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Sample records for titanium dental implant

  1. [Use of porous titanium nickelide dental implants].

    PubMed

    Radkevich, A A; Galonskiĭ, V G; Gantimurov, A A

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of 20 years clinical experience in dental prosthetics with the use of porous titanium nickelide dental implants. Implants were placed in 565 patients aged 15-17 years. Long-term results analysis showed restorations to function properly after mean follow-up period of 8 years in 435 patients (78.2%) proving this material to be clinically successful.

  2. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by titanium screws and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Maki; Nishigawa, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Youji; Ohe, Go; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2016-07-01

    Titanium has been considered to be a non-allergenic material. However, several studies have reported cases of metal allergy caused by titanium-containing materials. We describe a 69-year-old male for whom significant pathologic findings around dental implants had never been observed. He exhibited allergic symptoms (eczema) after orthopedic surgery. The titanium screws used in the orthopedic surgery that he underwent were removed 1 year later, but the eczema remained. After removal of dental implants, the eczema disappeared completely. Titanium is used not only for medical applications such as plastic surgery and/or dental implants, but also for paints, white pigments, photocatalysts, and various types of everyday goods. Most of the usage of titanium is in the form of titanium dioxide. This rapid expansion of titanium-containing products has increased percutaneous and permucosal exposure of titanium to the population. In general, allergic risk of titanium material is smaller than that of other metal materials. However, we suggest that pre-implant patients should be asked about a history of hypersensitivity reactions to metals, and patch testing should be recommended to patients who have experienced such reactions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Titanium Corrosion: Implications For Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rucha; Penmetsa, Deepika Shree Lakshmi; Thomas, Raison; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2016-12-01

    Titanium has been considered as one of the most biocompatible metals. Studies testing its corrosion resistance have proposed that the titanium oxide layer formed on the metal surface is lost under certain unavoidable conditions to which it is exposed in the oral environment. This questions its property of corrosion resistance in the oral cavity. Hence, there is a need to understand the mechanisms of corrosion, which can help in the long-term stability and function of implants. Here, we review the possible pathways of corrosion of titanium in the oral cavity, its implications and proposed methods of prevention of corrosion. Copyright© 2016 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  5. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  6. Electrochemical removal of biofilms from titanium dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Rudolph, Michael; Bause, Vanessa; Terfort, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The infection of dental implants may cause severe inflammation of tissue and even bone degradation if not treated. For titanium implants, a new, minimally invasive approach is the electrochemical removal of the biofilms including the disinfection of the metal surface. In this project, several parameters, such as electrode potentials and electrolyte compositions, were varied to understand the underlying mechanisms. Optimal electrolytes contained iodide as well as lactic acid. Electrochemical experiments, such as cyclic voltammetry or measurements of open circuit potentials, were performed in different cell set-ups to distinguish between different possible reactions. At the applied potentials of E < -1.4 V, the hydrogen evolution reaction dominated at the implant surface, effectively lifting off the bacterial films. In addition, several disinfecting species are formed at the anode, such as triiodide and hydrogen peroxide. Ex situ tests with model biofilms of E. coli clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of the respective anolytes in killing the bacteria, as determined by the LIVE/DEAD™ assay. Using optimized electrolysis parameters of 30 s at 7.0 V and 300 mA, a 14-day old wildtype biofilm could be completely removed from dental implants in vitro. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Binary titanium alloys as dental implant materials-a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotian; Chen, Shuyang; Tsoi, James K H; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2017-10-01

    Titanium (Ti) has been used for long in dentistry and medicine for implant purpose. During the years, not only the commercially pure Ti but also some alloys such as binary and tertiary Ti alloys were used. The aim of this review is to describe and compare the current literature on binary Ti alloys, including Ti-Zr, Ti-In, Ti-Ag, Ti-Cu, Ti-Au, Ti-Pd, Ti-Nb, Ti-Mn, Ti-Mo, Ti-Cr, Ti-Co, Ti-Sn, Ti-Ge and Ti-Ga, in particular to mechanical, chemical and biological parameters related to implant application. Literature was searched using the PubMed and Web of Science databases, as well as google without limiting the year, but with principle key terms such as ' Ti alloy', 'binary Ti ', 'Ti-X' (with X is the alloy element), 'dental implant' and 'medical implant'. Only laboratory studies that intentionally for implant or biomedical applications were included. According to available literatures, we might conclude that most of the binary Ti alloys with alloying <20% elements of Zr, In, Ag, Cu, Au, Pd, Nb, Mn, Cr, Mo, Sn and Co have high potential as implant materials, due to good mechanical performance without compromising the biocompatibility and biological behaviour compare to cp-Ti.

  8. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  9. Non-Destructive Analysis of Basic Surface Characteristics of Titanium Dental Implants Made by Miniature Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babík, Ondrej; Czán, Andrej; Holubják, Jozef; Kameník, Roman; Pilc, Jozef

    2016-12-01

    One of the most best-known characteristic and important requirement of dental implant is made of biomaterials ability to create correct interaction between implant and human body. The most implemented material in manufacturing of dental implants is titanium of different grades of pureness. Since most of the implant surface is in direct contact with bone tissue, shape and integrity of said surface has great influence on the successful osseointegration. Among other characteristics of titanium that predetermine ideal biomaterial, it shows a high mechanical strength making precise machining miniature Increasingly difficult. The article is focused on evaluation of the resulting quality, integrity and characteristics of dental implants surface after machining.

  10. Binary titanium alloys as dental implant materials—a review

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotian; Chen, Shuyang; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Titanium (Ti) has been used for long in dentistry and medicine for implant purpose. During the years, not only the commercially pure Ti but also some alloys such as binary and tertiary Ti alloys were used. The aim of this review is to describe and compare the current literature on binary Ti alloys, including Ti–Zr, Ti–In, Ti–Ag, Ti–Cu, Ti–Au, Ti–Pd, Ti–Nb, Ti–Mn, Ti–Mo, Ti–Cr, Ti–Co, Ti–Sn, Ti–Ge and Ti–Ga, in particular to mechanical, chemical and biological parameters related to implant application. Literature was searched using the PubMed and Web of Science databases, as well as google without limiting the year, but with principle key terms such as ‘ Ti alloy’, ‘binary Ti ’, ‘Ti-X’ (with X is the alloy element), ‘dental implant’ and ‘medical implant’. Only laboratory studies that intentionally for implant or biomedical applications were included. According to available literatures, we might conclude that most of the binary Ti alloys with alloying <20% elements of Zr, In, Ag, Cu, Au, Pd, Nb, Mn, Cr, Mo, Sn and Co have high potential as implant materials, due to good mechanical performance without compromising the biocompatibility and biological behaviour compare to cp-Ti. PMID:29026646

  11. Development and Applications of Porous Tantalum Trabecular Metal Enhanced Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Byrd, Warren C.; Altarawneh, Sandra; Hosseini, Bashir; Leong, Austin; Reside, Glenn; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem Porous tantalum trabecular metal has recently been incorporated in titanium dental implants as a new form of implant surface enhancement. However, there is little information on the applications of this material in implant dentistry. Methods We, therefore review the current literature on the basic science and clinical uses of this material. Results Porous tantalum metal is used to improve the contact between osseous structure and dental implants; and therefore presumably facilitate osseointegration. Success of porous tantalum metal in orthopedic implants led to the incorporation of porous tantalum metal in the design of root-from endosseous titanium implants. The porous tantalum three-dimensional enhancement of titanium dental implant surface allows for combining bone ongrowth together with bone ingrowth, or osseoincorporation. While little is known about the biological aspect of the porous tantalum in the oral cavity, there seems to be several possible advantages of this implant design. This article reviews the biological aspects of porous tantalum enhanced titanium dental implants, in particular the effects of anatomical consideration and oral environment to implant designs. Conclusions We propose here possible clinical situations and applications for this type of dental implant. Advantages and disadvantages of the implants as well as needed future clinical studies are discussed. PMID:23527899

  12. Development of binary and ternary titanium alloys for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Jairo M; Beline, Thamara; Ribeiro, Ana Lúcia R; Rangel, Elidiane C; da Cruz, Nilson C; Landers, Richard; Faverani, Leonardo P; Vaz, Luís Geraldo; Fais, Laiza M G; Vicente, Fabio B; Grandini, Carlos R; Mathew, Mathew T; Sukotjo, Cortino; Barão, Valentim A R

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop binary and ternary titanium (Ti) alloys containing zirconium (Zr) and niobium (Nb) and to characterize them in terms of microstructural, mechanical, chemical, electrochemical, and biological properties. The experimental alloys - (in wt%) Ti-5Zr, Ti-10Zr, Ti-35Nb-5Zr, and Ti-35Nb-10Zr - were fabricated from pure metals. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) and Ti-6Al-4V were used as controls. Microstructural analysis was performed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness, elastic modulus, dispersive energy spectroscopy, X-ray excited photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, surface roughness, and surface free energy were evaluated. The electrochemical behavior analysis was conducted in a body fluid solution (pH 7.4). The albumin adsorption was measured by the bicinchoninic acid method. Data were evaluated through one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=0.05). The alloying elements proved to modify the alloy microstructure and to enhance the mechanical properties, improving the hardness and decreasing the elastic modulus of the binary and ternary alloys, respectively. Ti-Zr alloys displayed greater electrochemical stability relative to that of controls, presenting higher polarization resistance and lower capacitance. The experimental alloys were not detrimental to albumin adsorption. The experimental alloys are suitable options for dental implant manufacturing, particularly the binary system, which showed a better combination of mechanical and electrochemical properties without the presence of toxic elements. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro biological outcome of laser application for modification or processing of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Hindy, Ahmed; Farahmand, Farzam; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

    2017-07-01

    There are numerous functions for laser in modern implant dentistry including surface treatment, surface coating, and implant manufacturing. As laser application may potentially improve osseointegration of dental implants, we systematically reviewed the literature for in vitro biological responses to laser-modified or processed titanium dental implants. The literature was searched in PubMed, ISI Web, and Scopus, using keywords "titanium dental implants," "laser," "biocompatibility," and their synonyms. After screening the 136 references obtained, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. We found that Nd:YAG laser was the most commonly used lasers in the treatment or processing of titanium dental implants. Most of the experiments used cell attachment and cell proliferation to investigate bioresponses of the implants. The most commonly used cells in these assays were osteoblast-like cells. Only one study was conducted in stem cells. These in vitro studies reported higher biocompatibility in laser-modified titanium implants. It seems that laser radiation plays a vital role in cell response to dental implants; however, it is necessary to accomplish more studies using different laser types and parameters on various cells to offer a more conclusive result.

  14. Surface Modification of Dental Titanium Implant by Layer-by-Layer Electrostatic Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Quan; Qian, Zhiyong; Liu, Donghua; Liu, Hongchen

    2017-01-01

    In vivo implants that are composed of titanium and titanium alloys as raw materials are widely used in the fields of biology and medicine. In the field of dental medicine, titanium is considered to be an ideal dental implant material. Good osseointegration and soft tissue closure are the foundation for the success of dental implants. Therefore, the enhancement of the osseointegration and antibacterial abilities of titanium and its alloys has been the focus of much research. With its many advantages, layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly is a self-assembly technique that is used to develop multilayer films based on complementary interactions between differently charged polyelectrolytes. The LbL approach provides new methods and applications for the surface modification of dental titanium implant. In this review, the application of the LbL technique to surface modification of titanium including promoting osteogenesis and osseointegration, promoting the formation and healing of soft tissues, improving the antibacterial properties of titanium implant, achieving local drug delivery and sustained release is summarized. PMID:28824462

  15. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  16. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex E.; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y.; Leroux, Brian G.; Hunter, Colby M.; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Noble, Peter A.; Bryers, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient’s mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4–5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients. PMID:26461491

  17. A Critical Review of Dental Implant Materials with an Emphasis on Titanium versus Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Reham B.; Swain, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the current publication is to provide a comprehensive literature review on the topic of dental implant materials. The following paper focuses on conventional titanium implants and more recently introduced and increasingly popular zirconia implants. Major subtopics include the material science and the clinical considerations involving both implant materials and the influence of their physical properties on the treatment outcome. Titanium remains the gold standard for the fabrication of oral implants, even though sensitivity does occur, though its clinical relevance is not yet clear. Zirconia implants may prove to be promising in the future; however, further in vitro and well-designed in vivo clinical studies are needed before such a recommendation can be made. Special considerations and technical experience are needed when dealing with zirconia implants to minimize the incidence of mechanical failure. PMID:28787980

  18. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct metal laser sintering titanium dental implants: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F; Chambrone, L; van Noort, R; Miller, C; Hatton, P; Mangano, C

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  20. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F.; Chambrone, L.; van Noort, R.; Miller, C.; Hatton, P.; Mangano, C.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  1. Comparison of bioactive glass coated and hydroxyapatite coated titanium dental implants in the human jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Mistry, S; Kundu, D; Datta, S; Basu, D

    2011-03-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include modification of titanium surfaces for the purpose of improving osseointegration by different additive (bioactive coatings) and subtractive processes (acid etching, grit-blasting). The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the behaviour of hydroxyapatite and the newly developed bioactive glass coated implants (62 implants) in osseous tissue following implantation in 31 patients. Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite was suitably coated on titanium alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air microplasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enamelling technique. The outcome was assessed up to 12 months after prosthetic loading using different clinical and radiological parameters. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were non-toxic and biocompatible. Overall results showed that bioactive glass coated implants were as equally successful as hydroxyapatite in achieving osseointegration and supporting final restorations. The newly developed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implants. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  2. A comparison of preload values in gold and titanium dental implant retaining screws.

    PubMed

    Doolabh, R; Dullabh, H D; Sykes, L M

    2014-08-01

    This in vitro investigation compared the effect of using either gold or titanium retaining screws on preload in the dental implant- abutment complex. Inadequate preload can result in screw loosening, whilst fracture may occur if preload is excessive. These are the most commonly reported complications in implant-retained prostheses, and result in unscheduled, costly and time-consuming visits for the patient and the clinician. This study investigated changes in preload generation after repeated torque applications to gold and titanium screws. The test set-up consisted of an implant body, a cylindrical transmucosa abutment, and the test samples of gold and of titanium retaining screws. The implant bodies were anchored using a load cell, and the transmucosal abutments were attached using either gold or titanium retaining screws. A torque gauge was used to apply torque of 20Ncm, 32Ncm, and 40Ncm to the retaining screws. The preloads generated in each screw type were compared at each torque setting, and after repeated tightening episodes. In addition, the effect of applying torque beyond the manufacturers' recommendations was also examined. Gold retaining screws were found to achieve consistently higher preload values than titanium retaining screws. Preload values were not significantly different from the first to the tenth torque cycle. Titanium screws showed more consistent preload values, albeit lower than those of the gold screws. However due to possible galling of the internal thread of the implant body by titanium screws, gold screws remain the retaining screw of choice. Based on the findings of this study, gold retaining screws generate better preload than titanium. Torque beyond the manufacturers' recommendations resulted in a more stable implant complex. However, further investigations, with torque applications repeated until screw breakage, are needed to advise on ideal maintenance protocols.

  3. Clinical evidence on titanium-zirconium dental implants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Altuna, P; Lucas-Taulé, E; Gargallo-Albiol, J; Figueras-Álvarez, O; Hernández-Alfaro, F; Nart, J

    2016-07-01

    The use of titanium implants is well documented and they have high survival and success rates. However, when used as reduced-diameter implants, the risk of fracture is increased. Narrow diameter implants (NDIs) of titanium-zirconium (Ti-Zr) alloy have recently been developed (Roxolid; Institut Straumann AG). Ti-Zr alloys (two highly biocompatible materials) demonstrate higher tensile strength than commercially pure titanium. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the existing clinical evidence on dental NDIs made from Ti-Zr. A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database to find relevant articles on clinical studies published in the English language up to December 2014. Nine clinical studies using Ti-Zr implants were identified. Overall, 607 patients received 922 implants. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.36±0.06mm after 1 year and 0.41±0.09mm after 2 years. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 36 months. Mean survival and success rates were 98.4% and 97.8% at 1 year after implant placement and 97.7% and 97.3% at 2 years. Narrow diameter Ti-Zr dental implants show survival and success rates comparable to regular diameter titanium implants (>95%) in the short term. Long-term follow-up clinical data are needed to confirm the excellent clinical performance of these implants. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of the height of the external hexagon and surface treatment on fatigue life of commercially pure titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gil, Francisco Javier; Aparicio, Conrado; Manero, Jose M; Padros, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of external hexagon height and commonly applied surface treatments on the fatigue life of titanium dental implants. Electropolished commercially pure titanium dental implants (seven implants per group) with three different external hexagon heights (0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 mm) and implants with the highest external hexagon height (1.8 mm) and different surface treatments (electropolishing, grit blasting with aluminium oxide, and acid etching with sulfuric acid) were tested to evaluate their mechanical fatigue life. To do so, 10-Hz triangular flexural load cycles were applied at 37 degrees C in artificial saliva, and the number of load cycles until implant fracture was determined. Tolerances of the hexagon/abutment fit and implant surface roughness were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and light interferometry. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction analyses of titanium hydrides were performed. First, the fatigue life of implants with the highest hexagon (8,683 +/- 978 load cycles) was more than double that of the implants with the shortest hexagons (3,654 +/- 789 load cycles) (P < .02). Second, the grit-blasted implants had the longest fatigue life of the tested materials (21,393 +/- 2,356 load cycles), which was significantly greater than that of the other surfaces (P < .001). The compressive surface residual stresses induced when blasting titanium are responsible for this superior mechanical response. Third, precipitation of titanium hydrides in grain boundaries of titanium caused by hydrogen adsorption from the acid solution deteriorates the fatigue life of acid-etched titanium dental implants. These implants had the shortest fatigue life (P < .05). The fatigue life of threaded root-form dental implants varies with the height of the external hexagon and/or the surface treatment of the implant. An external hexagon height of 1.8 mm and/or a blasting treatment appear to significantly increase fatigue life of

  5. Multifunctions of dual Zn/Mg ion co-implanted titanium on osteogenesis, angiogenesis and bacteria inhibition for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiqiang; Jin, Guodong; Xue, Yang; Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xuanyong; Sun, Jiao

    2017-02-01

    In order to improve the osseointegration and long-term survival of dental implants, it is urgent to develop a multifunctional titanium surface which would simultaneously have osteogeneic, angiogeneic and antibacterial properties. In this study, a potential dental implant material-dual Zn/Mg ion co-implanted titanium (Zn/Mg-PIII) was developed via plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The Zn/Mg-PIII surfaces were found to promote initial adhesion and spreading of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) via the upregulation of the gene expression of integrin α1 and integrin β1. More importantly, it was revealed that Zn/Mg-PIII could increase Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ concentrations in rBMSCs by promoting the influx of Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ and inhibiting the outflow of Zn 2+ , and then could enhance the transcription of Runx2 and the expression of ALP and OCN. Meanwhile, Mg 2+ ions from Zn/Mg-PIII increased Mg 2+ influx by upregulating the expression of MagT1 transporter in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and then stimulated the transcription of VEGF and KDR via activation of hypoxia inducing factor (HIF)-1α, thus inducing angiogenesis. In addition to this, it was discovered that zinc in Zn/Mg-PIII had certain inhibitory effects on oral anaerobic bacteria (Pg, Fn and Sm). Finally, the Zn/Mg-PIII implants were implanted in rabbit femurs for 4 and 12weeks with Zn-PIII, Mg-PIII and pure titanium as controls. Micro-CT evaluation, sequential fluorescent labeling, histological analysis and push-out test consistently demonstrated that Zn/Mg-PIII implants exhibit superior capacities for enhancing bone formation, angiogenesis and osseointegration, while consequently increasing the bonding strength at bone-implant interfaces. All these results suggest that due to the multiple functions co-produced by zinc and magnesium, rapid osseointegration and sustained biomechanical stability are enhanced by the novel Zn/Mg-PIII implants, which have the potential

  6. Influence of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implants surfaces: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Louropoulou, Anna; Slot, Dagmar E; Van der Weijden, Fridus

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implant surfaces. MEDLINE, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to December 2013, to identify controlled studies on the ability of cells to adhere and colonize non-contaminated and contaminated, smooth and rough, titanium surfaces after instrumentation with different mechanical instruments. A comprehensive search identified 1893 unique potential papers. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. All studies were in vitro studies. Most studies used titanium discs, strips and cylinders. The air abrasive was the treatment mostly evaluated. The available studies had a high heterogeneity which precluded any statistical analysis of the data. Therefore, the conclusions are not based on quantitative data. Instrumentation seems to have a selective influence on the attachment of different cells. In the presence of contamination, plastic curettes, metal curettes, rotating titanium brushes and an ultrasonic scaling system with a carbon tip and polishing fluid seem to fail to restore the biocompatibility of rough titanium surfaces. The air-powder abrasive system with sodium bicarbonate powder does not seem to affect the fibroblast-titanium surface interaction after treatment of smooth or rough surfaces, even in the presence of contamination. The available data suggest that treatment with an air-powder abrasive system with sodium bicarbonate powder does not seem to adversely affect the biocompatibility of titanium dental implant surfaces. However, the clinical impact of these findings requires further clarification. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Osseointegration of a 3D Printed Stemmed Titanium Dental Implant: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, James; Lee, Bryan E. J.; Lin, Alex Y. W.; Binkley, Dakota M.; Delaney, Kathleen H.; Kwiecien, Jacek M.

    2017-01-01

    In this pilot study, a 3D printed Grade V titanium dental implant with a novel dual-stemmed design was investigated for its biocompatibility in vivo. Both dual-stemmed (n = 12) and conventional stainless steel conical (n = 4) implants were inserted into the tibial metaphysis of New Zealand white rabbits for 3 and 12 weeks and then retrieved with the surrounding bone, fixed, dehydrated, and embedded into epoxy resin. The implants were analyzed using correlative histology, microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The histological presence of multinucleated osteoclasts and cuboidal osteoblasts revealed active bone remodeling in the stemmed implant starting at 3 weeks and by 12 weeks in the conventional implant. Bone-implant contact values indicated that the stemmed implants supported bone growth along the implant from the coronal crest at both 3- and 12-week time periods and showed bone growth into microporosities of the 3D printed surface after 12 weeks. In some cases, new bone formation was noted in between the stems of the device. Conventional implants showed mechanical interlocking but did have indications of stress cracking and bone debris. This study demonstrates the comparable biocompatibility of these 3D printed stemmed implants in rabbits up to 12 weeks. PMID:29527226

  8. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  9. Wear and Corrosion Interactions at the Titanium/Zirconia Interface: Dental Implant Application.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Craig L; Alfaro, Maria F; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Barao, Valentim A; Sukotjo, Cortino; Mathew, Mathew T

    2018-03-09

    Dental implants have been shown to have predictable success, but esthetic complications often arise. To reduce tissue shadowing from titanium, zirconia abutments may be used; however, the literature suggests that the use of zirconia leads to greater destruction of the implant interface that may result in biological complications such as titanium tattoos and heavy metal toxicity. Previous studies have examined the mechanical aspects of this implant/abutment relationship, but they have not accounted for the corrosive degradation that also takes place in the dynamic environment of the oral cavity. This study investigated the combined effect of both wear and corrosion on the materials at the implant and abutment interface. Using a simulated oral tribocorrosive environment, titanium (Ti) and zirconia (Zr) abutment materials were slid against titanium and Roxolid implant alloys. The four couplings (Ti/Ti, Ti/Rox, Zr/Ti, Zr/Rox) were selected for the tribocorrosion tests (N = 3). The testing was conducted for 25K cycles, and the coefficient of friction (CoF) and voltage evolution were recorded simultaneously. Following the tribocorrosion assays, the wear volume loss was calculated, and surface characterization was performed. Statistical analysis was completed using a one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Bonferroni comparisons. Zr/Ti groups had the highest CoF (1.1647), and Ti/Ti had the lowest (0.5033). The Zr/Ti coupling generated significantly more mechanical damage than the Ti/Ti group (p = 0.021). From the corrosion aspect, the Ti/Ti groups had the highest voltage drop (0.802 V), indicating greater corrosion susceptibility. In comparison, the Zr/Roxolid group had the lowest voltage drop (0.628 V) and significantly less electrochemical degradation (p = 0.019). Overall, the Ti/Ti group had the largest wear volume loss (15.1 × 10 7 μm 3 ), while the Zr/Ti group had the least volume loss (2.26 × 10 7 μm 3 ). Both zirconia couplings had significantly less wear volume

  10. Titanium dental implant surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition - From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    Commercial titanium-based dental implants are obtained applying various methods such as machining, acid etching, anodization, plasma spraying, grit blasting or combination techniques yielding materials with smooth or micro-roughened surfaces. Those techniques are used to optimize the surface properties and to maximize biocompatibility and bioactivity with bone tissue. Present review is focused on the material surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition (ASD). From the early 1980s till present, the results of numerous studies have shown that anodically oxidized surfaces with different dopants express a positive effect on osteoblasts behavior in vitro and osseointegration in vivo. Those surfaces demonstrated a high biocompatibility and rapid osseointegration in clinical application. This paper provides an overview of the preparation of implant surfaces by employing ASD process. Moreover, reviewed are clinically used ASD implant surfaces (Ticer, TiUnite, Osstem, etc.). The electrolyte variations in ASD process and their influence on surface properties are given herein. Using different electrolytes, anode voltages and temperatures, the above fabrication process can yield various surface morphologies from smooth to rough, porous surfaces. Furthermore, ASD enables thickening of oxide layers and enrichment with different dopands from used electrolyte, which hinder release of potentially toxic titanium ions in surrounding tissue. Particularly exciting results were achieved by calcium and phosphorus doping of the oxide layer (Ticer, ZL Microdent; TiUnite, Nobel Biocare Holding AB) which significantly increased the osteocompatibility. Ticer, a dental implant with anodically oxidized surface and the first among similar materials employed in clinical practice, was found to promote fast osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization processes. Moreover, Ticer accelerate the integration with the bone, increase the bone/implant contact and improve primary and secondary

  11. Osseointegration of dental implants in extraction sockets preserved with porous titanium granules - an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Verket, Anders; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Rønold, Hans J; Wohlfahrt, Johan C

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated osseointegration of dental implants inserted in healed extraction sockets preserved with porous titanium granules (PTG). Three adult female minipigs (Gøttingen minipig; Ellegaard A/S, Dalmose, Denmark) had the mandibular teeth P2, P3 and P4 extracted. The extraction sockets were preserved with metallic PTG (Tigran PTG; Tigran Technologies AB, Malmö, Sweden) n = 12, heat oxidized white porous titanium granules (WPTG) (Tigran PTG White) n = 12 or left empty (sham) n = 6. All sites were covered with collagen membranes (Bio-Gide; Geistlich Pharma, Wolhausen, Switzerland) and allowed 11 weeks of healing before implants (Straumann Bone Level; Straumann, Basel, Switzerland) were inserted. The temperature was measured during preparation of the osteotomies. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA, Osstell; Osstell AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) was performed at implant insertion and at termination. After 6 weeks of submerged implant healing, the pigs were euthanized and jaw segments were excised for microCT and histological analyses. In the temperature and RFA analyses no significant differences were recorded between the test groups. The microCT analysis demonstrated an average bone volume of 61.7% for the PTG group compared to 50.3% for the WPTG group (P = 0.03) and 57.1% for the sham group. Histomorphometry demonstrated an average bone-to-implant contact of 68.2% for the PTG group compared to 36.6% for the WPTG group and 60.9% for the sham group (n.s). Eight out of ten implants demonstrated apical osseous defects in the WPTG group, but similar defects were observed in all groups. PTG preserved extraction sockets demonstrate a similar outcome as the sham control group for all analyses suggesting that this material potentially can be used for extraction socket preservation prior to implant installment. Apical osseous defects were however observed in all groups including the sham group, and a single cause could not be determined. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Is there scientific evidence favoring the substitution of commercially pure titanium with titanium alloys for the manufacture of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Jairo M; Barão, Valentim A R

    2017-02-01

    The development of Ti alloys to manufacture dental implants has emerged in recent years due to the increased failure of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) implants. Thus, this study reviews existing information about the mechanical, chemical, electrochemical, and biological properties of the main Ti alloys developed over the past few years to provide scientific evidence in favor of using Ti-based alloys as alternative to cpTi. Ti alloys may be considered viable substitutes in the fabrication of dental implants. Such evidence is given by the enhanced properties of alloys, such as a low elastic modulus, high tensile strength, satisfactory biocompatibility, and good corrosion and wear resistances. In addition, Ti alloys may be modified at the structural, chemical, and thermomechanical levels, which allows the development of materials in accordance with the demands of several situations encountered in clinical practice. Although several in vitro studies have established the superiority of Ti alloys over cpTi, mainly in terms of their mechanical properties, there is no scientific evidence that supports the total replacement of this material in vivo. This review demonstrates the superiority of β-type alloys. However, it is evident that in vivo studies are encouraged to test new alloys to consolidate their use as substitutes for cpTi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Distortion of CAD-CAM-fabricated implant-fixed titanium and zirconia complete dental prosthesis frameworks.

    PubMed

    Al-Meraikhi, Hadi; Yilmaz, Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM)-fabricated titanium and zirconia implant-supported fixed dental prostheses have become increasingly popular for restoring patients with complete edentulism. However, the distortion level of these frameworks is not well known. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 3-dimensional (3D) distortion of CAD-CAM zirconia and titanium implant-fixed screw-retained complete dental prostheses. A master edentulous model with 4 implants at the positions of the maxillary first molars and canines was used. Multiunit abutments (Nobel Biocare) secured to the model were digitally scanned using scan bodies and a laboratory scanner (S600 ARTI; Zirkonzahn). Titanium (n=5) and zirconia (n=5) frameworks were milled using a CAD-CAM system (Zirkonzahn M1; Zirkonzahn). All frameworks were scanned using an industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner (Nikon/X-Tek XT H 225kV MCT Micro-Focus). The direct CT scans were reconstructed to generate standard tessellation language (STL) files. To calculate the 3D distortion of the frameworks, STL files of the CT scans were aligned to the CAD model using a sum of the least squares best-fit algorithm. Surface comparison points were placed on the CAD model on the midfacial aspect of all teeth. The 3D distortion of each direct scan to the CAD model was calculated. In addition, color maps of the scan-to-CAD comparison were constructed using a ±0.500 mm color scale range. Both materials exhibited distortion; however, no significant difference was found in the amount of distortion from the CAD model between the materials (P=.747). Absolute values of deviations from the CAD model were evident in the x and y plane and less so in the z direction. Zirconia and titanium frameworks showed similar 3D distortion compared with the CAD model for the tested CAD-CAM and implant systems. The distortion was more pronounced in the horizontal and sagittal plane than in the vertical plane

  14. Release of titanium after insertion of dental implants with different surface characteristics – an ex vivo animal study

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Mattias; Pettersson, Jean; Molin Thorén, Margareta; Johansson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, amount of titanium (Ti) released into the surrounding bone during placement of implants with different surface structure was investigated. Quantification of Ti released during insertion from three different implants was performed in this ex vivo study. Jaw bone from pigs was used as model for installation of the implants and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used for analysis of the released Ti. Implant surface were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after the placement into the bone. Ti was abraded to the surrounding bone upon insertion of a dental implant and the surface roughness of the implant increased the amount of Ti found. Diameter and total area of the implant were of less importance for the Ti released to the bone. No visible damages to the implant surfaces could be identified in SEM after placement. PMID:29242814

  15. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  16. Prospects of using titanium nickelide implants with modified surface in dental implantology.

    PubMed

    Razdorsky, V V

    2008-06-01

    Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 60 specimens of titanium nickelide with modified surfaces implanted into spongy bone were studied in rabbit experiments. Specimens modified by molybdenum ions exhibited high inertness and favorable tissue reaction. No accumulation of nickel and titanium ions in animal organs was detected.

  17. Experimental and numeric stress analysis of titanium and zirconia one-piece dental implants.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Nicola; Stefanoni, Filippo; Contiero, Paolo; Mollica, Francesco; Catapano, Santo

    2013-01-01

    To compare the stress in bone around zirconia and titanium implants under loading. A one-piece zirconia implant and a replica of the same implant made of commercially pure titanium were embedded in two self-curing acrylic resin blocks. To measure strain, a strain gauge was applied on the surface of the two samples. Loads of 50, 100, and 150 N, with orientations of 30, 45, and 60 degrees with respect to the implant axis were applied on the implant. Strain under all loading conditions on both samples was measured. Three-dimensional virtual replicas of both the implants were reproduced using the finite element method and inserted into a virtual acrylic resin block. All the materials were considered isotropic, linear, and elastic. The same geometry and loading conditions of the experimental setup were used to realize two new models, with the implants embedded within a virtual bone block. Very close values of strain in the two implants embedded in acrylic resin were obtained both experimentally and numerically. The stress states generated by the implants embedded in virtual bone were also very similar, even if the two implants moved differently. Moreover, the stress levels were higher on cortical bone than on trabecular bone. The stress levels in bone, generated by the two implants, appeared to be very similar. From a mechanical point of view, zirconia is a feasible substitute for titanium.

  18. Corrosion Analysis of an Experimental Noble Alloy on Commercially Pure Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bortagaray, Manuel Alberto; Ibañez, Claudio Arturo Antonio; Ibañez, Maria Constanza; Ibañez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the Noble Bond® Argen® alloy was electrochemically suitable for the manufacturing of prosthetic superstructures over commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants. Also, the electrolytic corrosion effects over three types of materials used on prosthetic suprastructures that were coupled with titanium implants were analysed: Noble Bond® (Argen®), Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®), and commercially pure titanium. Materials and Methods: 15 samples were studied, consisting in 1 abutment and one c.p. titanium implant each. They were divided into three groups, namely: Control group: five c.p Titanium abutments (B&W®), Test group 1: five Noble Bond® (Argen®) cast abutments and, Test group 2: five Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®) abutments. In order to observe the corrosion effects, the surface topography was imaged using a confocal microscope. Thus, three metric parameters (Sa: Arithmetical mean height of the surface. Sp: Maximum height of peaks. Sv: Maximum height of valleys.), were measured at three different areas: abutment neck, implant neck and implant body. The samples were immersed in artificial saliva for 3 months, after which the procedure was repeated. The metric parameters were compared by statistical analysis. Results: The analysis of the Sa at the level of the implant neck, abutment neck and implant body, showed no statistically significant differences on combining c.p. Ti implants with the three studied alloys. The Sp showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. The Sv showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. Conclusion: The effects of electrogalvanic corrosion on each of the materials used when they were in contact with c.p. Ti showed no statistically significant differences. PMID:27733875

  19. Lack of clinical evidence on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on dental titanium implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Frutos, J C; Rodríguez-Molinero, J; Prados-Privado, M; Torres, J H; Rojo, R

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proved to have biostimulating effects on tissues over which they are applied, therefore accelerating the healing process. Most studies in implantology were focused on a reduction of the duration of osseointegration. There exist few articles analyzing the potential effects of these therapies on the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LLLT on the interaction between the bone and the titanium dental implant and the methodological quality of the studies. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed, ISI Web, and Cochrane Library. From 37 references obtained, only 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the studies shows that most of the experiments were performed in animals, which have a high risk of bias from the methodological point of view. Only two studies were conducted in human bone under different conditions. Several protocols for the use of low-power laser and different types of laser for all studies analyzed were used. Although animal studies have shown a positive effect on osseointegration of titanium implants, it can be concluded that it is necessary to improve and define a unique protocol to offer a more conclusive result by meta-analysis.

  20. Effective removal of calcified deposits on microstructured titanium fixture surfaces of dental implants with erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toru; Aoki, Akira; Ichinose, Shizuko; Taniguchi, Yoichi; Tachikawa, Noriko; Shinoki, Takeshi; Meinzer, Walter; Sculean, Anton; Izumi, Yuichi

    2018-03-13

    Recently, the occurrence of peri-implantitis has been increasing. However, a suitable method to debride the contaminated surface of titanium implants has not been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the microstructured fixture surface after erbium laser irradiation, and to clarify the effects of the erbium lasers when used to remove calcified deposits from implant fixture surfaces. In experiment 1, sandblasted, large grit, acid etched surface implants were treated with Er:YAG laser or Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 30-60 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz with water spray. In experiments 2 and 3, the effects of erbium lasers used to remove calcified deposits (artificially prepared deposits on virgin implants and natural calculus on failed implants) were investigated and compared with mechanical debridement using either a titanium curette or cotton pellets. After the various debridement methods, all specimens were analyzed by stereomicroscopy (SM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Stereomicroscopy and SEM showed that erbium lasers with optimal irradiation parameters did not have an effect on titanium microstructures. Compared to mechanical debridement, erbium lasers were more capable of removing calcified deposits on the microstructured surface without surface alteration using a non-contact sweeping irradiation at 40 mJ/pulse (ED 14.2 J/cm 2 /pulse) and 20 Hz with water spray. These results indicate that Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers are more advantageous in removing calcified deposits on the microstructured surface of titanium implants without inducing damage, compared to mechanical therapy by cotton pellet or titanium curette. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Cell Compatibility of Dental Cements Used with Titanium Implant Components.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Jason C; Gallegos, Silvia I; Parsaei, Shaida; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2018-03-09

    To evaluate the biocompatibility of five dental cement compositions after directly exposing human gingival fibroblast (HGF) and MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells to cement alone and cement applied on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) specimens. Nanostructurally integrated bioceramic (NIB), resin (R), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC), zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), and zinc phosphate (ZP) compositions were prepared according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Samples were prepared in cylindrical Teflon molds or applied over the entire surface of polished cpTi discs. All samples were cured for 0.5, 1, 12, or 24 hours post-mixing. Direct contact testing was conducted according to ISO 10993 by seeding 6-well plates at 350,000 cells/well. Plates were incubated at 37°C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO 2 for 24 hours before individually plating samples and cpTi control discs. Plates were then incubated for an additional 24 hours. Microtetrazolium (MTT) cell viability assays were used to measure sample cytotoxicity. For samples that cured for 24 hours prior to direct contact exposure, only NIB and ZP cements when cemented on cpTi demonstrated cell viability percentages above the minimum biocompatibility requirement (≥70%) for both the investigative cell lines. R, RMGIC, and ZOE cements exhibited moderate to severe cytotoxic effects on both cell lines in direct contact and when cemented on cpTi specimens. For HGF cells, ZOE cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly decreased cytotoxicity, whereas RMGIC cemented-cpTi specimens exhibited significantly increased cytotoxicity. Despite previous studies that showed enhanced cpTi corrosion activity for fluoride-containing compositions (NIB and ZP), there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity between cement alone and cemented-cpTi. In general, the MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells were more sensitive than HGF cells to cement composition. Ultimately, cement composition played a significant role in maintaining

  2. Marginal bone-level alterations of loaded zirconia and titanium dental implants: an experimental study in the dog mandible.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel S; Benic, Goran I; Muñoz, Fernando; Kohal, Ralf; Sanz Martin, Ignacio; Cantalapiedra, Antonio G; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Jung, Ronald E

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to test whether or not the marginal bone-level alterations of loaded zirconia implants are similar to the bone-level alterations of a grade 4 titanium one-piece dental implant. In six dogs, all premolars and the first molars were extracted in the mandible. Four months later, three zirconia implants (BPI, VC, ZD) and a control titanium one-piece (STM) implant were randomly placed in each hemimandible and left for transmucosal healing (baseline). Six months later, CAD/CAM crowns were cemented. Sacrifice was scheduled at 6-month postloading. Digital X-rays were taken at implant placement, crowns insertion, and sacrifice. Marginal bone-level alterations were calculated, and intra- and intergroup comparisons performed adjusted by confounding factors. Implants were successfully placed. Until crown insertion, two implants were fractured (one VC, one ZD). At sacrifice, 5 more implants were (partly) fractured (one BPI, four ZD), and one lost osseointegration (VC). No decementation of crowns occurred. All implant systems demonstrated a statistically significant (except VC) loss of marginal bone between baseline and crown insertion ranging from 0.29 mm (VC; P = 0.116) to 0.80 mm (ZD; P = 0.013). The estimated marginal bone loss between baseline and 6 months of loading ranged between 0.19 mm (BPI) and 1.11 mm (VC), being statistically significant for STM and VC only (P < 0.05). The changes in marginal bone levels were statistically significantly different between zirconia implants and control implants (STM vs. BPI P = 0.007; vs. VC P = 0.001; vs. ZD P = 0.011). Zirconia implants were more prone to fracture prior to and after loading with implant-supported crowns compared to titanium implants. Individual differences and variability in the extent of the bone-level changes during the 12-month study period were found between the different implant types and materials. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26–67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  4. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results.

  5. THE ELECTROCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF FOUR DENTAL CASTING SUPRASTRUCTURE ALLOYS COUPLED WITH TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Pekmez, Nuran Ozcícek; Keyf, Filiz; Canlí, Fulya

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: As the choice of suprastructure alloy to be combined with titanium for the oral cavity is still a much debated issue, the aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical interaction of the suprastructure/implant couples under the determined experiment conditions. Material and Methods: The potentiodynamic polarization curves and open-circuit potentials (OCP) of four UCLA type suprastructures coupled with straight Swiss Plus implant fixtures were taken in Afnor type artificial saliva solution at 37°C. The concentration of ions leached into artificial saliva solutions was estimated with ICP-MS. SEM images of the margins of suprastructure/implant couples were obtained before and after the electrochemical tests. Results: The OCP value of titanium became passive at the most negative potential. The lowest difference between the initial and constant OCP value was exhibited by the Au based suprastructure. Suprastructures made greater contributions to the potentiodynamic polarization curves of the implant/suprastructure couples. According to the ICP-MS results, Pd based and Au based couples dissolved less than Co-Ni based and Co-Cr based couples. Conclusions: Within the conditions this study, it may be concluded that the titanium implant forms a stable passive oxide layer in artificial saliva exposed to open air and does not affect the corrosion properties of the suprastructures. Pd based and Au based couples have been found to be more corrosion-resistant than base alloy couples. PMID:19936528

  6. A noninterventional study documenting use and success of implants with a new chemically modified titanium surface in daily dental practice.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Giuseppe; Oteri, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    A new chemically modified titanium surface, SLActive, has recently been developed. The results obtained in controlled clinical trials indicate that this implant can be safely used and that it offers predictable results. The goal of this noninterventional study was to verify that the success rates of implants used in daily dental practice are comparable to those reported in controlled clinical trials. This study was a prospective, noninterventional study using implants with a chemically modified surface according to the daily dental practice procedures applied by private practitioners. The choice of the implantation procedure and the loading protocol were the responsibility of the investigator and were chosen according to the patient's needs. Thirty clinical centers actively participated in this study, and 226 patients were treated, of which, 8 patients were lost to follow-up. Because of the noninterventional design of the study, the patients were not selected according to strictly defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thus, the study included individuals with risk factors such as smoking (24%), untreated gingivitis or periodontitis (9%), and bruxism (6%). The implants were equally distributed between mandible (46%) and maxilla (54%). A bone augmentation procedure was done in 31% of the cases. Early loading (functional loading between 48 hours and 3 months after implant insertion) was applied most frequently (48%), followed by the conventional loading protocol (3 to 6 months after implant placement, 34%). Immediate restoration and immediate loading were rare (7% and 2%, respectively). Of 276 implants inserted and documented, 5 implants failures were reported, all of which were associated with a sinus floor augmentation procedure. The survival rate was 98.2% at the 1-year follow-up visit. The results showed that implants with a chemically modified surface can be successfully restored with success rates similar to those reported in formal clinical trials under more

  7. Dental implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Does milling one-piece titanium dental implants induce osteocyte and osteoclast changes?

    PubMed

    Russe, P; Pascaretti-Grizon, F; Aguado, E; Goyenvale, E; Filmon, R; Baslé, M-F; Chappard, D

    2011-06-01

    One-piece dental implants avoid adverse effects sometimes associated with the traditional implant-abutment interface and may provide a suitable alternative to two-piece implants; however, one-piece implants often need in situ milling, which may exacerbate cell apoptosis from excessive heat at the bone-implant interface and induce secondary crestal bone loss. Twelve implants were placed in the metaphyses of two sheep under general anesthesia. Six implants were milled with a diamond bur while the other six implants remained intact. Animals were euthanized after four days, and bone blocks were harvested. Bone samples were studied without decalcification. Osteocytes were stained with Hoechst 33342 and osteoclasts by the TRAcP reaction. Both cell types, in the cortical and trabecular bone around the implant's cervical region, were counted utilizing morphometric methods. Values were compared to areas at a distance from the cervical region. No difference was observed between milled and unmilled implants, which suggested that the amount of generated heat did not provoke osteocyte loss or induce osteoclastogenesis. Intraoral abutment preparations did not increase cellular apoptosis at the bone-implant interface after four days in the ovine model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  14. Synergistic interactions between corrosion and wear at titanium-based dental implant connections: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Apaza-Bedoya, K; Tarce, M; Benfatti, C A M; Henriques, B; Mathew, M T; Teughels, W; Souza, J C M

    2017-12-01

    Two-piece implant systems are mainly used in oral implantology involving an osseointegrated implant connected to an abutment, which supports prosthetic structures. It is well documented that the presence of microgaps, biofilms and oral fluids at the implant-abutment connection can cause mechanical and biological complications. The aim of this review paper was to report the degradation at the implant-abutment connection by wear and corrosion processes taking place in the oral cavity. Most of the retrieved studies evaluated the wear and corrosion (tribocorrosion) of titanium-based materials used for implants and abutments in artificial saliva. Electrochemical and wear tests together with microscopic techniques were applied to validate the tribocorrosion behavior of the surfaces. A few studies inspected the wear on the inner surfaces of the implant connection as a result of fatigue or removal of abutments. The studies reported increased microgaps after fatigue tests. In addition, data suggest that micromovements occurring at the contacting surfaces can increase the wear of the inner surfaces of the connection. Biofilms and/or glycoproteins act as lubricants, although they can also amplify the corrosion of the surfaces. Consequently, loosening of the implant-abutment connection can take place during mastication. In addition, wear and corrosion debris such as ions and micro- and nanoparticles released into the surrounding tissues can stimulate peri-implant inflammation that can lead to pathologic bone resorption. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-03-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  16. Tribocorrosion behaviour of anodic treated titanium surfaces intended for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. C.; Oliveira, F.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Celis, J.-P.; Rocha, L. A.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion plays an important role in the lifetime of metallic implants. Once implanted, biomaterials are subjected to micro-movements in aggressive biological fluids. Titanium is widely used as an implant material because it spontaneously forms a compact and protective nanometric thick oxide layer, mainly TiO2, in ambient air. That layer provides good corrosion resistance, and very low toxicity, but its low wear resistance is a concern. In this work, an anodizing treatment was performed on commercial pure titanium to form a homogeneous thick oxide surface layer in order to provide bioactivity and improve the biological, chemical and mechanical properties. Anodizing was performed in an electrolyte containing β-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate. The influence of the calcium acetate content on the tribocorrosion behaviour of the anodized material was studied. The concentration of calcium acetate in the electrolyte was found to largely affect the crystallographic structure of the resulting oxide layer. Better tribocorrosion behaviour was noticed on increasing the calcium acetate concentration.

  17. 10-year survival rate and the incidence of peri-implant disease of 374 titanium dental implants with a SLA surface: a prospective cohort study in 177 fully and partially edentulous patients.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Frank J J; Ofec, Ronen; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Ten Bruggenkate, Christiaan M

    2015-10-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates the 10-year survival and incidence of peri-implant disease at implant and patient level of sandblasted, large grid, and acid-etched titanium dental implants (Straumann, soft tissue level, SLA surface) in fully and partially edentulous patients. Patients who had dental implant surgery in the period between November 1997 and June 2001, with a follow-up of at least 10 years, were investigated for clinical and radiological examination. Among the 506 inserted dental implants in 250 patients, 10-year data regarding the outcome of implants were available for 374 dental implants in 177 patients. In the current study, peri-implantitis was defined as advanced bone loss (≧1.5 mm. postloading) in combination with bleeding on probing. At 10-year follow-up, only one implant was lost (0.3%) 2 months after implant surgery due to insufficient osseointegration. The average bone loss at 10 year postloading was 0.52 mm. Advanced bone loss at 10-year follow-up was present in 35 dental implants (9.8%). Seven percent of the observed dental implants showed bleeding on probing in combination with advanced bone loss and 4.2% when setting the threshold for advanced bone loss at 2.0 mm. Advanced bone loss without bleeding on probing was present in 2.8% of all implants. In this prospective study, the 10-year survival rate at implant and patient level was 99.7% and 99.4%, respectively. Peri-implantitis was present in 7% of the observed dental implants according to the above-mentioned definition of peri-implantitis. This study shows that SLA implants offer predictable long-term results as support in the treatment of fully and partially edentulous patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Digital data acquisition for a CAD/CAM-fabricated titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations for an implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Metz, Michael J; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2014-12-01

    This dental technique report describes a digital workflow with digital data acquisition at the implant level, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated, tissue-colored, anodized titanium framework, individually luted zirconium oxide restorations, and autopolymerizing injection-molded acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported, metal-ceramic-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. The 1-step computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabrication of titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations can provide a cost-effective alternative to the conventional metal-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of different air-abrasive powders on cell viability at biologically contaminated titanium dental implants surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Ferrari, Daniel; Popovski, Kristian; Hartig, Brigitte; Becker, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Studies have indicated that oral biofilm formation at structured titanium surfaces interferes with cell adhesion and proliferation, and its removal by means of conventional treatment procedures may not be sufficient to render these surfaces biologically acceptable. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of different air-abrasive powders on cell viability at biologically contaminated titanium dental implant surfaces. Intraoral splints were used to collect an in vivo biofilm on sandblasted and acid-etched titanium discs for 48 h. A single (1x) and repeated (2x) use of four different powders (amino acid glycine or sodium bicarbonate particles; range of mean particle size (d(v50)):20-75 microm) was applied at two distances (1 and 2 mm) and angles (30 degrees and 90 degrees) to the surfaces. Specimens (2x) were incubated with SaOs-2 cells for 7 days. Residual biofilm (RB) areas (%), and surface alterations (SEM) (1x and 2x), as well as SaOs-2 cell viability, expressed as mitochondrial cell activity (MA) (counts/second) (2x specimens), were assessed. Comparable mean RB areas were observed within and between groups after both 1x (RB: 0.0% +/- 0.0% to 5.7% +/- 5.7%) and 2x (RB: 0.0% +/- 0.0%) treatments. All surface treatments did not lead to MA (2x) values comparable to the sterile control group. However, sodium bicarbonate particles resulted in significantly higher MA (2x) values than amino acid glycine powders of different sizes. This was associated with pronounced alterations of the surface morphology (2x). Within the limits of the present study, it was concluded that SaOs-2 cell viability at biologically contaminated titanium surfaces was mainly influenced by the particle type of the powder. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Optimal Er:YAG laser irradiation parameters for debridement of microstructured fixture surfaces of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Schwarz, Frank; Izumi, Yuichi

    2013-07-01

    Er:YAG laser (ErL) irradiation has been reported to be effective for treating peri-implant disease. The present study seeks to evaluate morphological and elemental changes induced on microstructured surfaces of dental endosseous implants by high-pulse-repetition-rate ErL irradiation and to determine the optimal irradiation conditions for debriding contaminated microstructured surfaces. In experiment 1, dual acid-etched microstructured implants were irradiated by ErL (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; repetition rate, 30 Hz) with and without water spray and for used and unused contact tips. Experiment 2 compared the ErL treatment with conventional mechanical treatments (metal/plastic curettes and ultrasonic scalers). In experiment 3, five commercially available microstructures were irradiated by ErL light (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; pulse repetition rate, 30 Hz) while spraying water. In experiment 4, contaminated microstructured surfaces of three failed implants were debrided by ErL irradiation. After the experiments, all treated surfaces were assessed by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and/or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The stereomicroscopy, SEM, and EDS results demonstrate that, unlike mechanical treatments, ErL irradiation at 30 mJ/pulse and 30 Hz with water spray induced no color or morphological changes to the microstructures except for the anodized implant surface, which was easily damaged. The optimized irradiation parameters effectively removed calcified deposits from contaminated titanium microstructures without causing substantial thermal damage. ErL irradiation at pulse energies below 30 mJ/pulse (10.6 J/cm(2)/pulse) and 30 Hz with water spray in near-contact mode seems to cause no damage and to be effective for debriding microstructured surfaces (except for anodized microstructures).

