisture as input to the COSMO-CLM model will certainly improve model simulations.

  2. Assessing satellite-based rainfall estimates in semi-arid watersheds using the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch gauge network and TRMM-PR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rain gauge network associated with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in southeastern Arizona provides a unique opportunity for direct comparisons of in-situ measurements and satellite-based instantaneous rain-rate estimat...

  3. Improving the Quality of Welding Seam of Automatic Welding of Buckets Based on TCP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Min

    2018-02-01

    Since February 2014, the welding defects of the automatic welding line of buckets have been frequently appeared. The average repair time of each bucket is 26min, which seriously affects the production efficiency and welding quality. We conducted troubleshooting, and found the main reasons for the welding defects of the buckets were the deviations of the center points of the robot tools and the poor quality of the locating welding. We corrected the gripper, welding torch, and accuracy of repeat positioning of robots to control the quality of positioning welding. The welding defect rate of buckets was reduced greatly, ensuring the production efficiency and welding quality.

  4. On the properties of stochastic intermittency in rainfall processes.

    PubMed

    Molini, A; La, Barbera P; Lanza, L G

    2002-01-01

    In this work we propose a mixed approach to deal with the modelling of rainfall events, based on the analysis of geometrical and statistical properties of rain intermittency in time, combined with the predictability power derived from the analysis of no-rain periods distribution and from the binary decomposition of the rain signal. Some recent hypotheses on the nature of rain intermittency are reviewed too. In particular, the internal intermittent structure of a high resolution pluviometric time series covering one decade and recorded at the tipping bucket station of the University of Genova is analysed, by separating the internal intermittency of rainfall events from the inter-arrival process through a simple geometrical filtering procedure. In this way it is possible to associate no-rain intervals with a probability distribution both in virtue of their position within the event and their percentage. From this analysis, an invariant probability distribution for the no-rain periods within the events is obtained at different aggregation levels and its satisfactory agreement with a typical extreme value distribution is shown.

  5. New fire-fighting water bucket releases its load for a demonstration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter releases the contents of the high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket it holds. The 324-gallon container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  6. The concurrent multiplicative-additive approach for gauge-radar/satellite multisensor precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pintado, J.; Barberá, G. G.; Erena Arrabal, M.; Castillo, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    Objective analysis schemes (OAS), also called ``succesive correction methods'' or ``observation nudging'', have been proposed for multisensor precipitation estimation combining remote sensing data (meteorological radar or satellite) with data from ground-based raingauge networks. However, opposite to the more complex geostatistical approaches, the OAS techniques for this use are not optimized. On the other hand, geostatistical techniques ideally require, at the least, modelling the covariance from the rain gauge data at every time step evaluated, which commonly cannot be soundly done. Here, we propose a new procedure (concurrent multiplicative-additive objective analysis scheme [CMA-OAS]) for operational rainfall estimation using rain gauges and meteorological radar, which does not require explicit modelling of spatial covariances. On the basis of a concurrent multiplicative-additive (CMA) decomposition of the spatially nonuniform radar bias, within-storm variability of rainfall and fractional coverage of rainfall are taken into account. Thus both spatially nonuniform radar bias, given that rainfall is detected, and bias in radar detection of rainfall are handled. The interpolation procedure of CMA-OAS is built on the OAS, whose purpose is to estimate a filtered spatial field of the variable of interest through a successive correction of residuals resulting from a Gaussian kernel smoother applied on spatial samples. The CMA-OAS, first, poses an optimization problem at each gauge-radar support point to obtain both a local multiplicative-additive radar bias decomposition and a regionalization parameter. Second, local biases and regionalization parameters are integrated into an OAS to estimate the multisensor rainfall at the ground level. The approach considers radar estimates as background a priori information (first guess), so that nudging to observations (gauges) may be relaxed smoothly to the first guess, and the relaxation shape is obtained from the sequential

  7. New fire-fighting water bucket releases its water for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter releases 324 gallons of water onto a building in a simulated fire control demonstration. The high-impact- resistant flexible plastic bucket will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  8. Effect of heavy rain to the total received power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio

    1994-01-01

    If the average power at the receiver is substantially reduced by heavy rain, the AGC (automatic gain control) circuit of the rain gauge will try to compensate this reduction by increasing the gain. If this happens, then the pulses created by rain drops are amplified more than they should be and the rainfall rate may be overestimated. If the effective diameter (blocking efficiency) of a particle is 2 mm and if the beam width is 2 cm, each particle will reduce the received power by 10 percent when it crosses the beam. Since the beam is blocked by water drops 75 percent of the total time according to the above calculation, the total received power may be reduced by 7.5 percent. To compensate this reduction to the reference value, the gain of amplifier will be increased by 8.1 percent. This increase of gain will increase all pulse sizes by the same fraction and result in the overestimate of the rainfall rate.

  9. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  10. The Study of Rain Specific Attenuation for the Prediction of Satellite Propagation in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.; Ng, Y. Y.; Abdullah, H.; Abdullah, M.

    2010-06-01

    Specific attenuation is the fundamental quantity in the calculation of rain attenuation for terrestrial path and slant paths representing as rain attenuation per unit distance (dB/km). Specific attenuation is an important element in developing the predicted rain attenuation model. This paper deals with the empirical determination of the power law coefficients which allow calculating the specific attenuation in dB/km from the knowledge of the rain rate in mm/h. The main purpose of the paper is to obtain the coefficients of k and α of power law relationship between specific attenuation. Three years (from 1st January 2006 until 31st December 2008) rain gauge and beacon data taken from USM, Nibong Tebal have been used to do the empirical procedure analysis of rain specific attenuation. The data presented are semi-empirical in nature. A year-to-year variation of the coefficients has been indicated and the empirical measured data was compared with ITU-R provided regression coefficient. The result indicated that the USM empirical measured data was significantly vary from ITU-R predicted value. Hence, ITU-R recommendation for regression coefficients of rain specific attenuation is not suitable for predicting rain attenuation at Malaysia.

  11. Development and Evaluation of Ergonomic Interventions for Bucket Handling on Farms

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Fadi A.; Tang, Steven C.H.; Waters, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate two interventions, Ergo Bucket Carrier (EBC) and Easy Lift (EL), for youths (and adults) to handle water/feed buckets on farms. Background The physical activities of both adult and youth farm workers contribute to the development of low-back disorders (LBDs). Many of the activities youths perform on farms are associated with increased LBD risk, particularly, the handling of water and feed buckets. Methods Seventeen adult and youth participants (10 males and seven females) participated in this study. To assess the risk of LBDs, the participants were instrumented with a three-dimensional spinal electrogoniometer while lifting, carrying, and dumping water buckets using traditional method and the two interventions. Results For both the adult and youth groups, the results showed that the two interventions significantly decrease the magnitudes of LBD risk in many of the tasks evaluated. Overall, the use of the EBC resulted in a 41% reduction in the level of LBD risk for the carrying task, and a reduction of 69% for the dumping task. Using the EL, on the other hand, is especially effective for lifting tasks (55% reduction in LBD risk). Results of the subjective response were consistent with the objective evaluations. Conclusion This study demonstrated the potential for ergonomic interventions in reducing LBD risk during the common farming task of bucket handling. Application Potential application of this study includes the introduction of the EBC and EL in family farms to reduce the LBD risk among youth and adult farmers. PMID:26994024

  12. Rainfall, streamflow, and peak stage data collected at the Murfreesboro, Tennessee, gaging network, March 1989 through July 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Outlaw, G.S.; Butner, D.E.; Kemp, R.L.; Oaks, A.T.; Adams, G.S.

    1992-01-01

    Rainfall, stage, and streamflow data in the Murfreesboro area, Middle Tennessee, were collected from March 1989 through July 1992 from a network of 68 gaging stations. The network consists of 10 tipping-bucket rain gages, 2 continuous-record streamflow gages, 4 partial-record flood hydrograph gages, and 72 crest-stage gages. Data collected by the gages includes 5minute time-step rainfall hyetographs, 15-minute time-step flood hydrographs, and peak-stage elevations. Data are stored in a computer data base and are available for many computer modeling and engineering applications.

  13. Comparison between satellite precipitation product and observation rain gauges in the Red-Thai Binh River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Le, M. H.; Sutton, J. R. P.; Bui, D. D.; Bolten, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Red-ThaiBinh River is the second largest river in Vietnam in terms of economic impact and is home to around 29 million people. The river has been facing challenges for water resources allocation, which require reliable and routine hydrological assessments. However, hydrological analysis is difficult due to insufficient spatial coverage by rain gauges. Satellite-based precipitation estimates are a promising alternative with high-resolution in both time and space. This study aims at investigating the uncertainties in satellite-based precipitation product TRMM 3B42 v7.0 by comparing them against in-situ measurements over the Red-ThaiBinh River basin. The TRMM 3B42 v7.0 are assessed in terms of seasonal, monthly and daily variations over a 17-year period (1998 - 2014). Preliminary results indicate that at a daily scale, except for low Mean Bias Error (MBE), satellite based rainfall product has weak relationship with ground observation data, indicating by average performance of 0.326 and -0.485 for correlation coefficient and Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE), respectively. At monthly scale, we observe that the TRMM 3B42 v7.0 has higher correlation with the correlation increased significantly to 0.863 and NSE of 0.522. By analyzing wet season (May - October) and dry season (November - April) separately we find that the correlation between the TRMM 3B42 v7.0 with ground observations were higher for wet season than the dry season.

  14. Robustness and quality of precipitation and river flow data obtained through participatory monitoring and citizen scienc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytaert, W.; Ochoa-Tocachi, B. F.

    2016-12-01

    Apart for the most basic measurements of manual rain and staff gauges, hydrology and water resources are not an evident disciplines for the application of citizen science. High-resolution measurements require elaborate equipment, installation, and maintenance that is typically beyond the scope of non-scientists. Additionally, hydrological analysis has traditionally relied upon long time series of consistent accuracy and precision. Nevertheless, new opportunities for public participation in hydrological research are emerging, driven by increasingly affordable, robust, and more user-friendly technology. Here we analyse the results generated by participatory monitoring of river flow and precipitation in around 30 catchments in the tropical Andes. This monitoring network was set up through a collaborative effort between scientists, NGOs and local communities, with the intention to generate evidence about the impact of land-use change on streamflow. Monitoring was implemented using automatic but low-cost sensors operated and maintained by local users. Tipping bucket rain gauges are used for precipitation, and river flow is monitored with pressure transducers in combination with a V-notch weir to obtain a stable stage-discharge relation. Jointly, the sensors have now collected an equivalent of more than 30 years of data, with a measurement interval of typically 5 or 15 minutes. Analysing the data, we find that the observations themselves tend to be of a quality comparable to scientific observations. However, main issues are related to the continuity of the time series, as sensors eventually fail or run out of capacity in dataloggers or batteries in the most remote locations. Despite these shortcomings, the data have proven to be useful in characterizing land-use impacts well beyond what can be achieved with conventional data collection, thus filling long-standing gaps in local hydrological knowledge. Furthermore, we expect that the advent of new, more robust, resilient

  15. Stage 3 bucket shank bypass holes and related method

    DOEpatents

    Leone, Sal Albert; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    In a multi-stage turbine wherein at least one turbine wheel supports a row of buckets for rotation, and wherein the turbine wheel is located axially between first and second annular fixed arrays of nozzles, a cooling air circuit for purging a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles comprising a flowpath through a shank portion of one or more buckets connecting a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the first fixed annular array of nozzles with the wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles.

  16. New fire-fighting water bucket is lifted from water for a demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter lifts a high-impact-resistant flexible plastic bucket filled with water. The container will be used for fire protection on property and buildings at Kennedy Space Center.. Known as the 'Bambi' bucket, it will also support the Fish and Wildlife Service for controlled burns plus any wild fires in the area.

  17. Forces acting on particles in a Pelton bucket and similarity considerations for erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.; Kumar, A.; Staubli, T.

    2016-11-01

    High sediment transport rates cause severe erosion issues in hydropower plants leading to interruptions in power generation, decrease in efficiency and shutdown for repair and maintenance. For Pelton turbines operating at high head, the issue of erosion is severe, especially in components like buckets, nozzle rings and needles. Goal of the study is to develop erosion focussed guidelines for both designing as well as operating hydropower plants with Pelton runners. In this study, the flow of sediment inside a Pelton bucket with respect to forces acting on solid particles is analysed with an analytical approach by considering different dynamic forces originating from the rotation of the turbine, the curvature of the buckets, and the Coriolis effect. Further, the path of sediment particles and its effect on erosion phenomena are analysed based on the process of separation of different sized sediment particles from streamlines. The data relating to head, power, discharge, number of jet and efficiency of 250 hydropower plants installed all over the world were analysed in this study to find the major factors related to erosion in Pelton turbine bucket. From analysis of different force ratios, it is found that an increase of D/B, i.e. the ratio of pitch circle diameter and bucket width, and/or decrease of specific speed (nq) enhances erosion. As the erosion process depends significantly on nondimensional parameters D/B and nq, these are considered as similarity measures for scaling of the erosion process in the Pelton buckets of various sizes.

  18. Energy dissipation of slot-type flip buckets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-hua; Li, Shu-fang; Ma, Fei

    2018-03-01

    The energy dissipation is a key index in the evaluation of energy dissipation elements. In the present work, a flip bucket with a slot, called the slot-type flip bucket, is theoretically and experimentally investigated by the method of estimating the energy dissipation. The theoretical analysis shows that, in order to have the energy dissipation, it is necessary to determine the sequent flow depth h 1 and the flow speed V 1 at the corresponding position through the flow depth h 2 after the hydraulic jump. The relative flow depth h 2 / h 。 is a function of the approach flow Froude number Fr 。, the relative slot width b/B 。, and the relative slot angle θ/β. The expression for estimating the energy dissipation is developed, and the maximum error is not larger than 9.21%.

  19. Energy dissipation of slot-type flip buckets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-hua; Li, Shu-fang; Ma, Fei

    2018-04-01

    The energy dissipation is a key index in the evaluation of energy dissipation elements. In the present work, a flip bucket with a slot, called the slot-type flip bucket, is theoretically and experimentally investigated by the method of estimating the energy dissipation. The theoretical analysis shows that, in order to have the energy dissipation, it is necessary to determine the sequent flow depth h 1 and the flow speed V 1 at the corresponding position through the flow depth h 2 after the hydraulic jump. The relative flow depth h 2 / h o is a function of the approach flow Froude number Fr o, the relative slot width b/ B o, and the relative slot angle θ/ β. The expression for estimating the energy dissipation is developed, and the maximum error is not larger than 9.21%.

  20. Evaluation of precipitation estimates over CONUS derived from satellite, radar, and rain gauge data sets at daily to annual scales (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.

    2015-04-01

    We use a suite of quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) derived from satellite, radar, and surface observations to derive precipitation characteristics over the contiguous United States (CONUS) for the period 2002-2012. This comparison effort includes satellite multi-sensor data sets (bias-adjusted TMPA 3B42, near-real-time 3B42RT), radar estimates (NCEP Stage IV), and rain gauge observations. Remotely sensed precipitation data sets are compared with surface observations from the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily (GHCN-D) and from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model). The comparisons are performed at the annual, seasonal, and daily scales over the River Forecast Centers (RFCs) for CONUS. Annual average rain rates present a satisfying agreement with GHCN-D for all products over CONUS (±6%). However, differences at the RFC are more important in particular for near-real-time 3B42RT precipitation estimates (-33 to +49%). At annual and seasonal scales, the bias-adjusted 3B42 presented important improvement when compared to its near-real-time counterpart 3B42RT. However, large biases remained for 3B42 over the western USA for higher average accumulation (≥ 5 mm day-1) with respect to GHCN-D surface observations. At the daily scale, 3B42RT performed poorly in capturing extreme daily precipitation (> 4 in. day-1) over the Pacific Northwest. Furthermore, the conditional analysis and a contingency analysis conducted illustrated the challenge in retrieving extreme precipitation from remote sensing estimates.

  1. Experimental demonstration of using divergence cost-function in SPGD algorithm for coherent beam combining with tip/tilt control.

    PubMed

    Geng, Chao; Luo, Wen; Tan, Yi; Liu, Hongmei; Mu, Jinbo; Li, Xinyang

    2013-10-21

    A novel approach of tip/tilt control by using divergence cost function in stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm for coherent beam combining (CBC) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally in a seven-channel 2-W fiber amplifier array with both phase-locking and tip/tilt control, for the first time to our best knowledge. Compared with the conventional power-in-the-bucket (PIB) cost function for SPGD optimization, the tip/tilt control using divergence cost function ensures wider correction range, automatic switching control of program, and freedom of camera's intensity-saturation. Homemade piezoelectric-ring phase-modulator (PZT PM) and adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC) are developed to correct piston- and tip/tilt-type aberrations, respectively. The PIB cost function is employed for phase-locking via maximization of SPGD optimization, while the divergence cost function is used for tip/tilt control via minimization. An average of 432-μrad of divergence metrics in open loop has decreased to 89-μrad when tip/tilt control implemented. In CBC, the power in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main lobe increases by 32 times, and the phase residual error is less than λ/15.

  2. Design and initial evaluation of a portable in situ runoff and sediment monitoring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Cruse, Richard M.; Chen, Qiang; Li, Hao; Song, Chunyu; Zhang, Xingyi

    2014-11-01

    An inexpensive portable runoff and sediment monitoring device (RSMD) requiring no external electric power was developed for measuring water runoff and associated sediment loss from field plots ranging from 0.005 to 0.1 ha. The device consists of runoff gauge, sediment mixing and sectional subsampling assemblies. The runoff hydrograph is determined using a calibrated tipping bucket. The sediment mixing assembly minimizes fluid splash while mixing the runoff water/sediment mixture prior to subsampling this material. Automatic flow-proportional sampling utilizes mechanical power supplied by the tipping bucket action, with power transmitted to the sample collection assembly via the tipping bucket pivot bar. Runoff is well-mixed and subdivided twice before subsamples are collected for analysis. The resolution of this device for a 100 m2 plot is 0.025 mm of runoff; the device is able to capture maximum flow rates up to 82 mm h-1 in a plot of the same dimension. Calibration results indicated the maximum error is 2.1% for estimating flow rate and less than 10% for sediment concentration in most of the flow range. The RSMD was assessed by measuring field runoff and soil loss from different tillage and slope treatments for a single natural rainfall event. Results were in close agreement with those in published literature, giving additional evidence that this device is performing acceptably well. The RSMD is uniquely adapted for a wide range of field sites, especially for those without electric power, making it a useful tool for studying soil management strategies.

  3. Evaluation of X-band polarimetric radar estimation of rainfall and rain drop size distribution parameters in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, A. K.; Gosset, M.; Zahiri, E.-P.; Ochou, A. D.; Kacou, M.; Cazenave, F.; Assamoi, P.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) field campaign an X-band dual-polarization Doppler radar was deployed in Benin, West-Africa, in 2006 and 2007, together with a reinforced rain gauge network and several optical disdrometers. Based on this data set, a comparative study of several rainfall estimators that use X-band polarimetric radar data is presented. In tropical convective systems as encountered in Benin, microwave attenuation by rain is significant and quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) at X-band is a challenge. Here, several algorithms based on the combined use of reflectivity, differential reflectivity and differential phase shift are evaluated against rain gauges and disdrometers. Four rainfall estimators were tested on twelve rainy events: the use of attenuation corrected reflectivity only (estimator R(ZH)), the use of the specific phase shift only R(KDP), the combination of specific phase shift and differential reflectivity R(KDP,ZDR) and an estimator that uses three radar parameters R(ZH,ZDR,KDP). The coefficients of the power law relationships between rain rate and radar variables were adjusted either based on disdrometer data and simulation, or on radar-gauges observations. The three polarimetric based algorithms with coefficients predetermined on observations outperform the R(ZH) estimator for rain rates above 10 mm/h which explain most of the rainfall in the studied region. For the highest rain rates (above 30 mm/h) R(KDP) shows even better scores, and given its performances and its simplicity of implementation, is recommended. The radar based retrieval of two parameters of the rain drop size distribution, the normalized intercept parameter NW and the volumetric median diameter Dm was evaluated on four rainy days thanks to disdrometers. The frequency distributions of the two parameters retrieved by the radar are very close to those observed with the disdrometer. NW retrieval based on a combination of ZH

  4. The statistical characteristics of rain-generated stalks on water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinan; Liu, Ren; Duncan, James H.

    2017-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of the stalks generated by the impact of raindrops are performed in a 1.22-m-by-1.22-m water pool with a water depth of 0.3 m. Simulated raindrops are generated by an array of 22-gauge hypodermic needles that are attached to the bottom of an open-surface rain tank. The raindrop diameter is about 2.6 mm and the height of the rain tank above the water surface of the pool is varied from 1 m to 4.5 m to provide different impact velocities. A number of parameters, including the diameter, height and initial upward velocity of the center jets (stalks) are measured with a cinematic laser-induced- fluorescence technique. It is found that the maximum potential energy of the stalk and the joint distribution of stalk height and diameter are strongly correlated to the impact velocities of raindrops. Comparisons between the rain experiments and single drop impacts on a quiescent water surface are also shown.

  5. Uncertainty Analysis of Radar and Gauge Rainfall Estimates in the Russian River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Willie, D.; Reynolds, D.; Campbell, C.; Sukovich, E.

    2013-12-01

    Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) has been a very important application of weather radar since it was introduced and made widely available after World War II. Although great progress has been made over the last two decades, it is still a challenging process especially in regions of complex terrain such as the western U.S. It is also extremely difficult to make direct use of radar precipitation data in quantitative hydrologic forecasting models. To improve the understanding of rainfall estimation and distributions in the NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed in northern California (HMT-West), extensive evaluation of radar and gauge QPE products has been performed using a set of independent rain gauge data. This study focuses on the rainfall evaluation in the Russian River Basin. The statistical properties of the different gridded QPE products will be compared quantitatively. The main emphasis of this study will be on the analysis of uncertainties of the radar and gauge rainfall products that are subject to various sources of error. The spatial variation analysis of the radar estimates is performed by measuring the statistical distribution of the radar base data such as reflectivity and by the comparison with a rain gauge cluster. The application of mean field bias values to the radar rainfall data will also be described. The uncertainty analysis of the gauge rainfall will be focused on the comparison of traditional kriging and conditional bias penalized kriging (Seo 2012) methods. This comparison is performed with the retrospective Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) system installed at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. The independent gauge set will again be used as the verification tool for the newly generated rainfall products.

  6. The use of knowledge-based Genetic Algorithm for starting time optimisation in a lot-bucket MRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridwan, Muhammad; Purnomo, Andi

    2016-01-01

    In production planning, Material Requirement Planning (MRP) is usually developed based on time-bucket system, a period in the MRP is representing the time and usually weekly. MRP has been successfully implemented in Make To Stock (MTS) manufacturing, where production activity must be started before customer demand is received. However, to be implemented successfully in Make To Order (MTO) manufacturing, a modification is required on the conventional MRP in order to make it in line with the real situation. In MTO manufacturing, delivery schedule to the customers is defined strictly and must be fulfilled in order to increase customer satisfaction. On the other hand, company prefers to keep constant number of workers, hence production lot size should be constant as well. Since a bucket in conventional MRP system is representing time and usually weekly, hence, strict delivery schedule could not be accommodated. Fortunately, there is a modified time-bucket MRP system, called as lot-bucket MRP system that proposed by Casimir in 1999. In the lot-bucket MRP system, a bucket is representing a lot, and the lot size is preferably constant. The time to finish every lot could be varying depends on due date of lot. Starting time of a lot must be determined so that every lot has reasonable production time. So far there is no formal method to determine optimum starting time in the lot-bucket MRP system. Trial and error process usually used for it but some time, it causes several lots have very short production time and the lot-bucket MRP would be infeasible to be executed. This paper presents the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA) for optimisation of starting time in a lot-bucket MRP system. Even though GA is well known as powerful searching algorithm, however, improvement is still required in order to increase possibility of GA in finding optimum solution in shorter time. A knowledge-based system has been embedded in the proposed GA as the improvement effort, and it is proven that the

  7. Liquid cooled counter flow turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Dakin, James T.

    1982-09-21

    Means and a method are provided whereby liquid coolant flows radially outward through coolant passages in a liquid cooled turbine bucket under the influence of centrifugal force while in contact with countercurrently flowing coolant vapor such that liquid is entrained in the flow of vapor resulting in an increase in the wetted cooling area of the individual passages.

  8. Determination of Critical Rock Mass in a Bucket of a Dinting Loader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remiorz, Eryk

    2017-09-01

    The extraction of hard coal deposits lying in increasing depth causes significant problems with maintenance of roadways (maingates, tailgates, etc.). The reduction of the cross section of such excavations, caused by the floor upheaval, leads to the occurrence of many problems with transport and ventilation. Dinting loaders are employed to restore the original size of roadways tightened due to the activity of adverse stresses occurring in the rock mass. These are tracked machines, usually with small width of about 1 m. They often work in roadways with high longitudinal and lateral inclination, as a result of which they are especially susceptible to overturning. The article presents a mathematical model allowing to determine the critical mass of broken rock in a bucket. The model also allows to determine spatial coordinates of a dinting loader's centre of gravity depending on temporary position of movable elements of the loader such as a turntable, boom, coupler and bucket, and depending on the level of loading the bucket with broken rock. It also enables to determine critical angles of the roadways' longitudinal and lateral inclination. The outcomes of computer studies of variations in the position of the loader's centre of gravity depending on deflection angles of moving elements of the loader and the mass of broken rock in the bucket are also presented. Variability ranges of spatial coordinates of the centre of gravity of the loader are also established and examples are given for values of the critical mass of broken rock in the bucket.

  9. Bucket wheel rehabilitation of ERC 1400-30/7 high-capacity excavators from lignite quarries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vîlceanu, Fl; Iancu, C.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of bucket wheel equipment type ERC 1400-30/7 in lignite quarries with lifetime expired, or in the ultimate life period, together with high cost investments for their replacement, makes rational the efforts made to rehabilitation in order to extend their life. Rehabilitation involves checking operational safety based on relevant expertise of metal structures supporting effective resistance but also the replacement (or modernization) of subassemblies that can increase excavation process productivity, lowering energy consumption, reducing mechanical stresses. This paper proposes an analysis of constructive solution of using a part of the classical bucket wheel, on which are located 9 cutting cups and 9 chargers cups and adding a new part so that the new redesigned bucket-wheel will contain 18 cutting-chargers cups, compared to the classical model. On the CAD model of bucket wheel was performed a static and a dynamic FEA, the results being compared with the yield strength of the material of the entire structure, were checked mechanical stresses in the overall distribution map, and were verified the first 4 vibrating modes the structure compared to real loads. Thus was verified that the redesigned bucket-wheel can accomplish the proposed goals respectively increase excavation process productivity, lowering energy consumption and reducing mechanical stresses.

  10. Ground-water levels and precipitation data at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, October 1988-September 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zettwoch, Douglas D.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet--Department for Environmental Protection--Division of Waste Management, has an ongoing program to monitor water levels at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky. Ground-water-level and precipitation data were collected from 112 wells and 1 rain gage at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site during October 1988-September 2000. Data were collected on a semi-annual basis from 62 wells, continuously from 6 wells, and monthly or bimonthly from 44 wells (13 of which had continuous recorders installed for the period October 1998-September 2000). One tipping-bucket rain gage was used to collect data at the Maxey Flats site for the period October 1988-September 2000.

  11. Simulations of RF capture with barrier bucket in booster at injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.J.

    2012-01-23

    As part of the effort to increase the number of ions per bunch in RHIC, a new scheme for RF capture of EBIS ions in Booster at injection has been developed. The scheme was proposed by M. Blaskiewicz and J.M. Brennan. It employs a barrier bucket to hold a half turn of beam in place during capture into two adjacent harmonic 4 buckets. After acceleration, this allows for 8 transfers of 2 bunches from Booster into 16 buckets on the AGS injection porch. During the Fall of 2011 the necessary hardware was developed and implemented by the RF and Controlsmore » groups. The scheme is presently being commissioned by K.L. Zeno with Au32+ ions from EBIS. In this note we carry out simulations of the RF capture. These are meant to serve as benchmarks for what can be achieved in practice. They also allow for an estimate of the longitudinal emittance of the bunches on the AGS injection porch.« less

  12. Gauging Through the Crowd: A Crowd-Sourcing Approach to Urban Rainfall Measurement and Storm Water Modeling Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pan; Ng, Tze Ling

    2017-11-01

    Accurate rainfall measurement at high spatial and temporal resolutions is critical for the modeling and management of urban storm water. In this study, we conduct computer simulation experiments to test the potential of a crowd-sourcing approach, where smartphones, surveillance cameras, and other devices act as precipitation sensors, as an alternative to the traditional approach of using rain gauges to monitor urban rainfall. The crowd-sourcing approach is promising as it has the potential to provide high-density measurements, albeit with relatively large individual errors. We explore the potential of this approach for urban rainfall monitoring and the subsequent implications for storm water modeling through a series of simulation experiments involving synthetically generated crowd-sourced rainfall data and a storm water model. The results show that even under conservative assumptions, crowd-sourced rainfall data lead to more accurate modeling of storm water flows as compared to rain gauge data. We observe the relative superiority of the crowd-sourcing approach to vary depending on crowd participation rate, measurement accuracy, drainage area, choice of performance statistic, and crowd-sourced observation type. A possible reason for our findings is the differences between the error structures of crowd-sourced and rain gauge rainfall fields resulting from the differences between the errors and densities of the raw measurement data underlying the two field types.

  13. A New Use for an Old Pickle Bucket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitschele, Jonathan

    1994-01-01

    Uses the top three inches of a bucket with a vertical notch about three inches wide removed to demonstrate centripetal force and the minimum size of opening needed for a ball rolling inside to leave. Provides a mathematical explanation. (MVL)

  14. Data-dependent bucketing improves reference-free compression of sequencing reads.

    PubMed

    Patro, Rob; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-09-01

    The storage and transmission of high-throughput sequencing data consumes significant resources. As our capacity to produce such data continues to increase, this burden will only grow. One approach to reduce storage and transmission requirements is to compress this sequencing data. We present a novel technique to boost the compression of sequencing that is based on the concept of bucketing similar reads so that they appear nearby in the file. We demonstrate that, by adopting a data-dependent bucketing scheme and employing a number of encoding ideas, we can achieve substantially better compression ratios than existing de novo sequence compression tools, including other bucketing and reordering schemes. Our method, Mince, achieves up to a 45% reduction in file sizes (28% on average) compared with existing state-of-the-art de novo compression schemes. Mince is written in C++11, is open source and has been made available under the GPLv3 license. It is available at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/∼ckingsf/software/mince. carlk@cs.cmu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. The absent bow tie sign in bucket-handle tears of the menisci in the knee.