  1. Induction Plasma Sprayed Nano Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium for Orthopaedic and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preparation of a highly crystalline nano hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray and their in vitro and in vivo biological response. HA coatings were prepared on Ti using normal and supersonic plasma nozzles at different plate powers and working distances. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis show that the normal plasma nozzle lead to increased phase decomposition, high amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase formation, and severe dehydroxylation of HA. In contrast, coatings prepared using supersonic nozzle retained the crystallinity and phase purity of HA due to relatively short exposure time of HA particles in the plasma. In addition, these coatings exhibited a microstructure that varied from porous and glassy structure at the coating-substrate interface to dense HA at the top surface. The microstructural analysis showed that the coating was made of multigrain HA particles of ~200 nm in size, which consisted of recrystallized HA grains in the size range of 15– 20 nm. Apart from the type of nozzle, working distance was also found to have a strong influence on the HA phase decomposition, while plate power had little influence. Depending on the plasma processing conditions, a coating thickness between 300 and 400 μm was achieved where the adhesive bond strengths were found to be between 4.8 MPa to 24 MPa. The cytotoxicity of HA coatings was examined by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) on coated surfaces. In vivo studies, using the cortical defect model in rat femur, evaluated the histological response of the HA coatings prepared with supersonic nozzle. After 2 weeks of implantation, osteoid formation was evident on the HA coated implant surface, which could indicate early implant- tissue integration in vivo. PMID:21552358

  2. COMPRESSIVE FATIGUE IN TITANIUM DENTAL IMPLANTS SUBMITTED TO FLUORIDE IONS ACTION

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ana Lúcia Roselino; Noriega, Jorge Roberto; Dametto, Fábio Roberto; Vaz, Luís Geraldo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of a fluoridated medium on the mechanical properties of an internal hexagon implant-abutment set, by means of compression, mechanical cycling and metallographic characterization by scanning electronic microscopy. Five years of regular use of oral hygiene with a sodium fluoride solution content of 1500 ppm were simulated, immersing the samples in this medium for 184 hours, with the solutions being changed every 12 hours. Data were analyzed at a 95% confidence level with Fisher's exact test. After the action of fluoride ions, a negative influence occurred in the mechanical cycling test performed in a servohydraulic machine (Material Test System-810) set to a frequency of 15 Hz with 100,000 cycles and programmed to 60% of the maximum resistance of static compression test. The sets tended to fracture by compression on the screw, characterized by mixed ruptures with predominance of fragile fracture, as observed by microscopy. An evidence of corrosion by pitting on sample surfaces was found after the fluoride ions action. It may be concluded that prolonged contact with fluoride ions is harmful to the mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium structures. PMID:19089148

  3. Resolution, sensitivity, and in vivo application of high-resolution computed tomography for titanium-coated polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, Vincent M J I; Jaroszewicz, Jacub; Anil, Sukumaran; Al Farraj Aldosari, Abdullah; Walboomers, X Frank; Jansen, John A

    2014-03-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of micro- versus nano-computed tomography (CT) techniques and (ii) to validate micro- versus nano-CT in a dog dental implant model, comparative to histological analysis. To determine spatial resolution and sensitivity, standardized reference samples containing standardized nano- and microspheres were prepared in polymer and ceramic matrices. Thereafter, 10 titanium-coated polymer dental implants (3.2 mm in Ø by 4 mm in length) were placed in the mandible of Beagle dogs. Both micro- and nano-CT, as well as histological analyses, were performed. The reference samples confirmed the high resolution of the nano-CT system, which was capable of revealing sub-micron structures embedded in radiodense matrices. The dog implantation study and subsequent statistical analysis showed equal values for bone area and bone-implant contact measurements between micro-CT and histology. However, because of the limited sample size and field of view, nano-CT was not rendering reliable data representative of the entire bone-implant specimen. Micro-CT analysis is an efficient tool to quantitate bone healing parameters at the bone-implant interface, especially when using titanium-coated PMMA implants. Nano-CT is not suitable for such quantification, but reveals complementary morphological information rivaling histology, yet with the advantage of a 3D visualization. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Investigation of the mechanical and chemical characteristics of nanotubular and nano-pitted anodic films on grade 2 titanium dental implant materials.

    PubMed

    Weszl, Miklós; Tóth, Krisztián László; Kientzl, Imre; Nagy, Péter; Pammer, Dávid; Pelyhe, Liza; Vrana, Nihal E; Scharnweber, Dieter; Wolf-Brandstetter, Cornelia; Joób F, Árpád; Bognár, Eszter

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the reproducibility, mechanical integrity, surface characteristics and corrosion behavior of nanotubular (NT) titanium oxide arrays in comparison with a novel nano-pitted (NP) anodic film. Surface treatment processes were developed to grow homogenous NT and NP anodic films on the surface of grade 2 titanium discs and dental implants. The effect of process parameters on the surface characteristics and reproducibility of the anodic films was investigated and optimized. The mechanical integrity of the NT and NP anodic films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness measurement, scratch resistance and screwing tests, while the chemical and physicochemical properties were investigated in corrosion tests, contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The growth of NT anodic films was highly affected by process parameters, especially by temperature, and they were apt to corrosion and exfoliation. In contrast, the anodic growth of NP film showed high reproducibility even on the surface of 3-dimensional screw dental implants and they did not show signs of corrosion and exfoliation. The underlying reason of the difference in the tendency for exfoliation of the NT and NP anodic films is unclear; however the XPS analysis revealed fluorine dopants in a magnitude larger concentration on NT anodic film than on NP surface, which was identified as a possible causative. Concerning other surface characteristics that are supposed to affect the biological behavior of titanium implants, surface roughness values were found to be similar, whereas considerable differences were revealed in the wettability of the NT and NP anodic films. Our findings suggest that the applicability of NT anodic films on the surface of titanium bone implants may be limited because of mechanical considerations. In contrast, it is worth to consider the applicability of nano-pitted anodic films over nanotubular arrays

  5. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  6. [Computed tomographic and clinical validation of the use of endosseous titanium nickelide dental implants].

    PubMed

    Temerkhanov, F T; Garafutdinov, D M; Arkharov, S L

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyze the efficacy of repair of atrophied [correction of arthrophic] alveolar processes of the jaws in the projections of the maxillary sinus and inferior alveolar canal with endosseous implants with porous cone-dilating mesostructure made of TN-1P alloy. Prospects for using the new implant design are outlined.

  7. A Novel Multi-Phosphonate Surface Treatment of Titanium Dental Implants: A Study in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    von Salis-Soglio, Marcella; Stübinger, Stefan; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Kämpf, Käthi; Zlinszky, Katalin; Buchini, Sabrina; Curno, Richard; Péchy, Péter; Aronsson, Bjorn-Owe; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The study used two types of implants (rough or machined surface finish) each with either the multi-phosphonate Wet or Dry treatment or no treatment (control) for a total of six groups. Animals were sacrificed after 2, 8, and 52 weeks. No adverse events were observed at any time point. At two weeks, removal torque showed significantly higher values for the multi-phosphonate treated rough surface (+32% and +29%, Dry and Wet, respectively) compared to rough control. At 52 weeks, a significantly higher removal torque was observed for the multi-phosphonate treated machined surfaces (+37% and 23%, Dry and Wet, respectively). The multi-phosphonate treated groups showed a positive tendency for higher BIC with time and increased new-old bone ratio at eight weeks. SEM images revealed greater amounts of organic materials on the multi-phosphonate treated compared to control implants, with the bone fracture (from the torque test) appearing within the bone rather than at the bone to implant interface as it occurred for control implants. PMID:25215424

  8. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  9. The effects of diode laser on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide adherent to titanium oxide surface of dental implants. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This in vitro study aims at providing the experimental basis for possible use of diode laser (λ 808 nm) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was grown for 48 h on titanium discs with porous surface corresponding to the bone-implant interface and then irradiated with a diode laser (λ 808 nm) in noncontact mode with airflow cooling for 1 min using a Ø 600-μm fiber. Setting parameters were 2 W (400 J/cm 2 ) for continuous wave mode; 22 μJ, 20 kHz, 7 μs (88 J/cm 2 ) for pulsed wave mode. Bactericidal effect was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and counting the residual colony-forming units. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, the titanium discs were coated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), laser-irradiated and seeded with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Diode laser irradiation in both continuous and pulsed modes induced a statistically significant reduction of viable bacteria and nitrite levels. These results indicate that in addition to its bactericidal effect laser irradiation can also inhibit LPS-induced macrophage activation and thus blunt the inflammatory response. The λ 808-nm diode laser emerges as a valuable tool for decontamination/detoxification of the titanium implant surface and may be used in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

  10. Fracture and fatigue behavior of shot-blasted titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Planell, J A; Padrós, A

    2002-01-01

    This investigation studies the effect of the shot-blasting treatment on the cyclic deformation behavior of a commercially pure titanium, with two microstructures: equiaxed and acicular. The fatigue tests were carried out in artificial saliva medium at 37 degrees C. Cyclic deformation tests have been carried out up to fracture, and the fatigue crack nucleation and propagation have been analyzed. The results show that the shot-blasting treatment improves the fatigue life in the microstructures studied, and that the equiaxed was better in mechanical properties than the acicular. The cause of this improvement in the mechanical properties is due to the compressive stress on the material surface for the shot-blasted specimens. Hardness tests were carried out to determine the value of these internal stresses.

  11. Optimization of dental implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  12. Stress Analysis on the Bone Around Five Different Dental Implants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    University of Science and Technology, Tehran, IRAN Abstract- Implantology has a widespread application in dental cases these days. Although the life...System, in Mackinny RV: Endosteal Dental Implant, Mosby Year Book, 1991 [3] Weiss M, Titanium Fiber-Mesh Metal Implant, J. Oral Implantology , 1986...STRESS ANALYSIS ON THE BONE AROUND FIVE DIFFERENT DENTAL IMPLANTS S. M. Rajaai, S. Khorrami-mehr School of mechanical Engineering Iran

  13. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Individual titanium zygomatic implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekhoroshev, M. V.; Ryabov, K. N.; Avdeev, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    Custom individual implants for the reconstruction of craniofacial defects have gained importance due to better qualitative characteristics over their generic counterparts – plates, which should be bent according to patient needs. The Additive Manufacturing of individual implants allows reducing cost and improving quality of implants. In this paper, the authors describe design of zygomatic implant models based on computed tomography (CT) data. The fabrication of the implants will be carried out with 3D printing by selective laser melting machine SLM 280HL.

  15. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bulutsuz, A. G., E-mail: asligunaya@gmail.com; Demircioglu, P., E-mail: pinar.demircioglu@adu.edu.tr; Bogrekci, I., E-mail: ismail.bogrekci@adu.edu.tr

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailedmore » surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in

  16. Biofilm on dental implants: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Karthikeyan; Jung, Ronald E; Molenberg, Aart; Hammerle, Christoph H F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current literature with regard to biofilm formation on dental implants and the influence of surface characteristics (chemistry, surface free energy, and roughness) of dental implant and abutment materials and their design features on biofilm formation and its sequelae. An electronic MEDLINE literature search was conducted of studies published between 1966 and June 2007. The following search terms were used: biofilm and dental implants, biofilm formation/plaque bacterial adhesion and implants, plaque/biofilm and surface characteristics/roughness/surface free energy of titanium dental implants, implant-abutment interface and plaque/biofilm, biofilm and supragingival/subgingival plaque microbiology, biofilm/plaque and implant infection, antibacterial/bacteriostatic titanium, titanium nanocoating/nanopatterning, antimicrobial drug/titanium implant. Both in vitro and in vivo studies were included in this review. Fifty-three articles were identified in this review process. The articles were categorized with respect to their context on biofilm formation on teeth and dental implant surfaces and with regard to the influence of surface characteristics of implant biomaterials (especially titanium) and design features of implant and abutment components on biofilm formation. The current state of literature is more descriptive, rather than providing strong data that could be analyzed through meta-analysis. Basic research articles on surface modification of titanium were also included in the review to analyze the applications of such studies on the fabrication of implant surfaces that could possibly decrease early bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Increase in surface roughness and surface free energy facilitates biofilm formation on dental implant and abutment surfaces, although this conclusion is derived from largely descriptive literature. Surface chemistry and the design features of the implant-abutment configuration also

  17. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  18. Biomechanical investigation of thread designs and interface conditions of zirconia and titanium dental implants with bone: three-dimensional numeric analysis.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Michael Y C; Shen, Yen-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Bone stress and interfacial sliding at the bone-implant interface (BII) were analyzed in zirconia and titanium implants with various thread designs and interface conditions (bonded BII and contact BIIs with different frictional coefficients) for both conventional and immediately loaded treatments. A total of 18 finite element models comprising two implant materials (zirconia and titanium), three thread designs (different shapes and pitches), and three interface conditions (bonded and contact BIIs) were analyzed to assess the effects on bone stresses and on sliding at the BII. The material properties of the bone model were anisotropic, and a lateral force of 130 N was applied as the loading condition. In the immediately loaded implant, the stress was highly concentrated at one site of the peri-implant bone. The peak bone stress was more than 20% lower in zirconia implants than in titanium implants for a bonded BII and 14% to 20% lower for a contact BII. The bone stresses did not differ significantly between implants with V-shaped threads and square threads. However, sliding at the BII was more than 25% lower with square-thread implants than with V-shaped-thread implants for titanium implants and 36% lower for zirconia implants. Reducing the thread size and pitch in cortical bone (via two V-shaped threads with different pitches) decreased the bone stress by 13%. Increasing the frictional coefficient reduced sliding at the BII in both zirconia and titanium implants. As an implant material, zirconia can reduce the bone stress in the crestal cortical region. Bone stress and sliding at the BII are heavily dependent on the thread design and the frictional coefficient at the BII of immediately loaded implants.

  19. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  20. Microstructure of titanium-cement-lithium disilicate interface in CAD-CAM dental implant crowns: a three-dimensional profilometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Cresti, Stefano; Itri, Angelo; Rebaudi, Alberto; Diaspro, Alberto; Salerno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an infection of the implant surface caused by adhesion of bacteria that generate bone resorption and sometimes even consequent implant loss. Both screw-retained and cemented fixed implants are affected. The purpose of this study is to investigate the morphological defects at the cemented interface between titanium abutment and ceramic crown, comparing different adhesive cements used to fill the marginal gap. Twelve computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing dental crowns were cemented to titanium abutments using three different resin composite cements. Sealed margins were polished using grommets with descending diamond particle size. Three groups of four crowns each were made according to the cement used, namely RelyX Unicem (3 M ESPE), Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray), and NX3 (Nexus Kerr). Samples were analyzed using optical inspection, three-dimensional profilometry, and image analysis, including analysis of variance. Although RelyX showed significantly lower root mean square surface roughness (4.4 ± 1.5 μm) than that of NX3 (7.0 ± 2.9 μm), it showed no significant difference with Panavia (3.7 ± 1.5 μm). The marginal gap was significantly wider in Panavia (149 ± 108 μm) as compared with NX3 (71 ± 45 μm) and Relyx (64 ± 34 μm). For all groups, homogeneous heights of both metal-cement and ceramic-cement gaps were observed. Moreover, all samples showed homogeneity of the margins and absence of instrumental bias, thus validating both procedure and materials. When using the chosen polishing method, RelyX Unicem showed both low roughness and marginal width, and thus the smoothest and more continuous abutment-crown interlayer, promising a low probability of occurrence of peri-implantitis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  2. Direct laser metal sintering as a new approach to fabrication of an isoelastic functionally graded material for manufacture of porous titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Traini, T; Mangano, C; Sammons, R L; Mangano, F; Macchi, A; Piattelli, A

    2008-11-01

    This work focuses on a titanium alloy implants incorporating a gradient of porosity, from the inner core to the outer surface, obtained by laser sintering of metal powder. Surface appearance, microstructure, composition, mechanical properties and fractography were evaluated. All the specimens were prepared by a selective laser sintering procedure using a Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder with a particle size of 1-10 microm. The morphological and chemical analyses were performed by SEM and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The flexure strength was determined by a three-point bend test using a universal testing machine. The surface roughness was investigated using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The surface roughness variation was statistically evaluated by use of a Chi square test. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The original surface microstructure consisted of roughly spherical particles, diameter range 5-50 microm. After exposure to hydrofluoric acid some of these were removed and the microsphere diameter then ranged from 5.1 microm to 26.8 microm. Following an organic acid treatment, particles were replaced by grooves 14.6-152.5 microm in width and 21.4-102.4 microm depth. The metal core consisted of columnar beta grains with alpha and beta laths within the grains. The alloy was composed of 90.08% Ti, 5.67% Al and 4.25% V. The Young's modulus of the inner core material was 104+/-7.7 GPa; while that of the outer porous material was 77+/-3.5 GPa. The fracture face showed a dimpled appearance typical of ductile fracture. In conclusion, laser metal sintering proved to be an efficient means of construction of dental implants with a functionally graded material which is better adapted to the elastic properties of the bone. Such implants should minimize stress shielding effects and improve long-term performance.

  3. Titanium hydride and hydrogen concentration in acid-etched commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy implants: a comparative analysis of five implant systems.

    PubMed

    Szmukler-Moncler, S; Bischof, M; Nedir, R; Ermrich, M

    2010-09-01

    Acid etching is a popular method to texture the surface of dental implants. During etching, the titanium oxide protective layer is dissolved and small native hydrogen ions diffuse into the unprotected implant surface. They enrich the implant surface with hydrogen and precipitate into titanium hydride (TiH). The aim of this study was to measure the concentration of TiH at the implant surface and the total concentration of Hydrogen at five commercially available implant systems, made of either commercially pure (cp) titanium or titanium alloy. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) was conducted on each implant system to determine the compounds present at the implant surface. Following a TiH(2)/Ti calibration curve, the concentration of TiH was determined. Concentration of hydrogen in the implants was measured by the inert gas fusion thermal conductivity/infrared detection method. XRD data showed that TiH was present on all cp titanium implants but not on the alloyed implants. TiH concentration varied between 5% and 37%. Hydrogen concentration varied between 43 and 108 ppm, no difference in uptake was found between the cp titanium and alloyed implants. Low solubility of hydrogen in alpha-titanium is responsible for precipitation into TiH. Stronger etching conditions led to higher concentration of TiH2-x. High solubility of hydrogen in the beta-phase of the alloy is preventing hydrogen from precipitating into TiH. All implants, even those lacking TiH at the surface, were enriched with hydrogen. In all implants, hydrogen concentration was within the normative limit of 130 ppm.

  4. Wear at the titanium-titanium and the titanium-zirconia implant-abutment interface: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Stimmelmayr, Michael; Edelhoff, Daniel; Güth, Jan-Frederik; Erdelt, Kurt; Happe, Arndt; Beuer, Florian

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and measure the wear of the interface between titanium implants and one-piece zirconia abutments in comparison to titanium abutments. 6 implants were secured into epoxy resin blocks. The implant interface of these implants and 6 corresponding abutments (group Zr: three one-piece zirconia abutments; group Ti: three titanium abutments) were examined by a microscope and scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Also the implants and the abutments were scanned by 3D-Micro Computer Tomography (CT). The abutments were connected to the implants and cyclically loaded with 1,200,000 cycles at 100N in a two-axis fatigue testing machine. Afterwards, all specimens were unscrewed and the implants and abutments again were scanned by microscope, SEM and CT. The microscope and SEM images were compared, the CT data were superimposed and the wear was calculated by inspection software. The statistical analysis was carried out with an unpaired t-test. Abutment fracture or screw loosening was not observed during cyclical loading. Comparing the microscope and SEM images more wear was observed on the implants connected to zirconia abutments. The maximum wear on the implant shoulder calculated by the inspection software was 10.2μm for group Zr, and 0.7μm for group Ti. The influence of the abutment material on the measured wear was statistically significant (p≤0.001; Levene-test). Titanium implants showed higher wear at the implant interface following cyclic loading when connected to one-piece zirconia implant abutments compared to titanium abutments. The clinical relevance is not clear; hence damage of the internal implant connection could result in prosthetic failures up to the need of implant removal. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  6. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Osseointegrated dental implants produced via microwave processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, Muralithran G.

    This research is a comprehensive effort to develop osseointegrated dental implants via microwave processing. A net-shape microwave sintering procedure was employed to fabricate dental implants. Commercial pure titanium powders (-100, -200 and -325 mesh sizes) were used in this work. This process eliminates the need for machining of implants and prevents contamination. The idea was to take advantage of the peculiar way microwave couple with metallic powders, i.e. generating heat in the interior of the sample and dissipating it away through the surface. The desired features for an implant, a dense core with surface pores, is not possible via conventional sintering. Coating with hydroxyapatite via electrodeposition and chemical combustion vapor deposition was also attempted to further enhance the bioactivity of this layer. Surface roughness and area were measured using a non-contact surface profilometer to further describe the unique surface. In-vitro studies, conducted using osteoblast cells extracted from neonatal rat calvarial, showed improved cell growth on all the uncoated porous samples. However, the highest cell growth was observed on the -200 mesh size samples. The higher surface area of the -200 mesh samples is attributed to this observation. This work was able to identify the processing parameters for titanium in microwave and establishes the importance of surface area as a key parameter for cell growth on porous surfaces as compared to surface roughness.

  8. Induction of periimplantitis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephan T; Föge, Marc; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Gavrilova, Olga; Bolte, Hendrik; Rosenstiel, Philipp; Wiltfang, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Development, progression, and therapy of periimplantitis are nonresolved emerging problems. The aim of this pilot study was to establish a model for periimplantitis in mice to have a base for tests with immune-deficient knockout organisms to improve the knowledge about development and progression of periimplantitis and to develop further therapeutic options.In 8 mice, titanium implants were inserted in the median of the palate. Four of these implants had ligatures (periimplantitis group). After 2 weeks, the animals received a special diet enriched with sugar and flavor. After 9 weeks, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) examinations to evaluate the periimplant tissue and histologies were performed.Dental implant insertions within the oral cavity are possible in living mice. Implants with ligatures showed significantly larger periimplant bone defects than controls. The radiologic findings were confirmed by histology. At the end of the observation period, the portion of implants lost was higher in the ligature group.This is the first publication to describe the insertion of dental implants in living mice. In addition, it is the first time that periimplant infection could be induced in that species. This model will pave the way to study knockout mice with reduced or even enhanced resistance to periimplantitis.

  9. Ion Implantation Studies of Titanium Metal Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    sf.Th. 82-0 327 11,y 604.)___ _ 4 . TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Ion Implantation Studies of Titanium Metal Suf s 6 ...AD-A113 7ag GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL OF PHYSICS FIG 11/ 6 ION IMPLANTATION STUDOIES OF TITANIUM METAL SURtFACES. (U) 1901 J R STEVENSON. K...LL0 kpproved ror 82 4 ±s~rutic iui.~o 82r-~~ ION IMPLANTATION STUDIES OF TITANIUM METAL SURFACES SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OIOF THIS PAGE (0fen Date

  10. Comparative bone tissue integration of nanostructured and microroughened dental implants.

    PubMed

    Salou, Laëtitia; Hoornaert, Alain; Stanovici, Julien; Briand, Sylvain; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare osteointegration of nanostructured implants to a microsurface widely used for titanium dental implants. Commercial titanium dental implants with smooth or microroughened surfaces were nanostructured. Implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of rabbits. After 2 and 4 weeks, histomorphometry calculation was performed. Nanotubes measuring 60 nm in diameter were observed on both S-NANO (roughness: 0.05 μm) and R-NANO (roughness: 0.40 μm) surfaces. The MICRO surface exhibited typical random cavities (roughness: 2.09 μm). At 4 weeks, bone-to-implant contact values were significantly higher for the R-NANO than for the MICRO surface while no differences were observed at 2 weeks. Overall, this study shows that the nanostructured surfaces improved osteointegration similar or higher than the MICRO.

  11. Scaling of titanium implants entrains inflammation-induced osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Michal; Sterer, Nir; Liron, Tamar; Kohavi, David; Gabet, Yankel

    2017-01-01

    With millions of new dental and orthopedic implants inserted annually, periprosthetic osteolysis becomes a major concern. In dentistry, peri-implantitis management includes cleaning using ultrasonic scaling. We examined whether ultrasonic scaling releases titanium particles and induces inflammation and osteolysis. Titanium discs with machined, sandblasted/acid-etched and sandblasted surfaces were subjected to ultrasonic scaling and we physically and chemically characterized the released particles. These particles induced a severe inflammatory response in macrophages and stimulated osteoclastogenesis. The number of released particles and their chemical composition and nanotopography had a significant effect on the inflammatory response. Sandblasted surfaces released the highest number of particles with the greatest nanoroughness properties. Particles from sandblasted/acid-etched discs induced a milder inflammatory response than those from sandblasted discs but a stronger inflammatory response than those from machined discs. Titanium particles were then embedded in fibrin membranes placed on mouse calvariae for 5 weeks. Using micro-CT, we observed that particles from sandblasted discs induced more osteolysis than those from sandblasted/acid-etched discs. In summary, ultrasonic scaling of titanium implants releases particles in a surface type-dependent manner and may aggravate peri-implantitis. Future studies should assess whether surface roughening affects the extent of released wear particles and aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants. PMID:28059080

  12. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  13. [Application of plasma sprayed zirconia coating in dental implant: study in implant].

    PubMed

    Huang, Z F; Wang, Z F; Li, C H; Hao, D; Lan, J

    2018-04-09

    Objective: To investigate the osseointegration of a novel coating-plasma-sprayed zirconia in dental implant. Methods: Zirconia coating on non-thread titanium implant was prepared using plasma spraying, the implant surface morphology, surface roughness and wettability were measured. In vivo , zirconia coated implants were inserted in rabbit tibia and animals were respectively sacrificed at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after implantation. The bond strength between implant and bone was measured by push-out test. The osseointegration was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro CT and histological analyses. Quantified parameters including removal torque, and bone-implant contact (BIC) percentage were calculated. Results: The surface roughness (1.6 µm) and wettability (54.6°) of zirconia coated implant was more suitable than those of titanium implant (0.6 µm and 74.4°) for osseointegration. At 12 weeks, the push-out value of zirconia coated implant and titanium implant were (64.9±3.0) and (50.4±2.9) N, and BIC value of these two groups were (54.7±3.6)% and (41.5±3.6)%. All these differences had statistical significance. Conclusions: The surface characters of zirconia coated implant were more suitable for osseointegration and present better osseointegration than smooth titanium implant in vivo , especially at early stage.

  14. Dental implant tourism.

    PubMed

    Barrowman, R A; Grubor, D; Chandu, A

    2010-12-01

    Access and affordability of dental care can be problematic for some in the Australian community. Therefore, dental tourism is increasingly becoming more attractive to some patients due to decreased expense, increased convenience and immediacy of treatment. However, there are significant issues for both clinician and patient in regards to dental tourism. Lack of accountability and regulation are the main issues and this is particularly evident when complications occur. This paper presents five cases where complications have arisen in the setting of dental tourism. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Clinical evaluation of immediate loading of titanium orthodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, S.S.; Chakranarayan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skeletal anchorage using dental implants, miniplates, miniscrews and microscrews provides an absolute anchorage for tooth movement. Miniscrew and microscrew implants have many benefits such as ease of placement and removal and immediate orthodontic force application. Methods Fifteen subjects in the permanent dentition with an overjet ≥6 mm received treatment with the 0.018-inch pre-adjusted edgewise appliance system (Roth prescription) and extraction of all first premolars. Titanium orthodontic implants were placed in both the upper quadrants and were immediately loaded with elastic chain from the implant head to the sectional arch wire. Result The overall success rate of immediate loaded titanium orthodontic micro implants (OMI) in the present study was 83.33%, with a mean chairside time of 15.33 min of placing two implants in each patient. Peri-implant inflammation was the only complication observed. Most failures were in the initial part of the study. There was no significant difference in the success rate of implants based on sex, side of placement (right or left) and type of malocclusion. Conclusion The OMIs used in the present study proved to be effective and well tolerated in producing immediate orthodontic anchorage for the retraction. PMID:25859080

  16. Self-Assembled Monolayers for Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Uribe, Alejandra

    2018-01-01

    Implant-based therapy is a mature approach to recover the health conditions of patients affected by edentulism. Thousands of dental implants are placed each year since their introduction in the 80s. However, implantology faces challenges that require more research strategies such as new support therapies for a world population with a continuous increase of life expectancy, to control periodontal status and new bioactive surfaces for implants. The present review is focused on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for dental implant materials as a nanoscale-processing approach to modify titanium surfaces. SAMs represent an easy, accurate, and precise approach to modify surface properties. These are stable, well-defined, and well-organized organic structures that allow to control the chemical properties of the interface at the molecular scale. The ability to control the composition and properties of SAMs precisely through synthesis (i.e., the synthetic chemistry of organic compounds with a wide range of functional groups is well established and in general very simple, being commercially available), combined with the simple methods to pattern their functional groups on complex geometry appliances, makes them a good system for fundamental studies regarding the interaction between surfaces, proteins, and cells, as well as to engineering surfaces in order to develop new biomaterials. PMID:29552036

  17. Effect of Macrogeometry on the Surface Topography of Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Naves, Marina Melo; Menezes, Helder Henrique Machado; Magalhães, Denildo; Ferreira, Jessica Afonso; Ribeiro, Sara Ferreira; de Mello, José Daniel Biasoli; Costa, Henara Lillian

    2015-01-01

    Because the microtopography of titanium implants influences the biomaterial-tissue interaction, surface microtexturing treatments are frequently used for dental implants. However, surface treatment alone may not determine the final microtopography of a dental implant, which can also be influenced by the implant macrogeometry. This work analyzed the effects on surface roughness parameters of the same treatment applied by the same manufacturer to implants with differing macro-designs. Three groups of titanium implants with different macro-designs were investigated using laser interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. Relevant surface roughness parameters were calculated for different regions of each implant. Two flat disks (treated and untreated) were also investigated for comparison. The tops of the threads and the nonthreaded regions of all implants had very similar roughness parameters, independent of the geometry of the implant, which were also very similar to those of flat disks treated with the same process. In contrast, the flanks and valleys of the threads presented larger irregularities (Sa) with higher slopes (Sdq) and larger developed surface areas (Sdr) on all implants, particularly for implants with threads with smaller heights. The flanks and valleys displayed stronger textures (Str), particularly on the implants with threads with larger internal angles. Parameters associated with the height of the irregularities (Sa), the slope of the asperities (Sdq), the presence of a surface texture (Str), and the developed surface area of the irregularities (Sdr) were significantly affected by the macrogeometry of the implants. Flat disks subjected to the same surface treatment as dental implants reproduced only the surface topography of the flat regions of the implants.

  18. Discoloration of the Peri-implant Mucosa Caused by Zirconia and Titanium Implants.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel S; Ioannidis, Alexis; Cathomen, Elena; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Hüsler, Jürg; Jung, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the discoloration of the peri-implant mucosa caused by zirconia (Zr) and titanium (Ti) dental implants with and without soft tissue grafting (STG). Zr and Ti implants were inserted in edentulous areas in pig maxillae. Spectrophotometric measurements were performed prior to and after the insertion of the implants, and following the placement of a STG on the buccal side. A significant discoloration of the mucosa was observed with a mean ΔE of 8.05 (± 2.51) (Ti) and 4.93 (± 3.18) (Zr). In conjunction with a STG, ΔE values amounted to 5.31 ± 3.50 (Ti) and 5.95 (± 3.68) (Zr). The placement of Zr implants led to less discoloration of the mucosa than Ti implants without STG.

  19. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  20. [Dental implant restoration abutment selection].

    PubMed

    Bin, Shi; Hao, Zeng

    2017-04-01

    An increasing number of implant restoration abutment types are produced with the rapid development of dental implantology. Although various abutments can meet different clinical demands, the selection of the appropriate abutment is both difficult and confusing. This article aims to help clinicians select the appropriate abutment by describing abutment design, types, and selection criteria.

  1. A macro- and nanostructure evaluation of a novel dental implant.

    PubMed

    Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Traini, Tonino; Vinci, Raffaele; Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Gherlone, Enrico

    2008-09-01

    Success in implant dentistry also comes from the implant macrodesign and nanostructure of its surface. Titanium implant surface treatments have been shown to enhance osseointegration, maximize bone healing, and bone-to-implant contact for predictable clinical results. The aim of the study, was to evaluate the geometric macrodesign and the surface nanostructure of a novel dental implant full contact covering (FCC) obtained by electrochemical procedures. FCC implants were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope, profilometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with commercial sandblasted and sandblasted, large-grit acid-etched dental implants. Sample analysis allowed to distinguish the different implant macrodesigns, the step and the profile of the coils that cover the fixture, and the surface characteristics. FCC implant showed novel macro-characteristic of crestal module, coils, and apical zone compared with sandblasted and sandblasted and acid-etched dental implants. Moreover, the FCC nanostructure surface showed roughness values statistically higher than the 2 other surfaces, with a more homogeneity in a peaks and valleys arrangement. Finally, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis detected differences between the examined surfaces, with the presence of several contaminants according to the different treatment procedures. Research on new macrostructures and nano morphology should result in a better qualitative and quantitative osseointegration response, with a predictability of the clinical results and long-term success of the implants.

  2. Alveolar Ridge Reconstruction with Titanium Meshes and Simultaneous Implant Placement: A Retrospective, Multicenter Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Paraud Freixas, Andres; Han, Chang-Hun; Bechara, Sohueil; Tawil, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate horizontal bone gain and implant survival and complication rates in patients treated with titanium meshes placed simultaneously with dental implants and fixed over them. Methods. Twenty-five patients treated with 40 implants and simultaneous guided bone regeneration with titanium meshes (i–Gen®, MegaGen, Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea) were selected for inclusion in the present retrospective multicenter study. Primary outcomes were horizontal bone gain and implant survival; secondary outcomes were biological and prosthetic complications. Results. After the removal of titanium meshes, the CBCT evaluation revealed a mean horizontal bone gain of 3.67 mm (±0.89). The most frequent complications were mild postoperative edema (12/25 patients: 48%) and discomfort after surgery (10/25 patients: 40%); these complications were resolved within one week. Titanium mesh exposure occurred in 6 patients (6/25 : 24%): one of these suffered partial loss of the graft and another experienced complete graft loss and implant failure. An implant survival rate of 97.5% (implant-based) and a peri-implant marginal bone loss of 0.43 mm (±0.15) were recorded after 1 year. Conclusions. The horizontal ridge reconstruction with titanium meshes placed simultaneously with dental implants achieved predictable satisfactory results. Prospective randomized controlled trials on a larger sample of patients are required to validate these positive outcomes. PMID:27999799

  3. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements. If you have certain heart conditions or orthopedic implants, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics before surgery ... trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  4. Femtosecond laser structuring of titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2007-06-01

    In this study we perform the first femtosecond laser surface treatment of titanium in order to determine the potential of this technology for surface structuring of titanium implants. We find that the femtosecond laser produces a large variety of nanostructures (nanopores, nanoprotrusions) with a size down to 20 nm, multiple parallel grooved surface patterns with a period on the sub-micron level, microroughness in the range of 1-15 μm with various configurations, smooth surface with smooth micro-inhomogeneities, and smooth surface with sphere-like nanostructures down to 10 nm. Also, we have determined the optimal conditions for producing these surface structural modifications. Femtosecond laser treatment can produce a richer variety of surface structures on titanium for implants and other biomedical applications than long-pulse laser treatments.

  5. Why do dental implants fail? Part I.

    PubMed

    el Askary, A S; Meffert, R M; Griffin, T

    1999-01-01

    Many factors are attributed to failure of the dental implant, either directly or indirectly. The focus of this article is to define the causation of dental implant failure, as well as to present an evaluation of the implant literature regarding etiology, classification, management, and treatment of implant failures. This article will highlight the initial signs of implant failure with a view of some clinical cases in terms of classification and degrees of implant failure. Finally, a dental implant failure checklist is formulated to guide the practitioner in defining the cause of implant failure, be it infective or noninfective, and to establish percentages and frequency of occurrence. The checklist applies to all implant systems and will help to determine the factors responsible for causation and the repair procedures, whether they are at the surgical or restorative phases. The definition of implant failure is set forth in terms of ailing, failing, failed, and surviving implants, and the appropriate treatments and dispositions are outlined.

  6. Bioactive macroporous titanium implants highly interconnected.

    PubMed

    Caparrós, Cristina; Ortiz-Hernandez, Mónica; Molmeneu, Meritxell; Punset, Miguel; Calero, José Antonio; Aparicio, Conrado; Fernández-Fairén, Mariano; Perez, Román; Gil, Francisco Javier

    2016-10-01

    Intervertebral implants should be designed with low load requirements, high friction coefficient and low elastic modulus in order to avoid the stress shielding effect on bone. Furthermore, the presence of a highly interconnected porous structure allows stimulating bone in-growth and enhancing implant-bone fixation. The aim of this study was to obtain bioactive porous titanium implants with highly interconnected pores with a total porosity of approximately 57 %. Porous Titanium implants were produced by powder sintering route using the space holder technique with a binder phase and were then evaluated in an in vivo study. The size of the interconnection diameter between the macropores was about 210 μm in order to guarantee bone in-growth through osteblastic cell penetration. Surface roughness and mechanical properties were analyzed. Stiffness was reduced as a result of the powder sintering technique which allowed the formation of a porous network. Compression and fatigue tests exhibited suitable properties in order to guarantee a proper compromise between mechanical properties and pore interconnectivity. Bioactivity treatment effect in novel sintered porous titanium materials was studied by thermo-chemical treatments and were compared with the same material that had undergone different bioactive treatments. Bioactive thermo-chemical treatment was confirmed by the presence of sodium titanates on the surface of the implants as well as inside the porous network. Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the identified titanate structures would enhance in vivo apatite formation by promoting ion exchange for the apatite formation process. In vivo results demonstrated that the bioactive titanium achieved over 75 % tissue colonization compared to the 40 % value for the untreated titanium.

  7. Surface modifications of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Stanford, C M

    2008-06-01

    Dental implant surface technologies have been evolving rapidly to enhance a more rapid bone formation on their surface and hold a potential to increase the predictability of expedited implant therapy. While implant outcomes have become highly predictable, there are sites and conditions that result in elevated implant loss. This paper reviews the impact of macro-retentive features which includes approaches to surface oxide modification, thread design, press-fit and sintered-bead technologies to increase predictability of outcomes. Implant designs that lead to controlled lateral compression of the bone can improve primary stability as long as the stress does not exceed the localized yield strength of the cortical bone. Some implant designs have reduced crestal bone loss by use of multiple cutting threads that are closely spaced, smoothed on the tip but designed to create a hoop-stress stability of the implant as it is completely seated in the osteotomy. Following the placement of the implant, there is a predictable sequence of bone turnover and replacement at the interface that allows the newly formed bone to adapt to microscopic roughness on the implant surface, and on some surfaces, a nanotopography (<10(-9) m scale) that has been shown to preferably influence the formation of bone. Newly emerging studies show that bone cells are exquisitely sensitive to these topographical features and will upregulate the expression of bone related genes for new bone formation when grown on these surfaces. We live in an exciting time of rapid changes in the modalities we can offer patients for tooth replacement therapy. Given this, it is our responsibility to be critical when claims are made, incorporate into our practice what is proven and worthwhile, and to continue to support and provide the best patient care possible.

  8. R&D on dental implants breakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Sorin Mihai; Popovici, Ion Alexandru

    2017-09-01

    Most used dental implants for human dental prostheses are of two steps type: first step means implantation and, after several months healing and osseointegration, second step is prosthesis fixture. For sure, dental implants and prostheses are meant to last for a lifetime. Still, there are unfortunate cases when dental implants break. This paper studies two steps dental implants breakage and proposes a set of instruments for replacement and restoration of the broken implant. First part of the paper sets the input data of the study: structure of the studied two steps dental implants based on two Romanian patents and values of the loading forces found in practice and specialty papers. In the second part of the paper, using DEFORM 2D™ FEM simulation software, worst case scenarios of loading dental implants are studied in order to determine which zones and components of the dental implant set are affected (broken). Last part of the paper is dedicated to design and presentation of a set for extracting and cutting tools used to restore the broken implant set.

  9. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole.

  10. Comparison of surface modified zirconia implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants: a histological study in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gredes, Tomasz; Kubasiewicz-Ross, Pawel; Gedrange, Tomasz; Dominiak, Marzena; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2014-08-01

    New biomaterials and their various surface modifications should undergo in vitro and in vivo evaluation before clinical trials. The objective of our in vivo study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of newly created zirconium implant surfaces after implantation in the lower jaw of pigs and compare the osseointegration of these dental implants with commercially available zirconium and titanium implants. After a healing period of 12 weeks, a histological analysis of the soft and hard tissues and a histomorphometric analysis of the bone-implant contact (BIC) were performed. The implant surfaces showed an intimate connection to the adjacent bone for all tested implants. The 3 newly created zirconium implant surfaces achieved a BIC of 45% on average in comparison with a BIC of 56% from the reference zirconium implants and 35% from titanium implants. Furthermore, the new zirconium implants had a better attachment to gingival and bone tissues in the range of implant necks as compared with the reference implants. The results suggest that the new implants comparably osseointegrate within the healing period, and they have a good in vivo biocompatibility.

  11. Preliminary fabrication and characterization of electron beam melted Ti-6Al-4V customized dental implant.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnaiah, Ravikumar; Al Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Mohammad, Ashfaq; Divakar, Darshan Devang; Kotha, Sunil Babu; Celur, Sree Lalita; Hashem, Mohamed I; Vallittu, Pekka K; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2017-05-01

    The current study was aimed to fabricate customized root form dental implant using additive manufacturing technique for the replacement of missing teeth. The root form dental implant was designed using Geomagic™ and Magics™, the designed implant was directly manufactured by layering technique using ARCAM A2™ electron beam melting system by employing medical grade Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder. Furthermore, the fabricated implant was characterized in terms of certain clinically important parameters such as surface microstructure, surface topography, chemical purity and internal porosity. Results confirmed that, fabrication of customized dental implants using additive rapid manufacturing technology offers an attractive method to produce extremely pure form of customized titanium dental implants, the rough and porous surface texture obtained is expected to provide better initial implant stabilization and superior osseointegration.

  12. Custom-made laser-welded titanium implant prosthetic abutment.

    PubMed

    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A

    2005-10-01

    A technique to create an individually modified implant prosthetic abutment is described. An overcasting is waxed onto a machined titanium abutment, cast in titanium, and joined to it with laser welding. With the proposed technique, a custom-made titanium implant prosthetic abutment is created with adequate volume and contour of metal to support a screw-retained, metal-ceramic implant-supported crown.

  13. Finite element analysis (FEA) of dental implant fixture for mechanical stability and rapid osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Shafia; Murtaza, Ahmar; Ali, Hasan; Uddin, Zia Mohy; Zehra, Syedah Sadaf

    2017-10-01

    For rapid osseointegration of dental implant fixtures, various surface treatments including plasma spraying, hydroxyapatite coating, acid-etching, and surface grooving are used. However undesirable effects such as chemical modifications, loss of mechanical properties, prolonged processing times and post production treatment steps are often associated with these techniques. The osseointegration rate of the dental implants can be promoted by increasing the surface area of the dental implant, thus increasing the bone cells - implant material contact and allow bone tissues to grow rapidly. Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques can be used to fabricate dental implant fixtures with desirable surface area in a single step manufacturing process. AM allows the use of Computer Aided Designing (CAD) for customised rapid prototyping of components with precise control over geometry. In this study, the dental implant fixture that replaces the tooth root was designed on commercially available software COMSOL. Nickel - titanium alloy was selected as build materials for dental implant. The geometry of the dental fixture was varied by changing the interspacing distance (thread pitch) and number of threads to increase the total surface area. Three different microstructures were introduced on the surface of dental implant. The designed models were used to examine the effect of changing geometries on the total surface area. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to investigate the effect of changing geometries on the mechanical properties of the dental implant fixtures using stress analysis.

  14. Osseointegration of three-dimensional designed titanium implants manufactured by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Shaoki, Algabri; Xu, Jia-Yun; Sun, Haipeng; Chen, Xian-Shuai; Ouyang, Jianglin; Zhuang, Xiu-Mei; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-10-27

    The selective laser melting (SLM) technique is a recent additive manufacturing (AM) technique. Several studies have reported success in the SLM-based production of biocompatible orthopaedic implants and three-dimensional bone defect constructs. In this study, we evaluated the surface properties and biocompatibility of an SLM titanium implant in vitro and compared them with those of a machined (MA) titanium control surface. In addition, we evaluated the osseointegration capability of the SLM implants in vivo and compared it with those of MA and Nobel-speedy (Nobel-S) implants. SLM microtopographical surface analysis revealed porous and high roughness with varied geometry compared with a smooth surface in MA Ti samples but with similar favourable wettability. Osteoblast proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were significantly enhanced on the SLM surface. Histological analysis of the bone-implant contact ratio revealed no significant difference among SLM, MA, and Nobel-S implants. Micro-CT assessment indicated that there was no significant difference in bone volume fraction around the implant among SLM implants and other types of surface modification implants. The removal torque value measurement of SLM implants was significantly lower that of than Nobel-S implants P < 0.001 and higher than that of MA implants. The study demonstrates the capability of SLM implants to integrate with living bone. The SLM technique holds promise as a new dental implant manufacturing technique.

  15. Osseoperception in Dental Implants: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Brånemark, Per-Ingvar

    2016-04-01

    Replacement of lost teeth has significant functional and psychosocial effects. The capability of osseointegrated dental implants to transmit a certain amount of sensibility is still unclear. The phenomenon of developing a certain amount of tactile sensibility through osseointegrated dental implants is called osseoperception. The aim of this article is to evaluate the available literature to find osseoperception associated with dental implants. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and PubMed database. Articles published in English and articles whose abstract is available in English were included. The articles included in the review were based on osseoperception, tactile sensation, and neurophysiological mechanoreceptors in relation to dental implants. Articles on peri-implantitis and infection-related sensitivity were not included. Review articles without the original data were excluded, although references to potentially pertinent articles were noted for further follow-up. The phenomenon of osseoperception remains a matter of debate, so the search strategy mainly focused on articles on osseoperception and tactile sensibility of dental implants. This review presents the histological, neurophysiological, and psychophysical evidence of osseoperception and also the role of mechanoreceptors in osseoperception. The literature on osseoperception in dental implants is very scarce. The initial literature search resulted in 90 articles, of which 81 articles that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. Patients restored with implant-supported prostheses reported improved tactile and motor function when compared with patients wearing complete dentures. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Metallurgical effects on titanium by laser welding on dental stone.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Sonosuke; Kakimoto, Kazutoshi; Inoue, Taro; Okazaki, Joji; Komasa, Yutaka

    2003-12-01

    It is not known for certain that dental stone components influence titanium welding. In this study, we investigated metallurgical problems caused by laser welding on dental stones using wrought commercial pure (CP) titanium. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiated a number of specimens' surfaces which were fixed on either a dental hard stone or a titanium plate. The metallurgical properties of the weld were evaluated using the Vickers hardness test, microstructure observation, fractured surface observation and quantitative analysis of oxygen and hydrogen. In the weld formed on the dental stone there was an increase in hardness, the existence of an acicular structure and a brittle fractured surface, and an increase in the oxygen and hydrogen concentrations compared with base metal. In the weld formed on the titanium plate, these changes were not observed. Therefore, it was demonstrated that laser welding on dental stones made the welds brittle.

  17. Metal elements in tissue with dental peri-implantitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fretwurst, Tobias; Buzanich, Guenter; Nahles, Susanne; Woelber, Johan Peter; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Nelson, Katja

    2016-09-01

    Dental peri-implantitis is characterized by a multifactorial etiology. The role of metal elements as an etiological factor for peri-implantitis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of metal elements in bone and mucosal tissues around dental Grade 4 CP titanium implants with signs of peri-implantitis in human patients. In this prospective pilot study, all patients were enrolled consecutively in two study centers. Bone and soft tissue samples of patients with peri-implantitis with indication for explantation were analyzed for the incidence of different elements (Ca, P, Ti, Fe) by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SRXRF) and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The existence of macrophages and lymphocytes in the histologic specimens was analyzed. Biopsies of 12 patients (seven bone samples, five mucosal samples) were included and analyzed. In nine of the 12 samples (75%), the SRXRF examination revealed the existence of titanium (Ti) and an associated occurrence with Iron (Fe). Metal particles were detected in peri-implant soft tissue using PLM. In samples with increased titanium concentration, lymphocytes were detected, whereas M1 macrophages were predominantly seen in samples with metal particles. Titanium and Iron elements were found in soft and hard tissue biopsies retrieved from peri-implantitis sites. Further histologic and immunohistochemical studies need to clarify which specific immune reaction metal elements/particles induce in dental peri-implant tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Immediate loading of titanium hexed screw-type implants in the edentulous patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M P; Muller, E; Garg, A K

    2000-01-01

    Histologic and histomorphometric studies in both animals and humans have shown that more rapid and greater bone-to-implant contact can be achieved with implants that incorporate certain surface characteristics compared with the original machined-surface implants. Such findings are significant because various implant designs may allow the fixtures to sufficiently resist functional loading sooner than originally thought. The case report presented here indicates that immediate loading of hexed titanium screw-type implants in the anterior mandible can lead to successful osseointegration and clinical outcome. The number of implants placed, their distribution, and the type of rigid connection are critical considerations for immediate loading. A bone height that can accommodate dental implants > or = 10 mm long is recommended. Biomechanically, the implants to be immediately loaded must be stable and resistant to macromovement to ensure good osseointegration.