    PubMed

    Helms, C A; Laorr, A; Cannon, W D

    1998-01-01

    Bucket-handle tears of the menisci are one of the most frequently missed diagnoses in MR examinations of the knee. This article describes the "absent bow tie sign," which can be used to identify bucket-handle tears on routine MR examinations of the knee. The arthroscopic surgical reports (n = 350) from a single orthopedic surgeon's practice during a 24-month period were examined for patients who had a diagnosis of bucket-handle tear and who underwent MR imaging before surgery (n = 32). The MR examinations were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of a bow tie sign. The bow tie sign was considered normal when two sagittal images showed the body segment (a bow tie appearance). The bow tie sign was considered abnormal, consistent with a bucket-handle tear, when only one or no body segment was seen (the absent bow tie sign). Coronal images were evaluated for a truncated meniscus. Also, each MR examination was scrutinized for a displaced fragment and a double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign. Thirty-three bucket-handle tears were found at arthroscopy in 32 patients. One patient had tears of the medial and lateral menisci. The absent bow tie sign was seen in 32 of the 33 cases (sensitivity, 97%) and correlated with the medial or lateral meniscus that was reported torn at arthroscopy. The single false-negative result occurred in a patient with a nondisplaced bucket-handle tear. The findings in 31 contralateral normal menisci were all negative for an absent bow tie sign (specificity, 100%). A displaced fragment was found in 30 (94%) of 32 cases. The coronal images showed a truncated meniscus in 21 (64%) of 33 cases. A double PCL sign was seen in 10 (30%) of 33 cases. The absent bow tie sign is an easily applied finding that can be used with good sensitivity to diagnose bucket-handle tears of the menisci on MR imaging. This sign has a higher accuracy rate than other findings common with bucket-handle tears, such as displaced fragments, a truncated appearance of

  16. Are satellite products good proxies for gauge precipitation over Singapore?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Jina; Raghavan, Srivatsan V.; Nguyen, Ngoc Son; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2018-05-01

    The uncertainties in two high-resolution satellite precipitation products (TRMM 3B42 v7.0 and GSMaP v5.222) were investigated by comparing them against rain gauge observations over Singapore on sub-daily scales. The satellite-borne precipitation products are assessed in terms of seasonal, monthly and daily variations, the diurnal cycle, and extreme precipitation over a 10-year period (2000-2010). Results indicate that the uncertainties in extreme precipitation is higher in GSMaP than in TRMM, possibly due to the issues such as satellite merging algorithm, the finer spatio-temporal scale of high intensity precipitation, and the swath time of satellite. Such discrepancies between satellite-borne and gauge-based precipitations at sub-daily scale can possibly lead to distorting analysis of precipitation characteristics and/or application model results. Overall, both satellite products are unable to capture the observed extremes and provide a good agreement with observations only at coarse time scales. Also, the satellite products agree well on the late afternoon maximum and heavier rainfall of gauge-based data in winter season when the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is located over Singapore. However, they do not reproduce the gauge-observed diurnal cycle in summer. The disagreement in summer could be attributed to the dominant satellite overpass time (about 14:00 SGT) later than the diurnal peak time (about 09:00 SGT) of gauge precipitation. From the analyses of extreme precipitation indices, it is inferred that both satellite datasets tend to overestimate the light rain and frequency but underestimate high intensity precipitation and the length of dry spells. This study on quantification of their uncertainty is useful in many aspects especially that these satellite products stand scrutiny over places where there are no good ground data to be compared against. This has serious implications on climate studies as in model evaluations and in particular, climate

  17. Teflon-wire piston or stainless-steel bucket stapes prosthesis: does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Farrior, J B; Temple, A E

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether postoperative (implantation of a stapes prosthesis) hearing gain and the amount of air-bone gap overclosure are more improved with the Teflon-wire piston or with the stainless-steel bucket prosthesis. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 82 surgeries that had been performed by the primary author; 41 of these patients had received a Fisch Teflon-wire piston, and 41 had received a Bailey-modified Robinson stainless-steel bucket prosthesis. The mean hearing gain for the patients who received the Teflon-wire piston was 23.3 dB after primary stapes surgery and 20.5 dB after revision surgery. Patients who received the stainless-steel bucket prosthesis experienced a mean hearing gain of 20.7 and 20.3 dB, respectively. Following primary stapes surgery, the air-bone gap overclosure was 4.4 dB with the Teflon-wire piston and 5.2 dB with the stainless-steel bucket prosthesis. There was no statistically significant difference in either hearing gain or air-bone gap overclosure between the two prostheses.

  18. Comparison of radar and gauge precipitation data in watershed models across varying spatial and temporal scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Precipitation is a key control on watershed hydrologic modelling output, with errors in rainfall propagating through subsequent stages of water quantity and quality analysis. Most watershed models incorporate precipitation data from rain gauges; higher-resolution data sources are...

  19. Gauge-adjusted rainfall estimates from commercial microwave links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fencl, Martin; Dohnal, Michal; Rieckermann, Jörg; Bareš, Vojtěch

    2017-01-01

    Increasing urbanization makes it more and more important to have accurate stormwater runoff predictions, especially with potentially severe weather and climatic changes on the horizon. Such stormwater predictions in turn require reliable rainfall information. Especially for urban centres, the problem is that the spatial and temporal resolution of rainfall observations should be substantially higher than commonly provided by weather services with their standard rainfall monitoring networks. Commercial microwave links (CMLs) are non-traditional sensors, which have been proposed about a decade ago as a promising solution. CMLs are line-of-sight radio connections widely used by operators of mobile telecommunication networks. They are typically very dense in urban areas and can provide path-integrated rainfall observations at sub-minute resolution. Unfortunately, quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) from CMLs are often highly biased due to several epistemic uncertainties, which significantly limit their usability. In this manuscript we therefore suggest a novel method to reduce this bias by adjusting QPEs to existing rain gauges. The method has been specifically designed to produce reliable results even with comparably distant rain gauges or cumulative observations. This eliminates the need to install reference gauges and makes it possible to work with existing information. First, the method is tested on data from a dedicated experiment, where a CML has been specifically set up for rainfall monitoring experiments, as well as operational CMLs from an existing cellular network. Second, we assess the performance for several experimental layouts of ground truth from rain gauges (RGs) with different spatial and temporal resolutions. The results suggest that CMLs adjusted by RGs with a temporal aggregation of up to 1 h (i) provide precise high-resolution QPEs (relative error < 7 %, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient > 0.75) and (ii) that the

  20. Representing radar rainfall uncertainty with ensembles based on a time-variant geostatistical error modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecinati, Francesca; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel Angel; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Han, Dawei

    2017-05-01

    The application of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to hydrology and water quality models can be preferred to interpolated rainfall point measurements because of the wide coverage that radars can provide, together with a good spatio-temporal resolutions. Nonetheless, it is often limited by the proneness of radar QPE to a multitude of errors. Although radar errors have been widely studied and techniques have been developed to correct most of them, residual errors are still intrinsic in radar QPE. An estimation of uncertainty of radar QPE and an assessment of uncertainty propagation in modelling applications is important to quantify the relative importance of the uncertainty associated to radar rainfall input in the overall modelling uncertainty. A suitable tool for this purpose is the generation of radar rainfall ensembles. An ensemble is the representation of the rainfall field and its uncertainty through a collection of possible alternative rainfall fields, produced according to the observed errors, their spatial characteristics, and their probability distribution. The errors are derived from a comparison between radar QPE and ground point measurements. The novelty of the proposed ensemble generator is that it is based on a geostatistical approach that assures a fast and robust generation of synthetic error fields, based on the time-variant characteristics of errors. The method is developed to meet the requirement of operational applications to large datasets. The method is applied to a case study in Northern England, using the UK Met Office NIMROD radar composites at 1 km resolution and at 1 h accumulation on an area of 180 km by 180 km. The errors are estimated using a network of 199 tipping bucket rain gauges from the Environment Agency. 183 of the rain gauges are used for the error modelling, while 16 are kept apart for validation. The validation is done by comparing the radar rainfall ensemble with the values recorded by the validation rain

  1. Investigation of Bucket Wheel Excavator Lattice Structure Internal Stress in Harsh Environment through a Remote Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risteiu, M.; Dobra, R.; Andras, I.; Roventa, M.; Lorincz, A.

    2017-06-01

    The paper shows the results of a lab model for strain gauges based measuring system for multiple measuring heads of the mechanical stress in lattice structures of the bucket wheel excavator for open pit mines-harsh environment. The system is designed around a microcontroller system. Because of specific working conditions, the measuring system sends data to a processing system (a PC with Matlab software), we have implemented a secure communication solution based on ISM standard, by using NRF24L01 module. The transceiver contains a fully integrated frequency synthesizer based on crystal oscillator, and a Enhanced ShockBurst™ protocol engine. The proposed solution has a current consumption around 9.0 mA at an output power of -6dBm and 12.3mA in RX mode. Built-in Power Down and Standby modes makes power saving easily realizable for our solution battery powered. The stress from structures is taken by specific strain gauges adapted to low frequency vibrations. We are using a precision 24-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) designed for weigh scales and industrial control applications to interface directly with a bridge sensor-instrumentation device, with low drift voltage, low noise, common mode rejection signal, frequency and temperature stability. As backup implementation for measurements a high speed storage implementation is used.

  2. The effect of rainfall measurement uncertainties on rainfall-runoff processes modelling.

    PubMed

    Stransky, D; Bares, V; Fatka, P

    2007-01-01

    Rainfall data are a crucial input for various tasks concerning the wet weather period. Nevertheless, their measurement is affected by random and systematic errors that cause an underestimation of the rainfall volume. Therefore, the general objective of the presented work was to assess the credibility of measured rainfall data and to evaluate the effect of measurement errors on urban drainage modelling tasks. Within the project, the methodology of the tipping bucket rain gauge (TBR) was defined and assessed in terms of uncertainty analysis. A set of 18 TBRs was calibrated and the results were compared to the previous calibration. This enables us to evaluate the ageing of TBRs. A propagation of calibration and other systematic errors through the rainfall-runoff model was performed on experimental catchment. It was found that the TBR calibration is important mainly for tasks connected with the assessment of peak values and high flow durations. The omission of calibration leads to up to 30% underestimation and the effect of other systematic errors can add a further 15%. The TBR calibration should be done every two years in order to catch up the ageing of TBR mechanics. Further, the authors recommend to adjust the dynamic test duration proportionally to generated rainfall intensity.

  3. Optimization of the Water Volume in the Buckets of Pico Hydro Overshot Waterwheel by Analytical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarso; Adanta, Dendy; Warjito; Siswantara, A. I.; Saputra, Pradhana; Dianofitra, Reza

    2018-03-01

    Rapid economic and population growth in Indonesia lead to increased energy consumption, including electricity needs. Pico hydro is considered as the right solution because the cost of investment and operational cost are fairly low. Additionally, Indonesia has many remote areas with high hydro-energy potential. The overshot waterwheel is one of technology that is suitable to be applied in remote areas due to ease of operation and maintenance. This study attempts to optimize bucket dimensions with the available conditions. In addition, the optimization also has a good impact on the amount of generated power because all available energy is utilized maximally. Analytical method is used to evaluate the volume of water contained in bucket overshot waterwheel. In general, there are two stages performed. First, calculation of the volume of water contained in each active bucket is done. If the amount total of water contained is less than the available discharge in active bucket, recalculation at the width of the wheel is done. Second, calculation of the torque of each active bucket is done to determine the power output. As the result, the mechanical power generated from the waterwheel is 305 Watts with the efficiency value of 28%.

  4. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Tomassini, R; Rossi, G; Brouckaert, J-F

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  5. On the development of a magnetoresistive sensor for blade tip timing and blade tip clearance measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.; Brouckaert, J.-F.

    2016-10-01

    A simultaneous blade tip timing (BTT) and blade tip clearance (BTC) measurement system enables the determination of turbomachinery blade vibrations and ensures the monitoring of the existing running gaps between the blade tip and the casing. This contactless instrumentation presents several advantages compared to the well-known telemetry system with strain gauges, at the cost of a more complex data processing procedure. The probes used can be optical, capacitive, eddy current as well as microwaves, everyone with its dedicated electronics and many existing different signal processing algorithms. Every company working in this field has developed its own processing method and sensor technology. Hence, repeating the same test with different instrumentations, the answer is often different. Moreover, rarely it is possible to achieve reliability for in-service measurements. Developments are focused on innovative instrumentations and a common standard. This paper focuses on the results achieved using a novel magnetoresistive sensor for simultaneous tip timing and tip clearance measurements. The sensor measurement principle is described. The sensitivity to gap variation is investigated. In terms of measurement of vibrations, experimental investigations were performed at the Air Force Institute of Technology (ITWL, Warsaw, Poland) in a real aeroengine and in the von Karman Institute (VKI) R2 compressor rig. The advantages and limitations of the magnetoresistive probe for turbomachinery testing are highlighted.

  6. A Blade Tip Timing Method Based on a Microwave Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jilong; Duan, Fajie; Niu, Guangyue; Jiang, Jiajia; Li, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Blade tip timing is an effective method for blade vibration measurements in turbomachinery. This method is increasing in popularity because it is non-intrusive and has several advantages over the conventional strain gauge method. Different kinds of sensors have been developed for blade tip timing, including optical, eddy current and capacitance sensors. However, these sensors are unsuitable in environments with contaminants or high temperatures. Microwave sensors offer a promising potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this article, a microwave sensor-based blade tip timing measurement system is proposed. A patch antenna probe is used to transmit and receive the microwave signals. The signal model and process method is analyzed. Zero intermediate frequency structure is employed to maintain timing accuracy and dynamic performance, and the received signal can also be used to measure tip clearance. The timing method uses the rising and falling edges of the signal and an auto-gain control circuit to reduce the effect of tip clearance change. To validate the accuracy of the system, it is compared experimentally with a fiber optic tip timing system. The results show that the microwave tip timing system achieves good accuracy. PMID:28492469

  7. A Blade Tip Timing Method Based on a Microwave Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilong; Duan, Fajie; Niu, Guangyue; Jiang, Jiajia; Li, Jie

    2017-05-11

    Blade tip timing is an effective method for blade vibration measurements in turbomachinery. This method is increasing in popularity because it is non-intrusive and has several advantages over the conventional strain gauge method. Different kinds of sensors have been developed for blade tip timing, including optical, eddy current and capacitance sensors. However, these sensors are unsuitable in environments with contaminants or high temperatures. Microwave sensors offer a promising potential solution to overcome these limitations. In this article, a microwave sensor-based blade tip timing measurement system is proposed. A patch antenna probe is used to transmit and receive the microwave signals. The signal model and process method is analyzed. Zero intermediate frequency structure is employed to maintain timing accuracy and dynamic performance, and the received signal can also be used to measure tip clearance. The timing method uses the rising and falling edges of the signal and an auto-gain control circuit to reduce the effect of tip clearance change. To validate the accuracy of the system, it is compared experimentally with a fiber optic tip timing system. The results show that the microwave tip timing system achieves good accuracy.

  8. Hydrologic discovery through controlled experimentation, data analysis, and numerical and analytical modeling at the Landscape Evolution Observatory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troch, P. A.; Gevaert, A.; Smit, Y.; Niu, G.; Nakolan, L.; Kyzivat, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) at Biosphere 2-The University of Arizona consists of three identical, sloping, 333 m2 convergent landscapes inside a 5,000 m2 environmentally controlled facility. These engineered landscapes contain 1-meter depth of basaltic tephra, ground to homogenous loamy sand that will undergo physical, chemical, and mineralogical changes over many years. Each landscape contains a spatially dense sensor and sampler network capable of resolving meter-scale lateral heterogeneity and sub-meter scale vertical heterogeneity in moisture, energy and carbon states and fluxes. The density of sensors and frequency at which they can be polled allows for data collection at spatial and temporal scales that are impossible in natural field settings. Embedded solution and gas samplers allow for quantification of biogeochemical processes, and facilitate the use of chemical tracers to study water movement at very high spatial resolutions. Each ~600 metric ton landscape has load cells embedded into the structure to measure changes in total system mass with 0.05% full-scale repeatability (equivalent to less than 1 cm of precipitation). This facilitates the real time accounting of hydrological partitioning at the hillslope scale. Each hillslope is equipped with an engineered rain system capable of raining at rates between 3 and 45 mm/hr in a range of spatial patterns. The rain systems are capable of creating long-term steady state conditions or running complex simulations. The precipitation water supply storage system is flexibly designed to facilitate addition of tracers at constant or time-varying rates for any of the three hillslopes. Six trenches measure subsurface flow via tipping bucket gauges and electromagnetic flowmeters. This presentation will give an overview of lessons learned during the commissioning phase of the first hillslope of LEO, and will indicate several opportunities for collaborative research at Biosphere 2.

  9. SUBPIXEL-SCALE RAINFALL VARIABILITY AND THE EFFECTS ON SEPARATION OF RADAR AND GAUGE RAINFALL ERRORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the primary sources of the discrepancies between radar-based rainfall estimates and rain gauge measurements is the point-area difference, i.e., the intrinsic difference in the spatial dimensions of the rainfall fields that the respective data sets are meant to represent. ...

  10. Application of Virtual Rain and Stream Gauge Information Service for Improved Flood Early Warning System in Lower Mekong Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basnayake, S. B.; Jayasinghe, S.; Meechaiya, C.; Markert, K. N.; Lee, H.; Towashiraporn, P.; Anderson, E.; Okeowo, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Asia is the most vulnerable region in the world to hydro-meteorological extreme events, exacerbated by climate variability and change. Impacts of floods have been on the rapid increase in the recent decades. Myanmar is one of the most vulnerable countries in the lower Mekong region due to its socioeconomic situation (eg; Nargis in 2008, monsoon floods in 2015, etc). Early warning is an effective way to prepare for hydro-meteorological hazards, to minimize disaster risks; however, early warning systems in Myanmar are seriously hampered by limited observation networks. The Virtual Rain and Stream Gauge Information Service (VRSGIS) has been developed by SERVIR-Mekong program of Asian Disaster Preparedness Center (ADPC) to address these gaps and to provide dense, satellite-based rainfall and water level data, which are calibrated and validated with available in-situ observations. This service would enhance decision making in lower Mekong countries, including Myanmar, to minimize impacts of impending disasters. This service contains rainfall data from GPM IMERG and GSMap, CMORPH, TRMM, and CHIRPS, and water levels for 15 locations using Jason-2/3 altimetry. The virtual daily rainfall data sets are being calibrated with Gamma distribution method and are made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web interface.This paper presents a case study of satellite-derived rainfall data accessed from VRSGIS for hydrological modeling in Myanmar, to estimate inundation areas in Kalay township area of Chindwin River basin during the country's worst flood in 2015. Twelve out of fourteen States of Myanmar were severely affected, 103 people were killed, and one million were displaced due to heavy rains associated with Komen cyclone. The aforementioned rainfall data products are used as inputs for HEC-HMS hydrological runoff model to calculate river flows along Chindwin River, and HEC-RAS hydraulic model is used to estimate inundation areas in downstream including Kalay township

  11. Accuracy of tretyakov precipitation gauge: Result of wmo intercomparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Daqing; Goodison, Barry E.; Metcalfe, John R.; Golubev, Valentin S.; Elomaa, Esko; Gunther, Thilo; Bates, Roy; Pangburn, Timothy; Hanson, Clayton L.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Copaciu, Voilete; Milkovic, Janja

    1995-01-01

    The Tretyakov non-recording precipitation gauge has been used historically as the official precipitation measurement instrument in the Russian (formerly the USSR) climatic and hydrological station network and in a number of other European countries. From 1986 to 1993, the accuracy and performance of this gauge were evaluated during the WMO Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison at 11 stations in Canada, the USA, Russia, Germany, Finland, Romania and Croatia. The double fence intercomparison reference (DFIR) was the reference standard used at all the Intercomparison stations in the Intercomparison. The Intercomparison data collected at the different sites are compatible with respect to the catch ratio (measured/DFIR) for the same gauge, when compared using mean wind speed at the height of the gauge orifice during the observation period.The Intercomparison data for the Tretyakov gauge were compiled from measurements made at these WMO intercomparison sites. These data represent a variety of climates, terrains and exposures. The effects of environmental factors, such as wind speed, wind direction, type of precipitation and temperature, on gauge catch ratios were investigated. Wind speed was found to be the most important factor determining the gauge catch and air temperature had a secondary effect when precipitation was classified into snow, mixed and rain. The results of the analysis of gauge catch ratio versus wind speed and temperature on a daily time step are presented for various types of precipitation. Independent checks of the correction equations against the DFIR have been conducted at those Intercomparison stations and a good agreement (difference less than 10%) has been obtained. The use of such adjustment procedures should significantly improve the accuracy and homogeneity of gauge-measured precipitation data over large regions of the former USSR and central Europe.

  12. A Prototype Bucket Wheel Excavator for the Moon, Mars and Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muff, T.; Johnson, L.; King, R.; Duke, M. B.

    2004-02-01

    Excavation of surface regolith material is the first step in processes to extract volatile materials from planetary surface regolith for the production of propellant and life support consumables. Typically, concentrations of volatiles are low, so relatively large amounts of material must be excavated. A bucket wheel excavator is proposed, which has the capability of continuous excavation, which is readily adapted to granular regolith materials as found on the Moon, in drift deposits on Mars, and probably on the surface of asteroids and satellites, such as Phobos. The bucket wheel excavator is relatively simple, compared to machines such as front end loaders. It also has the advantage that excavation forces are principally horizontal rather than vertical, which minimizes the need for excavator mass and suits it to operations in reduced gravity fields. A prototype small bucket wheel excavator has been built at approximately the scale of the rovers that are carried to Mars on the Mars Exploration Rover Mission. The prototype allows the collection of data on forces exerted and power requirements for excavation and will provide data on which more efficient designs can be based. At excavation rates in the vicinity of one rover mass of material excavated per hour, tests of the prototype demonstrate that the power required is largely that needed to operate the excavator hardware and not related strongly to the amount of material excavated. This suggests that the excavation rate can be much larger for the same excavation system mass. Work on this prototype is continuing on the details of transfer of material from the bucket wheel to an internal conveyor mechanism, which testing demonstrated to be problematic in the current design.

  13. Metadata and Buckets in the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Croom, Delwin R., Jr.; Robbins, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) model for digital libraries (DLs), and discuss the role of metadata in SODA. The premise of the SODA model is to "push down" many of the functionalities generally associated with archives into the data objects themselves. Thus the data objects become "smarter", and the archives "dumber". In the SODA model, archives become primarily set managers, and the objects themselves negotiate and handle presentation, enforce terms and conditions, and perform data content management. Buckets are our implementation of smart objects, and da is our reference implementation for dumb archives. We also present our approach to metadata translation for buckets.

  14. CAD-based strength analysis of EK-18 excavator bucket construction for mounting of anti-adhesive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkov, S. A.; Lobanov, D. V.

    2018-03-01

    3D rigid-body model of a bucket of power shovel EK-18 was built using modern CAD-software. Tetrahedral grid with 10-node second-order elements was chosen, and the given model was imported to APM WinMachine - model preparation preprocessor for finite element analysis. The finite element model was based on the geometrical model, imported from KOMPAS-3D to APM Studio. Calculation of stressed-strained state of the bucket was carried out under the forces emerging while digging with “back hoe” equipment. Shift, deformation and tension charts were planned and the most and the least strained areas were pointed out. Wet coherent soil excavation deals with soil adhesion to working bodies of power shovels and leads to reduced performance. The performance decrease is caused by a reduction of useful bucket capacity and partial unloading, increased front resistance to cutting (digging) caused by wet soil adhesion to a working body, increased bucket entry resistance, increased idle time caused by necessity to clean working bodies. Also energy losses increase and quality of work drops because friction forces go up. Friction force occurs while digging and levelling account for 30…70 percent of total digging resistance while performance decreases 1.2…2 times and more. Vibrothermal exposure creates new technological effect which involves a wider humidity range of efficient application and a reduction of friction forces. Disintegrating adhesion bonds with heating requires less driving force from the vibrator. Vibration boosts up heating of the contact layer, which reduces thermal energy losses. However, the question of piezoelectric ceramic actuators location on the excavator bucket needs to be dealt with. The most suitable spots for mounting piezoelectric ceramic devices for reducing soil adhesion to the excavator bucket were defined. Their efficiency is derived from combined (vibrothermal) methods of exposure. Such devices eliminates soil adhesion to the bucket and increases

  15. Geostatistical interpolation of hourly precipitation from rain gauges and radar for a large-scale extreme rainfall event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberlandt, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    SummaryThe methods kriging with external drift (KED) and indicator kriging with external drift (IKED) are used for the spatial interpolation of hourly rainfall from rain gauges using additional information from radar, daily precipitation of a denser network, and elevation. The techniques are illustrated using data from the storm period of the 10th to the 13th of August 2002 that led to the extreme flood event in the Elbe river basin in Germany. Cross-validation is applied to compare the interpolation performance of the KED and IKED methods using different additional information with the univariate reference methods nearest neighbour (NN) or Thiessen polygons, inverse square distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK) and ordinary indicator kriging (IK). Special attention is given to the analysis of the impact of the semivariogram estimation on the interpolation performance. Hourly and average semivariograms are inferred from daily, hourly and radar data considering either isotropic or anisotropic behaviour using automatic and manual fitting procedures. The multivariate methods KED and IKED clearly outperform the univariate ones with the most important additional information being radar, followed by precipitation from the daily network and elevation, which plays only a secondary role here. The best performance is achieved when all additional information are used simultaneously with KED. The indicator-based kriging methods provide, in some cases, smaller root mean square errors than the methods, which use the original data, but at the expense of a significant loss of variance. The impact of the semivariogram on interpolation performance is not very high. The best results are obtained using an automatic fitting procedure with isotropic variograms either from hourly or radar data.

  16. Kicking the Bucket: It's All about Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Kekailoa

    2013-01-01

    In Hawai'i there is a myth known as the alamihi crab syndrome. The myth is a creation of foreign origin used to explain a Western worldview of Hawaiians. It is deployed to explain everything from the 1893 overthrow of the monarchy to the reason why Hawaiians can never better their lives. Crabs in a bucket have a tendency to struggle and fight to…

  17. 18. EASTERLY VIEW ALONG THE SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS.... ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. EASTERLY VIEW ALONG THE SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS.... Volume XX, No. 5, September 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  18. Blade tip timing (BTT) uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russhard, Pete

    2016-06-01

    Blade Tip Timing (BTT) is an alternative technique for characterising blade vibration in which non-contact timing probes (e.g. capacitance or optical probes), typically mounted on the engine casing (figure 1), and are used to measure the time at which a blade passes each probe. This time is compared with the time at which the blade would have passed the probe if it had been undergoing no vibration. For a number of years the aerospace industry has been sponsoring research into Blade Tip Timing technologies that have been developed as tools to obtain rotor blade tip deflections. These have been successful in demonstrating the potential of the technology, but rarely produced quantitative data, along with a demonstration of a traceable value for measurement uncertainty. BTT technologies have been developed under a cloak of secrecy by the gas turbine OEM's due to the competitive advantages it offered if it could be shown to work. BTT measurements are sensitive to many variables and there is a need to quantify the measurement uncertainty of the complete technology and to define a set of guidelines as to how BTT should be applied to different vehicles. The data shown in figure 2 was developed from US government sponsored program that bought together four different tip timing system and a gas turbine engine test. Comparisons showed that they were just capable of obtaining measurement within a +/-25% uncertainty band when compared to strain gauges even when using the same input data sets.

  19. Comparing Approaches to Deal With Non-Gaussianity of Rainfall Data in Kriging-Based Radar-Gauge Rainfall Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecinati, F.; Wani, O.; Rico-Ramirez, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    Merging radar and rain gauge rainfall data is a technique used to improve the quality of spatial rainfall estimates and in particular the use of Kriging with External Drift (KED) is a very effective radar-rain gauge rainfall merging technique. However, kriging interpolations assume Gaussianity of the process. Rainfall has a strongly skewed, positive, probability distribution, characterized by a discontinuity due to intermittency. In KED rainfall residuals are used, implicitly calculated as the difference between rain gauge data and a linear function of the radar estimates. Rainfall residuals are non-Gaussian as well. The aim of this work is to evaluate the impact of applying KED to non-Gaussian rainfall residuals, and to assess the best techniques to improve Gaussianity. We compare Box-Cox transformations with λ parameters equal to 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1, Box-Cox with time-variant optimization of λ, normal score transformation, and a singularity analysis technique. The results suggest that Box-Cox with λ = 0.1 and the singularity analysis is not suitable for KED. Normal score transformation and Box-Cox with optimized λ, or λ = 0.25 produce satisfactory results in terms of Gaussianity of the residuals, probability distribution of the merged rainfall products, and rainfall estimate quality, when validated through cross-validation. However, it is observed that Box-Cox transformations are strongly dependent on the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall and on the units used for the rainfall intensity. Overall, applying transformations results in a quantitative improvement of the rainfall estimates only if the correct transformations for the specific data set are used.

  20. Bucket platform cooling scheme and related method

    DOEpatents

    Abuaf, Nesim; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Chopra, Sanjay; Kercher, David Max; Kellock, Iain Robertson; Lenahan, Dean Thomas; Nellian, Sankar; Starkweather, John Howard; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil extending from a platform, having high and low pressure sides; a wheel mounting portion; a hollow shank portion located radially between the platform and the wheel mounting portion, the platform having an under surface. An impingement cooling plate is located in the hollow shank portion, spaced from the under surface, and the impingement plate is formed with a plurality of impingement cooling holes therein.

  1. The triple PCL sign: bucket handle tears of both medial and lateral menisci in a chronically ACL-deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Kakel, Rafid; Russell, Robert; VanHeerden, Pieter

    2010-10-11

    Bucket handle tears of both menisci in the setting of acute or chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears of the same knee have rarely been reported in the literature. This article presents a case of a bucket handle tear affecting both the medial and lateral menisci in a patient with chronic ACL rupture. Both bucket handle tears were displaced and locked in the intercondylar notch. A new magnetic resonance image (MRI) sign suggested on sagittal view is called the triple PCL sign, comprising the intact posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the 2 displaced fragments in the intercondylar notch from the two bucket handle tears. The precise diagnosis of this condition is of obvious importance for optimal operative planning. While finding the displaced fragment from the medial meniscus is expected to cause the double PCL sign, the torn ACL may have made it easier to visualize the bucket handle tear of the lateral meniscus in the same sagittal plane as the PCL. Only 5 other reports mention bimeniscal bucket handle tears of both the medial and lateral menisci in association with an ACL tear. None have shown the suggested triple PCL sign because of lack of overlap between the 2 bucket handle tears in the coronal plane while lying in the intercondylar notch causing them not to fall in the same sagittal plane. Our patient showed some overlap between the 2 meniscal fragments while lying in the notch to create the triple PCL sign on sagittal MRI. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Value of a dual-polarized gap-filling radar in support of southern California post-fire debris-flow warnings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorgensen, David P.; Hanshaw, Maiana N.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Laber, Jayme L; Staley, Dennis M.; Kean, Jason W.; Restrepo, Pedro J.