  19. Basic concepts and techniques of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tagliareni, Jonathan M; Clarkson, Earl

    2015-04-01

    Dental implants provide completely edentulous and partial edentulous patients the function and esthetics they had with natural dentition. It is critical to understand and apply predictable surgical principles when treatment planning and surgically restoring edentulous spaces with implants. This article defines basic implant concepts that should be meticulously followed for predictable results when treating patients and restoring dental implants. Topics include biological and functional considerations, biomechanical considerations, preoperative assessments, medical history and risk assessments, oral examinations, radiographic examinations, contraindications, and general treatment planning options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  1. Characterizations of additive manufactured porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Basalah, Ahmad; Shanjani, Yaser; Esmaeili, Shahrzad; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2012-10-01

    This article describes physical, chemical, and mechanical characterizations of porous titanium implants made by an additive manufacturing method to gain insight into the correlation of process parameters and final physical properties of implants used in orthopedics. For the manufacturing chain, the powder metallurgy technology was combined with the additive manufacturing to fabricate the porous structure from the pure tanium powder. A 3D printing machine was employed in this study to produce porous bar samples. A number of physical parameters such as titanium powder size, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) amount, sintering temperature and time were investigated to control the mechanical properties and porosity of the structures. The produced samples were characterized through porosity and shrinkage measurements, mechanical compression test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed a level of porosity in the samples in the range of 31-43%, which is within the range of the porosity of the cancelluous bone and approaches the range of the porosity of the cortical bone. The results of the mechanical test showed that the compressive strength is in the wide range of 56-509 MPa implying the effect of the process parameters on the mechanical strengths. This technique of manufacturing of Ti porous structures demonstrated a low level of shrinkage with the shrinkage percentage ranging from 1.5 to 5%. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Bacterial plaque colonization around dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Covani, Ugo; Marconcini, Simone; Crespi, Roberto; Barone, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    To examine the distribution of bacteria into the internal and external surfaces of failed implants using histologic analysis. There were 10 failed pure titanium and 5 failed hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants consecutively removed various years after their placement. Criteria for fixture removal were peri-implant radiolucency and clinical mobility. The mobile fixtures were retrieved with the patients under local anesthesia. Fixtures were removed maintaining the abutments with the aim to observe the bacterial infiltration at the level of abutment/implant interface and on the implant surface. A thin radiolucent space was always present around all the failed implants. The abutments screws were tightly secured in all clinical cases. The bacterial cells were composed of cocci and filaments, which were adherent to the implant surface with an orientation perpendicular to the long axis of the implant. All the specimens included in this study showed bacteria at the level of implant/abutment interface. Histologic analysis at the level of abutment/implant interface in 2-stage implants identified heavy bacterial colonization. These findings appear to support those studies showing bacteria penetration at the level of the micro-gap, which can legitimate the hypothesis that the micro-gap at the bone level could present a risk for bone loss caused by bacterial colonization.

  3. Effect of UV-photofunctionalization on Oral Bacterial Attachment and Biofilm Formation to Titanium Implant Material

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Lima, Bruno P.; Sekiya, Takeo; Torii, Yasuyoshi; Ogawa, Takahiro; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm infections remain prevalent reasons for implant failure. Dental implant placement occurs in the oral environment, which harbors a plethora of biofilm-forming bacteria. Due to its trans-mucosal placement, part of the implant structure is exposed to oral cavity and there is no effective measure to prevent bacterial attachment to implant materials. Here, we demonstrated that UV treatment of titanium immediately prior to use (photofunctionalization) affects the ability of human polymicrobial oral biofilm communities to colonize in the presence of salivary and blood components. UV-treatment of machined titanium transformed the surface from hydrophobic to superhydrophilic. UV-treated surfaces exhibited a significant reduction in bacterial attachment as well as subsequent biofilm formation compared to untreated ones, even though overall bacterial viability was not affected. The function of reducing bacterial colonization was maintained on UV-treated titanium that had been stored in a liquid environment before use. Denaturing gradient gel-electrophoresis (DGGE) and DNA sequencing analyses revealed that while bacterial community profiles appeared different between UV-treated and untreated titanium in the initial attachment phase, this difference vanished as biofilm formation progressed. Our findings confirm that UV-photofunctionalization of titanium has a strong potential to improve outcome of implant placement by creating and maintaining antimicrobial surfaces. PMID:26210175

  4. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  14. Precision of Fit of Titanium and Cast Implant Frameworks Using a New Matching Formula

    PubMed Central

    Sierraalta, Marianella; Vivas, Jose L.; Razzoog, Michael E.; Wang, Rui-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. Fit of prosthodontic frameworks is linked to the lifetime survival of dental implants and maintenance of surrounding bone. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the precision of fit of milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks to that of conventional cast frameworks. Material and Methods. Fifteen casts fabricated from a single edentulous CAD/CAM surgical guide were separated in two groups and resin patterns simulating the framework for a fixed complete denture developed. Five casts were sent to dental laboratories to invest, cast in a Palladium-Gold alloy and fit the framework. Ten casts had the resin pattern scanned for fabrication of milled bars in Titanium. Using measuring software, positions of implant replicas in the definitive model were recorded. The three dimensional spatial orientation of each implant replica was matched to the implant replica. Results. Results demonstrated the mean vertical gap of the Cast framework was 0.021 (+0.004) mm and 0.012 (0.002) mm determined by fixed and unfixed best-fit matching coordinate system. For Titanium frameworks they were 0.0037 (+0.0028) mm and 0.0024 (+0.0005) mm, respectively. Conclusions. Milled one-piece Titanium fixed complete denture frameworks provided a more accurate precision of fit then traditional cast frameworks. PMID:22550486

  15. Macro design morphology of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sahiwal, Indira G; Woody, Ronald D; Benson, Byron W; Guillen, Guillermo E

    2002-05-01

    The identification of dental implant bodies in patients without available records is a considerable problem due to increased patient mobility and to the large number of implant systems with different designs. The purpose of this study was to document the designs of selected implants to help clinicians identify these implants from their radiographic images. More than 50 implant manufacturers were contacted and asked to provide implants with dimensions as close as possible to 3.75 mm (diameter) x 10 mm (length). Forty-four implants were donated, separated into threaded and non-threaded categories, and further sorted into tapered and non-tapered categories. The implants were examined visually, and features on the entire circumference and length of each implant were recorded and categorized as coronal, midbody, or apical. A series of tables describe the 44 implants according to coronal, midbody, and apical features. The results of this project offer dentists basic knowledge of the design of selected dental implants. Such knowledge can aid the radiographic identification of these implants.

  16. Fracture Resistance and Mode of Failure of Ceramic versus Titanium Implant Abutments and Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    PubMed

    Sghaireen, Mohd G

    2015-06-01

    The material of choice for implant-supported restorations is affected by esthetic requirements and type of abutment. This study compares the fracture resistance of different types of implant abutments and implant-supported restorations and their mode of failure. Forty-five Oraltronics Pitt-Easy implants (Oraltronics Dental Implant Technology GmbH, Bremen, Germany) (4 mm diameter, 10 mm length) were embedded in clear autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The implants were randomly divided into three groups, A, B and C, of 15 implants each. In group A, titanium abutments and metal-ceramic crowns were used. In group B, zirconia ceramic abutments and In-Ceram Alumina crowns were used. In group C, zirconia ceramic abutments and IPS Empress Esthetic crowns were used. Specimens were tested to failure by applying load at 130° from horizontal plane using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Subsequently, the mode of failure of each specimen was identified. Fracture resistance was significantly different between groups (p < .05). The highest fracture loads were associated with metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments (p = .000). IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments had the lowest fracture loads (p = .000). Fracture modes of metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments included screw fracture and screw bending. Fracture of both crown and abutment was the dominant mode of failure of In-Ceram/IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. Metal-ceramic crowns supported by titanium abutments were more resistant to fracture than In-Ceram crowns supported by zirconia abutments, which in turn were more resistant to fracture than IPS Empress crowns supported by zirconia abutments. In addition, failure modes of restorations supported by zirconia abutments were more catastrophic than those for restorations supported by titanium abutments. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Nanoporous hydroxyapatite/sodium titanate bilayer on titanium implants for improved osteointegration.

    PubMed

    Carradò, A; Perrin-Schmitt, F; Le, Q V; Giraudel, M; Fischer, C; Koenig, G; Jacomine, L; Behr, L; Chalom, A; Fiette, L; Morlet, A; Pourroy, G

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the strength and quality of the titanium-hydroxyapatite interface in order to prevent long-term failure of the implanted devices originating from coating delamination and to test it in an in-vivo model. Ti disks and dental commercial implants were etched in Kroll solution. Thermochemical treatments of the acid-etched titanium were combined with sol-gel hydroxyapatite (HA) coating processes to obtain a nanoporous hydroxyapatite/sodium titanate bilayer. The sodium titanate layer was created by incorporating sodium ions onto the Ti surface during a NaOH alkaline treatment and stabilized using a heat treatment. HA layer was added by dip-coating in a sol-gel solution. The bioactivity was assessed in vitro with murine MC3T3-E1 and human SaOs-2 cells. Functional and histopathological evaluations of the coated Ti implants were performed at 22, 34 and 60days of implantation in a dog lower mandible model. Nanoporous hydroxyapatite/sodium titanate bilayer on titanium implants was sensitive neither to crack propagation nor to layer delamination. The in vitro results on murine MC3T3-E1 and human SaOs-2 cells confirm the advantage of this coating regarding the capacity of cell growth and differentiation. Signs of progressive bone incorporation, such as cancellous bone formed in contact with the implant over the existing compact bone, were notable as early as day 22. Overall, osteoconduction and osteointegration mean scores were higher for test implants compared to the controls at 22 and 34 days. Nanoporous hydroxyapatite/sodium titanate bilayer improves the in-vivo osteoconduction and osteointegration. It prevents the delamination during the screwing and it could increase HA-coated dental implant stability without adhesive failures. The combination of thermochemical treatments with dip coating is a low-cost strategy. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of conventional and synchrotron-radiation-based microtomography of bone around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Paolo M.; Dalstra, Michel; Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Melsen, Birte

    2004-10-01

    This study explores the application of conventional micro tomography (μCT) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based μCT to evaluate the bone around titanium dental implants. The SR experiment was performed at beamline W2 of HASYLAB at DESY using a monochromatic X-ray beam of 50 keV. The testing material consisted of undecalcified bone segments harvested from the upper jaw of a macaca fascicularis monkey each containing a titanium dental implant. The results from the two different techniques were qualitatively compared with conventional histological sections examined under light microscopy. The SR-based μCT produced images that, especially at the bone-implant interface, are less noisy and sharper than the ones obtained with conventional μCT. For the proper evaluation of the implant-bone interface, only the SR-based μCT technique is able to display the areas of bony contact and visualize the true 3D structure of bone around dental implants correctly. This investigation shows that both conventional and SR-based μCT scanning techniques are non-destructive methods, which provide detailed images of bone. However with SR-based μCT it is possible to obtain an improved image quality of the bone surrounding dental implants, which display a level of detail comparable to histological sections. Therefore, SR-based μCT scanning could represent a valid, unbiased three-dimensional alternative to evaluate osseointegration of dental implants

  19. Hybrid micro/nanostructural surface offering improved stress distribution and enhanced osseointegration properties of the biomedical titanium implant.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ping-Jen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chieh; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Ruslin, Muhammad; Sugiatno, Erwan; Yang, Tzu-Sen; Chou, Hsin-Hua

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the surface characteristic, biomechanical behavior, hemocompatibility, bone tissue response and osseointegration of the optimal micro-arc oxidation surface-treated titanium (MST-Ti) dental implant. The surface characteristic, biomechanical behavior and hemocompatibility of the MST-Ti dental implant were performed using scanning electron microscope, finite element method, blood dripping and immersion tests. The mini-pig model was utilized to evaluate the bone tissue response and osseointegration of the MST-Ti dental implant in vivo. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance using the Student's t-test (P ≤ 0.05). The hybrid volcano-like micro/nanoporous structure was formed on the surface of the MST-Ti dental implant. The hybrid volcano-like micro/nanoporous surface played an important role to improve the stress transfer between fixture, cortical bone and cancellous bone for the MST-Ti dental implant. Moreover, the MST-Ti implant was considered to have the outstanding hemocompatibility. In vivo testing results showed that the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) ratio significantly altered as the implant with micro/nanoporous surface. After 12 weeks of implantation, the MST-Ti dental implant group exhibited significantly higher BIC ratio than the untreated dental implant group. In addition, the MST-Ti dental implant group also presented an enhancing osseointegration, particularly in the early stages of bone healing. It can be concluded that the micro-arc oxidation approach induced the formation of micro/nanoporous surface is a promising and reliable alternative surface modification for Ti dental implant applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Micro- to Macroroughness of Additively Manufactured Titanium Implants in Terms of Coagulation and Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Klingvall Ek, Rebecca; Hong, Jaan; Thor, Andreas; Bäckström, Mikael; Rännar, Lars-Erik

    This study aimed to evaluate how as-built electron beam melting (EBM) surface properties affect the onset of blood coagulation. The properties of EBM-manufactured implant surfaces for placement have, until now, remained largely unexplored in literature. Implants with conventional designs and custom-made implants have been manufactured using EBM technology and later placed into the human body. Many of the conventional implants used today, such as dental implants, display modified surfaces to optimize bone ingrowth, whereas custom-made implants, by and large, have machined surfaces. However, titanium in itself demonstrates good material properties for the purpose of bone ingrowth. Specimens manufactured using EBM were selected according to their surface roughness and process parameters. EBM-produced specimens, conventional machined titanium surfaces, as well as PVC surfaces for control were evaluated using the slide chamber model. A significant increase in activation was found, in all factors evaluated, between the machined samples and EBM-manufactured samples. The results show that EBM-manufactured implants with as-built surfaces augment the thrombogenic properties. EBM that uses Ti6Al4V powder appears to be a good manufacturing solution for load-bearing implants with bone anchorage. The as-built surfaces can be used "as is" for direct bone contact, although any surface treatment available for conventional implants can be performed on EBM-manufactured implants with a conventional design.

  1. Immobilization of TiO 2 nanofibers on titanium plates for implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jin Ik; Yu, Bin; Woo, Kyung Mi; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2008-12-01

    Nanofibers have shown good biological performances such as improved cell adhesion and differentiation; therefore, nanofibrous modification of dental and bone implants might enhance osseo-integration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the nanofibrous modification of titanium implants. TiO 2 nanofibers were fabricated by the electrospinning method using a mixture of Ti(IV)isopropoxide and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) in acidic alcohol solution. Then the nanofibers were immobilized on the NaOH/HCl-treated titanium plates by inducing the alcohol condensation reaction of Ti(IV)isopropoxide with Ti-OH group on the titanium surface and subsequent calcination (500-1000 °C). The immobilized TiO 2 nanofibers were characterized by SEM, XRD and a simulated removal test. The diameter of the TiO 2 nanofibers could be controlled within the range of 20-350 nm by changing the amounts of Ti(IV)isopropoxide and PVP. Phase transformation from anatase to rutile was observed after calcination. After the simulated removal test, TiO 2 nanofibers remained on titanium surface. These TiO 2 nanofibers on titanium plates could be used for the surface modification of titanium implants to improve the osseo-integration.

  2. In vitro assessment of artifacts induced by titanium, titanium-zirconium and zirconium dioxide implants in cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Benic, Goran I

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether or not the intensity of artifacts around implants in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) differs between titanium, titanium-zirconium and zirconium dioxide implants. Twenty models of a human mandible, each containing one implant in the single-tooth gap position 45, were cast in dental stone. Five test models were produced for each of the following implant types: titanium 4.1 mm diameter (Ti4.1 ), titanium 3.3 mm diameter (Ti3.3 ), titanium-zirconium 3.3 mm diameter (TiZr3.3 ) and zirconium dioxide 3.5-4.5 mm diameter (ZrO3.5-4.5 ) implants. For control purposes, three models without implants were produced. Each model was scanned using a CBCT device. Gray values (GV) were recorded at eight circumferential positions around the implants at 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 2 mm from the implant surface (GVT est ). GV were assessed in the corresponding volumes of interest (VOI) in the control models without implants (GVC ontrol ). Differences of gray values (ΔGV) between GVT est and GVC ontrol were calculated as percentages. One-way ANOVA and post hoc tests were applied to detect differences between implant types. Mean ΔGV for ZrO3.5-4.5 presented the highest absolute values, generally followed by TiZr3.3 , Ti4.1 and Ti3.3 implants. The differences of ΔGV between ZrO3.5-4.5 and the remaining groups were statistically significant in the majority of the VOI (P ≤ 0.0167). ΔGV for TiZr3.3 , Ti4.1 and Ti3.3 implants did not differ significantly in the most VOI. For all implant types, ΔGV showed positive values buccally, mesio-buccally, lingually and disto-lingually, whereas negative values were detected mesially and distally. Zirconium dioxide implants generate significantly more artifacts as compared to titanium and titanium-zirconium implants. The intensity of artifacts around zirconium dioxide implants exhibited in average the threefold in comparison with titanium implants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  3. Bacteremia following dental implant surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Bölükbaşı, Nilüfer; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of bacteremia, bacteriology and antibiotic susceptibility against to causative bacteria associated with dental implant installation. 30 generally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30 minutes after dental implant installation and 24 hours after dental implant surgery. Blood samples were cultured in a BACTEC system. The isolated bacteria were identified using conventional methods. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests were performed by disc diffusion. No bacteria were isolated at the baseline and 24 hours after surgery, whereas the prevalence of bacteremia at 30 minutes after dental implant installation was 23%. The isolated bacteria species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Eubacterium spp., Corynebacterium spp. and Streptococcus viridans. The Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was isolated in three patients, was found to be resistant to penicillin which is first choice of many clinicians. Our findings suggest that installation of dental implants can produce bacteremia. Within the limitations of this study, it can be speculated that the resistance of antibiotics may compromise the routine prophylaxis against infective endocarditis. Therefore use of blood cultures and antibiograms may be suggested in risky patients. The outcome of the present study should be verified using a larger patient group with varying conditions.

  4. 78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    .... FDA-2012-N-0677] Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant AGENCY: Food...) is proposing to reclassify the blade- form endosseous dental implant, a preamendments class III... proposing to revise the classification of blade-form endosseous dental implants. DATES: Submit either...

  5. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathomarco, Ti R. V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C. N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-06-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  6. Antimicrobial and Osseointegration Properties of Nanostructured Titanium Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Dittrich, Florian; Köhling, Hedda Luise

    2017-01-01

    The surface design of titanium implants influences not only the local biological reactions but also affects at least the clinical result in orthopaedic application. During the last decades, strong efforts have been made to improve osteointegration and prevent bacterial adhesion to these surfaces. Following the rule of “smaller, faster, cheaper”, nanotechnology has encountered clinical application. It is evident that the hierarchical implant surface micro- and nanotopography orchestrate the biological cascades of early peri-implant endosseous healing or implant loosening. This review of the literature gives a brief overview of nanostructured titanium-base biomaterials designed to improve osteointegration and prevent from bacterial infection. PMID:29137166

  7. Antimicrobial and Osseointegration Properties of Nanostructured Titanium Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Jennissen, Herbert P; Dittrich, Florian; Fischer, Alfons; Köhling, Hedda Luise

    2017-11-13

    The surface design of titanium implants influences not only the local biological reactions but also affects at least the clinical result in orthopaedic application. During the last decades, strong efforts have been made to improve osteointegration and prevent bacterial adhesion to these surfaces. Following the rule of "smaller, faster, cheaper", nanotechnology has encountered clinical application. It is evident that the hierarchical implant surface micro- and nanotopography orchestrate the biological cascades of early peri-implant endosseous healing or implant loosening. This review of the literature gives a brief overview of nanostructured titanium-base biomaterials designed to improve osteointegration and prevent from bacterial infection.

  8. Antibacterial activity and biofilm inhibition by surface modified titanium alloy medical implants following application of silver, titanium dioxide and hydroxyapatite nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Besinis, A; Hadi, S D; Le, H R; Tredwin, C; Handy, R D

    2017-04-01

    One of the most common causes of implant failure is peri-implantitis, which is caused by bacterial biofilm formation on the surfaces of dental implants. Modification of the surface nanotopography has been suggested to affect bacterial adherence to implants. Silver nanoparticles are also known for their antibacterial properties. In this study, titanium alloy implants were surface modified following silver plating, anodisation and sintering techniques to create a combination of silver, titanium dioxide and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocoatings. Their antibacterial performance was quantitatively assessed by measuring the growth of Streptococcus sanguinis, proportion of live/dead cells and lactate production by the microbes over 24 h. Application of a dual layered silver-HA nanocoating to the surface of implants successfully inhibited bacterial growth in the surrounding media (100% mortality), whereas the formation of bacterial biofilm on the implant surfaces was reduced by 97.5%. Uncoated controls and titanium dioxide nanocoatings showed no antibacterial effect. Both silver and HA nanocoatings were found to be very stable in biological fluids with material loss, as a result of dissolution, to be less than 0.07% for the silver nanocoatings after 24 h in a modified Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer. No dissolution was detected for the HA nanocoatings. Thus, application of a dual layered silver-HA nanocoating to titanium alloy implants creates a surface with antibiofilm properties without compromising the HA biocompatibility required for successful osseointegration and accelerated bone healing.

  9. Analysis of the influence of the macro- and microstructure of dental zirconium implants on osseointegration: a minipig study.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Cornelia Katharina; Solcher, Philipp; Peisker, Andrè; Mtsariashvilli, Maia; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Rost, Juergen; Liefeith, Klaus; Chen, Jiang; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    It was the aim of this study to analyze the influence of implant design and surface topography on the osseointegration of dental zirconium implants. Six different implant designs were tested in the study. Nine or 10 test implants were inserted in the frontal skull in each of 10 miniature pigs. Biopsies were harvested after 2 and 4 months and subjected to microradiography. No significant differences between titanium and zirconium were found regarding the microradiographically detected bone-implant contact (BIC). Cylindric zirconium implants showed a higher BIC at the 2-month follow-up than conic zirconium implants. Among zirconium implants, those with an intermediate Ra value showed a significantly higher BIC compared with low and high Ra implants 4 months after surgery. Regarding osseointegration, titanium and zirconium showed equal properties. Cylindric implant design and intermediate surface roughness seemed to enhance osseointegration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface treatment of a titanium implant using low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Tang, Tianyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2015-09-01

    During the last two decades, atmospheric pressure plasmas(APP) are widely used in diverse fields of biomedical applications, reduction of pollutants, and surface treatment of materials. Applications of APP to titanium surface of dental implants is steadily increasing as it renders surfaces wettability and modifies the oxide layer of titanium that hinders the interaction with cells and proteins. In this study, we have treated the titanium surfaces of screw-shaped implant samples using a plasma jet which is composed of a ceramic coaxial tube of dielectrics, a stainless steel inner electrode, and a coper tube outer electrode. The plasma ignition occurred with Ar gas flow between two coaxial metal electrodes and a sinusoidal bias voltage of 3 kV with a frequency of 20 kHz. Titanium materials used in this study are screw-shaped implants of which diameter and length are 5 mm and 13 mm, respectively. Samples were mounted at a distance of 5 mm below the plasma source, and the plasma treatment time was set to 3 min. The wettability of titanium surface was measured by the moving speed of water on its surface, which is enhanced by plasma treatment. The surface roughness was also measured by atomic force microscopy. The optimal condition for wettability change is discussed.

  11. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for further improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care. PMID:21464998

  12. Enhanced osseointegration of titanium implants in a rat model of osteoporosis using multilayer bone mesenchymal stem cell sheets

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yan; Ma, Wei; Li, Dehua; Wang, Tongfei; Liu, Baolin

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets combined with titanium implants enhanced implant osseointegration in an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into a test group and control group. Allogenic BMSCs were collected from the rats, cultured and stored via cryopreservation. At 6 months post-ovariectomy, establishment of the OVX model was confirmed by micro-computed tomography (CT) measurements. BMSC sheets were subsequently layered and wrapped over titanium implants for implantation. Unmodified implants served as the control. At 8 weeks post-implantation, samples were observed by micro-CT reconstruction and histomorphometric evaluation. Micro-CT reconstruction identified a marked improvement in the surrounding bone volume following treatment, with data analyses indicating a significant increase in bone volume in the BMSC-implant group compared with the control implant group (P<0.05). In addition, histological staining identified new bone formation and an increased rate of bone-implant contact surrounding the BMSC-implant constructs. These results indicate that the use of BMSC sheets as a novel tissue engineering approach improves the osseointegration of titanium implants in an osteoporosis model. This method may expand the operative indications in patients with osteoporosis and improve the success rate of clinical dental implant treatments. PMID:29250137

  13. Analysis of the compressive behaviour of the three-dimensional printed porous titanium for dental implants using a modified cellular solid model.

    PubMed

    Gagg, Graham; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Wiria, Florencia E

    2013-09-01

    A set of cylindrical porous titanium test samples were produced using the three-dimensional printing and sintering method with samples sintered at 900 °C, 1000 °C, 1100 °C, 1200 °C or 1300 °C. Following compression testing, it was apparent that the stress-strain curves were similar in shape to the curves that represent cellular solids. This is despite a relative density twice as high as what is considered the threshold for defining a cellular solid. As final sintering temperature increased, the compressive behaviour developed from being elastic-brittle to elastic-plastic and while Young's modulus remained fairly constant in the region of 1.5 GPa, there was a corresponding increase in 0.2% proof stress of approximately 40-80 MPa. The cellular solid model consists of two equations that predict Young's modulus and yield or proof stress. By fitting to experimental data and consideration of porous morphology, appropriate changes to the geometry constants allow modification of the current models to predict with better accuracy the behaviour of porous materials with higher relative densities (lower porosity).

  14. Failure analysis of fractured dental zirconia implants.

    PubMed

    Gahlert, M; Burtscher, D; Grunert, I; Kniha, H; Steinhauser, E

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was the macroscopic and microscopic failure analysis of fractured zirconia dental implants. Thirteen fractured one-piece zirconia implants (Z-Look3) out of 170 inserted implants with an average in situ period of 36.75±5.34 months (range from 20 to 56 months, median 38 months) were prepared for macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy [SEM]) failure analysis. These 170 implants were inserted in 79 patients. The patient histories were compared with fracture incidences to identify the reasons for the failure of the implants. Twelve of these fractured implants had a diameter of 3.25 mm and one implant had a diameter of 4 mm. All fractured implants were located in the anterior side of the maxilla and mandibula. The patient with the fracture of the 4 mm diameter implant was adversely affected by strong bruxism. By failure analysis (SEM), it could be demonstrated that in all cases, mechanical overloading caused the fracture of the implants. Inhomogeneities and internal defects of the ceramic material could be excluded, but notches and scratches due to sandblasting of the surface led to local stress concentrations that led to the mentioned mechanical overloading by bending loads. The present study identified a fracture rate of nearly 10% within a follow-up period of 36.75 months after prosthetic loading. Ninety-two per cent of the fractured implants were so-called diameter reduced implants (diameter 3.25 mm). These diameter reduced implants cannot be recommended for further clinical use. Improvement of the ceramic material and modification of the implant geometry has to be carried out to reduce the failure rate of small-sized ceramic implants. Nevertheless, due to the lack of appropriate laboratory testing, only clinical studies will demonstrate clearly whether and how far the failure rate can be reduced. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. The role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry part I: Review of titanium alloys, surface characteristics and treatments.

    PubMed

    Saghiri, M-A; Asatourian, A; Garcia-Godoy, F; Sheibani, N

    2016-07-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in osseointegration process by contributing to inflammatory and regenerative phases of surrounding alveolar bone. The present review evaluated the effect of titanium alloys and their surface characteristics including: surface topography (macro, micro, and nano), surface wettability/energy, surface hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity, surface charge, and surface treatments of dental implants on angiogenesis events, which occur during osseointegration period. An electronic search was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases via OVID using the keywords mentioned in the PubMed and MeSH headings regarding the role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry from January 2000-April 2014. Of the 2,691 articles identified in our initial search results, only 30 met the inclusion criteria set for this review. The hydrophilicity and topography of dental implants are the most important and effective surface characteristics in angiogenesis and osteogenesis processes. The surface treatments or modifications of dental implants are mainly directed through the enhancement of biological activity and functionalization in order to promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis, and accelerate the osseointegration procedure. Angiogenesis is of great importance in implant dentistry in a manner that most of the surface characteristics and treatments of dental implants are directed toward creating a more pro-angiogenic surface on dental implants. A number of studies discussed the effect of titanium alloys, dental implant surface characteristic and treatments on agiogenesis process. However, clinical trials and in-vivo studies delineating the mechanisms of dental implants, and their surface characteristics or treatments, action in angiogenesis processes are lagging.

  16. One-Piece Zirconia Ceramic versus Titanium Implants in the Jaw and Femur of a Sheep Model: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, A; Duncan, W J; De Silva, R K; Zafar, S

    2016-01-01

    Reports have documented titanium (Ti) hypersensitivity after dental implant treatment. Alternative materials have been suggested including zirconia (Zr) ceramics, which have shown predictable osseointegration in animal studies and appear free of immune responses. The aim of the research was to investigate the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of one-piece Zr, compared with one-piece Ti implants, placed in the jaws and femurs of domestic sheep. Ten New Zealand mixed breed sheep were used. A One-piece prototype Ti (control) and one Zr (test) implant were placed in the mandible, and one of each implant (Ti and Zr) was placed into the femoral epicondyle of each animal. The femur implants were submerged and unloaded; the mandibular implants were placed using a one-stage transgingival protocol and were nonsubmerged. After a healing period of 12 weeks, %BIC was measured. The overall survival rate for mandibular and femur implants combined was 87.5%. %BIC was higher for Zr implants versus Ti implants in the femur (85.5%, versus 78.9%) ( p = 0.002). Zirconia implants in the mandible showed comparable %BIC to titanium implants (72.2%, versus 60.3%) ( p = 0.087). High failure rate of both Zr and Ti one-piece implants in the jaw could be attributed to the one-piece design and surface characteristics of the implant that could have influenced osseointegration. Further clinical trials are recommended to evaluate the performance of zirconia implants under loading conditions.

  17. One-Piece Zirconia Ceramic versus Titanium Implants in the Jaw and Femur of a Sheep Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, R. K.; Zafar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Reports have documented titanium (Ti) hypersensitivity after dental implant treatment. Alternative materials have been suggested including zirconia (Zr) ceramics, which have shown predictable osseointegration in animal studies and appear free of immune responses. The aim of the research was to investigate the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of one-piece Zr, compared with one-piece Ti implants, placed in the jaws and femurs of domestic sheep. Ten New Zealand mixed breed sheep were used. A One-piece prototype Ti (control) and one Zr (test) implant were placed in the mandible, and one of each implant (Ti and Zr) was placed into the femoral epicondyle of each animal. The femur implants were submerged and unloaded; the mandibular implants were placed using a one-stage transgingival protocol and were nonsubmerged. After a healing period of 12 weeks, %BIC was measured. The overall survival rate for mandibular and femur implants combined was 87.5%. %BIC was higher for Zr implants versus Ti implants in the femur (85.5%, versus 78.9%) (p = 0.002). Zirconia implants in the mandible showed comparable %BIC to titanium implants (72.2%, versus 60.3%) (p = 0.087). High failure rate of both Zr and Ti one-piece implants in the jaw could be attributed to the one-piece design and surface characteristics of the implant that could have influenced osseointegration. Further clinical trials are recommended to evaluate the performance of zirconia implants under loading conditions. PMID:28058261

  18. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  19. Transition from a fixed implant dental prosthesis to an implant overdenture in an edentulous patient: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bolouri; Bhavani, Venkatachalam

    2014-09-01

    The lack of planning before implant placement and restoration in edentulous patients can lead to a number of problems. Prosthodontists are often faced with the challenge of re-treating patients who have only recently been treated. Although many reports discuss retreatment by fabricating all new prosthetic components, few discuss salvaging parts of the patient's existing prosthesis. This report details the treatment of an edentulous patient who presented with an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis in the maxillary arch and no opposing prosthesis. The transition from an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis to a removable implant- and tissue-supported overdenture that uses the patient's existing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing milled titanium substructure is described. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Stress shielding and fatigue limits of poly-ether-ether-ketone dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Taek; Koak, Jai-Young; Lim, Young-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kyun; Kwon, Ho-Beom; Kim, Myung-Joo

    2012-05-01

    The poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) polymer is of great interest as an alternative to titanium in orthopedics because of its biocompatibility and low elastic modulus. This study evaluated the fatigue limits of PEEK and the effects of the low elastic modulus PEEK in relation to existing dental implants. Compressive loading tests were performed with glass fiber-reinforced PEEK (GFR-PEEK), carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK), and titanium rods. Among these tests, GFR-PEEK fatigue tests were performed according to ISO 14801. For the finite element analysis, three-dimensional models of dental implants and bone were constructed. The implants in the test groups were coated with a 0.5-mm thick and 5-mm long PEEK layer on the upper intrabony area. The strain energy densities (SED) were calculated, and the bone resorption was predicted. The fatigue limits of GFR-PEEK were 310 N and were higher than the static compressive strength of GFR-PEEK. The bone around PEEK-coated implants showed higher levels of SED than the bone in direct contact with the implants, and the wider diameter and stiffer implants showed lower levels of SED. The compressive strength of the GFR-PEEK and CFR-PEEK implants ranged within the bite force of the anterior and posterior dentitions, respectively, and the PEEK implants showed adequate fatigue limits for replacing the anterior teeth. Dental implants with PEEK coatings and PEEK implants may reduce stress shielding effects. Dental implant application of PEEK polymer-fatigue limit and stress shielding. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Assessment of Surface Area Characteristics of Dental Implants with Gradual Bioactive Surface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czan, Andrej; Babík, Ondrej; Miklos, Matej; Záušková, Lucia; Mezencevová, Viktória

    2017-10-01

    Since most of the implant surface is in direct contact with bone tissue, shape and integrity of said surface has great influence on successful osseointegration. Among other characteristics that predetermine titanium of different grades of pureness as ideal biomaterial, titanium shows high mechanical strength making precise miniature machining increasingly difficult. Current titanium-based implants are often anodized due to colour coding. This anodized layer has important functional properties for right usage and also bio-compatibility of dental implants. Physical method of anodizing and usage of anodizing mediums has a significant influence on the surface quality and itself functionality. However, basic requirement of the dental implant with satisfactory properties is quality of machined surface before anodizing. Roughness, for example, is factor affecting of time length of anodizing operation and so whole productivity. The paper is focused on monitoring of surface and area characteristics, such as roughness or surface integrity after different cutting conditions of miniature machining of dental implants and their impact on suitability for creation of satisfactory anodized layer with the correct biocompatible functional properties.

  2. Clinical evaluation of immediate loading of electroeroded screw-retained titanium fixed prostheses supported by tilted implant: a multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Acocella, Alessandro; Ercoli, Carlo; Geminiani, Alessandro; Feng, Changyong; Billi, Mauro; Acocella, Gabriele; Giannini, Domenico; Sacco, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Immediate occlusal loading of dental implants in the edentulous mandible has proven to be an effective, reliable, and predictable treatment protocol. However, there is limited long-term data available in the literature, when an electroeroded definitive cast-titanium fixed prosthesis is used for this treatment protocol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of dental implants (Astra Tech Dental, Mölndal, Sweden) in the edentulous mandible immediately loaded with an electroeroded cast-titanium screw-retained fixed prosthesis. Forty-five patients received five implants each in the interforaminal area. All the implants were inserted with torque up to 40 Ncm and the distal implants were distally tilted approximately 20 to 30 degrees to minimize the length of posterior cantilevers. Implants were loaded within 48 hours of placement with an acrylic resin-titanium screw-retained prosthesis fabricated by electroerosion. Two of the 225 inserted implants failed after 3 and 16 months of healing, respectively, with a cumulative survival rate of 99.1% and a prosthetic survival rate of 97.8%. Immediate loading of tilted dental implants inserted in the edentulous mandible with a screw-retained titanium definitive prosthesis fabricated with electrical discharge machining provide reliable and predictable results. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  4. Long-term hearing result using Kurz titanium ossicular implants.

    PubMed

    Hess-Erga, Jeanette; Møller, Per; Vassbotn, Flemming Slinning

    2013-05-01

    Titanium implants in middle ear surgery were introduced in the late 90s and are now frequently used in middle ear surgery. However, long-term studies of patient outcome are few and have only been published in subgroups of patients. We report the long-term effect of titanium middle ear implants for ossicular reconstruction in chronic ear disease investigated in a Norwegian tertiary otological referral centre. Retrospective chart reviews were performed for procedures involving 76 titanium implants between 2000 and 2007. All patients who underwent surgery using the Kurz Vario titanium implant were included in the study. Audiological parameters using four frequencies, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz, according to AAO-HNS guidelines, was assessed pre and postoperatively. Otosurgical procedures, complications, revisions, and extrusion rates were analyzed. The study had no dropouts. The partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) was used in 44 procedures and the total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP) in 32 procedures, respectively. Mean follow-up was 5.2 years (62 months). The ossiculoplasties were performed as staging procedures or in combination with other chronic ear surgery. The same surgeon performed all the procedures. A postoperative air-bone gap of ≤ 20 dB was obtained in 74 % of the patients, 82 % for the Bell (PORP) prosthesis, and 63 % for the Arial (TORP) prosthesis. The extrusion rate was 5 %. We conclude that titanium ossicular implants give stable and excellent long-term hearing results.

  5. PEEK with Reinforced Materials and Modifications for Dental Implant Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rahmitasari, Fitria; Ishida, Yuichi; Kurahashi, Kosuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Watanabe, Megumi

    2017-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a semi-crystalline linear polycyclic thermoplastic that has been proposed as a substitute for metals in biomaterials. PEEK can also be applied to dental implant materials as a superstructure, implant abutment, or implant body. This article summarizes the current research on PEEK applications in dental implants, especially for the improvement of PEEK surface and body modifications. Although various benchmark reports on the reinforcement and surface modifications of PEEK are available, few clinical trials using PEEK for dental implant bodies have been published. Controlled clinical trials, especially for the use of PEEK in implant abutment and implant bodies, are necessary. PMID:29563441

  6. PEEK with Reinforced Materials and Modifications for Dental Implant Applications.

    PubMed

    Rahmitasari, Fitria; Ishida, Yuichi; Kurahashi, Kosuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Watanabe, Megumi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-12-15

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a semi-crystalline linear polycyclic thermoplastic that has been proposed as a substitute for metals in biomaterials. PEEK can also be applied to dental implant materials as a superstructure, implant abutment, or implant body. This article summarizes the current research on PEEK applications in dental implants, especially for the improvement of PEEK surface and body modifications. Although various benchmark reports on the reinforcement and surface modifications of PEEK are available, few clinical trials using PEEK for dental implant bodies have been published. Controlled clinical trials, especially for the use of PEEK in implant abutment and implant bodies, are necessary.

  7. Peri-implant soft tissue colour around titanium and zirconia abutments: a prospective randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Cosgarea, Raluca; Gasparik, Cristina; Dudea, Diana; Culic, Bogdan; Dannewitz, Bettina; Sculean, Anton

    2015-05-01

    To objectively determine the difference in colour between the peri-implant soft tissue at titanium and zirconia abutments. Eleven patients, each with two contralaterally inserted osteointegrated dental implants, were included in this study. The implants were restored either with titanium abutments and porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns, or with zirconia abutments and ceramic crowns. Prior and after crown cementation, multi-spectral images of the peri-implant soft tissues and the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth were taken with a colorimeter. The colour parameters L*, a*, b*, c* and the colour differences ΔE were calculated. Descriptive statistics, including non-parametric tests and correlation coefficients, were used for statistical analyses of the data. Compared to the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth, the peri-implant soft tissue around titanium and zirconia (test group), showed distinguishable ΔE both before and after crown cementation. Colour differences around titanium were statistically significant different (P = 0.01) only at 1 mm prior to crown cementation compared to zirconia. Compared to the gingiva of the neighbouring teeth, statistically significant (P < 0.01) differences were found for all colour parameter, either before or after crown cementation for both abutments; more significant differences were registered for titanium abutments. Tissue thickness correlated positively with c*-values for titanium at 1 mm and 2 mm from the gingival margin. Within their limits, the present data indicate that: (i) The peri-implant soft tissue around titanium and zirconia showed colour differences when compared to the soft tissue around natural teeth, and (ii) the peri-implant soft tissue around zirconia demonstrated a better colour match to the soft tissue at natural teeth than titanium. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  9. Micro-CT based modelling for characterising injection-moulded porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junning; Chen, Liangjian; Chang, Che-Cheng; Zhang, Zhongpu; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Design of prosthetic implants to ensure rapid and stable osseointegration remains a significant challenge, and continuous efforts have been directed to new implant materials, structures and morphology. This paper aims to develop and characterise a porous titanium dental implant fabricated by metallic powder injection-moulding. The surface morphology of the specimens was first examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), followed by microscopic computerised tomography (μ-CT) scanning to capture its 3D microscopic features non-destructively. The nature of porosity and pore sizes were determined statistically. A homogenisation technique based on the Hills-energy theorem was adopted to evaluate its directional elastic moduli, and the conservation of mass theorem was employed to quantify the oxygen diffusivity for bio-transportation feature. This porous medium was found to have pore sizes varying from 50 to 400 µm and the average porosity of 46.90 ± 1.83%. The anisotropic principal elastic moduli were found fairly close to the upper range of cortical bone, and the directional diffusivities could potentially enable radial osseous tissue ingrowth and vascularisation. This porous titanium successfully reduces the elastic modulus mismatch between implant and bone for dental and orthopaedic applications, and provides improved capacity for transporting oxygen, nutrient and waste for pre-vascular network formation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Adhesion of osteoblasts to a nanorough titanium implant surface

    PubMed Central

    Gongadze, Ekaterina; Kabaso, Doron; Bauer, Sebastian; Slivnik, Tomaž; Schmuki, Patrik; van Rienen, Ursula; Iglič, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    This work considers the adhesion of cells to a nanorough titanium implant surface with sharp edges. The basic assumption was that the attraction between the negatively charged titanium surface and a negatively charged osteoblast is mediated by charged proteins with a distinctive quadrupolar internal charge distribution. Similarly, cation-mediated attraction between fibronectin molecules and the titanium surface is expected to be more efficient for a high surface charge density, resulting in facilitated integrin mediated osteoblast adhesion. We suggest that osteoblasts are most strongly bound along the sharp convex edges or spikes of nanorough titanium surfaces where the magnitude of the negative surface charge density is the highest. It is therefore plausible that nanorough regions of titanium surfaces with sharp edges and spikes promote the adhesion of osteoblasts. PMID:21931478

  11. Dental implants in medically complex patients-a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Manor, Yifat; Simon, Roy; Haim, Doron; Garfunkel, Adi; Moses, Ofer

    2017-03-01

    Dental implant insertion for oral rehabilitation is a worldwide procedure for healthy and medically compromised patients. The impact of systemic disease risks on the outcome of implant therapy is unclear, since there are few if any published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The objective of this study is to investigate the rate of complications and failures following dental implantation in medically compromised patients in order to elucidate risk factors and prevent them. A retrospective cohort study was conducted from patient files treated with dental implantation between the years 2008-2014. The study group consisted of medically complex patients while the control group consisted of healthy patients. Preoperative, intraoperative, and post operative clinical details were retrieved from patients' files. The survival rate and the success rate of the dental implants were evaluated clinically and radiographically. A total of 204 patients (1003 dental implants) were included in the research, in the study group, 93 patients with 528 dental implants and in the control group, 111 patients with 475 dental implants. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding implant failures or complications. The failure rate of dental implants among the patients was 11.8 % in the study group and 16.2 % in the control group (P = 0.04). It was found that patients with a higher number of implants (mean 6.8) had failures compared with patients with a lower number of implants (mean 4.2) regardless of their health status (P < 0.01). We found a similar rate of failure and complications of dental implantation in medically complex patients and in healthy patients. Medically complex patients can undergo dental implantation. There are similar rates of complications and failures of dental implants in medically complex patients and in healthy patients.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  13. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of the effect of dental implants in head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Julide; Dirican, Bahar; Oysul, Kaan; Beyzadeoglu, Murat; Ucok, Ozlem; Beydemir, Bedri

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the dose enhancement from scattered radiation at bone-dental implant interfaces during simulated head and neck radiotherapy. Four cylindrical titanium dental implants with 3 different sizes and lengths were implanted into a human mandible in 4 different positions. Ionization measurements for 6 MV X, 25 MV X, and Co-60 gamma rays were done. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD 100 ) chips were used to measure radiation dose enhancement due to the scattered electrons from titanium and electronic disequilibrium at the tissue-metal interface. The results showed that for Co-60, there is a 21% maximum increase in dose to alveolar mandibular bone at the close proximity to the titanium. For 6-MV x-rays the dose enhancement increase was almost the same or slightly lower than for Co-60, while for 25-MV high-energy x-rays, dose enhancement was lower than that of others. This increase in dose enhancement fell off rapidly and became insignificant at 2 mm from the interface. Total dose that may lead to osteoradionecrosis risk of the mandible is slightly but not significantly affected by the scattered dose of the dental implants of lower jaw in the radiation field exposed to 3 different radiation beams.

  15. Light and transmission electron microscopy of the intact interfaces between non-submerged titanium-coated epoxy resin implants and bone or gingiva.

    PubMed

    Listgarten, M A; Buser, D; Steinemann, S G; Donath, K; Lang, N P; Weber, H P

    1992-02-01

    This experiment was aimed at studying the intact tissue/implant interface of non-submerged dental implants with a titanium surface. Epoxy-resin replicas were fabricated from 3.05 x 8 mm cylindrical titanium implants with a plasma-sprayed apical portion and a smooth coronal collar. The replicas were coated with a 90-120-nm-thick layer of pure titanium and autoclaved. The coated replicas were inserted as non-submerged endosseous implants in the edentulous premolar region of dog mandibles and allowed to heal for three months. Jaw sections containing the implants were processed for light and electron microscopic study of the intact tissue/implant interface with and without prior demineralization. Gingival connective tissue fibers were closely adapted to the titanium layer, in an orientation more or less parallel to the implant surface. There was no evidence of any fiber insertions into the surface irregularities of the smooth or rough titanium surface. Undemineralized bone was intimately adapted to the titanium surface without any intervening space. In demineralized sections, the collagen fibers of the bone matrix tended to be somewhat thinner and occasionally less densely packed in the vicinity of the implant surface. However, they extended all the way to the titanium surface, without any intervening fibril-free layer.

  16. Dental Implant Macro-Design Features Can Impact the Dynamics of Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; Vandamme, Katleen; Chaudhari, Amol; De Rycker, Judith; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Naert, Ignace; Duyck, Joke

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical performance of two dental implant types possessing a different macro-design in the in vivo pig model. Titanium Aadva(TM) implants (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were compared with OsseoSpeed(TM) implants (Astra, Mölndal, Sweden), with the Aadva implant displaying significant larger inter-thread dimensions than the OsseoSpeed implant. Implants were installed in the parietal bone of 12 domestic pigs and left for healing for either 1 or 3 months. Implant osseointegration was evaluated by quantitative histology (bone volume relative to the tissue volume [BV/TV]; bone-to-implant contact [BIC]) for distinct implant regions (collar, body, total implant length) with specific implant thread features. The Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test with α = 0.05 was performed. An inferior amount of bone enveloping the Aadva implant compared with the OsseoSpeed implant was observed, in particular at the implant body part with its considerable inter-thread gaps (p < .05). Concomitantly, the Aadva macro-design negatively affected the amount of bone in direct contact with the implant for this specific implant part (p < .05), and resulted in an overall impaired implant osseointegration at the initial healing stage (total implant length; 1-month healing; p < .05). Although the Aadva implant displayed a clinically acceptable level of osseointegration, the findings demonstrate that implant macro-design features can impact the dynamics of implant osseointegration. Consideration of specific implant macro-design features should be made relative to the biological and mechanical microenvironment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-07

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  18. Improved Dental Implant Drill Durability and Performance Using Heat and Wear Resistant Protective Coatings.

    PubMed

    Er, Nilay; Alkan, Alper; Ilday, Serim; Bengu, Erman

    2018-06-01

    The dental implant drilling procedure is an essential step for implant surgery, and frictional heat in bone during drilling is a key factor affecting the success of an implant. The aim of this study was to increase the dental implant drill lifetime and performance by using heat- and wear-resistant protective coatings to decrease the alveolar bone temperature caused by the dental implant drilling procedure. Commercially obtained stainless steel drills were coated with titanium aluminum nitride, diamond-like carbon, titanium boron nitride, and boron nitride coatings via magnetron-sputter deposition. Drilling was performed on bovine femoral cortical bone under the conditions mimicking clinical practice. Tests were performed under water-assisted cooling and under the conditions when no cooling was applied. Coated drill performances and durabilities were compared with those of three commonly used commercial drills with surfaces made from zirconia, black diamond. and stainless steel. Protective coatings with boron nitride, titanium boron nitride, and diamond-like carbon have significantly improved drill performance and durability. In particular, boron nitride-coated drills have performed within safe bone temperature limits for 50 drillings even when no cooling is applied. Titanium aluminium nitride coated drills did not show any improvement over commercially obtained stainless steel drills. Surface modification using heat- and wear-resistant coatings is an easy and highly effective way to improve implant drill performance and durability, which can improve the surgical procedure and the postsurgical healing period. The noteworthy success of different types of coatings is novel and likely to be applicable to various other medical systems.

  19. A Novel Technique for the Connection of Ceramic and Titanium Implant Components Using Glass Solder Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Enrico; Tinschert, Joachim; Mitrovic, Aurica; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Both titanium and ceramic materials provide specific advantages in dental implant technology. However, some problems, like hypersensitivity reactions, corrosion and mechanical failure, have been reported. Therefore, the combining of both materials to take advantage of their pros, while eliminating their respective cons, would be desirable. Hence, we introduced a new technique to bond titanium and ceramic materials by means of a silica-based glass ceramic solder. Cylindrical compound samples (Ø10 mm × 56 mm) made of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ), as well as titanium grade 5, were bonded by glass solder on their end faces. As a control, a two-component adhesive glue was utilized. The samples were investigated without further treatment, after 30 and 90 days of storage in distilled water at room temperature, and after aging. All samples were subjected to quasi-static four-point-bending tests. We found that the glass solder bonding provided significantly higher bending strength than adhesive glue bonding. In contrast to the glued samples, the bending strength of the soldered samples remained unaltered by the storage and aging treatments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses confirmed the presence of a stable solder-ceramic interface. Therefore, the glass solder technique represents a promising method for optimizing dental and orthopedic implant bondings. PMID:28793440

  20. Cell-laden hydrogel/titanium microhybrids: Site-specific cell delivery to metallic implants for improved integration.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Geraldine; Ozcelik, Hayriye; Haesler, Lisa; Cihova, Martina; Ciftci, Sait; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Debry, Christian; Stelzle, Martin; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2016-03-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely used in dental, orthopaedic and otorhinolaryngology fields to improve implant integration to host tissue. A possible step further to improve the integration with the host is the incorporation of autologous cells in porous titanium structures via cell-laden hydrogels. Fast gelling hydrogels have advantageous properties for in situ applications such as localisation of specific cells and growth factors at a target area without dispersion. The ability to control the cell types in different regions of an implant is important in applications where the target tissue (i) has structural heterogeneity (multiple cell types with a defined spatial configuration with respect to each other); (ii) has physical property gradients essential for its function (such as in the case of osteochondral tissue transition). Due to their near immediate gelation, such gels can also be used for site-specific modification of porous titanium structures, particularly for implants which would face different tissues at different locations. Herein, we describe a step by step design of a model system: the model cell-laden gel-containing porous titanium implants in the form of titanium microbead/hydrogel (maleimide-dextran or maleimide-PVA based) microhybrids. These systems enable the determination of the effect of titanium presence on gel properties and encapsulated cell behaviour as a miniaturized version of full-scale implants, providing a system compatible with conventional analysis methods. We used a fibroblast/vascular endothelial cell co-cultures as our model system and by utilising single microbeads we have quantified the effect of gel microenvironment (degradability, presence of RGD peptides within gel formulation) on cell behaviour and the effect of the titanium presence on cell behaviour and gel formation. Titanium presence slightly changed gel properties without hindering gel formation or affecting cell viability. Cells showed a preference to move towards

  1. Medicolegal implications of dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recent economic downturn, the dental implant market continues to grow year on year. Many more dentists are involved in the placement restoration of dental implants and dental implants are being placed in an extended range of clinical scenarios. Dental implant therapy remains a high risk area for the inexperienced interns of civil negligence claims and General Dental Council hearings. Risk can be mitigated by:• Ensuring appropriate indemnity • Complying with the published requirements for training • Maintaining detailed and extensive clinical records • Completing the initial phases of history, examination and investigations robustly • Recording a diagnosis • Providing a bespoke written treatment plan that includes details of the need for treatment, the treatment options (the risks and benefits), the phases of treatment, the costs of treatment,the expected normal sequelae of surgery, the risks and complications of implant therapy and the requirement for future maintenance. The provision of treatment that is different in nature or extent to that agreed can result in a breach of contract as well as a claim for negligence • Engaging sufficiently with the patient to obtain consent • Providing written postoperative instructions detailing emergency arrangements, patients who are anxious or in pain may not retain oral information • Making a frank disclosure of complication or collateral damage • Considering referral at an early stage particularly if reparative surgery is required. The stress of complications or failure may impair a dentist's normally sound judgement; there may be financial pressure, or concerns regarding reputation. In some cases, dentists avoid making a frank disclosure, feel obliged to undertake complicated reparative surgery, fail to make a timely referral, fail to respond appropriately to patient's concerns and in some cases attempt to alter the clinical records.However, in the best of hands and without negligence

  2. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  3. The Effect of Titanium Surface Roughness on Growth, Differentiation, and Protein Synthesis of Cartilage and Bone Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    at San Antonio Supervising Professors: Barbara D. Boyan, Ph.D. David L. Cochran, D.D.S., Ph.D. Placement of endosseous dental implants requires the...titanium substratum was chosen for these studies since most medical and dental implants are fabricated from titanium The titanium was cut into uniform...electron microscopy to evaluate the histomorphometry of the implant-bone interface of various titanium and ceramic dental implants placed in dog mandibles

  4. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas; Baas, Jorgen; Møller, Per; Bechtold, Joan E.; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Noncemented implants are the primary choice for younger patients undergoing total hip replacements. However, the major concern in this group of patients regarding revision is the concern from wear particles, periimplant inflammation, and subsequently aseptic implant loosening. Macrophages have been shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration and increase mechanical fixation. Cylindrical porous coated Ti-6Al-4V implants partially coated with metallic gold were inserted in the proximal region of the humerus in ten canines and control implants without gold were inserted in contralateral humerus. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push out tests and stereological histomorphometrical analyses showed no statistically significant differences in the two groups. The unchanged parameters are considered an improvement of the coating properties, as a previous complete gold-coated implant showed inferior mechanical fixation and reduced osseointegration compared to control titanium implants in a similar model. Since sufficient early mechanical fixation is achieved with this new coating, it is reasonable to investigate the implant further in long-term studies. PMID:22847873

  5. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas; Baas, Jorgen; Møller, Per; Bechtold, Joan E; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Noncemented implants are the primary choice for younger patients undergoing total hip replacements. However, the major concern in this group of patients regarding revision is the concern from wear particles, periimplant inflammation, and subsequently aseptic implant loosening. Macrophages have been shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration and increase mechanical fixation. Cylindrical porous coated Ti-6Al-4V implants partially coated with metallic gold were inserted in the proximal region of the humerus in ten canines and control implants without gold were inserted in contralateral humerus. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push out tests and stereological histomorphometrical analyses showed no statistically significant differences in the two groups. The unchanged parameters are considered an improvement of the coating properties, as a previous complete gold-coated implant showed inferior mechanical fixation and reduced osseointegration compared to control titanium implants in a similar model. Since sufficient early mechanical fixation is achieved with this new coating, it is reasonable to investigate the implant further in long-term studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Implant stability and marginal bone level of microgrooved zirconia dental implants: A 3-month experimental study on dogs.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Marković, Aleksa; Calvo-Guirado, José Luís; Lazić, Zoran; Piattelli, Adriano; Boticelli, Daniele; Maté-Sánchez, José Eduardo; Negri, Bruno; Ramírez-Fernández, María Piedad; Mišić, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    The modification of implant surfaces could affect mechanical implant stability as well as dynamics and quality of peri-implant bone healing. The aim of this 3-month experimental study in dogs was to investigate implant stability, marginal bone levels and bone tissue response to zirconia dental implants with two laser-micro-grooved intraosseous surfaces in comparison with nongrooved sandblasted zirconia and sandblasted, high-temperature etched titanium implants. Implant surface characterization was performed using optical interferometric profilometty and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A total of 96 implants (4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length) were inserted randomly in both sides of the lower jaw of 12 Fox Hound dogs divided into groups of 24 each: the control (titanium), the group A (sandblasted zirconia), the group B (sandolasted zirconia plus microgrooved neck) and the group C (sandblasted zirconia plus all microgrooved). All the implants were immediately loaded. Insertion torque, periotest values, radiographic crestal bone level and removal torque were recorded during the 3-month follow-up. Qualitative scanning electon microscope (SEM) analysis of the bone-implant interfaces of each group was performed. Insertion torque values were higher in the group C and control implants (p < 0.05). Periotest values increased in all the periods in proportion to the extent of microgrooving as follows: the group C > the control > the group B > the group A (p < 0.05). Radiographic measurements showed minimal crestal bone loss at 3 months for microgrooved zirconia implants (groups C and B) and control implants compared with the group A implants (p < 0.05). The removal torque values increased with time for all the groups as follows: the group C > the control > the group B > the group A (p < 0.05). SEM showed that implant surfaces of the groups B and C had an extra bone growth inside the microgrooves that corresponded to the shape and direction of the microgrooves. The

  7. The medically compromised patient: Are dental implants a feasible option?

    PubMed

    Vissink, A; Spijkervet, Fkl; Raghoebar, G M

    2018-03-01

    In healthy subjects, dental implants have evolved to be a common therapy to solve problems related to stability and retention of dentures as well as to replace failing teeth. Although dental implants are applied in medically compromised patients, it is often not well known whether this therapy is also feasible in these patients, whether the risk of implant failure and developing peri-implantitis is increased, and what specific preventive measures, if any, have to be taken when applying dental implants in these patients. Generally speaking, as was the conclusion by the leading review of Diz, Scully, and Sanz on placement of dental implants in medically compromised patients (J Dent, 41, 2013, 195), in a few disorders implant survival may be lower, and the risk of a compromised peri-implant health and its related complications be greater, but the degree of systemic disease control outweighs the nature of the disorder rather than the risk accompanying dental implant treatment. So, as dental implant treatment is accompanied by significant functional benefits and improved oral health-related quality of life, dental implant therapy is a feasible treatment in almost any medically compromised patient when the required preventive measures are taken and follow-up care is at a high level. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of embedded titanium dioxide nanoparticles by oxygen ion implantation in titanium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukade, Deepti. A.; Desai, C. A.; Kulkarni, Nilesh; Tribedi, L. C.; Bhattacharyya, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Thin films of titanium of 100nm thickness are deposited on fused silica substrates. These films are implanted by oxygen ions with implantation energy of 60keV obtained from ECR based highly charged ion accelerator. The implanted films are later annealed in a tube furnace to establish nanophase formation. The post implanted annealed films are characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy and Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction technique (GAXRD). The phase formed and particle size is determined by GAXRD. Nanoparticle formation is confirmed by the UV-VIS spectroscopic analysis that shows quantum size effects in the form of a blue shift in the band-gap energy of titanium-oxide.

  9. Quasi-static strength and fractography analysis of two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Dedavid, Berenice Anina

    2018-06-01

    New manufacturing methods was developed to improve the tissues integration with the titanium alloy pieces. The present in vitro study was to assess the resistance and fracture mode after applied a quasi-static compressive force on the two dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering. Twenty dental implants manufactured by direct metal laser sintering, using titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) granules in two designs (n = 10 per group): Conventional dental implant (group Imp1) two-piece implant design, where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are two separate components and, the one-piece implant (group Imp2), where the surgical implant and prosthetic abutment are one integral piece. All samples were subjected to quasi-static loading at a 30° angle to the implant axis in a universal testing machine. The mean fracture strengths were 1269.2 ± 128.8 N for the group Imp1 and, 1259.5 ± 115.1 N for the group Imp2, without statistical differences (P = .8722). In both groups, the fracture surface does not present crack between the compact core and the superficial (less dense and porous) part of the implants. Based on the measured resistance data for the two implant models manufactured by direct metal laser sintering tested in the present study, we can suggest that they have adequate capacity to withstand the masticatory loads. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hybrid Calcium Phosphate Coatings for Titanium Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharapudchenko, E.; Ignatov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Tverdokhlebov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid multilayer coatings were obtained on titanium substrates by the combination of two methods: the micro-arc oxidation in phosphoric acid solution with the addition of calcium compounds to high supersaturated state and RF magnetron sputtering of the target made of synthetic hydroxyapatite. 16 different groups of coatings were formed on titanium substrates and in vitro studies were conducted in accordance with ISO 23317 in the solution simulating body fluid. The studies using SEM, XRD of the coatings of the samples before and after exposure to SBF were performed. The features of morphology, chemical and phase composition of the studied coatings are shown.

  11. In vitro studies of nanosilver-doped titanium implants for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pokrowiecki, Rafał; Zaręba, Tomasz; Szaraniec, Barbara; Pałka, Krzysztof; Mielczarek, Agnieszka; Menaszek, Elżbieta; Tyski, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The addition of an antibacterial agent to dental implants may provide the opportunity to decrease the percentage of implant failures due to peri-implantitis. For this purpose, in this study, the potential efficacy of nanosilver-doped titanium biomaterials was determined. Titanium disks were incorporated with silver nanoparticles over different time periods by Tollens reaction, which is considered to be an eco-friendly, cheap, and easy-to-perform method. The surface roughness, wettability, and silver release profile of each disc were measured. In addition, the antibacterial activity was also evaluated by using disk diffusion tests for bacteria frequently isolated from the peri-implant biofilm: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro in a natural human osteoblasts cell culture. The addition of nanosilver significantly increased the surface roughness and decreased the wettability in a dose-dependent manner. These surfaces were significantly toxic to all the tested bacteria following a 48-hour exposure, regardless of silver doping duration. A concentration of 0.05 ppm was sufficient to inhibit Gram-positive and Gram-negative species, with the latter being significantly more susceptible to silver ions. However, after the exposure of human osteoblasts to 0.1 ppm of silver ions, a significant decrease in cell viability was observed by using ToxiLight™ BioAssay Kit after 72 hours. Data from the present study indicated that the incorporation of nanosilver may influence the surface properties that are important in the implant healing process. The presence of nanosilver on the titanium provides an antibacterial activity related to the bacteria involved in peri-implantitis. Finally, the potential toxicological considerations of nanosilver should further be investigated, as both the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties

  12. Osseointegration of dental implants in Macaca fascicularis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, R. S.; Odang, R. W.; Odelia, L.

    2017-08-01

    Osseointegration is an important factor in determining the success of a dental implant. It can be assessed from the osseointegration that occurs between the implant and the bone. The implant stability is determined by the osseous support at the implant-bone interface, which is commonly evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether the osseointegration level measured by a Low Resonance Frequency Analyzer (LRFA) gave results as good as those obtained by histomorphometric examination. Six male Macaca fascicularis were used in this study. In each animal, two types of loading were performed: immediate and delayed loading. Clinical examination and LRFA measurement were performed to determine osseointegration at the first and second weeks and at the first, second, third, and fourth months. After four months, histomorphometric examination was performed. The relationship between the histomorphometric examination and LRFA measurement was compared using the Pearson correlation coefficient. There was no significant difference in the osseointegration between immediate loading and delayed loading (p > 0.05) The bone-implant contact percentage in the first group did not differ significantly from that in the second group. Statistical analysis showed that there was a strong correlation between LRFA measurement and histomorphometric examination. Osseointegration could be evaluated through LRFA measurement as well as through histomorphometric examination.

  13. Dual-modal photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Sungjo; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Dental implants are common method to replace decayed or broken tooth. As the implant treatment procedures varies according to the patients' jawbone, bone ridge, and sinus structure, appropriate examinations are necessary for successful treatment. Currently, radiographic examinations including periapical radiology, panoramic X-ray, and computed tomography are commonly used for diagnosing and monitoring. However, these radiographic examinations have limitations in that patients and operators are exposed to radioactivity and multiple examinations are performed during the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) combined imaging of dental implant that can lower the total amount of absorbed radiation dose in dental implant treatment. An acoustic resolution PA macroscopy and a clinical PA/US system was used for dental implant imaging. The acquired dual modal PA/US imaging results support that the proposed photoacoustic imaging strategy can reduce the radiation dose rate during dental implant treatment.

  14. Nanotubular topography enhances the bioactivity of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingyan; Zhang, Xinchun; Yan, Wangxiang; Chen, Zhipei; Shuai, Xintao; Wang, Anxun; Wang, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Surface modification on titanium implants plays an important role in promoting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) response to enhance osseointegration persistently. In this study, nano-scale TiO 2 nanotube topography (TNT), micro-scale sand blasted-acid etched topography (SLA), and hybrid sand blasted-acid etched/nanotube topography (SLA/TNT) were fabricated on the surfaces of titanium implants. Although the initial cell adherence at 60 min among TNT, SLA and TNT/SLA was not different, SLA and SLA/TNT presented to be rougher and suppressed the proliferation of MSC. TNT showed hydrophilic surface and balanced promotion of cellular functions. After being implanted in rabbit femur models, TNT displayed the best osteogenesis inducing ability as well as strong bonding strength to the substrate. These results indicate that nano-scale TNT provides favorable surface topography for improving the clinical performance of endosseous implants compared with micro and hybrid micro/nano surfaces, suggesting a promising and reliable surface modification strategy of titanium implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chimeric Peptides as Implant Functionalization Agents for Titanium Alloy Implants with Antimicrobial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T.; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host and bacterial cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with AMPs can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Escherichia coli. In biological interactions such as occur on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore

  16. Chimeric peptides as implant functionalization agents for titanium alloy implants with antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Deniz T; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M; Snead, Malcolm L; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMP's), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host- and bacterial- cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with antimicrobial peptides can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, S. mutans, S. epidermidis , and E. coli . In biological interactions such as occurs on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore open up

  17. The effects of PRGF on bone regeneration and on titanium implant osseointegration in goats: a histologic and histomorphometric study.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Orive, Gorka; Pla, Rafael; Roman, Pedro; Serrano, Victoriano; Andía, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    The effect of local application of scaffold-like preparation rich in growth factors (PRGF) on bone regeneration in artificial defects and the potential effect of humidifying titanium dental implants with liquid PRGF on their osseointegration were investigated. The PRGF formulations were obtained from venous blood of three goats and applied either as a 3D fibrin scaffold (scaffold-like PRGF) in the regeneration of artificial defects or as liquid PRGF via humidifying the implants before their insertion. Initially, 12 defects were filled with scaffold-like PRGF and another 12 were used as controls. The histological analysis at 8 weeks revealed mature bone trabeculae when PRGF was used, whereas the control samples showed mainly connective tissue with incipient signs of bone formation. For the second set of experiments, 26 implants (13 humidified with liquid PRGF) were placed in the tibiae of goats. Histological and histomorphometric results demonstrated that application of liquid PRGF increased the percentage of bone-implant contact in 84.7%. The whole surface of the PRGF-treated implants was covered by newly formed bone, whereas only the upper half was surrounded in control implants. In summary, PRGF can accelerate bone regeneration in artificial defects and improve the osseointegration of titanium dental implants.

  18. Comparative Clinical Study of Conventional Dental Implants and Mini Dental Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Aunmeungtong, Weerapan; Kumchai, Thongnard; Strietzel, Frank P; Reichart, Peter A; Khongkhunthian, Pathawee

    2017-04-01

    Dental implant-retained overdentures have been chosen as the treatment of choice for complete mandibular removable dentures. Dental implants, such as mini dental implants, and components for retaining overdentures, are commercially available. However, comparative clinical studies comparing mini dental implants and conventional dental implants using different attachment for implant-retained overdentures have not been well documented. To compare the clinical outcomes of using two mini dental implants with Equator ® attachments, four mini dental implants with Equator attachments, or two conventional dental implants with ball attachments, by means of a randomized clinical trial. Sixty patients received implant-retained mandibular overdentures in the interforaminal region. The patients were divided into three groups. In Groups 1 and 2, two and four mini dental implants, respectively, were placed and immediately loaded by overdentures, using Equator ® attachments. In Group 3, conventional implants were placed. After osseointegration, the implants were loaded by overdentures, using ball attachments. The study distribution was randomized and double-blinded. Outcome measures included changes in radiological peri-implant bone level from surgery to 12 months postinsertion, prosthodontic complications and patient satisfaction. The cumulative survival rate in the three clinical groups after one year was 100%. There was no significant difference (p < 0.05) in clinical results regarding the number (two or four) of mini dental implants with Equator attachments. However, there was a significant difference in marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction between those receiving mini dental implants with Equator attachments and conventional dental implants with ball attachments. The marginal bone resorption in Group 3 was significantly higher than in Groups 1 and 2 (p < 0.05); there were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 2. There was no significant difference in

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis patterns of Finnish dentists performing dental implant surgery.

    PubMed

    Pyysalo, Mikko; Helminen, Mika; Antalainen, Anna-Kaisa; Sándor, George K; Wolff, Jan

    2014-11-01

    The peri-operative use of prophylactic antibiotics in clinically healthy patients undergoing dental implant surgery is very common in Finland. While antibiotics are prescribed with the hope of preventing both local and systemic complications, their application and utilization is not uniform. The aim of this study was to assess the variation in prescribing patterns among Finnish dentists performing dental implant placement operations. This study also aimed to examine the possible relationship between early implant removal and the use of the prophylactic antibiotics in Finland. The National Institute for Health and Welfare in Finland granted permission to access the Finnish Dental Implant Register. The peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis prescribing patterns were assessed in a total of 110 543 dental implant placement procedures and 1038 dental implant removal operations performed in Finland between April 1994 and April 2012. A total of 61 different antibiotics or combinations were prescribed peri-operatively during implant placements in Finland between 1994-2012. Phenoxymethylpenicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug (72.2%). No statistically significant difference in early implant removal rates could be found between patients who had or had not received peri-operative prophylaxis. However, patients who had received peri-operative prophylaxis had statistically significant longer implant survival rates. There is a variation in antibiotic prescribing patterns among Finnish dentists placing dental implants. The results suggest that the use of prophylactic antibiotics has little effect on the prevention of primary implant surgery-related complications and, hence, success rates.

  20. A strontium-incorporated nanoporous titanium implant surface for rapid osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Guanglong; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Jun; Qiao, Yuqin; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-02-01

    Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to enhance rapid osseointegration. In vitro, the nanoporous structure significantly enhanced the initial adhesion of canine BMSCs. More importantly, sustained release of strontium ions also displayed a stronger effect on the BMSCs in facilitating their osteogenic differentiation and promoting the angiogenic growth factor secretion to recruit endothelial cells and promote blood vessel formation. Advanced mechanism analyses indicated that MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in these effects of the MAO-Sr coating. Finally, in the canine dental implantation study, the MAO-Sr coating induced faster bone formation within the initial six weeks and the osseointegration effect was comparable to that of the commercially available ITI implants. These results suggest that the MAO-Sr coating has the potential for future use in dental implants.Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to

  1. In vivo osseointegration of dental implants with an antimicrobial peptide coating.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zhou, X C; Liu, S; Wu, R F; Aparicio, C; Wu, J Y

    2017-05-01

    implants without coating. This study demonstrates that titanium dental implants with an antimicrobial GL13K coating enables in vivo implant osseointegration at similar bone growth rates than gold-standard non-coated dental implants up to 6 weeks of implantation in rabbit femurs.

  2. Teflon Implants Versus Titanium Implants in Stapes Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    Otosclerosis is the most common cause of bilateral gradually progressive conductive hearing loss with normal tympanic membrane and Eustachian tube. Otosclerosis surgical treatment is one of the most gratifying operations in Otorhinolaryngology. It is not only the surgical techniques but also the prosthesis which are evolving in the attempt of providing best hearing results. Teflon piston is the most commonly employed prosthesis in stapes surgery. Titanium pistons are relatively the new development in the evolution of stapes prosthesis. The aim of this review article is to know and compare the surgical technicalities and postoperative outcomes including hearing improvement after the use of Teflon and titanium stapes piston. The adverse reactions occurred during follow-up were taken into consideration. The data in this article are supported by a Medline search. The use of both the prosthesis gave good results in cases of otosclerosis. The placement of titanium soft clip design was found easier than the earlier àWengen design of clip piston.

  3. Corrosion resistance of titanium ion implanted AZ91 magnesium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chenglong; Xin Yunchang; Tian Xiubo

    2007-03-15

    Degradable metal alloys constitute a new class of materials for load-bearing biomedical implants. Owing to their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, magnesium alloys are promising in degradable prosthetic implants. The objective of this study is to improve the corrosion behavior of surgical AZ91 magnesium alloy by titanium ion implantation. The surface characteristics of the ion implanted layer in the magnesium alloys are examined. The authors' results disclose that an intermixed layer is produced and the surface oxidized films are mainly composed of titanium oxide with a lesser amount of magnesium oxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the oxide has threemore » layers. The outer layer which is 10 nm thick is mainly composed of MgO and TiO{sub 2} with some Mg(OH){sub 2}. The middle layer that is 50 nm thick comprises predominantly TiO{sub 2} and MgO with minor contributions from MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and TiO. The third layer from the surface is rich in metallic Mg, Ti, Al, and Ti{sub 3}Al. The effects of Ti ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and electrochemical behavior of the magnesium alloys are investigated in simulated body fluids at 37{+-}1 deg. C using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit potential techniques. Compared to the unimplanted AZ91 alloy, titanium ion implantation significantly shifts the open circuit potential (OCP) to a more positive potential and improves the corrosion resistance at OCP. This phenomenon can be ascribed to the more compact surface oxide film, enhanced reoxidation on the implanted surface, as well as the increased {beta}-Mg{sub 12}Al{sub 17} phase.« less

  4. Soft tissue sealing around dental implants based on histological interpretation.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Ikiru; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Kondo, Ryosuke; Oshiro, Wakana; Matsuura, Yuri; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue sealing around dental implants and teeth. This is a narrative review performed through scientific articles published between 1977 and 2014, indexed in MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The study selected articles that focused on epithelial sealing around dental implant or teeth with cell biology and histology of soft tissue. Implant therapy has been widely applied in dental rehabilitation for many years, with predictable long-term results. The longevity and functionality of dental implants is dependent on both osseointegration around the implant body and the establishment of a soft tissue barrier that protects the underlying hard tissue structures and the implant itself. The health and stability of the peri-implant mucosa also affects the esthetics of the implant. The healing and maintenance of the epithelial and connective tissues around implants are increasingly recognized as being fundamental to implant success. However, there has been little research into the function or formation of the soft tissue seal around dental implants, and the roles of this unique mucosal interface remain unclear. This narrative review explores the extent of the current knowledge of soft tissue barriers around implants from both a basic and clinical perspective, and aims to consolidate this knowledge and highlight the most pertinent questions relating to this area of research. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Short dental implants versus standard dental implants placed in the posterior jaws: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Ferro-Alves, Marcio Luiz; Okamoto, Roberta; Mendonça, Marcos Rogério; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare short implants (equal or less than 8mm) versus standard implants (larger than 8mm) placed in posterior regions of maxilla and mandible, evaluating survival rates of implants, marginal bone loss, complications and prosthesis failures. This review has been registered at PROSPERO under the number CRD42015016588. Main search terms were used in combination: dental implant, short implant, short dental implants, short dental implants posterior, short dental implants maxilla, and short dental implants mandible. An electronic search for data published up until September/2015 was undertaken using the PubMed/Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Library databases. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials and/or prospective studies, which evaluated short implants in comparison to standard implants in the same study. The search identified 1460 references, after inclusion criteria 13 studies were assessed for eligibility. A total of 1269 patients, who had received a total of 2631 dental implants. The results showed that there was no significant difference of implants survival (P=.24; RR:1.35; CI: 0.82-2.22), marginal bone loss (P=.06; MD: -0.20; CI: -0.41 to 0.00), complications (P=.08; RR:0.54; CI: 0.27-1.09) and prosthesis failures (P=.92; RR:0.96; CI: 0.44-2.09). Short implants are considered a predictable treatment for posterior jaws. However, short implants with length less than 8 mm (4-7 mm) should be used with caution because they present greater risks to failures compared to standard implants. Short implants are frequently placed in the posterior area in order to avoid complementary surgical procedures. However, clinicians need to be aware that short implants with length less than 8mm present greater risk of failures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Expansion of a Predoctoral Surgical Implant Selective for Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Stefanie D; Zimmermann, Richard L; Hendricson, William D

    2016-03-01

    Historically, predoctoral dental education programs have focused on the restoration of implants in the clinical environment; however, given the increase in dental implant therapy being performed by general dentists, the need to incorporate surgical implant training is becoming evident. This article describes a predoctoral surgical implant selective at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and its evolution across five years to include emerging techniques and technology to enhance students' understanding of dental implant therapy, both surgical and restorative. From virtual implant planning and guided surgery to intra-oral scanning of implants for custom abutments and restorations, students obtained first-hand experiences with a wide spectrum of aspects of implant therapy. The results of anonymous surveys completed by 2014-15 students before and after the year-long selective regarding their impression of the program are also discussed.

  7. Surface Damage on Dental Implants with Release of Loose Particles after Insertion into Bone.

    PubMed

    Senna, Plinio; Antoninha Del Bel Cury, Altair; Kates, Stephen; Meirelles, Luiz

    2015-08-01

    Modern dental implants present surface features of distinct dimensions that can be damaged during the insertion procedure into bone. The aims of this study were (1) to quantify by means of roughness parameters the surface damage caused by the insertion procedure of dental implants and (2) to investigate the presence of loose particles at the interface. Three groups of dental implants representing different surface topographies were inserted in fresh cow rib bone blocks. The surface roughness was characterized by interferometry on the same area before and after the insertion. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-back-scattered electron detector (BSD) analysis was used to identify loose particles at the interface. The amplitude and hybrid roughness parameters of all three groups were lower after insertion. The surface presenting predominance of peaks (Ssk [skewness] > 0) associated to higher structures (height parameters) presented higher damage associated to more pronounced reduction of material volume. SEM-BSD images revealed loose titanium and aluminum particles at the interface mainly at the crestal cortical bone level. Shearing forces during the insertion procedure alters the surface of dental implants. Loose metal particles can be generated at bone-implant interface especially around surfaces composed mainly by peaks and with increased height parameters. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surface Damage on Dental Implants with Release of Loose Particles after Insertion into Bone

    PubMed Central

    Senna, Plinio; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Kates, Stephen; Meirelles, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Modern dental implants present surface features of distinct dimensions that can be damaged during the insertion procedure into bone. Purpose The aims of this study were (1) to quantify by means of roughness parameters the surface damage caused by the insertion procedure of dental implants and (2) to investigate the presence of loose particles at the interface. Materials and Methods Three groups of dental implants representing different surface topographies were inserted in fresh cow rib bone blocks. The surface roughness was characterized by interferometry on the same area before and after the insertion. SEM-BSD analysis was used to identify loose particles at the interface. Results The amplitude and hybrid roughness parameters of all three groups were lower after insertion. The surface presenting predominance of peaks (Ssk>0) associated to higher structures (height parameters) presented higher damage associated to more pronounced reduction of material volume. SEM-BSD images revealed loose titanium and aluminum particles at the interface mainly at the crestal cortical bone level. Conclusions Shearing forces during the insertion procedure alters the surface of dental implants. Loose metal particles can be generated at bone-implant interface especially around surfaces composed mainly by peaks and with increased height parameters. PMID:24283455

  9. Biological response on a titanium implant-grade surface functionalized with modular peptides☆

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, H.; Fong, H.; Wilson, B.; Oren, E.E.; Amos, F.A.; Zhang, H.; Evans, J.S.; Snead, M.L.; Sarikaya, M.; Tamerler, C.

    2015-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are among the most successful implantable materials for dental and orthopedic applications. The combination of excellent mechanical and corrosion resistance properties makes them highly desirable as endosseous implants that can withstand a demanding biomechanical environment. Yet, the success of the implant depends on its osteointegration, which is modulated by the biological reactions occurring at the interface of the implant. A recent development for improving biological responses on the Ti-implant surface has been the realization that bifunctional peptides can impart material binding specificity not only because of their molecular recognition of the inorganic material surface, but also through their self-assembly and ease of biological conjugation properties. To assess peptide-based functionalization on bioactivity, the present authors generated a set of peptides for implant-grade Ti, using cell surface display methods. Out of 60 unique peptides selected by this method, two of the strongest titanium binding peptides, TiBP1 and TiBP2, were further characterized for molecular structure and adsorption properties. These two peptides demonstrated unique, but similar molecular conformations different from that of a weak binder peptide, TiBP60. Adsorption measurements on a Ti surface revealed that their disassociation constants were 15-fold less than TiBP60. Their flexible and modular use in biological surface functionalization were demonstrated by conjugating them with an integrin recognizing peptide motif, RGDS. The functionalization of the Ti surface by the selected peptides significantly enhanced the bioactivity of osteoblast and fibroblast cells on implant-grade materials. PMID:23159566

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Biomaterial Removal from Dental Implant Drills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    effectiveness o f biomateria l removal from dental implant dri l Is Is appropriately acknowledged and beyond brief excerpts. is with the perm issio n...certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: Evaluating the effectiveness of biomaterial removal from dental ...effectiveness of biomaterial removal from dental implant drills STEPHANIE M. PRICE, DDS B.M.E. University of Delaware, Newark, DE 1995 D.D.S. University

  11. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Management of dental implant fractures. A case history.

    PubMed

    Al Quran, Firas A M; Rashan, Bashar A; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of endosseous osseointegrated implants to replace missing natural teeth increases the chances of implant complications and failures, despite the high initial success rate reported in the literature. Implant fracture is one possible complication that results in ultimate failure of the dental implant. Such a complication poses a management crisis even for the most experienced clinician. This article reports on a case of implant fracture, its possible causes, and how the case was managed.

  13. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  14. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  15. Metal TiO2 Nanotube Layers for the Treatment of Dental Implant Infections.

    PubMed

    Roguska, Agata; Belcarz, Anna; Zalewska, Justyna; Hołdyński, Marcin; Andrzejczuk, Mariusz; Pisarek, Marcin; Ginalska, Grazyna

    2018-05-23

    Titanium oxide nanotube layers with silver and zinc nanoparticles are attracting increasing attention in the design of bone and dental implants due to their antimicrobial potential and their ability to control host cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. However, recent reports indicate that the etiology of dental infections is more complex than has been previously considered. Therefore, the antimicrobial potential of dental implants should be evaluated against at least several different microorganisms cooperating in human mouth colonization. In this study, Ag and Zn nanoparticles incorporated into titanium oxide nanotubular layers were studied with regard to how they affect Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Streptococcus mutans. Layers of titanium oxide nanotubes with an average diameter of 110 nm were fabricated by electrochemical anodization, annealed at 650 °C, and modified with approx. 5 wt % Ag or Zn nanoparticles. The surfaces were examined with the scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques and subjected to evaluation of microbial-killing and microbial adhesion-inhibiting potency. In a 1.5 h long adhesion test, the samples were found more effective toward yeast strains than toward S. mutans. In a release-killing test, the microorganisms were almost completely eliminated by the samples, either within 3 h of contact (for S. mutans) or 24 h of contact (for both yeast strains). Although further improvement is advisable, it seems that Ag and Zn nanoparticles incorporated into TiO 2 nanotubular surfaces provide a powerful tool for reducing the incidence of bone implant infections. Their high bidirectional activity (against both Candida species and S. mutans) makes the layers tested particularly promising for the design of dental implants.

  16. On stress/strain shielding and the material stiffness paradigm for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Korabi, Raoof; Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Stress shielding considerations suggest that the dental implant material's compliance should be matched to that of the host bone. However, this belief has not been confirmed from a general perspective, either clinically or numerically. To characterize the influence of the implant stiffness on its functionality using the failure envelope concept that examines all possible combinations of mechanical load and application angle for selected stress, strain and displacement-based bone failure criteria. Those criteria represent bone yielding, remodeling, and implant primary stability, respectively MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed numerical simulations to generate failure envelopes for all possible loading configurations of dental implants, with stiffness ranging from very low (polymer) to extremely high, through that of bone, titanium, and ceramics. Irrespective of the failure criterion, stiffer implants allow for improved implant functionality. The latter reduces with increasing compliance, while the trabecular bone experiences higher strains, albeit of an overall small level. Micromotions remain quite small irrespective of the implant's stiffness. The current paradigm favoring reduced implant material's stiffness out of concern for stress or strain shielding, or even excessive micromotions, is not supported by the present calculations, that point exactly to the opposite. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Modeling the surface contamination of dental titanium investment castings.

    PubMed

    Atwood, R C; Lee, P D; Curtis, R V

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a computational tool for assisting the design of titanium dental castings with minimal defects and to compare computational simulations with casting experiments. Modeling. An in-house cellular-automata solidification and finite-difference diffusion program was coupled with a commercial casting program and applied to (a) simple geometric wedge models and (b) a 3D-laser scan of a molar crown casting. Experimental. Wedges and molar crowns were hand-waxed and investment cast in commercial purity grade 1 (CP-1) titanium by a commercial dental laboratory. The castings were sectioned and analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and microhardness testing. In the wedge sample, contamination with impurities (Al, Si), including intermetallic precipitates, was found to extend to a depth ranging from 30 to 120 microm depending on the section thickness and hence the local cooling rate. Microstructural and mechanical (hardness) effects were found to a depth ranging from 80 to 250 microm. The coupled micro/macro model predictions showed reasonable agreement for the pattern of contamination. Dental and medical applications demand close dimensional tolerance and freedom from surface impurities and structural flaws in castings having unique shapes. The ability to predict the structural, mechanical, and chemical changes resulting from the casting process will help to design the casting and post-casting processes to minimize these problems.

  18. Surface insulating properties of titanium implanted alumina ceramics by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingdong; Song, Falun; Li, Fei; Jin, Xiao; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Langping

    2017-09-01

    The insulating property of the alumina ceramic in vacuum under high voltage is mainly limited by its surface properties. Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is an effective method to modify the surface chemical and physical properties of the alumina ceramic. In order to improve the surface flashover voltage of the alumina ceramic in vacuum, titanium ions with an energy of about 20 keV were implanted into the surface of the alumina ceramic using the PIII method. The surface properties of the as-implanted samples, such as the chemical states of the titanium, morphology and surface resistivity, were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and electrometer, respectively. The surface flashover voltages of the as-implanted alumina samples were measured by a vacuum surface flashover experimental system. The XPS spectra revealed that a compound of Ti, TiO2 and Al2O3 was formed in the inner surface of the alumina sample. The electrometer results showed that the surface resistivity of the implanted alumina decreased with increased implantation time. In addition, after the titanium ion implantation, the maximum hold-off voltage of alumina was increased to 38.4 kV, which was 21.5% higher than that of the unimplanted alumina ceramic.

  19. Osteal integration of porous implants from titanium nickelide.

    PubMed

    Kelmakov, V P; Itin, V I; Epifancev, A G; Lepakova, O K; Kitler, V D; Bulgakov, V N

    2009-10-01

    The microstructure of preparations from porous titanium nickelide was studied 4.5 months and 1.5 years after operations on the anterior compartments of the spine. Organic tissues of different morphology, compactness, and thickness occupied 100% of analyzed surface 1.5 years after implantation, while after 4.5 months the pores were filled by 60%. The content of calcium and phosphorus elements in surface pores after 1.5 years was close to their concentrations in human bones.

  20. Clinical Outcome of Hydroxyapatite Coated, Bioactive Glass Coated, and Machined Ti6Al4V Threaded Dental Implant in Human Jaws: A Short-Term Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Surajit; Roy, Rajiv; Kundu, Biswanath; Datta, Someswar; Kumar, Manoj; Chanda, Abhijit; Kundu, Debabrata

    2016-04-01

    Growing aspect of endosseous implant research is focused on surface modification of dental implants for the purpose of improving osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcome (ie, osseointegration) of hydroxyapatite coated, bioactive glass coated and machined titanium alloy threaded dental implants in human jaw bone after implantation. One hundred twenty-six implants (45 hydroxyapatite coated, 41 bioactive glass coated, and 40 machined titanium implants) have been placed in incisor areas of 62 adult patients. Outcome was assessed up to 12 months after prosthetic rehabilitation using different clinical and radiological parameters. Surface roughness of failed implants was analyzed by laser profilometer. Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were nontoxic and biocompatible. Least marginal bone loss in radiograph, significantly higher (P < 0.05) interface radiodensity, and less interfacial gaps were observed in computed tomography with bioactive glass coated implants at anterior maxilla compared to other 2 types. Bioactive glass coated implants are equally safe and effective as hydroxyapatite coated and machined titanium implants in achieving osseointegration; therefore, can be effectively used as an alternative coating material for dental implants.

  1. Histatin 1 Enhances Cell Adhesion to Titanium in an Implant Integration Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, I A; Beker, A F; Jellema, W; Nazmi, K; Wu, G; Wismeijer, D; Krawczyk, P M; Bolscher, J G M; Veerman, E C I; Stap, J

    2017-04-01

    Cellular adhesion is essential for successful integration of dental implants. Rapid soft tissue integration is important to create a seal around the implant and prevent infections, which commonly cause implant failure and can result in bone loss. In addition, soft tissue management is important to obtain good dental aesthetics. We previously demonstrated that the salivary peptide histatin 1 (Hst1) causes a more than 2-fold increase in the ability of human adherent cells to attach and spread on a glass surface. Cells treated with Hst1 attached more rapidly and firmly to the substrate and to each other. In the current study, we examine the potential application of Hst1 for promotion of dental implant integration. Our results show that Hst1 enhances the attachment and spreading of soft tissue cell types (oral epithelial cells and fibroblasts) to titanium (Ti) and hydroxyapatite (HAP), biomaterials that have found wide applications as implant material in dentistry and orthopedics. For improved visualization of cell adhesion to Ti, we developed a novel technique that uses sputtering to deposit a thin, transparent layer of Ti onto glass slides. This approach allows detailed, high-resolution analysis of cell adherence to Ti in real time. Furthermore, our results suggest that Hst1 has no negative effects on cell survival. Given its natural occurrence in the oral cavity, Hst1 could be an attractive agent for clinical application. Importantly, even though Hst1 is specific for saliva of humans and higher primates, it stimulated the attachment and spreading of canine cells, paving the way for preclinical studies in canine models.

  2. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Zicheng; Li, Lianshuo; Zhang, Jieni; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Lin, Jiuxiang; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial diversity was observed in subgingival sites of ailing implants, compared with healthy implants. Microbial co-occurrence analysis revealed that periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, were clustered into modules in the peri-implant mucositis network. Putative pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were present at a moderate relative abundance in peri-implant mucositis, suggesting that peri-implant mucositis an important early transitional phase during the development of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Eubacterium was increased at peri-implantitis locations, and co-occurrence analysis revealed that Eubacterium minutum was correlated with Prevotella intermedia in peri-implantitis sites, which suggests the association of Eubacterium with peri-implantitis. This study indicates that periodontal pathogens may play important roles in the shifting of healthy implant status to peri-implant disease. PMID:26077225

  3. Nanostructured titanate with different metal ions on the surface of metallic titanium: a facile approach for regulation of rBMSCs fate on titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Ren, Na; Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Sang, Yuanhua; Jiang, Huaidong; Boughton, Robert I; Huang, Ling; Huang, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2014-08-13

    Titanium (Ti) is widely used for load-bearing bio-implants, however, it is bio-inert and exhibits poor osteo-inductive properties. Calcium and magnesium ions are considered to be involved in bone metabolism and play a physiological role in the angiogenesis, growth, and mineralization of bone tissue. In this study, a facile synthesis approach to the in situ construction of a nanostructure enriched with Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) on the surface of titanium foil is proposed by inserting Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) into the interlayers of sodium titanate nanostructures through an ion-substitution process. The characteriz 0.67, and 0.73 nm ation results validate that cations can be inserted into the interlayer regions of the layered nanostructure without any obvious change of morphology. The cation content is positively correlated to the concentration of the solutions employed. The biological assessments indicate that the type and the amount of cations in the titanate nanostructure can alter the bioactivity of titanium implants. Compared with a Na(+) filled titanate nanostructure, the incorporation of divalent ions (Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) ) can effectively enhance protein adsorption, and thus also enhance the adhesion and differentiation ability of rat bone-marrow stem cells (rBMSCs). The Mg(2+) /Ca(2+) -titanate nanostructure is a promising implantable material that will be widely applicable in artificial bones, joints, and dental implants. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Toward optimizing dental implant performance: Surface characterization of Ti and TiZr implant materials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M; Walczak, M S; Thomas, A G; Silikas, N; Berner, S; Lindsay, R

    2017-01-01

    Targeting understanding enhanced osseointegration kinetics, the goal of this study was to characterize the surface morphology and composition of Ti and TiZr dental implant substrates subjected to one of two surface treatments developed by Straumann. These two treatments are typically known as SLA and SLActive, with the latter resulting in more rapid osseointegration. A range of techniques was applied to characterize four different substrate/surface treatment combinations (Ti SLA , Ti SLActive , TiZr SLA , and TiZr SLActive ). Contact angle measurements established their hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature. Surface morphology was probed with scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, Raman μ-spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to elucidate the composition of the near-surface region. Consistent with previous work, surface morphology was found to differ only at the nanoscale, with both SLActive substrates displaying nano-protrusions. Spectroscopic data indicate that all substrates exhibit surface films of titanium oxide displaying near TiO 2 stoichiometry. Raman μ-spectroscopy reveals that amorphous TiO 2 is most likely the only phase present on Ti SL A , whilst rutile-TiO 2 is also evidenced on Ti SLActive , TiZr SLA , and TiZr SLActive . For TiZr alloy substrates, there is no evidence of discrete phases of oxidized Zr. X-ray photoelectron spectra demonstrate that all samples are terminated by adventitious carbon, with it being somewhat thicker (∼1nm) on Ti SL A and TiZr SLA . Given previous in vivo studies, acquired data suggest that both nanoscale protrusions, and a thinner layer of adventitious carbon contribute to the more rapid osseointegration of SLActive dental implants. Composition of the surface oxide layer is apparently less important in determining osseointegration kinetics. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge and attitude of elderly persons towards dental implants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Frauke; Salem, Kamel; Barbezat, Cindy; Herrmann, François R; Schimmel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Despite their unrivalled place in restorative treatment, dental implants are still scarcely used in elderly patients. The aim of this survey was therefore to identify potential barriers for accepting an implant treatment. Participants were recruited from a geriatric hospital, two long-term-care facilities and a private clinic. The final study sample comprised 92 persons, 61 women and 31 men with an average age of 81.2 ± 8.0 years. In a semi-structured interview, the participants' knowledge of implants and attitude towards a hypothetical treatment with dental implants were evaluated. Twenty-seven participants had never heard of dental implants, and another 13 participants could not describe them. The strongest apprehensions against implants were cost, lack of perceived necessity and old age. Univariate and multiple linear regression analysis identified being women, type and quality of denture, having little knowledge on implants and being hospitalised as the risk factors for refusing implants. However, old age as such was not associated with a negative attitude. The acceptance of dental implants in the elderly population might be increased by providing further information and promoting oral health in general. Regardless of the age, dental implants should be placed when patients are still in good health and live independently. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Bioactive potential of silica coatings and its effect on the adhesion of proteins to titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gavilan, F; Araújo-Gomes, N; Sánchez-Pérez, A M; García-Arnáez, I; Elortza, F; Azkargorta, M; de Llano, J J Martín; Carda, C; Gurruchaga, M; Suay, J; Goñi, I

    2018-02-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to develop dental implants with ideal characteristics to achieve specific and desired biological response in the scope of improve the healing process post-implantation. Following that premise, enhancing and optimizing titanium implants through superficial treatments, like silica sol-gel hybrid coatings, are regarded as a route of future research in this area. These coatings change the physicochemical properties of the implant, ultimately affecting its biological characteristics. Sandblasted acid-etched titanium (SAE-Ti) and a silica hybrid sol-gel coating (35M35G30T) applied onto the Ti substrate were examined. The results of in vitro and in vivo tests and the analysis of the protein layer adsorbed to each surface were compared and discussed. In vitro analysis with MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, showed that the sol-gel coating raised the osteogenic activity potential of the implants (the expression of osteogenic markers, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and IL-6 mRNAs, increased). In the in vivo experiments using as model rabbit tibiae, both types of surfaces promoted osseointegration. However, the coated implants demonstrated a clear increase in the inflammatory activity in comparison with SAE-Ti. Mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis showed differences in the composition of protein layers formed on the two tested surfaces. Large quantities of apolipoproteins were found attached predominantly to SAE-Ti. The 35M35G30T coating adsorbed a significant quantity of complement proteins, which might be related to the material intrinsic bioactivity, following an associated, natural and controlled immune response. The correlation between the proteomic data and the in vitro and in vivo outcomes is discussed on this experimental work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and manufacture of customized dental implants by using reverse engineering and selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyu; Zhang, Zhiguang; Chen, Xianshuai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Gong; Xu, Zhewu

    2014-11-01

    Recently a new therapeutic concept of patient-specific implant dentistry has been advanced based on computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology. However, a comprehensive study of the design and 3-dimensional (3D) printing of the customized implants, their mechanical properties, and their biomechanical behavior is lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and biomechanical performance of a novel custom-made dental implant fabricated by the selective laser melting technique with simulation and in vitro experimental studies. Two types of customized implants were designed by using reverse engineering: a root-analog implant and a root-analog threaded implant. The titanium implants were printed layer by layer with the selective laser melting technique. The relative density, surface roughness, tensile properties, bend strength, and dimensional accuracy of the specimens were evaluated. Nonlinear and linear finite element analysis and experimental studies were used to investigate the stress distribution, micromotion, and primary stability of the implants. Selective laser melting 3D printing technology was able to reproduce the customized implant designs and produce high density and strength and adequate dimensional accuracy. Better stress distribution and lower maximum micromotions were observed for the root-analog threaded implant model than for the root-analog implant model. In the experimental tests, the implant stability quotient and pull-out strength of the 2 types of implants indicated that better primary stability can be obtained with a root-analog threaded implant design. Selective laser melting proved to be an efficient means of printing fully dense customized implants with high strength and sufficient dimensional accuracy. Adding the threaded characteristic to the customized root-analog threaded implant design maintained the approximate geometry of the natural root and exhibited better stress distribution and

  8. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Nelson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  9. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior ofmore » the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.« less

  10. Influence of a fluoridated medium with different pHs on commercially pure titanium-based implants.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Rafael; Correa, Cassia Bellotto; Marcantonio, Elcio; Vaz, Luis Geraldo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of a fluoride medium with different pHs on the corrosion resistance of three commercially pure titanium-based dental implant commercial brands, under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDS. Forty-two dental implants, from three commercial brands, were used. Five years of regular use of mouth rinsing, with NaF 1500 ppm content and two different pHs, were simulated by immersing the specimens into that medium for 184 hours. SEM and EDS analyses demonstrated no evidence of corrosion on the specimens' surfaces after being submitted to fluoride ions or incorporation of fluoride ions to the set surface. It was possible to conclude that both the fluoride concentration and the pH of the solutions did not exert any influence upon implant corrosion resistance.

  11. Hybrid bone implants: self-assembly of peptide amphiphile nanofibers within porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, Timothy D; Guler, Mustafa O; Oppenheimer, Scott M; Mata, Alvaro; Satcher, Robert L; Dunand, David C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few decades there has been great interest in the use of orthopedic and dental implants that integrate into tissue by promoting bone ingrowth or bone adhesion, thereby eliminating the need for cement fixation. However, strategies to create bioactive implant surfaces to direct cellular activity and mineralization leading to osteointegration are lacking. We report here on a method to prepare a hybrid bone implant material consisting of a Ti-6Al-4V foam, whose 52% porosity is filled with a peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber matrix. These PA nanofibers can be highly bioactive by molecular design, and are used here as a strategy to transform an inert titanium foam into a potentially bioactive implant. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy, we show that PA molecules self-assemble into a nanofiber matrix within the pores of the metallic foam, fully occupying the foam's interconnected porosity. Furthermore, the method allows the encapsulation of cells within the bioactive matrix, and under appropriate conditions the nanofibers can nucleate mineralization of calcium phosphate phases with a Ca:P ratio that corresponds to that of hydroxyapatite. Cell encapsulation was quantified using a DNA measuring assay and qualitatively verified by SEM and confocal microscopy. An in vivo experiment was performed using a bone plug model in the diaphysis of the hind femurs of a Sprague Dawley rat and examined by histology to evaluate the performance of these hybrid systems after 4 weeks of implantation. Preliminary results demonstrate de novo bone formation around and inside the implant, vascularization around the implant, as well as the absence of a cytotoxic response. The PA-Ti hybrid strategy could be potentially tailored to initiate mineralization and direct a cellular response from the host tissue into porous implants to form new bone and thereby improve fixation, osteointegration, and long term stability of implants.

  12. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model.

  13. Comparing Short Dental Implants to Standard Dental Implants: Protocol for a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Monzavi, Abbas; Hashemi, Kazem; Bitaraf, Tahereh

    2018-01-18

    Short dental implants have been proposed as a simpler, cheaper, and faster alternative for the rehabilitation of atrophic edentulous areas to avoid the disadvantages of surgical techniques for increasing bone volume. This review will compare short implants (4 to 8 mm) to standard implants (larger than 8 mm) in edentulous jaws, evaluating on the basis of marginal bone loss (MBL), survival rate, complications, and prosthesis failure. We will electronically search for randomized controlled trials comparing short dental implants to standard dental implants in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov with English language restrictions. We will manually search the reference lists of relevant reviews and the included articles in this review. The following journals will also be searched: European Journal of Oral Implantology, Clinical Oral Implants Research, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Two reviewers will independently perform the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Cochrane Collaboration tool) of included studies. All meta-analysis procedures including appropriate effect size combination, sub-group analysis, meta-regression, assessing publication or reporting bias will be performed using Stata (Statacorp, TEXAS) version 12.1. Short implant effectiveness will be assessed using the mean difference of MBL in terms of weighted mean difference (WMD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) using Cohen's method. The combined effect size measures in addition to the related 95% confidence intervals will be estimated by a fixed effect model. The heterogeneity of the related effect size will be assessed using a Q Cochrane test and I2 measure. The MBL will be presented by a standardized mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. The survival rate of implants, prostheses failures, and complications will be reported using a risk

  14. Quality of YouTube TM videos on dental implants.

    PubMed

    Abukaraky, A; Hamdan, A-A; Ameera, M-N; Nasief, M; Hassona, Y

    2018-07-01

    Patients search YouTube for health-care information. To examine what YouTube offers patients seeking information on dental implants, and to evaluate the quality of provided information. A systematic search of YouTube for videos containing information on dental implants was performed using the key words Dental implant and Tooth replacement. Videos were examined by two senior Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery residents who were trained and calibrated to perform the search. Initial assessment was performed to exclude non- English language videos, duplicate videos, conference lectures, and irrelevant videos. Included videos were analyzed with regard to demographics and content's usefulness. Information for patients available from the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, European Association of Osseointegration, and British Society of Restorative Dentistry were used for benchmarking. A total of 117 videos were analyzed. The most commonly discussed topics were related to procedures involved in dental implantology (76.1%, n=89), and to the indications for dental implants (58.1%, n=78). The mean usefulness score of videos was poor (6.02 ±4.7 [range 0-21]), and misleading content was common (30.1% of videos); mainly in topics related to prognosis and maintenance of dental implants. Most videos (83.1%, n=97) failed to mention the source of information presented in the video or where to find more about dental implants. Information about dental implants on YouTube is limited in quality and quantity. YouTube videos can have a potentially important role in modulating patients attitude and treatment decision regarding dental implants.