    2011-01-01

    A portable truck-mounted C-band Doppler weather radar was deployed to observe rainfall over the Station Fire burn area near Los Angeles, California, during the winter of 2009/10 to assist with debris-flow warning decisions. The deployments were a component of a joint NOAA–U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research effort to improve definition of the rainfall conditions that trigger debris flows from steep topography within recent wildfire burn areas. A procedure was implemented to blend various dual-polarized estimators of precipitation (for radar observations taken below the freezing level) using threshold values for differential reflectivity and specific differential phase shift that improves the accuracy of the rainfall estimates over a specific burn area sited with terrestrial tipping-bucket rain gauges. The portable radar outperformed local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) National Weather Service network radars in detecting rainfall capable of initiating post-fire runoff-generated debris flows. The network radars underestimated hourly precipitation totals by about 50%. Consistent with intensity–duration threshold curves determined from past debris-flow events in burned areas in Southern California, the portable radar-derived rainfall rates exceeded the empirical thresholds over a wider range of storm durations with a higher spatial resolution than local National Weather Service operational radars. Moreover, the truck-mounted C-band radar dual-polarimetric-derived estimates of rainfall intensity provided a better guide to the expected severity of debris-flow events, based on criteria derived from previous events using rain gauge data, than traditional radar-derived rainfall approaches using reflectivity–rainfall relationships for either the portable or operational network WSR-88D radars. Part of the reason for the improvement was due to siting the radar closer to the burn zone than the WSR-88Ds, but use of the dual-polarimetric variables

  3. Double and triple-harmonic RF buckets and their use for bunch squeezing in AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2016-08-24

    For the past several years we have merged bunches in AGS in order to achieve the desired intensity per bunch prior to injection into RHIC. The merging is done on a flat porch at or above AGS injection energy. Because the merges involve the reduction of the RF harmonic number by a factor of 2 (for a 2 to 1 merge) and then a factor of 3 (for a 3 to 1 merge), one requires RF frequencies 6hf s, 3hf s, 2hf s and hf s, where f s is the revolution frequency on the porch and h = 4more » is the fundamental harmonic number. The standard AGS RF cavities cannot operate at the lowest frequencies 2hf s and hf s; these are provided by two modified cavities. Upon completion of the merges, the bunches are sitting in harmonic h buckets. In order to be accelerated they need to be squeezed into harmonic 3h buckets. This is accomplished by producing a double-harmonic bucket in which harmonics h and 2h act in concert, and then a triple-harmonic bucket in which harmonics h, 2h, and 3h act in concert. Simulations have shown that the squeeze presents an acceptance bottleneck which limits the longitudinal emittance that can be put into the harmonic 3h bucket. In this note the areas of the double and triple-harmonic buckets are calculated explicitly, and it is shown that these go through a minimum as the RF voltages are raised to the desired values. Several RF voltage ranges are examined, and the acceptance bottleneck is determined for each of these. Finally, the acceptance bottleneck for Au77+ bunches in AGS is calculated for several RF voltage ranges. The main result is that the RF voltages for the low-frequency harmonic h and 2h cavities both must be at least 22 kV in order to achieve an acceptance of 0:6 eV s per nucleon. If the harmonic h and 2h voltages are 15 and 22 kV, respectively, then the acceptance is reduced to 0:548 eV s per nucleon.« less

  4. Cascading gauge theory on dS4 and String Theory landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchel, Alex; Galante, Damián A.

    2014-06-01

    Placing anti-D3 branes at the tip of the conifold in Klebanov-Strassler geometry provides a generic way of constructing meta-stable de Sitter (dS) vacua in String Theory. A local geometry of such vacua exhibit gravitational solutions with a D3 charge measured at the tip opposite to the asymptotic charge. We discuss a restrictive set of such geometries, where anti-D3 branes are smeared at the tip. Such geometries represent holographic dual of cascading gauge theory in dS4 with or without chiral symmetry breaking. We find that in the phase with unbroken chiral symmetry the D3 charge at the tip is always positive. Furthermore, this charge is zero in the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. We show that the effective potential of the chirally symmetric phase is lower than that in the symmetry broken phase, i.e., there is no spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking for cascading gauge theory in dS4. The positivity of the D3 brane charge in smooth de-Sitter deformed conifold geometries with fluxes presents difficulties in uplifting AdS vacua to dS ones in String Theory via smeared anti-D3 branes. First, turning on fluxes on Calabi-Yau compactifications of type IIB string theory produces highly warped geometry with stabilized complex structure (but not Kähler) moduli of the compactification [3]; Next, including non-perturbative effects (which are under control given the unbroken supersymmetry), one obtains anti-de Sitter (AdS4) vacua with all moduli fixed; Finally, one uses anti-D3 branes of type IIB string theory to uplift AdS4 to de Sitter (dS4) vacua. As the last step of the construction completely breaks supersymmetry, it is much less controlled. In fact, in [4-7] it was argued that putting anti-D3 branes at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler (KS) [8] geometry (as done in KKLT construction) leads to a naked singularity. Whether or not the resulting singularity is physical is subject to debates. When M4=dS4 and the chiral symmetry is unbroken, the D3 brane

  5. Performance Evaluation of Bucket based Excavating, Loading and Transport (BELT) Equipment - An OEE Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mousa; Rai, Piyush; Gupta, Suprakash

    2017-03-01

    Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) has been used since last over two decades as a measure of performance in manufacturing industries. Unfortunately, enough, application of OEE in mining and excavation industry has not been duly adopted. In this paper an effort has been made to identify the OEE for performance evaluation of Bucket based Excavating, Loading and Transport (BELT) equipment. The conceptual model of OEE, as used in the manufacturing industries, has been revised to adapt to the BELT equipment. The revised and adapted model considered the operational time, speed and bucket capacity utilization losses as the key OEE components for evaluating the performance of BELT equipment. To illustrate the efficacy of the devised model on real-time basis, a case study was undertaken on the biggest single bucket excavating equipment - the dragline, in a large surface coal mine. One-year data was collected in order to evaluate the proposed OEE model.

  6. Assessing the accuracy of weather radar to track intense rain cells in the Greater Lyon area, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Florent; Chapon, Pierre-Marie; Comby, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The Greater Lyon is a dense area located in the Rhône Valley in the south east of France. The conurbation counts 1.3 million inhabitants and the rainfall hazard is a great concern. However, until now, studies on rainfall over the Greater Lyon have only been based on the network of rain gauges, despite the presence of a C-band radar located in the close vicinity. Consequently, the first aim of this study was to investigate the hydrological quality of this radar. This assessment, based on comparison of radar estimations and rain-gauges values concludes that the radar data has overall a good quality since 2006. Given this good accuracy, this study made a next step and investigated the characteristics of intense rain cells that are responsible of the majority of floods in the Greater Lyon area. Improved knowledge on these rainfall cells is important to anticipate dangerous events and to improve the monitoring of the sewage system. This paper discusses the analysis of the ten most intense rainfall events in the 2001-2010 period. Spatial statistics pointed towards straight and linear movements of intense rainfall cells, independently on the ground surface conditions and the topography underneath. The speed of these cells was found nearly constant during a rainfall event, but depend from event to ranges on average from 25 to 66 km/h.

  7. Affordable Acoustic Disdrometer: Design, Calibration, Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, N.; Degen, C.; Hut, R.

    2009-12-01

    It would be a hydrological understatement to say that measuring rainfall correctly is important. Recent years have seen important lowering of the costs of raingauges capable of measuring rainfall intensities. Such raingauges are typically tipping bucket raingauges, connected to an event logger. Costs for such a raingauge are about 100. Accuracy is not always very high, especially during high intensity storms. The moving parts make them vulnerable to slight disruptions such as insects. We set out to design a raingauge without moving parts and at a better price/quality ratio than existing raingauges. After testing several potential candidates, we settled on a very simple piezo ceramic element, which measures the impact of single drops. Such an element costs around 1. The impact of each drop causes an acoustic signal that is transformed into a voltage. A typical impact gives an upswing of up to 1 V and the ringing lasts about 50 ms. With a surface area of about 20 cm2, there is almost never overlap between the signals of different drops. The basic assumption is that each drop will have reached terminal velocity and that the total energy of the impact can, thereby, be related to drop size. We calibrated this acoustic disdrometer by letting drops of different size fall on the disdrometer. A very encouraging calibration curve was obtained in this way. Further testing consisted of comparisons during rainstorms between the acoustic disdrometer and standard tipping bucket raingauges. During intensive storms, the acoustic disdrometer gave results that were very close to those of a nearby totaling raingauge. The signal of the tipping bucket raingauges was clearly saturated as these were not capable of keeping up with the rain. During low intensity events, tipping bucket raingauges performed better as drops too small to detect by the acoustic disdrometer became a significant part of the total rainfall. In first instance, a simple MP3 player with recording functionality ($50

  8. A Bibliometric Assessment of Global Ice Bucket Challenge (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) Research.

    PubMed

    Ram, Shri

    2016-10-01

    This study is a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the global research trends on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (popularly known as Ice Bucket Challenge), through related literatures retrieved from SCOPUS multidisciplinary database for the period 1974-2013. This study is aimed at analyzing the literature on ALS in terms of document type, language, annual growth, productive country, journal, authors, subject, and most cited articles. The bibliographic data for this study was retrieved from the SCOPUS database using keywords 'amyotrophic lateral sclerosis', 'motor neurone disease', 'Charcot disease', 'Lou Gehrig's disease', 'Ice Bucket Challenge' available in title, abstract, and keyword fields of Scopus database from 1974 to 2013. The literature analysis included 21,750 articles during the period from 1974 to 2013 in different areas of ALS. USA was the most productive country in terms of literature produced, while Neurology was the most productive journal. An intensive awareness created by 'Ice Bucket Challenge' has attracted masses, and an intensive growth of literature is pertinent on ALS. The results of this study are expressed in terms of growth of literature, output of individual countries, and authors, and will be helpful in collaborative research in future.

  9. 20. WESTERLY VIEW SHOWING SPILLWAY BUCKET COMPLETED, EXCEPT FOR WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. WESTERLY VIEW SHOWING SPILLWAY BUCKET COMPLETED, EXCEPT FOR WING WALL IN THE FOREGROUND.... Volume XX, No. 7, September 25, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  10. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  11. Effects of simulated acid rain on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism of recalcitrant-seeded Trichilia dregeana grown in its natural seed bank.

    PubMed

    Ramlall, Chandika; Varghese, Boby; Ramdhani, Syd; Pammenter, Norman W; Bhatt, Arvind; Berjak, Patricia; Sershen

    2015-01-01

    Increased air pollution in a number of developing African countries, together with the reports of vegetation damage typically associated with acid precipitation in commercial forests in South Africa, has raised concerns over the potential impacts of acid rain on natural vegetation in these countries. Recalcitrant (i.e. desiccation sensitive) seeds of many indigenous African species, e.g. must germinate shortly after shedding and hence, may not be able to avoid exposure to acid rain in polluted areas. This study investigated the effects of simulated acid rain (rainwater with pH adjusted to pH 3.0 and 4.5 with 70:30, H2 SO4 :HNO3 ) on germination, seedling growth and oxidative metabolism in a recalcitrant-seeded African tree species Trichilia dregeana Sond., growing in its natural seed bank. The results suggest that acid rain did not compromise T. dregeana seed germination and seedling establishment significantly, relative to the control (non-acidified rainwater). However, pH 3.0 treated seedlings exhibited signs of stress typically associated with acid rain: leaf tip necrosis, abnormal bilobed leaf tips, leaf necrotic spots and chlorosis, reduced leaf chlorophyll concentration, increased stomatal density and indications of oxidative stress. This may explain why total and root biomass of pH 3.0 treated seedlings were significantly lower than the control. Acid rain also induced changes in the species composition and relative abundance of the different life forms emerging from T. dregeana's natural seed bank and in this way could indirectly impact on T. dregeana seedling establishment success. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. Postdural puncture headache: comparison of 25-gauge Whitacre and Quincke needles.

    PubMed

    Buettner, J; Wresch, K P; Klose, R

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of the shape of the needle tip on postdural puncture headache (PDPH) independent of the needle diameter, a 25-gauge Whitacre and a 25-gauge Quincke needle were compared. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind fashion, the study was carried out on 400 patients who received spinal anesthesia for operations of the lower extremities. The 25-gauge Whitacre needle (group 1) and the 25-gauge Quincke needle (group 2) were randomly assigned to the patients, 200 in each group. Patients were interviewed postoperatively on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 using a standardized questionnaire. Only postural headache was defined as PDPH. The intensity of both postural and nonpostural headache were quantified using a 4-point rating scale and a visual analog pain scale (VAS). Statistical analysis was performed with parametric and nonparametric tests when appropriate, p < or = 0.05 was considered as significant. There were no differences in age and sex distribution between the two groups. Significantly more patients in group 2 (8.5%) complained of PDPH than in group 1 (3%, p < or = 0.02). Duration of PDPH ranged from 1-3 days (median: 1) in group 1, and from 1-9 days (median: 3) in group 2. This difference closely approached significance (p = 0.058). The mean maximal intensity of PDPH was comparable in both groups. Severe PDPH occurred only in two patients of group 2. One of them required a blood patch. With respect to the nonpostural headache, no significant differences were seen. The use of a conical tipped Whitacre needle results in significantly less PDPH compared to a standard Quincke spinal needle of the same size.

  13. Convenient optical pressure gauge for multimegabar pressures calibrated to 300 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liling; Ruoff, Arthur L.; Stupian, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The accurate measurement of pressure by a straightforward and inexpensive optical procedure has been needed in the multimegabar region since static pressures over 216GPa, 361GPa, 420GPa and 560GPa were obtained in the diamond anvil cell. Here, a simple optical pressure gauge based on the Raman shift of the diamond at the center of a diamond tip at the diamond-sample interface is calibrated against a primary gauge (Pt isotherm at 300K from shock data) to 300GPa, thus enabling researchers who do not have a synchrotron to conveniently measure pressure with an optical scale from 50to300GPa.

  14. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus bucket-handle tear using the posteromedial portal.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Oh, Irvin

    2004-09-01

    Arthroscopic resection of irreparable bucket-handle tears of the medial meniscus is a commonly performed procedure. Adequate visualization of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus can be a challenging task with the conventional use of the anterior portal. An attempt to resect the posterior horn in a blind fashion may result in iatrogenic damage of the articular cartilage in the posterior compartment, over-resection of a remnant meniscus, or an insufficient resection of the torn fragment. We describe the use of the posteromedial portal for an accurate visualization and resection of the posterior attachment of a bucket-handle tear for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, as well as detection of other injuries that may be involved in the posteromedial compartment, while avoiding injury to other intra-articular structures during the arthroscopic procedure. We found that the use of the posteromedial portal is a safe and efficient method in removing a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus in one piece.

  15. Evaluation of satellite-retrieved extreme precipitation using gauge observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhoff, M.; Zolina, O.; Simmer, C.; Schulz, J.

    2012-04-01

    Precipitation extremes have already been intensively studied employing rain gauge datasets. Their main advantage is that they represent a direct measurement with a relatively high temporal coverage. Their main limitation however is their poor spatial coverage and thus a low representativeness in many parts of the world. In contrast, satellites can provide global coverage and there are meanwhile data sets available that are on one hand long enough to be used for extreme value analysis and that have on the other hand the necessary spatial and temporal resolution to capture extremes. However, satellite observations provide only an indirect mean to determine precipitation and there are many potential observational and methodological weaknesses in particular over land surfaces that may constitute doubts concerning their usability for the analysis of precipitation extremes. By comparing basic climatological metrics of precipitation (totals, intensities, number of wet days) as well as respective characteristics of PDFs, absolute and relative extremes of satellite and observational data this paper aims at assessing to which extent satellite products are suitable for analysing extreme precipitation events. In a first step the assessment focuses on Europe taking into consideration various satellite products available, e.g. data sets provided by the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). First results indicate that satellite-based estimates do not only represent the monthly averaged precipitation very similar to rain gauge estimates but they also capture the day-to-day occurrence fairly well. Larger differences can be found though when looking at the corresponding intensities.

  16. Olympus propagation studies in the US: Receiver development and the data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeeman, John C.

    1990-01-01

    Virginia Tech has developed two types of receivers to monitor the Olympus beacons, as well as a custom data acquisition system to store and display propagation data. Each of the receiver designs uses new hybrid analog/digital techniques. The data acquisition system uses a stand alone processor to collect and format the data for display and subsequent processing. The launch of the Olympus satellite with its coherent beacons offers new opportunities to study propagation effects at 12.5, 20, and 30 GHz. At Virginia Tech, the satellite is at 14 degrees in elevation, which allows us to measure low elevation angle effects. However, to make these measurements, a very accurate and stable measurement system is required. Virginia Tech has constructed a complex receiving system which monitors the Olympus beacons and all parameters associated with propagation research. In the current configuration, researchers have developed a receiver which frequency locks to the less fade susceptible 12.5 GHz beacon. Since all beacons on the satellite are driven from a single master oscillator, drift in the 12.5 GHz beacon implies corresponding drifts in the 20, and 30 GHz beacons. The receivers for the 20 and 30 GHz systems derive their frequency locking information from the 12.5 GHz system. This widens the dynamic range of the receivers and allows the receivers to maintain lock in severe fade conditions. In addition to monitoring the beacons, the sky noise is monitored with radiometers at each frequency. The radiometer output is used to set the clear air level for each beacon measurement. Researchers also measure the rain rate with several tipping bucket rain gauges placed along the propagation path.

  17. 28. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 1. Sheet S37, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 1. Sheet S-37, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/47. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  18. 30. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 4. Sheet S44, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 4. Sheet S-44, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/50. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  19. 29. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 3. Sheet S40, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SPILLWAY BUCKET SLAB: REINFORCEMENT DETAILS NO. 3. Sheet S-40, December, 1939. File no. SA 342/49. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  20. Applications of Hobbyist Electronics in Monitoring Stemflow Processes: Preliminary Insights and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlyle-Moses, D. E.; Turner, B.; Hill, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Leveraging the power and adaptability of inexpensive, accessible hobbyist electronics it has been possible to gain insights into the processes governing stemflow. The sensor platform utilizes an Arduino® microcontroller equipped with an ultrasonic sensor and wetness sensor as well as a GPS unit for accurate timestamps. The wetness sensor, which is attached to the terminus of a collection tube diverting water entering the stemflow collar to a collection vessel, provides the precise time in which stemflow commences. In turn, this time can be compared with the time stamp record of a high precision tipping-bucket rain gauge so that the rain depth required for stemflow generation can be derived. In addition, the ultrasonic sensor mounted above the stemflow collection vessel monitors changes in water depth over time. The changes in water depth are then converted to volumetric changes allowing for reasonable approximations of stemflow flow rates throughout the storm event. As a trial, the stemflow monitoring platform was deployed from May 1 to June 30, 2016 on an ornamental Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) tree on the grounds of Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada (500 40' 25" N, 1200 21' 50" W). The tree was in full-leaf condition, was 7.4 m in height and had a diameter at breast height of 10.8 cm. Rain totaled 77.2 mm during the study and was distributed over 15 events (mean = 5.1 mm, range = 0.2 - 14.3 mm), with the five smallest rain events (0.2 - 1.3 mm) not producing stemflow. The study period funneling ratio was 14.0 (event range = 0.0 - 40.0). Regression analysis revealed that for events in which stemflow was produced, rainfall depth explained only 50.2 percent of the variation in event stemflow volumes. The variant nature of stemflow in our study was a consequence of both highly variable mean event flow rates once stemflow had commenced (mean = 0.197 L / mm of rain, coefficient of variation = 0.67, range = 0.009 - 0.444 L

  1. 19. WESTERLY VIEW ALONG SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WESTERLY VIEW ALONG SPILLWAY BUCKET, SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OPERATIONS IN PROGRESS. THE DAM EMBANKMENT IS SHOWN IN THE LEFT DISTANCE.... Volume XX, No. 6, September 5, 1940. - Prado Dam, Spillway, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  2. Construction of Polarimetric Radar-Based Reference Rain Maps for the Iowa Flood Studies Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter; Wolff, David; Krajewski, Witek; Gatlin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) campaign was conducted in central and northeastern Iowa during the months of April-June, 2013. Specific science objectives for IFloodS included quantification of uncertainties in satellite and ground-based estimates of precipitation, 4-D characterization of precipitation physical processes and associated parameters (e.g., size distributions, water contents, types, structure etc.), assessment of the impact of precipitation estimation uncertainty and physical processes on hydrologic predictive skill, and refinement of field observations and data analysis approaches as they pertain to future GPM integrated hydrologic validation and related field studies. In addition to field campaign archival of raw and processed satellite data (including precipitation products), key ground-based platforms such as the NASA NPOL S-band and D3R Ka/Ku-band dual-polarimetric radars, University of Iowa X-band dual-polarimetric radars, a large network of paired rain gauge platforms, and a large network of 2D Video and Parsivel disdrometers were deployed. In something of a canonical approach, the radar (NPOL in particular), gauge and disdrometer observational assets were deployed to create a consistent high-quality distributed (time and space sampling) radar-based ground "reference" rainfall dataset, with known uncertainties, that could be used for assessing the satellite-based precipitation products at a range of space/time scales. Subsequently, the impact of uncertainties in the satellite products could be evaluated relative to the ground-benchmark in coupled weather, land-surface and distributed hydrologic modeling frameworks as related to flood prediction. Relative to establishing the ground-based "benchmark", numerous avenues were pursued in the making and verification of IFloodS "reference" dual-polarimetric radar-based rain maps, and this study documents the process and results as they pertain specifically

  3. Cistern Performance for Stormwater Management in Camden ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority (CCMUA) installed different types of green infrastructure Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) at locations around the city of Camden, NJ. The installed SCMs include cisterns. Cisterns provide a cost effective approach to reduce stormwater runoff volume and peak discharge. The collected water can be used as a substitute for potable water in some applications. This presentation focuses on five cisterns that were monitored as part of a capture and use system at community gardens. The cisterns capture water from existing rooftops or shade structures installed by CCMUA as part of the project. Cistern volumes varied from 305 gallons to 1100 gallons based on the available roof area. Water level was monitored at 10-minute intervals using pressure transducers and rainfall was recorded using tipping bucket rain gauges. Soil moisture was monitored near the root zone using frequency domain reflectometer buried under selected plants. These data were analyzed to better understand the supply and demand relationship. Cisterns were sampled at 6 to 8 week intervals through the growing season for determination of microorganism, nutrients and metal concentrations. The analyses detected Antimony, Arsenic, Barium, Copper, Lead, Manganese, Nickel, Vanadium and Zinc. Concentration of all these metals were below recommended water quality criteria for irrigation by EPA guideline for water reuse. The total nitrogen and phosphorous concen

  4. Near Two-Decade Instrument Performance for Hydrological Monitoring at the Prototype Hanford Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, C. E.; Clayton, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface barriers have been proposed for use at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site as a means to isolate certain radioactive waste sites that, for reasons of cost or worker safety, may not be exhumed. The Hanford Prototype Barrier was constructed in 1994 using mostly natural materials to demonstrate its long-term performance. The barrier is expected to perform for at least 1000 years by limiting water, plant, animal, and human intrusion and minimizing erosion. Extensive instrumentation is used to monitor the hydrological regime above, within, below, and around the barrier. Specifically, natural precipitation and irrigation are measured with rain gauges, runoff water with a runoff flume, soil water content within the barrier at 12 stations with a neutron probe, a capacitance probe, and time-domain-reflectometry probes, and soil water pressure with gypsum blocks and heat-dissipation-units. Drainage through the barrier and the side slopes is measured with 12 water collection vaults, respectively, for 12 zones. Each drainage vault is equipped with a dosing siphon, a dose counter, a pressure transducer to measure the water level, and a tipping bucket to measure the inflow. During the near two-decade monitoring period, some of the instruments stopped functioning, while others still function normally till present. This presentation will summarize the performance of these instruments. Recommendations for future barrier monitoring will be given.

  5. The development of an hourly gridded rainfall product for hydrological applications in England and Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Sara; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Souvignet, Maxime; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim; Woods, Ross

    2014-05-01

    This research presents a newly developed observed sub-daily gridded precipitation product for England and Wales. Importantly our analysis specifically allows a quantification of rainfall errors from grid to the catchment scale, useful for hydrological model simulation and the evaluation of prediction uncertainties. Our methodology involves the disaggregation of the current one kilometre daily gridded precipitation records available for the United Kingdom[1]. The hourly product is created using information from: 1) 2000 tipping-bucket rain gauges; and 2) the United Kingdom Met-Office weather radar network. These two independent datasets provide rainfall estimates at temporal resolutions much smaller than the current daily gridded rainfall product; thus allowing the disaggregation of the daily rainfall records to an hourly timestep. Our analysis is conducted for the period 2004 to 2008, limited by the current availability of the datasets. We analyse the uncertainty components affecting the accuracy of this product. Specifically we explore how these uncertainties vary spatially, temporally and with climatic regimes. Preliminary results indicate scope for improvement of hydrological model performance by the utilisation of this new hourly gridded rainfall product. Such product will improve our ability to diagnose and identify structural errors in hydrological modelling by including the quantification of input errors. References [1] Keller V, Young AR, Morris D, Davies H (2006) Continuous Estimation of River Flows. Technical Report: Estimation of Precipitation Inputs. in Agency E (ed.). Environmental Agency.

  6. Explicit modeling of groundwater-surface water interactions using a simple bucket-type model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudinger, Maria; Carlier, Claire; Brunner, Philip; Seibert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Longer dry spells can become critical for water supply and groundwater dependent ecosystems. During these dry spells groundwater is often the most relevant source for streams. Hence, the hydrological behavior of a catchment is often dominated by groundwater surface water interactions, which can vary considerably in space and time. While classical hydrological approaches hardly consider this spatial dependence, quantitative, hydrogeological modeling approaches can couple surface runoff processes and groundwater processes. Hydrogeological modeling can help to gain an improved understanding of catchment processes during low flow. However, due to their complex parametrization and large computational requirements, such hydrogeological models are difficult to employ at catchment scale, particularly for a larger set of catchments. Then bucket-type hydrological models remain a practical alternative. In this study we combine the strengths of both the hydrogeological and bucket-type hydrological models to better understand low flow processes and ultimately to use this knowledge for low flow projections. Bucket-type hydrological models have traditionally not been developed with focus on the simulation of low flow. One consequence is that interactions between surface and groundwater are not explicitly considered. Water fluxes in bucket-type hydrological models are commonly simulated only in one direction, namely from the groundwater to the stream but not from the stream to the groundwater. This latter flux, however, can become more important during low flow situations. We therefore further developed the bucket-type hydrological model HBV to simulate low flow situations by allowing for exchange in both directions i.e. also from the stream to the groundwater. The additional HBV exchange box is developed by using a variety of synthetic hydrogeological models as training set that were generated using a fully coupled, physically based hydrogeological model. In this way processes

  7. Variation of rain intensity and drop size distribution with General Weather Patterns (GWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghada, Wael; Buras, Allan; Lüpke, Marvin; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Short-duration rainfall extremes may cause flash floods in certain catchments (e.g. cities or fast responding watersheds) and pose a great risk to affected communities. In order to predict their occurrence under future climate change scenarios, their link to atmospheric circulation patterns needs to be well understood. We used a comprehensive data set of meteorological data (temperature, rain gauge precipitation) and precipitation spectra measured by a disdrometer (OTT PARSIVEL) between October 2008 and June 2010 at Freising, southern Germany. For the 21 months of the study period, we integrated the disdrometer spectra over intervals of 10 minutes to correspond to the temporal resolution of the weather station data and discarded measurements with air temperatures below 0°C. Daily General Weather Patterns ("Großwetterlagen", GWL) were downloaded from the website of the German Meteorological Service. Out of the 29 GWL, 14 were included in the analysis for which we had at least 12 rain events during our study period. For the definition of a rain event, we tested different lengths of minimum inter-event times and chose 30 min as a good compromise between number and length of resulting events; rain events started when more than 0.001 mm/h (sensitivity of the disdrometer) were recorded. The length of the rain events ranged between 10 min and 28 h (median 130 min) with the maximum rain intensity recorded being 134 mm/h on 24-07-2009. Seasonal differences were identified for rain event average intensities and maximum intensities per event. The influence of GWL on rain properties such as rain intensity and drop size distribution per time step and per event was investigated based on the above mentioned rain event definition. Pairwise Wilcoxon-tests revealed that higher rain intensity and larger drops were associated with the GWL "Low over the British Isles" (TB), whereas low rain intensities and less drops per interval were associated with the GWL "High over Central Europe

  8. Buckets: A New Digital Library Technology for Preserving NASA Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Michael L.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for preserving and disseminating scientific and technical information through digital libraries and describes buckets, an intelligent construct for publishing that contains data and metadata and methods for accessing them. Explains SODA (Smart Object, Dumb Archive) and discusses experiences using these technologies in NASA and…

  9. Accounting for spatiotemporal errors of gauges: A critical step to evaluate gridded precipitation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guoqiang; Behrangi, Ali; Long, Di; Li, Changming; Hong, Yang

    2018-04-01

    Rain gauge observations are commonly used to evaluate the quality of satellite precipitation products. However, the inherent difference between point-scale gauge measurements and areal satellite precipitation, i.e. a point of space in time accumulation v.s. a snapshot of time in space aggregation, has an important effect on the accuracy and precision of qualitative and quantitative evaluation results. This study aims to quantify the uncertainty caused by various combinations of spatiotemporal scales (0.1°-0.8° and 1-24 h) of gauge network designs in the densely gauged and relatively flat Ganjiang River basin, South China, in order to evaluate the state-of-the-art satellite precipitation, the Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG). For comparison with the dense gauge network serving as "ground truth", 500 sparse gauge networks are generated through random combinations of gauge numbers at each set of spatiotemporal scales. Results show that all sparse gauge networks persistently underestimate the performance of IMERG according to most metrics. However, the probability of detection is overestimated because hit and miss events are more likely fewer than the reference numbers derived from dense gauge networks. A nonlinear error function of spatiotemporal scales and the number of gauges in each grid pixel is developed to estimate the errors of using gauges to evaluate satellite precipitation. Coefficients of determination of the fitting are above 0.9 for most metrics. The error function can also be used to estimate the required minimum number of gauges in each grid pixel to meet a predefined error level. This study suggests that the actual quality of satellite precipitation products could be better than conventionally evaluated or expected, and hopefully enables non-subject-matter-expert researchers to have better understanding of the explicit uncertainties when using point-scale gauge observations to evaluate areal products.

  10. Study of 1-min rain rate integration statistic in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2017-03-01

    The design of millimeter wave communication links and the study of propagation impairments at higher frequencies due to a hydrometeor, particularly rain, require the knowledge of 1-min. rainfall rate data. Signal attenuation in space communication results are due to absorption and scattering of radio wave energy. Radio wave attenuation due to rain depends on the relevance of a 1-min. integration time for the rain rate. However, in practice, securing these data over a wide range of areas is difficult. Long term precipitation data are readily available. However, there is a need for a 1-min. rainfall rate in the rain attenuation prediction models for a better estimation of the attenuation. In this paper, we classify and survey the prominent 1-min. rain rate models. Regression analysis was performed for the study of cumulative rainfall data measured experimentally for a decade in nine different regions in South Korea, with 93 different locations, using the experimental 1-min. rainfall accumulation. To visualize the 1-min. rainfall rate applicable for the whole region for 0.01% of the time, we have considered the variation in the rain rate for 40 stations across South Korea. The Kriging interpolation method was used for spatial interpolation of the rain rate values for 0.01% of the time into a regular grid to obtain a highly consistent and predictable rainfall variation. The rain rate exceeded the 1-min. interval that was measured through the rain gauge compared to the rainfall data estimated using the International Telecommunication Union Radio Communication Sector model (ITU-R P.837-6) along with the empirical methods as Segal, Burgueno et al., Chebil and Rahman, logarithmic, exponential and global coefficients, second and third order polynomial fits, and Model 1 for Icheon regions under the regional and average coefficient set. The ITU-R P. 837-6 exhibits a lower relative error percentage of 3.32% and 12.59% in the 5- and 10-min. to 1-min. conversion, whereas the

  11. Injection method of barrier bucket supported by off-aligned electron cooling for CRing of HIAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guo-Dong; Yang, Jian-Cheng; Xia, Jia-Wen; Mao, Li-Jun; Yin, Da-Yu; Chai, Wei-Ping; Shi, Jian; Sheng, Li-Na; Smirnov, A.; Wu, Bo; Zhao, He

    2016-08-01

    A new accelerator complex, HIAF (the High Intensity Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility), has been approved in China. It is designed to provide intense primary and radioactive ion beams for research in high energy density physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics as well as other applications. In order to achieve a high intensity of up to 5×1011 ppp 238U34+, the Compression Ring (CRing) needs to stack more than 5 bunches transferred from the Booster Ring (BRing). However, the normal bucket to bucket injection scheme can only achieve an intensity gain of 2, so an injection method, fixed barrier bucket (BB) supported by electron cooling, is proposed. To suppress the severe space charge effect during the stacking process, off-alignment is adopted in the cooler to control the transverse emittance. In this paper, simulation and optimization with the BETACOOL program are presented. Supported by New Interdisciplinary and Advanced Pilot Fund of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  12. Data driven analysis of rain events: feature extraction, clustering, microphysical /macro physical relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djallel Dilmi, Mohamed; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent; Chazottes, Aymeric

    2017-04-01

    that a rain time series can be considered by an alternation of independent rain event and no rain period. The five selected feature are used to perform a hierarchical clustering of the events. The well-known division between stratiform and convective events appears clearly. This classification into two classes is then refined in 5 fairly homogeneous subclasses. The data driven analysis performed on whole rain events instead of fixed length samples allows identifying strong relationships between macrophysics (based on rain rate) and microphysics (based on raindrops) features. We show that among the 5 identified subclasses some of them have specific microphysics characteristics. Obtaining information on microphysical characteristics of rainfall events from rain gauges measurement suggests many implications in development of the quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), for the improvement of rain rate retrieval algorithm in remote sensing context.