  15. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p<0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p<0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p<0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Engineered Protein Coatings to Improve the Osseointegration of Dental and Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B.; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 hours, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure. PMID:26790146

  17. A prospective clinical study to evaluate the performance of zirconium dioxide dental implants in single-tooth gaps.

    PubMed

    Gahlert, Michael; Kniha, Heinz; Weingart, Dieter; Schild, Sabine; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Bormann, Kai-Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    Dental implants have traditionally been made from titanium or its alloys, but recently full-ceramic implants have been developed with comparable osseointegration properties and functional strength properties to titanium. These ceramic implants may have advantages in certain patients and situations, for example, where esthetic outcomes are particularly important. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the performance of a newly developed full-ceramic ZrO 2 monotype implant design (PURE Ceramic Implant; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) in single-tooth gaps in the maxilla and mandible. This was a prospective, open-label, single-arm study in patients requiring implant rehabilitation in single-tooth gaps. Full-ceramic implants were placed, with provisional and final prostheses inserted after 3 and 6 months, respectively. Crestal bone level was measured at implant placement and after 6 and 12 months. Implant survival and success were evaluated after 6 and 12 months. Further evaluations are planned after 24 and 36 months. Forty-six patients were screened for potential study participation, of whom 44 (17 men and 27 women, mean age 48 ± 14 years) were recruited into the study. The majority of implants (90.9%) were placed in the maxilla. The implant survival and implant success rate after 12 months were 97.6%. A minor change of the mean bone level occurred between implant loading (final prosthesis insertion after 6 months) and 12 months (-0.14 mm) after initial bone remodeling was observed between implant placement and loading (-0.88 mm). The results indicated that monotype ceramic implants can achieve clinical outcomes comparable to published outcomes of equivalent titanium implants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prefabricated fibula free flap with dental implants for mandibular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pauchet, D; Pigot, J-L; Chabolle, F; Bach, C-A

    2018-03-02

    Free fibula transplant is routinely used for mandibular reconstruction in head and neck cancer. Dental rehabilitation, the objective of mandibular reconstruction, requires the use of dental implants as supports for fixed or removable dentures. Positioning of fibular bone grafts and implants determines implant osseointegration and the possibilities of dental rehabilitation. Prefabrication of a fibula free flap with dental implants prior to harvesting as a free flap can promote implant osseointegration. The position of the implants must then be precisely planned. Virtual surgery and computer-assisted design and prefabrication techniques are used to plan the reconstruction and then reproduce this planning by means of tailored fibula and mandible cutting guides, thereby ensuring correct positioning of fibular bone fragments and implants. The prefabricated fibula free flap technique requires two surgical procedures (prefabrication and flap transfer) and precise preoperative planning. Prefabricated fibula free flap with dental implants, by improving the quality of osseointegration of the implants before flap transfer, extends the possibilities of prosthetic rehabilitation in complex secondary mandibular reconstructions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [INFLUENCE OF TITANIUM COATING ON THE BIOCOMPATIBILITY OF POLYPROPYLENE IMPLANTS].

    PubMed

    Babichenko, I I; Kazantsev, A A; Titarov, D L; Shemyatovsky, K A; Ghevondian, N M; Melchenko, D; Alekhin, A I

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the proliferative activity of inflammatory cells and distribution of collagen types I and III was carried out around the net materials of polypropylene and titanium coating polypropylene using im- munohistochemical method and polarization microscopy. Experimental modeling of implanted mesh material were made in the soft tissues of the lumbar region of rats. On the 7th postoperative day, quantitative analysis of proliferating cells delected using antibodies to the Ki-67 protein showed, a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in the number of proliferating cells around the network elements of the polypropylene (29.1 ± 5.7 %), when com- pared to similar figures of infiltrates in titanium coating polypropylene (33.6 ± 3.1 %). Similar patterns were found on the 30th day of the experiment--15.9 ± 4.3 and 26.9 ± 3.6%--respectively (p < 0.001). Different types of collagen fibers in the granulomas around various types of implanted mesh material were detected on sections stained with Sirius red at polarizing light. On the 7th day after surgery, the ratio of collagen fibers ty- pe I and III in granulomas around the mesh material made of polypropylene was 1.085 ± 0.022 and this rati around materials of titanium coated polypropylene was higher--1.107 ± 0.013 (p = 0.017). On the 30th posto- perative day in the interface area ratio I/III collagen significantly increased and amounted to 1.174 ± 0.036 and 1.246 ± 0.102, respectively (p = 0.045). Assessing the impact of the use of titanium as a coating on the po- lypropylene, it can be argued that it promotes the formation of collagen I type and a more mature connective tis- sue around the mesh of the implants.

  20. Phelligridin D-loaded oral nanotube titanium implant enhances osseointegration and prevents osteolysis in rat mandible.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Takanche, Jyoti Shrestha; Kim, Jeong-Seok; Lee, Min-Ho; Jeon, Jae-Gyu; Park, Il-Song; Yi, Ho-Keun

    2018-04-12

    Poor bone quality and osteolysis are the major causes of implant failure in dentistry. Here, this study tested the effect of phelligridin D-loaded nanotubes titanium (Ti) for bone formation around the dental implants. The purpose of this study was to enhance osseointegration of phelligridin D-loaded implant into the bone for bone formation and prevention of osteolysis. Cell viability, crystal violet staining, Western blot, alizarin red S staining, alkaline phosphatase activity, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, micro-computed tromography (μ-CT), hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining were used in vitro and in vivo to test the biocompatibility of phelligridin D. Phelligridin D enhanced osteoblast differentiation and mineralization by increasing bone morphogenic protein-2/7 (BMP-2/7), Osterix, Runx-2, osteoprotegerin (OPG), alkaline phosphatase and inhibited osteoclast differentiation by decreasing receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in MC-3T3 E1 cells. Further, phelligridin D promoted bone regeneration around nanotube Ti implant surface by increasing the levels of BMP-2/7 and OPG in a rat model. Phelligridin D also inhibited osteolysis by suppressing the expression of RANKL. These findings strongly suggest that phelligridin D is a new compound representing a potential therapeutic candidate for implant failure caused by osteolysis and poor bone quality of teeth.

  1. Microbial diversity of supra- and subgingival biofilms on freshly colonized titanium implant abutments in the human mouth.

    PubMed

    Heuer, W; Stiesch, M; Abraham, W R

    2011-02-01

    Supra- and subgingival biofilm formation is considered to be mainly responsible for early implant failure caused by inflammations of periimplant tissues. Nevertheless, little is known about the complex microbial diversity and interindividual similarities around dental implants. An atraumatic assessment was made of the diversity of microbial communities around titanium implants by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene amplicons as well as subsequent sequence analysis. Samples of adherent supra- and subgingival periimplant biofilms were collected from ten patients. Additionally, samples of sulcusfluid were taken at titanium implant abutments and remaining teeth. The bacteria in the samples were characterized by SSCP and sequence analysis. A high diversity of bacteria varying between patients and within one patient at different locations was found. Bacteria characteristic for sulcusfluid and supra- and subgingival biofilm communities were identified. Sulcusfluid of the abutments showed higher abundance of Streptococcus species than from residual teeth. Prevotella and Rothia species frequently reported from the oral cavity were not detected at the abutments suggesting a role as late colonizers. Different niches in the human mouth are characterized by specific groups of bacteria. Implant abutments are a very valuable approach to study dental biofilm development in vivo.

  2. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Observation of topography and analysis of surface contamination of titanium implant after roughness treatment].

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongdan; Yang, Xiaodong; Wu, Dayi; Zhang, Xingdong

    2007-04-01

    The roughness treatment of dental implant surface could improve the bone bonding and increase the success rate of implant, but the difference of diverse treatments is still unknown. In this study using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectrometer (EDS) and the test of contact angle, we studied the microstructure, surface contamination and surface energy, and hence conducted a comparative analysis of the following surface roughness treatments: Polished Treatment (PT), Sandblasting with Alumina(SA), Sandblasting with Aluminia and Acid-etched (SAA), Sandblasting with Titanium Acid-etched (STA), Electro-erosion Treatment(ET). The result of SEM showed that the surface displayed irregularities after roughness treatments and that the surface properties of different roughness treatments had some distinctions. SAA and SA had some sharp edges and protrutions; the STA showed a regular pattern like honeycomb, but the ET sample treated by electric erosion exhibited the deeper pores of different sizes and the pores with a perforated secondary structure. The EDS indicated that the surface was contaminated after the treatment with foreign materials; the SA surface had some embedded contaminations even after acid etching. The measurement of water contact angle indicated that the morphology correlated with the surface treatments. These findings suggest that the distinction of surface structure and composition caused by different treatments may result in the disparity in biological behavior of dental implant.

  4. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants-A Review.

    PubMed

    Sidambe, Alfred T

    2014-12-19

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing) or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy.

  5. Nanostructured severe plastic deformation processed titanium for orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    Serra, Glaucio; Morais, Liliane; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Semenova, Irina P; Valiev, Ruslan; Salimgareeva, Gulnaz; Pithon, Matheus; Lacerda, Rogério

    2013-10-01

    Titanium mini-implants have been successfully used as anchorage devices in Orthodontics. Commercially pure titanium (cpTi) was recently replaced by Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the mini-implant material base due to the higher strength properties of the alloy. However, the lower corrosion resistance and the lower biocompatibility have been lowering the success rate of Ti-6Al-4V mini-implants. Nanostructured titanium (nTi) is commercially pure titanium that was nanostructured by a specific technique of severe plastic deformation. It is bioinert, does not contain potentially toxic or allergic additives, and has higher specific strength properties than any other titanium applied in medical implants. The higher strength properties associated to the higher biocompatibility make nTi potentially useful for orthodontic mini-implant applications, theoretically overcoming cpTi and Ti-6Al-4V mini-implants. The purposes of the this work were to process nTi, to mechanically compare cpTi, Ti-6Al-4V, and nTi mini-implants by torque test, and to evaluate both the surface morphology and the fracture surface characteristics of them by SEM. Torque test results showed significant increase in the maximum torque resistance of nTi mini-implants when compared to cpTi mini-implants, and no statistical difference between Ti-6Al-4V and nTi mini-implants. SEM analysis demonstrated smooth surface morphology and transgranular fracture aspect for nTi mini-implants. Since nanostructured titanium mini-implants have mechanical properties comparable to titanium alloy mini-implants, and biocompatibility comparable to commercially pure titanium mini-implants, it is suggestive that nanostructured titanium can replace Ti-6Al-4V alloy as the material base for mini-implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Laser bioengineering of glass-titanium implants surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusquiños, F.; Arias-González, F.; Penide, J.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pascual, M. J.; Durán, A.; Pou, J.

    2013-11-01

    Osseointegration is the mean challenge when surgical treatments fight against load-bearing bone diseases. Absolute bone replacement by a synthetic implant has to be completed not only from the mechanics point of view, but also from a biological approach. Suitable strength, resilience and stress distribution of titanium alloy implants are spoiled by the lack of optimal biological characteristics. The inert quality of extra low interstitial titanium alloy, which make it the most attractive metallic alloy for biomedical applications, oppose to an ideal surface with bone cell affinity, and capable to stimulate bone attachment bone growth. Diverse laser treatments have been proven as effective tools to modify surface properties, such as wettability in contact to physiological fluids, or osteoblast guided and slightly enhanced attachment. The laser surface cladding can go beyond by providing titanium alloy surfaces with osteoconduction and osteoinduction properties. In this research work, the laser radiation is used to produce bioactive glass coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy substrates. Specific silicate bioactive glass compositions has been investigated to achieve suitable surface tension and viscosity temperature behavior during processing, and to provide with the required release of bone growth gene up regulation agents in the course of resorption mediated by physiological fluids. The produced coatings and interfaces, the surface osteoconduction properties, and the chemical species release in simulated physiological fluid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X ray fluorescence (XRF), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  7. Comparison of Results of Measurement of Dimensions of the Placed Dental Implants on Cone Beam Computed Tomography with Dimensions of the Producers of the Implants.

    PubMed

    Repesa, Merisa; Sofic, Amela; Jakupovic, Selma; Tosum, Selma; Kazazic, Lejla; Dervisevic, Almir

    2017-06-01

    One of the most frequently used method for scanning patients with indication for dental implantation in dentistry is cone beam computed tomography. Implantation, CBCT imaging and implant programme are inevitable when planning a successful replacement of lost teeth. CBCT offers exact information about available bone and its density, adjacent tooth roots, the place of mandibular canal and maxillary sinus and adjacent anatomical structure. The goal of this study is to estimate accuracy of measurements on CBCT images ofpatients who have implants of different producers and determine if there is any statistically significant correlation between four test groups regardless of the alloy of which implants are made. The study was a prospective-comparative, and included fifteen patients with hundred dental implants divided in four groups depending on the producer. Over dimensioning in the gained measurements of the whole sample on CBCT images in relation to dimensions of producers is between 0.1006mm and 0.368mm. Even though over dimensioning is measured in millimetres, it has to be taken into consideration in clinical practice when planning an implant placement, and we can recommend safety zone of 0.5mm. There have been no statistically significant differences in the gained results in over dimensioning of implants of different alloys for horizontal and vertical measurements on CBCT images of Astra Tech, Brendet titanium implants and Straumann titanium-zirconium implants. Based on the goals of the study there have been confirmed statistically significant correlations of great value (from 0.841 to 0.936) of high level of importance between manufactured value of dimensions and average dimensions values gained through CBCT imaging in four types of implants (four test groups). The total exactness of measurements on CBCT scan in this research is 96.66% for horizontal measuring and 96.92% for vertical measuring. Therefore, we can conclude that CBCT as radiological method has an

  8. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  9. Smoking increases salivary arginase activity in patients with dental implants.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, D A; Cortelli, J R; Holzhausen, M; Rodrigues, E; Aquino, D R; Saad, W A

    2009-09-01

    It is believed that an increased arginase activity may lead to less nitric oxide production, which consequently increases the susceptibility to bacterial infection. Considering the hypothesis that smoking may alter the arginase activity and that smoking is considered a risk factor to dental implant survival, the present study aimed at evaluating the effect of smoking on the salivary arginase activity of patients with dental implants. Salivary samples of 41 subjects were collected: ten non-smoking and with no dental implants (group A), ten non-smoking subjects with dental implants (group B), ten smoking subjects with implants (group C), and 11 smoking subjects with no dental implants (group D). The levels of salivary arginase activity were determined by the measurement of L-ornithine and expressed as mIU/mg of protein. A significant increase in the salivary arginase activity was verified in groups C (64.26 +/- 16.95) and D (49.55 +/- 10.01) compared to groups A (10.04 +/- 1.95, p = 0.00001 and p = 0.0110, groups C and D, respectively) and B (11.77 +/- 1.45, p = 0.00001 and p = 0.0147, groups C and D, respectively). No significant difference was found between groups C and D (p = 0.32). Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that salivary arginase activity is increased in smoking subjects with dental implants in contrast to non-smoking subjects with dental implants, therefore suggesting a possible mechanism by which cigarette smoking may lead to implant failure. The analysis of salivary arginase activity may represent an important tool to prevent implant failure in the near future.

  10. [Surface modifications of titanium implant material with excimer laser for more effective osseointegration].

    PubMed

    Pelsoczi, Kovács István; Bereznai, Miklós; Tóth, Zsolt; Turzó, Kinga; Radnai, Márta; Bor, Zsolt; Fazekas, András

    2004-12-01

    The biointegration of dental and orthopaedic implants depends mainly on the morphology and physical-chemical properties of their surfaces. Accordingly, the development of the desired microstructure is a relevant requirement in the bulk manufacture. Besides the widely used sandblasting plus acid etching and plasma-spray coating techniques, the laser surface modification method offers a plausible alternative. In order to analyze the influence of the laser treatment, the surfaces of titanium samples were exposed to excimer laser irradiation. The aim of this study was to develop surfaces that provide optimal conditions for bone-implant contact, bone growth, formation and maintenance of gingival attachment. For this purpose, holes were ablated on the surface of samples by nanosecond (18 ns, ArF) and also sub-picosecond (0,5 ps, KrF) laser pulses. Using pulses of ns length, due to melt ejection, crown-like protrusions were formed at the border of the holes, which made them sensitive to mechanical effects. To avoid these undesirable crown-like structures ultrashort KrF excimer laser pulses were successfully applied. On the other hand, titanium samples were laser-polished in favour of formation and connection of healthy soft tissues. Irradiation by a series of nanosecond laser pulses resulted in an effective smoothening as detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM). By inhibiting plaque accumulation this favours formation of gingival attachment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that laser treatment, in addition to micro-structural and morphological modification, results in decreasing of surface contamination and thickening of the oxide layer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the original alpha-titanium crystalline structure of the laser-polished titanium surface was not altered by the irradiation.

  11. Automated dental implantation using image-guided robotics: registration results.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; McKenzie, Frederic D; Bawab, Sebastian; Li, Jiang; Yoon, Yongki; Huang, Jen-K

    2011-09-01

    One of the most important factors affecting the outcome of dental implantation is the accurate insertion of the implant into the patient's jaw bone, which requires a high degree of anatomical accuracy. With the accuracy and stability of robots, image-guided robotics is expected to provide more reliable and successful outcomes for dental implantation. Here, we proposed the use of a robot for drilling the implant site in preparation for the insertion of the implant. An image-guided robotic system for automated dental implantation is described in this paper. Patient-specific 3D models are reconstructed from preoperative Cone-beam CT images, and implantation planning is performed with these virtual models. A two-step registration procedure is applied to transform the preoperative plan of the implant insertion into intra-operative operations of the robot with the help of a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM). Experiments are carried out with a phantom that is generated from the patient-specific 3D model. Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) and Target Registration Error (TRE) values are calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the registration procedure. FRE values are less than 0.30 mm. Final TRE values after the two-step registration are 1.42 ± 0.70 mm (N = 5). The registration results of an automated dental implantation system using image-guided robotics are reported in this paper. Phantom experiments show that the practice of robot in the dental implantation is feasible and the system accuracy is comparable to other similar systems for dental implantation.

  12. Research on dental implant and its industrialization stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongjoon, Yang; Sukyoung, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Bone cell attachment to Ti implant surfaces is the most concerned issue in the clinical implant dentistry. Many attempts to achieve the fast and strong integration between bone and implant have been tried in many ways, such as selection of materials (for example, Ti, ZrO2), shape design of implant (for example, soft tissue level, bone level, taped or conical, etc), and surface modification of implants (for example, roughed. coated, hybrid), etc. Among them, a major consideration is the surface design of dental implants. The surface with proper structural characteristics promotes or induces the desirable responses of cells and tissues. To obtain such surface which has desirable cell and tissue response, a variety of surface modification techniques has been developed and employed for many years. In this review, the method and trend of surface modification will be introduced and explained in terms of the surface topography and chemistry of dental implants.

  13. Electrochemical Behaviour and Galvanic Effects of Titanium Implants Coupled to Metallic Suprastructures in Artificial Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Igual Muñoz, Anna; Guiñón Pina, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the electrochemical behavior of five different dental alloys: two cobalt-chromium alloys (CoCr and CoCr-c), one nickel-chromium-titanium alloy (NiCrTi), one gold-palladium alloy (Au), and one titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), and the galvanic effect when they are coupled to titanium implants (TiG2). It was carried out by electrochemical techniques (open circuit measurements, potentiodynamic curves and Zero-Resistance Ammetry) in artificial saliva (AS), with and without fluorides in different acidic conditions. The studied alloys are spontaneously passivated, but NiCrTi alloy has a very narrow passive domain and losses its passivity in presence of fluorides, so is not considered as a good option for implant superstructures. Variations of pH from 6.5 to 3 in artificial saliva do not change the electrochemical behavior of Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCr alloys, and couples, but when the pH of the artificial saliva is below 3.5 and the fluoride content is 1000 ppm Ti and Ti6Al4V starts actively dissolving, and CoCr-c superstructures coupled to Ti show acceleration of corrosion due to galvanic effects. Thus, NiCrTi is not recommended for implant superstructures because of risk of Ni ion release to the body, and fluorides should be avoided in acidic media because Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCr-c superstructures show galvanic corrosion. The best combinations are Ti/Ti6Al4V and Ti/CoCr as alternative of noble gold alloys. PMID:29361767

  14. Electrochemical Behaviour and Galvanic Effects of Titanium Implants Coupled to Metallic Suprastructures in Artificial Saliva.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Muñoz, Anna Igual; Pina, Virginia Guiñón; Sola-Ruiz, Ma Fernanda

    2018-01-22

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the electrochemical behavior of five different dental alloys: two cobalt-chromium alloys (CoCr and CoCr-c), one nickel-chromium-titanium alloy (NiCrTi), one gold-palladium alloy (Au), and one titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), and the galvanic effect when they are coupled to titanium implants (TiG2). It was carried out by electrochemical techniques (open circuit measurements, potentiodynamic curves and Zero-Resistance Ammetry) in artificial saliva (AS), with and without fluorides in different acidic conditions. The studied alloys are spontaneously passivated, but NiCrTi alloy has a very narrow passive domain and losses its passivity in presence of fluorides, so is not considered as a good option for implant superstructures. Variations of pH from 6.5 to 3 in artificial saliva do not change the electrochemical behavior of Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCr alloys, and couples, but when the pH of the artificial saliva is below 3.5 and the fluoride content is 1000 ppm Ti and Ti6Al4V starts actively dissolving, and CoCr-c superstructures coupled to Ti show acceleration of corrosion due to galvanic effects. Thus, NiCrTi is not recommended for implant superstructures because of risk of Ni ion release to the body, and fluorides should be avoided in acidic media because Ti, Ti6Al4V, and CoCr-c superstructures show galvanic corrosion. The best combinations are Ti/Ti6Al4V and Ti/CoCr as alternative of noble gold alloys.

  15. Modified titanium implant as a gateway to the human body: the implant mediated drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Seok; Cho, Joo-Youn; Lee, Shin-Jae; Hwang, Chee Il

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a proposed new implant mediated drug delivery system (IMDDS) in rabbits. The drug delivery system is applied through a modified titanium implant that is configured to be implanted into bone. The implant is hollow and has multiple microholes that can continuously deliver therapeutic agents into the systematic body. To examine the efficacy and feasibility of the IMDDS, we investigated the pharmacokinetic behavior of dexamethasone in plasma after a single dose was delivered via the modified implant placed in the rabbit tibia. After measuring the plasma concentration, the areas under the curve showed that the IMDDS provided a sustained release for a relatively long period. The result suggests that the IMDDS can deliver a sustained release of certain drug components with a high bioavailability. Accordingly, the IMDDS may provide the basis for a novel approach to treating patients with chronic diseases.

  16. Morphology, Composition, and Bioactivity of Strontium-Doped Brushite Coatings Deposited on Titanium Implants via Electrochemical Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yongqiang; Li, Haoyan; Xu, Jiang; Li, Xin; Qi, Mengchun; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Surface modification techniques have been applied to generate titanium implant surfaces that promote osseointegration for use in dental applications. In this study, strontium-doped brushite coatings were deposited on titanium by electrochemical deposition. The phase composition of the coating was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphologies of the coatings were studied through scanning electron microscopy, and the cytocompatibility and bioactivity of the strontium-doped brushite coatings were evaluated using cultured osteoblasts. Osteoblast proliferation was enhanced by the addition of strontium, suggesting a possible mechanism by which strontium incorporation in brushite coatings increased bone formation surrounding the implants. Cell growth was also strongly influenced by the composition of the deposited coatings, with a 10% Sr-doped brushite coating inducing the greatest amount of bone formation among the tested materials. PMID:24901526

  17. Dental implants typically help retain peri-implant vertical bone height: evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Cavallaro, John

    2013-01-01

    The dental literature is assessed regarding the ability of dental implants to maintain vertical bone height after various implant placement scenarios: immediate, delayed, insertion into partially and fully edentate healed ridges, and under overdentures. Studies are also reviewed to determine if bone loss after implant insertion is continuous. Numerous investigations that support the concept that implants preserve bone height are identified. In addition, the data indicate that a minuscule amount of annual bone loss usually persists after implant placement, but it is often clinically imperceptible.

  18. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  19. Decoronation followed by dental implants placement: fundamentals, applications and explanations

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto; Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Cardoso, Maurício A.; Miranda, Dario A. Oliveira; Salfatis, Monica

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dental arches areas with teeth presenting dentoalveolar ankylosis and replacement root resorption can be considered as presenting normal bone, in full physiological remodeling process; and osseointegrated implants can be successfully placed. Bone remodeling will promote osseointegration, regardless of presenting ankylosis and/or replacement root resorption. After 1 to 10 years, all dental tissues will have been replaced by bone. The site, angulation and ideal positioning in the space to place the implant should be dictated exclusively by the clinical convenience, associated with previous planning. One of the advantages of decoronation followed by dental implants placement in ankylosed teeth with replacement resorption is the maintenance of bone volume in the region, both vertical and horizontal. If possible, the buccal part of the root, even if thin, should be preserved in the preparation of the cavity for the implant, as this will maintain gingival tissues looking fully normal for long periods. In the selection of cases for decoronation, the absence of microbial contamination in the region - represented by chronic periapical lesions, presence of fistula, old unconsolidated root fractures and active advanced periodontal disease - is important. Such situations are contraindications to decoronation. However, the occurrence of dentoalveolar ankylosis and replacement resorption without contamination should neither change the planning for implant installation, nor the criteria for choosing the type and brand of dental implant to be used. Failure to decoronate and use dental implants has never been reported. PMID:29791693

  20. Full-arch milled titanium implant bridge: technical report.

    PubMed

    Peché, Wendy-Ann; Van Vuuren, Ludwig Jansen; Park, Chae

    2011-09-01

    The manufacturing of full-arch fixed implant-supported bridges with the use of the traditional lost wax technique remains a technical challenge. Distortion of the alloy during casting and subsequent heating cycles during porcelain build-up causes numerous problems. Fracturing of porcelain on large restorations is difficult and costly to restore. The fitting problems can be eliminated by utilising CAD/CAM technology in the manufacturing of long-span or full-arch titanium bridges. Repair of damaged porcelain can be simplified with the use of discrete, individually-removable crowns on the bridge.

  1. Differences in knowledge related to dental implants between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ken, Yukawa; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this study was to investigate the differences between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants by use of a questionnaire survey in order to determine the information that is required for patients undergoing dental implants. The questionnaires were given to 4512 patients who visited the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital for oral implants between January 2012 and December 2014, and 2972 (66%) valid questionnaires were collected. There were 857 patients with a treatment history of dental implants and 2115 patients without. "Preservation of an adjacent tooth" was the reason that 32% of these patients chose implant therapy, and the patients without treatment history were significantly higher than the patients with one. Significantly, more patients without a treatment history of dental implants selected the after-effects of surgery and pain after surgery as their main concerns for implant therapy compared to those with a treatment history. In the question "Pain after surgery," the patients without treatment history did not know significantly lower than the patients with one. Patients without a treatment history of dental implants placed more importance on the preservation of healthy teeth. Because patients, in particular those without a treatment history of dental implants, are anxious about surgery, we should provide them with more information on treatment than we already do and explain the risks of treatment to them. To keep the credence between doctors and patients, informed consent and patient education on treatment are six important concerns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  3. Fluorine-doping in titanium dioxide by ion implantation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaki, T.; Umebayashi, T.; Sumita, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Itoh, H.

    2003-05-01

    We implanted 200 keV F + in single crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO 2) rutile at a nominal fluence of 1 × 10 16 to 1 × 10 17 ions cm -2 and then thermally annealed the implanted sample in air. The radiation damage and its recovery process during the annealing were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry and variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy. The lattice disorder was completely recovered at 1200 °C by the migration of point defects to the surface. According to secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis, the F depth profile was shifted to a shallower region along with the damage recovery and this resulted in the formation of an F-doped layer where the impurity concentration steadily increased toward the surface. The F doping proved to provide a modification to the conduction-band edge of TiO 2, as assessed by theoretical band calculations.

  4. Treatment of soft tissue recessions at titanium implants using a resorbable collagen matrix: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Mihatovic, Ilja; Shirakata, Yoshinori; Becker, Jürgen; Bosshardt, Dieter; Sculean, Anton

    2014-01-01

    To histologically assess the effectiveness of a porcine-derived collagen matrix (CM) and a subepithelial connective tissue graft (CTG) for the coverage of single mucosal recessions at osseointegrated dental implants. Chronic-type mucosal Miller Class I-like recessions (mean clinical defect height: 0.67 ± 0.33-1.16 ± 0.19 mm) were established at the buccal aspect of titanium implants with platform switch in six beagle dogs. The defects were randomly allocated to either (1) coronally advanced flap surgery (CAF) + CM, (2) CAF + CTG or (3) CAF alone. At 12 weeks, histomorphometrical measurements were made (e.g.) between the implant shoulder (IS) and the mucosal margin (PM) and IS and the outer contour of the adjacent soft tissue (mucosal thickness [MT]). All treatment procedures investigated were associated with an almost complete soft tissue coverage of the defect area (i.e. coronal positioning of PM relative to IS). Mean IS-PM and MT values tended to be increased in both CAF + CM (1.04 ± 0.74 mm/0.71 ± 0.55 mm) and CAF + CTG (0.88 ± 1.23 mm/0.62 ± 0.66 mm) groups when compared with CAF (0.16 ± 0.28 mm/0.34 ± 0.23 mm) alone. These differences, however, did not reach statistical significance. Within the limits of this pilot study, it was concluded that all treatment procedures investigated were effective in covering soft tissue recessions at titanium implants. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  6. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SALIBA, Felipe Miguel; CARDOSO, Mayra; TORRES, Marcelo Ferreira; TEIXEIRA, Alexandre Carvalho; LOURENÇO, Eduardo José Veras; TELLES, Daniel de Moraes

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. Material and methods Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. Results There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm) and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm), with p=0.001. Conclusion This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws. PMID:21437472

  7. Surface characteristics of a novel hydroxyapatite-coated dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ui-Won; Hwang, Ji-Wan; Choi, Da-Yae; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kwon, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the surface characteristics and bond strength produced using a novel technique for coating hydroxyapatite (HA) onto titanium implants. Methods HA was coated on the titanium implant surface using a super-high-speed (SHS) blasting method with highly purified HA. The coating was performed at a low temperature, unlike conventional HA coating methods. Coating thickness was measured. The novel HA-coated disc was fabricated. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed directly on the disc to evaluate crystallinity. Four novel HA-coated discs and four resorbable blast medium (RBM) discs were prepared. Their surface roughnesses and areas were measured. Five puretitanium, RBM-treated, and novel HA-coated discs were prepared. Contact angle was measured. Two-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Scheffe's test were used to analyze differences between the groups, with those with a probability of P<0.05 considered to be statistically significant. To evaluate exfoliation of the coating layer, 7 sites on the mandibles from 7 mongrel dogs were used. Other sites were used for another research project. In total, seven novel HA-coated implants were placed 2 months after extraction of premolars according to the manufacturer's instructions. The dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after implant surgery. Implants were removed using a ratchet driver. The surface of the retrieved implants was evaluated microscopically. Results A uniform HA coating layer was formed on the titanium implants with no deformation of the RBM titanium surface microtexture when an SHS blasting method was used. Conclusions These HA-coated implants exhibited increased roughness, crystallinity, and wettability when compared with RBM implants. PMID:22586524

  8. Osteoblastic differentiating potential of dental pulp stem cells in vitro cultured on a chemically modified microrough titanium surface.

    PubMed

    DE Colli, Marianna; Radunovic, Milena; Zizzari, Vincenzo L; DI Giacomo, Viviana; DI Nisio, Chiara; Piattelli, Adriano; Calvo Guirado, José L; Zavan, Barbara; Cataldi, Amelia; Zara, Susi

    2018-03-30

    Titanium surface modification is critical for dental implant success. Our aim was to determine surfaces influence on dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) viability and differentiation. Implants were divided into sandblasted/acid-etched (control) and sandblasted/acid-etched coated with calcium and magnesium ions (CaMg), supplied as composite (test). Proliferation was evaluated by MTT, differentiation checking osteoblastic gene expression, PGE2 secretion and matrix formation, inflammation by Interleukin 6 (IL-6) detection. MTT and IL-6 do not modify on test. A PGE2 increase on test is recorded. BMP2 is higher on test at early experimental points, Osterix and RUNX2 augment later. Alizarin-red S reveals higher matrix production on test. These results suggest that test surface is more osteoinductive, representing a start point for in vivo studies aiming at the construction of more biocompatible dental implants, whose integration and clinical performance are improved and some undesired effects, such as implant stability loss and further surgical procedures, are reduced.

  9. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  10. Readability of websites containing information on dental implants.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, Yasas S N; Anderson, Nina K; Zwahlen, Roger A

    2014-12-01

    It is recommended that health-related materials for patients be written at sixth grade level or below. Many websites oriented toward patient education about dental implants are available, but the readability of these sites has not been evaluated. To assess readability of patient-oriented online information on dental implants. Websites containing patient-oriented information on dental implants were retrieved using the Google search engine. Individual and mean readability/grade levels were calculated using standardized formulas. Readability of each website was classified as easy (≤ 6th-grade level) or difficult (≥ 10th grade level). Thirty nine websites with patient-oriented information on dental implant were found. The average readability grade level of these websites was 11.65 ± 1.36. No website scored at/below the recommended 6th grade level. Thirty four of 39 websites (87.18%) were difficult to read. The number of characters, words, and sentences on these sites varied widely. All patient-oriented websites on dental implants scored above the recommended grade level, and majority of these sites were "difficult" in their readability. There is a dire need to create patient information websites on implants, which the majority can read. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Measurement of clinicians' ability to hand torque dental implant components.

    PubMed

    Kanawati, Ali; Richards, Mark W; Becker, Jeffery J; Monaco, Natalie E

    2009-01-01

    There is a varying degree of hand torque abilities using finger drivers among clinicians. Calibrating one's own abilities requires complicated instruments not readily available. This study evaluated a simple-to-use method that allows dental practitioners to have a quantifiable clinical assessment of relative torque ability using finger drivers to torque down dental implant components. A typodont that includes dental implants was mounted in a mannequin placed in a patient-reclined position. The subjects were asked to torque as tightly as they could a new healing abutment to an implant secured firmly in resin within the typodont. All participants wore moistened gloves when using a finger driver. The healing abutment was countertorqued using a certified precalibrated precision torque measurement device. The reading on the torque driver was recorded when the healing abutment disengaged. An average of torque values of dentists and dental students was calculated. Fifty subjects had an average maximum torque ability of 24 Ncm (male dentists: 28 Ncm; students: 22 Ncm; male students: 24 Ncm; female students: 19 Ncm). Maximum torque values for all participants ranged from 11 Ncm to 38 Ncm. There was no significant difference between groups. This study showed a varying degree of hand torquing abilities using a finger driver. Clinicians should regularly calibrate their ability to torque implant components to more predictably perform implant dentistry. Dental implant manufacturers should more precisely instruct clinicians as to maximum torque, as opposed to "finger tighten only".

  12. Fatigue lifetime prediction of a reduced-diameter dental implant system: Numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Gonzalez, Jorge A; Kulkarni, Pratim A; Nagy, William W; Griggs, Jason A

    2018-06-16

    To validate the fatigue lifetime of a reduced-diameter dental implant system predicted by three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) by testing physical implant specimens using an accelerated lifetime testing (ALT) strategy with the apparatus specified by ISO 14801. A commercially-available reduced-diameter titanium dental implant system (Straumann Standard Plus NN) was digitized using a micro-CT scanner. Axial slices were processed using an interactive medical image processing software (Mimics) to create 3D models. FEA analysis was performed in ABAQUS, and fatigue lifetime was predicted using fe-safe ® software. The same implant specimens (n=15) were tested at a frequency of 2Hz on load frames using apparatus specified by ISO 14801 and ALT. Multiple step-stress load profiles with various aggressiveness were used to improve testing efficiency. Fatigue lifetime statistics of physical specimens were estimated in a reliability analysis software (ALTA PRO). Fractured specimens were examined using SEM with fractographic technique to determine the failure mode. FEA predicted lifetime was within the 95% confidence interval of lifetime estimated by experimental results, which suggested that FEA prediction was accurate for this implant system. The highest probability of failure was located at the root of the implant body screw thread adjacent to the simulated bone level, which also agreed with the failure origin in physical specimens. Fatigue lifetime predictions based on finite element modeling could yield similar results in lieu of physical testing, allowing the use of virtual testing in the early stages of future research projects on implant fatigue. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dental implants modified with drug releasing titania nanotubes: therapeutic potential and developmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Ivanovski, Sašo

    2017-08-01

    The transmucosal nature of dental implants presents a unique therapeutic challenge, requiring not only rapid establishment and subsequent maintenance of osseointegration, but also the formation of resilient soft tissue integration. Key challenges in achieving long-term success are sub-optimal bone integration in compromised bone conditions and impaired trans-mucosal tissue integration in the presence of a persistent oral microbial biofilm. These challenges can be targeted by employing a drug-releasing implant modification such as TiO 2 nanotubes (TNTs), engineered on titanium surfaces via electrochemical anodization. Areas covered: This review focuses on applications of TNT-based dental implants towards achieving optimal therapeutic efficacy. Firstly, the functions of TNT implants will be explored in terms of their influence on osseointegration, soft tissue integration and immunomodulation. Secondly, the developmental challenges associated with such implants are reviewed including sterilization, stability and toxicity. Expert opinion: The potential of TNTs is yet to be fully explored in the context of the complex oral environment, including appropriate modulation of alveolar bone healing, immune-inflammatory processes, and soft tissue responses. Besides long-term in vivo assessment under masticatory loading conditions, investigating drug-release profiles in vivo and addressing various technical challenges are required to bridge the gap between research and clinical dentistry.

  14. Influence of Piezosurgery on Bone Healing around Titanium Implants: A Histological Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sirolli, Marcelo; Mafra, Carlos Eduardo Secco; Santos, Rodrigo Albuquerque Basílio Dos; Saraiva, Luciana; Holzhausen, Marinella; César, João Batista

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate histomorphometrically the influence of two techniques of dental implant site preparation on bone healing around titanium implants. Fifteen male Wistar rats (±300 g) were used in the study. Each tibia was randomly assigned to receive the implant site preparation either with a conventional drilling technique (control - DRILL group) or with a piezoelectric device (PIEZO group). The animals were sacrificed after 30 days and then the following histomorphometric parameters were evaluated (percentage) separately for cortical and cancellous regions: proportion of mineralized tissue (PMT) adjacent to implant threads (500 μm adjacent); bone area within the threads (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC). The results demonstrated that there were no statistically significant differences between both groups for cancellous BIC (p>0.05) and cortical PMT (p>0.05). On the other hand, a higher percentage of BA was observed in the PIEZO group in the cortical (71.50±6.91 and 78.28±4.38 for DRILL and PIEZO groups, respectively; p<0.05) and cancellous regions (9.62±4.06 and 19.94±14.18 for DRILL and PIEZO groups, respectively; p<0.05). The piezosurgery also showed higher PMT values in the cancellous zone (9.35±5.54 and 18.72±13.21 for DRILL and PIEZO groups, respectively; p<0.05). However, the DRILL group presented better results for BIC in cortical region (80.42±10.88 and 70.25±16.93 for DRILL and PIEZO groups, respectively; p<0.05). In conclusion, for the implant site preparation, the piezosurgery was beneficial to bone healing rates in the cancellous bone region, while the drill technique produced better results in the cortical bone.

  15. An in vitro biofilm model associated to dental implants: structural and quantitative analysis of in vitro biofilm formation on different dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, M C; Llama-Palacios, A; Fernández, E; Figuero, E; Marín, M J; León, R; Blanc, V; Herrera, D; Sanz, M

    2014-10-01

    The impact of implant surfaces in dental biofilm development is presently unknown. The aim of this investigation was to assess in vitro the development of a complex biofilm model on titanium and zirconium implant surfaces, and to compare it with the same biofilm formed on hydroxyapatite surface. Six standard reference strains were used to develop an in vitro biofilm over sterile titanium, zirconium and hydroxyapatite discs, coated with saliva within the wells of pre-sterilized polystyrene tissue culture plates. The selected species used represent initial (Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces naeslundii), early (Veillonella parvula), secondary (Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). The developed biofilms (growth time 1 to 120h) were studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy using a vital fluorescence technique and with low-temperature scanning electron microscopy. The number (colony forming units/biofilm) and kinetics of the bacteria within the biofilm were studied with quantitative PCR (qPCR). As outcome variables, the biofilm thickness, the percentage of cell vitality and the number of bacteria were compared using the analysis of variance. The bacteria adhered and matured within the biofilm over the three surfaces with similar dynamics. Different surfaces, however, demonstrated differences both in the thickness, deposition of the extracellular polysaccharide matrix as well as in the organization of the bacterial cells. While the formation and dynamics of an in vitro biofilm model was similar irrespective of the surface of inoculation (hydroxyapatite, titanium or zirconium), there were significant differences in regards to the biofilm thickness and three-dimensional structure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of Different Surgeons on Dental Implant Failure.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    To assess the influence of several factors on the prevalence of dental implant failure, with special consideration of the placement of implants by different dental surgeons. This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants at one specialist clinic. Only the data of patients and implants treated by surgeons who had inserted a minimum of 200 implants at the clinic were included. Kaplan-Meier curves were stratified with respect to the individual surgeon. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were placed in a single patient. The factors bone quantity, bone quality, implant location, implant surface, and implant system were analyzed with descriptive statistics separately for each individual surgeon. A total of 10 surgeons were eligible. The differences between the survival curves of each individual were statistically significant. The multivariate GEE model showed the following variables to be statistically significant: surgeon, bruxism, intake of antidepressants, location, implant length, and implant system. The surgeon with the highest absolute number of failures was also the one who inserted the most implants in sites of poor bone and used turned implants in most cases, whereas the surgeon with the lowest absolute number of failures used mainly modern implants. Separate survival analyses of turned and modern implants stratified for the individual surgeon showed statistically significant differences in cumulative survival. Different levels of failure incidence could be observed between the surgeons, occasionally reaching significant levels. Although a direct causal relationship could not be ascertained, the results of the present study suggest that the surgeons' technique, skills, and/or judgment may negatively influence implant survival rates.

  17. Short-term results using Kurz titanium ossicular implants.

    PubMed

    Vassbotn, Flemming S; Møller, Per; Silvola, Juha

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of titanium middle ear prosthesis for ossicular reconstruction in chronic ear disease is investigated in a Scandinavian two-center retrospective study from a Norwegian tertiary otology referral center and a Finnish otology referral center. Retrospective chart reviews were performed for procedures involving 73 titanium prostheses between 1999 and 2004. All patients that underwent surgery including the Kurz Vario titanium prosthesis were included in the study, 38 procedures including the partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP) and 35 procedures including the total ossicular replacement prosthesis (TORP). Mean follow-up was 14 months. The ossiculoplasty was performed alone (29 patients) or in combination with other chronic ear surgery procedures (34 patients). Comparisons of preoperative and postoperative pure tone averages (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz) according to AAO-HNS guidelines are presented, as well as data for different PTA definitions. Otosurgery procedures, complications, revisions, and extrusion rates are reported. A postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) of Titanium prostheses have been easy and fast to handle and effective implants for reconstruction of the ossicular chain. We found no difference between reconstruction with or without cholesteatoma surgery during the same procedure. The combination of CWD and Torp gave significant inferior hearing thresholds as compared to Torp/CWU and Porp/CWD combinations.

  18. SU-E-T-492: The Dosimetric and Clinical Impact of the Metallic Dental Implants on Radiation Dose Distributions in IMRT Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Xing, L; Le, Q

    2012-06-01

    In H&N cancer patients, the development of oral mucositis is related closely to the radiation dose to the oral cavity. It is generally presumed that the existence of metallic dental implants makes it worse due to the scattering effect of the metal. This study investigates the effects of the dental implants on radiation doses to PTV, tongue mucosa, and other structures for IMRT H&N cancer patients by Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. Two H&N cancer patients who have dental implant and are treated by IMRT technique are selected for the purpose. The BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC codes are employed for the CT-image based dose calculations. The radiation sources are the validated Varian phase-space files for 6MV linac beams. The CT image artifacts caused by the dental fillings are replaced by tissue material. Two sets of MC calculations for each patient are performed at a calculation statistics of 1%: one treats all dental implants as bones, the other substitutes the implants by metal of either titanium or gold with correct density. Doses in PTV and various tissue structures are compared for the two scenarios. With titanium implant, there is no significant difference in doses to PTV and tongue mucosa from that when treating implant as bone. With gold implant, the mean dose to PTV is slightly lowered by 1%; the mean dose to tongue mucosa is reduced by less than 0.5%, although the maximum dose is increased by 5%. The scattering dose from titanium implants is not of concern for H&N patients irradiated by 6MV IMRT beams. For gold implants, the scattering dose to tongue mucosa is not as severe as presumed; and the dose to PTV could be slightly compromised due to the attenuation effect of the metal. This work was supported in part by Varian Medical Systems. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  20. Effects of pH and elevated glucose levels on the electrochemical behavior of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Evsen; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-04-01

    Implant failure is more likely to occur in persons with medically compromising systemic conditions, such as diabetes related to high blood glucose levels and inflammatory diseases related to pH levels lower than those in healthy people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lower pH level and simulated- hyperglycemia on implant corrosion as these effects are critical to biocompatibility and osseointegration. The electrochemical corrosion properties of titanium implants were studied in four different solutions: Ringer's physiological solution at pH = 7.0 and pH = 5.5 and Ringer's physiological solution containing 15 mM dextrose at pH = 7 and pH = 5.5. Corrosion behaviors of dental implants were determined by cyclic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Surface alterations were studied using a scanning electron microscope. All test electrolytes led to apparent differences in corrosion behavior of the implants. The implants under conditions of test exhibited statistically significant increases in I(corr) from 0.2372 to 1.007 μAcm(-2), corrosion rates from 1.904 to 8.085 mpy, and a decrease in polarization resistances from 304 to 74 Ω. Implants in dextrose-containing solutions were more prone to corrosion than those in Ringer's solutions alone. Increasing the acidity also yielded greater corrosion rates for the dextrose-containing solutions and the solutions without dextrose.

  1. Reality of Dental Implant Surface Modification: A Short Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Screw-shaped endosseous implants that have a turned surface of commercially pure titanium have a disadvantage of requiring a long time for osseointegration while those implants have shown long-term clinical success in single and multiple restorations. Titanium implant surfaces have been modified in various ways to improve biocompatibility and accelerate osseointegration, which results in a shorter edentulous period for a patient. This article reviewed some important modified titanium surfaces, exploring the in vitro, in vivo and clinical results that numerous comparison studies reported. Several methods are widely used to modify the topography or chemistry of titanium surface, including blasting, acid etching, anodic oxidation, fluoride treatment, and calcium phosphate coating. Such modified surfaces demonstrate faster and stronger osseointegration than the turned commercially pure titanium surface. However, there have been many studies finding no significant differences in in vivo bone responses among the modified surfaces. Considering those in vivo results, physical properties like roughening by sandblasting and acid etching may be major contributors to favorable bone response in biological environments over chemical properties obtained from various modifications including fluoride treatment and calcium phosphate application. Recently, hydrophilic properties added to the roughened surfaces or some osteogenic peptides coated on the surfaces have shown higher biocompatibility and have induced faster osseointegration, compared to the existing modified surfaces. However, the long-term clinical studies about those innovative surfaces are still lacking. PMID:25400716

  2. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  3. Histomorphometric and histologic evaluation of titanium-zirconium (aTiZr) implants with anodized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; McQuillan, A James; Shibata, Yo; Sharma, Lavanya A; Waddell, John Neil; Duncan, Warwick John

    2016-05-01

    The choice of implant surface has a significant influence on osseointegration. Modification of TiZr surface by anodization is reported to have the potential to modulate the osteoblast cell behaviour favouring more rapid bone formation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of anodizing the surface of TiZr discs with respect to osseointegration after four weeks implantation in sheep femurs. Titanium (Ti) and TiZr discs were anodized in an electrolyte containing DL-α-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate at 300 V. The surface characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and goniometry. Forty implant discs with thickness of 1.5 and 10 mm diameter (10 of each-titanium, titanium-zirconium, anodized titanium and anodized titanium-zirconium) were placed in the femoral condyles of 10 sheep. Histomorphometric and histologic analysis were performed 4 weeks after implantation. The anodized implants displayed hydrophilic, porous, nano-to-micrometer scale roughened surfaces. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis revealed calcium and phosphorous incorporation into the surface of both titanium and titanium-zirconium after anodization. Histologically there was new bone apposition on all implanted discs, slightly more pronounced on anodised discs. The percentage bone-to-implant contact measurements of anodized implants were higher than machined/unmodified implants but there was no significant difference between the two groups with anodized surfaces (P > 0.05, n = 10). The present histomorphometric and histological findings confirm that surface modification of titanium-zirconium by anodization is similar to anodised titanium enhances early osseointegration compared to machined implant surfaces.