  13. Understanding Exponential Growth: As Simple as a Drop in a Bucket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred; Shuman, James

    1984-01-01

    Provides procedures for a simple laboratory activity on exponential growth and its characteristic doubling time. The equipment needed consists of a large plastic bucket, an eyedropper, a stopwatch, an assortment of containers and graduated cylinders, and a supply of water. (JN)

  14. Kriging and local polynomial methods for blending satellite-derived and gauge precipitation estimates to support hydrologic early warning systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdin, Andrew; Funk, Christopher C.; Rajagopalan, Balaji; Kleiber, William

    2016-01-01

    Robust estimates of precipitation in space and time are important for efficient natural resource management and for mitigating natural hazards. This is particularly true in regions with developing infrastructure and regions that are frequently exposed to extreme events. Gauge observations of rainfall are sparse but capture the precipitation process with high fidelity. Due to its high resolution and complete spatial coverage, satellite-derived rainfall data are an attractive alternative in data-sparse regions and are often used to support hydrometeorological early warning systems. Satellite-derived precipitation data, however, tend to underrepresent extreme precipitation events. Thus, it is often desirable to blend spatially extensive satellite-derived rainfall estimates with high-fidelity rain gauge observations to obtain more accurate precipitation estimates. In this research, we use two different methods, namely, ordinary kriging and κ-nearest neighbor local polynomials, to blend rain gauge observations with the Climate Hazards Group Infrared Precipitation satellite-derived precipitation estimates in data-sparse Central America and Colombia. The utility of these methods in producing blended precipitation estimates at pentadal (five-day) and monthly time scales is demonstrated. We find that these blending methods significantly improve the satellite-derived estimates and are competitive in their ability to capture extreme precipitation.

  15. NCSTRL+: Adding Multi-Discipline and Multi-Genre Support to the Dienst Protocol Using Clusters and Buckets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N. T.; Zubair, Mohammad

    1998-01-01

    We describe NCSTRL+, a unified, canonical digital library for scientific and technical information (STI). NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible digital library (DL) that provides access to over 100 university departments and laboratories. NCSTRL+ implements two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing buckets. We have extended Dienst, the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to cluster independent collections into a logically centralized digital library based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genres of material. The bucket construct provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data forms as a single object. The NCSTRL+ prototype DL contains the holdings of NCSTRL and the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of publishing into a multi-cluster DL, searching across clusters, and storing and presenting buckets of information.

  16. Midweek Increase in U.S. Summer Rain and Storm Heights, Suggests Air Pollution Invigorates Rainstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Thomas L.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Yoo, Jung-Moon; Hahnenberger, Maura

    2007-01-01

    Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite data show a significant midweek increase in summertime rainfall over the southeast U.S., due to afternoon intensification. TRMM radar data show a significant midweek increase in rain area and in the heights reached by afternoon storms. Weekly variations in model-reanalysis wind patterns over the region and in rain-gauge data are consistent with the satellite data. A midweek decrease of rainfall over the nearby Atlantic is also seen. EPA measurements of particulate concentrations show a midweek peak over much of the U.S. These observations are consistent with the theory that anthropogenic air pollution suppresses cloud-drop coalescence and early rainout during the growth of thunderstorms over land, allowing more water to be carried above the 0 C isotherm, where freezing yields additional latent heat, invigorating the storms--most dramatically evidenced by the shift in the midweek distribution of afternoon-storm heights--and producing large ice hydrometeors. The enhanced convection induces regional convergence, uplifting and an overall increase of rainfall. Compensating downward air motion suppresses convection over the adjacent ocean areas. Pre-TRMM-era data suggest that the weekly cycle only became strong enough to be detectable beginning in the 1980's. Rain-gauge data also suggest that a weekly cycle may have been detectable in the 1940's, but with peak rainfall on Sunday or Monday, possibly explained by the difference in composition of aerosol pollution at that time. This "weekend effect" may thus offer climate researchers an opportunity to study the regional climate-scale impact of aerosols on storm development and monsoon-like circulation.

  17. Application of a Threshold Method to the TRMM Radar for the Estimation of Space-Time Rain Rate Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    1997-01-01

    One of the TRMM radar products of interest is the monthly-averaged rain rates over 5 x 5 degree cells. Clearly, the most directly way of calculating these and similar statistics is to compute them from the individual estimates made over the instantaneous field of view of the Instrument (4.3 km horizontal resolution). An alternative approach is the use of a threshold method. It has been established that over sufficiently large regions the fractional area above a rain rate threshold and the area-average rain rate are well correlated for particular choices of the threshold [e.g., Kedem et al., 19901]. A straightforward application of this method to the TRMM data would consist of the conversion of the individual reflectivity factors to rain rates followed by a calculation of the fraction of these that exceed a particular threshold. Previous results indicate that for thresholds near or at 5 mm/h, the correlation between this fractional area and the area-average rain rate is high. There are several drawbacks to this approach, however. At the TRMM radar frequency of 13.8 GHz the signal suffers attenuation so that the negative bias of the high resolution rain rate estimates will increase as the path attenuation increases. To establish a quantitative relationship between fractional area and area-average rain rate, an independent means of calculating the area-average rain rate is needed such as an array of rain gauges. This type of calibration procedure, however, is difficult for a spaceborne radar such as TRMM. To estimate a statistic other than the mean of the distribution requires, in general, a different choice of threshold and a different set of tuning parameters.

  18. Postmyelography headache rates with Whitacre versus Quincke 22-gauge spinal needles.

    PubMed

    Peterman, S B

    1996-09-01

    To compare the postdural puncture headache (PDPH) rates after myelography with use of 22-gauge Whitacre (blunt tip) versus standard 22-gauge Quincke (bevel-tip) spinal needles. At myelography, 340 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups in which either the Whitacre (167 patients) or the Quincke (173 patients) needle was used. Follow-up was at 48 hours and at 4 days after the procedure. Crude and adjusted Whitacre/PDPH odds ratios and risk ratios were calculated. The crude Whitacre needle PDPH risk was 9.6%, and the crude Quincke needle PDPH risk was 15.6%. The absolute risk difference was 6.0% with a 95% confidence interval of -0.98% and 13.04%. The adjusted Whitacre/PDPH odds ratio was 0.492 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.241 and 1.003. The Whitacre needle group had a statistically significantly lower PDPH severity grade (P = .0151), similar PDPH duration, and more technical difficulty with the needle. The Whitacre needle is associated with an equal or lower PDPH risk; the lack of statistical significance is most likely related to sample size. Further study is necessary to determine whether the decreased PDPH rate justifies the added difficulty associated with use of the Whitacre needle.

  19. Use of midlatitude soil moisture and meteorological observations to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, Alan; Vinnikov, Konstantin YA.; Schlosser, C. Adam; Speranskaya, Nina A.; Xue, Yongkang

    1995-01-01

    Soil moisture observations in sites with natural vegetation were made for several decades in the former Soviet Union at hundreds of stations. In this paper, the authors use data from six of these stations from different climatic regimes, along with ancillary meteorological and actinometric data, to demonstrate a method to validate soil moisture simulations with biosphere and bucket models. Some early and current general circulation models (GCMs) use bucket models for soil hydrology calculations. More recently, the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) was developed to incorporate the effects of vegetation on fluxes of moisture, momentum, and energy at the earth's surface into soil hydrology models. Until now, the bucket and SiB have been verified by comparison with actual soil moisture data only on a limited basis. In this study, a Simplified SiB (SSiB) soil hydrology model and a 15-cm bucket model are forced by observed meteorological and actinometric data every 3 h for 6-yr simulations at the six stations. The model calculations of soil moisture are compared to observations of soil moisture, literally 'ground truth,' snow cover, surface albedo, and net radiation, and with each other. For three of the stations, the SSiB and 15-cm bucket models produce good simulations of seasonal cycles and interannual variations of soil moisture. For the other three stations, there are large errors in the simulations by both models. Inconsistencies in specification of field capacity may be partly responsible. There is no evidence that the SSiB simulations are superior in simulating soil moisture variations. In fact, the models are quite similar since SSiB implicitly has a bucket embedded in it. One of the main differences between the models is in the treatment of runoff due to melting snow in the spring -- SSiB incorrectly puts all the snowmelt into runoff. While producing similar soil moisture simulations, the models produce very different surface latent and sensible heat fluxes, which

  20. Design and evaluation of an intraocular B-scan OCT-guided 36-gauge needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jin H.; Joos, Karen M.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography imaging is widely used in ophthalmology and optometry clinics for diagnosing retinal disorders. External microscope-mounted OCT operating room systems have imaged retinal changes immediately following surgical manipulations. However, the goal is to image critical surgical maneuvers in real time. External microscope-mounted OCT systems have some limitations with problems tracking constantly moving intraocular surgical instruments, and formation of absolute shadows by the metallic surgical instruments upon the underlying tissues of interest. An intraocular OCT-imaging probe was developed to resolve these problems. A disposable 25-gauge probe tip extended beyond the handpiece, with a 36-gauge needle welded to a disposable tip with its end extending an additional 3.5 mm. A sealed 0.35 mm diameter GRIN lens protected the fiber scanner and focused the scanning beam at a 3 to 4 mm distance. The OCT engine was a very high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system (870 nm, Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC) which produced 2000 A-scan lines per B-scan image at a frequency of 5 Hz with the fiber optic oscillations matched to this frequency. Real-time imaging of the needle tip as it touched infrared paper was performed. The B-scan OCT-needle was capable of real-time performance and imaging of the phantom material. In the future, the B-scan OCT-guided needle will be used to perform sub-retinal injections.

  1. Large-scale modeling of rain fields from a rain cell deterministic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FéRal, Laurent; Sauvageot, Henri; Castanet, Laurent; Lemorton, JoëL.; Cornet, FréDéRic; Leconte, Katia

    2006-04-01

    A methodology to simulate two-dimensional rain rate fields at large scale (1000 × 1000 km2, the scale of a satellite telecommunication beam or a terrestrial fixed broadband wireless access network) is proposed. It relies on a rain rate field cellular decomposition. At small scale (˜20 × 20 km2), the rain field is split up into its macroscopic components, the rain cells, described by the Hybrid Cell (HYCELL) cellular model. At midscale (˜150 × 150 km2), the rain field results from the conglomeration of rain cells modeled by HYCELL. To account for the rain cell spatial distribution at midscale, the latter is modeled by a doubly aggregative isotropic random walk, the optimal parameterization of which is derived from radar observations at midscale. The extension of the simulation area from the midscale to the large scale (1000 × 1000 km2) requires the modeling of the weather frontal area. The latter is first modeled by a Gaussian field with anisotropic covariance function. The Gaussian field is then turned into a binary field, giving the large-scale locations over which it is raining. This transformation requires the definition of the rain occupation rate over large-scale areas. Its probability distribution is determined from observations by the French operational radar network ARAMIS. The coupling with the rain field modeling at midscale is immediate whenever the large-scale field is split up into midscale subareas. The rain field thus generated accounts for the local CDF at each point, defining a structure spatially correlated at small scale, midscale, and large scale. It is then suggested that this approach be used by system designers to evaluate diversity gain, terrestrial path attenuation, or slant path attenuation for different azimuth and elevation angle directions.

  2. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  3. Development and testing of highway storm-sewer flow measurement and recording system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Kaehrle, W.R.; Hardee, Jack; Cordes, E.H.; Landers, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive study and development of measuring instruments and techniques for measuring all components of flow in a storm-sewer drainage system was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey under the sponsorship of the Federal Highway Administration. The study involved laboratory and field calibration and testing of measuring flumes, pipe insert meters, weirs, electromagnetic velocity meters as well as the development and calibration of pneumatic-bubbler pressure transducer head measuring systems. Tracer-dilution and acoustic flow meter measurements were used in field verification tests. A single micrologger was used to record data from all the above instruments as well as from a tipping-bucket rain gage and also to activate on command the electromagnetic velocity meter and tracer-dilution systems. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  5. Characterization of intermittency and statistical properties of high-resolution rainfall observations across a topographic transect in Northwest Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascaro, G.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.; Watts, C. J.; Rodriguez, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    In northwest Mexico, the statistical properties of rainfall at high temporal resolution (up to 1 min) have been poorly characterized, mainly due to a lack of observations. Under a combined effort of US and Mexican institutions initiated during the North American Monsoon-Soil Moisture Experiment in 2004 (NAME-SMEX04), a network of 8 tipping-bucket rain gauges were installed across a topographic transect in the Sierra Los Locos basin of Sonora, Mexico. The transect spans a distance of ~14 km and an elevation difference of 748 m, thus including valley, mid-elevation and ridge sites where rainfall generation mechanisms in the summer and winter seasons are potentially affected by orography. In this study, we used the data collected during the period of 2007-2010 to characterize the rainfall statistical properties in a wide range of time scales (1 min to ~45 days) and analyzed how these properties change as a function of elevation, the gauge separation distance, and the summer and winter seasons. We found that the total summer (winter) rainfall decreases (increases) with elevation, and that rainfall has a clear diurnal cycle in the summertime, with a peak around 9 pm at all gauges. The correlation structure across the transect indicates that: (i) when times series are aggregated at a resolution greater than 3 hours, the correlation distance is greater than the maximum separation distance (~14 km), while it dramatically decreases for lower time resolutions (e.g., it is ~1.5 km when the resolution is 10 min). Consistent with other semiarid regions, spectral and scale invariance analyses show the presence of different scaling regimes, which are associated to single convective events and larger stratiform systems, with different intermittency properties dependent on the rainfall season. Results of this work are useful for the interpretation of storm generation mechanisms and hydrologic response in the region, as well as for the calibration of high-resolution, stochastic

  6. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  7. Magnetic bucket for rotating unmagnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Katz, Noam; Collins, Cami; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Weisberg, David; Jara-Almonte, Jon; Reese, Ingrid; Wahl, Carl; Forest, Cary

    2012-06-01

    A new experiment is described which generates flow in unmagnetized plasma. Confinement is provided by a cage of permanent magnets, arranged to form an axisymmetric, high-order, multipolar magnetic field. This field configuration-sometimes called a "magnetic bucket"-has a vanishingly small field in the core of the experiment. Toroidal rotation is driven by J × B forces applied in the magnetized edge. The cross-field current that is required for this forcing flows from anodes to thermionic cathodes, which are inserted between the magnet rings. The rotation at the edge reaches 3 km/s and is viscously coupled to the unmagnetized core plasma. We describe the conditions necessary for rotation, as well as a 0-dimensional power balance used to understand plasma confinement in the experiment.

  8. Scale Dependence of Statistics of Spatially Averaged Rain Rate Seen in TOGA COARE Comparison with Predictions from a Stochastic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Bell, T. L.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A characteristic feature of rainfall statistics is that they in general depend on the space and time scales over which rain data are averaged. As a part of an earlier effort to determine the sampling error of satellite rain averages, a space-time model of rainfall statistics was developed to describe the statistics of gridded rain observed in GATE. The model allows one to compute the second moment statistics of space- and time-averaged rain rate which can be fitted to satellite or rain gauge data to determine the four model parameters appearing in the precipitation spectrum - an overall strength parameter, a characteristic length separating the long and short wavelength regimes and a characteristic relaxation time for decay of the autocorrelation of the instantaneous local rain rate and a certain 'fractal' power law exponent. For area-averaged instantaneous rain rate, this exponent governs the power law dependence of these statistics on the averaging length scale $L$ predicted by the model in the limit of small $L$. In particular, the variance of rain rate averaged over an $L \\times L$ area exhibits a power law singularity as $L \\rightarrow 0$. In the present work the model is used to investigate how the statistics of area-averaged rain rate over the tropical Western Pacific measured with ship borne radar during TOGA COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment) and gridded on a 2 km grid depends on the size of the spatial averaging scale. Good agreement is found between the data and predictions from the model over a wide range of averaging length scales.

  9. Validation and correction of rainfall data from the WegenerNet high density network in southeast Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O, Sungmin; Foelsche, U.; Kirchengast, G.; Fuchsberger, J.

    2018-01-01

    Eight years of daily rainfall data from WegenerNet were analyzed by comparison with data from Austrian national weather stations. WegenerNet includes 153 ground level weather stations in an area of about 15 km × 20 km in the Feldbach region in southeast Austria. Rainfall has been measured by tipping bucket gauges at 150 stations of the network since the beginning of 2007. Since rain gauge measurements are considered close to true rainfall, there are increasing needs for WegenerNet data for the validation of rainfall data products such as remote sensing based estimates or model outputs. Serving these needs, this paper aims at providing a clearer interpretation on WegenerNet rainfall data for users in hydro-meteorological communities. Five clusters - a cluster consists of one national weather station and its four closest WegenerNet stations - allowed us close comparison of datasets between the stations. Linear regression analysis and error estimation with statistical indices were conducted to quantitatively evaluate the WegenerNet daily rainfall data. It was found that rainfall data between the stations show good linear relationships with an average correlation coefficient (r) of 0.97 , while WegenerNet sensors tend to underestimate rainfall according to the regression slope (0.87). For the five clusters investigated, the bias and relative bias were - 0.97 mm d-1 and - 11.5 % on average (except data from new sensors). The average of bias and relative bias, however, could be reduced by about 80 % through a simple linear regression-slope correction, with the assumption that the underestimation in WegenerNet data was caused by systematic errors. The results from the study have been employed to improve WegenerNet data for user applications so that a new version of the data (v5) is now available at the WegenerNet data portal (www.wegenernet.org).

  10. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  11. Gas turbine bucket cooling circuit and related process

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Doyle C.; Barb, Kevin Joseph

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges; at least one radially extending cooling passage within the airfoil portion, the airfoil portion joined to a platform at a radially inner end of the airfoil portion; a dovetail mounting portion enclosing a cooling medium supply passage; and, a crossover passage in fluid communication with the cooling medium supply passage and with at least one radially extending cooling passage, the crossover passage having a portion extending along and substantially parallel to an underside surface of the platform.

  12. Heavy rain effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge of the effect of heavy rain on airplane performance. Although the effects of heavy rain on airplane systems and engines are generally known, only recently has the potential aerodynamic effect of heavy rain been recognized. In 1977 the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) conducted a study of 25 aircraft accidents and incidents which occurred between 1964 and 1976 in which low-altitude wind shear could have been a contributing factor. Of the 25 cases (23 approach or landing and 2 take-off) in the study, ten cases had occurred in a rain environment, and in five cases these were classified as intense or heavy rain encounters. These results led to the reconsideration of high-intensity, short-duration rainfall as a potential weather-related aircraft safety hazard, particularly in the take-off and/or approach phases of flight.

  13. Newton’s Rotating Water Bucket: A Simple Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    surface of the water must be an equipotential relative to the sum of the gravitational and centrifugal potential energies [9].) The value of z0 can be...twisted and the bucket is then released, it begins to spin and the surface of the water acquires a paraboloidal shape. In this paper, the parabolic...adopts a curved surface . Ernst Mach, for example, postulated that the parabolic shape must be due to the existence of matter in the universe

  14. Soak Up the Rain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Soak Up the Rain promotes green infrastructure practices such as rain barrels, rain gardens, permeable pavements and green roofs to reduce stormwater runoff and prevent water pollution while bringing about a broad range of community benefits.

  15. Rain attenuation studies from radiometric and rain DSD measurements at two tropical locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Tuhina; Adhikari, Arpita; Maitra, Animesh

    2018-05-01

    Efficient use of satellite communication in tropical regions demands proper characterization of rain attenuation, particularly, in view of the available popular propagation models which are mostly based on temperate climatic data. Thus rain attenuations at frequencies 22.234, 23.834 and 31.4/30 GHz over two tropical locations Kolkata (22.57°N, 88.36°E, India) and Belem (1.45°S, 48.49° W, Brazil), have been estimated for the year 2010 and 2011, respectively. The estimation has been done utilizing ground-based disdrometer observations and radiometric measurements over Earth-space path. The results show that rain attenuation estimations from radiometric data are reliable only at low rain rates (<30 mm/h). However, the rain attenuation estimations from disdrometer measurements show good agreement with the ITU-R model, even at high rain rates (upto100 mm/h). Despite having significant variability in terms of drop size distribution (DSD), the attenuation values calculated from DSD data (disdrometer measurements) at Kolkata and Belem differ a little for the rain rates below 30 mm/h. However, the attenuation values, obtained from radiometric measurements at the two places, show significant deviations ranging from 0.54 dB to 3.2 dB up to a rain rate of 30 mm/h, on account of different rain heights, mean atmospheric temperatures and climatology of the two locations.

  16. Extended gauge theory and gauged free differential algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, P.; Salgado, S.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, Antoniadis, Konitopoulos and Savvidy introduced, in the context of the so-called extended gauge theory, a procedure to construct background-free gauge invariants, using non-abelian gauge potentials described by higher degree forms. In this article it is shown that the extended invariants found by Antoniadis, Konitopoulos and Savvidy can be constructed from an algebraic structure known as free differential algebra. In other words, we show that the above mentioned non-abelian gauge theory, where the gauge fields are described by p-forms with p ≥ 2, can be obtained by gauging free differential algebras.

  17. Internal cooling circuit for gas turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Susan Marie; Davis, Richard Mallory

    2005-10-25

    In a gas turbine bucket having a shank portion and an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, an internal cooling circuit, the internal cooling circuit having a serpentine configuration including plural radial outflow passages and plural radial inflow passages, and wherein a coolant inlet passage communicates with a first of the radial outflow passages along the trailing edge, the first radial outflow passage having a plurality of radially extending and radially spaced elongated rib segments extending between and connecting the pressure and suction sides in a middle region of the first passage to prevent ballooning of the pressure and suction sides at the first radial outflow passage.

  18. Global-scale evaluation of 22 precipitation datasets using gauge observations and hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Hylke E.; Vergopolan, Noemi; Pan, Ming; Levizzani, Vincenzo; van Dijk, Albert I. J. M.; Weedon, Graham P.; Brocca, Luca; Pappenberger, Florian; Huffman, George J.; Wood, Eric F.

    2017-12-01

    We undertook a comprehensive evaluation of 22 gridded (quasi-)global (sub-)daily precipitation (P) datasets for the period 2000-2016. Thirteen non-gauge-corrected P datasets were evaluated using daily P gauge observations from 76 086 gauges worldwide. Another nine gauge-corrected datasets were evaluated using hydrological modeling, by calibrating the HBV conceptual model against streamflow records for each of 9053 small to medium-sized ( < 50 000 km2) catchments worldwide, and comparing the resulting performance. Marked differences in spatio-temporal patterns and accuracy were found among the datasets. Among the uncorrected P datasets, the satellite- and reanalysis-based MSWEP-ng V1.2 and V2.0 datasets generally showed the best temporal correlations with the gauge observations, followed by the reanalyses (ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and NCEP-CFSR) and the satellite- and reanalysis-based CHIRP V2.0 dataset, the estimates based primarily on passive microwave remote sensing of rainfall (CMORPH V1.0, GSMaP V5/6, and TMPA 3B42RT V7) or near-surface soil moisture (SM2RAIN-ASCAT), and finally, estimates based primarily on thermal infrared imagery (GridSat V1.0, PERSIANN, and PERSIANN-CCS). Two of the three reanalyses (ERA-Interim and JRA-55) unexpectedly obtained lower trend errors than the satellite datasets. Among the corrected P datasets, the ones directly incorporating daily gauge data (CPC Unified, and MSWEP V1.2 and V2.0) generally provided the best calibration scores, although the good performance of the fully gauge-based CPC Unified is unlikely to translate to sparsely or ungauged regions. Next best results were obtained with P estimates directly incorporating temporally coarser gauge data (CHIRPS V2.0, GPCP-1DD V1.2, TMPA 3B42 V7, and WFDEI-CRU), which in turn outperformed the one indirectly incorporating gauge data through another multi-source dataset (PERSIANN-CDR V1R1). Our results highlight large differences in estimation accuracy, and hence the importance of P

  19. Global-scale evaluation of 22 precipitation datasets using gauge observations and hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, H.; Vergopolan, N.; Pan, M.; Levizzani, V.; van Dijk, A.; Weedon, G. P.; Brocca, L.; Huffman, G. J.; Wood, E. F.; William, L.

    2017-12-01

    We undertook a comprehensive evaluation of 22 gridded (quasi-)global (sub-)daily precipitation (P) datasets for the period 2000-2016. Twelve non-gauge-corrected P datasets were evaluated using daily P gauge observations from 76,086 gauges worldwide. Another ten gauge-corrected ones were evaluated using hydrological modeling, by calibrating the conceptual model HBV against streamflow records for each of 9053 small to medium-sized (<50,000 km2) catchments worldwide, and comparing the resulting performance. Marked differences in spatio-temporal patterns and accuracy were found among the datasets. Among the uncorrected P datasets, the satellite- and reanalysis-based MSWEP-ng V1.2 and V2.0 datasets generally showed the best temporal correlations with the gauge observations, followed by the reanalyses (ERA-Interim, JRA-55, and NCEP-CFSR), the estimates based primarily on passive microwave remote sensing of rainfall (CMORPH V1.0, GSMaP V5/6, and TMPA 3B42RT V7) or near-surface soil moisture (SM2RAIN-ASCAT), and finally, estimates based primarily on thermal infrared imagery (GridSat V1.0, PERSIANN, and PERSIANN-CCS). Two of the three reanalyses (ERA-Interim and JRA-55) unexpectedly obtained lower trend errors than the satellite datasets. Among the corrected P datasets, the ones directly incorporating daily gauge data (CPC Unified and MSWEP V1.2 and V2.0) generally provided the best calibration scores, although the good performance of the fully gauge-based CPC Unified is unlikely to translate to sparsely or ungauged regions. Next best results were obtained with P estimates directly incorporating temporally coarser gauge data (CHIRPS V2.0, GPCP-1DD V1.2, TMPA 3B42 V7, and WFDEI-CRU), which in turn outperformed those indirectly incorporating gauge data through other multi-source datasets (PERSIANN-CDR V1R1 and PGF). Our results highlight large differences in estimation accuracy, and hence, the importance of P dataset selection in both research and operational applications

  20. Comparison of the effects of 23-gauge and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy blade designs on incision architecture.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Makoto; Abulon, Dina Joy K; Hirakata, Akito

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effects of different 23- and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy trocar cannula entry systems on incision architecture. We tested one ridged microvitreoretinal (MVR), one non-ridged MVR, one pointed beveled, and one round-tipped beveled blade (n=10 per blade design per incision type). Each blade's straight and oblique incision architecture was assessed in a silicone disc simulating the sclera. Wound leakage under pressure and endoscopic observations were conducted on sclerotomy sites of isolated porcine eyes (n=4 per blade design) after simulated vitrectomy. Differences in blade design created distinct incision architecture. Incisions were linear with the ridged MVR blade, flattened "M-shaped" with the non-ridged MVR blade, asymmetrical chevron-shaped with the pointed beveled blade, and curved with the round-tipped beveled blade. With the exception of oblique entry incision thickness, both MVR blade designs created thinner incisions than the beveled blades at entry and exit sites. Only the ridged MVR blade created incisions with no leakage. Vitreous incarceration was observed with all trocar cannula systems. Wound closure in porcine eyes was similar with all blades despite differences in incision architecture. Wound leakage occurred at low to moderate infusion pressures with most blades; no wound leakage was observed with ridged MVR blades.

  1. Comparison of the effects of 23-gauge and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy blade designs on incision architecture

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Makoto; Abulon, Dina Joy K; Hirakata, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effects of different 23- and 25-gauge microincision vitrectomy trocar cannula entry systems on incision architecture. Methods We tested one ridged microvitreoretinal (MVR), one non-ridged MVR, one pointed beveled, and one round-tipped beveled blade (n=10 per blade design per incision type). Each blade’s straight and oblique incision architecture was assessed in a silicone disc simulating the sclera. Wound leakage under pressure and endoscopic observations were conducted on sclerotomy sites of isolated porcine eyes (n=4 per blade design) after simulated vitrectomy. Results Differences in blade design created distinct incision architecture. Incisions were linear with the ridged MVR blade, flattened “M-shaped” with the non-ridged MVR blade, asymmetrical chevron-shaped with the pointed beveled blade, and curved with the round-tipped beveled blade. With the exception of oblique entry incision thickness, both MVR blade designs created thinner incisions than the beveled blades at entry and exit sites. Only the ridged MVR blade created incisions with no leakage. Vitreous incarceration was observed with all trocar cannula systems. Conclusion Wound closure in porcine eyes was similar with all blades despite differences in incision architecture. Wound leakage occurred at low to moderate infusion pressures with most blades; no wound leakage was observed with ridged MVR blades. PMID:25429201

  2. A bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF upgrade platform

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.S.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.