  4. Survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno R; Kisch, Jenö; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2017-11-01

    To assess the survival of dental implants placed in sites of previously failed implants and to explore the possible factors that might affect the outcome of this reimplantation procedure. Patients that had failed dental implants, which were replaced with the same implant type at the same site, were included. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the patients and implants; survival analysis was also performed. The effect of systemic, environmental, and local factors on the survival of the reoperated implants was evaluated. 175 of 10,096 implants in 98 patients were replaced by another implant at the same location (159, 14, and 2 implants at second, third, and fourth surgeries, respectively). Newly replaced implants were generally of similar diameter but of shorter length compared to the previously placed fixtures. A statistically significant greater percentage of lost implants were placed in sites with low bone quantity. There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.032) in the survival rates between implants that were inserted for the first time (94%) and implants that replaced the ones lost (73%). There was a statistically higher failure rate of the reoperated implants for patients taking antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. Dental implants replacing failed implants had lower survival rates than the rates reported for the previous attempts of implant placement. It is suggested that a site-specific negative effect may possibly be associated with this phenomenon, as well as the intake of antidepressants and antithrombotic agents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Titanium dioxide in dental enamel as a trace element and its variation with bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Sedó, Randall; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Background Titanium is a less studied trace element in dental enamel. Literature relates an increased Titanium concentration with a decreased enamel crystal domain size, which in turn is related to a higher color value. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of tooth bleaching agents on its concentration in dental enamel by means of confocal Raman spectroscopy. Material and Methods Human teeth were randomly distributed in six experimental groups (n=10) and submitted to different bleaching protocols according to the manufacturer´s instructions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy was carried out in order to identify and quantify the presence of titanium dioxide molecules in enamel prior to and during whitening. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results Titanium dioxide concentration was negatively affected by the longer bleaching protocols (at-home bleaching gels). All in-office whitening products increased significantly the studied molecule (p≤0,05). Conclusions All dental specimens depicted the presence of titanium dioxide as a trace element in dental enamel. Bleaching gels that have to be applied at higher concentrations but for shorter periods of time increase the concentration of titanium dioxide, whilst at-home whitening gels used for longer periods of time despite the lower concentration caused a loss in titanium. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, titanium dioxide. PMID:29930771

  6. Titanium dioxide in dental enamel as a trace element and its variation with bleaching.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Durán-Sedó, Randall; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2018-06-01

    Titanium is a less studied trace element in dental enamel. Literature relates an increased Titanium concentration with a decreased enamel crystal domain size, which in turn is related to a higher color value. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of tooth bleaching agents on its concentration in dental enamel by means of confocal Raman spectroscopy. Human teeth were randomly distributed in six experimental groups (n=10) and submitted to different bleaching protocols according to the manufacturer´s instructions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy was carried out in order to identify and quantify the presence of titanium dioxide molecules in enamel prior to and during whitening. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance ( p ≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Titanium dioxide concentration was negatively affected by the longer bleaching protocols (at-home bleaching gels). All in-office whitening products increased significantly the studied molecule ( p ≤0,05). All dental specimens depicted the presence of titanium dioxide as a trace element in dental enamel. Bleaching gels that have to be applied at higher concentrations but for shorter periods of time increase the concentration of titanium dioxide, whilst at-home whitening gels used for longer periods of time despite the lower concentration caused a loss in titanium. Key words: Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, titanium dioxide.

  7. In Vivo Response of Laser Processed Porous Titanium Implants for Load-Bearing Implants.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Shivaram, Anish; Tarafder, Solaiman; Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Banerjee, Dishary; Bose, Susmita

    2017-01-01

    Applications of porous metallic implants to enhance osseointegration of load-bearing implants are increasing. In this work, porous titanium implants, with 25 vol.% porosity, were manufactured using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) to measure the influence of porosity towards bone tissue integration in vivo. Surfaces of the LENS™ processed porous Ti implants were further modified with TiO 2 nanotubes to improve cytocompatibility of these implants. We hypothesized that interconnected porosity created via additive manufacturing will enhance bone tissue integration in vivo. To test our hypothesis, in vivo experiments using a distal femur model of male Sprague-Dawley rats were performed for a period of 4 and 10 weeks. In vivo samples were characterized via micro-computed tomography (CT), histological imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical push-out tests. Our results indicate that porosity played an important role to establish early stage osseointegration forming strong interfacial bonding between the porous implants and the surrounding tissue, with or without surface modification, compared to dense Ti implants used as a control.

  8. In vivo response of laser processed porous titanium implants for load-bearing implants

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Shivaram, Anish; Tarafder, Solaiman; Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Banerjee, Dishary; Bose, Susmita

    2016-01-01

    Applications of porous metallic implants to enhance osseointegration of load-bearing implants are increasing. In this work, porous titanium implants, with 25 volume% porosity, were manufactured using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) to measure the influence of porosity towards bone tissue integration in vivo. Surfaces of the LENS™ processed porous Ti implants were further modified with TiO2 nanotubes to improve cytocompatibility of these implants. We hypothesized that interconnected porosity created via additive manufacturing will enhance bone tissue integration in vivo. To test our hypothesis, in vivo experiments using a distal femur model of male Sprague-Dawley rats were performed for a period of 4 and 10 weeks. In vivo samples were characterized via micro-computed tomography (CT), histological imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical push-out tests. Our results indicate that porosity played an important role to establish early stage osseointegration forming strong interfacial bonding between the porous implants and the surrounding tissue, with or without surface modification, compared to dense Ti implants used as a control. PMID:27307009

  9. Bone integration capability of nanopolymorphic crystalline hydroxyapatite coated on titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Masahiro; Ueno, Takeshi; Tsukimura, Naoki; Ikeda, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Kaori; Hori, Norio; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium promotes bone–implant integration is largely unknown. Furthermore, refining the fabrication of nano-structured HA to the level applicable to the mass production process for titanium implants is challenging. This study reports successful creation of nanopolymorphic crystalline HA on microroughened titanium surfaces using a combination of flame spray and low-temperature calcination and tests its biological capability to enhance bone–implant integration. Sandblasted microroughened titanium implants and sandblasted + HA-coated titanium implants were subjected to biomechanical and histomorphometric analyses in a rat model. The HA was 55% crystallized and consisted of nanoscale needle-like architectures developed in various diameters, lengths, and orientations, which resulted in a 70% increase in surface area compared to noncoated microroughened surfaces. The HA was free from impurity contaminants, with a calcium/phosphorus ratio of 1.66 being equivalent to that of stoichiometric HA. As compared to microroughened implants, HA-coated implants increased the strength of bone–implant integration consistently at both early and late stages of healing. HA-coated implants showed an increased percentage of bone–implant contact and bone volume within 50 μm proximity of the implant surface, as well as a remarkably reduced percentage of soft tissue intervention between bone and the implant surface. In contrast, bone volume outside the 50 μm border was lower around HA-coated implants. Thus, this study demonstrated that the addition of pure nanopolymorphic crystalline HA to microroughened titanium not only accelerates but also enhances the level of bone–implant integration and identified the specific tissue morphogenesis parameters modulated by HA coating. In particular, the nanocrystalline HA was proven to be drastic in increasing osteoconductivity and inhibiting soft tissue infiltration, but the effect was

  10. Fracture resistance of inter-joined zirconia abutment of dental implant system with injection molding technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianjun; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guangyuan; Wang, Dashan

    2013-11-01

    Zirconia powder in nanometers can be fabricated into inter-joined abutment of dental implant system with the injection shaping technique. This study was to detect the resistance of inter-joined zirconia abutment with different angle loading for clinical applications. The inter-joined abutments were shaped with the technique of injection of zirconia powder in nanometers. Sixty Osstem GSII 5 × 10 mm implants were used with 30 zirconia abutments and 30 Osstem GSII titanium abutments for fixation using 40 N torque force. The loading applications included 90°, 30°, and 0° formed by the long axis of abutments and pressure head of universal test machine. The fracture resistances of zirconia and titanium abutments were documented and analyzed. The inter-joined zirconia abutments were assembled to the Osstem GSII implants successfully. In the 90° loading mode, the fracture resistance of zirconia abutment group and titanium abutment group were 301.5 ± 15.4 N and 736.4 ± 120.1 N, respectively. And those in the 30° groups were 434.7 ± 36.1 N and 1073.1 ± 74 N, correspondingly. Significant difference in the two groups was found using t-test and Wilcoxon test. No damage on the abutments of the two groups but S-shaped bending on the implants was found when the 0° loading was 1300-2000 N. Through the assembly of Zirconia abutments and implants, all the components presented sufficient resistance acquired for the clinical application under loadings with different angle. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Effect of implantoplasty on fracture resistance and surface roughness of standard diameter dental implants.

    PubMed

    Costa-Berenguer, Xavier; García-García, Marta; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Sanz-Alonso, Mariano; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effect of implantoplasty on the fracture resistance, surface roughness, and macroscopic morphology of standard diameter (4.1 mm) external connection dental implants. An in vitro study was conducted in 20 screw-shaped titanium dental implants with an external connection. In 10 implants, the threads and surface were removed and polished with high-speed burs (implantoplasty), while the remaining 10 implants were used as controls. The final implant dimensions were recorded. The newly polished surface quality was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by 3D surface roughness analysis using a confocal laser microscope. Finally, all the implants were subjected to a mechanical pressure resistance test. A descriptive analysis of the data was made. Also, Student's t tests were employed to detect differences regarding the compression tests. Implantoplasty was carried out for a mean time of 10 min and 48 s (standard deviation (SD) of 1 min 22 s). Macroscopically, the resulting surface had a smooth appearance, although small titanium shavings and silicon debris were present. The final surface roughness (S a values 0.1 ± 0.02 μm) was significantly lower than that of the original (0.75 ± 0.08 μm S a ) (p = .005). There was minimal reduction in the implant's inner body diameter (0.19 ± 0.03 mm), and no statistically significant differences were found between the test and control implants regarding the maximum resistance force (896 vs 880 N, respectively). Implantoplasty, although technically demanding and time-consuming, does not seem to significantly alter fracture resistance of standard diameter external connection implants. A smooth surface with S a values below 0.1 μm can be obtained through the use of silicon polishers. A larger sample is required to confirm that implantoplasty does not significantly affect the maximum resistance force of standard diameter external connection implants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published

  12. The effects of titanium nitride-coating on the topographic and biological features of TPS implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Annunziata, Marco; Oliva, Adriana; Basile, Maria Assunta; Giordano, Michele; Mazzola, Nello; Rizzo, Antonietta; Lanza, Alessandro; Guida, Luigi

    2011-11-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) coating has been proposed as an adjunctive surface treatment aimed to increase the physico-mechanical and aesthetic properties of dental implants. In this study we investigated the surface characteristics of TiN-coated titanium plasma sprayed (TiN-TPS) and uncoated titanium plasma sprayed (TPS) surfaces and their biological features towards both primary human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) and bacterial cultures. 15 mm×1 mm TPS and TiN-TPS disks (P.H.I. s.r.l., San Vittore Olona, Milano, Italy) were topographically analysed by confocal optical profilometry. Primary human BM-MSC were obtained from healthy donors, isolated and expanded. Cells were seeded on the titanium disks and cell adhesion, proliferation, protein synthesis and osteoblastic differentiation in terms of alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin synthesis and extracellular mineralization, were evaluated. Furthermore, adhesion and proliferation of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus sanguinis on both surfaces were also analysed. TiN-TPS disks showed a decreased roughness (about 50%, p < 0.05) and a decreased bacterial adhesion and proliferation compared to TPS ones. No difference (p > 0.05) in terms of BM-MSC adhesion, proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation between TPS and TiN-TPS surfaces was found. TiN coating showed to modify the topographical characteristics of TPS titanium surfaces and to significantly reduce bacterial adhesion and proliferation, although maintaining their biological affinity towards bone cell precursors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Dental Implants on Oral Lesions.

    PubMed

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Rohani, Bita

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether dental implants impress oral lesions, and to evaluate the nature of their effect on the lesions. A comprehensive search was done via Google and PubMed for articles (including case reports and literature reviews) containing the keywords 'oral squamous cell carcinoma' (OSCC), 'oral lichen planus' (OLP), 'lichenoid contact reaction' (LCR), 'osseointegrated implants', and 'dental implants' , in the last 10 years (2002-2012). The study included 24 articles involving patients with dental implants, and some oral lesions (e.g. oral lichen planus and oral squamous cell carcinoma) or with a history of lesions. In these publications, there is evidence suggesting the possibility of emergence, exacerbation, recurrence, or even malignant transformation of the oral lesions after implant placement in some cases. Based on our review of the literature, implant treatment does not seem to be completely safe under any circumstances, but may have some complications in subjects with certain diseases (e.g. oral lesions, autoimmune diseases, malignancies, allergic reactions, etc.). Therefore prior to treatment, patients should be fully informed of the risks. Implant treatment is best done with caution in patients with cancer or mucocutaneous disorders.

  14. Strength of titanium intramedullary implant versus miniplate fixation of mandibular condyle fractures.

    PubMed

    Frake, Paul C; Howell, Rebecca J; Joshi, Arjun S

    2012-07-01

    To test the strength of internal fixation of mandibular condyle fractures repaired with titanium miniplates versus titanium intramedullary implants. Prospective laboratory experimentation in urethane mandible models and human cadaveric mandibles. Materials testing laboratory at an academic medical center. Osteotomies of the mandibular condyle were created in 40 urethane hemimandible models and 24 human cadaveric specimens. Half of the samples in each group were repaired with traditional miniplates, and the other half were repaired with intramedullary titanium implants. Anteroposterior and mediolateral loads were applied to the samples, and the displacement was measured with reference to the applied force. Titanium intramedullary implants demonstrated statistically significant improved strength and stiffness versus miniplates in the urethane model experimental groups. Despite frequent plastic deformation and mechanical failures of the miniplates, a 1.6-mm-diameter titanium intramedullary pin did not mechanically fail in any of the cases. Intramedullary implantation failures were due to secondary fracture of the adjacent cortical bone or experimental design limitations including rotation of the smooth pin implant. Mechanical implant failures that were encountered with miniplate fixation were not seen with titanium intramedullary implants. These intramedullary implants provide stronger and more rigid fixation of mandibular condyle fractures than miniplates in this in vitro model.

  15. Bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental cements.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Chandur; Chung, Kwok-Hung

    2015-11-01

    The most appropriate luting agent for restoring cement-retained implant restorations has yet to be determined. Leachable chemicals from some types of cement designed for teeth may affect metal surfaces. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and interactions of machined titanium-based alloy with dental luting agents. Eight dental luting agents representative of 4 different compositional classes (resin, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and zinc oxide-based cements) were used to evaluate their effect on machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy surfaces. Ninety-six paired disks were cemented together (n=12). After incubation in a 37°C water bath for 7 days, the shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine (Instron) and a custom fixture with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Differences were analyzed statistically with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). The debonded surfaces of the Ti alloy disks were examined under a light microscope at ×10 magnification to record the failure pattern, and the representative specimens were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The mean ±SD of shear failure loads ranged from 3.4 ±0.5 to 15.2 ±2.6 MPa. The retention provided by both polycarboxylate cements was significantly greater than that of all other groups (P<.05). The scanning electron microscope examination revealed surface pits only on the bonded surface cemented with the polycarboxylate cements. Cementation with polycarboxylate cement obtained higher shear bond strength. Some chemical interactions occurred between the machined Ti-6Al-4V alloy surface and polycarboxylate cements during cementation. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  17. A Retrospective Analysis of Dental Implants Replacing Failed Implants in Grafted Maxillary Sinus: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Manor, Yifat; Chaushu, Gavriel; Lorean, Adi; Mijiritzky, Eithan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of dental implants replacing failed implants in grafted maxillary sinuses using the lateral approach vs nongrafted posterior maxillae. A retrospective analysis was conducted to study the survival of secondary dental implants inserted in the posterior maxilla in previously failed implant sites between the years 2000 and 2010. The study group consisted of patients who had also undergone maxillary sinus augmentation, and the control group consisted of patients in whom implants in the posterior maxilla had failed. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed using a structured form. Seventy-five patients with a total of 75 replaced implants were included in the study. The study group comprised 40 patients and the control group, 35 patients. None of the replaced implants in the study group failed, resulting in an overall survival of 100%; three replaced implants in the control group failed (92% survival). The main reason for the primary implant removal was lack of osseointegration (35 [87.5%] of 40 study group implants and 23 [65.7%] of 35 control group implants [P = .027]). The difference between the groups with regard to the timing of primary implant failure was statistically significant. The study group had more early failures of the primary implant than did the control group (77% vs 62%; P = .038). Dental implants replaced in the posterior maxilla had a high survival rate. A higher rate of survival was found in augmented maxillary sinus sites. Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that previous implant failures in the grafted maxillary sinus should not discourage practitioners from a second attempt.

  18. Upper and lower full arch dental reconstruction with implant supported overdentures: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jerome P

    2013-04-01

    In clinical situations where implant placement in the maxilla is prohibited due to the lack of available bone, more invasive techniques such as autogenous bone grafting and sinus augmentation are often off-putting to patients due to the added expense, risk and morbidity. Purpose of treatment: The intention of this treatment was to dentally restore a patient with a severely resorbed edentulous maxilla, without the use of any grafting techniques. Under local anaesthetic, five implants were placed in the patient's maxilla using the combined techniques of alveolar ridge-splitting and a Summer's lift. The crest of the alveolus was dissected bilaterally with a fine rotary disc. A combination of osteotomes and bone spreaders were then used to create the individual osteotomies. In the most distal site on the right side, the floor of the maxillary sinus was tapped up to facilitate implant placement. All implants were submerged under the gum for six months to allow them to ossteointegrate. Restorative stages were then completed. At six months, all five maxillary implants had successfully integrated. The maxilla also showed marked expansion where the alveolus had been dissected and bone had healed between the separated buccal and palatal plates. The final restoration was a metal-framed overdenture attached to a milled titanium bar supported on five implants. In this single case study, a patient's atrophic, edentulous maxilla was successfully restored without grafting techniques. The overdenture has been in trouble-free function for two years.

  19. Surface characteristics of clinically used dental implant screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Myung-Ju; Choe, Han-Cheol; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2005-12-01

    Surface alteration of implant screws after function may be associated with mechanicalffailure. This type of metal fatigue appears to be the most common cause of structural failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface alteration of implant screws after function through an examination of used and unused implant screws via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study, abutment screws (Steri-oss, 3i, USA), gold retaining screws (3i, USA), and titanium retaining screws (3i, USA) were retrieved from patients, New, unused abutment, and retaining screws were prepared for a control group. Each of the old, used screws was retrieved with a screwdriver. The retrieved implant complex of a Steri-oss system was also prepared for this study. SEM investigation and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the abutment and retaining screws were then performed, as well as SEM investigation of a cross-sectioned sample of the retrieved implant complex in the case of new, unused implant screws, as-manufactured circumferential grooves were regularly examined and screw threads were sharply maintained. Before ultrasonic cleansing of old, used implant screws, there was a large amount of debris accumulation and corrosion products. After ultrasonic cleansing of old, used implant screws, circumferential grooves were examined were found to be randomly deepened and scratching increased. Also, dull screw fhreads were observed. More surface alterations after function were observed in titanium screws than in gold screws. Furthermore, more surface alteration was observed when the screws were retrieved with a driver than without a driver. These surface alterations after function may result in screw instability. Regular cleansing and exchange of screws is therefore recommended. We also recommend the use of gold screws over titanium screws, and careful manipulation of the driver.

  20. Effects of pore size, implantation time and nano-surface properties on rat skin ingrowth into percutaneous porous titanium implants

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Ritter, Jana M.; Kelley, Sean; Popat, Ketul; Pitkin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The main problem of percutaneous osseointegrated implants is poor skin-implant integration, which may cause infection. This study investigated the effects of pore size (Small, 40–100 microns and Large, 100–160 microns), nanotubular surface treatment (Nano), and duration of implantation (3 and 6 weeks) on skin ingrowth into porous titanium. Each implant type was percutaneously inserted in the back of 35 rats randomly assigned to 7 groups. Implant extrusion rate was measured weekly and skin ingrowth into implants was determined histologically after harvesting implants. It was found that all 3 types of implants demonstrated skin tissue ingrowth of over 30% (at week 3) and 50% (at weeks 4–6) of total implant porous area under the skin; longer implantation resulted in greater skin ingrowth (p<0.05). Only one case of infection was observed (infection rate 2.9%). Small and Nano groups showed the same implant extrusion rate which was lower than the Large group rate (0.06±0.01 vs. 0.16 ± 0.02 cm/week; p<0.05). Ingrowth area was comparable in the Small, Large and Nano implants. However, qualitatively, the Nano implants showed greatest cellular inhabitation within first three weeks. We concluded that percutaneous porous titanium implants allow for skin integration with the potential for a safe seal. PMID:23703928

  1. Implant Insertion Torque: Its Role in Achieving Primary Stability of Restorable Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Gary; Cavallaro, John

    2017-02-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the role of insertion torque in attaining primary stability of dental implants. The review is comprised of articles that discussed the amount of torque needed to achieve primary implant stability in healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets prior to immediate implant loading. Studies were appraised that addressed the effects of minimum and maximum forces that can be used to successfully place implants. The minimum torque that can be employed to attain primary stability is undefined. Forces ≥30 Ncm are routinely used to place implants into healed ridges and fresh extraction sockets prior to immediate loading of implants. Increased insertion torque (≥50 Ncm) reduces micromotion and does not appear to damage bone. In general, the healing process after implant insertion provides a degree of biologic stability that is similar whether implants are placed with high or low initial insertion torque. Primary stability is desirable when placing implants, but the absence of micromotion is what facilitates predictable implant osseointegration. Increased insertion torque helps achieve primary stability by reducing implant micromotion. Furthermore, tactile information provided by the first surgical twist drill can aid in selecting the initial insertion torque to achieve predictable stability of inserted dental implants.

  2. Osseointegration into a Novel Titanium Foam Implant in the Distal Femur of a Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Bettina M.; Yang, Xu; Kelly, Natalie H.; Merkow, Justin; Gagne, Shawn; Ware, Robin; Wright, Timothy M.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel porous titanium foam implant has recently been developed to enhance biological fixation of orthopaedic implants to bone. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical and histological characteristics of bone apposition into two different pore sizes of this titanium foam (565 and 464 micron mean void intercept length) and to compare these characteristics to those obtained with a fully porous conventionally sintered titanium bead implant. Cylindrical implants were studied in a rabbit distal femoral intramedullary osseointegration model at time zero and at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. The amount of bone ingrowth, amount of periprosthetic bone, and mineral apposition rate of periprosthetic bone measured did not differ among the three implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. By 12 weeks, the interface stiffness and maximum load of the beaded implant was significantly greater than either foam implant. No significant difference was found in the interface stiffness or maximum load between the two foam implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. The lower compressive modulus of the foam compared to the more dense sintered beaded implants likely contributed to the difference in failure mode. However, the foam implants have a similar compressive modulus to other clinically successful coatings, suggesting they are nonetheless clinically adequate. Additional studies are required to confirm this in weight-bearing models. Histological data suggest that these novel titanium foam implants are a promising alternative to current porous coatings and should be further investigated for clinical application in cementless joint replacement. PMID:20024964

  3. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh, E-mail: a.kiani@unb.ca

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples withmore » nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.« less

  4. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples with nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.

  5. Fit of cobalt–chromium implant frameworks before and after ceramic veneering in comparison with CNC‐milled titanium frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Svanborg, Per; Eliasson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Computer‐aided design/computer‐aided manufacturing fabrication of implant‐supported frameworks is a standard procedure, and the use of ceramic‐veneered cobalt–chromium alloys is increasing. However, no data are available concerning the precision of fit of these frameworks and the impact on the fit of the veneering procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fit of computer numeric‐controlled‐milled cobalt–chromium and titanium implant frameworks for edentulous maxillas, provided with six implants. An additional aim was to evaluate the effect of ceramic veneering on the fit of the cobalt–chromium frameworks. Ten stone casts simulating an edentulous maxilla provided with six dental implants and abutments were produced. One computer numeric‐controlled‐milled cobalt–chromium framework and one titanium framework were fabricated for each stone cast. Each stone cast and corresponding titanium and cobalt–chromium framework was measured with a coordinate measuring machine in the three‐dimensional (X axis, Y axis, and Z axis) directions. Both milled titanium and cobalt–chromium frameworks presented a good fit in the vertical plane (Z axis), 5.3 µm for titanium frameworks and 4.6 µm for the cobalt–chromium frameworks. The titanium frameworks showed a statistically significant smaller mean degree of misfit in the horizontal plane, X (5.0 µm) and Y (2.8 µm) axes as compared with the cobalt–chromium frameworks presenting a mean deviation of 13.5 µm in X axis and 6.3 µm in Y axis (P < 0.001). After ceramic veneering of the cobalt–chromium frameworks, the horizontal distortion significantly decreased from 13.5 to 9.7 µm in X axis (P = 0.007) and from 6.3 to 4.4 µm in Y axis (P = 0.017). The fit of both titanium and cobalt–chromium frameworks was very good. There were small but significant differences in fit between the titanium and cobalt–chromium frameworks, but the difference is of no

  6. Stability of tapered and parallel-walled dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Atieh, Momen A; Alsabeeha, Nabeel; Duncan, Warwick J

    2018-05-15

    Clinical trials have suggested that dental implants with a tapered configuration have improved stability at placement, allowing immediate placement and/or loading. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the implant stability of tapered dental implants compared to standard parallel-walled dental implants. Applying the guidelines of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched for in electronic databases and complemented by hand searching. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool and data were analyzed using statistical software. A total of 1199 studies were identified, of which, five trials were included with 336 dental implants in 303 participants. Overall meta-analysis showed that tapered dental implants had higher implant stability values than parallel-walled dental implants at insertion and 8 weeks but the difference was not statistically significant. Tapered dental implants had significantly less marginal bone loss compared to parallel-walled dental implants. No significant differences in implant failure rate were found between tapered and parallel-walled dental implants. There is limited evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered dental implants in achieving greater implant stability compared to parallel-walled dental implants. Superior short-term results in maintaining peri-implant marginal bone with tapered dental implants are possible. Further properly designed RCTs are required to endorse the supposed advantages of tapered dental implants in immediate loading protocol and other complex clinical scenarios. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Bruxism and Dental Implants: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-10-01

    To test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss after the insertion of dental implants in bruxers compared with the insertion in non-bruxers against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search was undertaken in June 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical studies, either randomized or not. Ten publications were included with a total of 760 implants inserted in bruxers (49 failures; 6.45%) and 2989 in non-bruxers (109 failures; 3.65%). Due to lack of information, meta-analyses for the outcomes "postoperative infection" and "marginal bone loss" were not possible. A risk ratio of 2.93 was found (95% confidence interval, 1.48-5.81; P = 0.002). These results cannot suggest that the insertion of dental implants in bruxers affects the implant failure rates due to a limited number of published studies, all characterized by a low level of specificity, and most of them deal with a limited number of cases without a control group. Therefore, the real effect of bruxing habits on the osseointegration and survival of endosteal dental implants is still not well established.

  8. A novel root analogue dental implant using CT scan and CAD/CAM: selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M; Mangano, F; Mangano, C

    2012-07-01

    Direct laser metal forming (DLMF) is a new technique which allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model. For dental implants, the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. Modern computed tomography (CT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMF process, allows the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAI), perfect copies of the radicular units that need replacing. This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implant. CT images of the residual non-restorable root of a right maxillary premolar were acquired and modified with specific software into a 3D model. From this model, a custom-made, root-analogue, DLMF implant was fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the root-analogue implant was placed in the extraction socket and restored with a single crown. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the custom-made implant showed almost perfect functional and aesthetic integration. The possibility of fabricating custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implants opens new interesting perspectives for immediate placement of dental implants. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. One-year results of maxillary overdentures supported by 2 titanium-zirconium implants - implant survival rates and radiographic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zembic, Anja; Tahmaseb, Ali; Jung, Ronald E; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    To assess implant survival rates and peri-implant bone loss of 2 titanium-zirconium implants supporting maxillary overdentures at 1 year of loading. Twenty maxillary edentulous patients (5 women and 15 men) being dissatisfied with their complete dentures were included. In total, 40 diameter-reduced titanium-zirconium implants were placed in the anterior maxilla. Local guided bone regeneration (GBR) was allowed if the treatment did not compromise implant stability. Following 3 to 5 months of healing, implant-supported overdentures were inserted on two ball anchors. Implants and overdentures were assessed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after implant insertion and 2, 4, and 12 months after insertion of overdentures (baseline). Standardized radiographs were taken at implant loading and 1 year. Implant survival rates and bone loss were the primary outcomes. Nineteen patients (1 dropout) with 38 implants were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 1.1 years (range 1.0-1.7 years). One implant failed resulting in an implant survival rate of 97.3%. There was a significant peri-implant bone loss of the implants at 1 year of function (mean, 0.7 mm, SD = 1.1 mm; median: 0.48 mm, IQR = 0.56 mm). There was a high 1-year implant survival rate for edentulous patients receiving 2 maxillary implants and ball anchors as overdenture support. However, several implants exhibited an increased amount of bone loss of more than 2 mm. Overdentures supported by 2 maxillary implants should thus be used with caution as minimally invasive treatment for specific patients encountering problems with their upper dentures until more long-term data is available. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. CO2 laser surface treatment of failed dental implants for re-implantation: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Kasraei, Shahin; Torkzaban, Parviz; Shams, Bahar; Hosseinipanah, Seyed Mohammad; Farhadian, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the success rate of failed implants re-implanted after surface treatment with CO2 laser. Despite the widespread use of dental implants, there are many incidents of failures. It is believed that lasers can be applied to decontaminate the implant surface without damaging the implant. Ten dental implants that had failed for various reasons other than fracture or surface abrasion were subjected to CO2 laser surface treatment and randomly placed in the maxillae of dogs. Three failed implants were also placed as the negative controls after irrigation with saline solution without laser surface treatment. The stability of the implants was evaluated by the use of the Periotest values (PTVs) on the first day after surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-operatively. The mean PTVs of treated implants increased at the first month interval, indicating a decrease in implant stability due to inflammation followed by healing of the tissue. At 3 and 6 months, the mean PTVs decreased compared to the 1-month interval (P < 0.05), indicating improved implant stability. The mean PTVs increased in the negative control group compared to baseline (P < 0.05). Independent t-test showed that the mean PTVs of treated implants were significantly lower than control group at 3 and 6 months after implant placement (P < 0.05). Based on the PTVs, re-implantation of failed implants in Jack Russell Terrier dogs after CO2 laser surface debridement is associated with a high success rate in terms of implant stability.

  11. A comparison of fit of CNC-milled titanium and zirconia frameworks to implants.

    PubMed

    Abduo, Jaafar; Lyons, Karl; Waddell, Neil; Bennani, Vincent; Swain, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Computer numeric controlled (CNC) milling was proven to be predictable method to fabricate accurately fitting implant titanium frameworks. However, no data are available regarding the fit of CNC-milled implant zirconia frameworks. To compare the precision of fit of implant frameworks milled from titanium and zirconia and relate it to peri-implant strain development after framework fixation. A partially edentulous epoxy resin models received two Branemark implants in the areas of the lower left second premolar and second molar. From this model, 10 identical frameworks were fabricated by mean of CNC milling. Half of them were made from titanium and the other half from zirconia. Strain gauges were mounted close to the implants to qualitatively and quantitatively assess strain development as a result of framework fitting. In addition, the fit of the framework implant interface was measured using an optical microscope, when only one screw was tightened (passive fit) and when all screws were tightened (vertical fit). The data was statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. All frameworks produced measurable amounts of peri-implant strain. The zirconia frameworks produced significantly less strain than titanium. Combining the qualitative and quantitative information indicates that the implants were under vertical displacement rather than horizontal. The vertical fit was similar for zirconia (3.7 µm) and titanium (3.6 µm) frameworks; however, the zirconia frameworks exhibited a significantly finer passive fit (5.5 µm) than titanium frameworks (13.6 µm). CNC milling produced zirconia and titanium frameworks with high accuracy. The difference between the two materials in terms of fit is expected to be of minimal clinical significance. The strain developed around the implants was more related to the framework fit rather than framework material. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Marta S; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior. PMID:27877662

  13. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  14. Cooling profile following prosthetic preparation of 1-piece dental implants.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Omer; Gabay, Eran; Machtei, Eli E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water irrigation on heat dissipation kinetics following abutment preparation of 1-piece dental implants. UNO 1-piece dental implants were mounted on Plexiglas apparatus clamping the implant at the collar. T-type thermocouple was attached to the first thread of the implant and recorded thermal changes at 100 millisecond intervals. Implants were prepared using highspeed dental turbine at 400,000 RPM with a coarse diamond bur. Once temperature reached 47 degrees C, abutment preparation was discontinued. Thirty implants were divided into 2 groups. Group A: Passive cooling without water irrigation. Group B: Cooling with turbine's water spray adjacent to the implant (30 mL/min). The following parameters were measured: T47 (time from peak temperature to 47 degrees C), T50%, T75% (time until the temperature amplitude decayed by 50% and 75%, respectively), dTemp50%/dt decay, and dTemp75%/dt decay (cooling rate measured at 50% and 75% of amplitude decay, respectively). Water spray irrigation significantly reduced T47 (1.37+/-0.29 seconds vs 19.97+/-3.06 seconds, P<0.0001), T50% (3.04+/-0.34 seconds vs 27.37+/-2.56 seconds, P<0.0001), and T75% (5.71+/-0.57 seconds vs 57.61+/-5.47 seconds, P<0.0001). Water spray irrigation also increased cooling capacity ninefold: dTemp50%/dt decay (4.14+/-0.61 degrees C/s vs 0.48+/-0.06 degrees C/s, P<0.0001), and dTemp50%/dt decay (1.70+/-0.29 degrees C/s vs 0.19+/-0.03 degrees C/s, P<0.0001). The continuous use of water spray adjacent to the abutment following the cessation of implant preparation might prove beneficial for rapid cooling of the implant.

  15. Sprue Design and Its Effect on the Castability and Porosity of Titanium Removable Partial Denture Frameworks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-10

    been in the area of implantology . Recent advances in dental titanium casting machines allow for the use of titanium for crowns, fixed partial dentures...medical implant prostheses (McKinney and Lemons, 1985; Williams, 1981). By the end of the 1960s, titanium found a niche in dental implantology ...as an implant or restorative material. In the field of dental implantology , evidence suggests that metal corrosion and allergenicity may be important

  16. Surface characteristics and biocompatibility of cranioplasty titanium implants following different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Hatamleh, Muhanad M; Wu, Xiaohong; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Watson, Jason; Watts, David

    2018-04-01

    Surface and mechanical properties of titanium alloys are integral for their use in restoring bone defects of skull and face regions. These properties are affected by the method of constructing and surface treatment of the titanium implant. This study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium finishing protocols on the surface morphology, hardness and biocompatibility of TiAl6V4. Square shaped TiAl6V4 specimens (ASTM F68) (10×10×0.5mm) were divided into seven groups of different surface treatments (n=10). The treatments included mechanical polishing, sandblasting with AL 2 O 3 (50μm), immersion in different acids, and/or electro-chemical anodization. Weight loss %; 3D micro-roughness; Knoop micro-hardness, and osteoblast cell attachment and proliferation (after 3 days) were determined for each specimen. Data was analysed using one way ANOVA and Dunett T3 post-hoc tests, and t-test (p<0.05). Weight loss % was in the range of 1.70-5.60 as mechanical polishing produced the highest weight loss, followed by sandblasting, and combined protocol of mechanical polishing and acid treatment (p<0.05). Micro-roughness values (μm) were in the range of 2.81-16.68. It was the highest for control specimens (p<0.05), and smoothest surfaces after combined mechanical polishing and acid treatment; or after electro-chemical treatment (p<0.05). Micro-hardness values (MPa) ranged 170.90-442.15 as sandblasting with/without acid treatment caused statically significantly the highest values (p<0.05) while control and mechanically polished specimens had the lowest values (p<0.05). All treatments produced equally biocompatible surfaces (p>0.05) after 1h or 3 days. Furthermore, osteoblast cell proliferation statistically significantly increased after 3days among each surface treatment (p<0.05). Different finishing treatments have variable effect on cranioplasty titanium surface loss, micro-roughness and micro-hardness but constant improved biocompatibility effect. Electro

  17. Effect of plastic-covered ultrasonic scalers on titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mann, M; Parmar, D; Walmsley, A D; Lea, S C

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining oral health around titanium implants is essential. The formation of a biofilm on the titanium surface will influence the continuing success of the implant. These concerns have led to modified ultrasonic scaler instruments that look to reduce implant damage while maximising the cleaning effect. This study aimed to assess the effect of instrumentation, with traditional and modified ultrasonic scalers, on titanium implant surfaces and to correlate this with the oscillations of the instruments. Two ultrasonic insert designs (metallic TFI-10 and a plastic-tipped implant insert) were selected. Each scaler probe was scanned using a scanning laser vibrometer, under loaded and unloaded conditions, to determine their oscillation characteristics. Loads were applied against a titanium implant (100g and 200 g) for 10 s. The resulting implant surfaces were then scanned using laser profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Insert probes oscillated with an elliptical motion with the maximum amplitude at the probe tip. Laser profilometry detected defects in the titanium surface only for the metallic scaler insert. Defect widths at 200 g high power were significantly larger than all other load/power conditions (P<0.02). Using SEM, it was observed that modifications to the implant surface had occurred following instrumentation with the plastic-tipped insert. Debris was also visible around the defects. Metal scalers produce defects in titanium implant surfaces and load and power are important factors in the damage caused. Plastic-coated scaler probes cause minimal damage to implant surfaces and have a polishing action but can leave plastic deposits behind on the implant surface. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Gruber, Reinhard; Bosshardt, Dieter D

    2014-04-01

    To provide an overview on the biology and soft tissue wound healing around teeth and dental implants. This narrative review focuses on cell biology and histology of soft tissue wounds around natural teeth and dental implants. The available data indicate that: (a) Oral wounds follow a similar pattern. (b) The tissue specificities of the gingival, alveolar and palatal mucosa appear to be innately and not necessarily functionally determined. (c) The granulation tissue originating from the periodontal ligament or from connective tissue originally covered by keratinized epithelium has the potential to induce keratinization. However, it also appears that deep palatal connective tissue may not have the same potential to induce keratinization as the palatal connective tissue originating from an immediately subepithelial area. (d) Epithelial healing following non-surgical and surgical periodontal therapy appears to be completed after a period of 7–14 days. Structural integrity of a maturing wound between a denuded root surface and a soft tissue flap is achieved at approximately 14-days post-surgery. (e) The formation of the biological width and maturation of the barrier function around transmucosal implants requires 6–8 weeks of healing. (f) The established peri-implant soft connective tissue resembles a scar tissue in composition, fibre orientation, and vasculature. (g) The peri-implant junctional epithelium may reach a greater final length under certain conditions such as implants placed into fresh extraction sockets versus conventional implant procedures in healed sites. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT radiation in dental implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Lauridsen, Torsten; Rack, Alexander; Lefolii, Tore Tranberg; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a refined method using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRmicro-CT) to evaluate osseointegration and peri-implant bone volume fraction after titanium dental implant insertion. SRmicro-CT is considered gold standard evaluating bone microarchitecture. Its high resolution, high contrast, and excellent high signal-to-noise-ratio all contribute to the highest spatial resolutions achievable today. Using SRmicro-CT at a voxel size of 5 μm in an experimental goat mandible model, the peri-implant bone volume fraction was found to quickly increase to 50% as the radial distance from the implant surface increased, and levelled out to approximately 80% at a distance of 400 μm. This method has been successful in depicting the bone and cavities in three dimensions thereby enabling us to give a more precise answer to the fraction of the bone-to-implant contact compared to previous methods. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SLM Produced Porous Titanium Implant Improvements for Enhanced Vascularization and Osteoblast Seeding

    PubMed Central

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release. PMID:25849656

  1. SLM produced porous titanium implant improvements for enhanced vascularization and osteoblast seeding.

    PubMed

    Matena, Julia; Petersen, Svea; Gieseke, Matthias; Kampmann, Andreas; Teske, Michael; Beyerbach, Martin; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Haferkamp, Heinz; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Nolte, Ingo

    2015-04-02

    To improve well-known titanium implants, pores can be used for increasing bone formation and close bone-implant interface. Selective Laser Melting (SLM) enables the production of any geometry and was used for implant production with 250-µm pore size. The used pore size supports vessel ingrowth, as bone formation is strongly dependent on fast vascularization. Additionally, proangiogenic factors promote implant vascularization. To functionalize the titanium with proangiogenic factors, polycaprolactone (PCL) coating can be used. The following proangiogenic factors were examined: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12). As different surfaces lead to different cell reactions, titanium and PCL coating were compared. The growing into the porous titanium structure of primary osteoblasts was examined by cross sections. Primary osteoblasts seeded on the different surfaces were compared using Live Cell Imaging (LCI). Cross sections showed cells had proliferated, but not migrated after seven days. Although the cell count was lower on titanium PCL implants in LCI, the cell count and cell spreading area development showed promising results for titanium PCL implants. HMGB1 showed the highest migration capacity for stimulating the endothelial cell line. Future perspective would be the incorporation of HMGB1 into PCL polymer for the realization of a slow factor release.

  2. Plasma-sprayed titanium coating to polyetheretherketone improves the bone-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Walsh, William R; Bertollo, Nicky; Christou, Chrisopher; Schaffner, Dominik; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-05-01

    Rapid and stable fixation at the bone-implant interface would be regarded as one of the primary goals to achieve clinical efficacy, regardless of the surgical site. Although mechanical and physical properties of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) provide advantages for implant devices, the hydrophobic nature and the lack of direct bone contact remains a limitation. To examine the effects of a plasma-sprayed titanium coated PEEK on the mechanical and histologic properties at the bone-implant interface. A preclinical laboratory study. Polyetheretherketone and plasma-sprayed titanium coated PEEK implants (Ti-bond; Spinal Elements, Carlsbad, CA, USA) were placed in a line-to-line manner in cortical bone and in a press-fit manner in cancellous bone of adult sheep using an established ovine model. Shear strength was assessed in the cortical sites at 4 and 12 weeks, whereas histology was performed in cortical and cancellous sites at both time points. The titanium coating dramatically improved the shear strength at the bone-implant interface at 4 weeks and continued to improve with time compared with PEEK. Direct bone ongrowth in cancellous and cortical sites can be achieved using a plasma-sprayed titanium coating on PEEK. Direct bone to implant bonding can be achieved on PEEK in spite of its hydrophobic nature using a plasma-sprayed titanium coating. The plasma-sprayed titanium coating improved mechanical properties in the cortical sites and the histology in cortical and cancellous sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A residual granuloma in association with a dental implant.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Michael S; Chavali, Ramakiran V; Al-Naief, Nasser Said; Eleazer, Paul D

    2012-04-01

    At times, dental implants are placed into sites with a history of periapical pathology. Sometimes the infection is active, and other times the tooth may have been extracted years before implant placement. In either case, the possibility exists for long-term residual cysts or infections that can negatively impact the prognosis of the implant. In this case report, an implant is placed into a healed mandibular ridge several months after extraction of the tooth. A radiolucency was noted on routine radiographic examination 2 years later. Surgical inspection and histology revealed a periapical granuloma with acute and chronic inflammatory cells. After surgical curettage of the site, the patient healed without complication. Implants may develop apical pathology as a result of a preexisting long-term residual infection.

  4. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Predoctoral dental implant education at Creighton University School of Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Lawrence; Hunter, Richard; Kimmes, Nici; Wilcox, Charles; Nunn, Martha; Miyamoto, Takanari

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the dental implant education that predoctoral students receive and to characterize the patient population receiving implants at Creighton University School of Dentistry (CDS). CDS has no postdoctoral residency programs. Therefore, clinical management of diagnosis, treatment planning, surgical aspects, restoration, complications, and maintenance of dental implants requires significant involvement by predoctoral dental students. CDS implant education involves radiology diagnostic assets of the General Dentistry Department (including the use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography), as well as faculty and equipment from the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Periodontics, and Prosthodontics, with a majority of students satisfied with their didactic preparation for their clinical experiences. Focusing on a three-year window from August 2007 to August 2010 and using electronic health records, this study found that a total of 242 implants were placed, out of which six failed within one year of placement and had to be removed. The average age of the population of 153 patients was found to be 53.3 years, with a range of eighteen to eighty-nine. Treatment outcomes compared very favorably with those published in the literature.

  6. Reactive oral lesions associated with dental implants. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Atarbashi-Moghadam, Fazele; Atarbashi-Moghadam, Saede; Namdari, Mahshid; Shahrabi-Farahani, Shokoufeh

    2018-05-11

    Reactive lesion formation around dental implants a complication that has been given much consideration. These lesions can lead to marginal bone loss, and consequently, implant failure. In the present systematic review, all reported reactive lesions associated with dental implants in the literature were assessed. An electronic search was performed using PubMed Central, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Science Direct. The search strategy was limited to human studies (case reports and case series), full-text English language articles, published until May 2017. A total of 19 articles reporting 27 lesions in 25 cases were included. Peripheral giant cell granuloma and pyogenic granuloma were the most reactive lesions found around dental implants. The mean age of the patients was 51.28 ± 14.48 years, with a slight female predilection. Posterior mandibular gingiva was the most common location for these lesions. The recurrence rate of lesions was 33.33%, and the chance of implant removal was 29.62%. Due to the clinical significance of these lesions, early histopathologic examination is recommended to exclude the presence of such pathological lesions. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Gallium and silicon synergistically promote osseointegration of dental implant in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Wu, Zuosu; He, Hongli; Cai, Kaiyong; Zhang, Hualin; Xu, Lihua

    2017-06-01

    Over the last few decades, a wide variety of dental implants have been successfully placed in jaw bones to restore tooth function. But major challenges still remain in patients with osteoporosis involving compromised osseointegration, and the therapeutic methods is far from optimism. Gallium can directly inhibit bone osteolysis, prevent bone calcium release and augment bone mass, which makes Ga unique among the potential antiresorptive drugs. Silicon, as an indispensable modulator in bone formation, presents its bone anabolic effects, while reduces, at least doesn't increase, bone resorption. We hypothesize that the combination of bone anabolic effects of Si and antiresorptive effects of Ga will result in synergistic effects on the improvement of osteointegration under osteoporotic condition. In our strategy, in order to maximize the efficacy while minimize the side effects of ions, a novel titania mesoporous layer fabricated by electrochemical anodization on the surface of titanium implant will be employed as a promising local drug delivery system. The synergistic effects of Ga and Si on improving osseointegration will be verified by animal experiments, and be furthered by clinical trials. Our hypothesis could help to create an option to improve success rate of dental implants in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Determining the Young's modulus of a cellular titanium implant by FEM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginov, Yu. N.; Golodnov, A. I.; Stepanov, S. I.; Kovalev, E. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    The role of additive manufacturing is noted for the construction of titanium medical implants. The purpose of the study is to determine the Young's modulus of cellular titanium implants, which is based on calculations performed by finite element analysis. A honeycomb structure from intersecting cylinder surfaces is offered for the implant made of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Boundary conditions are stated for the loading of the implant structure. It is demonstrated that the Young's modulus can be reduced more than three times comparing to a solid titanium alloy. Zones of strain and stress localization located near the abutment of the cylindrical surfaces. Recommendations for the further improvement of the implant architecture are generated.

  9. A comparative study of zirconium and titanium implants in rat: osseointegration and bone material quality.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Rebecca M; Katunar, María R; Gomez Sanchez, Andrea; Orellano, Juan C; Ceré, Silvia M; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Ballarre, Josefina

    2014-02-01

    Permanent metal implants are widely used in human medical treatments and orthopedics, for example as hip joint replacements. They are commonly made of titanium alloys and beyond the optimization of this established material, it is also essential to explore alternative implant materials in view of improved osseointegration. The aim of our study was to characterize the implant performance of zirconium in comparison to titanium implants. Zirconium implants have been characterized in a previous study concerning material properties and surface characteristics in vitro, such as oxide layer thickness and surface roughness. In the present study, we compare bone material quality around zirconium and titanium implants in terms of osseointegration and therefore characterized bone material properties in a rat model using a multi-method approach. We used light and electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate the osseointegration in terms of compositional and structural properties of the newly formed bone. Regarding the mineralization level, the mineral composition, and the alignment and order of the mineral particles, our results show that the maturity of the newly formed bone after 8 weeks of implantation is already very high. In conclusion, the bone material quality obtained for zirconium implants is at least as good as for titanium. It seems that the zirconium implants can be a good candidate for using as permanent metal prosthesis for orthopedic treatments.

  10. Biomechanical Consequences of the Elastic Properties of Dental Implant Alloys on the Supporting Bone: Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chávarri-Prado, David; Jiménez-Garrudo, Antonio; Solaberrieta-Méndez, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Dehesa-Ibarra, Borja; Monticelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate how the elastic properties of the fabrication material of dental implants influence peri-implant bone load transfer in terms of the magnitude and distribution of stress and deformation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis was performed; the model used was a section of mandibular bone with a single implant containing a cemented ceramic-metal crown on a titanium abutment. The following three alloys were compared: rigid (Y-TZP), conventional (Ti-6Al-4V), and hyperelastic (Ti-Nb-Zr). A 150-N static load was tested on the central fossa at 6° relative to the axial axis of the implant. The results showed no differences in the distribution of stress and deformation of the bone for any of the three types of alloys studied, mainly being concentrated at the peri-implant cortical layer. However, there were differences found in the magnitude of the stress transferred to the supporting bone, with the most rigid alloy (Y-TZP) transferring the least stress and deformation to cortical bone. We conclude that there is an effect of the fabrication material of dental implants on the magnitude of the stress and deformation transferred to peri-implant bone. PMID:27995137

  11. Influence of different restorative materials on the stress distribution in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Datte, Carlos-Eduardo; Tribst, João-Paulo-Mendes; Dal Piva, Amanda-Maria-de Oliveira; Nishioka, Renato-Sussumu; Bottino, Marco-Antonio; Evangelhista, Alexandre-Duarte M; Monteiro, Fabrício M de M; Borges, Alexandre-Luiz-Souto

    2018-05-01

    To assist clinicians in deciding the most suitable restorative materials to be used in the crowns and abutment in implant rehabilitation. For finite element analysis (FEA), a regular morse taper implant was created using a computer aided design software. The implant was inserted at the bone model with 3 mm of exposed threads. An anatomic prosthesis representing a first maxillary molar was modeled and cemented on the solid abutment. Considering the crown material (zirconia, chromium-cobalt, lithium disilicate and hybrid ceramic) and abutment (Titanium and zirconia), the geometries were multiplied, totaling eight groups. In order to perform the static analysis, the contacts were considered bonded and each material was assigned as isotropic. An axial load (200 N) was applied on the crown and fixation occurred on the base of the bone. Results using Von-Mises criteria and micro strain values were obtained. A sample identical to the CAD model was made for the Strain Gauge (SG) analysis; four SGs were bonded around the implant to obtain micro strain results in bone tissue. FEA results were 3.83% lower than SG. According to the crown material, it is possible to note that the increase of elastic modulus reduces the stress concentration in all system without difference for bone. Crown materials with high elastic modulus are able to decrease the stress values in the abutments while concentrates the stress in its structure. Zirconia abutments tend to concentrate more stress throughout the prosthetic system and may be more susceptible to mechanical problems than titanium. Key words: Finite element analysis, dental implants, ceramic.

  12. A light and scanning electron microscopic evaluation of electro-discharge-compacted porous titanium implants in rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Drummond, J F; Dominici, J T; Sammon, P J; Okazaki, K; Geissler, R; Lifland, M I; Anderson, S A; Renshaw, W

    1995-01-01

    This study used light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) histomorphometric methods to quantitate the rate of osseointegration of totally porous titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) implants prepared by a novel fabrication technique--electrodischarge compaction (EDC). EDC was used to fuse 150-250-micrometer spherical titanium alloy beads into 4 X 6 mm cylindrical implants through application of a 300-microsecond pulse of high-voltage/high-current density. Two sterilized implants were surgically placed into each tibia of 20 New Zealand white rabbits and left in situ for periods corresponding to 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. At each time point, 4 rabbits were humanely killed, and the implants with surrounding bone were removed, fixed, and sectioned for light and SEM studies. The degree of osseointegration was quantitated by means of a True Grid Digitizing Pad and Jandel Scan Version 3.9 software on an IBM PS/2 computer. The total pore area occupied by bone was divided by the total pore area available for bone ingrowth, and a Bone Ingrowth Factor (BIF) was calculated as a percent. The light microscopic results showed BIFs of 4% at week 2, 47% at week 4, 62% at week 8, 84% at week 12, and greater than 90% at week 24. The SEM results showed BIFs of 5% at week 2, 34% at week 4, 69% at week 8, 75% at week 12, and in excess of 90% at week 24. The results of this study show that EDC implants are biocompatible and support rapid osseointegration in the rabbit tibia and suggest that, after additional studies, they may be suitable for use as dental implants in humans.