    2011-03-28

    As part of the overall development effort for the RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform [1,2,3], a generic four channel 16 bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) daughter module was developed to provide high speed, wide dynamic range digitizing and processing of signals from DC to several hundred megahertz. The first operational use of this card was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector for the RHIC LLRF beam control feedback loops. This paper will describe the design and performance features of this daughter module as a bunch to bucket phase detector, and also provide an overview of its place within the overallmore » LLRF platform architecture as a high performance digitizer and signal processing module suitable to a variety of applications. In modern digital control and signal processing systems, ADCs provide the interface between the analog and digital signal domains. Once digitized, signals are then typically processed using algorithms implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic, general purpose processors (GPPs), digital signal processors (DSPs) or a combination of these. For the recently developed and commissioned RHIC LLRF Upgrade Platform, we've developed a four channel ADC daughter module based on the Linear Technology LTC2209 16 bit, 160 MSPS ADC and the Xilinx V5FX70T FPGA. The module is designed to be relatively generic in application, and with minimal analog filtering on board, is capable of processing signals from DC to 500 MHz or more. The module's first application was to implement the bunch to bucket phase detector (BTB-PD) for the RHIC LLRF system. The same module also provides DC digitizing of analog processed BPM signals used by the LLRF system for radial feedback.« less

  3. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  4. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  5. No Rain, No Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Marketing is like the rain. Some people are quickly aware of it, while others take repeated and consistent drops for quite an extended period of time before they take action. Building on the marketing principles discussed in previous issues, the next key principle to smart marketing is the "Rain Effect." The Rain Effect is the use of consistent…

  6. High-Resolution Rainfall From Radar Reflectivity and Terrestrial Rain Gages for use in Estimating Debris-Flow Susceptibility in the Day Fire, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanshaw, M. N.; Schmidt, K. M.; Jorgensen, D. P.; Stock, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Constraining the distribution of rainfall is essential to evaluating the post-fire mass-wasting response of steep soil-mantled landscapes. As part of a pilot early-warning project for flash floods and debris flows, NOAA deployed a portable truck-mounted Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R) to the 2006 Day fire in the Transverse Ranges of Southern California. In conjunction with a dense array of ground- based instruments, including 8 tipping-bucket rain gages located within an area of 170 km2, this C-band mobile Doppler radar provided 200-m grid cell estimates of precipitation data at fine temporal and spatial scales in burned steeplands at risk from hazardous flash floods and debris flows. To assess the utility of using this data in process models for flood and debris flow initiation, we converted grids of radar reflectivity to hourly time-steps of precipitation using an empirical relationship for convective storms, sampling the radar data at the locations of each rain gage as determined by GPS. The SMART-R was located 14 km from the farthest rain gage, but <10 km away from our intensive research area, where 5 gages are located within <1-2 km of each other. Analyses of the nine storms imaged by radar throughout the 2006/2007 winter produced similar cumulative rainfall totals between the gages and their SMART-R grid location over the entire season which correlate well on the high side, with gages recording the most precipitation agreeing to within 11% of the SMART-R. In contrast, on the low rainfall side, totals between the two recording systems are more variable, with a 62% variance between the minimums. In addition, at the scale of individual storms, a correlation between ground-based rainfall measurements and radar-based rainfall estimates is less evident, with storm totals between the gages and the SMART-R varying between 7 and 88%, a possible result of these being relatively small, fast-moving storms in an unusually dry winter. The

  7. The tale of two buckets and associated containers: impact on aedes albopictus oviposition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aedes albopictus is an invasive species. Its oviposition behavior is the subject of several projects in our research unit. The main emphasis of this presentation is a study which utilizes two five gallon buckets, one heated and one with ambient temperature. The heat is provided by an aquarium hea...

  8. Ultrasound-guided transhepatic puncture of the hepatic veins for TIPS placement.

    PubMed

    Gazzera, C; Fonio, P; Gallesio, C; Camerano, F; Doriguzzi Breatta, A; Righi, D; Veltri, A; Gandini, G

    2013-04-01

    This retrospective analysis was carried out to assess the feasibility and results of transjugular intrahepatic portal systemic shunt (TIPS) performed with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous puncture of the hepatic veins. Over a period of 3 years, 153 patients were treated with TIPS at our centre. In eight cases, a percutaneous puncture of the middle (n=7) or right (n=1) hepatic vein was required because the hepatic vein ostium was not accessible. Indications for TIPS were bleeding (n=1), Budd-Chiari syndrome (n=1), ascites (n=2), reduced portal flow (n=1) and incomplete portal thrombosis (n=3). A 0.018-in. guidewire was anterogradely introduced into the hepatic vein to the inferior vena cava (IVC) through a 21-gauge needle. In the meantime, a 25-mm snare-loop catheter was introduced through the jugular access to retrieve the guidewire, achieving through-andthrough access. Then, a Rosch-Uchida set was used to place the TIPS with the traditional technique. Technical success was achieved in all patients. There was one case of stent thrombosis. One patient died of pulmonary oedema. Three patients were eligible for liver transplantation, whereas the others were excluded due to shunt thrombosis (n=1) and previous nonhepatic neoplasms (n=3). The percutaneous approach to hepatic veins is rapid and safe and may be useful for avoiding traumatic liver injuries.

  9. Self-Consistency of Rain Event Definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teves, J. B.; Larsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    A dense optical rain disdrometer array was constructed to study rain variability on spatial scales less than 100 meters with temporal resolution of 1 minute. Approximately two months of data were classified into rain events using methods common in the literature. These methods were unable to identify an array-wide consensus as to the total number of rain events; instruments as little as 2 meters apart with similar data records sometimes identified different rain event totals. Physical considerations suggest that these differing event totals are likely due to instrument sampling fluctuations that are typically not accounted for in rain event studies. Detection of varying numbers of rain events impact many commonly used storm statistics including storm duration distributions and mean rain rate. A summary of the results above and their implications are presented.

  10. Posterior double PCL sign: a case report of unusual MRI finding of bucket-handle tear of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Hahn, Sung Ho; Yi, Seung Rim; Kim, Seong Wan

    2007-11-01

    Among the MRI signs of bucket-handle tears of medial meniscus, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign denotes a low signal band anterior and parallel to the PCL, which looks like another PCL in MR images. If the bucket-handle fragment subsequently tears at the anterior horn, the torn meniscal substance can be displaced to the posterosuperior region of the PCL, and looks like another PCL behind the original PCL. We propose the lesion be called the "posterior double PCL sign" in contrast to the ordinary double PCL sign. We present a case showing the posterior double PCL sign.

  11. The risk of capsular breakage from phacoemulsification needle contact with the lens capsule: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jay J; Kuo, Annie F; Olson, Randall J

    2010-06-01

    To determine capsular breakage risk from contact by phacoemulsification needles by machine and tip type. Experimental laboratory investigation. Infiniti (Alcon, Inc.) with Intrepid cartridges and Signature (Abbott Medical Optics, Inc.) phacoemulsification machines were tested using 19- and 20-gauge sharp and rounded tips. Actual and unoccluded flow vacuum were determined at 550 mm Hg, bottle height of 75 cm, and machine-indicated flow rate of 60 mL/minute. Breakage from brief tip contact with a capsular surrogate and human cadaveric lenses was calculated. Nineteen-gauge tips had more flow and less unoccluded flow vacuum than 20-gauge tips for both machines, with highest unoccluded flow vacuum in the Infiniti. The 19-gauge sharp tip was more likely than the 20-gauge sharp tip to cause surrogate breakage for Signature with micropulse and Ellips (Abbott Medical Optics, Inc.) ultrasound at 100% power. For Infiniti using OZil (Alcon, Inc.) ultrasound, 20-gauge sharp tips were more likely than 19-gauge sharp tips to break the membrane. For cadaveric lenses, using rounded 20-gauge tips at 100% power, breakage rates were micropulse (2.3%), Ellips (2.3%), OZil (5.3%). Breakage rates for sharp 20-gauge Ellips tips were higher than for rounded tips. Factors influencing capsular breakage may include active vacuum at the tip, flow rate, needle gauge, and sharpness. Nineteen-gauge sharp tips were more likely than 20-gauge tips to cause breakage in lower vacuum methods. For higher-vacuum methods, breakage is more likely with 20-gauge than with 19-gauge tips. Rounded-edge tips are less likely than sharp-edged tips to cause breakage. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Life in Tropical Rain Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of rain forest life, the adaptations of rain forest plants and animals, and ways these organisms interact. Includes activities on canopy critters with a copyable sheet, rain forest revue, design a plant, and jungle sleuths. (RT)

  13. Assessing Applications of GPM and IMERG Passive Microwave Rain Rates in Modeling and Operational Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, B.; Le Roy, A.; Smith, M. R.; Case, J.

    2016-12-01

    In support of NASA's recently launched GPM `core' satellite, the NASA-SPoRT project is leveraging experience in research-to-operations transitions and training to provide feedback on the operational utility of GPM products. Thus far, SPoRT has focused on evaluating the Level 2 GPROF passive microwave and IMERG rain rate estimates. Formal evaluations with end-users have occurred, as well as internal evaluations of the datasets. One set of end users for these products is National Weather Service Forecast Offices (WFOs) and National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (RFCs), comprising forecasters and hydrologists. SPoRT has hosted a series of formal assessments to determine uses and utility of these datasets for NWS operations at specific offices. Forecasters primarily have used Level 2 swath rain rates to observe rainfall in otherwise data-void regions and to confirm model QPF for their nowcasting or short-term forecasting. Hydrologists have been evaluating both the Level 2 rain rates and the IMERG rain rates, including rain rate accumulations derived from IMERG; hydrologists have used these data to supplement gauge data for post-event analysis as well as for longer-term forecasting. Results from specific evaluations will be presented. Another evaluation of the GPM passive microwave rain rates has been in using the data within other products that are currently transitioned to end-users, rather than as stand-alone observations. For example, IMERG Early data is being used as a forcing mechanism in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) for real-time soil moisture product over eastern Africa. IMERG is providing valuable precipitation information to LIS in an otherwise data-void region. Results and caveats will briefly be discussed. A third application of GPM data is using the IMERG Late and Final products for model verification in remote regions where high-quality gridded precipitation fields are not readily available. These datasets can now be used to verify NWP

  14. Prediction of Scour below Flip Bucket using Soft Computing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamathulla, H. Md.; Ab Ghani, Aminuddin; Azazi Zakaria, Nor

    2010-05-01

    The accurate prediction of the depth of scour around hydraulic structure (trajectory spillways) has been based on the experimental studies and the equations developed are mainly empirical in nature. This paper evaluates the performance of the soft computing (intelligence) techiques, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy System (ANFIS) and Genetic expression Programming (GEP) approach, in prediction of scour below a flip bucket spillway. The results are very promising, which support the use of these intelligent techniques in prediction of highly non-linear scour parameters.

  15. Lessons from the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Presents a first-grade art project after students learned about the rain forest and heard the story, "The Great Kapok Tree: A Tale of the Amazon Rain Forest" (Lynn Cherry). Explains that the students created pictures of the rain forest. (CMK)

  16. Validation of crowdsourced automatic rain gauge measurements in Amsterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number of privately owned weather stations and the facilitating role the internet to make this data publicly available, has led to several online platforms that collect and visualize crowdsourced weather data. This has resulted in ever increasing freely available datasets of weather measurements generated by amateur weather enthusiasts. Because of the lack of quality control and the frequent absence of metadata, these measurements are often considered as unreliable. Given the often large variability of weather variables in space and time, and the generally low number of official weather stations, this growing quantity of crowdsourced data may become an important additional source of information. Amateur weather observations have become more frequent over the past decade due to weather stations becoming more user-friendly and affordable. The variables measured by these weather stations are temperature, pressure and dew point, and in some cases wind and rainfall. Meteorological data from crowdsourced automatic weather stations in cities have primarily been used to examine the urban heat island effect. Thus far, these studies have focused on the comparison of the crowdsourced station temperature measurements with a nearby WMO-standard weather station, which is often located in a rural area or the outskirts of a city, generally not being representative of the city center. Instead of temperature, the rainfall measurements by the stations are examined. This research focuses on the combined ability of a large number of privately owned weather stations in an urban setting to correctly monitor rainfall. A set of 64 automatic weather stations distributed over Amsterdam (The Netherlands) that have at least 3 months of precipitation measurement during one year are evaluated. Precipitation measurements from stations are compared to a merged radar-gauge precipitation product. Disregarding sudden jumps in station measured precipitation, the accumulative rainfall

  17. Gauge Factor and Stretchability of Silicon-on-Polymer Strain Gauges

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shixuan; Lu, Nanshu

    2013-01-01

    Strain gauges are widely applied to measure mechanical deformation of structures and specimens. While metallic foil gauges usually have a gauge factor slightly over 2, single crystalline silicon demonstrates intrinsic gauge factors as high as 200. Although silicon is an intrinsically stiff and brittle material, flexible and even stretchable strain gauges have been achieved by integrating thin silicon strips on soft and deformable polymer substrates. To achieve a fundamental understanding of the large variance in gauge factor and stretchability of reported flexible/stretchable silicon-on-polymer strain gauges, finite element and analytically models are established to reveal the effects of the length of the silicon strip, and the thickness and modulus of the polymer substrate. Analytical results for two limiting cases, i.e., infinitely thick substrate and infinitely long strip, have found good agreement with FEM results. We have discovered that strains in silicon resistor can vary by orders of magnitude with different substrate materials whereas strip length or substrate thickness only affects the strain level mildly. While the average strain in silicon reflects the gauge factor, the maximum strain in silicon governs the stretchability of the system. The tradeoff between gauge factor and stretchability of silicon-on-polymer strain gauges has been proposed and discussed. PMID:23881128

  18. Particle transport patterns of short-distance soil erosion by wind-driven rain, rain and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; de Lima, João L. M. P.; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    Short distance erosion of soil surface material is one of the big question marks in soil erosion studies. The exact measurement of short-distance transported soil particles, prior to the occurrence of overland flow, is a challenge to soil erosion science due to the particular requirements of the experimental setup and test procedure. To approach a quantification of amount and distance of each type of transport, we applied an especially developed multiple-gutter system installed inside the Trier Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator (PWRS). We measured the amount and travel distance of soil particles detached and transported by raindrops (splash), wind-driven rain (splash-saltation and splash-drift) and wind (saltation). The test setup included three different erosion agents (rain/ wind-driven rain/ wind), two substrates (sandy/ loamy), three surface structures (grain roughness/ rills lengthwise/ rills transversal) and three slope angles (0°/+7°/-7°). The results present detailed transport patterns of the three erosion agents under the varying soil and surface conditions up to a distance of 1.6 m. Under the applied rain intensity and wind velocity, wind-driven rain splash generates the highest erosion. The erodibility and travel distance of the two substrates depend on the erosion agent. The total erosion is slightly higher for the slope angle -7° (downslope), but for wind-driven rain splash, the inclination is not a relevant factor. The effect of surface structures (rills) changes with traveling distance. The wind driven rain splash generates a much higher amount of erosion and a further travel distance of the particles due to the combined action of wind and rain. The wind-driven rain factor appears to be much more significant than the other factors. The study highlights the effects of different erosion agents and surface parameters on short-distance particle transport and the powerful impact of wind-driven rain on soil erosion.

  19. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency.

  20. Microfluidic size separation of cells and particles using a swinging bucket centrifuge

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Wang, Zhiping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular separation is crucial for downstream analysis. Separation technique mainly relies on centrifugal sedimentation. However, minuscule sample volume separation and extraction is difficult with conventional centrifuge. Furthermore, conventional centrifuge requires density gradient centrifugation which is laborious and time-consuming. To overcome this challenge, we present a novel size-selective bioparticles separation microfluidic chip on a swinging bucket minifuge. Size separation is achieved using passive pressure driven centrifugal fluid flows coupled with centrifugal force acting on the particles within the microfluidic chip. By adopting centrifugal microfluidics on a swinging bucket rotor, we achieved over 95% efficiency in separating mixed 20 μm and 2 μm colloidal dispersions from its liquid medium. Furthermore, by manipulating the hydrodynamic resistance, we performed size separation of mixed microbeads, achieving size efficiency of up to 90%. To further validate our device utility, we loaded spiked whole blood with MCF-7 cells into our microfluidic device and subjected it to centrifugal force for a mere duration of 10 s, thereby achieving a separation efficiency of over 75%. Overall, our centrifugal microfluidic device enables extremely rapid and label-free enrichment of different sized cells and particles with high efficiency. PMID:26487900

  1. Higgsed Gauge-flation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adshead, Peter; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I.

    2017-08-01

    We study a variant of Gauge-flation where the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by a Higgs sector. We work in the Stueckelberg limit and demonstrate that the dynamics remain (catastrophically) unstable for cases where the gauge field masses satisfy γ < 2, where γ = g 2 ψ 2/ H 2, g is the gauge coupling, ψ is the gauge field vacuum expectation value, and H is the Hubble rate. We compute the spectrum of density fluctuations and gravitational waves, and show that the model can produce observationally viable spectra. The background gauge field texture violates parity, resulting in a chiral gravitational wave spectrum. This arises due to an exponential enhancement of one polarization of the spin-2 fluctuation of the gauge field. Higgsed Gauge-flation can produce observable gravitational waves at inflationary energy scales well below the GUT scale.

  2. Rain Forest Murals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  3. Higgsed Gauge-flation

    DOE PAGES

    Adshead, Peter; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I.

    2017-08-29

    We study a variant of Gauge-flation where the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by a Higgs sector. Here, we work in the Stueckelberg limit and demonstrate that the dynamics remain (catastrophically) unstable for cases where the gauge field masses satisfy γ< 2, where γ= g 2 2=ψH 2, g is the gauge coupling, ψ is the gauge field vacuum expectation value, and H is the Hubble rate. We compute the spectrum of density uctuations and gravitational waves, and show that the model can produce observationally viable spectra. The background gauge field texture violates parity, resulting in a chiral gravitational wavemore » spectrum. This arises due to an exponential enhancement of one polarization of the spin-2 fluctuation of the gauge field. Higgsed Gauge-flation can produce observable gravitational waves at in inflationary energy scales well below the GUT scale.« less

  4. Higgsed Gauge-flation

    SciTech Connect

    Adshead, Peter; Sfakianakis, Evangelos I.

    We study a variant of Gauge-flation where the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken by a Higgs sector. Here, we work in the Stueckelberg limit and demonstrate that the dynamics remain (catastrophically) unstable for cases where the gauge field masses satisfy γ< 2, where γ= g 2 2=ψH 2, g is the gauge coupling, ψ is the gauge field vacuum expectation value, and H is the Hubble rate. We compute the spectrum of density uctuations and gravitational waves, and show that the model can produce observationally viable spectra. The background gauge field texture violates parity, resulting in a chiral gravitational wavemore » spectrum. This arises due to an exponential enhancement of one polarization of the spin-2 fluctuation of the gauge field. Higgsed Gauge-flation can produce observable gravitational waves at in inflationary energy scales well below the GUT scale.« less

  5. The bucket and the searchlight: formulating and testing risk hypotheses about the weediness and invasiveness potential of transgenic crops.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The bucket and the searchlight are metaphors for opposing theories of the growth of scientific knowledge. The bucket theory proposes that knowledge is gained by observing the world without preconceptions, and that knowledge emerges from the accumulation of observations that support a hypothesis. There are many problems with this theory, the most serious of which is that it does not appear to offer a means to distinguish between the many hypotheses that could explain a particular set of observations. The searchlight theory proposes that preconceptions are unavoidable and that knowledge advances through the improvement of our preconceptions - our hypotheses - by continuous criticism and revision. A hypothesis is a searchlight that illuminates observations that test the hypothesis and reveal its flaws, and knowledge thereby increases through the elimination of false hypotheses. Research into the risks posed by the cultivation of transgenic crops often appears to apply the bucket theory; many data are produced, but knowledge of risk is not advanced. Application of the searchlight theory, whereby risk assessments test hypotheses that transgenic crops will not be harmful, seems to offer a better way to characterise risk. The effectiveness of an environmental risk assessment should not be measured by the size of the bucket of observations on a transgenic crop, but by the power of the risk hypothesis searchlights to clarify the risks that may arise from cultivation of that crop. These points are illustrated by examples of hypotheses that could be tested to assess the risks from transgenic crops and their hybrids becoming weeds or invading non-agricultural habitats. © ISBR, EDP Sciences, 2011.

  6. Outcomes after repair of chronic bucket-handle tears of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Reina, Alejandro; Serrano-Fernández, José Miguel; Martín-Castilla, Belén; Estades-Rubio, Francisco Javier; Briggs, Karen K; Espejo-Baena, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcomes after repair of chronic bucket-handle medial meniscal tears by use of magnetic resonance imaging, clinical examination, and patient-reported outcomes. A retrospective review of patients with chronic bucket-handle medial meniscal tears that had been repaired with meniscal sutures was undertaken. The following criteria for inclusion were adopted: minimum tear length of 2 cm and chronic medial meniscal tear identified at the time of arthroscopy. The tears were susceptible to dislocation with probing. Data collected included demographic, clinical, radiologic, and surgical data. Postoperative healing was assessed with the clinical criteria of Barrett et al. The International Knee Documentation Committee rating, Lysholm score, and Tegner activity level were determined, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate healing in accordance with the criteria of Henning et al. Twenty-four patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean time from injury to surgery was 10 months (range, 2 to 60 months). Sixteen patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 1 patient underwent posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and 6 patients underwent meniscus repair only. A median of 5 sutures (range, 3 to 6 sutures) were used for repair. Four cases (all of which had undergone meniscus repair only) required revision. Complete healing was achieved in 83% of cases according to the criteria of Barrett et al. The mean follow-up time was 48 months (range, 24 to 112 months). An International Knee Documentation Committee rating of A or B was achieved in the 20 patients who did not require revision. The median Lysholm score was 95 (range, 92 to 100). The median Tegner activity level before injury was 7, and it remained unchanged after surgery in all cases. This study showed that repair of chronic bucket-handle meniscal tears can lead to good clinical outcomes and a relatively low (17

  7. Pollen selection under acid rain stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.

    To investigate whether acid rain stress induces pollen selection in nature, three different approaches were used, based on the assumption that the response of pollen grains to acid rain is controlled by an acid sensitive gene product. Germination of pollen from homozygous and heterozygous individuals under acid rain stress was examined to detect any differences in rate of germination between populations of homogeneous and heterogeneous pollen grains. In vitro and in vivo bulked segregant analysis using RAPDs was used to search for differences in DNA constitution between the survivors of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed pollen populations inmore » vitro and between the progenies of acid rain stressed and non-acid rain stressed populations during pollination, respectively. No evidence for the pollen selection under acid rain stress was obtained in any of the test systems. Inhibition of protein synthesis using cycloheximide led to significant reduction of tube elongation at 4 hr and had no effect on pollen germination at any time interval tested. Total proteins extracted from control and acid rain stressed pollen grain populations exhibited no differences. The reduction of corn pollen germination in vitro under acid rain stress was mainly due to pollen rupture. The present data indicates the reduction of pollen germination and tube growth under acid rain stress may be a physiological response rather than a genetic response. A simple, nontoxic, and effective method to separate germinated from ungerminated pollen grains has been developed using pollen from corn (Zea mays, L. cv. Pioneer 3747). The separated germinated pollen grains retained viability and continued tube growth when placed in culture medium.« less

  8. RAINE Public Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The file geodatabase (fgdb) contains the New England Town Boundaries and information related specifically to the Resilience and Adaptation in New England (RAINE) web application. This includes data tables relating to particular aspects of towns notably features, funding, impacts, partners, plans, and programs (refer to V_MAP_STATIC tables). New England Town Boundary coverage is a compilation of coverages received from the six New England State GIS Offices. The EPA New England GIS Center appended the coverages together into a single file and generated attrributes to link to the Facility Identification Online system. These feature class points represent the communities (Communities in gdb) and featured RAINE communities (RAINE_Communities_201609), which contain more detailed information that is contained within the included data tables.

  9. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  10. Remembering tips

    MedlinePlus

    Memory aids; Alzheimer disease - remembering tips; Early memory loss - remembering tips; Dementia - remembering tips ... harder for your brain to create a new memory, even while you can remember actions and events ...

  11. On gauge independence for gauge models with soft breaking of BRST symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    A consistent quantum treatment of general gauge theories with an arbitrary gauge-fixing in the presence of soft breaking of the BRST symmetry in the field-antifield formalism is developed. It is based on a gauged (involving a field-dependent parameter) version of finite BRST transformations. The prescription allows one to restore the gauge-independence of the effective action at its extremals and therefore also that of the conventional S-matrix for a theory with BRST-breaking terms being additively introduced into a BRST-invariant action in order to achieve a consistency of the functional integral. We demonstrate the applicability of this prescription within the approach of functional renormalization group to the Yang-Mills and gravity theories. The Gribov-Zwanziger action and the refined Gribov-Zwanziger action for a many-parameter family of gauges, including the Coulomb, axial and covariant gauges, are derived perturbatively on the basis of finite gauged BRST transformations starting from Landau gauge. It is proved that gauge theories with soft breaking of BRST symmetry can be made consistent if the transformed BRST-breaking terms satisfy the same soft BRST symmetry breaking condition in the resulting gauge as the untransformed ones in the initial gauge, and also without this requirement.

  12. Nonquadratic gauge fixing and ghosts for gauge theories on the hypersphere

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, F. T.; McKeon, D. G. C.; Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Algoma University, Sault St. Marie, Ontario P6A 2G4

    2011-10-15

    It has been suggested that using a gauge fixing Lagrangian that is not quadratic in a gauge fixing condition is most appropriate for gauge theories formulated on a hypersphere. We reexamine the appropriate ghost action that is to be associated with gauge fixing, applying a technique that has been used for ensuring that the propagator for a massless spin-two field is transverse and traceless. It is shown that this nonquadratic gauge fixing Lagrangian leads to two pair of complex Fermionic ghosts and two Bosonic real ghosts.

  13. Spread of acid rain over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemani, L. T.; Momin, G. A.; Rao, P. S. Prakasa; Safai, P. D.; Singh, G.; Kapoor, R. K.

    Rain water and aerosol samples were collected at a few locations representative of urban and non-urban regions in India. Also, rain water samples were collected in and around a coal-fired power plant. All the rain water and aerosol samples were analyzed for major chemical components along with pH. The rain water at all the places of measurement, except near the industrial sources, has been found to be alkaline and was characterized by the presence of excess cations, particularly by Ca 2+. The acid rain near the industrial sources was associated with excess anions, especially SO 42-. The atmospheric aerosols at all the places of measurement were found rich with basic components, suggesting that the alkaline soil dust and fly ash are responsible at present for preventing the spread of acid rain in India.

  14. When It Rains, It Pours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Linda

    2012-01-01

    "It's raining, it's pouring, the old man is snoring!" "The itsy, bitsy spider crawled up the waterspout, down came the rain and washed the spider out. Out came the sun and dried up all the rain, and the itsy, bitsy spider went up the spout again." What do children's nursery rhymes have to do with the school library? The author begins by telling a…

  15. Semicircular thermocouple needle depth gauge for cryoprocedures.

    PubMed

    Pappenfort, R B

    1981-06-01

    A semicircular thermocouple needle depth gauge made of an aluminum alloy drilled with tracks at different angles to place thermocouple needles at various depths below the surface is described herein. Its shape offers definite advantages over circular jigs (templates) when doing cryoexperimentation and when used clinically. The material of which it is made is more durable than plastic. Grommets that firmly snap in place within the inner rim of the instrument permit accurate placement of liquid gas spray, cryoprobes, and other applicators directly over the thermocouple needle tips. This is of special importance when doing cryoexperiments. Furthermore, with this design, the advancing ice front and possible liquid gas runoff are more easily seen. By using both halves it is suitable for monitoring the temperature when freezing large tumors at two different sites and a different depths.

  16. Scaling properties of Polish rain series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licznar, P.

    2009-04-01

    Scaling properties as well as multifractal nature of precipitation time series have not been studied for local Polish conditions until recently due to lack of long series of high-resolution data. The first Polish study of precipitation time series scaling phenomena was made on the base of pluviograph data from the Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences meteorological station located at the south-western part of the country. The 38 annual rainfall records from years 1962-2004 were converted into digital format and transformed into a standard format of 5-minute time series. The scaling properties and multifractal character of this material were studied by means of several different techniques: power spectral density analysis, functional box-counting, probability distribution/multiple scaling and trace moment methods. The result proved the general scaling character of time series at the range of time scales ranging form 5 minutes up to at least 24 hours. At the same time some characteristic breaks at scaling behavior were recognized. It is believed that the breaks were artificial and arising from the pluviograph rain gauge measuring precision limitations. Especially strong limitations at the precision of low-intensity precipitations recording by pluviograph rain gauge were found to be the main reason for artificial break at energy spectra, as was reported by other authors before. The analysis of co-dimension and moments scaling functions showed the signs of the first-order multifractal phase transition. Such behavior is typical for dressed multifractal processes that are observed by spatial or temporal averaging on scales larger than the inner-scale of those processes. The fractal dimension of rainfall process support derived from codimension and moments scaling functions geometry analysis was found to be 0.45. The same fractal dimension estimated by means of the functional box-counting method was equal to 0.58. At the final part of the study

  17. Gauge choices and entanglement entropy of two dimensional lattice gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the question of how different gauge choices in a gauge theory affect the tensor product structure of the Hilbert space in configuration space. In particular, we study the Coulomb gauge and observe that the naive gauge potential degrees of freedom cease to be local operators as soon as we impose the Dirac brackets. We construct new local set of operators and compute the entanglement entropy according to this algebra in 2 + 1 dimensions. We find that our proposal would lead to an entanglement entropy that behave very similar to a single scalar degree of freedom if we do not include further centers, but approaches that of a gauge field if we include non-trivial centers. We explore also the situation where the gauge field is Higgsed, and construct a local operator algebra that again requires some deformation. This should give us some insight into interpreting the entanglement entropy in generic gauge theories and perhaps also in gravitational theories.

  18. Cooling supply system for stage 3 bucket of a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Burns, James Lee; Palmer, Gene David; Leone, Sal Albert; Drlik, Gary Joseph; Gibler, Edward Eugene

    2002-01-01

    In a land based gas turbine including a compressor, a combustor and turbine section including at least three stages, an improvement comprising an inlet into a third stage nozzle from the compressor for feeding cooling air from the compressor to the third stage nozzle; at least one passageway running substantially radially through each airfoil of the third stage nozzle and an associated diaphragm, into an annular space between the rotor and the diaphragm; and passageways communicating between the annular space and individual buckets of the third stage.

  19. SU-E-J-81: Beveled Needle Tip Detection Error in Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Leu, S; Ruiz, B; Podder, T

    2012-06-01

    To quantify the needle tip detection errors in ultrasound images due to bevel-tip orientation in relation to the location on template grid. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) system (BK Medical) with physical template grid and 18-gauge bevel-tip (20-deg beveled angle) brachytherapy needle (Bard Medical, Covington, GA) were used. The TRUS was set at 6.5MHz in water phantom at 40°C and measurements were taken with 50% and 100% TRUS gains. Needles were oriented with bevel-tip facing up (0-degree) and inserted through template grid-holes. Reference needle depths were measured when needle tip image intensity was bright enough for potentially consistent readings. High-resolution digital vernier caliper was used to measure needle depth. Needle bevel-tip orientation was then changed to bevel down (by rotating 180-degree) and needle depth was adjusted by retracting so that the needle-tip image intensity appeared similar to when the needle bevel-tip was at 0-degree orientation. Clinically relevant locations were considered for needle placement on the template grids (1st row to 9th row, and 'a-f' columns). For 50% TRUS gain, bevel tip detection errors/differences were 0.69±0.30mm (1st row) to 3.23±0.22mm (9th row) and 0.78±0.71mm (1st row) to 4.14±0.56mm (9th row) in columns 'a' and 'D', respectively. The corresponding errors for 100% TRUS gain were 0.57±0.25mm to 5.24±0.36mm and 0.84±0.30mm to 4.2±0.20mm in columns 'a' and 'D', respectively. These errors/differences varied linearly for grid-hole locations on the rows and columns in between, smaller to large depending on distance from the TRUS probe. Observed no effect of gains (50% vs. 100%) along 'D' column, which was directly above the TRUS probe. Experiment results revealed that the beveled needle tip orientation could significantly impact the detection accuracy of the needle tips, based on which the seeds might be delivered. These errors may lead to considerable dosimetric deviations in prostate brachytherapy seed

  20. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Goldband, Ryan S

    2016-01-25

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  1. Lateral Tip Control Effects in CD-AFM Metrology: The Large Tip Limit

    PubMed Central

    Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Goldband, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    Sidewall sensing in critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs) usually involves continuous lateral dithering of the tip or the use of a control algorithm and fast response piezo actuator to position the tip in a manner that resembles touch-triggering of coordinate measuring machine (CMM) probes. All methods of tip position control, however, induce an effective tip width that may deviate from the actual geometrical tip width. Understanding the influence and dependence of the effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip can improve the measurement accuracy and uncertainty estimation for CD-AFM measurements. Since CD-AFM typically uses tips that range from 15 nm to 850 nm in geometrical width, the behavior of effective tip width throughout this range should be understood. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been investigating the dependence of effective tip width on the dither settings and lateral stiffness of the tip, as well as the possibility of material effects due to sample composition. For tip widths of 130 nm and lower, which also have lower lateral stiffness, the response of the effective tip width to lateral dither is greater than for larger tips. However, we have concluded that these effects will not generally result in a residual bias, provided that the tip calibration and sample measurement are performed under the same conditions. To validate that our prior conclusions about the dependence of effective tip width on lateral stiffness are valid for large CD-tips, we recently performed experiments using a very large non-CD tip with an etched plateau of approximately 2 μm width. The effective lateral stiffness of these tips is at least 20 times greater than typical CD-AFM tips, and these results supported our prior conclusions about the expected behavior for larger tips. The bottom-line importance of these latest observations is that we can now reasonably conclude that a dither slope of 3 nm

  2. Double PCL sign does not always indicate a bucket-handle tear of medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zheng, Hua Yong; Huang, Yan; Li, Hai Peng; Wu, Han; Sun, Tian Sheng; Yao, Jian Hua

    2016-09-01

    The discoid medial meniscus is an extremely rare anomaly. Bilateral discoid medial menisci are much more rare but intermittently reported. We report the first case of bilateral discoid medial menisci with positive double PCL sign, which typically indicates a bucket-handle tear of medial meniscus. A literature review was also conducted on bilateral discoid medial menisci.