  13. A new device for improving dental implants anchorage: a histological and micro-computed tomography study in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo; Neuman, Moshe; Iezzi, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano; Perrotti, Vittoria; Gabet, Yankel

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, a new healing cap that could generate a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) around titanium implants to stimulate peri-implant osteogenesis was tested in the rabbit model. A total of 22 implants were inserted in the proximal tibial metaphysis of 22 rabbits. A healing cap containing the active device was inserted in half of the implants (11 test implants); an "empty" healing cap was inserted in the other ones (11 control implants). The animals were euthanized after 2 and 4 weeks, and the samples were processed for micro-computed tomography and histology. The peri-implant volume was divided into coronal (where the PEMF was the strongest) and apical regions. Most of the effects of the tested device were confined to the coronal region. Two weeks post-implantation, test implants showed a significant 56% higher trabecular bone fraction (BV/TV), associated with enhanced trabecular number (Tb.N, +37%) and connectivity density (Conn.D, +73%) as compared to the control group; at 4 weeks, the PEMF induced a 69% increase in BV/TV and 34% increase of Tb.N. There was no difference in the trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) at either time point. Furthermore, we observed a 48% higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC) in the test implants vs. controls after 2 weeks; this increase tended to remain stable until the fourth week. Mature trabecular and woven bone were observed in direct contact with the implant surface with no gaps or connective tissue at the bone-implant interface. These results indicate that the PEMF device stimulated early bone formation around dental implants resulting in higher peri-implant BIC and bone mass already after 2 weeks which suggests an acceleration of the osseointegration process by more than three times. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Design optimization of a radial functionally graded dental implant.

    PubMed

    Ichim, Paul I; Hu, Xiaozhi; Bazen, Jennifer J; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use FEA to test the hypothesis that a low-modulus coating of a cylindrical zirconia dental implant would reduce the stresses in the peri-implant bone and we use design optimization and the rule of mixture to estimate the elastic modulus and the porosity of the coating that provides optimal stress shielding. We show that a low-modulus coating of a dental implant significantly reduces the maximum stresses in the peri-implant bone without affecting the average stresses thus creating a potentially favorable biomechanical environment. Our results suggest that a resilient coating is capable of reducing the maximum compressive and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 50% and the average stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 15%. We further show that a transitional gradient between the high-modulus core and the low-modulus coating is not necessary and for a considered zirconia/HA composite the optimal thickness of the coating is 100 µ with its optimal elastic at the lowest value considered of 45 GPa. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fatigue failure of dental implants in simulated intraoral media.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    Metallic dental implants are exposed to various intraoral environments and repetitive loads during service. Relatively few studies have systematically addressed the potential influence of the environment on the mechanical integrity of the implants, which is therefore the subject of this study. Four media (groups) were selected for room temperature testing, namely dry air, saliva substitute, same with 250ppm of fluoride, and saline solution (0.9%). Monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were loaded until fracture, using random spectrum loading. The study reveals that the only aggressive medium of all is the saline solution, as it shortens significantly the spectrum fatigue life of the implants. The quantitative scanning electron fractographic analysis indicates that all the tested implants grew fatigue cracks of similar lengths prior to catastrophic fracture. However, the average crack growth rate in the saline medium was found to largely exceed that in other media, suggesting a decreased fracture toughness. The notion of a characteristic timescale for environmental degradation was proposed to explain the results of our spectrum tests that blend randomly low and high cycle fatigue. Random spectrum fatigue testing is powerful technique to assess and compare the mechanical performance of dental implants for various designs and/or environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predoctoral Dental Students' Perceptions of Dental Implant Training: Effect of Preclinical Simulation and Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Bansal, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to assess 1) differences in perceptions of dental implant training between dental students who received didactic training alone (control group) and those who received didactic plus simulation training (test group); 2) differences in response between students with and without clinical experience in implant dentistry; and 3) the interaction effect of simulation training and clinical experience on students' satisfaction. A survey was distributed to the control group in 2014 and to the test group in 2015; both groups were at the same U.S. dental school. Data were collected on confidence levels with various implant restorative procedures along with overall satisfaction and number of implant restorations performed by each student. The response rate was 78.7% in the control group and 81.3% in the test group. In the control group, 85.7% of students reported being satisfied with implant training compared to 90.8% of students in the test group. The interaction effect of simulation training and clinical experience on overall student satisfaction was OR=1.5 at 95% CI: 0.8, 3.0. The students who had clinical experience with implant restorative procedures had significantly greater satisfaction than those who did not (OR=4.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 11.1, p<0.01). This study found that both the simulation and clinical experience affected these students' confidence and satisfaction levels with implant education: they were almost five times more satisfied with implant training when clinical experience in implant restorative procedures was a part of their implant education.

  17. Dental implants in patients with ectodermal dysplasia: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos

    2018-05-21

    This study sought to assess the clinical outcome and survival rate of oral implants placed in individuals with ectodermal dysplasia (ED), based on previously published studies. An electronic search without time restrictions was undertaken in 5 databases (PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, J-Stage, Lilacs). Descriptive statistics, Kaplan Meier estimator and implant failure probability were calculated. 90 publications were included, reporting 228 ED patients that received 1472 implants (1392 conventional, 47 zygomatic, 33 mini-implants). Mean age of the patients was 20.2 ± 6.8 years (2-56). Patients had a mean of 3.2 ± 2.5 maxillary and 2.1 ± 2.6 mandibular permanent teeth (min-max, 0-14). Patients received a mean of 8.2 ± 3.8 implants (1-20). Most implants were placed in the third decade of life, 24.6% of the implants were placed in children (0-17 years of age). 1391 implants had information on follow-up (72 failures, 5.2%). The 20-year CSR was 84.6%. The probability of failure was 4.5% (95%CI 3.5%-5.6%, p < 0.001). Additional treatments performed were Le Fort I (99 implants, 20 patients, 3.5% failed), grafting (497 implants, 77 patients, 5.2% failed), distraction osteogenesis (79 implants, 16 patients, 10.1% failed). Mean follow-up was 42.9 ± 41.9 months (min-max, 2-240). Dental implants placed in ED patients, either infants or adults, present a high survival rate (20-year CSR 84.6%). Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of implant diameter in the displacement of dental implants in trabecular bovine bone under a static lateral load: experimental results and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Wilfried; Decco, Oscar A; Cura, Andrea C; Maldonado, Isai; Crippa, Federico G

    2014-12-01

    Primary stability and micromovement of dental implants depend on structural properties of the surrounding bone and on implant dimension and design. The purpose of this study was to provide objective data for the influence of implant diameter on the displacement of titanium screw implants. Ninety Semados implants (length 15 mm, diameter 3.25, 3.75, and 4.5 mm; Bego, Bremen, Germany) were inserted in trabecular bone specimens. All implants were inserted with a torque up to 30 N·cm and loaded horizontally with 10, 20, and 30 N for 2 seconds. All implants showed primary stability. With increasing force, a gradual increase of micromovement was observed (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.000). No significant differences were found (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.148) comparing different diameters for every force. Variation of the diameter of standard implants between 3.25 and 4.5 mm does not seem to influence the primary stability in trabecular bone specimen. Differences between experimental and computational results may be due to the simplification used when modeling.

  19. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  20. Electromagnetic interference of dental equipment with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Dadalti, Manoela Teixeira de Sant'Anna; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves; Araújo, Marcos César Pimenta de; Moraes, Luis Gustavo Belo de; Risso, Patrícia de Andrade

    2017-11-01

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI). The aim of this study was to assess both the EMI of dental equipments with ICDs and related factors. High- and low-speed handpieces, an electric toothbrush, an implant motor and two types of ultrasonic devices were tested next to an ICD with different sensitivity settings. The ICD was immersed in a saline solution with electrical resistance of 400-800 ohms to simulate the resistance of the human body. The dental equipments were tested in both horizontal (0°) and vertical (90°) positions in relation to the components of the ICD. The tests were performed with a container containing saline solution, which was placed on a dental chair in order to assess the cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields. The dental chair, high- and low-speed handpieces, electric toothbrush, implant motor and ultrasonic devices caused no EMI with the ICD, irrespective of the program set-up or positioning. No cumulative effect of electromagnetic fields was verified. The results of this study suggest that the devices tested are safe for use in patients with an ICD.

  1. Electrical characteristic of the titanium mesh electrode for transcutaneous intrabody communication to monitor implantable artificial organs.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a tissue-inducing electrode using titanium mesh to obtain mechanically and electrically stable contact with the tissue for a new transcutaneous communication system using the human body as a conductive medium. In this study, we investigated the electrical properties of the titanium mesh electrode by measuring electrode-tissue interface resistance in vivo. The titanium mesh electrode (Hi-Lex Co., Zellez, Hyogo, Japan) consisted of titanium fibers (diameter of 50 μm), and it has an average pore size of 200 μm and 87 % porosity. The titanium mesh electrode has a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm. Three titanium mesh electrodes were implanted separately into the dorsal region of the rat. We measured the electrode-electrode impedance using an LCR meter for 12 weeks, and we calculated the tissue resistivity and electrode-tissue interface resistance. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode decreased slightly until the third POD and then continuously increased to 75 Ω. The electrode-tissue interface resistance of the titanium mesh electrode is stable and it has lower electrode-tissue interface resistance than that of a titanium disk electrode. The extracted titanium mesh electrode after 12 weeks implantation was fixed in 10 % buffered formalin solution and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Light microscopic observation showed that the titanium mesh electrode was filled with connective tissue, inflammatory cells and fibroblasts with some capillaries in the pores of the titanium mesh. The results indicate that the titanium mesh electrode is a promising electrode for the new transcutaneous communication system.

  2. Effect of surface treatment on unalloyed titanium implants: spectroscopic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kilpadi, D V; Raikar, G N; Liu, J; Lemons, J E; Vohra, Y; Gregory, J C

    1998-06-15

    Surgical implant finishing and sterilization procedures were investigated to determine surface characteristics of unalloyed titanium (Ti). All specimens initially were cleaned with phosphoric acid and divided into five groups for comparisons of different surface treatments (C = cleaned as above, no further treatment; CP = C and passivated in nitric acid; CPS = CP and dry-heat sterilized; CPSS = CPS and resterilized; CS = C and dry-heat sterilized). Auger (AES), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), and Raman spectroscopic methods were used to examine surface compositions. The surface oxides formed by all treatments primarily were TiO2, with some Ti2O3 and possibly TiO. Significant concentrations of carbonaceous substances also were observed. The cleaning procedure alone resulted in residual phosphorus, primarily as phosphate groups along with some hydrogen phosphates. A higher percentage of physisorbed water appeared to be associated with the phosphorus. Passivation (with HNO3) alone removed phosphorus from the surface; specimens sterilized without prior passivation showed the thickest oxide and phosphorus profiles, suggesting that passivation alters the oxide characteristics either directly by altering the oxide structure or indirectly by removing moieties that alter the oxide. Raman spectroscopy showed no crystalline order in the oxide. Carbon, oxygen, phosphorus, and nitrogen presence were found to correlate with previously determined surface energy.

  3. [Study on antibacterial properties and osteoblast activity of antimicrobial peptide coatings on titanium implants].

    PubMed

    Sun, F Q; Li, M Q; Peng, S H; Zhang, H M; Liu, M; Qu, X Y

    2018-06-09

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial property and biological activity of Ti dental implant with antimicrobial peptide Pac-525 coatings, and to study the effect of peptide Pac-525 coatings on Porphyromonas gingivalis 's antibacterial performance and osteoblast proliferation and adhesion. Methods: After ultrasonic micro arc oxidation, alkali treatment and silane treatment, forty-five pure titanium specimens were exposed to antibacterial peptide Pac-525 in different concentration (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 g/L). The titanium specimens in the control group were only treated with ultrasonic micro arc oxidation, alkali treatment and silane treatment. The morphologies of coatings were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the element changes were detected by energy spectrum analyzer. Orange acridine-ethidium bromide double staining was used to detect the average percentage of live bacteria and biofilm thickness, after the specimens in each group and Porphyromonas gingivalis were co-cultured for 72 hours. Cell counting Kit-8 method and immunofluorescence staining were used to test the proliferation of osteoblasts, the number and growth morphologies of adherent cells, respectively. Results: SEM and energy spectrum analysis showed that the Pac-525 particles loaded on the surface of the coating, and the C and N elements in the Pac-525 coating group were significantly more than those in the control group. The average percentage of living bacteria in the control group, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 g/L antimicrobial peptides were 0.58%, 0.45%, 0.34% and 0.28%, respectively, and the difference between each group was statistically significant ( P< 0.05). The biofilm thickness of Porphyromonas gingivalis in 0.50 and 0.75 g/L antibacterial peptide group were (98.3±1.2) and (94.5±2.5) μm respectively, which were significantly less than those in control group and 0.25 g/L antibacterial peptide group [(117.6±1.5) and (118.0±1.3) μm] ( P< 0.05), respectively. The number of bone

  4. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber; Mulier, Michiel; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of a navigation system for dental implantation as a tool to train novice dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Casap, Nardy; Nadel, Sahar; Tarazi, Eyal; Weiss, Ervin I

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of a virtual reality navigation system for teaching the surgical stage of dental implantation to final-year dental students. The study aimed to assess the students' performance in dental implantation assignments by comparing freehand protocols with virtual reality navigation. Forty final-year dentistry students without previous experience in dental implantation surgery were given an implantation assignment comprising 3 tasks. Marking, drilling, and widening of implant holes were executed by a freehand protocol on the 2 mandibular sides by 1 group and by virtual reality navigation on 1 side and contralaterally with the freehand protocol by the other group. Subjective and objective assessments of the students' performance were graded. Marking with the navigation system was more accurate than with the standard protocol. The 2 groups performed similarly in the 2-mm drilling on the 2 mandibular sides. Widening of the 2 mesial holes to 3 mm was significantly better with the second execution in the standard protocol group, but not in the navigation group. The navigation group's second-site freehand drilling of the molar was significantly worse than the first. The execution of all assignments was significantly faster in the freehand group than in the navigation group (60.75 vs 77.25 minutes, P = .02). Self-assessment only partly matched the objective measurements and was more realistic in the standard protocol group. Despite the improved performance with the navigation system, the added value of training in dental implantation surgery with virtual reality navigation was minimal. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Success and High Predictability of Intraorally Welded Titanium Bar in the Immediate Loading Implants

    PubMed Central

    Fogli, Vaniel; Camerini, Michele; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The implants failure may be caused by micromotion and stress exerted on implants during the phase of bone healing. This concept is especially true in case of implants placed in atrophic ridges. So the primary stabilization and fixation of implants are an important goal that can also allow immediate loading and oral rehabilitation on the same day of surgery. This goal may be achieved thanks to the technique of welding titanium bars on implant abutments. In fact, the procedure can be performed directly in the mouth eliminating possibility of errors or distortions due to impression. This paper describes a case report and the most recent data about long-term success and high predictability of intraorally welded titanium bar in immediate loading implants. PMID:24963419

  7. The effects of implant angulation on the resonance frequency of a dental implant.

    PubMed

    Harirforoush, R; Arzanpour, S; Chehroudi, B

    2014-08-01

    Dental implants are ideally placed in an orientation that allows vertical transfer of occlusal forces along their long axis. Nevertheless, optimal situations for implant placement are seldom encountered resulting in implants placement in angulated positions, which may affect their long-term success. The resonance frequency (RF) is an objective tool used to monitor stability of the implant tissue integration; however, little is known of the effect of the implant orientation in bone on the RF and its potential significance. The purpose of this research was to determine the relation between the dental implant orientation and the corresponding RF of implant. Three-dimensional (3D) modelling software was used to construct a 3D model of a pig mandible from computed tomography (CT) images. The RF of the implant was analysed using finite element (FE) modal analysis in software ANSYS (v.12). In addition, a cubical model was also developed in MIMICS to investigate the parameters affecting the relationship between RF and implant orientation in a simplified environment. The orientation angle was increased from 0 to 10 degrees in 1 degree increments and the resulting RF was analysed using correlation analysis and one-way ANOVA. Our analysis illustrated that the RF fluctuation following altering implant orientation was strongly correlated (r=0.97) with the contacting cortical to cancellous bone ratio (CCBR) at the implant interface. The most extreme RF change (from 9.81kHz to 10.07kHz) occurred when the implant was moved 0.5mm in positive z-direction, which resulted in the maximum change of CCBR from 52.9 to 54.8. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Cellular Responses Evoked by Different Surface Characteristics of Intraosseous Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Liviu; Jadwat, Yusuf; Khammissa, Razia A. G.; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The properties of biomaterials, including their surface microstructural topography and their surface chemistry or surface energy/wettability, affect cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The nanotopography of moderately rough implant surfaces enhances the production of biological mediators in the peri-implant microenvironment with consequent recruitment of differentiating osteogenic cells to the implant surface and stimulates osteogenic maturation. Implant surfaces with moderately rough topography and with high surface energy promote osteogenesis, increase the ratio of bone-to-implant contact, and increase the bonding strength of the bone to the implant at the interface. Certain features of implant surface chemistry are also important in enhancing peri-implant bone wound healing. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the more important features of titanium implant surfaces which have an impact on osseointegration. PMID:25767803

  9. Outcomes of Cranioplasty with Preformed Titanium versus Freehand Molded Polymethylmethacrylate Implants.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Julius; Werzmirzowsky, Korbinian; Ott, Christian; Hohenberger, Christoph; Hassanin, Bahaa Ghareb; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2018-05-01

     Cranioplasty reshapes the neurocranium and viscerocranium after craniectomy. Different materials have been used for cranioplasty. However, no consistent data are yet available comparing these different materials regarding indications, complications, and outcome. We report our experience with preformed titanium implants and freehand molded polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implants for cranioplasty.  This retrospective single-center analysis included 120 consecutive cranioplasty patients who had been operated between 2006 and 2013. A total of 60 patients (27 women, 33 men; mean age: 54 years) had received a preformed titanium implant and 60 patients (22 women, 38 men; mean age: 46 years) a freehand molded PMMA implant. We evaluated all demographic and procedure-related data, indications, and outcome. The longest follow-up was 5.5 years.  The most frequent indications for cranioplasty were trauma ( n  = 48 [40%]), malignant infarction ( n  = 27 [23%]), tumor ( n  = 22 [18%]), spontaneous intracerebral or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage ( n  = 16 [13%]), revision surgery ( n  = 5 [4%]), and empyema ( n  = 2 [2%]). PMMA implants were more often associated with wound-healing disorders ( p  < 0.023; odds ratio [OR]: 10.53) and epidural hematoma ( p  < 0.03; OR: 8.46), resulting in a significantly higher re-operation rate ( p  < 0.005). Precise fitting was radiologically confirmed in 98% of titanium implants but in only 71% of PMMA implants ( p  < 0.001). Magnetic resonance imaging of patients with titanium implants ( n  = 4) did not show any relevant artifacts.  Cranioplasty with preformed titanium implants seems to be superior to freehand molded PMMA implants regarding surgical morbidity, revision rate, and aesthetic results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Comparison of mechanical and biological properties of zirconia and titanium alloy orthodontic micro-implants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae Won; Park, Young Seok; Chung, Shin Hye; Jung, Min Ho; Moon, Won; Rhee, Sang Hoon

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial stability as insertion and removal torque and the clinical applicability of novel orthodontic zirconia micro-implants made using a powder injection molding (PIM) technique with those parameters in conventional titanium micro-implants. Sixty zirconia and 60 titanium micro-implants of similar design (diameter, 1.6 mm; length, 8.0 mm) were inserted perpendicularly in solid polyurethane foam with varying densities of 20 pounds per cubic foot (pcf), 30 pcf, and 40 pcf. Primary stability was measured as maximum insertion torque (MIT) and maximum removal torque (MRT). To investigate clinical applicability, compressive and tensile forces were recorded at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03 mm displacement of the implants at angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40°. The biocompatibility of zirconia micro-implants was assessed via an experimental animal study. There were no statistically significant differences between zirconia micro-implants and titanium alloy implants with regard to MIT, MRT, or the amount of movement in the angulated lateral displacement test. As angulation increased, the mean compressive and tensile forces required to displace both types of micro-implants increased substantially at all distances. The average bone-to-implant contact ratio of prototype zirconia micro-implants was 56.88 ± 6.72%. Zirconia micro-implants showed initial stability and clinical applicability for diverse orthodontic treatments comparable to that of titanium micro-implants under compressive and tensile forces.

  11. Mathematical filtering minimizes metallic halation of titanium implants in MicroCT images.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jee; Osher, Stanley J; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography (MicroCT) images containing titanium implant suffer from x-rays scattering, artifact and the implant surface is critically affected by metallic halation. To improve the metallic halation artifact, a nonlinear Total Variation denoising algorithm such as Split Bregman algorithm was applied to the digital data set of MicroCT images. This study demonstrated that the use of a mathematical filter could successfully reduce metallic halation, facilitating the osseointegration evaluation at the bone implant interface in the reconstructed images.

  12. Primary Stability of Zirconium vs Titanium Implants: An In Vitro Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-05

    Zirconia implant and 4x11.5 Titanium implant placed in artificial bone ( polyurethane foam ) at .08 rotations /sec…………………………………28   viii...measurements as they relate to primary Implant Stability. Artificial Bone made of solid ridged polyurethane foam was used as an alternative test...30 pound per cubic foot solid rigid polyurethane blocks used to substitute human cancellous bone

  13. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Arnau, Amparo; Vallecillo-Capilla, Manuel-Francisco; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Material and Methods Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls(p<0.05) tests. Results Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. Conclusions The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use. Key words:Implants for clinical use, topography, confocal microscopy. PMID:27475680

  14. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  15. Evaluation of possible prognostic factors for the success, survival, and failure of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Geckili, Onur; Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Esma; Cilingir, Altug; Mumcu, Emre; Bural, Canan

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the prognostic factors that are associated with the success, survival, and failure rates of dental implants. Data including implant sizes, insertion time, implant location, and prosthetic treatment of 1656 implants have been collected, and the association of these factors with success, survival, and failure of implants was analyzed. The success rate was lower for short and maxillary implants. The failure rate of maxillary implants exceeded that of mandibular implants, and the failure rate of implants that were placed in the maxillary anterior region was significantly higher than other regions. The failure rates of implants that were placed 5 years ago or more were higher than those that were placed later. Anterior maxilla is more critical for implant loss than other sites. Implants in the anterior mandible show better success compared with other locations, and longer implants show better success rates. The learning curve of the clinician influences survival and success rates of dental implants.

  16. Titanium tetrafluoride and dental caries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rubiane Diógenes; Souza, Tatyana Maria Silva de; Lima, Kenio Costa de

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of titanium tetrafluoride as a preventive or cariostatic agent against caries. The databases used to find the articles analyzed were MEDLINE LILACS, and BBO. In MEDLINE and LILACS the search strategy utilized was "titanium" [Words] and "tetrafluoride" [Words] and Spanish or English or Portuguese [Language], whereas In BBO "titânio" [Words] and "tetrafluoreto" [Words] and Espanhol or Inglês or Português [Language]. Out of a total of 42 studies found, which assessed possible preventive/cariostatic effects of titanium tetrafluoride against caries in vivo, only 2 were selected. In both studies, titanium tetrafluoride was shown to be effective against caries. However, given that the quality and consequently the validity of these two clinical studies are questionable, their results do not allow to conclude that titanium tetrafluoride is effective against caries clinically.

  17. Biofilm formation on titanium implants counteracted by grafting gallium and silver ions.

    PubMed

    Cochis, Andrea; Azzimonti, Barbara; Della Valle, Cinzia; Chiesa, Roberto; Arciola, Carla Renata; Rimondini, Lia

    2015-03-01

    Biofilm-associated infections remain the leading cause of implant failure. Thanks to its established biocompatibility and biomechanical properties, titanium has become one of the most widely used materials for bone implants. Engineered surface modifications of titanium able to thwart biofilm formation while endowing a safe anchorage to eukaryotic cells are being progressively developed. Here surfaces of disks of commercial grade 2 titanium for bone implant were grafted with gallium and silver ions by anodic spark deposition. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface morphology and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for characterization. Gallium-grafted titanium was evaluated in comparison with silver-grafted titanium for both in vivo and in vitro antibiofilm properties and for in vitro compatibility with human primary gingival fibroblasts. Surface-modified materials showed: (i) homogeneous porous morphology, with pores of micrometric size; (ii) absence of cytotoxic effects; (iii) ability to support in vitro the adhesion and spreading of gingival fibroblasts; and (iv) antibiofilm properties. Although both silver and gallium exhibited in vitro strong antibacterial properties, in vivo gallium was significantly more effective than silver in reducing number and viability of biofilm bacteria colonies. Gallium-based treatments represent promising titanium antibiofilm coatings to develop new bone implantable devices for oral, maxillofacial, and orthopedic applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mechanics of the tapered interference fit in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Dinçer; Müftü, Sinan

    2003-11-01

    In evaluation of the long-term success of a dental implant, the reliability and the stability of the implant-abutment interface plays a great role. Tapered interference fits provide a reliable connection method between the abutment and the implant. In this work, the mechanics of the tapered interference fits were analyzed using a closed-form formula and the finite element (FE) method. An analytical solution, which is used to predict the contact pressure in a straight interference, was modified to predict the contact pressure in the tapered implant-abutment interface. Elastic-plastic FE analysis was used to simulate the implant and abutment material behavior. The validity and the applicability of the analytical solution were investigated by comparisons with the FE model for a range of problem parameters. It was shown that the analytical solution could be used to determine the pull-out force and loosening-torque with 5-10% error. Detailed analysis of the stress distribution due to tapered interference fit, in a commercially available, abutment-implant system was carried out. This analysis shows that plastic deformation in the implant limits the increase in the pull-out force that would have been otherwise predicted by higher interference values.

  19. Custom Titanium Ridge Augmentation Matrix (CTRAM): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Connors, Christopher A; Liacouras, Peter C; Grant, Gerald T

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a custom titanium ridge augmentation matrix (CTRAM). Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a custom titanium space-maintaining device was developed. Alveolar ridges were virtually augmented, a matrix was virtually designed, and the CTRAM was additively manufactured with titanium (Ti6Al4V). Two cases are presented that resulted in sufficient increased horizontal bone volume with successful dental implant placement. The CTRAM design allows for preoperative planning for increasing alveolar ridge dimensions to support dental implants, reduces surgical time, and prevents the need for a second surgical site to gain sufficient alveolar ridge bone volume for dental implant therapy.

  20. The Key Points of Maintenance Therapy for Dental Implants: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Pirc, Miha; Dragan, Irina F

    2017-04-01

    Dental implants require lifelong maintenance and care. Success is defined by biologic factors (presence of inflamed soft tissues surrounding dental implants and radiographic changes in the crestal bone levels) and mechanical factors (stability of the implant fixture and implant supported restoration, etc). Most implant failures are initiated by incipient stages of inflammatory processes, which lead to peri-mucositis and peri-implantitis. The evidence regarding the value of maintenance protocol regarding implants is sparse compared with the one for teeth. This article addresses the existing literature on processes for oral hygiene for implant care.

  1. Long-term Survival of Straumann Dental Implants with TPS Surfaces: A Retrospective Study with a Follow-up of 12 to 23 Years.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephan T; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E; Rossmann, Christian M; Behrens, Eleonore; Jochens, Arne; Wiltfang, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term dental implant survival rates of Straumann dental implants in a university hospital environment over 12 to 23 years. A total of 388 Straumann dental implants with titanium-sprayed surfaces (TPS) were inserted in 92 patients between 1988 and 1999 in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel, and they were reevaluated with standardized clinical and radiological exams. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed for individual factors. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was used to detect the factors influencing long-term implant failure. The long-term implant survival rate was 88.03% after an observation time of 12.2 to 23.5 years. Cox regression revealed statistically significant influences of the International Team for Implantology (ITI) implantation type (p = .00354) and tobacco smoking (p = .01264) on implant failure. A proportion 82.8% of the patients with implant losses had a medical history of periodontitis. Peri-implantitis was diagnosed in 9.7% of the remaining implants in the long-term survey. This study emphasized the long-term rehabilitation capabilities of Straumann dental implants in complex cases. The survival rates after several years constitute important information for patients, as well as for clinicians, in deciding about different concepts of tooth replacement. Patient-related and technical factors - determined before implant placement - could help to predict the risk of implant loss. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Systemic Assessment of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgeries: A Trans- and Post-operative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Byakodi, Sanjay; Kumar, Sachin; Reddy, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Vipin; Sepolia, Shipra; Gupta, Shivangi; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2017-01-01

    Procedure-related and patient-related factors influence the prognosis of dental implants to a major extent. Hence, we aimed to evaluate and analyze various systemic factors in patients receiving dental implants. Fifty-one patients were included in the study, in which a total of 110 dental implants were placed. Complete examination of the subjects was done before and after placement of dental implants. Implant surgery was planned, and osseointegrated dental implants were placed in the subjects. Postoperative evaluation of the dental implant patients was done after 3 weeks. Anxiety levels were determined using State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaire on the surgery day and after 1 week of surgery. The participant describes how they feel at the moment by responding to twenty items as follows: (1) absolutely not, (2) slightly, (3) somewhat, or (4) very much. All the results were recorded and statistical analyzed by SPSS software. Out of 51, 29 patients were males while 22 were females, with ratio of 1.32:1. Female patients' mean age was 50.18 years while male patients' mean age was 52.71 years, with statistically nonsignificant difference between them. Functional rehabilitation was the main purpose of choosing dental implants in more than 90% of the subjects. Diameter of 3.75 mm was the shortest implants to be placed in the present study, whereas in terms of length, 8.5 mm was the shortest length of dental implant used in the present study. Tooth area in which maximum implants were placed in our study was 36 tooth region. Maximum implants were placed in Type II bone quality ( n = 38). Implants installed in the mandible were clamped more efficiently than implants placed in the maxilla ( P < 0.001). The difference of average STAI-State subscore before and after the surgery was statistically significant ( P < 0.05; significant). Mandibular dental implants show more clamping (torque) than maxillary dental implants.

  3. Optimally oriented grooves on dental implants improve bone quality around implants under repetitive mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Nakano, Takayoshi; Ishimoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Muneteru; Inoue, Maaya; Yasutake, Munenori; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-01-15

    The aim was to investigate the effect of groove designs on bone quality under controlled-repetitive load conditions for optimizing dental implant design. Anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with -60° and +60° grooves around the neck were placed in the proximal tibial metaphysis of rabbits. The application of a repetitive mechanical load was initiated via the implants (50N, 3Hz, 1800 cycles, 2days/week) at 12weeks after surgery for 8weeks. Bone quality, defined as osteocyte density and degree of biological apatite (BAp) c-axis/collagen fibers, was then evaluated. Groove designs did not affect bone quality without mechanical loading; however, repetitive mechanical loading significantly increased bone-to-implant contact, bone mass, and bone mineral density (BMD). In +60° grooves, the BAp c-axis/collagen fibers preferentially aligned along the groove direction with mechanical loading. Moreover, osteocyte density was significantly higher both inside and in the adjacent region of the +60° grooves, but not -60° grooves. These results suggest that the +60° grooves successfully transmitted the load to the bone tissues surrounding implants through the grooves. An optimally oriented groove structure on the implant surface was shown to be a promising way for achieving bone tissue with appropriate bone quality. This is the first report to propose the optimal design of grooves on the necks of dental implants for improving bone quality parameters as well as BMD. The findings suggest that not only BMD, but also bone quality, could be a useful clinical parameter in implant dentistry. Although the paradigm of bone quality has shifted from density-based assessments to structural evaluations of bone, clarifying bone quality based on structural bone evaluations remains challenging in implant dentistry. In this study, we firstly demonstrated that the optimal design of dental implant necks improved bone quality defined as osteocytes and the preferential alignment degree of biological

  4. Intraoral radiographs texture analysis for dental implant planning.

    PubMed

    Mundim, Mayara B V; Dias, Danilo R; Costa, Ronaldo M; Leles, Cláudio R; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo M; Ribeiro-Rotta, Rejane F

    2016-11-01

    Computer vision extracts features or attributes from images improving diagnosis accuracy and aiding in clinical decisions. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using texture analysis of periapical radiograph images as a tool for dental implant treatment planning. Periapical radiograph images of 127 jawbone sites were obtained before and after implant placement. From the superimposition of the pre- and post-implant images, four regions of interest (ROI) were delineated on the pre-implant images for each implant site: mesial, distal and apical peri-implant areas and a central area. Each ROI was analysed using Matlab® software and seven image attributes were extracted: mean grey level (MGL), standard deviation of grey levels (SDGL), coefficient of variation (CV), entropy (En), contrast, correlation (Cor) and angular second moment (ASM). Images were grouped by bone types-Lekholm and Zarb classification (1,2,3,4). Peak insertion torque (PIT) and resonance frequency analysis (RFA) were recorded during implant placement. Differences among groups were tested for each image attribute. Agreement between measurements of the peri-implant ROIs and overall ROI (peri-implant + central area) was tested, as well as the association between primary stability measures (PIT and RFA) and texture attributes. Differences among bone type groups were found for MGL (p = 0.035), SDGL (p = 0.024), CV (p < 0.001) and En (p < 0.001). The apical ROI showed a significant difference from the other regions for all attributes, except Cor. Concordance correlation coefficients were all almost perfect (ρ > 0.93), except for ASM (ρ = 0.62). Texture attributes were significantly associated with the implant stability measures. Texture analysis of periapical radiographs may be a reliable non-invasive quantitative method for the assessment of jawbone and prediction of implant stability, with potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  5. Titanium versus zirconia implants supporting maxillary overdentures: three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Reham B; Elkhadem, Amr H; Ma, Sunyoung; Swain, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the stress and strain occurring in peri-implant bone and implants used to support maxillary overdentures. Three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) was used to compare one-piece zirconia and titanium implants. Two types of implants were simulated using a 3D FEA model: one-piece zirconia and titanium implants (diameter, 3.8 × 11.5 mm) with 2.25-mm diameter ball abutments. In each simulation four implants were placed bilaterally in the canine/premolar region of an edentulous maxillary model. Static loads were applied axially and 20 degrees buccolingually on the buccal slope of the lingual cusps of posterior teeth of the first quadrant. Von Mises stresses and equivalent strains generated in peri-implant bone and first principal stresses in the implants were calculated. Comparable stress and strain values were shown in the peri-implant bone for both types of implants. The maximum equivalent strain produced in the peri-implant region was mostly within the range for bone augmentation. Under oblique loading, maximum von Mises stresses and equivalent strain were more evident at the neck of the most distal implant on the loaded side. Under axial load, the stress and strain were transferred to the peri-implant bone around the apex of the implant. Maximum tensile stresses that developed for either material were well below their fracture strength. The highest stresses were mainly located at the distobuccal region of the neck for the two implant materials under both loading conditions. From a biomechanical point of view, ceramic implants made from yttrium-stabilized tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia may be a potential alternative to conventional titanium implants for the support of overdentures. This is particularly relevant for a select group of patients with a proven allergy to titanium. Prospective clinical studies are still required to confirm these in vitro results. Different simulations presenting various cortical bone

  6. Are clinical findings of systemic titanium dispersion following implantation explained by available in vitro evidence? An evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Justin Paul; Wang, Minji

    2017-08-01

    Although the presence of titanium wear particles released into tissues is known to induce local inflammation following the therapeutic implantation of titanium devices into humans, the role that titanium ions play in adverse tissue responses has received little attention. Support that ongoing titanium ion release occurs is evidenced by the presence of ionic titanium bound to transferrin in blood, and ongoing excretion in the urine of patients with titanium devices. However, as reports documenting the presence of titanium within tissues do not distinguish between particulate and ionic forms due to technical challenges, the degree to which ionic titanium is released into tissues is unknown. To determine the potential for titanium ion release into tissues, this study evaluates available in vitro evidence relating to the release of ionic titanium under physiological conditions. This is a systematic literature review of studies reporting titanium ion release into solutions from titanium devices under conditions replicating the interstitial pH and constituents. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. Of 452 articles identified, titanium ions were reported in nine media relevant to human biology in seventeen studies. Only one study, using human serum replicated both physiological pH and the concentration of constituents while reporting the presence of titanium ions. While there is insufficient information to explain the factors that contribute to the presence of titanium ions in serum of humans implanted with titanium devices, currently available information suggests that areas of future inquiry include the role of transferrin and organic acids.

  7. Fabrication of porous titanium implants by three-dimensional printing and sintering at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yaoyang; Qian, Chao; Sun, Jian

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of using three-dimensional printing (3DP) to fabricate porous titanium implants. Titanium powder was blended with a water-soluble binder material. Green, porous, titanium implants fabricated by 3DP were sintered under protective argon atmosphere at 1,200, 1,300, or 1,400°C. Sintered implant prototypes had uniform shrinkage and no obvious shape distortion after sintering. Evaluation of their mechanical properties revealed that titanium prototypes sintered at different temperatures had elastic modulus of 5.9-34.8 GPa, porosity of 41.06-65.01%, hardness of 115.2-182.8 VHN, and compressive strength of 81.3-218.6 MPa. There were significant differences in each type of these data among the different sintering temperatures (p<0.01). Results of this study confirmed the feasibility of fabricating porous titanium implants by 3DP: pore size and pore interconnectivity were conducive to bone cell ingrowth for implant stabilization, and the mechanical properties matched well with those of the human bone.

  8. The effect of hierarchical micro/nanosurface titanium implant on osseointegration in ovariectomized sheep.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Zhou, H; Zhao, L; Sun, Y; Guan, S; Liu, B; Kong, L

    2011-06-01

    Hydrofluoric etching and anodized hierarchical micro/nanotextured surface titanium implant was placed in mandibles of ovariectomized sheep for 12 weeks, and it showed improved osseointegration by resonance frequency analysis (RFA), microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation, histomorphometry, and biomechanical test. This study aimed to investigate the effects of micro/nanotextured titanium implant on osseointegration in ovariectomized (OVX) sheep. The hierarchical micro/nanotextured surface of titanium implant was fabricated by acid in 0.5% (w/v) hydrofluoric (HF) and anodized in HF acid electrolytes with a DC power of 20 V, and the machined surface implants with no treatment served as control group. The implants were placed in mandibles of OVX sheep, respectively. Twelve weeks after implantation, RFA, microcomputed tomography, histomorphometry, and biomechanical tests were applied to detect the osseointegration of the two groups. The implant stability quotient (ISQ) values, the maximum pull-out forces, and the bone-implant contact (BIC) were 65.5 ± 6.3, 490.6 ± 72.7 N, and 58.31 ± 5.79% in the micro/nanogroup and 58.3 ± 8.9, 394.5 ± 54.5 N, and 46.85 ± 5.04% in the control group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups in ISQ values (p > 0.05), but in the micro/nanogroup, the maximal pull-out force and the BIC were increased significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). Micro-CT analysis showed that the bone volume ratio and the trabecular number increased significantly (p < 0.01), and the trabecular separation decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the micro/nanogroup. Implant modification by HF acid etching and anodization to form a hierarchical micro/nanotextured surface could improve titanium implant osseointegration in OVX sheep 12 weeks after implantation.

  9. Dental implant imaging: TeraRecon's Dental 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography System.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun K

    2007-06-01

    Early in the development of implant technology, conventional dental imaging techniques were limited for evaluating the patient for implant surgery. During the treatment-planning phase, the recipient bed is routinely assessed by visual examination and palpation, as well as by periapical and panoramic radiology. These two imaging modalities provide a two-dimensional image of the mesiodistal and occlusoapical dimensions of the edentulous regions where the implants might be placed. When adequate occlusoapical bone height is available for endosteal implants, the buccolingual width and angulation of the available bone are the most important criteria for implant selection and success. However, neither buccolingual width nor angulation can be visualized on most traditional radiographs. Although clinical examination and traditional radiographs may be adequate for patients with wide residual ridges that exhibit sufficient bone crestal to the mandibular nerve and maxillary sinus, these methods do not allow for the precise measurement of the buccolingual dimension of the bone or assessment of the location of unanticipated undercuts. Because of these concerns, it is necessary to view the recipient site in a plane through the arch of the maxilla or mandible in the region of the proposed implants. Implant surgeons soon recognized that, for the optimum placement of implants, cross-sectional views of the maxilla and mandible are the ideal means for providing necessary preoperative information. For complex cases where multiple implants are required or where anatomical measurements are crucial, but also increasingly for more routine cases, more and more clinicians are recommending CT scan imaging procedure such as that offered by TeraRecon's Dental CBCT system. Because of its ability to reconstruct a fully three-dimensional model of the maxilla and mandible, CBCT provides a highly sophisticated format for precisely defining the jaw structure and locating critical anatomic structures

  10. Comprehensive rehabilitation using dental implants in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Asha; Ravi, Sheethalan; Kaarthikeyan, Gurumoorthy

    2017-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) is a debilitating form of the disease and it results in deteriorating effects on the esthetic and functional aspects of the oral cavity. This case report describes the comprehensive rehabilitation of GAP patient using dental implants. The treatment planning involved thorough scaling and root planning (SRP) with oral hygiene instructions. The patient was motivated to adhere to a strict oral hygiene regimen following which periodontal flap surgery employing guided tissue regeneration and bone grafts was performed. Bacterial culture for anaerobic microorganisms was done using a gas pack pre- and postperiodontal treatment to confirm the effectiveness of the periodontal treatment regimen and also to proceed with dental implant placement. The rigorous maintenance program ensured the stability of the periodontium following which immediate placement of dental implants in the maxillary and mandibular anterior region was done. The fixed metal-ceramic prosthesis was fabricated in a step-by-step process and the patient was recalled on a periodic basis over a 3-year follow-up duration. This case is a testimonial to the postperiodontal treatment long-term stability with excellent patient cooperation and strict maintenance protocol. PMID:29398863

  11. Controlled electro-implementation of fluoride in titanium implant surfaces enhances cortical bone formation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Taxt-Lamolle, Sébastien F; Rubert, Marina; Haugen, Håvard J; Lyngstadaas, Ståle Petter; Ellingsen, Jan Eirik; Monjo, Marta

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone-to-implant attachment of titanium implants to cortical bone is improved when the surface is modified with hydrofluoric acid. The aim of this study was to investigate if biological factors are involved in the improved retention of these implants. Fluoride was implemented in implant surfaces by cathodic reduction with increasing concentrations of HF in the electrolyte. The modified implants were placed in the cortical bone in the tibias of New Zealand white rabbits. After 4 weeks of healing, wound fluid collected from the implant site showed lower lactate dehydrogenase activity and less bleeding in fluoride-modified implants compared to control. A significant increase in gene expression levels of osteocalcin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) was found in the cortical bone attached to Ti implants modified with 0.001 and 0.01 vol.% HF, while Ti implants modified with 0.1% HF showed only induced TRAP mRNA levels. These results were supported by the performed micro-CT analyses. The volumetric bone mineral density of the cortical bone hosting Ti implants modified with 0.001% and 0.01% HF was higher both in the newly woven bone (<100 microm from the interface) and in the older Haversian bone (>100 microm). In conclusion, the modulation of these biological factors by surface modification of titanium implants with low concentrations of HF using cathodic reduction may explain their improved osseointegration properties. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the fracture resistance of dental implants with different abutment taper angles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Geng, Jianping; Jones, David; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of abutment taper angles on the fracture strength of dental implants with TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) connection. Thirty prototype cylindrical titanium alloy 5.0mm-diameter dental implants with different TIS-connection designs were divided into six groups and tested for their fracture strength, using a universal testing machine. These groups consisted of combinations of 3.5 and 4.0 mm abutment diameter, each with taper angles of 6°, 8° or 10°. 3-Dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was also used to analyze stress states at implant-abutment connection areas. In general, the mechanical tests found an increasing trend of implant fracture forces as the taper angle enlarged. When the abutment diameter was 3.5 mm, the mean fracture forces for 8° and 10° taper groups were 1638.9 N ± 20.3 and 1577.1 N ± 103.2, respectively, both larger than that for the 6° taper group of 1475.0 N ± 24.4, with the largest increasing rate of 11.1%. Furthermore, the difference between 8° and 6° taper groups was significant, based on Tamhane's multiple comparison test (P<0.05). In 4.0 mm-diameter abutment groups, as the taper angle was enlarged from 6° to 8° and 10°, the mean fracture value was increased from 1066.7 N ± 56.1 to 1241.4 N ± 6.4 and 1419.3 N ± 20.0, with the largest increasing rate of 33.1%, and the differences among the three groups were significant (P<0.05). The FEA results showed that stress values varied in implants with different abutment taper angles and supported the findings of the static tests. In conclusion, increases of the abutment taper angle could significantly increase implant fracture resistance in most cases established in the study, which is due to the increased implant wall thickness in the connection part resulting from the taper angle enlargement. The increasing effects were notable when a thin implant wall was present to accommodate wide abutments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acid Etching and Plasma Sterilization Fail to Improve Osseointegration of Grit Blasted Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Saksø, Mikkel; Jakobsen, Stig S; Saksø, Henrik; Baas, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Thomas; Søballe, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between implant surface and surrounding bone influences implant fixation. We attempted to improve the bone-implant interaction by 1) adding surface micro scale topography by acid etching, and 2) removing surface-adherent pro-inflammatory agents by plasma cleaning. Implant fixation was evaluated by implant osseointegration and biomechanical fixation. The study consisted of two paired animal sub-studies where 10 skeletally mature Labrador dogs were used. Grit blasted titanium alloy implants were inserted press fit in each proximal tibia. In the first study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants. In the second study grit blasted implants were compared with acid etched grit blasted implants that were further treated with plasma sterilization. Implant performance was evaluated by histomorphometrical investigation (tissue-to-implant contact, peri-implant tissue density) and mechanical push-out testing after four weeks observation time. Neither acid etching nor plasma sterilization of the grit blasted implants enhanced osseointegration or mechanical fixation in this press-fit canine implant model in a statistically significant manner. PMID:22962567

  14. Transmission of acoustic emission in bones, implants and dental materials.

    PubMed

    Ossi, Zannar; Abdou, Wael; Reuben, Robert L; Ibbetson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    There is considerable interest in using acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound to assess the quality of implant-bone interfaces and to monitor for micro-damage leading to loosening. However, remarkably little work has been done on the transmission of ultrasonic waves though the physical and biological structures involved. The aim of this in vitro study is to assess any differences in transmission between various dental materials and bovine rib bones with various degrees of hydration. Two types of tests have been carried out using pencil lead breaks as a standard AE source. The first set of tests was configured to assess the surface propagation of AE on various synthetic materials compared with fresh bovine rib bone. The second is a set of transmission tests on fresh, dried and hydrated bones each fitted with dental implants with various degrees of fixity, which includes components due to bone and interface transmission. The results indicate that transmission through glass ionomer cement is closest to the bone. This would suggest that complete osseointegration could potentially be simulated using such cement. The transmission of AE energy through bone was found to be dependent on its degree of hydration. It was also found that perfusing samples of fresh bone with water led to an increase in transmitted energy, but this appeared to affect transmission across the interface more than transmission through the bone. These findings have implications not only for implant interface inspection but also for passive AE monitoring of implants.

  15. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Arnau, A; Vallecillo-Capilla, M-F; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M-Á; Rosales-Leal, J-I

    2016-09-01

    To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls (p<0.05) tests. Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use.

  16. Effects of Cement, Abutment Surface Pretreatment, and Artificial Aging on the Force Required to Detach Cantilever Fixed Dental Prostheses from Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Kappel, Stefanie; Chepura, Taras; Schmitter, Marc; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    To examine the in vitro effects of different cements, abutment surface preconditioning, and artificial aging on the maximum tensile force needed to detach cantilever fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) from dental implants with titanium abutments. A total of 32 tissue-level implants were combined with standardized titanium abutments. For each test group, eight cantilever FDPs were fabricated using selective laser melting (cobalt-chromium [CoCr] alloy). The inner surfaces of the cantilever FDPs and half of the abutments were sandblasted and then joined by use of four different cements (two permanent and two semi-permanent) in two different amounts per cement. Subgroups were tested after either artificial aging (thermocycling and chewing simulation) or 3 days of water storage. Finally, axial pull off-tests were performed for each abutment separately. Cement type and surface pretreatment significantly affected decementation behavior. The highest retention forces (approximately 1,200 N) were associated with sandblasted abutments and permanent cements. With unconditioned abutments, temporary cements (Fu < 100 N), as well as glass-ionomer cement (Fu ≈ 100 N), resulted in rather low retention forces. Zinc phosphate cement guaranteed high retention forces. After aging, retention was sufficient only for cementation with zinc phosphate cement and for the combination of sandblasted abutments and glass-ionomer cement. When glass-ionomer cement is used to fix cantilever FDPs on implants, sandblasting of standard titanium abutments may help prevent loss of retention. Retention forces were still high for FDPs fixed with zinc phosphate cement, even when the abutments were not pretreated. Use of permanent cements only, however, is recommended to prevent unwanted loosening of cantilever FDPs.

  17. Heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy-a review: heat generated by dental implant drills.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    Osseointegration is the more stable situation and results in a high success rate of dental implants. Heat generation during rotary cutting is one of the important factors influencing the development of osseointegration. To assess the various factors related to implant drills responsible for heat generation during osteotomy. To identify suitable literature, an electronic search was performed using Medline and Pubmed database. Articles published in between 1960 to February 2013 were searched. The search is focused on heat generated by dental implant drills during osteotomy. Various factors related to implant drill such effect of number of blades; drill design, drill fatigue, drill speed and force applied during osteotomies which were responsible for heat generation were reviewed. Titles and abstracts were screened, and literature that fulfilled the inclusion criteria was selected for a full-text reading. The initial literature search resulted in 299 articles out of which only 70 articles fulfils the inclusion criteria and were included in this systematic review. Many factors related to implant drill responsible for heat generation were found. Successful preparation of an implant cavity with minimal damage to the surrounding bone depends on the avoidance of excessive temperature generation during surgical drilling. The relationship between heat generated and implant drilling osteotomy is multifactorial in nature and its complexity has not been fully studied. Lack of scientific knowledge regarding this issue still exists. Further studies should be conducted to determine the various factors which generate less heat while osteotomy such as ideal ratio of force and speed in vivo, exact time to replace a drill, ideal drill design, irrigation system, drill-bone contact area.

  18. A comparison of MRI and CT imaging clarity of titanium alloy and titanium alloy with cobalt-chromium-alloy pedicle screw and rod implants in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Terry R; Flint, Kathy; Ramsey, Curtis J

    2012-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) imaging are important postoperative diagnostic and evaluation tools, particularly in patients who have undergone spinal fusions. Advancements in materials and imaging techniques have lessened artifact and improved overall imaging results. Systems that combine titanium alloy and cobalt-chromium components have been introduced to reduce implant profile while maintaining strength. The objective of this study was to determine if there were any differences in the clarity of imaging between two types of implant materials in a lumbar spine construct model. One of two lumbar spine stabilization implant systems, titanium alloy (titanium) or titanium alloy with cobalt-chromium alloy (titanium-cobalt), was placed to simulate a four-level fusion construct in two human cadaveric spine segments, followed by MRI and CT imaging. The implant systems were then removed from each cadaver and implanted in the other cadaver. Nine physician graders from three subspecialties scored the images using a 5-point scale, with higher imaging scores indicating greater clarity of the region of interest. Physician-rated scores were compared across systems and between physician groups. There were no significant differences in the overall mean total scores on the basis of construct material. Overall mean scores were 18.16 for titanium and 17.45 for titanium-cobalt (p = 0.275). Among images of the titanium-cobalt constructs, no significant differences in mean scores were found between specimens with use of MRI (p = 0.883) or with use of CT only (p = 0.274). Among images of the titanium system, a slightly significant difference was found between specimens with use of MRI (p = 0.044) but not with CT imaging (p = 0.837). Overall image clarity scores were not significantly different between titanium and titanium-cobalt implant systems in the lumbar spine. Observation of pertinent anatomy in the regions of interest was not degraded by the

  19. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  20. Fabrication, pore structure and compressive behavior of anisotropic porous titanium for human trabecular bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuping; Li, Jinshan; Xu, Guangsheng; Liu, Gejun; Kou, Hongchao; Zhou, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium with average pore size of 100-650 μm and porosity of 30-70% was fabricated by diffusion bonding of titanium meshes. Pore structure was characterized by Micro-CT scan and SEM. Compressive behavior of porous titanium in the out-of-plane direction was studied. The effect of porosity and pore size on the compressive properties was also discussed based on the deformation mode. The results reveal that the fabrication process can control the porosity precisely. The average pore size of porous titanium can be tailored by adjusting the pore size of titanium meshes. The fabricated porous titanium possesses an anisotropic structure with square pores in the in-plane direction and elongated pores in the out-of-plane direction. The compressive Young's modulus and yield stress are in the range of 1-7.5 GPa and 10-110 MPa, respectively. The dominant compressive deformation mode is buckling of mesh wires, but some uncoordinated buckling is present in porous titanium with lower porosity. Relationship between compressive properties and porosity conforms well to the Gibson-Ashby model. The effect of pore size on compressive properties is fundamentally ascribed to the aspect ratio of titanium meshes. Porous titanium with 60-70% porosity has potential for trabecular bone implant applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry.

  2. Anti-infection activity of nanostructured titanium percutaneous implants with a postoperative infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Li, Yiting; Liu, Zhiyuan; Qu, Shuxin; Lu, Xiong; Wang, Jianxin; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2015-07-01

    The titanium percutaneous implants were widely used in clinic; however, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Lack of complete skin integration with the implants can cause infection and implant removal. In this work, three titania nanotubes (TNT) with different diameters, 50 nm (TNT-50), 100 nm (TNT-100) and 150 nm (TNT-150) arrays were prepared on titanium surfaces by anodization, pure titanium (pTi) was used as control. Samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle analysis. The antibacterial efficiency of TNT was evaluated in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus under the visible light. The results indicated that TNT-100 had the highest antibacterial efficiency under the visible light. Subsequently, TNT implants and pTi implants were placed subcutaneously to the dorsum of New Zealand White rabbits, 108 CFU S. aureus was inoculated into the implant sites 4 h after surgery. The TNF-alpha and IL-1alpha were determined using enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). TNT implants revealed less inflammatory factor release than pTi implants with or without injected S. aureus liquid. According to the histological results, the TNT implants displayed excellent tissue integration. Whereas, pTi implants were surrounded with fibrotic capsule, and the skin tissue was almost separated from the implant surface. Therefore, the TNT significantly inhibited the infection risk and enhanced tissue integration of the percutaneous implants compared to pTi. The immersion test in the culture medium suggested that one of causes be probably more proteins adsorbed on TNT than on pTi.

  3. Percutaneous Implants with Porous Titanium Dermal Barriers: An In Vivo Evaluation of Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants are a promising prosthetic alternative for a subset of amputees. However, as with all percutaneous implants, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Theoretically, host tissues could attach to the metal implant creating a barrier to infection. When compared with smooth surfaces, it is hypothesized that porous surfaces improve the attachment of the host tissues to the implant, and decrease the infection risk. In this study, 4 titanium implants, manufactured with a percutaneous post and a subcutaneous disk, were placed subcutaneously on the dorsum of eight New Zealand White rabbits. Beginning at four weeks post-op, the implants were inoculated weekly with 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus until signs of clinical infection presented. While we were unable to detect a difference in the incidence of infection of the porous metal implants, smooth surface (no porous coating) percutaneous and subcutaneous components had a 7-fold increased risk of infection compared to the implants with a porous coating on one or both components. The porous coated implants displayed excellent tissue ingrowth into the porous structures; whereas, the smooth implants were surrounded with a thick, organized fibrotic capsule that was separated from the implant surface. This study suggests that porous coated metal percutaneous implants are at a significantly lower risk of infection when compared to smooth metal implants. The smooth surface percutaneous implants were inadequate in allowing a long-term seal to develop with the soft tissue, thus increasing vulnerability to the migration of infecting microorganisms. PMID:21145778

  4. Titanium dental copings prepared by a powder metallurgy method: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mikael; Andersson, Matts; Carlström, Elis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the Procera pressed-powder method can be used to fabricate titanium copings. Commercially pure titanium powder was used to prepare the copings. The powder was pressed onto an enlarged tooth preparation die of aluminum using cold isostatic pressing. The outer shape of the coping was formed using a Procera milling machine, and the copings were vacuum sintered. Titanium copings could be prepared using this method. The density of the sintered copings reached 97% to 99%+ of theoretic density, and the copings showed ductile behavior after sintering. Enlarging the tooth preparation die to compensate for the sintering shrinkage could optimize the final size of the copings. Ductile and dense titanium dental copings can be produced with powder-metal processing using cold isostatic pressing, followed by milling and sintering to final shape. The forming technique has, if properly optimized, a potential of becoming a more cost-efficient production method than spark erosion.

  5. Anodization: a promising nano-modification technique of titanium implants for orthopedic applications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chang; Webster, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Anodization is a well-established surface modification technique that produces protective oxide layers on valve metals such as titanium. Many studies have used anodization to produce micro-porous titanium oxide films on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications. An additional hydrothermal treatment has also been used in conjunction with anodization to deposit hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces; this is in contrast to using traditional plasma spray deposition techniques. Recently, the ability to create nanometer surface structures (e.g., nano-tubular) via anodization of titanium implants in fluorine solutions have intrigued investigators to fabricate nano-scale surface features that mimic the natural bone environment. This paper will present an overview of anodization techniques used to produce micro-porous titanium oxide structures and nano-tubular oxide structures, subsequent properties of these anodized titanium surfaces, and ultimately their in vitro as well as in vivo biological responses pertinent for orthopedic applications. Lastly, this review will emphasize why anodized titanium structures that have nanometer surface features enhance bone forming cell functions.

  6. Cell responses to titanium treated by a sandblast-free method for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Xie, Youneng; Zuo, Jun; Li, Jiaxin; Wei, Qiuping; Yu, Zhiming; Tang, Zhangui

    2017-09-01

    Sandblast and acid-etching (SLA) is the most prevalent treatment to titanium implants, while residual sand particles are inevitably introduced on SLA titanium surfaces. NH 4 OH and H 2 O 2 mixture was used to etch titanium plates (E) and titanium bars (EB), aiming at substituting sandblast procedure. To study the effects of different scale rough structures on cell response of Human osteoblast-like cells (MG63), traditional H 2 SO 4 and HCl mixture was also used to further etch the titanium plates above (DE). Holes of 10-20μm were obtained on E and DE surfaces, which are very close to the size of osteoblasts. Surfaces with micro/nano and micro/submicro hierarchical structures were obtained on the treated titanium. As-prepared E, DE and EB surfaces are hydrophilic, while only EB stayed hydrophilic after 5days' exposure to air. MG63 cultured on E and EB surfaces showed higher proliferation rate and attachment area than on DE and P surfaces. E and DE showed higher alkaline phosphatases (ALP) activity after 7 and 14days of osteoinduction, while EB showed the highest osteopontin (OPN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) production after 21days of osteoinduction. These results indicate that E and EB surfaces boost the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MG63 without introducing sand particles. This is a promising treatment to titanium implant. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Bone Response to Two Dental Implants with Different Sandblasted/Acid-Etched Implant Surfaces: A Histological and Histomorphometrical Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Piattelli, Adriano; Quaranta, Alesandro

    2017-01-01

    Background Scientific evidence in the field of implant dentistry of the past 20 years established that titanium rough surfaces have shown improved osseointegration rates. In a majority of dental implants, the surface microroughness was obtained by grit blasting and/or acid etching. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vivo two different highly hydrophilic surfaces at different experimental times. Methods Calcium-modified (CA) and SLActive surfaces were evaluated and a total of 18 implants for each type of surface were positioned into the rabbit articular femoral knee-joint in a split model experiment, and they were evaluated histologically and histomorphometrically at 15, 30, and 60 days of healing. Results Bone-implant contact (BIC) at the two-implant surfaces was significantly different in favor of the CA surface at 15 days (p = 0.027), while SLActive displayed not significantly higher values at 30 (p = 0.51) and 60 days (p = 0.061). Conclusion Both implant surfaces show an intimate interaction with newly formed bone. PMID:29445746

  8. Cannabis sativa smoke inhalation decreases bone filling around titanium implants: a histomorphometric study in rats.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Filho, Getulio da R; Cadide, Tiago; Rosa, Bruno T; Neiva, Tiago G; Tunes, Roberto; Peruzzo, Daiane; Nociti, Francisco Humberto; César-Neto, João B

    2008-12-01

    Although the harmful effect of tobacco smoking on titanium implants has been documented, no studies have investigated the effects of cannabis sativa (marijuana) smoking. Thus, this study investigated whether marijuana smoke influences bone healing around titanium implants. Thirty Wistar rats were used. After anesthesia, the tibiae surface was exposed and 1 screw-shaped titanium implant was placed bilaterally. The animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: control (n = 15) and marijuana smoke inhalation (MSI) 8 min/d (n = 15). Urine samples were obtained to detect the presence of tetra-hidro-cannabinoid. After 60 days, the animals were killed. The degree of bone-to-implant contact and the bone area within the limits of the threads of the implant were measured in the cortical (zone A) and cancellous bone (zone B). Tetra-hidro-cannabinoid in urine was positive only for the rats of MSI group. Intergroup analysis did not indicate differences in zone A-cortical bone (P > 0.01), however, a negative effect of marijuana smoke (MSI group) was observed in zone B-cancellous bone for bone-to-implant contact and bone area (Student's t test, P < 0.01) values. Considering the limitations of the present study, the deleterious impact of cannabis sativa smoke on bone healing may represent a new concern for implant success/failure.

  9. Effect of ion-implantation on surface characteristics of nickel titanium and titanium molybdenum alloy arch wires.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Manu; Saraswathy, Seema; Sukumaran, Kalathil; Abraham, Kurian Mathew

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in surface roughness and frictional features of 'ion-implanted nickel titanium (NiTi) and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) arch wires' from its conventional types in an in-vitro laboratory set up. 'Ion-implanted NiTi and low friction TMA arch wires' were assessed for surface roughness with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3 dimensional (3D) optical profilometry. Frictional forces were studied in a universal testing machine. Surface roughness of arch wires were determined as Root Mean Square (RMS) values in nanometers and Frictional Forces (FF) in grams. Mean values of RMS and FF were compared by Student's 't' test and one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). SEM images showed a smooth topography for ion-implanted versions. 3D optical profilometry demonstrated reduction of RMS values by 58.43% for ion-implanted NiTi (795.95 to 330.87 nm) and 48.90% for TMA groups (463.28 to 236.35 nm) from controls. Nonetheless, the corresponding decrease in FF was only 29.18% for NiTi and 22.04% for TMA, suggesting partial correction of surface roughness and disproportionate reduction in frictional forces with ion-implantation. Though the reductions were highly significant at P < 0.001, relations between surface roughness and frictional forces remained non conclusive even after ion-implantation. The study proved that ion-implantation can significantly reduce the surface roughness of NiTi and TMA wires but could not make a similar reduction in frictional forces. This can be attributed to the inherent differences in stiffness and surface reactivity of NiTi and TMA wires when used in combination with stainless steel brackets, which needs further investigations.

  10. Immobilization of Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 on a modified titanium implant surface and improved human gingival fibroblasts behavior.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; Mei, Shenglin; Ji, Kun; Zhang, Yumei; Chu, Paul K

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to form a rapid and firm soft tissue sealing around dental implants that resists bacterial invasion. We present a novel approach to modify Ti surface by immobilizing Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 compound bioactive factors onto a titania nanotubular surface. The titanium samples were anodized to form vertically organized TiO(2) nanotube arrays and Ag nanoparticles were electrodeposited onto the nanotubular surface, on which FGF-2 was immobilized with repeated lyophilization. A uniform distribution of Ag nanoparticles/FGF-2 was observed on the TiO(2) nanotubular surface. The L929 cell line was used for cytotoxicity assessment. Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were cultured on the modified surface for cytocompatibility determination. The Ag/FGF-2 immobilized samples displayed excellent cytocompatibility, negligible cytotoxicity, and enhanced HGF functions such as cell attachment, proliferation, and ECM-related gene expression. The Ag nanoparticles also exhibit some bioactivity. In conclusion, this modified TiO(2) nanotubular surface has a large potential for use in dental implant abutment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Allergic reaction to vanadium causes a diffuse eczematous eruption and titanium alloy orthopedic implant failure.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, Sally; Segal, Robert J

    2017-04-01

    Allergy as a cause of adverse outcomes in patients with implanted orthopedic hardware is controversial. Allergy to titanium-based implants has not been well researched, as titanium is traditionally thought to be inert. We highlight the case of a patient who developed systemic dermatitis and implant failure after surgical placement of a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) plate in the left foot. The hardware was removed and the eruption cleared in the following weeks. The plate and screws were submitted for metal analysis. The elemental composition of both the plate and screws included 3 major elements-titanium, aluminum, and vanadium-as well as trace elements. Metal analysis revealed that the plate and screws had different microstructures, and electrochemical studies demonstrated that galvanic corrosion could have occurred between the plate and screws due to their different microstructures, contributing to the release of vanadium in vivo. The patient was patch tested with several metals including components of the implant and had a positive patch test reaction only to vanadium trichloride. These findings support a diagnosis of vanadium allergy and suggests that clinicians should consider including vanadium when patch testing patients with a suspected allergic reaction to vanadium-containing implants.

  12. [A study on the bond interface between low-fusing dental porcelain and pure titanium].

    PubMed

    Mo, A; Cen, Y; Liao, Y; Wang, J; Shi, X

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the bond interface between low fusing dental porcelain and pure titanium by observing the topography and detecting the ionic diffusion in the interface area. The low fusing-porcelain La-porcelain produced by the authors or Vita Titankeramik porcelain was fused to the surfaces of pure titanium. The topography of the interface between pure titanium and porcelain, and the structure of experimental materials were observed with SEM. The state of ionic diffusion in the interface area was investigated with EPMA. Excellent permeation and diffusion of La-porcelain were observed on the surfaces of pure titanium. The diffusion of ions of stannum and silicon was discovered in the interface area. The microstructure of La-porcelain to pure titanium bond interface was finer than that of Vita Titankeramik porcelain. Excellent bond can be produced in the interface between La-porcelain and pure titanium. The bonding mechanism may involve mechanical bond and chemical bond. The ionic diffusion of stannum plays an important role in the bonding of porcelain to pure titanium.

  13. Histological, mechanical, and radiological study of osteoformation in titanium foam implants.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Arai, Yoshinori; Kawahara, Ichiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Titanium (Ti) is widely used for implants because of its high mechanical reliability and because it aids osteoformation. However, it also produces artifacts during radiological imaging. Further, Ti implants can sometimes cause the surrounding bone to break. Owing to recent advances, Ti can be transformed into sponge-like, porous materials having a three-dimensional network of pores; such materials are called Ti foams. These foams exhibit distinct characteristics that make them more suitable than nonporous Ti. The objective of this study was to evaluate Ti foams as implant materials. Implants based on Ti foams having porosities of 80% and 90% were embedded in the femurs of 11 rabbits. Implants based on 0% porosity Ti were used as controls. Five rabbits were sacrificed 4 weeks after implantation, while the remaining were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The femurs containing the Ti implants were harvested and analyzed. Biomechanical analyses showed that the 80% porosity implants induced greater osteoformation. There were significant differences in the average pushout strengths of the control and 80% porosity implants after 4 weeks (p = 0.048) and 12 weeks (p = 0.001). Histopathological analyses confirmed osteoformation in the case of the 80% porosity implants. Analyses of the micro-computed tomography images of the Ti foam-based implants did not suggest the presence of artifacts. The 80% porosity Ti implants did not exhibit the shortcomings associated with conventional Ti implants. In addition, they induced greater osteoformation. Finally, the Ti foams did not produce radiological artifacts.

  14. Evaluation of bone response to titanium-coated polymethyl methacrylate resin (PMMA) implants by X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, Manal M; Wolke, Johannes G C; Cuijpers, Vincent M J I; Jansen, John A

    2007-10-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional data about the bone response to oral implants can be obtained by using microfocus computer tomography. However, a disadvantage is that metallic implants cause streaking artifacts due to scattering of X-rays, which prevents an accurate evaluation of the interfacial bone-to-implant contact. It has been suggested that the use of thin titanium coatings deposited on polymeric implants can offer an alternative option for analyzing bone contact using micro-CT imaging. Consequently, the aim of the current study was to investigate bone behavior to titanium-coated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implants by micro-CT and histological evaluation. For the experiment titanium-coated PMMA implants were used. The implants had a machined threaded appearance and were provided with a 400-500 nm thick titanium coating. The implants were inserted in the right or left tibia of 10 goats. After an implantation period of 12 weeks the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computer tomography (microCT), light microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. The micro-CT showed that the screw-threads and typical implant configuration were well maintained through the installation procedure. Overall, histological responses showed that the titanium-coated implants were well tolerated and caused no atypical tissue response. In addition, the bone was seen in direct contact with the titanium-coated layer. The X-ray microanalysis results confirmed the light microscopical data. In conclusion, the obtained results proof the final use of titanium-coated PMMA implants for evaluation of the bone-implant response using microCT. However, this study also confirms that for a proper analysis of the bone-implant interface the additional use of microscopical techniques is still required.

  15. Bioactive and thermally compatible glass coating on zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, A; Hausmann, A; Weber, M; Fischer, J; Fischer, H

    2015-02-01

    The healing time of zirconia implants may be reduced by the use of bioactive glass coatings. Unfortunately, existing glasses are either bioactive like Bioglass 45S5 but thermally incompatible with the zirconia substrate, or they are thermally compatible but exhibit only a very low level of bioactivity. In this study, we hypothesized that a tailored substitution of alkaline earth metals and alkaline metals in 45S5 can lead to a glass composition that is both bioactive and thermally compatible with zirconia implants. A novel glass composition was analyzed using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and heating microscopy to investigate its chemical, physical, and thermal properties. Bioactivity was tested in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF). Smooth and microstructured glass coatings were applied using a tailored spray technique with subsequent thermal treatment. Coating adhesion was tested on implants that were inserted in bovine ribs. The cytocompatibility of the coating was analyzed using L929 mouse fibroblasts. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the novel glass was shown to be slightly lower (11.58 · 10(-6) K(-1)) than that of the zirconia (11.67 · 10(-6) K(-1)). After storage in SBF, the glass showed reaction layers almost identical to the bioactive glass gold standard, 45S5. A process window between 800 °C and 910 °C was found to result in densely sintered and amorphous coatings. Microstructured glass coatings on zirconia implants survived a minimum insertion torque of 60 Ncm in the in vitro experiment on bovine ribs. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of the glass coatings was comparable with the controls. The novel glass composition showed a strong adhesion to the zirconia substrate and a significant bioactive behavior in the SBF in vitro experiments. Therefore, it holds great potential to significantly reduce the healing time of zirconia dental implants. © International & American Associations for Dental

  16. The osteoplastic effectiveness of the implants made of mesh titanium nickelide constructs.

    PubMed

    Mikhailovich Irianov, Iurii; Vladimirovna Diuriagina, Olga; Iurevna Karaseva, Tatiana; Anatolevich Karasev, Evgenii

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the work was to study the features of reparative osteogenesis for filling the defect of tubular bone under implantation of mesh titanium nickelide constructs. Tibial fenestrated defect was modeled experimentally in 30 Wistar pubertal rats, followed by implant intramedullary insertion. The techniques of radiography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray electron probe microanalysis were used. The mesh implant of titanium nickelide has been established to possess biocompatibility, osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, the zone of osteogenesis and angiogenesis is created around it, bone cover is formed. Osteointegration of the implant occurs early, by 7 days after surgery, and by 30 days after surgery organotypical re-modelling of the regenerated bone takes place, as well as the defect is filled with lamellar bone tissue by the type of bone wound primary adhesion. By 30 days after surgery mineral content of the regenerated bone tissue approximates to the composition of intact cortex mineral phase.

  17. The osteoplastic effectiveness of the implants made of mesh titanium nickelide constructs

    PubMed Central

    Irianov, Iurii Mikhailovich; Diuriagina, Olga Vladimirovna; Karaseva, Tatiana Iurevna; Karasev, Evgenii Anatolevich

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to study the features of reparative osteogenesis for filling the defect of tubular bone under implantation of mesh titanium nickelide constructs. Tibial fenestrated defect was modeled experimentally in 30 Wistar pubertal rats, followed by implant intramedullary insertion. The techniques of radiography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray electron probe microanalysis were used. The mesh implant of titanium nickelide has been established to possess biocompatibility, osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties, the zone of osteogenesis and angiogenesis is created around it, bone cover is formed. Osteointegration of the implant occurs early, by 7 days after surgery, and by 30 days after surgery organotypical re-modelling of the regenerated bone takes place, as well as the defect is filled with lamellar bone tissue by the type of bone wound primary adhesion. By 30 days after surgery mineral content of the regenerated bone tissue approximates to the composition of intact cortex mineral phase. PMID:24579962

  18. Simulation of peri-implant bone healing due to immediate loading in dental implant treatments.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsuan-Yu; Müftü, Sinan

    2013-03-15

    The goal of this work was to investigate the role of immediate loading on the peri-implant bone healing in dental implant treatments. A mechano-regulatory tissue differentiation model that takes into account the stimuli through the solid and the fluid components of the healing tissue, and the diffusion of pluripotent stem cells into the healing callus was used. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model consisting of a dental implant, the healing callus tissue and the host bone tissue was constructed for the finite element analysis. Poroelastic material properties were assigned to the healing callus and the bone tissue. The effects of micro-motion, healing callus size, and implant thread design on the length of the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and the bone volume (BV) formed in the healing callus were investigated. In general, the analysis predicted formation of a continuous layer of soft tissue along the faces of the implant which are parallel to the loading direction. This was predicted to be correlated with the high levels of distortional strain transferred through the solid component of the stimulus. It was also predicted that the external threads on the implant, redistribute the interfacial load, thus help reduce the high distortional stimulus and also help the cells to differentiate to bone tissue. In addition, the region underneath the implant apex was predicted to experience high fluid stimulus that results in the development of soft tissue. The relationship between the variables considered in this study and the outcome measures, BV and BIC, was found to be highly nonlinear. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the results was conducted and it showed that micro-motion presents the largest hindrance to bone formation during healing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective laser melting of titanium alloy enables osseointegration of porous multi-rooted implants in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Xu, Liangwei; You, Jia; Fang, Lihua; Zhang, Qing

    2016-07-21

    Osseointegration refers to the direct connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant. Porous implants with well-controlled porosity and pore size can enhance osseointegration. However, until recently implants were produced by machining solid core titanium rods. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-rooted dental implant (MRI) with a connected porous surface structure to facilitate osseointegration. MRIs manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) and commercial implants with resorbable blasting media (RBM)-treated surfaces were inserted into the hind limbs of New Zealand white rabbits. Osseointegration was evaluated periodically over 12 weeks by micro-computerized tomography (CT) scanning, histological analysis, mechanical push-out tests, and torque tests. Bone volume densities were consistently higher in the MRI group than in the RBM group throughout the study period, ultimately resulting in a peak value of 48.41 % for the MRI group. Histological analysis revealed denser surrounding bone growth in the MRIs; after 4 and 8 weeks, bone tissue had grown into the pore structures and root bifurcation areas, respectively. Biomechanics tests indicated binding of the porous MRIs to the neobone tissues, as push-out forces strengthened from 294.7 to 446.5 N and maximum mean torque forces improved from 81.15 to 289.57 N (MRI), versus 34.79 to 87.8 N in the RBM group. MRIs manufactured by SLM possess a connected porous surface structure that improves the osteogenic characteristics of the implant surface.

  1. A study on setting of the fatigue limit of temporary dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Cho, E J; Lee, J W; Kim, E K; Yoo, S H; Park, C W

    2017-07-01

    A temporary dental implant is a medical device which is temporarily used to support a prosthesis such as an artificial tooth used for restoring patient's masticatory function during implant treatment. It is implanted in the oral cavity to substitute for the role of tooth. Due to the aging and westernization of current Korean society, the number of tooth extraction and implantation procedures is increasing, leading to an increase in the use and development of temporary dental implants. Because an implant performs a masticatory function in place of a tooth, a dynamic load is repeatedly put on the implant. Thus, the fatigue of implants is reported to be the most common causes of the fracture thereof. According to the investigation and analysis of the current domestic and international standards, the standard for fatigue of implant fixtures is not separately specified. Although a test method for measuring the fatigue is suggested in an ISO standard, it is a standard for permanent dental implants. Most of the test standards for Korean manufacturers and importers apply 250 N or more based on the guidance for the safety and performance evaluation of dental implants. Therefore, this study is intended to figure out the fatigue standard which can be applied to temporary dental implants when measuring the fatigue according to the test method suggested in the permanent dental implant standard. The results determined that suitable fatigue standards of temporary dental implants should be provided by each manufacturer rather than applying 250 N. This study will be useful for the establishment of the fatigue standards and fatigue test methods of the manufacturers and importers of temporary dental implants.

  2. Prevalence of Dental Implants and Evaluation of Peri-implant Bone Levels in Patients Presenting to a Dental School: A Radiographic Cross-Sectional 2-Year Study.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Eylem Ayhan; Mau, Lian Ping; Schoolfield, John; Guest, Gary F; Cochran, David L

    To evaluate the number of patients with dental implants who present to a dental school clinic for screening and to report the prevalence of peri-implant bone level change detected on digital panoramic radiographs of those subjects. Patient screening files for 9,422 patients over a 2-year period were examined to see how many patients presented with dental implants. Those patients with at least one implant were further evaluated by measuring the bone level on the mesial and distal sides of the implant using the screening radiograph. A total of 187 patients (2%) had at least one implant. In regard to implants, 423 were examined and 146 (33%) had no detectable bone loss defined as bone level below the top of the implant. When thresholds of bone loss were evaluated, 109 implants (25%) had ≥ 2 mm of bone loss on either the mesial or distal sides or both. The median bone loss was 1.74 mm for the 277 implants with detectable bone loss and 2.97 mm for the 109 implants that had ≥ 2 mm bone loss. Interestingly, patients who were ≥ 70 years of age had significantly (P = .03) more bone loss in the mandible compared with the maxilla, while patients who were 60 to 69 years of age had significantly greater loss in the maxilla. These data reveal that for patients presenting to the dental school for a screening over a 2-year period, 1.98% had one or more dental implants. Furthermore, those patients with implants had a minimum amount of bone loss as measured from the top of the implant.

  3. Modelling dental implant extraction by pullout and torque procedures.

    PubMed

    Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A; Shemtov-Yona, K

    2017-07-01

    Dental implants extraction, achieved either by applying torque or pullout force, is used to estimate the bone-implant interfacial strength. A detailed description of the mechanical and physical aspects of the extraction process in the literature is still missing. This paper presents 3D nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations of a commercial implant extraction process from the mandible bone. Emphasis is put on the typical load-displacement and torque-angle relationships for various types of cortical and trabecular bone strengths. The simulations also study of the influence of the osseointegration level on those relationships. This is done by simulating implant extraction right after insertion when interfacial frictional contact exists between the implant and bone, and long after insertion, assuming that the implant is fully bonded to the bone. The model does not include a separate representation and model of the interfacial layer for which available data is limited. The obtained relationships show that the higher the strength of the trabecular bone the higher the peak extraction force, while for application of torque, it is the cortical bone which might dictate the peak torque value. Information on the relative strength contrast of the cortical and trabecular components, as well as the progressive nature of the damage evolution, can be revealed from the obtained relations. It is shown that full osseointegration might multiply the peak and average load values by a factor 3-12 although the calculated work of extraction varies only by a factor of 1.5. From a quantitative point of view, it is suggested that, as an alternative to reporting peak load or torque values, an average value derived from the extraction work be used to better characterize the bone-implant interfacial strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing the Quality of Life of Patients Requesting Dental Implants Before and After Implant.

    PubMed

    Sargozaie, Naser; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Shojaie, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Tooth loss is a serious life event that impairs two important functions, namely, eating and speaking, and has significant side effects on different aspects of quality of life. These effects are internalized by the individual. The present study aimed to compare the quality of life (QOL) of patients requesting dental implants before and after implant. This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on patients referred to the Mashhad faculty of Dentistry and private clinics with dental implants in 2015. Patient Quality Of Life (QOL) was assessed using the Oral Impact on Daily Practice (OIDP) questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. In this study, the most common problems reported by patients were eating (78%), smiling, laughing, and embarrassment (53%) before surgery. The quality of life associated with eating; speaking clearly; clean teeth or dentures; light physical activities, such as working at home, going out to work or meeting others; smiling; laughing; showing teeth without discomfort and embarrassment; emotional conditions, such as becoming upset quicker than usual, enjoying communication with others ( i.e. , friends, relatives and neighbors); and job-related activities significantly increased after surgery, but QOL associated with the amount of sleep and resting did not improve. No significant association was noted between quality of life after implantation and place of residence, education and gender. In this study, implants had a favorable impact on a patient's quality of life.

  5. [Bone defect replacement under conditions of transosseous osteosynthesis and titanium nickelide implant application].

    PubMed

    Ir'ianov, Iu M; Ir'ianova, T Iu

    2012-01-01

    In the experiment conducted on 30 Wistar rats, the peculiarities of tibial bone defect replacement under conditions of transosseous osteosynthesis and implantation of titanium nickelide mesh structures were studied using the methods of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray electron probe microanalysis. It was demonstrated that implant osseointegration occured 7 days after surgery, and after 30 days the defect was replaced with bone tissue by the type of primary bone wound healing, thus the organotypical remodeling of regenerated bone took place.

  6. New Ti-Alloys and Surface Modifications to Improve the Mechanical Properties and the Biological Response to Orthopedic and Dental Implants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kirmanidou, Yvoni; Sidira, Margarita; Drosou, Maria-Eleni; Bennani, Vincent; Bakopoulou, Athina; Tsouknidas, Alexander; Michailidis, Nikolaos; Michalakis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are widely used in the orthopedic and dentistry fields for many decades, for joint arthroplasties, spinal and maxillofacial reconstructions, and dental prostheses. However, despite the quite satisfactory survival rates failures still exist. New Ti-alloys and surface treatments have been developed, in an attempt to overcome those failures. This review provides information about new Ti-alloys that provide better mechanical properties to the implants, such as superelasticity, mechanical strength, and corrosion resistance. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies, which investigate the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these new biomaterials, are introduced. In addition, data regarding the bioactivity of new surface treatments and surface topographies on Ti-implants is provided. The aim of this paper is to discuss the current trends, advantages, and disadvantages of new titanium-based biomaterials, fabricated to enhance the quality of life of many patients around the world. PMID:26885506

  7. Incidence and Determinants of Dental Implant Failure: A Review of Electronic Health Records in a U.S. Dental School.

    PubMed

    Hickin, Matthew Parker; Shariff, Jaffer A; Jennette, Philip J; Finkelstein, Joseph; Papapanou, Panos N

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use electronic health care records (EHRs) to examine retrospectively the incidence of and attributes associated with dental implant failures necessitating implant removal in a large cohort of patients treated in the student clinics of a U.S. dental school over three and a half years. EHRs were searched for all patients who received dental implants between July 1, 2011, and December 31, 2014. Characteristics of patients and implants that were actively removed due to irrevocable failure of any etiology ("failure cohort") during this period were compared to those of all other patients who received dental implants during the same time frame ("reference cohort"). Differences in the frequency distribution of various characteristics between the failure and reference cohorts were compared. Of a total 6,129 implants placed in 2,127 patients during the study period, 179 implants (2.9%) in 120 patients (5.6%) were removed. In the multivariate analysis, presence of a removable (OR=2.86) or fixed temporary prosthesis (OR=3.71) was statistically significantly associated with increased risk for implant failure. In contrast, antibiotic coverage (pre- and post-surgery OR=0.16; post-surgery only OR=0.38) and implants of certain manufacturers were associated with lower risk of implant failure. In this sizeable cohort of patients receiving care in dental student clinics, the review of EHRs facilitated identification of multiple variables associated with implant failure resulting in removal; however, these findings do not suggest causative relationships. The adopted analytical approach can enhance quality assurance measures and may contribute to the identification of true risk factors for dental implant failure.

  8. Stress and strain distribution in three different mini dental implant designs using in implant retained overdenture: a finite element analysis study.

    PubMed

    Aunmeungtong, W; Khongkhunthian, P; Rungsiyakull, P

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used for prediction of stress and strain between dental implant components and bone in the implant design process. Purpose of this study was to characterize and analyze stress and strain distribution occurring in bone and implants and to compare stress and strain of three different implant designs. Three different mini dental implant designs were included in this study: 1. a mini dental implant with an internal implant-abutment connection (MDIi); 2. a mini dental implant with an external implant-abutment connection (MDIe); 3. a single piece mini dental implant (MDIs). All implant designs were scanned using micro-CT scans. The imaging details of the implants were used to simulate models for FEA. An artificial bone volume of 9×9 mm in size was constructed and each implant was placed separately at the center of each bone model. All bone-implant models were simulatively loaded under an axial compressive force of 100 N and a 45-degree force of 100 N loading at the top of the implants using computer software to evaluate stress and strain distribution. There was no difference in stress or strain between the three implant designs. The stress and strain occurring in all three mini dental implant designs were mainly localized at the cortical bone around the bone-implant interface. Oblique 45° loading caused increased deformation, magnitude and distribution of stress and strain in all implant models. Within the limits of this study, the average stress and strain in bone and implant models with MDIi were similar to those with MDIe and MDIs. The oblique 45° load played an important role in dramatically increased average stress and strain in all bone-implant models. Mini dental implants with external or internal connections have similar stress distribution to single piece mini dental implants. In clinical situations, the three types of mini dental implant should exhibit the same behavior to chewing force.

  9. Subgingival Microbiome Colonization and Cytokine Production during Early Dental Implant Healing.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jeffrey B; Johnson, Paul G; Kok, Car Reen; Gomes-Neto, João C; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Schmid, Marian J; Hutkins, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about longitudinal development of the peri-implant subgingival microbiome and cytokine production as a new sulcus forms after dental implant placement. Therefore, the purpose of this observational study was to evaluate simultaneous longitudinal changes in the oral microbiome and cytokine production in the developing peri-implant sulcus compared to control natural teeth. Four and 12 weeks after implant placement and abutment connection, a dental implant and a natural tooth were sampled in 25 patients for subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF [around teeth] and peri-implant crevicular fluid [PICF] around implants). DNA from plaque samples was extracted and sequenced using Illumina-based 16S rRNA sequencing. GCF and PICF samples were analyzed using a customized Milliplex human cytokine and chemokine magnetic bead panel. Beta diversity analysis revealed that natural teeth and implants had similar subgingival microbiomes, while teeth had greater alpha diversity than implants. At the genus level, however, few differences were noted between teeth and dental implants over 12 weeks. Specifically, Actinomyces and Selenomonas were significantly elevated around teeth versus dental implants at both 4 weeks and 12 weeks, while Corynebacterium and Campylobacter were significantly elevated only at 4 weeks around teeth. The only difference between PICF and GCF biomarkers was significantly elevated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels around teeth versus dental implants at the 4-week visit. The subgingival microbiome and cytokine production were similar between teeth and implants during early healing, suggesting that these profiles are driven by the patient following dental implant placement and are not determined by anatomical niche. IMPORTANCE Dental implants are a common treatment option offered to patients for tooth replacement. However, little is known regarding initial colonization of the subgingival microbiome and

  10. Histological Evaluation of Nano-Micro Titanium Implant Surface Treatment in Beagle Humerus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kwidug; Kang, Seongsoo; Oh, Gyejeong; Lim, Hyunpil; Lee, Kwangmin; Yang, Hongso; Vang, Mongsook; Park, Sangwon

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of nano-micro titanium implant surface using histology in beagle dogs. A total of 48 screw-shaped implants (Megagen, Daegu, Korea) which dimensions were 4 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length, were used. The implants were classified into 4 groups (n = 12): machined surface (M group), RBM (Resorbable Blasting Media) surface (R group), nano surface which is nanotube formation on the machined surface (MA group) and nano-micro surface which is nanotube formation on the RBM surface (RA group). Anodic oxidation was performed at a constant voltage of 20 V for 10 min using a DC power supply (Fine Power F-3005; SG EMD, Anyang, Korea). The bone blocks were investigated using histology. There was no inflammation around implants, and new bone formation was shown along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces. The amount of bone formation was increased depending on time comparing 4 weeks and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, lamellar bone was more formed along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces than 4 weeks. It indicated that nano-micro surface showed good result in terms of osseointegration.

  11. Thin sol-gel-derived silica coatings on dental pure titanium casting.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Sato, K; Hatada, R; Baba, K; Atsuta, M

    1999-01-01

    The sol-gel dipping process, in which liquid silicon alkoxide is transformed into a solid silicon-oxygen network, can produce a thin film coating of silica (SiO(2)). The features of this method are high homogeneity and purity of the thin SiO(2) film and a low sinter temperature, which are important in the preparation of coating films that can protect metallic ion release from the metal substrate and prevent attachment of dental plaque. We evaluated the surface properties of dental pure titanium casting coated with a thin SiO(2) or SiO(2)/F-hybrid film by the sol-gel dipping process. The metal specimens were pretreated by dipping in isopropylalcohol solution containing 10 wt% 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane and treated by dipping in the silica precursor solution for 5 min, withdrawal at a speed of 2 mm/min, air-drying for 20 min at room temperature, heating at 120 degrees C for 20 min, and then storing at room temperature. Both SiO(2) and SiO(2)/F films bonded strongly (above 55 MPa) to pure titanium substrate by a tensile test. SiO(2(-)) and SiO(2)/F-coated specimens immersed in 1 wt% of lactic acid solution for two weeks showed significantly less release of titanium ions (30. 5 ppb/cm(2) and 9.5 ppb/cm(2), respectively) from the substrate than noncoated specimens (235.2 ppb/cm(2)). Hydrophobilization of SiO(2(-)) and SiO(2)/F-coated surfaces resulted in significant increases of contact angle of water (81.6 degrees and 105.7 degrees, respectively) compared with noncoated metal specimens (62.1 degrees ). The formation of both thin SiO(2) and SiO(2)/F-hybrid films by the sol-gel dipping process on the surface of dental pure titanium casting may be useful clinically in enhancing the bond strength of dental resin cements to titanium, preventing titanium ions release from the substrate, and reducing the accumulation of dental plaque attaching to intraoral dental restorations. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. In vitro fatigue tests and in silico finite element analysis of dental implants with different fixture/abutment joint types using computer-aided design models.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Machado, Lucas S; Matsumoto, Shuji; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue resistance of dental fixtures with two different fixture-abutment connections by in vitro fatigue testing and in silico three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) using original computer-aided design (CAD) models. Dental implant fixtures with external connection (EX) or internal connection (IN) abutments were fabricated from original CAD models using grade IV titanium and step-stress accelerated life testing was performed. Fatigue cycles and loads were assessed by Weibull analysis, and fatigue cracking was observed by micro-computed tomography and a stereomicroscope with high dynamic range software. Using the same CAD models, displacement vectors of implant components were also analyzed by 3D FEA. Angles of the fractured line occurring at fixture platforms in vitro and of displacement vectors corresponding to the fractured line in silico were compared by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue testing showed significantly greater reliability for IN than EX (p<0.001). Fatigue crack initiation was primarily observed at implant fixture platforms. FEA demonstrated that crack lines of both implant systems in vitro were observed in the same direction as displacement vectors of the implant fixtures in silico. In silico displacement vectors in the implant fixture are insightful for geometric development of dental implants to reduce complex interactions leading to fatigue failure. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Accuracy of mechanical torque-limiting devices for dental implants.

    PubMed

    L'Homme-Langlois, Emilie; Yilmaz, Burak; Chien, Hua-Hong; McGlumphy, Edwin

    2015-10-01

    A common complication in implant dentistry is unintentional implant screw loosening. The critical factor in the prevention of screw loosening is the delivery of the appropriate target torque value. Mechanical torque-limiting devices (MTLDs) are the most frequently recommended devices by the implant manufacturers to deliver the target torque value to the screw. Two types of MTLDs are available: friction-style and spring-style. Limited information is available regarding the influence of device type on the accuracy of MTLDs. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the accuracy of spring-style and friction-style MTLDs. Five MTLDs from 6 different dental implant manufacturers (Astra Tech/Dentsply, Zimmer Dental, Biohorizons, Biomet 3i, Straumann [ITI], and Nobel Biocare) (n=5 per manufacturer) were selected to determine their accuracy in delivering target torque values preset by their manufacturers. All torque-limiting devices were new and there were 3 manufacturers for the friction-style and 3 manufacturers for the spring-style. The procedure of target torque measurement was performed 10 times for each device and a digital torque gauge (Chatillon Model DFS2-R-ND; Ametek) was used to record the measurements. Statistical analysis used nonparametric tests to determine the accuracy of the MTLDs in delivering target torque values and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to assess pairwise comparisons. Median absolute difference between delivered torque values and target torque values of friction-style and spring-style MTLDs were not significantly different (P>.05). Accuracy of Astra Tech and Zimmer Dental friction-style torque-limiting devices were significantly different than Biohorizons torque-limiting devices (P<.05). There is no difference between the accuracy of new friction-style MTLDs and new spring-style MTLDs. All MTLDs fell within ±10% of the target torque value. Astra Tech and Zimmer Dental friction-style torque-limiting devices were significantly

  14. Delivery of antagomiR204-conjugated gold nanoparticles from PLGA sheets and its implication in promoting osseointegration of titanium implant in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangwei; Tan, Naiwen; Zhou, Yuchao; Wei, Hongbo; Ren, Shuai; Yu, Fan; Chen, Hui; Jia, Chengming; Yang, Guodong; Song, Yingliang

    2017-01-01

    Impaired osseointegration of the implant remains the big hurdle for dental implant therapy in diabetic patients. In this study, the authors first identified that miR204 was strikingly highly expressed in the bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) of diabetic rats. Forced expression of miR204 repressed the osteogenic potential of BMSCs, while inhibition of miR204 significantly increased the osteogenic capacity. Moreover, the miR204 inhibitor was conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNP-antagomiR204) and dispersed them in the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) solution. The AuNP-antagomiR204 containing PLGA solution was applied for coating the surface of titanium implant. Electron microscope revealed that an ultrathin sheet was formed on the surface of the implant, and the AuNPs were evenly dispersed in the coated PLGA sheet. Cellular experiments revealed that these encapsulated AuNP-antagomiR204 were able to be released from the PLGA sheet and uptaken by adherent BMSCs. In vivo animal study further confirmed that the AuNP-antagomiR204 released from PLGA sheet promoted osseointegration, as revealed by microcomputerized tomography (microCT) reconstruction and histological assay. Taken together, this study established that miR204 misexpression accounted for the deficient osseointegation in diabetes mellitus, while PLGA sheets aided the release of AuNP-antagomiR204, which would be a promising strategy for titanium implant surface functionalization toward better osseointegration.

  15. High-intensity low energy titanium ion implantation into zirconium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, A. I.; Kashkarov, E. B.; Pushilina, N. S.; Syrtanov, M. S.; Shevelev, A. E.; Korneva, O. S.; Sutygina, A. N.; Lider, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    This research describes the possibility of ultra-high dose deep titanium ion implantation for surface modification of zirconium alloy Zr-1Nb. The developed method based on repetitively pulsed high intensity low energy titanium ion implantation was used to modify the surface layer. The DC vacuum arc source was used to produce metal plasma. Plasma immersion titanium ions extraction and their ballistic focusing in equipotential space of biased electrode were used to produce high intensity titanium ion beam with the amplitude of 0.5 A at the ion current density 120 and 170 mA/cm2. The solar eclipse effect was used to prevent vacuum arc titanium macroparticles from appearing in the implantation area of Zr sample. Titanium low energy (mean ion energy E = 3 keV) ions were implanted into zirconium alloy with the dose in the range of (5.4-9.56) × 1020 ion/cm2. The effect of ion current density, implantation dose on the phase composition, microstructure and distribution of elements was studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy, respectively. The results show the appearance of Zr-Ti intermetallic phases of different stoichiometry after Ti implantation. The intermetallic phases are transformed from both Zr0.7Ti0.3 and Zr0.5Ti0.5 to single Zr0.6Ti0.4 phase with the increase in the implantation dose. The changes in phase composition are attributed to Ti dissolution in zirconium lattice accompanied by the lattice distortions and appearance of macrostrains in intermetallic phases. The depth of Ti penetration into the bulk of Zr increases from 6 to 13 μm with the implantation dose. The hardness and wear resistance of the Ti-implanted zirconium alloy were increased by 1.5 and 1.4 times, respectively. The higher current density (170 mA/cm2) leads to the increase in the grain size and surface roughness negatively affecting the tribological properties of the alloy.

  16. The efficacy of two-stage titanium implants as orthodontic anchorage in the preprosthodontic correction of third molars in adults--a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Haanaes, H R; Stenvik, A; Beyer-Olsen, E S; Tryti, T; Faehn, O

    1991-08-01

    Orthodontic movement of teeth is often required to satisfactorily treat a variety of oral rehabilitation problems. Considerable limitations in the clinical application of orthodontic treatment may result from the lack of teeth suitable for anchorage. Three patients with edentulous posterior segments are presented illustrating how implants can be utilized for preprosthodontic correction of impacted third molars rendering them suitable as bridge abutments. The patients have been followed for 8-10 years. Two-stage titanium implants were used as orthodontic anchorage as no dental anchorage was available. Edgewise orthodontic mechanics were used to move the third molars mesially with forces up to 2.5 N (about 250 g). No movement of the implants occurred and they were radiologically and clinically intact at the end of the orthodontic loading and were, therefore, subsequently used as bridge abutments.

  17. In situ fabrication of silver nanoparticle-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on metallic titanium surface for bacteriostatic and biocompatible implantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Sun, Yan; Wang, Dongzhou; Liu, Hong; Boughton, Robert I

    2013-01-01

    A silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer was synthesized in situ on a metallic titanium substrate. In the synthesis approach, a layer of sodium titanate nanotubes is first prepared on the titanium surface by using a hydrothermal method. Silver nitrate solution is absorbed into the nanotube channels by immersing a dried nanotube layer in silver nitrate solution. Finally, silver ions are reduced by glucose, leading to the in situ growth of AgNPs in the hydrogen titanate nanotube channels. Long-term silver release and bactericidal experiments demonstrated that the effective silver release and effective antibacterial period of the titanium foil with a AgNP-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on the surface can extend to more than 15 days. This steady and prolonged release characteristic is helpful to promote a long-lasting antibacterial capability for the prevention of severe infection after surgery. A series of antimicrobial and biocompatible tests have shown that the sandwich nanostructure with a low level of silver loading exhibits a bacteriostatic rate as high as 99.99%, while retaining low toxicity for cells and possessing high osteogenic potential. Titanium foil with a AgNP-filled hydrogen titanate nanotube layer on the surface that is fabricated with low-cost surface modification methods is a promising implantable material that will find applications in artificial bones, joints, and dental implants. PMID:23966780

  18. [Gingival fluid cytokine profile in patients after dental implantation and by periimplantitis].

    PubMed

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Ippolitov, E V; Tsareva, T V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 32 patients with complications which have developed 3 months to 14 years after dental implants placement. ELISA method was used to assess cytokines content in various sites of tooth alignment in patients with Herpesviridae and periodontopathogenics bacteria associated periimplantitis. The results prove the necessity for Herpesviridae and selected bacteria monitoring after dental implantation.

  19. Bone response to a titanium aluminium nitride coating on metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C O; Brook, I M

    2006-05-01

    The design, surface characteristics and strength of metallic implants are dependant on their intended use and clinical application. Surface modifications of materials may enable reduction of the time taken for osseointegration and improve the biological response of bio-mechanically favourable metals and alloys. The influence of a titanium aluminium nitride (TAN) coating on the response of bone to commercially pure titanium and austenitic 18/8 stainless steel wire is reported. TAN coated and plain rods of stainless steel and commercially pure titanium were implanted into the mid-shaft of the femur of Wistar rats. The femurs were harvested at four weeks and processed for scanning electron and light microscopy. All implants exhibited a favourable response in bone with no evidence of fibrous encapsulation. There was no significant difference in the amount of new bone formed around the different rods (osseoconduction), however, there was a greater degree of shrinkage separation of bone from the coated rods than from the plain rods (p = 0.017 stainless steel and p = 0.0085 titanium). TAN coating may result in reduced osseointegration between bone and implant.

  20. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of Titanium Implant Surfaces: Microgroove-Structures Improve Cellular Adhesion and Viability.

    PubMed

    Hartjen, Philip; Hoffmann, Alexia; Henningsen, Anders; Barbeck, Mike; Kopp, Alexander; Kluwe, Lan; Precht, Clarissa; Quatela, Olivia; Gaudin, Robert; Heiland, Max; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Knipfer, Christian; Grubeanu, Daniel; Smeets, Ralf; Jung, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is an established electrochemical treatment technique that can be used for surface modifications of metal implants. In this study we to treated titanium implants with PEO, to examine the resulting microstructure and to characterize adhesion and viability of cells on the treated surfaces. Our aim was to identify an optimal surface-modification for titanium implants in order to improve soft-tissue integration. Three surface-variants were generated on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by PEO-treatment. The elemental composition and the microstructures of the surfaces were characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. In vitro cytocompatibility of the surfaces was assessed by seeding L929 fibroblasts onto them and measuring the adhesion, viability and cytotoxicity of cells by means of live/dead staining, XTT assay and LDH assay. Electron microscopy and profilometry revealed that the PEO-surface variants differed largely in microstructure/topography, porosity and roughness from the untreated control material as well as from one another. Roughness was generally increased after PEO-treatment. In vitro, PEO-treatment led to improved cellular adhesion and viability of cells accompanied by decreased cytotoxicity. PEO-treatment provides a promising strategy to improve the integration of titanium implants with surrounding tissues. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. In vitro osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells in biomimetic surface modified titanium alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Santander, Sonia; Alcaine, Clara; Lyahyai, Jaber; Pérez, Maria Angeles; Rodellar, Clementina; Doblaré, Manuel; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between cells and implant surface is crucial for clinical success. This interaction and the associated surface treatment are essential for achieving a fa