  3. Rain, Snow, and Spring Runoff Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the theory behind the correlation between warm rain, rapid snowmelt, and the subsequent runoff using the concepts of enthalpy, thermal transfer, and energy transfer. Concludes that rapid runoff is not a consequence of rain per se but of the high humidities associated with the rain. (JRH)

  4. Gauge engineering and propagators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Beyond perturbation theory gauge-fixing becomes more involved due to the Gribov-Singer ambiguity: The appearance of additional gauge copies requires to define a procedure how to handle them. For the case of Landau gauge the structure and properties of these additional gauge copies will be investigated. Based on these properties gauge conditions are constructed to account for these gauge copies. The dependence of the propagators on the choice of these complete gauge-fixings will then be investigated using lattice gauge theory for Yang-Mills theory. It is found that the implications for the infrared, and to some extent mid-momentum behavior, can be substantial. In going beyond the Yang-Mills case it turns out that the influence of matter can generally not be neglected. This will be briefly discussed for various types of matter.

  5. Optical Tip Clearance Measurements as a Tool for Rotating Disk Characterization

    PubMed Central

    García, Iker; Zubia, Joseba; Beloki, Josu; Arrue, Jon; Durana, Gaizka; Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the vibrational behavior of a rotating disk by means of three optical fiber sensors is presented. The disk, which is a scale model of the real disk of an aircraft engine, was assembled in a wind tunnel in order to simulate real operation conditions. The pressure difference between the upstream and downstream sides of the disk causes an airflow that might force the disk to vibrate. To characterize this vibration, a set of parameters was determined by measuring the tip clearance of the disk: the amplitude, the frequency and the number of nodal diameters in the disk. All this information allowed the design of an upgraded prototype of the disk, whose performance was also characterized by the same method. An optical system was employed for the measurements, in combination with a strain gauge mounted on the disk surface, which served to confirm the results obtained. The data of the strain gauge coincided closely with those provided by the optical fiber sensors, thus demonstrating the suitability of this innovative technique to evaluate the vibrational behavior of rotating disks. PMID:28098845

  6. Rain Rate Statistics in Southern New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulic, Frank J., Jr.; Horan, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    The methodology used in determining empirical rain-rate distributions for Southern New Mexico in the vicinity of White Sands APT site is discussed. The hardware and the software developed to extract rain rate from the rain accumulation data collected at White Sands APT site are described. The accuracy of Crane's Global Model for rain rate predictions is analyzed.

  7. Building Multi-Discipline, Multi-Format Digital Libraries Using Clusters and Buckets. Degree rewarded by Old Dominion Univ. on Aug. 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Our objective was to study the feasibility of extending the Dienst protocol to enable a multi-discipline, multi-format digital library. We implemented two new technologies: cluster functionality and publishing buckets. We have designed a possible implementation of clusters and buckets, and have prototyped some aspects of the resultant digital library. Currently, digital libraries are segregated by the disciplines they serve (computer science, aeronautics, etc.), and by the format of their holdings (reports, software, datasets, etc.). NCSTRL+ is a multi-discipline, multi-format digital library (DL) prototype created to explore the feasibility of the design and implementation issues involved with created a unified, canonical scientific and technical information (STI) DL. NCSTRL+ is based on the Networked Computer Science Technical Report Library (NCSTRL), a World Wide Web (WWW) accessible DL that provides access to over 80 university departments and laboratories. We have extended the Dienst protocol (version 4.1.8), the protocol underlying NCSTRL, to provide the ability to cluster independent collections into a logically centralized DL based upon subject category classification, type of organization, and genre of material. The concept of buckets provides a mechanism for publishing and managing logically linked entities with multiple data formats.

  8. Acid Rain: What We Must Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Eville

    1983-01-01

    Addresses questions about the nature, source, and history of acid rain. In addition, discusses the questions: Why is acid rain a problem? Is acid rain getting worse? What is the threat of further problems? Concludes that it is time to act on the problem and recommends an appropriate course of action. (JN)

  9. Blood patch rates after lumbar puncture with Whitacre versus Quincke 22- and 20-gauge spinal needles.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Malcolm K; Handrich, Stephen J; Willis, Jeffrey A; Beres, Robert A; Zaleski, George X

    2008-06-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the incidence of blood patch as the best objective indicator of postdural puncture headache after elective fluoroscopic lumbar puncture with the use of a 22-gauge Whitacre (pencil point) needle versus standard 22- and 20-gauge Quincke (bevel-tip) needles and to determine the best level of puncture. The records of 724 consecutive patients who were referred to St. Mary's Medical Center department of radiology for fluoroscopic lumbar puncture from January 2003 through April 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Emergency requests (191) were discarded along with those for patients with clinical signs of pseudotumor cerebri (21), normal pressure hydrocephalus (3), and failed attempts (4). The collective total was 505 elective lumbar punctures. The blood patch rate for the 22-gauge Whitacre needle was 4.2%. The result for the 22-gauge Quincke point needle was 15.1% whereas that for the 20-gauge Quincke point needle was 29.6%. In addition, the level of puncture showed a blood patch rate that increased as the level of lumbar puncture lowered. The highest level of lumbar puncture was L1-L2 with the lowest recorded level being L5-S1. The Whitacre needle is associated with a significantly lower incidence of blood patch rate after lumbar puncture. The highest level of puncture (L1-L2) also provides the lowest level of blood patch rate.

  10. Presenting the Rain-Sea Interaction Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, Larry F.; Elfouhaily, Tonas M.

    1993-01-01

    The new Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) was established at GSFC/WFF and the first finds are presented. The unique feature of this laboratory is the ability to systematically study microwave scattering from a water surface roughened by artificial rain, for which the droplets are at terminal velocity. The fundamental instruments and systems (e.g., the rain simulator, scatterometers, and surface elevation probes) were installed and evaluated during these first experiments - so the majority of the data were obtained with the rain simulator at 1 m above the water tank. From these initial experiments, three new models were proposed: the square-root function for NCS vs. R, the log Gaussian model for ring-wave elevation frequency spectrum, and the Erland probability density distribution for back scattered power. Rain rate is the main input for these models, although the coefficients may be dependent upon other factors (drop-size distribution, fall velocity, radar configuration, etc.). The facility is functional and we foresee collaborative studies with investigators who are engaged in measuring and modeling rain-sea interaction processes.

  11. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesionsmore » at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.« less

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Rain Attenuation Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Surendra Kr.; Jha, Santosh Kr.; Jha, Lallan

    2007-07-01

    Satellite communication technologies are now highly developed and high quality, distance-independent services have expanded over a very wide area. As for the system design of the Hokkaido integrated telecommunications(HIT) network, it must first overcome outages of satellite links due to rain attenuation in ka frequency bands. In this paper theoretical analysis of rain attenuation probability on a slant path has been made. The formula proposed is based Weibull distribution and incorporates recent ITU-R recommendations concerning the necessary rain rates and rain heights inputs. The error behaviour of the model was tested with the loading rain attenuation prediction model recommended by ITU-R for large number of experiments at different probability levels. The novel slant path rain attenuastion prediction model compared to the ITU-R one exhibits a similar behaviour at low time percentages and a better root-mean-square error performance for probability levels above 0.02%. The set of presented models exhibits the advantage of implementation with little complexity and is considered useful for educational and back of the envelope computations.

  13. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water...

  14. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water...

  15. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water...

  16. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water...

  17. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges (modifies PG-60). 52.01-110 Section 52.01-110 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS General Requirements § 52.01-110 Water-level indicators, water...

  18. Regularization of the light-cone gauge gluon propagator singularities using sub-gauge conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Wertepny, Douglas E.

    2015-12-21

    Perturbative QCD calculations in the light-cone gauge have long suffered from the ambiguity associated with the regularization of the poles in the gluon propagator. In this work we study sub-gauge conditions within the light-cone gauge corresponding to several known ways of regulating the gluon propagator. By using the functional integral calculation of the gluon propagator, we rederive the known sub-gauge conditions for the θ-function gauges and identify the sub-gauge condition for the principal value (PV) regularization of the gluon propagator’s light-cone poles. The obtained sub-gauge condition for the PV case is further verified by a sample calculation of the classicalmore » Yang-Mills field of two collinear ultrarelativistic point color charges. Our method does not allow one to construct a sub-gauge condition corresponding to the well-known Mandelstam-Leibbrandt prescription for regulating the gluon propagator poles.« less

  19. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section: comparison of 22-gauge and 25-gauge Whitacre needles with 26-gauge Quincke needles.

    PubMed

    Shutt, L E; Valentine, S J; Wee, M Y; Page, R J; Prosser, A; Thomas, T A

    1992-12-01

    We have studied 150 women undergoing elective Caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia. They were allocated randomly to have a 22-gauge Whitacre, a 25-gauge Whitacre or a 26-gauge Quincke needle inserted into the lumbar subarachnoid space. The groups were compared for ease of insertion, number of attempted needle insertions before identification of cerebrospinal fluid, quality of subsequent analgesia and incidence of postoperative complications. There were differences between groups, but they did not reach statistical significance. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) was experienced by one mother in the 22-gauge Whitacre group, none in the 25-gauge Whitacre group and five in the 26-gauge Quincke group. Five of the six PDPH occurred after a single successful needle insertion. Seven of the 15 mothers in whom more than two needle insertions were made experienced backache, compared with 12 of the 129 receiving two or less (P < 0.001). We conclude that the use of 22- and 25-gauge Whitacre needles in elective Caesarean section patients is associated with a low incidence of PDPH and that postoperative backache is more likely when more than two attempts are made to insert a spinal needle.

  20. Characterization of precipitation features over CONUS derived from satellite, radar, and rain gauge datasets (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, O. P.; Nelson, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    We use a suite of quantitative precipitation estimates (QPEs) derived from satellite, radar, surface observations, and models to derive precipitation characteristics over CONUS for the period 2002-2012. This comparison effort includes satellite multi-sensor datasets of TMPA 3B42, CMORPH, and PERSIANN. The satellite based QPEs are compared over the concurrent period with the NCEP Stage IV product, which is a near real time product providing precipitation data at the hourly temporal scale gridded at a nominal 4-km spatial resolution. In addition, remotely sensed precipitation datasets are compared with surface observations from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN-Daily) and from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model), which provides gridded precipitation estimates that are used as a baseline for multi-sensor QPE products comparison. The comparisons are performed at the annual, seasonal, monthly, and daily scales with focus on selected river basins (Southeastern US, Pacific Northwest, Great Plains). While, unconditional annual rain rates present a satisfying agreement between all products, results suggest that satellite QPE datasets exhibit important biases in particular at higher rain rates (≥4 mm/day). Conversely, on seasonal scales differences between remotely sensed data and ground surface observations can be greater than 50% and up to 90% for low daily accumulation (≤1 mm/day) such as in the Western US (summer) and Central US (winter). The conditional analysis performed using different daily rainfall accumulation thresholds (from low rainfall intensity to intense precipitation) shows that while intense events measured at the ground are infrequent (around 2% for daily accumulation above 2 inches/day), remotely sensed products displayed differences from 20-50% and up to 90-100%. A discussion on the impact of differing spatial and temporal resolutions with respect to the datasets ability to capture extreme

  1. Rain water chemistry in Ankara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncel, Semra G.; Ungör, Sevgi

    Samples of rain water were collected in Ankara for the period between September 1989 and May 1990, by using wet-only sampler. Concentrations of major cations (H +, Na + K + Ca 2+ and NH 4+) and major anions (Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42-) were determined for the first time in Turkey. The rain water was not acidic owing to high concentrations of alkaline soil particles in the atmosphere. However, the concentrations of acid forming ions, such as SO 4- and N03, were higher than the concentrations expected in a typical urban atmosphere. Most of the SO 4- in rain water was in the form of CaSO 4. Rain-aerosol coupling were examined by simultaneous sampling of aerosols with rain. The ions most efficiently scavenged from the atmosphere were found to be SO 42- and Ca 2+.

  2. Building a Global Network of Hydro-climatology Sites in Cloud-affected Tropical Montane Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W.; Asbjornsen, H.; Bruijnzeel, S., Sr.; Berry, Z. C.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Martin, P.; Mulligan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical montane forests are characteristically wet environments with low evapotranspiration and sometimes significant contributions from fog interception. They are often located at headwater catchments critical for water supplies, but ecohydroclimate data in these regions are sparse. Such evidence may be crucial for assessing climate alterations in these sensitive ecosystems. As part of a global effort led by the Tropical Montane Cloud Forest Research Coordination Network (Cloudnet - http://cloudnet.agsci.colostate.edu), we aim to extend the network of tropical montane forest sites and establish robust protocols for measuring key ecohydroclimatic parameters, including fog interception, windblown rain, throughfall, leaf wetness, and micrometeorological conditions. Specific recommendations for standardized protocols include (1) rain and fog collectors uniquely designed to separately quantify fog interception from direct rain inputs, even in windy conditions, (2) trough-style throughfall gages that collect 40 times the area of a typical tipping bucket gage with added features to reduce splash-out, (3) clusters of leaf wetness sensors to differentiate frequency and duration of wetness caused by rain and fog on windward and leeward exposures, and (4) basic micrometeorological sensors for solar radiation, temperature, humidity, and wind. At sites where resources allow for additional measurements, we developed protocols for quantifying soil moisture, soil saturation, and plant water uptake from both roots and leaves (i.e. foliar absorption), since these are also important drivers in these systems. Participating sites will be invited to contribute to a global meta-analysis that will provide new insights into the ecohydrology of cloud-affected tropical montane forests.

  3. Carrying BioMath education in a Leaky Bucket.

    PubMed

    Powell, James A; Kohler, Brynja R; Haefner, James W; Bodily, Janice

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a project-based mathematical lab implemented in our Applied Mathematics in Biology course. The Leaky Bucket Lab allows students to parameterize and test Torricelli's law and develop and compare their own alternative models to describe the dynamics of water draining from perforated containers. In the context of this lab students build facility in a variety of applied biomathematical tools and gain confidence in applying these tools in data-driven environments. We survey analytic approaches developed by students to illustrate the creativity this encourages as well as prepare other instructors to scaffold the student learning experience. Pedagogical results based on classroom videography support the notion that the Biology-Applied Math Instructional Model, the teaching framework encompassing the lab, is effective in encouraging and maintaining high-level cognition among students. Research-based pedagogical approaches that support the lab are discussed.

  4. One method for life time estimation of a bucket wheel machine for coal moving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vîlceanu, Fl; Iancu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Rehabilitation of outdated equipment with lifetime expired, or in the ultimate life period, together with high cost investments for their replacement, makes rational the efforts made to extend their life. Rehabilitation involves checking operational safety based on relevant expertise of metal structures supporting effective resistance and assessing the residual lifetime. The bucket wheel machine for coal constitute basic machine within deposits of coal of power plants. The estimate of remaining life can be done by checking the loading on the most stressed subassembly by Finite Element Analysis on a welding detail. The paper presents step-by-step the method of calculus applied in order to establishing the residual lifetime of a bucket wheel machine for coal moving using non-destructive methods of study (fatigue cracking analysis + FEA). In order to establish the actual state of machine and areas subject to study, was done FEA of this mining equipment, performed on the geometric model of mechanical analyzed structures, with powerful CAD/FEA programs. By applying the method it can be calculated residual lifetime, by extending the results from the most stressed area of the equipment to the entire machine, and thus saving time and money from expensive replacements.

  5. Acid Rain: What It Is -- How You Can Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication discusses the nature and consequences of acid precipitation (commonly called acid rain). Topic areas include: (1) the chemical nature of acid rain; (2) sources of acid rain; (3) geographic areas where acid rain is a problem; (4) effects of acid rain on lakes; (5) effect of acid rain on vegetation; (6) possible effects of acid rain…

  6. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  7. Rain Gardens: Stormwater Infiltrating Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hydrological dynamics and changes in stormwater nutrient concentrations within rain gardens were studied by introducing captured stormwater runoff to rain gardens at EPA’s Urban Water Research Facility in Edison, New Jersey. The runoff used in these experiments was collected...

  8. An experimental study of the temporal statistics of radio signals scattered by rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. W.; Hull, J. A.; Rice, P. L.; Wells, P. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fixed-beam bistatic CW experiment designed to measure the temporal statistics of the volume reflectivity produced by hydrometeors at several selected altitudes, scattering angles, and at two frequencies (3.6 and 7.8 GHz) is described. Surface rain gauge data, local meteorological data, surveillance S-band radar, and great-circle path propagation measurements were also made to describe the general weather and propagation conditions and to distinguish precipitation scatter signals from those caused by ducting and other nonhydrometeor scatter mechanisms. The data analysis procedures were designed to provide an assessment of a one-year sample of data with a time resolution of one minute. The cumulative distributions of the bistatic signals for all of the rainy minutes during this period are presented for the several path geometries.

  9. Influence of blade tip rounding on tip leakage vortex cavitation of axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. Q.; Shi, W. D.; Zhang, D. S.; Yao, J.; Cheng, C.

    2013-12-01

    Tip leakage flow in axial flow pumps is mainly caused by the tip clearance, which is the main cause of tip leakage vortex cavitation and blade tip cavitation erosion. In order to improve tip clearance flow and reduce TLV cavitation, four schemes were adopted to the round blade tip. These are: no tip rounding, one time tip clearance tip rounding, two times tip clearance tip rounding, four times tip clearance tip rounding. Using SST k-ω turbulence model and Zwart cavitation model in CFX software, this simulation obtained four kinds of inner flow field results. The numerical results indicated that with the increase of r*, NPSHc gradually increased and the cavitation performance reduced. However, corner vortex was eliminated so that cavitation in gap was restrained. But TLV vorticity increased and cavitation's range here had a little expansion. Combined with the research of this paper and the different analyses of four schemes, we recommend adopting the two times of the tip clearance rounding.

  10. Gauge copies in the Landau-DeWitt gauge: A background invariant restriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudal, David; Vercauteren, David

    2018-04-01

    The Landau background gauge, also known as the Landau-DeWitt gauge, has found renewed interest during the past decade given its usefulness in accessing the confinement-deconfinement transition via the vacuum expectation value of the Polyakov loop, describable via an appropriate background. In this Letter, we revisit this gauge from the viewpoint of it displaying gauge (Gribov) copies. We generalize the Gribov-Zwanziger effective action in a BRST and background invariant way; this action leads to a restriction on the allowed gauge fluctuations, thereby eliminating the infinitesimal background gauge copies. The explicit background invariance of our action is in contrast with earlier attempts to write down and use an effective Gribov-Zwanziger action. It allows to address certain subtleties arising in these earlier works, such as a spontaneous and thus spurious Lorentz symmetry breaking, something which is now averted.

  11. An Analysis of the Autorotative Performance of a Helicopter Powered by Rotor-Tip Jet Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessow, Alfred

    1950-01-01

    The autorotative performance of an assumed helicopter was studied to determine the effect of inoperative jet units located at the rotor-blade tip on the helicopter rate of descent. For a representative ramjet design, the effect of the jet drag is to increase the minimum rate of descent of the helicopter from about 1,OO feet per minute to 3,700 feet per minute when the rotor is operating at a tip speed of approximately 600 feet per second. The effect is less if the rotor operates at lower tip speeds, but the rotor kinetic energy and the stall margin available for the landing maneuver are then reduced. Power-off rates of descent of pulse-jet helicopters would be expected to be less than those of ramjet. helicopters because pulse jets of current design appear to have greater ratios of net power-on thrust to power-off, drag than currently designed rain jets. Iii order to obtain greater accuracy in studies of autorotative performance, calculations in'volving high power-off rates of descent should include the weight-supporting effect of the fuselage parasite-drag force and the fact that the rotor thrust does not equal the weight of the helicopter.

  12. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  13. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  14. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  15. Nambu-Poisson gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčo, Branislav; Schupp, Peter; Vysoký, Jan

    2014-06-01

    We generalize noncommutative gauge theory using Nambu-Poisson structures to obtain a new type of gauge theory with higher brackets and gauge fields. The approach is based on covariant coordinates and higher versions of the Seiberg-Witten map. We construct a covariant Nambu-Poisson gauge theory action, give its first order expansion in the Nambu-Poisson tensor and relate it to a Nambu-Poisson matrix model.

  16. Comparison of Various Supersonic Turbine Tip Designs to Minimize Aerodynamic Loss and Tip Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The rotor tips of axial turbines experience high heat flux and are the cause of aerodynamic losses due to tip clearance flows, and in the case of supersonic tips, shocks. As stage loadings increase, the flow in the tip gap approaches and exceeds sonic conditions. This introduces effects such as shock-boundary layer interactions and choked flow that are not observed for subsonic tip flows that have been studied extensively in literature. This work simulates the tip clearance flow for a flat tip, a diverging tip gap and several contoured tips to assess the possibility of minimizing tip heat flux while maintaining a constant massflow from the pressure side to the suction side of the rotor, through the tip clearance. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code GlennHT was used for the simulations. Due to the strong favorable pressure gradients the simulations assumed laminar conditions in the tip gap. The nominal tip gap width to height ratio for this study is 6.0. The Reynolds number of the flow is 2.4 x 10(exp 5) based on nominal tip width and exit velocity. A wavy wall design was found to reduce heat flux by 5 percent but suffered from an additional 6 percent in aerodynamic loss coefficient. Conventional tip recesses are found to perform far worse than a flat tip due to severe shock heating. Overall, the baseline flat tip was the second best performer. A diverging converging tip gap with a hole was found to be the best choice. Average tip heat flux was reduced by 37 percent and aerodynamic losses were cut by over 6 percent.

  17. Spatial reconstruction of semi-quantitative precipitation fields over Africa during the nineteenth century from documentary evidence and gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Sharon E.; Klotter, Douglas; Dezfuli, Amin K.

    2012-07-01

    The article presents a newly created precipitation data set for the African continent and describes the methodology used in its creation. It is based on a combination of proxy data and rain gauge records. The data set is semi-quantitative, with a "wetness" index of - 3 to + 3 to describe the quality of the rainy season. It covers the period AD 1801 to 1900 and includes data for 90 geographical regions of the continent. The results underscore a multi-decadal period of aridity early in the nineteenth century.

  18. Acid Rain: What's the Forecast?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various types of acid rain, considered to be a century-old problem. Topics include: wet and dry deposition, effects on a variety of environments, ecosystems subject to detrimental effects, and possible solutions to the problem. A list of recommended resources on acid rain is provided. (BC)

  19. Rainfall estimation from soil moisture data: crash test for SM2RAIN algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocca, Luca; Albergel, Clement; Massari, Christian; Ciabatta, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    mean square differences and categorical scores were used to evaluate the goodness of the results. This analysis wants to draw global picture of the performance of SM2RAIN algorithm in absence of errors in soil moisture and rainfall data. First preliminary results over Europe have shown that SM2RAIN performs particularly well over southern Europe (e.g., Spain, Italy and Greece) while its performances diminish by moving towards Northern latitudes (Scandinavia) and over Alps. The results on a global scale will be shown and discussed at the conference session. REFERENCES Brocca, L., Melone, F., Moramarco, T., Wagner, W. (2013). A new method for rainfall estimation through soil moisture observations. Geophysical Research Letters, 40(5), 853-858. Brocca, L., Ciabatta, L., Massari, C., Moramarco, T., Hahn, S., Hasenauer, S., Kidd, R., Dorigo, W., Wagner, W., Levizzani, V. (2014). Soil as a natural rain gauge: estimating global rainfall from satellite soil moisture data. Journal of Geophysical Research, 119(9), 5128-5141. Chen F, Crow WT, Ryu D. (2014) Dual forcing and state correction via soil moisture assimilation for improved rainfall-runoff modeling. J Hydrometeor, 15, 1832-1848. Crow, W.T., van den Berg, M.J., Huffman, G.J., Pellarin, T. (2011). Correcting rainfall using satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals: the soil moisture analysis rainfall tool (SMART). Water Resour Res, 47, W08521. Dee, D. P.,et al. (2011). The ERA-Interim reanalysis: configuration and performance of the data assimilation system. Q. J. Roy. Meteorol. Soc., 137, 553-597 Massari, C., Brocca, L., Moramarco, T., Tramblay, Y., Didon Lescot, J.-F. (2014). Potential of soil moisture observations in flood modelling: estimating initial conditions and correcting rainfall. Advances in Water Resources, 74, 44-53.

  20. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably receivedmore » and clamped within the socket.« less

  1. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  2. The effects of droplet characteristics on the surface features in a rain field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R.; Brown, H.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The characteristics of the shape of a water surface in response to the impact of simulated raindrops are studied experimentally in a 1.22-m-by-1.22-m water pool with a water depth of 0.3 m. A rain generator consisting of an open-surface water tank with an array of 22-gauge hypodermic needles (typical needle-to-needle spacing of about L0 = 3 . 5 cm) attached to holes in the tank bottom is mounted 2 m above the water pool. The tank is connected to a 2D translation stage to provide a small-radius (rain characteristics are discussed. The support of the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, and the assistance of Mr. Larry Gong are gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Second-order Boltzmann equation: gauge dependence and gauge invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruko, Atsushi; Pitrou, Cyril; Koyama, Kazuya; Sasaki, Misao

    2013-08-01

    In the context of cosmological perturbation theory, we derive the second-order Boltzmann equation describing the evolution of the distribution function of radiation without a specific gauge choice. The essential steps in deriving the Boltzmann equation are revisited and extended given this more general framework: (i) the polarization of light is incorporated in this formalism by using a tensor-valued distribution function; (ii) the importance of a choice of the tetrad field to define the local inertial frame in the description of the distribution function is emphasized; (iii) we perform a separation between temperature and spectral distortion, both for the intensity and polarization for the first time; (iv) the gauge dependence of all perturbed quantities that enter the Boltzmann equation is derived, and this enables us to check the correctness of the perturbed Boltzmann equation by explicitly showing its gauge-invariance for both intensity and polarization. We finally discuss several implications of the gauge dependence for the observed temperature.

  4. Design of barrier bucket kicker control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Fa-Fu; Wang, Yan-Yu; Yin, Jun; Zhou, De-Tai; Shen, Guo-Dong; Zheng, Yang-De.; Zhang, Jian-Chuan; Yin, Jia; Bai, Xiao; Ma, Xiao-Li

    2018-05-01

    The Heavy-Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) contains two synchrotrons: the main cooler storage ring (CSRm) and the experimental cooler storage ring (CSRe). Beams are extracted from CSRm, and injected into CSRe. To apply the Barrier Bucket (BB) method on the CSRe beam accumulation, a new BB technology based kicker control system was designed and implemented. The controller of the system is implemented using an Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) Machine (ARM) chip and a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) chip. Within the architecture, ARM is responsible for data presetting and floating number arithmetic processing. The FPGA computes the RF phase point of the two rings and offers more accurate control of the time delay. An online preliminary experiment on HIRFL was also designed to verify the functionalities of the control system. The result shows that the reference trigger point of two different sinusoidal RF signals for an arbitrary phase point was acquired with a matched phase error below 1° (approximately 2.1 ns), and the step delay time better than 2 ns were realized.

  5. Bucket shaking stops bunch dancing in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Tan, C.Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Bunches in Tevatron are known to be longitudinally unstable: their collective oscillations, also called dancing bunches, persist without any signs of decay. Typically, a damper is used to stop these oscillations, but recently, it was theoretically predicted that the oscillations can be stabilized by means of small bucket shaking. Dedicated measurements in Tevatron have shown that this method does stop the dancing. According to predictions of Refs. [2,3], the flattening of the bunch distribution at low amplitudes should make the bunch more stable against LLD. An experiment has been devised to flatten the distribution by modulating the RF phase atmore » the low-amplitude synchrotron frequency for a few degrees of amplitude. These beam studies show that stabilisation really happens. After several consecutive shakings, the dancing disappears and the resulting bunch profile becomes smoother at the top. Although not shown in this report, sometimes a little divot forms at the centre of the distribution. These experiments confirm that resonant RF shaking flattens the bunch distribution at low amplitudes, and the dancing stops.« less

  6. Gauge calibration by diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J.; Feakes, F. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    Vacuum gage calibration by diffusing a known quantity of gas through a heated barrier into a gauge is examined. The gas flow raises the pressure in the gauge to known level and is then compared with the gauge's pressure reading.

  7. Acid Rain: An Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, James I.

    1984-01-01

    Deals with how educators can handle the subject of acid rain; illustrates suggestions with experiences of grade nine students visiting Frost Valley Environmental Education Center (Oliverea, New York) to learn scientific concepts through observation of outdoor phenomena, including a stream; and discusses acid rain, pH levels, and pollution control…

  8. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  9. Create a Rain Forest in the Gym.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a creative interdisciplinary program for K-3 students that involves setting up a rain forest in the gymnasium to teach students gymnastic skills in the context of the Amazon rain forest. The paper describes how to set up the rain forest and teach a variety of classes. Rainforest resources are included. (SM)

  10. A Field Study of Pixel-Scale Variability of Raindrop Size Distribution in the MidAtlantic Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokay, Ali; D'adderio, Leo Pio; Wolff, David P.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial variability of parameters of the raindrop size distribution and its derivatives is investigated through a field study where collocated Particle Size and Velocity (Parsivel2) and two-dimensional video disdrometers were operated at six sites at Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia, from December 2013 to March 2014. The three-parameter exponential function was employed to determine the spatial variability across the study domain where the maximum separation distance was 2.3 km. The nugget parameter of the exponential function was set to 0.99 and the correlation distance d0 and shape parameter s0 were retrieved by minimizing the root-mean-square error, after fitting it to the correlations of physical parameters. Fits were very good for almost all 15 physical parameters. The retrieved d0 and s0 were about 4.5 km and 1.1, respectively, for rain rate (RR) when all 12 disdrometers were reporting rainfall with a rain-rate threshold of 0.1 mm h1 for 1-min averages. The d0 decreased noticeably when one or more disdrometers were required to report rain. The d0 was considerably different for a number of parameters (e.g., mass-weighted diameter) but was about the same for the other parameters (e.g., RR) when rainfall threshold was reset to 12 and 18 dBZ for Ka- and Ku-band reflectivity, respectively, following the expected Global Precipitation Measurement missions spaceborne radar minimum detectable signals. The reduction of the database through elimination of a site did not alter d0 as long as the fit was adequate. The correlations of 5-min rain accumulations were lower when disdrometer observations were simulated for a rain gauge at different bucket sizes.

  11. Wind, rain and soil erosion rates on bare and plant covered agriculture plots at the experimental station of El Teularet -Sierra de Enguera, Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Iserloh, Th.

    2012-04-01

    covered with straw, chipped branches of olive and with a geotextil developed specifically to control erosion on agricultural fields. The Soil Erosion Experimental Station of the El Teularet-Serra de Enguera is located in Eastern Spain. The station is devoted to study the soil water erosion processes under rain-fed agriculture fields and the rangelands. Agriculture is the main source of sedi ments on the mountainous areas of Spain due to the current management. The exper imental station of the El Teularet-Sierra de Enguera is composed also of a meteorological station with tipping-bucket raingauges (0.2 mm), and sensors that measure soil and air moisture and temperature, wind direction and speed and the sun radiation connected to a data-logger that record these data every five minutes. This paper will review the data collected during the period 2004 to 2011 in order to determine if the wind direction and wind speed determined the soil erosion rates. In this way it will be clarified the infliuence of wind on the soil erosion processes.The results will be compared to the measurement collected at the Montesa experimental station devoted to the study of soil erosion on citrus orchards. The experimental setup within the citrus plantation is being supported by the research project CGL2008- 02879/BTE.

  12. Acid rain and its ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of rain-water is identified as one of the most serious environmental problems of transboundary nature. Acid rain is mainly a mixture of sulphuric and nitric acids depending upon the relative quantities of oxides of sulphur and nitrogen emissions. Due to the interaction of these acids with other constituents of the atmosphere, protons are released causing increase in the soil acidity Lowering of soil pH mobilizes and leaches away nutrient cations and increases availability of toxic heavy metals. Such changes in the soil chemical characteristics reduce the soil fertility which ultimately causes the negative impact on growth and productivity of forest trees and crop plants. Acidification of water bodies causes large scale negative impact on aquatic organisms including fishes. Acidification has some indirect effects on human health also. Acid rain affects each and every components of ecosystem. Acid rain also damages man-made materials and structures. By reducing the emission of the precursors of acid rain and to some extent by liming, the problem of acidification of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem has been reduced during last two decades.

  13. Multidimensional Modeling of Coronal Rain Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that capture the initial formation and long-term sustainment of the enigmatic coronal rain phenomenon. We demonstrate how thermal instability can induce a spectacular display of in situ forming blob-like condensations which then start their intimate ballet on top of initially linear force-free arcades. Our magnetic arcades host a chromospheric, transition region, and coronal plasma. Following coronal rain dynamics for over 80 minutes of physical time, we collect enough statistics to quantify blob widths, lengths, velocity distributions, and other characteristics which directly match modern observational knowledge. Our virtual coronal rain displays the deformation of blobs into V-shaped features, interactions of blobs due to mostly pressure-mediated levitations, and gives the first views of blobs that evaporate in situ or are siphoned over the apex of the background arcade. Our simulations pave the way for systematic surveys of coronal rain showers in true multidimensional settings to connect parameterized heating prescriptions with rain statistics, ultimately allowing us to quantify the coronal heating input.

  14. SciTech Connect

    Wang, John Zhiqiang

    A gas turbine has buckets rotatable about an axis, the buckets having angel wing seals. The seals have outer and inner surfaces, at least one of which, and preferably both, extend non-linearly between root radii and the tip of the seal body. The profiles are determined in a manner to minimize the weight of the seal bodies, while maintaining the stresses below predetermined maximum or allowable stresses.

  15. Effect of tip flange on tip leakage flow of small axial flow fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yingzi; Jin, Yuzhen

    2014-02-01

    Aerodynamic performance of an axial flow fan is closely related to its tip clearance leakage flow. In this paper, the hot-wire anemometer is used to measure the three dimensional mean velocity near the blade tips. Moreover, the filtered N-S equations with finite volume method and RNG k-ɛ turbulence model are adopted to carry out the steady simulation calculation of several fans that differ only in tip flange shape and number. The large eddy simulation and the FW-H noise models are adopted to carry out the unsteady numerical calculation and aerodynamic noise prediction. The results of simulation calculation agree roughly with that of tests, which proves the numerical calculation method is feasible.The effects of tip flange shapes and numbers on the blade tip vortex structure and the characteristics are analyzed. The results show that tip flange of the fan has a certain influence on the characteristics of the fan. The maximum efficiencies for the fans with tip flanges are shifted towards partial flow with respect to the design point of the datum fan. Furthermore, the noise characteristics for the fans with tip flanges have become more deteriorated than that for the datum fan. Tip flange contributes to forming tip vortex shedding and the effect of the half-cylinder tip flange on tip vortex shedding is obvious. There is a distinct relationship between the characteristics of the fan and tip vortex shedding. The research results provide the profitable reference for the internal flow mechanism of the performance optimization of small axial flow fans.

  16. Influence of simulated acidic rain on root-infecting fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Influences of the acidity of simulated rain on root-infecting fungi were investigated. Effects of rain acidity on Phytophthora cinnamomi were studied. Propagule densities in soil depended upon the acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of simulated rain and soil depth (1, 2, 4, or 8 cm). Lowest densities occurred in 1 to 2 cm soil layers exposed to rains at pH 3.2 or 2.4. Sporangium production on radicles of Lupinus angustifolius in Lakeland sand moistened with rain solution at pH 2.4 was 47% less than production with solution at pH 5.6. A linear response to solution acidity was exhibited.more » Infection of L. angustifolius roots by zoospores demonstrated a linear response to acidity of rain. Approximately 44% fewer lesions occurred on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 2.4 than on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 5.6. The acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of repeated rains had no consistent effect on disease progress among L. augustifolius seedlings planted in infested soil. The formation of ectomycorrhizae on Pinus taeda seedlings exhibited a quadratic response to acidity of repeated rains. The percentage of short roots that were ectomycorrhizal was greatest among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 2.4 and least among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 4.0. The density of Macrophomina phaseolina propagules in Lakeland sand exposed to repeated rains at pH 2.4 was an average of 20% less than densities associated with rains at pH 5.6, 4.0, or 3.2.« less

  17. Soil Type Has a Stronger Role than Dipterocarp Host Species in Shaping the Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Community in a Bornean Lowland Tropical Rain Forest

    PubMed Central

    Essene, Adam L.; Shek, Katherine L.; Lewis, J. D.; Peay, Kabir G.; McGuire, Krista L.

    2017-01-01

    The role that mycorrhizal fungal associations play in the assembly of long-lived tree communities is poorly understood, especially in tropical forests, which have the highest tree diversity of any ecosystem. The lowland tropical rain forests of Southeast Asia are characterized by high levels of species richness within the family Dipterocarpaceae, the entirety of which has been shown to form obligate ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal associations. Differences in ECM assembly between co-occurring species of dipterocarp have been suggested, but never tested in adult trees, as a mechanism for maintaining the coexistence of closely related tree species in this family. Testing this hypothesis has proven difficult because the assembly of both dipterocarps and their ECM associates co-varies with the same edaphic variables. In this study, we used high-throughput DNA sequencing of soils and Sanger sequencing of root tips to evaluate how ECM fungi were structured within and across a clay–sand soil nutrient ecotone in a mixed-dipterocarp rain forest in Malaysian Borneo. We compared assembly patterns of ECM fungi in bulk soil to ECM root tips collected from three ecologically distinct species of dipterocarp. This design allowed us to test whether ECM fungi are more strongly structured by soil type or host specificity. As with previous studies of ECM fungi on this plot, we observed that clay vs. sand soil type strongly structured both the bulk soil and root tip ECM fungal communities. However, we also observed significantly different ECM communities associated with two of the three dipterocarp species evaluated on this plot. These results suggest that ECM fungal assembly on these species is shaped by a combination of biotic and abiotic factors, and that the soil edaphic niche occupied by different dipterocarp species may be mediated by distinct ECM fungal assemblages. PMID:29163567

  18. Acid Rain: The Scientific Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Documents the workings and findings of the Massachusetts Acid Rain Monitoring Project, which has pooled the volunteer efforts of more than 1,000 amateur and professional scientists since 1983. Reports on the origins of air pollution, the prediction of acid rain, and its effects on both water life and land resources. (JJK)

  19. Large Aperture "Photon Bucket" Optical Receiver Performance in High Background Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Hoppe, D.

    2011-01-01

    The potential development of large aperture groundbased "photon bucket" optical receivers for deep space communications, with acceptable performance even when pointing close to the sun, is receiving considerable attention. Sunlight scattered by the atmosphere becomes significant at micron wavelengths when pointing to a few degrees from the sun, even with the narrowest bandwidth optical filters. In addition, high quality optical apertures in the 10-30 meter range are costly and difficult to build with accurate surfaces to ensure narrow fields-of-view (FOV). One approach currently under consideration is to polish the aluminum reflector panels of large 34-meter microwave antennas to high reflectance, and accept the relatively large FOV generated by state-of-the-art polished aluminum panels with rms surface accuracies on the order of a few microns, corresponding to several-hundred micro-radian FOV, hence generating centimeter-diameter focused spots at the Cassegrain focus of 34-meter antennas. Assuming pulse-position modulation (PPM) and Poisson-distributed photon-counting detection, a "polished panel" photon-bucket receiver with large FOV will collect hundreds of background photons per PPM slot, along with comparable signal photons due to its large aperture. It is demonstrated that communications performance in terms of PPM symbol-error probability in high-background high-signal environments depends more strongly on signal than on background photons, implying that large increases in background energy can be compensated by a disproportionally small increase in signal energy. This surprising result suggests that large optical apertures with relatively poor surface quality may nevertheless provide acceptable performance for deep-space optical communications, potentially enabling the construction of cost-effective hybrid RF/optical receivers in the future.

  20. Amazon rain-forest fires.

    PubMed

    Sanford, R L; Saldarriaga, J; Clark, K E; Uhl, C; Herrera, R

    1985-01-04

    Charcoal is common in the soils of mature rain forests within 75 kilometers of San Carlos de Rio Negro in the north central Amazon Basin. Carbon-14 dates of soil charcoal from this region indicate that numerous fires have occurred since the mid-Holocene epoch. Charcoal is most common in tierra firme forest Oxisols and Ultisols and less common in caatinga and igapo forest soils. Climatic changes or human activities, or both, have caused rain-forest fires.

  1. The efficiency of gravity distribution devices for on-site wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Patel, T; O'Luanaigh, N; Gill, L W

    2008-01-01

    A detailed analysis of different types of gravity distribution devices, designed to split on-site wastewater effluent equally between percolation trenches, has been carried out both in the laboratory and also in the field under realistic loading conditions. Five different types of distribution device have been compared: a V-notch distribution box, stilling chamber box, T-splitters with and without baffles and tipping bucket device. The trials carried out in the laboratory with clean water showed that flow distribution for all devices was sensitive to both the off-level installation angles and variable flow rates, with the most stable performance achieved using the T-splitters with baffles and tipping bucket devices. In parallel to this, the on-site flow regime experienced at two sites was continuously monitored using a tipping bucket and data-logger over eighteen month periods, finding that the most common flow rates at the distribution unit were in the range of 0.1-2.5 L/min. The on-site performance of these devices receiving both septic tank and secondary treated effluent showed that significant solid deposition and biofilm development had severely affected the equal distribution between the trenches, hence highlighting the need for regular maintenance to ensure efficient performance over time after installation. IWA Publishing 2008.

  2. SM2RAIN-CCI: a new global long-term rainfall data set derived from ESA CCI soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatta, Luca; Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Gruber, Alexander; Reimer, Christoph; Hahn, Sebastian; Paulik, Christoph; Dorigo, Wouter; Kidd, Richard; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    Accurate and long-term rainfall estimates are the main inputs for several applications, from crop modeling to climate analysis. In this study, we present a new rainfall data set (SM2RAIN-CCI) obtained from the inversion of the satellite soil moisture (SM) observations derived from the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) via SM2RAIN (Brocca et al., 2014). Daily rainfall estimates are generated for an 18-year long period (1998-2015), with a spatial sampling of 0.25° on a global scale, and are based on the integration of the ACTIVE and the PASSIVE ESA CCI SM data sets.The quality of the SM2RAIN-CCI rainfall data set is evaluated by comparing it with two state-of-the-art rainfall satellite products, i.e. the Tropical Measurement Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 real-time product (TMPA 3B42RT) and the Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique (CMORPH), and one modeled data set (ERA-Interim). A quality check is carried out on a global scale at 1° of spatial sampling and 5 days of temporal sampling by comparing these products with the gauge-based Global Precipitation Climatology Centre Full Data Daily (GPCC-FDD) product. SM2RAIN-CCI shows relatively good results in terms of correlation coefficient (median value > 0.56), root mean square difference (RMSD, median value < 10.34 mm over 5 days) and bias (median value < -14.44 %) during the evaluation period. The validation has been carried out at original resolution (0.25°) over Europe, Australia and five other areas worldwide to test the capabilities of the data set to correctly identify rainfall events under different climate and precipitation regimes.The SM2RAIN-CCI rainfall data set is freely available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.846259.

  3. Acid Rain: The Silent Environmental Threat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zmud, Mia

    1992-01-01

    Describes the silent environmental threat posed by acid rain. Caused mainly by manmade pollutants, acid rain damages water and trees, decreases visibility, corrodes monuments, and threatens public health. The article includes guidelines for action. (SM)

  4. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  5. Rainfall and water-level data for a wetland area near Millington, Shelby County, Tennessee, October 1996 through September 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, R.R.

    1998-01-01

    Rainfall amounts and water levels at a degraded wetland area near Millington, Shelby County, Tennessee, were collected to assist the Tennessee Department of Transportation with a program designed to restore the wetland to a more natural condition. The site is located along a channelized reach of Big Creek Drainage Canal, east of State Route 240, and near the southeastern boundary of the Naval Support Activity Memphis, Millington. Rainfall amounts were recorded at 5-minute intervals using a tipping-bucket rain gage from October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. Total rainfall for this period was 70.16 inches. In general, water levels at the wetland were above or near the ground surface during the 6-month period from the first of January through June 1997. For the remainder of the year, water levels generally subsided to several feet below land surface. However, some locations within the wetland were wet or highly saturated year round.

  6. HOAPS precipitation validation with ship-borne rain and snow measurements over the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumke, Karl; Schröder, Marc; Fennig, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Measuring precipitation over the oceans is still a challenging task. The main reason for a lack of such data can be attributed to the difficulty of measuring precipitation on moving platforms under high wind speeds. The progress in satellite technology has provided the possibility to retrieve global data sets from space, including precipitation. Levizzani et al. (2007) showed that precipitation over the oceans can be derived with sufficient accuracy from passive microwave radiometry. On the other hand, Andersson et al. (2011) pointed out that even state-of-the-art satellite retrievals and reanalysis data sets still disagree on global precipitation with respect to amounts, patterns, variability and temporal behaviour. This creates the need for ship-based precipitation validation data using instruments capable of accurately measuring rain rates even under high wind speed conditions. In the present study we use ship rain gauges (Hasse et al., 1998) and optical disdrometers (Großklaus et al., 1998), the latter is also capable to measure snow (Lempio et al., 2007). Measurements are point-to-area collocated against Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and fluxes from Satellite (HOAPS) data (Andersson et al., 2011). The used HOAPS-S data subset contains all retrieved physical parameters at the native SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) pixel-level resolution of approximately 50 km for each individual satellite. The algorithm does not discriminate between rain and snowfall. The satellite data is compared to the in situ measurement by the nearest neighbour approach. Therefore, it must be ensured that both observations are related to each other, which can be determined by the decorrelation length. At least a number of 660 precipitation events are at our disposal including 127 snow events. The statistical analysis follows the recommendations given by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for dichotomous or binary forecasts (WWRP/WGNE: http

  7. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  8. Nature in the Classroom: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1982-01-01

    As a lesson topic, acid rain is defined, its chemistry given, and its development since the 1950s described. The worldwide effects of acid rain are discussed along with the available technology for controlling the problem. (CM)

  9. Evaluating a slope-stability model for shallow rain-induced landslides using gage and satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yatheendradas, S.; Kirschbaum, D.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    Improving prediction of landslide early warning systems requires accurate estimation of the conditions that trigger slope failures. This study tested a slope-stability model for shallow rainfall-induced landslides by utilizing rainfall information from gauge and satellite records. We used the TRIGRS model (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-based Regional Slope-stability analysis) for simulating the evolution of the factor of safety due to rainfall infiltration. Using a spatial subset of a well-characterized digital landscape from an earlier study, we considered shallow failure on a slope adjoining an urban transportation roadway near the Seattle area in Washington, USA.We ran the TRIGRS model using high-quality rain gage and satellite-based rainfall data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Preliminary results with parameterized soil depth values suggest that the steeper slope values in this spatial domain have factor of safety values that are extremely close to the failure limit within an extremely narrow range of values, providing multiple false alarms. When the soil depths were constrained using a back analysis procedure to ensure that slopes were stable under initial condtions, the model accurately predicted the timing and location of the landslide observation without false alarms over time for gage rain data. The TRMM satellite rainfall data did not show adequately retreived rainfall peak magnitudes and accumulation over the study period, and as a result failed to predict the landslide event. These preliminary results indicate that more accurate and higher-resolution rain data (e.g., the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission) are required to provide accurate and reliable landslide predictions in ungaged basins.

  10. 27 CFR 19.709 - Gauging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Gauging. (a) Gauging equipment and methods. A proprietor of an alcohol fuel plant must perform periodic gauges of the distilled spirits and fuel alcohol at the alcohol fuel plant. The procedures for the... following rules for the gauging of distilled spirits and fuel alcohol under this subpart also apply: (1) The...

  11. A coupled hydrological-hydraulic flood inundation model calibrated using post-event measurements and integrated uncertainty analysis in a poorly gauged Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hdeib, Rouya; Abdallah, Chadi; Moussa, Roger; Colin, Francois

    2017-04-01

    Developing flood inundation maps of defined exceedance probabilities is required to provide information on the flood hazard and the associated risk. A methodology has been developed to model flood inundation in poorly gauged basins, where reliable information on the hydrological characteristics of floods are uncertain and partially captured by the traditional rain-gauge networks. Flood inundation is performed through coupling a hydrological rainfall-runoff (RR) model (HEC-HMS) with a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS). The RR model is calibrated against the January 2013 flood event in the Awali River basin, Lebanon (300 km2), whose flood peak discharge was estimated by post-event measurements. The resulting flows of the RR model are defined as boundary conditions of the hydraulic model, which is run to generate the corresponding water surface profiles and calibrated against 20 post-event surveyed cross sections after the January-2013 flood event. An uncertainty analysis is performed to assess the results of the models. Consequently, the coupled flood inundation model is simulated with design storms and flood inundation maps are generated of defined exceedance probabilities. The peak discharges estimated by the simulated RR model were in close agreement with the results from different empirical and statistical methods. This methodology can be extended to other poorly gauged basins facing common stage-gauge failure or characterized by floods with a stage exceeding the gauge measurement level, or higher than that defined by the rating curve.

  12. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germinationmore » in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.« less

  13. Wind scatterometry with improved ambiguity selection and rain modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, David Willis

    Although generally accurate, the quality of SeaWinds on QuikSCAT scatterometer ocean vector winds is compromised by certain natural phenomena and retrieval algorithm limitations. This dissertation addresses three main contributors to scatterometer estimate error: poor ambiguity selection, estimate uncertainty at low wind speeds, and rain corruption. A quality assurance (QA) analysis performed on SeaWinds data suggests that about 5% of SeaWinds data contain ambiguity selection errors and that scatterometer estimation error is correlated with low wind speeds and rain events. Ambiguity selection errors are partly due to the "nudging" step (initialization from outside data). A sophisticated new non-nudging ambiguity selection approach produces generally more consistent wind than the nudging method in moderate wind conditions. The non-nudging method selects 93% of the same ambiguities as the nudged data, validating both techniques, and indicating that ambiguity selection can be accomplished without nudging. Variability at low wind speeds is analyzed using tower-mounted scatterometer data. According to theory, below a threshold wind speed, the wind fails to generate the surface roughness necessary for wind measurement. A simple analysis suggests the existence of the threshold in much of the tower-mounted scatterometer data. However, the backscatter does not "go to zero" beneath the threshold in an uncontrolled environment as theory suggests, but rather has a mean drop and higher variability below the threshold. Rain is the largest weather-related contributor to scatterometer error, affecting approximately 4% to 10% of SeaWinds data. A simple model formed via comparison of co-located TRMM PR and SeaWinds measurements characterizes the average effect of rain on SeaWinds backscatter. The model is generally accurate to within 3 dB over the tropics. The rain/wind backscatter model is used to simultaneously retrieve wind and rain from SeaWinds measurements. The simultaneous

  14. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Nock, Charles A; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: 'IceCube', which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and 'IceTree', a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R(2) = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of

  15. Linking ice accretion and crown structure: towards a model of the effect of freezing rain on tree canopies

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Charles A.; Lecigne, Bastien; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Greene, David F.; Dauzat, Jean; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite a longstanding interest in variation in tree species vulnerability to ice storm damage, quantitative analyses of the influence of crown structure on within-crown variation in ice accretion are rare. In particular, the effect of prior interception by higher branches on lower branch accumulation remains unstudied. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that intra-crown ice accretion can be predicted by a measure of the degree of sheltering by neighbouring branches. Methods Freezing rain was artificially applied to Acer platanoides L., and in situ branch-ice thickness was measured directly and from LiDAR point clouds. Two models of freezing rain interception were developed: ‘IceCube’, which uses point clouds to relate ice accretion to a voxel-based index (sheltering factor; SF) of the sheltering effect of branch elements above a measurement point; and ‘IceTree’, a simulation model for in silico evaluation of the interception pattern of freezing rain in virtual tree crowns. Key Results Intra-crown radial ice accretion varied strongly, declining from the tips to the bases of branches and from the top to the base of the crown. SF for branches varied strongly within the crown, and differences among branches were consistent for a range of model parameters. Intra-crown variation in ice accretion on branches was related to SF (R2 = 0·46), with in silico results from IceTree supporting empirical relationships from IceCube. Conclusions Empirical results and simulations confirmed a key role for crown architecture in determining intra-crown patterns of ice accretion. As suspected, the concentration of freezing rain droplets is attenuated by passage through the upper crown, and thus higher branches accumulate more ice than lower branches. This is the first step in developing a model that can provide a quantitative basis for investigating intra-crown and inter-specific variation in freezing rain damage. PMID:27107412

  16. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  17. Acid rain stimulation of Lake Michigan phytoplankton growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Fahnenstiel, G.L.; Gardner, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    Three laboratory experiments demonstrated that additions of rainwater to epilimnetic lake water collected in southeastern Lake Michigan stimulated chlorophyll a production more than did additions of reagent-grade water during incubations of 12 to 20 d. Chlorophyll a production did not begin until 3–5 d after the rain and lake water were mixed. The stimulation caused by additions of rain acidified to pH 3.0 was greater than that caused by additions of untreated rain (pH 4.0–4.5). Our results support the following hypotheses: (1) Acid rain stimulates the growth of phytoplankton in lake water; (2) phosphorus in rain appears to be the factor causing this stimulation. We conclude that acid rain may accelerate the growth of epilimnetic phytoplankton in Lake Michigan (and other similar lakes) during stratification when other sources of bioavailable phosphorus to the epilimnion are limited

  18. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  19. The Effects of Rain Garden Size on Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the effect of rain garden size on the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of rain garden systems. The slides will summarize data from both the full-scale rain garden project associated with the permeable pavement parking lot as well as the pilo...

  20. Arctic climate tipping points.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  1. [Over projected tip].

    PubMed

    Duron, J-B; Nguyen, P S; Levet, Y; Bardot, J; Aiach, G

    2014-12-01

    Overprojected tip is a pretty usual request not easy to manage. Preop analysis is crucial in order to evaluate tip support and skin thickness and ability to retract. For example, if the skin is very thick and has poor chance to retract, the surgeon should be very careful in the tip projection decreasing to avoid a skin pollybeak deformity. In such cases, he has to analyze the facial proportions, especially other areas projection (radix, dorsum and chin) and think about augmenting them to balance the profile rather than decreasing tip projection. Correction should always be conducted incrementally, starting with weakening the tip support mechanisms and, only if necessary, continue with alar cartilage interruption. This can be performed on many areas (lateral cruras, domes, medial cruras) and with several techniques (resection or interruption+overlapping). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH PROGRAM: Rain Gardens

    EPA Science Inventory

    the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) rain garden evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research that evaluates a variety of stormwater management practices. The U.S. EPA recognizes the potential of rain gardens as a green infrastructure manag...

  3. Rain attenuation measurements: Variability and data quality assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    Year to year variations in the cumulative distributions of rain rate or rain attenuation are evident in any of the published measurements for a single propagation path that span a period of several years of observation. These variations must be described by models for the prediction of rain attenuation statistics. Now that a large measurement data base has been assembled by the International Radio Consultative Committee, the information needed to assess variability is available. On the basis of 252 sample cumulative distribution functions for the occurrence of attenuation by rain, the expected year to year variation in attenuation at a fixed probability level in the 0.1 to 0.001 percent of a year range is estimated to be 27 percent. The expected deviation from an attenuation model prediction for a single year of observations is estimated to exceed 33 percent when any of the available global rain climate model are employed to estimate the rain rate statistics. The probability distribution for the variation in attenuation or rain rate at a fixed fraction of a year is lognormal. The lognormal behavior of the variate was used to compile the statistics for variability.

  4. Pyrite oxidation under simulated acid rain weathering conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Li, Heping; Wang, Luying; Wen, Xiaoying; Liu, Qingyou

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the electrochemical corrosion behavior of pyrite in simulated acid rain with different acidities and at different temperatures. The cyclic voltammetry, polarization curve, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that pyrite has the same electrochemical interaction mechanism under different simulated acid rain conditions, regardless of acidity or environmental temperature. Either stronger acid rain acidity or higher environmental temperature can accelerate pyrite corrosion. Compared with acid rain having a pH of 5.6 at 25 °C, the prompt efficiency of pyrite weathering reached 104.29% as the acid rain pH decreased to 3.6, and it reached 125.31% as environmental temperature increased to 45 °C. Increasing acidity dramatically decreases the charge transfer resistance, and increasing temperature dramatically decreases the passivation film resistance, when other conditions are held constant. Acid rain always causes lower acidity mine drainage, and stronger acidity or high environmental temperatures cause serious acid drainage. The natural parameters of latitude, elevation, and season have considerable influence on pyrite weathering, because temperature is an important influencing factor. These experimental results are of direct significance for the assessment and management of sulfide mineral acid drainage in regions receiving acid rain.

  5. Gravitational wave-Gauge field oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Devulder, C.; Maksimova, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational waves propagating through a stationary gauge field transform into gauge field waves and back again. When multiple families of flavor-space locked gauge fields are present, the gravitational and gauge field waves exhibit novel dynamics. At high frequencies, the system behaves like coupled oscillators in which the gravitational wave is the central pacemaker. Due to energy conservation and exchange among the oscillators, the wave amplitudes lie on a multidimensional sphere, reminiscent of neutrino flavor oscillations. This phenomenon has implications for cosmological scenarios based on flavor-space locked gauge fields.

  6. On the nature of rainfall in dry climate: Space-time patterns of convective rain cells over the Dead Sea region and their relations with synoptic state and flash flood generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belachsen, Idit; Marra, Francesco; Peleg, Nadav; Morin, Efrat

    2017-04-01

    Space-time patterns of rainfall are important climatic characteristics that influence runoff generation and flash flood magnitude. Their derivation requires high-resolution measurements to adequately represent the rainfall distribution, and is best provided by remote sensing tools. This need is further emphasized in dry climate regions, where rainfall is scarce and, often, local and highly variable. Our research is focused on understanding the nature of rainfall events in the dry Dead Sea region (Eastern Mediterranean) by identifying and characterizing the spatial structure and the dynamics of convective storm cores (known as rain cells). To do so, we take advantage of 25 years of corrected and gauge-adjusted weather radar data. A statistical analysis of convective rain-cells spatial and temporal characteristics was performed with respect to synoptic pattern, geographical location, and flash flood generation. Rain cells were extracted from radar data using a cell segmentation method and a tracking algorithm and were divided into rain events. A total of 10,500 rain cells, 2650 cell tracks and 424 rain events were elicited. Rain cell properties, such as mean areal and maximal rain intensity, area, life span, direction and speed, were derived. Rain events were clustered, according to several ERA-Interim atmospheric parameters, and associated with three main synoptic patterns: Cyprus Low, Low to the East of the study region and Active Red Sea Trough. The first two originate from the Mediterranean Sea, while the third is an extension of the African monsoon. On average, the convective rain cells in the region are 90 km2 in size, moving from West to East in 13 ms-1 and living 18 minutes. Several significant differences between rain cells of the various synoptic types were observed. In particular, Active Red Sea Trough rain cells are characterized by higher rain intensities and lower speeds, suggesting a higher flooding potential for small catchments. The north

  7. The Effect of Rain on Air-Water Gas Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, David T.; Bliven, Larry F.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Schlosser, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The relationship between gas transfer velocity and rain rate was investigated at NASA's Rain-Sea Interaction Facility (RSIF) using several SF, evasion experiments. During each experiment, a water tank below the rain simulator was supersaturated with SF6, a synthetic gas, and the gas transfer velocities were calculated from the measured decrease in SF6 concentration with time. The results from experiments with IS different rain rates (7 to 10 mm/h) and 1 of 2 drop sizes (2.8 or 4.2 mm diameter) confirm a significant and systematic enhancement of air-water gas exchange by rainfall. The gas transfer velocities derived from our experiment were related to the kinetic energy flux calculated from the rain rate and drop size. The relationship obtained for mono-dropsize rain at the RSIF was extrapolated to natural rain using the kinetic energy flux of natural rain calculated from the Marshall-Palmer raindrop size distribution. Results of laboratory experiments at RSIF were compared to field observations made during a tropical rainstorm in Miami, Florida and show good agreement between laboratory and field data.

  8. Multivariate spatial analysis of a heavy rain event in a densely populated delta city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Santiago; ten Veldhuis, Marie-claire; Bruni, Guenda; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Delta cities account for half of the world's population and host key infrastructure and services for the global economic growth. Due to the characteristic geography of delta areas, these cities face high vulnerability to extreme weather and pluvial flooding risks, that are expected to increase as climate change drives heavier rain events. Besides, delta cities are subjected to fast urban densification processes that progressively make them more vulnerable to pluvial flooding. Delta cities need to be adapted to better cope with this threat. The mechanism leading to damage after heavy rains is not completely understood. For instance, current research has shown that rain intensities and volumes can only partially explain the occurrence and localization of rain-related insurance claims (Spekkers et al., 2013). The goal of this paper is to provide further insights into spatial characteristics of the urban environment that can significantly be linked to pluvial-related flooding impacts. To that end, a study-case has been selected: on October 12 to 14 2013, a heavy rain event triggered pluvial floods in Rotterdam, a densely populated city which is undergoing multiple climate adaptation efforts and is located in the Meuse river Delta. While the average yearly precipitation in this city is around 800 mm, local rain gauge measurements ranged from aprox. 60 to 130 mm just during these three days. More than 600 citizens' telephonic complaints reported impacts related to rainfall. The registry of those complaints, which comprises around 300 calls made to the municipality and another 300 to the fire brigade, was made available for research. Other accessible information about this city includes a series of rainfall measurements with up to 1 min time-step at 7 different locations around the city, ground-based radar rainfall data (1 Km^2 spatial resolution and 5 min time-step), a digital elevation model (50 cm of horizontal resolution), a model of overland-flow paths, cadastral

  9. Canada issues booklet describing acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A booklet recently released by Environment Canada describes acid rain in terms easily understood by the general public. Although Acid Rain — The Facts tends somewhat to give the Canadian side of this intercountry controversial subject, it nevertheless presents some very interesting, simple statistics of interest to people in either the U.S. or Canada. Copies of the booklet can be obtained from Inquiry Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OH3, Canada, tel. 613-997-2800.The booklet points out that acid rain is caused by emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Once released into the atmosphere, these substances can be carried long distances by prevailing winds and return to Earth as acidic rain, snow, fog, or dust. The main sources of SO2 emissions in North America are coal-fired power generating stations and nonferrous ore smelters. The main sources of NOx emissions are vehicles and fuel combustion. From economical and environmental viewpoints, Canada believes acid rain is one of the most serious problems presently facing the country: increasing the acidity of more than 20% of Canada's 300,000 lakes to the point that aquatic life is depleted and acidity of soil water and shallow groundwater is increasing, causing decline in forest growth and water fowl populations, and eating away at buildings and monuments. Acid rain is endangering fisheries, tourism, agriculture, and forest resources in an area of 2.6 million km2 (one million square miles) of eastern Canada, about 8% of Canada's gross national product.

  10. The tipping point: A mathematical model for the profit-driven abandonment of restaurant tipping.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Sara M; Herbers, Eileen; Chen, Jack; Abrams, Daniel M

    2018-02-01

    The custom of voluntarily tipping for services rendered has gone in and out of fashion in America since its introduction in the 19th century. Restaurant owners that ban tipping in their establishments often claim that social justice drives their decisions, but we show that rational profit-maximization may also justify the decisions. Here, we propose a conceptual model of restaurant competition for staff and customers, and we show that there exists a critical conventional tip rate at which restaurant owners should eliminate tipping to maximize profits. Because the conventional tip rate has been increasing steadily for the last several decades, our model suggests that restaurant owners may abandon tipping en masse when that critical tip rate is reached.

  11. The tipping point: A mathematical model for the profit-driven abandonment of restaurant tipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Sara M.; Herbers, Eileen; Chen, Jack; Abrams, Daniel M.

    2018-02-01

    The custom of voluntarily tipping for services rendered has gone in and out of fashion in America since its introduction in the 19th century. Restaurant owners that ban tipping in their establishments often claim that social justice drives their decisions, but we show that rational profit-maximization may also justify the decisions. Here, we propose a conceptual model of restaurant competition for staff and customers, and we show that there exists a critical conventional tip rate at which restaurant owners should eliminate tipping to maximize profits. Because the conventional tip rate has been increasing steadily for the last several decades, our model suggests that restaurant owners may abandon tipping en masse when that critical tip rate is reached.

  12. Topological Quantum Phase Transition in Synthetic Non-Abelian Gauge Potential: Gauge Invariance and Experimental Detections

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fadi; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Ye, Jinwu; Fan, Heng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The method of synthetic gauge potentials opens up a new avenue for our understanding and discovering novel quantum states of matter. We investigate the topological quantum phase transition of Fermi gases trapped in a honeycomb lattice in the presence of a synthetic non-Abelian gauge potential. We develop a systematic fermionic effective field theory to describe a topological quantum phase transition tuned by the non-Abelian gauge potential and explore its various important experimental consequences. Numerical calculations on lattice scales are performed to compare with the results achieved by the fermionic effective field theory. Several possible experimental detection methods of topological quantum phase transition are proposed. In contrast to condensed matter experiments where only gauge invariant quantities can be measured, both gauge invariant and non-gauge invariant quantities can be measured by experimentally generating various non-Abelian gauges corresponding to the same set of Wilson loops. PMID:23846153

  13. Rain Hampers Tsunami Relief Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The cleanup and relief efforts from the recent tsunamis continue in coastal communities that were ravaged by the waves all across the Indian Ocean. Heavy rains have further complicated the matter and added to the misery in parts of eastern Sri Lanka. Between December 28, 2004, and January 5, 2005, up to 10 to 15 inches of rain may have fallen along the southeast coast of the island, and as much as 20 inches (red areas) fell just offshore. This rainfall map was created by the TRMM-based, near-real time Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, which monitors rainfall over the global tropics. The map shows that many other regions around the Indian Ocean were also affected by the rains, including Malaysia and parts of Sumatra. The heaviest rains fell on December 31 and January 4. The rains were likely the result of a combination of the northeast monsoon interacting with the topography and an active phase of what is known as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) (or 30-60 day oscillation). The MJO is a large-scale disturbance that propagates eastward from the Indian Ocean into the West Pacific Ocean, bringing extended periods of unsettled weather with it. Individual convective complexes within the MJO can last on the order of a day. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. NASA image produced by Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC) and caption by Steve Lang (SSAI/NASA GSFC).

  14. Dynamic cone penetration tests in granular media: Determination of the tip's dynamic load-penetration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Benz, M.; Gourvès, R.; Breul, P.

    2013-06-01

    In this article a two-dimensional discrete numerical model, realized in PFC2D, is presented. This model is used in the dynamic penetration tests in a granular medium. Its objective being the validation of the measurement technique offered by Panda 3® (Benz et al. 2011) which is designed to calculate the tip's load-penetration curve for each impact in the soil where different parameters are used. To do so, we have compared the results obtained by calculation during the impacts to those measured directly in the model of a penetrometer through the installation of the gauges at the cone.

  15. SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Mohd Khairul Bazli Mohd, E-mail: mkbazli@yahoo.com; Yusof, Fadhilah, E-mail: fadhilahy@utm.my; Daud, Zalina Mohd, E-mail: zalina@ic.utm.my

    Recently, many rainfall network design techniques have been developed, discussed and compared by many researchers. Present day hydrological studies require higher levels of accuracy from collected data. In numerous basins, the rain gauge stations are located without clear scientific understanding. In this study, an attempt is made to redesign rain gauge network for Johor, Malaysia in order to meet the required level of accuracy preset by rainfall data users. The existing network of 84 rain gauges in Johor is optimized and redesigned into a new locations by using rainfall, humidity, solar radiation, temperature and wind speed data collected during themore » monsoon season (November - February) of 1975 until 2008. This study used the combination of geostatistics method (variance-reduction method) and simulated annealing as the algorithm of optimization during the redesigned proses. The result shows that the new rain gauge location provides minimum value of estimated variance. This shows that the combination of geostatistics method (variance-reduction method) and simulated annealing is successful in the development of the new optimum rain gauge system.« less

  16. The mixing of rain with near-surface water

    Treesearch

    Dennis F. Houk

    1976-01-01

    Rain experiments were run with various temperature differences between the warm rain and the cool receiving water. The rain intensities were uniform and the raindrop sizes were usually uniform (2.2 mm, 3.6 mm, and 5.5 mm diameter drops). Two drop size distributions were also used.

  17. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    lysimeter has been calculated by adding lysimeter mass and the leachate tank mass for every minute. Based on the resolution of the scales and an evaluation of noise in periods without precipitation and evaporation a dmin-value of 0.002 to filter the leachate tank measurements and a dmin-value of 0.012 was used to filter the lysimeter weight data and the upper boundary data. A mandatory requirement for the quantification of P or ET from lysimeter measurements is that in a reasonably small time interval, either P or ET is negligible. With this assumption, every increase in upper boundary data is interpreted as P. Every increase of seepage mass is interpreted as L, every decrease as C. ΔS is evaluated from filtered lysimeter mass. ET is calculated using the water balance equation. The evaluation results are given as water balance components time series on a minute scale. P measured with the lysimeter for the two years 2010 and 2011 is 105 % of precipitation measured with a standard tipping bucket gauge 100 m beside the lysimeter. While P during the summer season (April to September) is very close to standard precipitation measurement, P during the winter season is more than 120 % of tipping bucket precipitation. Meissner et al. (2007) showed that P includes precipitation of dewfall and rime. A detailed evaluation of the HYDRO-Lysimeter in Wagna showed, that precipitation in the night and not recognized with the standard tipping bucket (interpreted as dew or rime) is about 1 % of P, the highest monthly sums (> 1 mm) are recognized from August to November. Klammler, G. and Fank, J.: Determining water and nitrogen balances for beneficial management practices using lysimeters at Wagna test site (Austria). Science of the Total Environment 499 (2014) 448-462. Meissner, R., Seeger, J., Rupp, H., Seyfarth, M., and Borg, H.: Measurement of dew, fog, and rime with a high-precision gravitation lysimeter, J. Plant Nutr. Soil Sci. 2007, 170, 335-344. Peters, A., Nehls, T., Schonsky, H

  18. Rain-induced spring wheat harvest losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A.; Black, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    When rain or a combination of rain and high humidity delay wheat harvest, losses can occur in grain yield and/or grain quality. Yield losses can result from shattering, from reduction in test weight, and in the case of windrowed grain, from rooting of sprouting grain at the soil: windrow contact. Losses in grain quality can result from reduction in test weight and from sprouting. Sprouting causes a degradation of grain proteins and starches, hence flour quality is reduced, and the grain price deteriorates to the value of feed grain. Although losses in grain yield and quality are rain-induced, these losses do not necessarily occur because a standing or windrowed crop is wetted by rain. Spike water concentration in hard red spring wheat must be increased to about 45-49% before sprouting is initiated in grain that has overcome dormancy. The time required to overcome this dormancy after the cultivar has dried to 12 to 14% water concentration differs with hard red spring cultivars. The effect of rain on threshing-ready standing and windrowed hard red spring wheat grain yeild and quality was evaluated. A goal was to develop the capability to forecast the extent of expected loss of grain yield and quality from specific climatic events that delay threshing.

  19. An almost trivial gauge theory in the limit of infinite gauge coupling constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, S.

    A local SU(2) gauge theory with one multiplet of scalars in the adjoint representation is considered. In the limit of infinite gauge coupling constant Yang-Mills fields become auxiliary and the action possesses a larger invariance than the usual gauge invariance; hence, the system develops a richer structure of constraints. The constraint analysis is carried out.

  20. Determination of functions of controlling drives of main executive mechanisms of mining excavators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagunova, Yu A.; Komissarov, A. P.; Lukashuk, O. A.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that a special shovel is a feature of the structure of the drives of the main mechanisms (mechanisms of lifting and pressure) of career excavators with working equipment, the presence in the transfer device of a two-crank-lever mechanism of working equipment that connects the main mechanisms with the working body (bucket). In this case, the transformation of the mechanical energy parameters of the motors into energy-force parameters realized at the cutting edge of the bucket (teeth) takes place depending on the type of the kinematic scheme of the two-link-lever mechanism. The concept of “control function” defining the relationship between the parameters characterizing the position of the bucket in the face (the coordinates of the tip of the cutting edge of the bucket, the digging speed) and the required control level are introduced. These are the values of the lifting and head speeds ensuring the bucket movement along a given trajectory.

  1. Gauge and Non-Gauge Tensor Multiplets in 5D Conformal Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugo, T.; Ohashi, K.

    2002-12-01

    An off-shell formulation of two distinct tensor multiplets, a massive tensor multiplet and a tensor gauge multiplet, is presented in superconformal tensor calculus in five-dimensional space-time. Both contain a rank 2 antisymmetric tensor field, but there is no gauge symmetry in the former, while it is a gauge field in the latter. Both multiplets have 4 bosonic and 4 fermionic on-shell modes, but the former consists of 16 (boson)+16 (fermion) component fields, while the latter consists of 8 (boson)+8 (fermion) component fields.

  2. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  3. Rain garden guidelines for southwest Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens are a unique and practical landscape feature that can enhance the beauty of home gardens. When properly installed, they are one method of limiting the negative effects of rainfall runoff in urban areas. Indeed, rain gardens turn a "negative" into a "positive" by capt...

  4. Torsion in gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieh, H. T.

    2018-02-01

    The potential conflict between torsion and gauge symmetry in the Riemann-Cartan curved spacetime was noted by Kibble in his 1961 pioneering paper and has since been discussed by many authors. Kibble suggested that, to preserve gauge symmetry, one should forgo the covariant derivative in favor of the ordinary derivative in the definition of the field strength Fμ ν for massless gauge theories, while for massive vector fields, covariant derivatives should be adopted. This view was further emphasized by Hehl et al. in their influential 1976 review paper. We address the question of whether this deviation from normal procedure by forgoing covariant derivatives in curved spacetime with torsion could give rise to inconsistencies in the theory, such as the quantum renormalizability of a realistic interacting theory. We demonstrate in this paper the one-loop renormalizability of a realistic gauge theory of gauge bosons interacting with Dirac spinors, such as the SU(3) chromodynamics, for the case of a curved Riemann-Cartan spacetime with totally antisymmetric torsion. This affirmative confirmation is one step toward providing justification for the assertion that the flat-space definition of the gauge-field strength should be adopted as the proper definition.

  5. Rain erosion considerations for launch vehicle insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, D. J.; Sieker, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the Delta launch vehicle has incorporated the capability to be launched through rain. This capability was developed to eliminate a design constraint which could result in a costly launch delay. This paper presents the methodology developed to implement rain erosion protection for the insulated exterior vehicle surfaces. The effect of the interaction between insulation material rain erosion resistance, rainstorm models, surface geometry and trajectory variations is examined. It is concluded that rain erosion can significantly impact the performance of launch vehicle insulation systems and should be considered in their design.

  6. The potential influence of rain on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The potential influence of heavy rain on airfoil performance is discussed. Experimental methods for evaluating rain effects are reviewed. Important scaling considerations for extrapolating model data are presented. It is shown that considerable additional effort, both analytical and experimental, is necessary to understand the degree of hazard associated with flight operations in rain.

  7. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    DOEpatents

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  8. Enveloping algebra-valued gauge transformations for non-abelian gauge groups on non-commutative spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurco, B.; Schraml, S.; Schupp, P.; Wess, J.

    2000-11-01

    An enveloping algebra-valued gauge field is constructed, its components are functions of the Lie algebra-valued gauge field and can be constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. This allows the formulation of a dynamics for a finite number of gauge field components on non-commutative spaces.

  9. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  10. Effect of rain on Ku-band scatterometer wind measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Shimada, Masanobu

    1991-01-01

    The impact of precipitation on scatterometer wind measurements is investigated. A model is developed which includes the effects of rain attenuation, rain backscatter, and storm horizontal structure. Rain attenuation is found to be the dominant error source at low radar incidence angles and high wind speeds. Volume backscatter from the rain-loaded atmosphere, however, is found to dominate for high incidence angles and low wind speeds.

  11. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  12. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  13. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  14. Acid Rain: A Teaching Focus for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Renee B.; Adams, Neil D.

    1992-01-01

    The study of acid rain provides ample opportunities for active, interdisciplinary learning. This article describes 12 hands-on activities designed to expand students' understanding of acid rain. Background information on acid rain is included. (LB)

  15. Acid Rain Students Do Original Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outdoor Communicator, 1984

    1984-01-01

    At Park Senior High School (Cottage Grove, Minnesota), 46 juniors and seniors planted 384 red pine seedlings in connection with their original research on acid rain, with advice from Dr. Harriet Stubbs, director of the Acid Precipitation Awareness Program (West Saint Paul), which has been developing acid rain teaching materials. (MH)

  16. Technology Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Some inexpensive or free ways that enable to capture and use images in work are mentioned. The first tip demonstrates the methods of using some of the built-in capabilities of the Macintosh and Windows-based PC operating systems, and the second tip describes methods to capture and create images using SnagIt.

  17. CR@BaSO4: an acid rain-indicating material.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Wen; Xu, Xin-Hui

    2011-12-28

    The CR@BaSO(4) hybrid was synthesized, characterized and used as an acid rain-indicating (ARI) material. A painted ARI umbrella was discolored after exposure to simulated acid rain of pH 5 or less and returned to the initial color after the rain stopped. Such a functionalized material may make acid rain visual to remind people in real-time. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS): Timely Volunteer Precipitation Measurements to Supplement Existing Hydrometeorological Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reges, H. W.; Doesken, N. J.; Cifelli, R. C.; Turner, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) is a community-based, education-focused high density network of individual and family volunteers of all ages and backgrounds, who take daily measurements of rain, hail and snow at their homes, schools and businesses. Precipitation is measured using low-cost high capacity 4" diameter plastic rain gauges and Styrofoam wrapped in aluminum foil "hail pads". Thanks to the "low-tech/low-cost" approach, thousands of volunteers can afford to participate, giving the end user a large collection of data points that fill in gaps in many existing networks and data sets. Where feasible, CoCoRaHS is striving to achieve a station density approaching one observation per km-squared providing exceptional detail on cumulative storm precipitation over populated areas. These observations are collected and made available on the CoCoRaHS website: www.cocorahs.org in map and table format. The data are already being used daily by federal, state and community organizations and businesses for many resource management and hydrologic monitoring and predication applications. CoCoRaHS "Intense Rain Reports" and "Hail Reports" are used in "real time" by the National Weather Service in the issuing of flash flood warnings and severe thunderstorm warnings. While only providing once-daily and occasional event reports, CoCoRaHS does provide excellent observational consistency and accuracy including snowfall, depth and water content measurements, as well as the only comprehensive hail data currently being gathered in the U.S. The CoCoRaHS network currently engages over 2,000 volunteer observers in communities across six states, and the network continues to grow.

  19. Comparing the impact of time displaced and biased precipitation estimates for online updated urban runoff models.

    PubMed

    Borup, Morten; Grum, Morten; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2013-01-01

    When an online runoff model is updated from system measurements, the requirements of the precipitation input change. Using rain gauge data as precipitation input there will be a displacement between the time when the rain hits the gauge and the time where the rain hits the actual catchment, due to the time it takes for the rain cell to travel from the rain gauge to the catchment. Since this time displacement is not present for system measurements the data assimilation scheme might already have updated the model to include the impact from the particular rain cell when the rain data is forced upon the model, which therefore will end up including the same rain twice in the model run. This paper compares forecast accuracy of updated models when using time displaced rain input to that of rain input with constant biases. This is done using a simple time-area model and historic rain series that are either displaced in time or affected with a bias. The results show that for a 10 minute forecast, time displacements of 5 and 10 minutes compare to biases of 60 and 100%, respectively, independent of the catchments time of concentration.

  20. Synergetic Combination of Radar Information and Gauge Measurements - with the Conflict between Two Types of Data Being Removed via Displacement and Downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.; Bardossy, A.

    2017-12-01

    Rain gauges are the foundation in hydrology to collect rainfall data, however, gauge measurements alone are limited at representing the complete rainfall distribution. On the other hand, the reliability of radar data is often limited because of the errors in the radar signal (e.g. clutter, variation of the vertical reflectivity profile, beam blockage, attenuation, etc). Thus, merging radar information and gauge rainfall measurements is in an area of active research. The merging method proposed here is to use the radar data in its [0, 1] format (p-value). The actual precipitation values come from the gauge measurements. At each measurement location, two types of data are available, the radar p-value and the gauge measurement in mm. It happens very frequently that there exists a contradiction between these two types of data. A very likely reason is the influence of the unknown process between the radar measurement height and the surface onto which the hydrometeors fall. A method for quantification of the impact of the unknown process is proposed to fix the conflict, but only to a certain degree. Another possible source that can explain the discrepancy between these two types of data is discretization, i.e., the spatial variability cannot be identified by coarse discretization. Thus, downscaling is also considered to further remove the conflict. Based on the p-value from the radar data and the precipitation from the gauge measurements, a distribution function can be built up. The ultimate goal is to simulate the precipitation field for nowcasting purpose. The conditions to be fulfilled by the simulated field is as the following: honoring the measurements at the gauge locations; sharing a similar pattern with the radar image; preserving the inherent covariance structure. The simulation approach employed here is random mixing. The study domain is located in Reutlingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany (Latitude 48.49N, Longitude 9.20E). The radar data are obtained from a C

  1. Exploration of a Dynamic Merging Scheme for Precipitation Estimation over a Small Urban Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azerji, Sherien; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel, ,, Dr.; Han, Dawei, ,, Prof.

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of quantitative precipitation estimation is of significant importance for urban areas due to the potentially damaging consequences that can result from pluvial flooding. Improved accuracy could be accomplished by merging rain gauge measurements with weather radar data through different merging methods. Several factors may affect the accuracy of the merged data, and the gauge density used for merging is one of the most important. However, if there are no gauges inside the research area, then a gauge network outside the research area can be used for the merging. Generally speaking, the denser the rain gauge network is, the better the merging results that can be achieved. However, in practice, the rain gauge network around the research area is fixed, and the research question is about the optimal merging area. The hypothesis is that if the merging area is too small, there are fewer gauges for merging and thus the result would be poor. If the merging area is too large, gauges far away from the research area can be included in merging. However, due to their large distances, those gauges far away from the research area provide little relevant information to the study and may even introduce noise in merging. Therefore, an optimal merging area that produces the best merged rainfall estimation in the research area could exist. To test this hypothesis, the distance from the centre of the research area and the number of merging gauges around the research area were gradually increased and merging with a new domain of radar data was then performed. The performance of the new merging scheme was compared with a gridded interpolated rainfall from four experimental rain gauges installed inside the research area for validation. The result of this analysis shows that there is indeed an optimum distance from the centre of research area and consequently an optimum number of rain gauges that produce the best merged rainfall data inside the research area. This study is of

  2. Gene-expression programming for flip-bucket spillway scour.

    PubMed

    Guven, Aytac; Azamathulla, H Md

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, researchers have noticed that the use of soft computing techniques as an alternative to conventional statistical methods based on controlled laboratory or field data, gave significantly better results. Gene-expression programming (GEP), which is an extension to genetic programming (GP), has nowadays attracted the attention of researchers in prediction of hydraulic data. This study presents GEP as an alternative tool in the prediction of scour downstream of a flip-bucket spillway. Actual field measurements were used to develop GEP models. The proposed GEP models are compared with the earlier conventional GP results of others (Azamathulla et al. 2008b; RMSE = 2.347, δ = 0.377, R = 0.842) and those of commonly used regression-based formulae. The predictions of GEP models were observed to be in strictly good agreement with measured ones, and quite a bit better than conventional GP and the regression-based formulae. The results are tabulated in terms of statistical error measures (GEP1; RMSE = 1.596, δ = 0.109, R = 0.917) and illustrated via scatter plots.

  3. Interferometric step gauge for CMM verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemming, B.; Esala, V.-P.; Laukkanen, P.; Rantanen, A.; Viitala, R.; Widmaier, T.; Kuosmanen, P.; Lassila, A.

    2018-07-01

    The verification of the measurement capability of coordinate measuring machines (CMM) is usually performed using gauge blocks or step gauges as reference standards. Gauge blocks and step gauges are robust and easy to use, but have some limitations such as finite lengths and uncertainty of thermal expansion. This paper describes the development, testing and uncertainty evaluation of an interferometric step gauge (ISG) for CMM verification. The idea of the ISG is to move a carriage bearing a gauge block along a rail and to measure the position with an interferometer. For a displacement of 1 m the standard uncertainty of the position of the gauge block is 0.2 µm. A short range periodic error of CMM can also be detected.

  4. Environmental Education about the Rain Forest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkmuller, Klaus

    Designed to help in the development of an educational program about the value of rain forests, this handbook presents a condensation of issues, facts, and concepts. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part one introduces the rain forest ecosystem and provides conceptual background material needed in the determination of problems, the…

  5. What You Can Do to Soak Up the Rain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Take steps around your home and community to reduce stormwater runoff. Use rain barrels, disconnect/redirect downspouts, plant trees and rain gardens, use drywells and permeable pavers, and plant green roofs. Take action to soak up the rain.

  6. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy: Recent advance in tip production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yasuhiko; Walke, Peter; De Feyter, Steven; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) microscopy is a technique that combines the chemical sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy with the resolving power of scanning probe microscopy. The key component of any TERS setup is a plasmonically-active noble metal tip, which serves to couple far-field incident radiation with the near-field. Thus, the design and implementation of reproducible probes are crucial for the continued development of TERS as a tool for nanoscopic analysis. Here we discuss conventional methods for the fabrication of TERS-ready tips, highlighting the problems therein, as well as detailing more recent developments to improve reducibility. In addition, the idea of remote excitation-TERS is enlightened upon, whereby TERS sensitivity is further improved by using propagating surface plasmons to separate the incident radiation from the tip apex, as well as how this can be incorporated into the fabrication process.

  7. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN APPLIED ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH AMBIENT RAIN ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF FIELD-GROWN SNAP BEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-grown snap bean plants were treated with simulated acidic rain applied either alone or in combination with ambient rain and the effects on growth and yield were determined. In plots where ambient rain was excluded, a retractable canopy was activated to shield the crop. Four...

  8. Gauge-invariant flow equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2018-06-01

    We propose a closed gauge-invariant functional flow equation for Yang-Mills theories and quantum gravity that only involves one macroscopic gauge field or metric. It is based on a projection on physical and gauge fluctuations. Deriving this equation from a functional integral we employ the freedom in the precise choice of the macroscopic field and the effective average action in order to realize a closed and simple form of the flow equation.

  9. Gauged twistor spinors and symmetry operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Ümit

    2017-03-01

    We consider gauged twistor spinors which are supersymmetry generators of supersymmetric and superconformal field theories in curved backgrounds. We show that the spinor bilinears of gauged twistor spinors satisfy the gauged conformal Killing-Yano equation. We prove that the symmetry operators of the gauged twistor spinor equation can be constructed from ordinary conformal Killing-Yano forms in constant curvature backgrounds. This provides a way to obtain gauged twistor spinors from ordinary twistor spinors.

  10. Adding gauge fields to Kaplan's fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Kärkkäinen, Leo

    1994-04-01

    We experiment with adding dynamical gauge field to Kaplan (defect) fermions. In the case of U (1) gauge theory we use an inhomogenous Higgs mechanism to restrict the 3d gauge dynamics to a planar 2d defect. In our simulations the 3d theory produce the correct 2d gauge dynamics. We measure fermion propagators with dynamical gauge fields. They posses the correct chiral structure. The fermions at the boundary of the support of the gauge field (waveguide) are non-chiral, and have a mass two times heavier than the chiral modes. Moreover, these modes cannot be excited by a source at the defect; implying that they are dynamically decoupled. We have also checked that the anomaly relation is fullfilled for the case of a smooth external gauge field.

  11. Evaluation of Improvements to the TRMM Microwave Rain Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, Williams S.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Improvements made to the Version 5 TRMM passive microwave rain retrieval algorithm (2A-12) are evaluated using independent data. Surface rain rate estimates from the Version 5 TRMM TMI (2A-12), PR (2A-25) and TMI/PR Combined (2B-31) algorithms and ground-based radar estimates for selected coincident subset datasets in 1998 over Melbourne and Kwajalein show varying degrees of agreement. The surface rain rates are then classified into convective and stratiform rain types over ocean, land, and coastal areas for more detailed comparisons to the ground radar measurements. These comparisons lead to a better understanding of the relative performances of the current TRMM rain algorithms. For example, at Melbourne more than 80% of the radar-derived rainfall is classified as convective rain. Convective rain from the TRMM rain algorithms is less than that from ground radar measurements, while TRMM stratiform rain is much greater. Rain area coverage from 2A-12 is also in reasonable agreement with ground radar measurements, with about 25% more over ocean and 25% less over land and coastal areas. Retrieved rain rates from the improved (Version 6) 2A-12 algorithm will be compared to 2A-25, 2B-31, and ground-based radar measurements to evaluate the impact of improvements to 2A-12 in Version 6. An important improvement to the Version 6 2A-12 algorithm is the retrieval of Q1/Q2 (latent heating/drying) profiles in addition to the surface rain rate and hydrometeor profiles. In order to ascertain the credibility of the new products, retrieved Q1/Q2 profiles are compared to independent ground-based estimates. Analyses of dual-Doppler radar data in conjunction with coincident rawinsonde data yield estimates of the vertical distributions of diabatic heating/drying at high horizontal resolution for selected cases over the Kwajalein and LBA field sites. The estimated vertical heating/drying structures appear to be reasonable. Comparisons of Q1/Q2 profiles from Version 6 2A-12 and the ground

  12. Cellular functions of TIP60.

    PubMed

    Sapountzi, Vasileia; Logan, Ian R; Robson, Craig N

    2006-01-01

    TIP60 was originally identified as a cellular acetyltransferase protein that interacts with HIV-1 Tat. As a consequence, the role of TIP60 in transcriptional regulation has been investigated intensively. Recent data suggest that TIP60 has more divergent functions than originally thought and roles for TIP60 in many processes, such as cellular signalling, DNA damage repair, cell cycle and checkpoint control and apoptosis are emerging. TIP60 is a tightly regulated transcriptional coregulator, acting in a large multiprotein complex for a range of transcription factors including androgen receptor, Myc, STAT3, NF-kappaB, E2F1 and p53. This usually involves recruitment of TIP60 acetyltransferase activities to chromatin. Additionally, in response to DNA double strand breaks, TIP60 is recruited to DNA lesions where it participates both in the initial as well as the final stages of repair. Here, we describe how TIP60 is a multifunctional enzyme involved in multiple nuclear transactions.

  13. High-resolution space-time characterization of convective rain cells: implications on spatial aggregation and temporal sampling operated by coarser resolution instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Francesco; Morin, Efrat

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting the occurrence of flash floods and debris flows is fundamental to save lives and protect infrastructures and properties. These natural hazards are generated by high-intensity convective storms, on space-time scales that cannot be properly monitored by conventional instrumentation. Consequently, a number of early-warning systems are nowadays based on remote sensing precipitation observations, e.g. from weather radars or satellites, that proved effective in a wide range of situations. However, the uncertainty affecting rainfall estimates represents an important issue undermining the operational use of early-warning systems. The uncertainty related to remote sensing estimates results from (a) an instrumental component, intrinsic of the measurement operation, and (b) a discretization component, caused by the discretization of the continuous rainfall process. Improved understanding on these sources of uncertainty will provide crucial information to modelers and decision makers. This study aims at advancing knowledge on the (b) discretization component. To do so, we take advantage of an extremely-high resolution X-Band weather radar (60 m, 1 min) recently installed in the Eastern Mediterranean. The instrument monitors a semiarid to arid transition area also covered by an accurate C-Band weather radar and by a relatively sparse rain gauge network ( 1 gauge/ 450 km2). Radar quantitative precipitation estimation includes corrections reducing the errors due to ground echoes, orographic beam blockage and attenuation of the signal in heavy rain. Intense, convection-rich, flooding events recently occurred in the area serve as study cases. We (i) describe with very high detail the spatiotemporal characteristics of the convective cores, and (ii) quantify the uncertainty due to spatial aggregation (spatial discretization) and temporal sampling (temporal discretization) operated by coarser resolution remote sensing instruments. We show that instantaneous rain intensity

  14. A New Conception of Bucket Wheel Excavator Cab and Seat Mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blekta, J.; Mevald, J.; Petríková, I.; Petříček, J.; Lufinka, A.

    One of the most important problem of coal mining by bucket wheel excavators is how to minimize influence of vibrations on driver's body. Project of Ministry of Trade and Industry of the Czech Republic solved in Technical University of Liberec was engaged in this problem. The aim of this project was to design a new cab and seat mounting of wheel excavator Schrs 1320. A suitable possibilities of cab suspensions were investigated to minimize driver body vibrations and to improve influence of mining process to drivers health. After optimization one concept was chosen. A new methodic of measured data evaluation was created for using in excavators as well as in laboratory. The new concept of dynamic seat absorber were designed also.

  15. 49 CFR 230.43 - Gauge siphon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam