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Sample records for tongue mucosa treated

  1. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells.

  2. Genomic instability in non-neoplastic oral mucosa cells can predict risk during 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Fávero Salvadori, Daisy Maria; da Silva, Renata Nunes; Ribeiro Darros, Bruno; Alencar Marques, Mariangela Esther

    2004-10-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO)-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis is a useful model for studying oral squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of DNA damage induced by 4NQO in oral mucosa cells by the single cell gel (comet) assay. Male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups of 10 animals each and treated with 50 ppm 4NQO solution by drinking water for 4, 12 or 20 weeks. Ten animals were used as negative control. Statistically significant increase of DNA damage was observed in non-neoplastic oral cells at four weeks of 4NQO administration when compared with control (P < 0.05). The level of DNA damage was directly associated with the severity of histological changes. The results suggest that histologically normal tissue is able to harbor genetically unstable cells contributing to the initiation of oral carcinogenesis. Genomic instability appears to be associated with the risk and progression of oral cancer.

  3. Morphogenesis of the tongue mucosa in the domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos f. domestica) during the late embryonic stages.

    PubMed

    Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Jackowiak, Hanna; Kontecka, Helena

    2014-09-01

    The tongue in domestic duck, as in other Anseriformes, is characterized by wide variety of shape and mechanical papillae and they fulfill different function during food collection. The present work aims to describe morphological features of the tongue as well as the pace formation of the mechanical papillae during embryonic period. The results may allow to answer whether the tongue in duck is ready to fulfill feeding function after hatching. The study revealed that the particular part of the tongue and the conical papillae of the body develop between 10th and 16th day of incubation, from the caudal part of the body into the rostral part of the tongue. The conical papillae of the lingual prominence in the first row are formed from 11th to 16th day and in the second row at the turn of the 15th and 16th day of incubation. These papillae developed symmetrically from the median part of the lingual prominence, to its edges. The lingual comb, which is used during transport of the food particles, is formed between 16th and 19th day. The present study indicated the morphological changes of the particular part of the tongue and the mechanical papillae were varied between the developmental stages. The morphology of the tongue in the domestic duck is fully developed before hatching and ready to collect food by pecking and grazing. However, filter-feeding mechanism is not still obvious.

  4. Mouse papillomavirus MmuPV1 infects oral mucosa and preferentially targets the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, a new mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, was discovered in a colony of NMRI- Foxn1nu /Foxn1nu athymic mice in India. This finding was significant because it was the first papillomavirus to be found in a laboratory mouse. In this paper we report successful infections of both dorsal and ventral surfaces of the rostral tongues of outbred athymic nude mice. We also report the observation that the base of the tongue, the area of the tongue often targeted by cancer-associated high-risk papillomavirus infections in humans, is especially susceptible to infection. A suitable animal model for the study of oral papillomavirus infections, co-infections, and cancers has long been sought. The work presented here suggests that such a model is now at hand. PMID:26609937

  5. [Solcoseryl--dental adherent paste in the treatment of acute radiation-induced inflammation of oral mucosa, gingivae and tongue].

    PubMed

    Kryst, L; Kowalik, S; Bartkowski, S; Henning, G

    1990-07-01

    On the basis of a study carried out in three teaching departments of maxillofacial surgery the effect was analysed of Solcoseryl dental adherent paste and Linomag in the treatment of acute radiation-induced stomatitis. Both drugs were effective but Solcoseryl was superior to the other drug since it accelerated healing by about 50% and formed a protecting dressing on the inflamed mucosa.

  6. Immunohistochemical analysis of type III collagen expression in the lingual mucosa of rats during organogenesis of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi; Asami, Tomoichiro; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Aoyagi, Hidekazu

    2008-07-01

    We examined the distribution of immunofluorescence due to immunostaining of type III collagen, differential interference contrast (DIC) images and images obtained in the transmission mode after toluidine blue staining by laser-scanning microscopy of semi-ultrathin sections of epoxy resin-embedded samples, during morphogenesis of the filiform papillae, keratinization of the lingual epithelium, and myogenesis of the rat tongue. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was distributed widely in the mesenchymal connective tissue in fetuses on day 15 after conception (E15), at which time the lingual epithelium was composed of one or two layers of cuboidal cells and the lingual muscle was barely recognizable. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was clearly detected on the lamina propria in fetuses on E17 and E19, and it was relatively distinct just beneath the lingual epithelium. Immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen was sparsely distributed on the connective tissue around the developing lingual muscle. In fetuses on E19, the epithelium became clearly stratified and squamous. At postnatal stages from newborn (P0) to postnatal day 14 (P14), keratinization of the lingual epithelium advanced gradually with the development of filiform papillae. On P0, myogenesis of the tongue was almost completed. The intensity of the fluorescence immunoreactivity specific for type III collagen at postnatal stages was almost same as that on E19. The immunoreactivity around the fully mature muscle was relatively distinct between P0 and P14. Thus, type III collagen appeared in conjunction with the morphogenesis of filiform papillae and the keratinization of the lingual epithelium as well as in the connective tissue that surrounded the lingual muscle during myogenesis of the rat tongue.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Frangou, Phroso; Buettner, Maike; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2005-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted through saliva, but the cellular source is controversial. Putative reservoirs include oral epithelium and salivary glands. Tongue mucosal samples, salivary glands, and tongue carcinomas were studied, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, for evidence of EBV infection. EBV replication was seen in 1.3% of tongue mucosal samples. No latent infection was found at this site. EBV infection was detected neither in normal salivary glands nor in tongue carcinomas. Thus, EBV replication occurs infrequently in tongue epithelial cells, and salivary glands are unlikely to harbor EBV. EBV is unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of tongue cancer.

  8. Effects of visible light irradiation on eugenol-treated oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Muraoka, Eitoku; Nakazato, Yoshihiro; Okada, Norihisa

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of eugenol (EUG) and iso-eugenol (IsoEUG)--with or without visible light (VL) irradiation--on oral mucous membranes. Oral mucous membranes of mice were applied with three agents, EUG, IsoEUG, and aceton (as the control) in the absence or presence of VL irradiation. VL irradiation resulted in more tissue damage for EUG- or IsoEUG-treated mucosa compared to corresponding compounds without VL irradiation, and that damage under IsoEUG treatment was greater than that under EUG treatment. Necrosis, but not apoptosis, was preferentially expressed in EUG- or IsoEUG-treated mucous membranes in the presence of VL irradiation.

  9. Effects of exercise on swallowing and tongue strength in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Falciglia, D; DeLacure, M; Branski, R C; Kraus, D; Lee, N; Ho, M; Ganz, C; Smith, B; Sanfilippo, N

    2014-05-01

    Tongue strength is reduced in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Tongue strengthening protocols have resulted in improved lingual strength and swallowing in healthy individuals, as well as in patients following a neurological event. However, no studies have examined the efficacy of tongue strengthening exercises on tongue strength, swallowing, and quality of life (QOL; Head and Neck Cancer Inventory) in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial examined the effects of a tongue strengthening programme paired with traditional exercises vs. traditional exercises alone. Dependent variables included tongue strength, swallowing, and QOL in a group of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Differences with regard to tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE) were not observed within or between groups. QOL in the eating and speech domains improved following treatment in both groups. However, the experimental group demonstrated greater impairment in QOL in the social disruption domain following treatment, whereas the control group demonstrated a slight improvement in functioning. Tongue strengthening did not yield a statistically significant improvement in either tongue strength or swallowing measures in this patient cohort. Patient compliance and treatment timing may be factors underlying these outcomes.

  10. Treating animal bites: susceptibility of Staphylococci from oral mucosa of cats.

    PubMed

    Muniz, I M; Penna, B; Lilenbaum, W

    2013-11-01

    Infected wounds determined by cats' bites represent high costs to public health, and their adequate treatment relies on the knowledge of the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial agents found in the oral microbiota. Members of the genus Staphylococcus sp. belong to the microbiota of the oral mucosa of cats and are frequently involved in secondary infections of these wounds. This study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus species isolated from oral mucosa of cats. Samples were collected from 200 clinically healthy cats and processed by standard bacteriological methods and tested for susceptibility to a panel of 16 antimicrobials. A total of 212 staphylococci isolates were obtained from 141 of the 200 cats (70.5%), and more than one colony was recognized in 53 cases. Coagulase-negative species were most frequently found (89.6%) distributed among Staphylococcus xylosus (50.9%), Staphylococcus felis (27.4%), Staphylococcus simulans (6.1%) and Staphylococcus sciuri (5.2%). Coagulase-positive species (10.4%) were distributed among Staphylococcus aureus (4.7%) and Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) (5.7%). Regarding to antimicrobial resistance, 178 isolates (83.9%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, and rifampicin showed the best results with 100% of sensitive strains. Conversely, high rates of resistance were observed for penicillin and tetracycline (56.1%). The 212 staphylococci isolates and 30 (14.1%) strains were resistant to methicillin (on the disc susceptibility test) and may be preliminarily considered as methicilin-resistant staphylococci. In conclusion, this study reports important rates of antimicrobial resistance among the species of Staphylococcus isolated from clinical specimens of cats, which must be considered for the treating of cats' bites in humans.

  11. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  12. Clinical inquiries. When should you treat tongue-tie in a newborn?

    PubMed

    Cho, Anthony; Kelsberg, Gary; Safranek, Sarah

    2010-12-01

    Consider treatment when the infant is having difficulty breastfeeding. Infants with mild to moderate tongue-tie, or ankyloglossia, are likely to breastfeed successfully and usually require no treatment (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, a prospective controlled trial and a case-control study). However, mothers of infants with any degree of tongue-tie who have difficulty with breastfeeding despite lactation support report immediate improvement after frenotomy is performed on the baby. Complications from the procedure are minimal (SOR: B, a small randomized controlled trial [ RCT] and multiple uncontrolled cohort studies and case series).

  13. Mortality in tongue cancer patients treated by curative surgery: a retrospective cohort study from CGRD

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Shao; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Geng-He; Tsai, Yao-Te; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Chien, Chih-Yen; Young, Chi-Kuang; Fang, Ku-Hao; Liu, Chin-Jui; Yeh, Re-Ming A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to compare the outcomes of surgical treatment of tongue cancer patients in three different age groups. Methods From 2004 to 2013, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 1,712 patients who were treated in the four institutions constituting the Chang Gung Memorial Hospitals (CGMH). We divided and studied the patients in three age groups: Group 1, younger (<65 years); Group 2, young old (65 to <75); and Group 3, older old patients (≥75 years). Results Multivariate analyses determined the unfavorable, independent prognostic factors of overall survival to be male sex, older age, advanced stage, advanced T, N classifications, and surgery plus chemotherapy. No significant differences were found in adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of death in early-stage disease (stage I–II) among Group 1 (HR 1.0), Group 2 (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.87–2.34], p = 0.158), and Group 3 (HR 1.22, 95% CI [0.49–3.03], p = 0.664) patients. However, amongst advanced-stage patients (stage (III–IV)), Group 3 (HR 2.53, 95% CI [1.46–4.38], p  = 0.001) showed significantly worse survival than the other two groups after other variables were adjusted for. Fourteen out of 21 older old, advanced-staged patients finally died, and most of the mortalities were non-cancerogenic (9/14, 64.3%), and mostly occurred within one year (12/14, 85%) after cancer diagnosis. These non-cancer cause of death included underlying diseases in combination with infection, pneumonia, poor nutrition status, and trauma. Conclusions Our study showed that advanced T classification (T3–4), positive nodal metastasis (N1–3) and poorly differentiated tumor predicted poor survival for all patients. Outcome of early-stage patients (stage I–II) among three age groups were not significantly different. However, for advanced-stage patients (stage III–IV), the older old patients (≥75) had significantly worse survival than the other two patient groups. Therefore, for early

  14. Tongue Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your tongue helps you taste, swallow, and chew. You also use it to speak. Your tongue is made up of many muscles. The upper surface contains your taste buds. Problems with the tongue include Pain Swelling ...

  15. Characteristics of filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae and surface of interface epithelium-connective tissue of the maned sloth tongue mucosa (Bradypus torquatus, Iliger, 1811): Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Benetti, E J; Pícoli, L C; Guimarães, J P; Motoyama, A A; Miglino, M A; Watanabe, L-S

    2009-02-01

    The study of lingual surfaces and the surface of interface epithelium-connective tissue of the tongue of Bradypus torquatus was performed by employing the light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results revealed that the rostral part of the tongue presents a round apex and covered by filiform and fungiform lingual papillae and a ventral smooth surface. It was observed that the epithelial layer of the dorsal surface possesses the basal, spinosum, granular and cornified epithelial cells. The lamina propria is characterized by a dense connective tissue forming the long, short and round papillae. Numerous typical filiform papillae are located especially in the rostral part intermingled for few fungiform papillae, which were revealed in three-dimensional SEM images. Usually, the fungiform papillae are located in the border of rostral apex of the tongue exhibiting the rounded form. They are covered by keratinized epithelial cells. In the fungiform papillae, several taste pores were observed on the surface. The vallate papillae presented numerous taste buds in the wall of epithelial cells, being that the major number of taste buds is located on the superior half of vallate papilla. The taste pores are surrounded by several laminae of keratinized epithelial cells. The samples treated with NaOH solution and examined by SEM revealed, after removal of the epithelial layer, the dense connective core in original disposition, presenting different sizes and shapes. The specimens stained with Picrosirius and examined by polarized light microscopy revealed the connective tissue, indicating the collagen fibres type I and type III.

  16. Nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells of patients with type I and II diabetes treated with folic acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Meda, B C; Zamora-Perez, A L; Muñoz-Magallanes, T; Sánchez-Parada, M G; García Bañuelos, J J; Guerrero-Velázquez, C; Sánchez-Orozco, L V; Vera-Cruz, J M; Armendáriz-Borunda, J; Zúñiga-González, G M

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by high blood glucose. Excessive production of free radicals may cause oxidative damage to DNA and other molecules, leading to complications of the disease. It may be possible to delay or reduce such damage by administration of antioxidants such as folic acid (FA). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of FA on nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in the oral mucosa of patients with DM. NAs (micronucleated cells, binucleated cells, pyknotic nuclei, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, abnormally condensed chromatin, and nuclear buds) were analyzed in 2000 cells from 45 healthy individuals (control group) and 55 patients with controlled or uncontrolled type I or II DM; 35 patients in the latter group were treated with FA. Samples were taken from the FA group before and after treatment. An increased rate of NAs was found in patients with DM in comparison with that of the control group (P<0.001). FA supplementation in patients with DM reduced the frequency of NAs (20.4 ± 8.0 before treatment vs. 10.5 ± 5.2 after treatment; P<0.001). The type I and type II DM and controlled and uncontrolled DM subgroups were analyzed in terms of sex, age, and smoking habit. The significantly reduced frequencies of buccal mucosa cells with micronuclei, binucleation, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, karyorrhexis+abnormally condensed chromatin, karyolysis, and nuclear buds produced by FA supplementation in DM patients (P<0.02) are consistent with the idea that free radicals are responsible for the increased frequency of NAs in DM patients.

  17. Tongue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The tongue is mainly composed of muscles. It is covered with a mucous membrane. Small nodules of tissue (papillae) cover the upper surface of the tongue. Between the papillae are the taste buds, which ...

  18. Increased susceptibility of ethanol-treated gastric mucosa to naproxen and its inhibition by DA-9601, an Artemisia asiatica extract

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae Young; Ahn, Gook Jun; Choi, Seul Min; Ahn, Byoung Ok; Kim, Won Bae

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of DA-9601, a new gastroprotective agent, on the vulnerability of ethanol-treated rat’s stomach to naproxen (NAP). METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with 1 mL of 50% ethanol twice a day for 5 d and then NAP (50 mg/kg) was administered. DA-9601 was administered 1 h before NAP. Four hours after NAP, the rats were killed to examine gross injury index (mm2), histologic change and to determine mucosal levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glutathione (GSH) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). RESULTS: Pretreatment of ethanol significantly increased NAP-induced gastric lesions, as well as an increase in MDA and MPO. On the contrary, mucosal PGE2 and GSH contents were decreased dramatically by ethanol pretreatment, which were aggravated by NAP. DA-9601 significantly reduced NAP-induced gastric injury grossly and microscopically, regardless of pretreatment with ethanol. DA-9601 preserved, or rather, increased mucosal PGE2 and GSH in NAP-treated rats (P<0.05), with reduction in mucosal MDA and MPO levels. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that repeated alcohol consumption renders gastric mucosa more susceptible to NSAIDs though, at least in part, reduction of endogenous cytoprotectants including PGE2 and GSH, and increase in MPO activation, and that DA-9601, a new gastroprotectant, can reduce the increased vulnerability of ethanol consumers to NSAIDs-induced gastric damage via the mechanism in which PGE2 and GSH are involved. PMID:16437715

  19. Kinetics of changes in the crypts of the jejunal mucosa of dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sunter, J. P.; Appleton, D. R.; Wright, N. A.; Watson, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    When symmetrical 1,2 dimethylhydrazine was administered to rats by weekly s.c. injection, 37% of the animals had developed small intestinal carcinomas after 21-27 weeks. These lesions were largely localized to duodenum and upper jejunum. At the same time there was a diffuse crypt hyperplasia in the jejunum which affected all the treated animals, not just those with neoplasms. This marked hyperplasia was preceded by a modest sustained crypt elongation which was seen soon after DMH injections began. In these hyperplastic jejunal crypts the absolute size of the proliferative compartment was increased, but the growth fraction calculated from labelling studies appeared to fall, probably by reduction in relative size of the proliferating population within the proliferative compartment. No convincing alteration in actual cell-cycle time was observed in the abnormal crypts. There was a slight (25%) increase in cell-production rate in the abnormal crypts. Images Fig. 1 PMID:656298

  20. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56 years (range, 18-85 years). The median dose administered was 30 Gy (range, 30-46 Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9 years (range, 0.9-22 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ≥4 cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12 years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  1. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Tongue Cancer Treated with Induction DCF Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Koyanagi, Kazuo; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 60s was admitted for the treatment of advanced cervical esophageal cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes and advanced tongue cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes. Esophageal cancer was suspected to have invaded the trachea. The tongue cancer was located on the left side and had invaded beyond the median line of the tongue. Both cancers were pathologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, it was determined that pharyngo-laryngo- esophagectomy and total glossectomy were required prior to the treatment. However, after 2 courses of docetaxel/cisplatin/ 5-FU combined induction chemotherapy, both cancers remarkably decreased; consequently, an esophagectomy to preserve laryngeal function and partial glossectomy could be performed simultaneously. The patient is well without recurrence 1 year post-surgery.

  2. [Research progress on the risk factors of geographic tongue].

    PubMed

    Huamei, Yang; Yu, Zhou; Xin, Zeng; Ga, Liao; Qianming, Chen

    2015-02-01

    Geographic tongue, also called benign migratory glossitis, is a common and superficial benign inflammatory disorder that affects the tongue epithelium. The majority of geographic tongue lesions typically manifest as irregular central erythematous patches. These lesions, which are caused by the loss of filiform papillae, are defined by an elevated whitish band-like border that can change location, size, and pattern over a period of time. Histological observations of the oral mucosa affected by geographic tongue revealed nonspecific inflammation. Some reports described cases of migratory stomatitis, wherein lesions simultaneously manifested on the extra lingual oral mucosa. This condition is also called ectopic geographic tongue, which is clinically and histologically similar to the type normally confined to the tongue. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. The condition may spontaneously exhibit periods of remission and exacerbation with good prognosis. The specific etiology of geographic tongue remains unknown. Geographic tongue is age-related and is prevalent among young individuals. Various etiological factors that have been suggested in literature include immunological factors, genetic factors, atopic or allergic tendency, emotional stress, tobacco consumption, hormonal disturbances, and zinc deficiency. Geographic tongue may coexist with other disorders, such as fissured tongue, psoriasis, diabetes mellitus, gastroin- testinal diseases, burning mouth syndrome, and Down syndrome. Experts currently disagree on whether geographic tongue is an oral manifestation of psoriasis. Moreover, some scholars suggest that geographic tongue is a prestage of fissured tongue. The objective of this review is to summarize current research on risk factors of geographic tongue.

  3. Efficacy of krypton laser photodynamic therapy for oral mucosa dysplasia in 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene-treated hamsters.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lingyue; Xu, Qing; Li, Pingping; Zhou, Guoyu

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of krypton laser photodynamic therapy (PDT) with PsD-007 for the treatment of oral mucosa dysplasia in 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-treated hamsters. A DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch model of precancerous lesions was created and the resultant 25 hamsters were divided into five groups. The right side was treated with PDT and the left side was used as the positive control. Following systemic anesthesia, an incision was made in the groin area to expose the femoral vein. PsD-007 was administered intravenously through the femoral vein. Various doses of photosensitizer were used to treat groups A-E. Subsequent to closing the incision, the right side of the buccal mucosa was irradiated with light using the krypton laser at a wavelength of 413 nm, a power density of 150 mW/cm(2) and an irradiation time of 20 min. At six weeks post-surgery, the response was analyzed using histological examinations of the buccal pouch mucosa. A total of 24 hamsters completed the six-week observation period, as one hamster from group C died in the second week following the PDT. Of all 24 irradiated sides, 15 formed normal mucosal tissues and nine demonstrated mild dysplasia. Of the total control sides, six developed moderate dysplasia, five developed severe dysplasia and 13 progressed to carcinoma in situ or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The results revealed a significant difference between the two sides (P<0.01) and the various doses of the PsD-007 groups. When the PsD-007 dose was >10 mg/kg, there was no statistical difference (P>0.05). PsD-007-mediated krypton laser PDT is effective for the treatment of oral mucosa dysplasia in hamsters.

  4. Your Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... taste buds , so you can taste everything from apples to zucchini! People are born with about 10, ... onion slice under your nose while eating an apple. What do you taste? Your tongue also gets ...

  5. Tongue problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... purple) tongue: Folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiency Pellagra Pernicious anemia Plummer-Vinson syndrome Sprue Possible causes ... micrognathia Down syndrome Hypothyroidism Infection Leukemia ... Pernicious anemia Strep infection Tumor of the pituitary ...

  6. Tongue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Results Mean Abnormal results may mean: Amyloidosis Tongue (oral) cancer Viral ulcer Benign tumors Risks Risks for this ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21093621 . Read More Oral cancer Primary amyloidosis Review Date 2/9/2015 Updated ...

  7. Tongue tie

    MedlinePlus

    ... this band is overly short and thick. The exact cause of tongue tie is not known. Your ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  8. Geographic Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases, most often related to eating hot, spicy, salty or acidic foods Many people with geographic tongue ... sensitive oral tissues, including: Hot, spicy, acidic or salty foods Tobacco products Toothpaste that contains tartar-control ...

  9. Geographic tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a long time. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if the symptoms last longer than 10 days. Seek immediate medical help if: You have breathing problems. Your tongue ...

  10. Tyrrhena Tongue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a tongue of debris at the base of the wall of a large crater in Terra Tyrrhena. The tongue is the combined product of landsliding and emplacement of crater ejecta-a 3 km (1.9 mi) wide impact crater formed on the rim of the larger crater and, when it did, it caused the movement which created the tongue. About one third of the crater that caused this can be seen near the southwest (lower left) corner of the image.

    Location near: 21.1oS, 270.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  11. Reanimation of the hemiparalytic tongue.

    PubMed

    Rubin, L R; Mishriki, Y Y; Speace, G

    1984-02-01

    Tongue hemiparesis is the inevitable result when the freshly severed 12th nerve is anastomosed to the trunk of a paralyzed 7th nerve in the technique commonly used by neurosurgeons, head and neck surgeons, otologists, and plastic surgeons to treat unilateral facial paralysis. This author has reactivated hemiparalytic tongues after research on cats. The technique has now been proved to be successful on two human beings. The reanimation is based on a simple Z-plasty of tongue muscle across the midline. Two principles are established: (1) placing a normal muscle in direct contact with a denervated muscle stimulates axons from the normal side to penetrate into the denervated side, eventually restoring function, and (2) transposition of a flap of muscle from the normal side containing extrinsic tongue muscles could provide a motor apparatus to activate the paralytic side. Biopsy slides taken from the paralyzed side of the cat tongues after 18 months showed sprouting of multiple nerves. Nerve sprouting can be found in human tongues 1 year after Z-plasties. The two patients who experienced atrophy and hemiparesis after the 12th-7th nerve hookup regained full range of tongue movements by 2 months and 4 months, respectively, demonstrating that with time, motor axons from the normal side innervated the atrophic muscle side to form new neuromotor junctions resulting in tongue movements. EMGs of the reanimated tongue showed normal activity in both sides of the tongue. Biopsies of the interface between the normal and former paralyzed side taken 1 year later showed nerves crossing the scar barrier. Apparently, the role of additional extrinsic muscle to the paralyzed side played a minor role.

  12. The molecular features of tongue epithelium treated with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide and alcohol as a model for HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Tang, Xiao-Han; Urvalek, Alison M; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2013-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer affecting humans worldwide. To determine the potential mechanisms by which chronic tobacco and alcohol abuse lead to HNSCC of the oral cavity, we have used both the 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) murine oral carcinogenesis and the Meadows-Cook alcohol models. In this study, we treated mice with 4-NQO in drinking water for 10 weeks and then administered 20% (w:v) ethanol (EtOH) for another 10 weeks. We observed increased levels and/or activation of signaling proteins [p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), β-catenin and Erk 1/2] that are typically altered during HNSCC initiation in humans. We found that EtOH administration alone increased the expression of p38 MAPK but not Erk 1/2 MAPK. Total β-catenin levels in the tongues increased by 2- to 3-fold after 4-NQO treatment, with or without EtOH. However, EtOH combined with 4-NQO reduced phosphorylated β-catenin levels, whereas 4-NQO treatment alone did not. These data implicate EtOH as a regulator of β-catenin signaling in this HNSCC model. We also utilized K14-CreER(TAM); ROSA26 mice to mark permanently stem/progenitor cells in the tongue epithelia. We found that 4-NQO alone and 4-NQO plus EtOH treatment resulted in massive, horizontal expansion of stem/progenitor cell populations arising from single stem cells in the basal layer of the epithelia. This expansion is consistent with carcinogen-associated, symmetric division of stem/progenitor cells. Our data suggest that specific therapeutic targets for prevention of HNSCC of the oral cavity associated with both alcohol and tobacco use are p38 MAPK and β-catenin.

  13. p53 mutation is rare in oral mucosa brushings from patients previously treated for a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acha-Sagredo, Amelia; Ruesga, Maria T; Rodriguez, Carlos; Aguirregaviria, Jose I; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Califano, Joseph A; Aguirre, Jose M

    2009-08-01

    Mutations of the tumour suppressor gene p53 are common in human cancer, and seem to be an early event in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The aim of our study was to determine the status of the tumour suppressor gene p53 in the oral mucosa of patients previously treated for a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, at risk of developing an oral squamous cell carcinoma, but without oral clinical lesions. Oral brushings from 87 patients were sequenced with matched genomic DNA. No mutations were found in exons 5, 7 and 8, whereas in exon 6 silent mutations (n=6) and a polymorphism (n=7) were found. Mutation of the tumour suppressor gene p53 does not seem to be a frequent event in patients at risk but without oral lesions.

  14. Downregulation of Notch1 and its potential correlation with epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong-jie; Ping, Fei-yun; Hu, Ji-an; Zhao, Shi-fang

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the expression of Notch1 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and explored its potential correlation with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in oral SCC. Paraffin sections of primary SCC of the tongue and normal mucosa were screened immunohistochemically for Notch1 and EGFR proteins. Human SCC of the tongue Tca8113 cells were treated with AG1478 to block EGFR signalling, and were transfected with the vector that encodes the specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) that targets EGFR. In SCC of the tongue expression of Notch1 was cancelled except in sites of squamous metaplasia where it was raised, while expression of EGFR was found in the peripheral cells of carcinomas, but not in sites of squamous metaplasia. In normal tongue mucosa, Notch1 was expressed mainly in the stratum corneum, but not in the stratum basale, while EGFR was expressed mainly in the stratum basale, but not in the stratum granulosum or stratum corneum. The blocking of EGFR signalling or the silencing of the EGFR gene resulted in upregulation of Notch1 at mRNA and protein levels in Tca8113 cells. These observations suggest that downregulation of Notch1 in oral SCC may be associated with upregulation of EGFR signalling.

  15. Verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa: An epidemiological and follow-up study of patients treated with surgery in 5 last years

    PubMed Central

    Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco J.; Heredero-Jung, Susana; García-García, Blas; Ruiz-Masera, Juan J.; Arévalo-Arévalo, Rafael; Zafra-Camacho, Francisco; Valenzuela-Salas, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (OVC) is described apart of the Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) due to its specific properties. The objective of our study is to show our series of cases of OVC and to compare with the SCC in terms of clinical manifestations, epidemiology, histopathology, treatment and follow-up. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study of all the OVC treated in our department between January-2007 and December-2011. The analyzed variables were sex, age, localization in the oral cavity, histopathology, number of biopsies needed to diagnose OVC, TNM classification, treatment and recurrences during follow-up. Results: Our sample was composed by n=14 patients, 57% female, with a mean age of 69.14 years. The most common localization was buccal mucosa (n=5). Seven patients were diagnosed of OVC with the first biopsy. TNM classification was: pT1: 7 patients, pT2: 3 patients, pT3: 3 patients, pT4: 1 patient. No cervical metastases were observed either in cervical neck dissection or during the follow-up of the patients. The treatment was surgery with clinical resection margins up to 1 cm in all cases, followed by radiotherapy in selected cases. Only n=1 patient (7.69%) presented a recurrence after 34 months of follow-up. The overall survival rate was 92.85%. Conclusions: In our population, OVC represents the 6.16% of all oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, and is more frequent in female patients above 70 years old. It uses to rise over a previous lesion, and usually affects the buccal mucosa. In patients with high suspicious lesions, more than one biopsy may be needed to diagnose OVC. No patient showed cervical dissemination. In our experience, treatment based on local resection, without cervical neck dissection, could be a good option for these patients. Key words:Verrucous carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, oral cancer, oral cavity, epidemiology, follow-up. PMID:24880446

  16. Common tongue conditions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Derby, Richard; Bunt, Christopher W

    2010-03-01

    Although easily examined, abnormalities of the tongue can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for physicians. Recognition and diagnosis require a thorough history, including onset and duration, antecedent symptoms, and tobacco and alcohol use. Examination of tongue morphology and a careful assessment for lymphadenopathy are also important. Geographic tongue, fissured tongue, and hairy tongue are the most common tongue problems and do not require treatment. Median rhomboid glossitis is usually associated with a candidal infection and responds to topical antifungals. Atrophic glossitis is often linked to an underlying nutritional deficiency of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, riboflavin, or niacin and resolves with correction of the underlying condition. Oral hairy leukoplakia, which can be a marker for underlying immunodeficiency, is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus and is treated with oral antivirals. Tongue growths usually require biopsy to differentiate benign lesions (e.g., granular cell tumors, fibromas, lymphoepithelial cysts) from premalignant leukoplakia or squamous cell carcinoma. Burning mouth syndrome often involves the tongue and has responded to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive behavior therapy in controlled trials. Several trials have also confirmed the effectiveness of surgical division of tongue-tie (ankyloglossia), in the context of optimizing the success of breastfeeding compared with education alone. Tongue lesions of unclear etiology may require biopsy or referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, head and neck surgeon, or a dentist experienced in oral pathology.

  17. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn's Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-07-04

    BACKGROUND This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn's disease (CD). CASE REPORT A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months' duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. CONCLUSIONS Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract.

  18. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn’s Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 50 Final Diagnosis: Anal canal adenocarcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT • MRI • biopsy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn’s disease (CD). Case Report: A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months’ duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. Conclusions: Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract. PMID:27373845

  19. Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie): a diagnostic and treatment quandary.

    PubMed

    Kotlow, L A

    1999-04-01

    The tongue is an important oral structure that affects speech, the position of teeth, periodontal tissue, nutrition, swallowing, nursing, and certain social activities. Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) limits the range of motion of the tongue, impairing its ability to fulfill its functions. In this article, diagnostic criteria needed to evaluate and treat ankyloglossia are suggested, and a method for classifying ankyloglossia is proposed.

  20. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo; Azumi, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  1. Morphological study of the northern pike (Esox lucius) tongue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghinezhad, Javad; Rahmati-holasoo, Hooman; Fayyaz, Sahel; Zargar, Ashkan

    2015-09-01

    The northern pike (Esox lucius) is a fresh water species belonging to the Esocidae family. It is a carnivorous fish feeding mostly on invertebrates and fishes. Due to the scantiness of relevant literature regarding the morphology of the tongue in fish we carried out this study with the aim of providing information on the dorsal surface morphology and histological structures of the tongue in E. lucius. The tongues of five E. lucius were examined using light- and scanning electron- microscopy (SEM) techniques. The SEM studies revealed the presence of numerous teeth, longitudinal mucosal strands and scattered taste buds spread on the tongue surface. Histological studies using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining showed that the musculature was not visible in the tongue of E. lucius. The tongue is composed of mucosa, and submucosa supported by osteocartilagionous skeleton. The mucosa consists of several layers of unicellular mucous cells interrupted by numerous teeth. The derivation of teeth from the underlying bronchial skeleton was visible in longitudinal section. The scattered taste buds with a typical onion shape were also present. Overall, the morphological features of the E. lucius tongue together suggested its mechanical and sensory roles. The findings of this study together with morphological and physiological data from other fishes contribute to the knowledge of the nutrition and feeding behavior in aquaculture species.

  2. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-L; Chiang, C-W; Shiao, C-C

    2015-12-01

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  3. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Lien; Chiang, Ching-Wen; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2015-07-22

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  4. Small cell carcinoma of the lung in a treated case of Myoepithelial carcinoma of the tongue--report of a rare case with illustrated review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Venkatesulu, Bhanuprasad; Mallick, Supriya; George, Archana; Bhasker, Suman

    2016-03-01

    Myoepithelial carcinoma has rarely been reported in the oral cavity and oropharynx. We found only 6 cases of myoepithelioma of the tongue reported till date. Two cases had a benign myoepithelioma; four had epithelial-Myoepithelial carcinoma. The present case had malignant myoepithelioma, a distinct entity from other histologies.

  5. Black, Hairy Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... content of the mouth following antibiotic use Poor oral hygiene Dry mouth (xerostomia) Medications containing bismuth, such as ... as: Normal variations in tongue color (pigment) Poor oral hygiene Foods or medications that have stained the tongue ...

  6. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; Kakimoto, Naoya; Sumida, Iori; Fujiwara, Masateru; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients. Methods First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations. Results With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant) distances to the source. Conclusions The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT. PMID:27128434

  7. Cat tongue Velcro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alexis; Martinez, Andrea; Jung, Hyewon; Tsai, Ting-Wen; Hu, David

    2016-11-01

    A cat's tongue is covered in an array of spines called papillae. These spines are thought to be used in grooming and rasping meat from bones of prey, although no mechanism has been given. We use high-speed video to film a cat removing cat food deeply wedged into a 3-D printed fur mat. We show that the spines on the tongue act as Velcro for particles. The tongue itself is highly elastic. As the cat presses it against a substrate, the tongue flattens and the spines separate. When the tongue is removed from the substrate the spines come together, wedging particles between them. This elasticity-driven entrapment permits the surface of the tongue to act as a carrier for hard to reach particles, and to increase the efficacy of grooming and feeding.

  8. Geographic tongue and tenofovir

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Alexandre Oliveira; Marinho, Rui Tato; Velosa, José; Costa, João Borges

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis B was started on tenofovir. One month after initiating the new medication, he developed severe symptomatology with odynophagia and a very painful tongue. The physical examination reveals multiple erythematous patches on his tongue and a biopsy was performed. It allowed the diagnosis of benign migratory glossitis or geographic tongue. The patient was kept on tenofovir, but had to start topical corticoid therapy. Geographic tongue is a common condition that may be caused by drug idiosyncrasy, but has never before been associated to tenofovir. It is usually asymptomatic, but sometimes it causes severe symptoms, being an important impairment of quality of life. PMID:23598934

  9. A Large Pregnancy Tumor of Tongue – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arunmozhi, U.; Priya, R. Shanmuga; Kadhiresan, R.; Shamsudeen-SS, Shaik M

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma is a tissue overgrowth which commonly develops as a response to irritation or trauma which is usually localized. Though gingiva is said to be the common site, it also can occur on lip, tongue and buccal mucosa. Pathogenesis is unclear but trauma, infection and hormonal imbalance are attributed as reasons for occurrence. Histologically this reactive lesion is filled with immature fibroblastic connective tissue, profilerative blood vessels and inflammatory cells. This article presents a case of a large pyogenic granuloma of the tongue which is a rare site for this tumor in a 27 year old woman. PMID:27891481

  10. Pentafid tongue: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Senan, Manesh; Menon, Varun P

    2015-01-01

    Tongue plays a pivotal role in both physiological and functional life of human beings. Structural and developmental abnormalities of the tongue in various forms have been reported in isolation or in combination with various syndromes. Though cases of bifid tongues have been mentioned in literature, no reports of pentafid tongue have been reported till date. Here we describe a unique case of congenital pentafid tongue along with bilateral polydactyly and its surgical management. PMID:26933286

  11. Effects of 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate on mutagenesis and p53 protein expression in the tongue of lacI rats treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph; Chen, Kun-Ming; Khmelnitsky, Michael; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Hennessy, Jeanine; Bruggeman, Richard; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Spratt, Tomas; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2009-01-01

    Previously we showed that the organoselenium compound, 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC)1 inhibits 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue tumorigenesis in Fisher rats. Here we investigate possible mechanisms of this inhibition by monitoring mutagenesis and p53 protein levels in lacI and conventional Fisher rats treated with: 1) a carcinogenic dose of 4-NQO for 10 weeks in drinking water, 2) 4-NQO + p-XSC (15 ppm as selenium), and 3) 4-NQO followed by p-XSC. For mutagenesis studies, rats were euthanized at 7, 12 or 23 wks after the start of 4-NQO. For studies on p53 levels, rats were euthanized at 11, 15 and 23 wks. Appropriate controls were also monitored. In the 4-NQO-alone groups, the mutant fraction (MF) in the cII gene in tongue increased at least 50 × background level. The MF (in units of mutants/105 plaque forming units) for the 7, 12 and 23 week 4-NQO groups were respectively, 184 ± 88, 237 ± 105, 329 ± 110. Thus, mutagenesis increased with length of exposure and post-treatment time. p-XSC modestly (ca. 15 - 30%) inhibited mutagenesis under all conditions. The inhibition reached significance at the last time point. When p-XSC was administered after 4-NQO, the MF was also modestly reduced. In 4-NQO-alone animals, levels of p53 in tongue (determined by Western blotting) were 1, 1.5 and 2.4 control levels at 10, 15 and 23 weeks respectively. In the p-XSC + 4-NQO group, the enhancement in p53 levels by 4-NQO treatment was decreased about 90% at 15 weeks and 45% (P < 0.05) at 23 weeks, and by slightly smaller percentages in corresponding post-treatment groups. p-XSC alone did not alter p53 levels. As p53 levels generally increase in response to DNA damage, these results suggest that p-XSC reduces 4-NQO-induced DNA damage, resulting in reduced 4-NQO-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. However, the fact that p-XSC is also effective when administered after 4-NQO, suggests additional mechanisms of inhibition exist. PMID:17720616

  12. Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in some individuals. When Is Tongue-tie a Problem That Needs Treatment? In Infants Feeding – A new baby with a too tight frenulum can have trouble sucking and may have poor weight gain. Such feeding ...

  13. Mandible and Tongue Development

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Carolina; Chai, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The tongue and mandible have common origins. They arise simultaneously from the mandibular arch and are coordinated in their development and growth, which is evident from several clinical conditions such as Pierre Robin sequence. Here, we review in detail the molecular networks controlling both mandible and tongue development. We also discuss their mechanical relationship and evolution as well as the potential for stem cell-based therapies for disorders affecting these organs. PMID:26589920

  14. Tongue lesions in psoriasis: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Moslehi, Homayoon; Akhyani, Maryam; Etesami, Marjan

    2004-01-01

    Background Our objective was to study tongue lesions and their significance in psoriatic patients. Methods The oral mucosa was examined in 200 psoriatic patients presenting to Razi Hospital in Tehran, Iran, and 200 matched controls. Results Fissured tongue (FT) and benign migratory glossitis (BMG) were the two most frequent findings. FT was seen more frequently in psoriatic patients (n = 66, 33%) than the control group (n = 19, 9.5%) [odds ratio (OR): 4.69; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.61–8.52] (p-value < 0.0001). BMG, too, was significantly more frequent in psoriatic patients (28 cases, 14%) than the control group (12 cases, 6%) (OR: 2.55; 95% CI: 1.20–5.50) (p-value < 0.012). In 11 patients (5.5%), FT and BMG coexisted. FT was more frequent in pustular psoriasis (7 cases, 53.8%) than erythemato-squamous types (56 cases, 30.4%). On the other hand, the frequency of BMG increased with the severity of psoriasis in plaque-type psoriasis assessed by psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) score. Conclusions Nonspecific tongue lesions are frequently observed in psoriasis. Further studies are recommended to substantiate the clinical significance of these seemingly nonspecific findings in suspected psoriatic cases. PMID:15527508

  15. [Exfoliatio areata linguae et mucosae oris: a mucous membrane manifestation of psoriasis pustulosa?].

    PubMed

    Casper, U; Seiffert, K; Dippel, E; Zouboulis, C C

    1998-11-01

    Lesions of the oral mucosa are frequently described in association with psoriasis, particularly in the pustular type. Controversy surrounds the question whether mucosal lesions can be considered as oral manifestation of psoriasis. Two patients presented with concurrent pustular psoriasis and mucosal lesions with the characteristic picture of geographic tongue. Histopathology of the mucosa showed typical features of psoriasis such as marked acanthosis, clubbing of the rete ridges, focal parakeratosis and neutrophilic infiltrates. There was parallel improvement of the skin and the mucosal lesions with systemic retinoid treatment. On the basis of the histopathological features and the clinical course we favour the hypothesis that geographic tongue is an oral manifestation of pustular psoriasis.

  16. Course and distribution of the lingual nerve in the ventral tongue region: anatomical considerations for frenectomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hun-Mu; Woo, Yong-Je; Won, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Da-Hye; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the sublingual and intralingual courses of the lingual nerve (LN) in the ventral tongue region, providing a clinical guide for safe surgical procedures such as frenectomy. We evaluated 16 specimens (32 sides) by gross observation after detailed dissections, and a further 6 specimens were examined after Sihler staining. All specimens were harvested from embalmed Korean cadavers. We classified the innervation patterns of the LN into 5 types and confirmed the distribution of the LN in the tip of the tongue. The classification of the LN was made with reference to a line formed by the interlacing of the styloglossus and genioglossus muscles. Based on the course of LN and the presence of a tiny twig (twigs directly innervating the ventral mucosa of the tongue, TM) directly innervating the sublingual mucosa, the course of the LN was classified as being straight, curved, or vertical and with or without the TM. Straight, curved, and vertical courses without the TM were seen in 9.4%, 46.9%, and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Straight and curved courses with the TM were observed in 6.3% and 18.8% of the cases, respectively. Sihler staining revealed that the tongue tip is innervated by the LN. These findings indicate that surgical manipulations at the ventral tongue region might damage the LN and result in numbness of the tongue tip, and provide a useful anatomic reference for various surgical procedures involving the ventral tongue region.

  17. The Tongue and Quill

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    CEPME/EDC/6-4309/ dcm /18 Aug 04 – 211 – The Tongue and Quill ER 1-inch top and bottom m argins -inch top and bottom m argins APER background...reports. The Chicago Manual of Style The Phantom of the Opera AFM 33-326, Preparing Official Communications Star Trek The Montgomery Advertiser

  18. Geographic tongue and psoriasis: clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic correlation - a literature review*

    PubMed Central

    Picciani, Bruna Lavinas Sayed; Domingos, Tábata Alves; Teixeira-Souza, Thays; dos Santos, Vanessa de Carla Batista; Gonzaga, Heron Fernando de Sousa; Cardoso-Oliveira, Juliana; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Carneiro, Sueli

    2016-01-01

    Geographic tongue is a chronic, inflammatory, and immune-mediated oral lesion of unknown etiology. It is characterized by serpiginous white areas around the atrophic mucosa, which alternation between activity, remission and reactivation at various locations gave the names benign migratory glossitis and wandering rash of the tongue. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with frequent cutaneous involvement and an immunogenetic basis of great importance in clinical practice. The association between geographic tongue and psoriasis has been demonstrated in various studies, based on observation of its fundamental lesions, microscopic similarity between the two conditions and the presence of a common genetic marker, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-C*06. The difficulty however in accepting the diagnosis of geographic tongue as oral psoriasis is the fact that not all patients with geographic tongue present psoriasis. Some authors believe that the prevalence of geographic tongue would be much greater if psoriatic patients underwent thorough oral examination. This study aimed to develop a literature review performed between 1980 and 2014, in which consultation of theses, dissertations and selected scientific articles were conducted through search in Scielo and Bireme databases, from Medline and Lilacs sources, relating the common characteristics between geographic tongue and psoriasis. We observed that the frequency of oral lesions is relatively common, but to establish a correct diagnosis of oral psoriasis, immunohistochemical and genetic histopathological analyzes are necessary, thus highlighting the importance of oral examination in psoriatic patients and cutaneous examination in patients with geographic tongue. PMID:27579734

  19. Intramuscular haemangioma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Babu, D; Bhamre, R; Katna, R; Pai, P

    2014-09-01

    Haemangiomas are one of the most common benign tumours. Clinicians come across haemangiomas of different subtypes at different locations in the body. They are often faced with the question of whether to treat them or leave it to the natural history of the disease. We present a case of the intramuscular variety of haemangioma found in the unusual location of the tongue in a 60-year-old woman. Fine needle aspiration was inconclusive and on magnetic resonance imaging, it mimicked a malignancy, which prompted treatment. We also review the unique pathology of this variety of haemangioma, which defines their treatment. The radiological attributes of the disease and recurrence rates of surgery are also discussed.

  20. Treatment and retention of relapsed anterior open-bite with low tongue posture and tongue-tie: A 10-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Su-Jung; Munkhshur, Janchivdorj; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ngan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current report is to present 6-year long-term stability and 10-year follow-up data for an adult patient who was treated with a tongue elevator for relapsed anterior open-bite. The 19-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of difficulty in chewing his food. Collectively, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed an anterior open-bite, low tongue posture, and tongue-tie. The patient opted for orthodontic treatment alone, without any surgical procedure. A lingual frenectomy was recommended to avoid the risk of relapse, but the patient declined because he was not experiencing tongue discomfort. Initial treatment of the anterior open-bite with molar intrusion and tongue exercises was successful, but relapse occurred during the retention period. A tongue elevator was used for retreatment, because the approach was minimally invasive and suited the patient's requirements regarding discomfort, cost, and time. The appliance changed the tongue posture and generated an altered tongue force, which ultimately resulted in intrusive dentoalveolar effects, and a subsequent counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. The results showed long-term stability and were maintained for six years through continual use of the tongue elevator. The results of this case indicated that a tongue elevator could be used not only as an alternative treatment for open-bite, but also as an active retainer. PMID:25133135

  1. Treatment and retention of relapsed anterior open-bite with low tongue posture and tongue-tie: A 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Su-Jung; Munkhshur, Janchivdorj; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ngan, Peter; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the current report is to present 6-year long-term stability and 10-year follow-up data for an adult patient who was treated with a tongue elevator for relapsed anterior open-bite. The 19-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of difficulty in chewing his food. Collectively, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed an anterior open-bite, low tongue posture, and tongue-tie. The patient opted for orthodontic treatment alone, without any surgical procedure. A lingual frenectomy was recommended to avoid the risk of relapse, but the patient declined because he was not experiencing tongue discomfort. Initial treatment of the anterior open-bite with molar intrusion and tongue exercises was successful, but relapse occurred during the retention period. A tongue elevator was used for retreatment, because the approach was minimally invasive and suited the patient's requirements regarding discomfort, cost, and time. The appliance changed the tongue posture and generated an altered tongue force, which ultimately resulted in intrusive dentoalveolar effects, and a subsequent counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. The results showed long-term stability and were maintained for six years through continual use of the tongue elevator. The results of this case indicated that a tongue elevator could be used not only as an alternative treatment for open-bite, but also as an active retainer.

  2. Solitary Nodular Lesion of Tongue- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, P.; Reddy, C.H. Sampath; A.K, Patil; Kurra, Saritha

    2014-01-01

    The solitary, nodular lesions of the oral mucosa present a diagnostic dilemma to the dentist with their analogous presentation. The lesions that appear on the tongue, a soft muscular organ are distinct and even rarer with varied manifestations. Oral mucosa presents lesions of the tongue in all age groups that may range from a small nodular swelling and ulcer formation in an infant of a few days old to an ulcer or a lesion in a 70-year-old. The reason for the appearance of an ulcer may be trauma to the soft tissues in an infant may be due to the presence of natal teeth to the presence of a sharp tooth in the older individuals. These lesions have to be clinically and histologically correlated for the final outcome of the diagnosis, so that there is no chance of any recurrence. We present a unique case of a solitary nodular lesion on the ventral surface of tongue On a 6 year female, where there was a recurrence after surgical excision and after an unusual therapy of non surgical resolution, no recurrence was observed. PMID:24701550

  3. Black hairy tongue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient’s re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment. PMID:25152586

  4. Bacterial-killing effect of atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma jet and oral mucosa response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dexi; Xiong, Zilan; Du, Tianfeng; Zhou, Xincai; Cao, Yingguang; Lu, Xinpei

    2011-12-01

    Recently, plasma sterilization has attracted increasing attention in dental community for the atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma jet (APNPs), which is driven by a kilohertz pulsed DC power, may be applied to the dental and oral diseases. However, it is still in doubt whether APNPs can effectively kill pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity and produce no harmful effects on normal oral tissues, especially on normal mucosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial-killing effect of APNPs in the biofilms containing a single breed of bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, P.g.), and the pathological changes of the oral mucosa after treatment by APNPs. P.g. was incubated to form the biofilms in vitro, and the samples were divided into three groups randomly: group A (blank control); group B in which the biofilms were treated by APNPs (the setting of the equipment: 10 kHz, 1600 ns and 8 kV); group C in which the biofilms were exposed only to a gas jet without ignition of the plasma. Each group had three samples and each sample was processed for up to 5 min. The biofilms were then fluorescently stained, observed and photographed under a laser scanning confocal microscope. In the animal experiment, six male Japanese white rabbits were divided into two groups randomly (n=3 in each group) in terms of the different post-treatment time (1-day group and 5-day group). The buccal mucosa of the left side and the mucosa of the ventral surface of the tongue were treated by APNPs for 10 min in the same way as the bacterial biofilm experiment in each rabbit, and the corresponding mucosa of the other sides served as normal control. The clinical manifestations of the oral mucosa were observed and recorded every day. The rabbits were sacrificed one or five day(s) after APNPs treatment. The oral mucosa were harvested and prepared to haematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Clinical observation and histopathological scores were used to assess mucosal changes. The results

  5. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes.

  6. Impact of tongue biofilm removal on mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; Mariano, Marcelo; Kallas, Monira Samaan; Vilela, Maria Carolina Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a tongue cleaner in the removal of tongue biofilm in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods Tongue biofilm and tracheal secretion samples were collected from a total of 50 patients: 27 in the study group (SG) who were intubated or tracheostomized under assisted ventilation and treated with the tongue cleaner and 23 in the control group (CG) who did not undergo tongue cleaning. Oral and tracheal secretion cultures of the SG (initially and after 5 days) and the CG (at a single time-point) were performed to evaluate the changes in bacterial flora. Results The median age of the SG patients was 77 years (45-99 years), and that of the CG patients was 79 years (21-94 years). The length of hospital stay ranged from 17-1,370 days for the SG with a median stay of 425 days and from 4-240 days for the CG with a median stay of 120 days. No significant differences were found when the dental plaque indexes were compared between the SG and the CG. There was no correlation between the index and the length of hospital stay. The same bacterial flora was found in the dental plaque of 9 of the 27 SG patients before and after the tongue scraper was used for 5 days compared with the CG (p=0.683). Overall, 7 of the 27 SG patients had positive bacterial cultures for the same strains in both tongue biofilm and tracheal secretions compared with the CG (p=0.003). Significant similarities in strain resistance and susceptibility of the assessed microorganisms were observed between oral and tracheal microflora in 6/23 cases in the CG (p=0.006). Conclusion The use of a tongue cleaner is effective at reducing tongue biofilm in patients on mechanical ventilation and facilitates oral hygiene interventions performed by caregivers. Clinical Trials Registry NCT01294943 PMID:23887759

  7. Hummingbird tongues are elastic micropumps.

    PubMed

    Rico-Guevara, Alejandro; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Rubega, Margaret A

    2015-08-22

    Pumping is a vital natural process, imitated by humans for thousands of years. We demonstrate that a hitherto undocumented mechanism of fluid transport pumps nectar onto the hummingbird tongue. Using high-speed cameras, we filmed the tongue-fluid interaction in 18 hummingbird species, from seven of the nine main hummingbird clades. During the offloading of the nectar inside the bill, hummingbirds compress their tongues upon extrusion; the compressed tongue remains flattened until it contacts the nectar. After contact with the nectar surface, the tongue reshapes filling entirely with nectar; we did not observe the formation of menisci required for the operation of capillarity during this process. We show that the tongue works as an elastic micropump; fluid at the tip is driven into the tongue's grooves by forces resulting from re-expansion of a collapsed section. This work falsifies the long-standing idea that capillarity is an important force filling hummingbird tongue grooves during nectar feeding. The expansive filling mechanism we report in this paper recruits elastic recovery properties of the groove walls to load nectar into the tongue an order of magnitude faster than capillarity could. Such fast filling allows hummingbirds to extract nectar at higher rates than predicted by capillarity-based foraging models, in agreement with their fast licking rates.

  8. Enteric Duplication Cyst Located at the Posterior Tongue: A Rare Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Savran, Bircan; Kucur, Cuneyt; Kocak, Cengiz; Ozbay, Isa; Metineren, Mehmet Huseyin; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul

    2015-01-01

    The lingual localization of an enteric duplication is extremely rare but may present with respiratory and feeding problems that require emergency intervention. A 7-month-old boy was brought to our clinic with feeding difficulties and tongue swelling. Physical examination showed a cystic lesion located near the left side of the tongue base that caused tongue protrusion to the contralateral side. During surgery, a 3-cm diameter opaque thick-walled cyst was found to be very closely adherent to the base of tongue, which was excised in its entirety. Following surgery, the patient fed during the early postoperative period and no complications were observed other than hypersalivation. On histological examination, a cystic lesion lined with intestinal mucosa and goblet cells was found. We present the rare case of a duplication cyst of the posterior tongue, with a literature review. PMID:25802786

  9. Purple bamboo salt has anticancer activity in TCA8113 cells in vitro and preventive effects on buccal mucosa cancer in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Deng, Xiaoxiao; Park, Kun-Young; Qiu, Lihua; Pang, Liang

    2013-02-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional healthy salt known in Korea. The in vitro anticancer effects of the salt were evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in TCA8113 human tongue carcinoma cells. At 1% concentration, the growth inhibitory rate of purple bamboo salt was 61% higher than that of sea salt (27%). Apoptosis analysis of the cancer cells was carried out using 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining to investigate the mechanism of the anticancer effects in tongue carcinoma cells. Purple bamboo salt induced a stronger apoptotic effect than sea salt. An Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mouse buccal mucosa cancer model was established by injecting mice with U14 squamous cell carcinoma cells. Following injection, the wound at the injection site was smeared with salt samples. It was observed that the tumor volumes for the group treated with purple bamboo salt were smaller than those from the sea salt treatment and control groups. The sections of buccal mucosa cancer tissue showed that canceration in the purple bamboo salt group was weaker compared with that in the sea salt group. Similar results were observed in the lesion section of the cervical lymph. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting, the purple bamboo salt group demonstrated an increase in Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and a decrease in B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, compared with the sea salt and control groups. The results demonstrated that purple bamboo salt had improved in vivo buccal mucosa cancer preventive activity compared with sea salt in mice.

  10. Light and scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo (Phalacrocoracidae, Aves).

    PubMed

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Andrzejewski, Wojciech; Godynicki, Szymon

    2006-02-01

    The tongue of the cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo is a small, immobile structure with a length of 1.4 cm, situated in the middle part of the elongated lower bill. The uniquely shaped tongue resembles a mushroom, with a short base and an elongated dorsal part with sharpened anterior and posterior tips. A median crest can be observed on the surface of the tongue. Examination by light and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the whole tongue is formed by a dense connective tissue with many bundles of elastic fibers. The lingual mucosa is covered by a multilayered keratinized epithelium. The thickest, horny layer of the lingual epithelium was observed on the surface of the median crest and on the posterior tip of the tongue. Lingual glands are absent in cormorants. The framework of the tongue is composed of a hyoid cartilage incorporated into the base. The localization and structure of the tongue in the cormorant show that it is a rudimentary organ and that the lingual body, usually well-developed in birds, is conserved.

  11. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap for reconstruction of large palatal-alveolar fistulas in cleft patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large palatal fistula in cleft patients is a difficult situation, especially with previous multiple surgeries, which have led to severe scars in the palatal mucosa. Tongue flaps are useful aids in such situations. Materials and Methods: Seven cleft patients who were reconstructed by posteriorly based lateral tongue flap between 2005 and 2012 were studied. Variables such as flap-ability to close the fistula, remaining tongue shape at least 1 year after operation, and speech improvement (patients’ self-assessment) were evaluated. Results: Age range of the patients was 14‒45 years. The male-to-female ratio was 2/7. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap effectively closed the large fistula in 6/7 of patients. The largest dimensions of fistula closed by this flap was 5 cm × 1.5 cm. Follow-up of 2‒7 years showed that the tongue never returned to the original size and remained asymmetrical. In addition, the nasal speech did not improve dramatically after the closure of large palatal/alveolar fistulas in this age group. Conclusion: Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap is an effective method to solve the problem of large palatal fistulas in adult cleft patients. The most useful indication for this flap is a large longitudinal palatal fistula, extending to the alveolar process. Asymmetrical tongue shape after surgery is the rule and speech improvement depends on patient's age and location of fistula. PMID:26981466

  12. Biomechanics of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of prosthodontic treatment has been well recognized, and the need is continuously increasing with the ageing population. While the oral mucosa plays a critical role in the treatment outcome, the associated biomechanics is not yet fully understood. Using the literature available, this paper provides a critical review on four aspects of mucosal biomechanics, including static, dynamic, volumetric and interactive responses, which are interpreted by its elasticity, viscosity/permeability, apparent Poisson's ratio and friction coefficient, respectively. Both empirical studies and numerical models are analysed and compared to gain anatomical and physiological insights. Furthermore, the clinical applications of such biomechanical knowledge on the mucosa are explored to address some critical concerns, including stimuli for tissue remodelling (interstitial hydrostatic pressure), pressure–pain thresholds, tissue displaceability and residual bone resorption. Through this review, the state of the art in mucosal biomechanics and their clinical implications are discussed for future research interests, including clinical applications, computational modelling, design optimization and prosthetic fabrication. PMID:26224566

  13. Literacy and the Mother Tongue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Work, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Reviewing the situation of literacy in the mother tongue, the article reports on projects in: (1) Africa--Mali and Nigeria, (2) the Amazonian jungle of Peru in Latin America, and (3) Papua, New Guinea. Psychological, sociological, and educational advantages of the mother tongue are discussed. (MW)

  14. Hummingbird tongues are elastic micropumps

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Guevara, Alejandro; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Rubega, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Pumping is a vital natural process, imitated by humans for thousands of years. We demonstrate that a hitherto undocumented mechanism of fluid transport pumps nectar onto the hummingbird tongue. Using high-speed cameras, we filmed the tongue–fluid interaction in 18 hummingbird species, from seven of the nine main hummingbird clades. During the offloading of the nectar inside the bill, hummingbirds compress their tongues upon extrusion; the compressed tongue remains flattened until it contacts the nectar. After contact with the nectar surface, the tongue reshapes filling entirely with nectar; we did not observe the formation of menisci required for the operation of capillarity during this process. We show that the tongue works as an elastic micropump; fluid at the tip is driven into the tongue's grooves by forces resulting from re-expansion of a collapsed section. This work falsifies the long-standing idea that capillarity is an important force filling hummingbird tongue grooves during nectar feeding. The expansive filling mechanism we report in this paper recruits elastic recovery properties of the groove walls to load nectar into the tongue an order of magnitude faster than capillarity could. Such fast filling allows hummingbirds to extract nectar at higher rates than predicted by capillarity-based foraging models, in agreement with their fast licking rates. PMID:26290074

  15. Functional Segments in Tongue Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Epstein, Melissa A.; Iskarous, Khalil

    2004-01-01

    The tongue is a deformable object, and moves by compressing or expanding local functional segments. For any single phoneme, these functional tongue segments may move in similar or opposite directions, and may reach target maximum synchronously or not. This paper will discuss the independence of five proposed segments in the production of speech.…

  16. Innate tissue fluorescence of the oral mucosa of controls and head-and-neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Howard E.; Kolli, Venkateswara; Ansley, John; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y.; Alfano, Robert R.; Schantz, Stimson P.

    1995-04-01

    Base line spectral excitation and emission scans were defined for the oral mucosa in a population of 61 controls, 16 oral tongue cancer patients and 2 patients with tongue leukoplakia. A xenon-based fluorescence spectrophotometer (Mediscience Corp.) with a fiberoptic probe (Mediscience Corp.) was used to collect excitation and emission spectra. Two excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm; (lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm) and two emission scans ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm; (lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360-660 nm) were used to analyze the buccal mucosa (BM), hard palate (HP), floor of mouth (FOM) and dorsal tongue (DT) of 61 control individuals. In 41 controls the lateral tongue site (LT) was added. The same set of scans was performed on tumor lesions and contralateral normal tissues of 16 patients with lateral tongue tumors and on two individuals with leukoplakia of the tongue. Ratios of points on the individual scans were used to quantitate data. The excitation scan ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm) and the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm) were able to statistically discriminate the HP and DT from the BM and FOM. The ratios of intensities of neoplastic mucosa and contralateral sites were significantly different with the excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm, p < 0.001) and ((lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm, p < 0.01) and with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm, p < 0.001). Discrimination was significant with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360- 660 nm, p < 0.07). Innate tissue fluorescence has potential as a monitor of cancer patients and populations at risk for head and neck cancer.

  17. A standard picture of healthy oral mucosae by direct oral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drogoszewska, Barbara; Michcik, Adam; Polcyn, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Direct oral microscopy constitutes a novel technique of in vivo oral mucosae examination. The basic principles of this method derive from colposcopy and dermoscopy. The main goal of direct oral microscopy is the earliest possible detection of oral precancerous lesions in order to implement their treatment as quickly as possible and prevent malignant transformation. Aim To establish a standard picture of healthy oral mucosae with direct oral microscopy applying standard colposcopic criteria in order to create a reference point for further diagnosis of precancerous lesions. Material and methods Thirty patients of both genders with clinically unaltered oral mucosae were examined. For every individual, clinical examination with the naked eye was performed, followed by direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria. Oral mucosae at various sites (lip, cheek, floor of mouth, ventral and lateral sides of the tongue, alveolar ridge and soft palate) were examined. Results Subepithelial blood vessel patterns, mucosal surface, colour tone and transparency were described for healthy oral mucosae. Moreover, cases with clinically unaltered oral mucosae where direct oral microscopy revealed subclinical alterations were described. Conclusions Direct oral microscopy with colposcopic assessment criteria enables establishment of a repeated picture of unaltered oral mucosae. The standard picture of healthy oral mucosae is an essential reference point for application of this technique to early diagnose potentially malignant oral mucosal lesions as well as apply their early treatment. PMID:24278068

  18. How Is Angina Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor prescribes, especially if you have diabetes . Medicines Nitrates are the medicines most commonly used to treat ... GLIS-er-in) is the most commonly used nitrate for angina. Nitroglycerin that dissolves under your tongue ...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6230 - Tongue depressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tongue depressor. 880.6230 Section 880.6230 Food... § 880.6230 Tongue depressor. (a) Identification. A tongue depressor is a device intended to displace the tongue to facilitate examination of the surrounding organs and tissues. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. The tongue after whiplash: case report and osteopathic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, Fabiola; Morabito, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tongue plays a fundamental role in several bodily functions; in the case of a dysfunction, an exhaustive knowledge of manual techniques to treat the tongue is useful in order to help patients on their path toward recovery. A 30-year-old male patient with a recent history of whiplash, with increasing cervical pain during swallowing and reduced ability to open the mouth, was treated with osteopathic techniques addressed to the tongue. The osteopathic techniques led to a disappearance of pain and the complete recovery of the normal functions of the tongue, such as swallowing and mouth opening. The manual osteopathic approach consists of applying a low load, in order to produce a long-lasting stretching of the myofascial complex, with the aim of restoring the optimal length of this continuum, decreasing pain, and improving functionality. According to the authors’ knowledge, this is the first article reporting a case of resolution of a post whiplash disorder through osteopathic treatment of the tongue. PMID:27462180

  1. Well-differentiated liposarcoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Nunes, F D; Loducca, S V L; de Oliveira, E M F; de Araújo, V C

    2002-01-01

    Intraoral liposarcomas are rare, with most reported cases being of the myxoid histological type. We present a well-differentiated liposarcoma of the tongue, in a 65-year-old man. The tumour presented lipoblasts in various stages of differentiation, lipocytes in different sizes and shapes, mesenchymal and signet-ring cells. Lipoma, spindle-cell lipoma, myxoma, hibernoma, angiolipoma, fibrolipoma, pseudosarcomatous faciitis and malignant hysticytoma were considered in the diagnosis process. The patient was treated surgically and so far is free of disease.

  2. Light and scanning electron microcopy study of the tongue in Rhea americana.

    PubMed

    Carlesso Santos, Tatiana; Yuri Fukuda, Katia; Plácido Guimarães, Juliana; Franco Oliveira, Moacir; Angelica Miglino, Maria; Watanabe, Li-Sei

    2011-01-01

    Morphological characteristics of the tongue were studied in adult rhea (Rhea americana). The lingual surface and the surface of epithelium-connective tissue interface of rhea tongue were examined macroscopically and by light and scanning electron microscopy. The rhea tongue revealed a triangular aspect, without adjustment of the inferior bill formation, occupying approximately ¼ of the length of the oral cavity. Lingual papilla-like structures were not observed over the lingual surface. The tongue mucosa was composed of a thick non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in the dorsal and ventral part, supported by a connective tissue core. The submucosa contained numerous glands with cytoplasmic granules, and luminal secretion was positive for histochemical reaction to Alcian Blue in pH 2.5 and PAS, and negative to Alcian Blue in pH 0.5. Despite the rudimentary characteristic of the tongue in rhea, our results suggest an important role of tongue secretions in food lubrication and humidification during the swallowing process, based on the enormous quantity of lingual glands in the submucosa and the histochemical characteristics of their secretions.

  3. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Catherine Hy; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig's angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk.

  4. Arnold Tongues in Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Mogens

    In a recent work with Leo Kadanoff we studied the synchronization between an internal and an external frequency. One obtains a highly structured diagram with details that in essence are related to the difference between rational and irrational number. The synchronized regions appear as Arnold tongues that widen as the coupling between the frequencies increases. Such tongues have been observed in many physical systems, like in the Libchaber convective cell in the basement of the University of Chicago. In biological systems, where oscillators appear in in a broad variety, very little research on Arnold tongues has been performed. We discuss single cell oscillating dynamics triggered by an external cytokine signal. When this signal is overlaid by an oscillating variation, the two oscillators might couple leading to Arnold tongue diagram. When the tongues overlap, the cell dynamics can shift between the tongues eventually leading to a chaotic response. We quantify such switching in single cell experiments and in model systems based on Gillespie simulations. Kadanoff session.

  5. Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae.

    PubMed

    Vago, Bernadette; Hausser, Ingrid; Hennies, Hans Christian; Enk, Alexander; Jappe, Uta

    2007-05-01

    Hyalinosis cutis et mucosae is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which is characterized by deposition of hyaline material around the basement membrane of the skin and mucous membranes. Typical clinical symptoms are hoarseness, infiltration of the mucous membranes and papular verrucous skin changes. Mutations within the extracellular matrix protein gene (ECM-1) are the underlying defect. We report on a 24-year-old man, who had first been seen in our department at the age of seven and had undergone the necessary diagnostic procedures and who revisited 17 years later with hoarseness and extensive verrucous skin changes at elbows and knees which were removed by excision. A new mutation of the ECM1 gene was identified.

  6. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Tongue-Type Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Ming-Zhu; Yang, Yun-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Displaced tongue-type fractures of the calcaneus can lead to severe pain and disability if not treated appropriately. Failure to reduce articular displacement may require subtalar joint arthrodesis with subsequent loss of function. The subtalar joint is crucial for normal foot and ankle function. In selected cases, if the malunited joint is still in good condition, it is preserved by corrective osteotomy. A joint-preserving osteotomy with axial realignment is a treatment option for malunited tongue-type calcaneal fractures encountered early on, before the development of subtalar arthrosis in carefully selected patients.

  7. Lymphangioma of the Tongue - A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    V, Usha; Sivasankari, T.; Jeelani, S.; Parthiban, J.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign tumours resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. They are relatively uncommon and usually diagnosed in infancy and early childhood. Commonly located at head and neck, they rarely occur in the oral cavity. Intraoral lymphangiomas occur more frequently on the dorsum of tongue, followed by palate, buccal mucosa, gingiva, and lips. Lymphangioma of the tongue is a common cause of macroglossia in children associated with difficulty in swallowing and mastication, speech disturbances, airway obstruction, mandibular prognathism, openbite and other possible deformities of maxillofacial structures. We present the case of a 13-year-old female with lymphangioma of tongue. The clinical, radiological, and treatment modalities of this case are discussed. PMID:25386537

  8. Morphometric study of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in granular cell tumors of the tongue.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, N; Baak, J P; Schipper, N W; van der Waal, I

    1989-01-01

    Several reports have mentioned the possibility of misdiagnosing pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia (PEH) of the overlying mucosa of a granular cell tumor as a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Because of this, morphometry was applied to five granular cell tumors with PEH and five well-differentiated SCC of the tongue. In addition, ten normal tongues have been examined. The mean area, the mean perimeter and the mean diameter of the 50 largest squamous epithelial nuclei in 50 fields were found to be significantly larger in squamous cell carcinomas than in granular cell tumors and normal tongues. The shape factor of the nucleus and the mitotic activity appeared to be of no significant value in this respect.

  9. Removal of the intestinal mucosa: photochemical approach in bladder augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselhuhn, Gregory D.; Kropp, Kenneth A.; Keck, Rick W.; Selman, Steven H.

    1995-03-01

    Experiments were undertaken to determine whether 5-aminoleuvinic acid in combination with light could be used as an adjunct to intestinal bladder augmentation with the aim of removing intestinal mucosa with subsequent re-epithelialization of the treated segment with urothelium. Histopathologic studies of so-treated intestinal segments used in bladder augmentation demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  10. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of pre- and post-treated oral submucous fibrosis: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivabalan, S.; Ponranjini Vedeswari, C.; Jayachandran, S.; Koteeswaran, D.; Pravda, C.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.

    2010-02-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a high risk precancerous condition characterized by changes in the connective tissue fibers of the lamina propria and deeper parts leading to stiffness of the mucosa and restricted mouth opening, fibrosis of the lining mucosa of the upper digestive tract involving the oral cavity, oro- and hypo-pharynx and the upper two-thirds of the oesophagus. Optical reflectance measurements have been used to extract diagnostic information from a variety of tissue types, in vivo. We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to quantitatively monitor tumour response to chemotherapy. Twenty patients with submucous fibrosis were diagnosed with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and treated with the chemotherapy drug, Dexamethasone sodium phosphate and Hyaluronidase injection for seven weeks and after the treatment they were again subjected to the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The major observed spectral alterations on pre and post treated submucous fibrosis is an increase in the diffuse reflectance from 450 to 600 nm. Normal mucosa has showed higher reflectance when compared to the pre and post-treated cases. The spectral changes were quantified and correlated to conventional diagnostic results viz., maximum mouth opening, tongue protrusion and burning sensation. The results of this study suggest that the diffuse reflectance spectroscopy may also be considered as complementary optical techniques to monitor oral tissue transformation.

  11. Traumatic partial amputation of the tongue. Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Méndez, José Roberto; Rodríguez-Luna, María Rita; Guarneros-Zárate, Joaquín Eugenio; Vélez-Palafox, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The traumatic injuries to the tongue can go form section to partial or complete amputation, the latter being a rare presentation in the setting of facial trauma or even in patients with mental illness. Case report We present 25-year-old patient with traumatic partial amputation of the tongue who presented to the emergency department with successful surgical repair with good functional and esthetic outcome. Discussion The tongue can suffer a broad type of traumatic injuries, in the setting of active bleeding, the muscular planes must be closed with absorbable sutures to stop the hemorrhage and prevent hematoma formation. Tongue surgical repair in the setting of a total section requires integrity of arterial and venous flow, so anastomosis must be executed. Conclusion Amputation of the tongue can put the patient's life at risk and its management needs to be mastered by the surgeons treating polytraumatized patients. PMID:26900463

  12. [Bullous autoimmune diseases of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, L

    1999-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBD) are characterized by autoantibodies targeted against adhesion molecules, impairing their formation. According to localization criteria, pemphigus (intraepidermal blister and desmosomal involvement) and pemphigoid (subepidermal blister and dermoepidermal junction involvement) can be distinguished. In two-thirds of the cases, pemphigus vulgaris begins with oral lesions (mainly the buccal mucosa and palate, rarely the gingiva). Skin lesions are usual. Excepting paraneoplastic pemphigus (a recently individualized entity), oral lesions are uncommon in other types of pemphigus. Cicatricial pemphigoid mainly involves oral mucosa, frequently other mucous membranes, and rarely the skin. Gingival involvement is frequent. In case of desquamative gingivitis, the clip sign gives the diagnosis of cicatricial pemphigoid. Ocular involvement is frequent and causes blindness. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and IgA linear dermatosis are rare. Bullous pemphigoid and bullous lupus rarely involve the oral mucosa. Diagnosis of AIBD requires a biopsy within the mucosal membrane lesion for pathology examination and another biopsy in a lesion-free area for direct immunofluorescence detection of antibody fixation. Immunoelectron microscopy or immunoblast transfer may be needed for positive diagnosis. Corticosteroids are used to treat pemphigus and dapsone is used for cicatricial pemphigoid. Immunosuppressive therapy is rarely needed.

  13. Population Ration, Intermarriage and Mother Tongue Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Eddie C. Y.

    1978-01-01

    An explanatory model of the relationship between mother tongue retention, population ratio, and intermarriage is presented. In general, data collected on mother tongue retention in Singapore, a multilingual and multiethnic society, support the proposed model. (DS)

  14. Transoral robotic-assisted tongue base resection in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: case presentation, clinical and technical consideration.

    PubMed

    Montevecchi, Filippo; Bellini, Chiara; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Hoff, Paul T; Dinelli, Elisa; Dallan, Iacopo; Corso, Ruggero M; Vicini, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is primarily caused by adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, tongue base hypertrophy is increasingly being recognized as a cause, even after adenotonsillectomy. We report three cases of pediatric OSAS successfully treated by transoral robotic reduction of the tongue base. In all children, we were able to achieve improved retrolingual patency while avoiding significant procedure-related morbidity. In conclusion, tongue base reduction by transoral robotic surgery appears to be a feasible solution for the base of tongue obstruction due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy in pediatric patients.

  15. Interface Electronic Circuitry for an Electronic Tongue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Electronic circuitry has been developed to serve as an interface between an electronic tongue and digital input/output boards in a laptop computer that is used to control the tongue and process its readings. Electronic tongues can be used for a variety of purposes, including evaluating water quality, analyzing biochemicals, analyzing biofilms, and measuring electrical conductivities of soils.

  16. Treatment of geographic tongue with topical tacrolimus

    PubMed Central

    Purani, Jigar M; Purani, Hiral J

    2014-01-01

    Geographic tongue is an inflammatory condition of the dorsal surface and lateral border of the tongue, which may be asymptomatic. This article presents a case of geographic tongue in a 6-year-old child. Successful management was achieved with topical application of 0.1% tacrolimus. PMID:25085945

  17. Relationship between squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the position of dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Yong; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue has a relatively high incidence of all oral cancers. Some studies have reported a relationship between intraoral dental prosthesis and SCC of the tongue; however, this relationship remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between SCC of the tongue and the positional aspects of dental prosthesis using a retrospective analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 439 patients with SCC of the tongue were diagnosed and treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Patients were treated over a 12.5-year period ranging from January 1, 2001 to June 30, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed to examine potential differences between the groups. RESULTS The number of patients with a crown and/or a bridge (134, 63.5%) was significantly different than the number of patients without a prosthesis (77, 36.5%). Even after accounting for different types of prostheses such as crowns, bridges, and dentures, no significant differences were observed between the position of the prosthesis and the location of the SCC of the tongue, with significance defined as a P-value less than .05 by the Pearson-Chi square test. CONCLUSION Patients with crowns and/or bridges exhibited more frequent SCC of the tongue compared with patients without these prosthesis. These data support the hypothesis that mechanical trauma and galvanic phenomena play a role in the etiology of SCC of the tongue. PMID:25932311

  18. Mycobacterium leprae is identified in the oral mucosa from paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Morgado de Abreu, M A M; Roselino, A M; Enokihara, M; Nonogaki, S; Prestes-Carneiro, L E; Weckx, L L M; Alchorne, M M A

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, the nasal mucosa is considered as the principal route of transmission for the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. The objective of this study was to identify M. leprae in the oral mucosa of 50 untreated leprosy patients, including 21 paucibacillary (PB) and 29 multibacillary (MB) patients, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), with antibodies against bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and phenolic glycolipid antigen-1 (PGL-1), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with MntH-specific primers for M. leprae, and to compare the results. The material was represented by 163 paraffin blocks containing biopsy samples obtained from clinically normal sites (including the tongue, buccal mucosa and soft palate) and visible lesions anywhere in the oral mucosa. All patients and 158 available samples were included for IHC study. Among the 161 available samples for PCR, 110 had viable DNA. There was viable DNA in at least one area of the oral mucosa for 47 patients. M. leprae was detected in 70% and 78% of patients using IHC and PCR, respectively, and in 94% of the patients by at least one of the two diagnostic methods. There were no differences in detection of M. leprae between MB and PB patients. Similar results were obtained using anti-BCG and anti-PGL-1 antibodies, and immunoreactivity occurred predominantly on free-living bacteria on the epithelial surface, with a predilection for the tongue. Conversely, there was no area of predilection according to the PCR results. M. leprae is present in the oral mucosa at a high frequency, implicating this site as a potential means of leprosy transmission.

  19. Comparison of quality-of-life in tongue cancer patients undergoing tongue reconstruction with lateral upper arm free flap and radial forearm free flap

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yujie; Cui, Yaqi; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Surgery entails radical resection, neck dissection and tongue reconstruction has been commonly used in treatment of T2 and T3 tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Although lateral upper arm free flap (LUFF) and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) are similar in texture and thickness, significant differences can be noticed in the donor-site function and surgical demands. In the treatment of T2 and T3 tongue cancer, the choice of either LUFF or RFFF is still not defined.We aim to investigatethe long-term QOL of patients with moderate tongue defect and reconstruction with LUFF or RFFF, based on which to provide clinical suggestion for tongue reconstructions.Sixty-five patients (T2 or T3 stage, 42 underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF and 23 with LUFF) treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University from January 2005 to June 2009 were included. The QOL of each patient was determined using the questionnaire designed based on the University of Washington Quality-of-Life (UW-QOL, version 4). The questionnaire was accomplished by a qualified medical staff blinded to the study after telephone communication with each patient. Statistical analysis showed that no significant difference was noticed in the long-term QOL of patients with tongue cancer after tongue reconstruction using LUFF or RFFF, respectively, indicating that similar QOLs were obtained in the long-term follow-up of patients with tongue cancer (T2 or T3 stages) using LUFF and RFFF for reconstruction. PMID:26064380

  20. Tongue Tumor Detection in Medical Hyperspectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hongjun; Li, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system to measure and analyze the reflectance spectra of the human tongue with high spatial resolution is proposed for tongue tumor detection. To achieve fast and accurate performance for detecting tongue tumors, reflectance data were collected using spectral acousto-optic tunable filters and a spectral adapter, and sparse representation was used for the data analysis algorithm. Based on the tumor image database, a recognition rate of 96.5% was achieved. The experimental results show that hyperspectral imaging for tongue tumor diagnosis, together with the spectroscopic classification method provide a new approach for the noninvasive computer-aided diagnosis of tongue tumors. PMID:22368462

  1. [Neonatal tongue-tie: myths and science].

    PubMed

    Dollberg, Shaul; Botzer, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical restraining of tongue movement (tongue-tie, ankyloglossia) has been known for centuries and the subject of dozens of articles. The heated debate persists on its clinical significance and indications for treatment. Most authorities in the field of infant feeding and Lactation agree that breastfeeding problems, such as nipple pain and latching difficulties, are common signs of clinicaLly significant tongue-tie and indications for performing a frenotomy, while the sole presence of a visible lingual frenulum is not. In contrast, the lack of a visible frenulum does not rule out the diagnosis of clinically significant tongue-tie since submucosal ties, also called "posterior tongue-tie", may interfere with efficient breastfeeding. Whether tongue-tie interferes with speech articulation to a significant extent is currently unknown. Theoretically, articulation of some consonants (e.g., /s/, /th/, /r/) would be affected by impeded tongue movement. These articulation problems are, however, Less common than tongue-tie itself, and children and adults characteristically use various compensatory techniques of mouth opening and tongue movements. When it is indicated, frenotomy is performed by lifting the tongue and snipping the frenulum with scissors. Complications of frenotomy are rare and consist mainly of self-limited minor bleeding. The significance of posterior tongue tie and the long-term effects of frenotomy performed during early infancy are unresolved issues.

  2. Electronic Nose and Electronic Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyay, Rajib

    Human beings have five senses, namely, vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste. The sensors for vision, hearing and touch have been developed for several years. The need for sensors capable of mimicking the senses of smell and taste have been felt only recently in food industry, environmental monitoring and several industrial applications. In the ever-widening horizon of frontier research in the field of electronics and advanced computing, emergence of electronic nose (E-Nose) and electronic tongue (E-Tongue) have been drawing attention of scientists and technologists for more than a decade. By intelligent integration of multitudes of technologies like chemometrics, microelectronics and advanced soft computing, human olfaction has been successfully mimicked by such new techniques called machine olfaction (Pearce et al. 2002). But the very essence of such research and development efforts has centered on development of customized electronic nose and electronic tongue solutions specific to individual applications. In fact, research trends as of date clearly points to the fact that a machine olfaction system as versatile, universal and broadband as human nose and human tongue may not be feasible in the decades to come. But application specific solutions may definitely be demonstrated and commercialized by modulation in sensor design and fine-tuning the soft computing solutions. This chapter deals with theory, developments of E-Nose and E-Tongue technology and their applications. Also a succinct account of future trends of R&D efforts in this field with an objective of establishing co-relation between machine olfaction and human perception has been included.

  3. Effects of Tongue Strength Training and Detraining on Tongue Pressures in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Chi

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effect of tongue strengthening training and long-term detraining on tongue tip pressure, tongue base pressure, and tongue pressure during effortful swallowing. Ten young healthy volunteers (21-35 years) were participated in this study. Participants received 8-week tongue strengthening exercise 3 days a week with each session lasting 30 min. Measurement of tongue pressure and tongue strengthening exercise were administrated using Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). Training intensity was applied at 60 and 80% of maximal tongue pressure for the first week and the remainder, respectively. Following completion of 8-week training, 28 weeks of detraining period was continued. Training increased tongue tip pressure, tongue base pressure, and tongue pressure during effortful swallowing above pre-training values (p < 0.05). After 28-week detraining, all tongue variables were significantly lower than after 8-week training (p < 0.05) but remained significantly higher than pre-training levels (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that high-intensity tongue strengthening exercise can improve tongue pressures. However, training effects were diminished gradually during detraining period. Thus, maintenance programs after strengthening exercise would be required for prolonging training effects.

  4. Anatomical and histological structure of the tongue and histochemical characteristics of the lingual salivary glands in the Chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, Gray 1830).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, S; Sağsöz, H; Akbalik, M E

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the morphology of the tongue and the histochemical features of the lingual salivary glands in this species. 2. The tongue was elongated, terminating in a rather sharp, dagger-like apex. On the surface of the tongue and situated between the body and root of the tongue, two rows of conical papillae, the sharp apices of which pointed towards the posterior part of the tongue, were observed. The keratinised epithelium lining the dorsal surface lacked typical gustatory papillae. However, it was observed that taste buds were present in the epithelium of the lingual body and root. The tongue was supported by a structure composed of hyaline cartilage, the paraglossum, which extended from the lingual root to the apex. Simple branched tubular glands, which were encapsulated by connective tissue, were embedded within the submucosa in the body (anterior salivary glands) and root (posterior salivary glands) of the tongue. It was observed that the secretion of the lingual glands contained neutral mucins, proteoglycans containing carboxylic acid, weak and strong sulphated groups, N-acetylated sialomucins, but lacked glycogen. 3. It was demonstrated that, the general morphological features, papillary distribution of the tongue and the histological structure of the mucosa epithelium and the supportive elements displayed similarity to those of other domestic avian species. It was also determined that, in view of the particular feeding types, in the partridge, the presence of the papillary crest was not correlated with diet.

  5. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  6. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results.

  7. [Intraoperative CT Is Useful in Diagnosing a Fish Bone Foreign Body Buried in the Tongue: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Chiyonobu, Kazuki; Ishinaga, Hajime; Otsu, Kazuya; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Fish bones as a foreign body are often present in the palatine tonsil and the base of the tongue. Such foreign bodies can often be diagnosed with inspection only. However, it is difficult to diagnose and extirpate a foreign body when it is buried in the oral/pharyngeal mucosa. We experienced a case of a fish bone foreign body buried in the tongue muscle layer. We report herein on the case of a 49-year-old man with a fish bone foreign body buried in his tongue. The patient had noticed a sore throat since eating a sea bream and was referred to our department. Visual inspection revealed no foreign body, but CT imaging revealed a fish bone in the tongue. We performed an emergency surgical exploration of tongue to locate the fish bone. Because the fish bone as a foreign body was unable to be confirmed by palpation, we identified the location of the fish bone by intraoperative CT. This is a rare case of a fish bone buried in the tongue muscle layer, and intraoperative CT was useful in identifying the positon of the foreign body.

  8. A New Accurate 3D Measurement Tool to Assess the Range of Motion of the Tongue in Oral Cancer Patients: A Standardized Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Simone; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Jacobi, Irene; Smeele, Ludwig E; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Balm, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    In oral cancer treatment, function loss such as speech and swallowing deterioration can be severe, mostly due to reduced lingual mobility. Until now, there is no standardized measurement tool for tongue mobility and pre-operative prediction of function loss is based on expert opinion instead of evidence based insight. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a triple-camera setup for the measurement of tongue range of motion (ROM) in healthy adults and its feasibility in patients with partial glossectomy. A triple-camera setup was used, and 3D coordinates of the tongue in five standardized tongue positions were achieved in 15 healthy volunteers. Maximum distances between the tip of the tongue and the maxillary midline were calculated. Each participant was recorded twice, and each movie was analysed three times by two separate raters. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability were the main outcome measures. Secondly, feasibility of the method was tested in ten patients treated for oral tongue carcinoma. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability all showed high correlation coefficients of >0.9 in both study groups. All healthy subjects showed perfect symmetrical tongue ROM. In patients, significant differences in lateral tongue movements were found, due to restricted tongue mobility after surgery. This triple-camera setup is a reliable measurement tool to assess three-dimensional information of tongue ROM. It constitutes an accurate tool for objective grading of reduced tongue mobility after partial glossectomy.

  9. Do tongue ties affect breastfeeding?

    PubMed

    Griffiths, D Mervyn

    2004-11-01

    This study assessed indications for and safety and outcome of simple division of tongue tie without an anesthetic. There were 215 infants younger than 3 months (mean 0-19 days) who had major problems breastfeeding, despite professional support. Symptoms, tongue tie details, safety of division, and complications were recorded. Feeding was assessed by the mothers immediately, at 24 hours, and 3 months after division. Prior to division, 88% had difficulty latching, 77% of mothers experienced nipple trauma, and 72% had a continuous feeding cycle. During division, 18% slept throughout; 60% cried more after division (mean 0-15 seconds). There were no significant complications. Within 24 hours, 80% were feeding better. Overall, 64% breastfed for at least 3 months (UK national average is 30%). Initial assessment, diagnosis, and help, followed by division and subsequent support by a qualified lactation consultant, might ensure that even more mothers and infants benefit from breastfeeding.

  10. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  11. Familial ankyloglossia (tongue-tie).

    PubMed

    Klockars, Tuomas

    2007-08-01

    Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) is a congenital anomaly with a prevalence of 4-5% and characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum. For unknown reasons the abnormality seems to be more common in males. The pathogenesis of ankyloglossia is not known. The author reports a family with isolated ankyloglossia inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The identification of the defective gene(s) causing ankyloglossia might reveal novel information on the craniofacial embryogenesis and its disorders.

  12. Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photo shows the complex bottom topography of the Bahama Banks area(24.0N, 77.0W). The majority of the feature (light blue color), where the tide and current sculpted bottom detail may be seen, is shallow water, generally less than three meters deep. However, the Tongue of the Ocean, Deep blue color, is water over 2,000 meters in depth. Andros Island is the largest island in the photograph. _

  13. Sulglycotide displays cytoprotective activity in rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Niada, R; Mantovani, M; Prino, G; Omini, C; Berti, F

    1983-01-01

    Sulglycotide, a well known antisecretory and antiulcer compound, has been further investigated for its ability to protect rat gastric mucosa against extensive necrosis induced by absolute ethanol, NaOH (0.2N) and NaCl (30%). Sulglycotide, which has been compared with cimetidine, displays a dose-dependent cytoprotective activity against the above necrotizing agents. The results obtained indicate that Sulglycotide requires a normal prostaglandin biosynthetic process in order to manifest its antiulcer activity. In fact gastric mucosa from animals treated with Sulglycotide releases in vitro a greater amount of PGl2-like activity; and furthermore no protection was observed against gastric lesions induced by indomethacin. As far as the mode of action of Sulglycotide is concerned it is tempting to speculate that the compound may interfere with prostaglandin degradation or it may trigger an adaptive cytoprotection which is important in maintaining the cellular integrity of rat gastric mucosa.

  14. Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of lung: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Subir; Deb, Asit Ranjan; Aich, Ranen Karti; Chakraborty, Sudipto; Das, Diptimoy; Dee, Abhijit

    2010-07-01

    Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is a rare disease particularly when occurring in the lungs. In 1983, Issacson and Wright first described it as a distinct clinicopathological entity. A 39-year-old woman was suffering from mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the lung and was treated with moderate dose radiotherapy only. Six months after treatment the woman is symptom free and without any evidence of relapse. The disease undergoes a very indolent course and local form of treatment like surgery or radiotherapy is effective though radiotherapy is probably associated with higher local control rate and event free survival particularly in early stages. But for diagnostic purpose thoracotomy is generally required in pulmonary variety. Due to rarity of cases it is almost impossible to compare surgery with radiotherapy in mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma disorder in a prospective manner. Radiotherapy is the preferred mode of treatment either alone or in combination with surgery.

  15. Raynaud's of the tongue following chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2017-01-01

    Raynaud's of the tongue following radiation alone or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is a rare occurrence. The present study reports a case where typical symptoms and signs of Raynaud's phenomenon involving the tongue occurred ~18 months following CRT treatment in a 53-year-old female, who was a smoker prior to CRT with stage T2N2cM0 local-regional advanced stage IV oropharyngeal cancer. The patient was treated using cisplatin chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation with a dose of 70 Gray (Gy). The intermittent episodes of painful discoloration of the tongue were exacerbated due to the cold and emotional stress. No definite clinical or laboratory evidence of connective tissue disorder was identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Raynaud's of the tongue following CRT without primary Raynaud's of the digits. The possible pathogenesis involving vascular and neural mechanism is discussed in the case report. PMID:28357090

  16. Cross-activation and Detraining Effects of Tongue Exercise in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schaser, Allison J.; Ciucci, Michelle R.; Connor, Nadine P.

    2015-01-01

    Voice and swallowing deficits can occur with aging. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow may be used to treat swallowing disorders, but may also benefit vocal function due to cross-system activation effects. It is unknown how exercise-based neuroplasticity contributes to behavior and maintenance following treatment. Eighty rats were used to examine behavioral parameters and changes in neurotrophins after tongue exercise paired with a swallow. Tongue forces and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded before and after training/detraining in young and old rats. Tissue was analyzed for neurotrophin content. Results showed tongue exercise paired with a swallow was associated with increased tongue forces at all ages. Gains diminished after detraining in old rats. Age-related changes in vocalizations, neurotrophin 4 (NT4), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found. Minimal cross-system activation effects were observed. Neuroplastic benefits were demonstrated with exercise in old rats through behavioral improvements and up-regulation of BDNF in the hypoglossal nucleus. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow should be developed, studied, and optimized in human clinical research to treat swallowing and voice disorders in elderly people. PMID:26477376

  17. Cross-activation and detraining effects of tongue exercise in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Schaser, Allison J; Ciucci, Michelle R; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-01-15

    Voice and swallowing deficits can occur with aging. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow may be used to treat swallowing disorders, but may also benefit vocal function due to cross-system activation effects. It is unknown how exercise-based neuroplasticity contributes to behavior and maintenance following treatment. Eighty rats were used to examine behavioral parameters and changes in neurotrophins after tongue exercise paired with a swallow. Tongue forces and ultrasonic vocalizations were recorded before and after training/detraining in young and old rats. Tissue was analyzed for neurotrophin content. Results showed tongue exercise paired with a swallow was associated with increased tongue forces at all ages. Gains diminished after detraining in old rats. Age-related changes in vocalizations, neurotrophin 4 (NT4), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were found. Minimal cross-system activation effects were observed. Neuroplastic benefits were demonstrated with exercise in old rats through behavioral improvements and up-regulation of BDNF in the hypoglossal nucleus. Tongue exercise paired with a swallow should be developed, studied, and optimized in human clinical research to treat swallowing and voice disorders in elderly people.

  18. Clipping the (tongue) tie

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nagate Raghavendra; Marudhappan, Yuvaraja; Devi, Renuka; Narang, Sumit

    2014-01-01

    Ankyloglossia is an uncommon congenital oral anomaly that can cause difficulty with breast-feeding and speech articulation. For many years, the subject of ankyloglossia has been controversial with practitioners of many specialties having widely different views regarding its significance and management. This study is about a series of five cases of ankyloglossia subjected to surgical correction by frenectomy procedure. Three cases were treated with electrocautery, one case with diode laser and one case with conventional scalpel technique. 1 week and 1 month post-operative follow-ups were done and healing was compared with the available literature. Manipulation of tissues was better in laser and electrocautery techniques when compared with scalpel. Post-operative complication of swelling and pain was seen in scalpel technique whereas it was largely uneventful in other techniques. Though, there was no difference in healing at the end of first month clinically, scalpel technique has shown better results in organization of muscle fibers. This clinical study indicates that laser and electrocautery treatment used for frenectomy operations provides better patient perception in terms of postoperative pain and function than that obtained by the scalpel technique. Considering the above advantages, when used correctly, the laser and electrocautery offers a safe, effective, acceptable and impressive alternative for frenectomy operations. PMID:25024558

  19. Clipping the (tongue) tie.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Nagate Raghavendra; Marudhappan, Yuvaraja; Devi, Renuka; Narang, Sumit

    2014-05-01

    Ankyloglossia is an uncommon congenital oral anomaly that can cause difficulty with breast-feeding and speech articulation. For many years, the subject of ankyloglossia has been controversial with practitioners of many specialties having widely different views regarding its significance and management. This study is about a series of five cases of ankyloglossia subjected to surgical correction by frenectomy procedure. Three cases were treated with electrocautery, one case with diode laser and one case with conventional scalpel technique. 1 week and 1 month post-operative follow-ups were done and healing was compared with the available literature. Manipulation of tissues was better in laser and electrocautery techniques when compared with scalpel. Post-operative complication of swelling and pain was seen in scalpel technique whereas it was largely uneventful in other techniques. Though, there was no difference in healing at the end of first month clinically, scalpel technique has shown better results in organization of muscle fibers. This clinical study indicates that laser and electrocautery treatment used for frenectomy operations provides better patient perception in terms of postoperative pain and function than that obtained by the scalpel technique. Considering the above advantages, when used correctly, the laser and electrocautery offers a safe, effective, acceptable and impressive alternative for frenectomy operations.

  20. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  1. Tongue coating frequency and its colonization by yeasts in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pieralisi, N; de Souza Bonfim-Mendonça, P; Negri, M; Jarros, I C; Svidzinski, T

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate tongue coating (TC) frequency and its colonization by yeasts in a group of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Clinical examination of the oral mucosa of 33 CKD patients was performed to investigate oral and tongue lesions. TC was diagnosed according to its clinical characteristics. Stimulated saliva and TC samples were collected to verify the salivary flow, and determine yeast frequency, species and counts. TC was found in 18/33 of the patients (54.55 %) and was the most frequent oral lesion found. Of 18 patients with TC, 13 (72.22 %) presented positive cultures for yeasts on the tongue dorsum, and one (5.55 %) in the saliva only. Yeasts were significantly more frequent in the tongue dorsum when compared to the saliva (p = 0.0106). The most frequent yeast species found was C. albicans (55.55 %), while C. parapsilosis comprised 50 % of non-albicans Candida species. This study demonstrated high amounts of yeasts on the cultures from TC samples of CKD patients, strongly suggesting that TC is a clinical representation of a polymicrobial biofilm, which could serve as a gateway for disseminated infection in immunosuppressed patients undergoing frequent hospitalization.

  2. Tongue fissure extraction and classification using hyperspectral imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Sun, Zhen; Liu, Zhi

    2010-04-10

    Tongue fissures, an important feature on the tongue surface, may be pathologically related to some diseases. Most existing tongue fissure extraction methods use tongue images captured by traditional charge coupled device cameras. However, these conventional methods cannot be used for an accurate analysis of the tongue surface due to limited information from the images. To solve this, a hyperspectral tongue imager is used to capture tongue images instead of a digital camera. New algorithms for automatic tongue fissure extraction and classification, based on hyperspectral images, are presented. Both spectral and spatial information of the tongue surface is used to segment the tongue body and extract tongue fissures. Then a classification algorithm based on a hidden Markov model is used to classify tongue fissures into 12 typical categories. Results of the experiment show that the new method has good performance in terms of the classification rates of correctness.

  3. Pale nasal mucosa affects airflow limitations in upper and lower airways in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Odajima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Atsunobu; Taba, Naohiko; Murakami, Yoko; Nishima, Sankei

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe asthmatics are thought to have severer rhinitis than mild asthmatics. A pale nasal mucosa is a typical clinical finding in subjects with severe allergic rhinitis. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether a pale nasal mucosa affects airflow limitations in the upper and lower airways in asthmatic children. Methods Rhinomanometry, nasal scraping, and spirometry were performed in 54 asthmatic children (median age, 10 years). The nasal mucosa was evaluated by an otolaryngologist. Thirty-seven patients were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, and 11 patients were treated with intranasal corticosteroids. Results Subjects with a pale nasal mucosa (n = 23) exhibited a lower nasal airflow (p < 0.05) and a larger number of nasal eosinophils (p < 0.05) in the upper airway as well as lower pulmonary functional parameters (p < 0.05 for all comparisons), i.e., the forced vital capacity (FVC), the forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and the peak expiratory flow, compared with the subjects who exhibited a normal or pinkish mucosa (n = 31). No significant difference in the forced expiratory flow between 25%–75% of the FVC, regarded as indicating the peripheral airway, was observed between the 2 groups. Conclusion A pale nasal mucosa may be a predictor of eosinophil infiltration of the nasal mucosa and central airway limitations in asthmatic children. When allergists observe a pale nasal mucosa in asthmatic children, they should consider the possibility of airflow limitations in not only the upper airway, but also the lower airway. PMID:27803882

  4. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. Methods We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. Results After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Conclusions Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health. PMID:24423407

  5. Electrophysiological properties of the tongue epithelium of the toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Baker, Timothy K; Rios, Karina; Hillyard, Stanley D

    2002-07-01

    The dorsal lingual epithelium from the tongue of the toad Bufo marinus was mounted in an Ussing-type chamber, and the short-circuit current (I(sc)) was measured using a low-noise voltage clamp. With NaCl Ringer bathing the mucosal and serosal surfaces of the isolated tissue, an outwardly directed (mucosa-positive) I(sc) was measured that averaged -10.71+/-0.82 microA cm(-2) (mean +/- S.E.M., N=24) with a resistance of 615+/-152 Omega cm(2) (mean +/- S.E.M., N=10). Substitution of chloride with sulfate as the anion produced no significant change in I(sc). Fluctuation analysis with either NaCl or Na(2)SO(4) Ringer bathing both sides of the tissue revealed a spontaneous Lorentzian component, suggesting that the I(sc) was the result of K(+) secretion through spontaneously fluctuating channels in the apical membrane of the epithelium. This hypothesis was supported by the reversible inhibition of I(sc) by Ba(2+) added to the mucosal Ringer. Analysis of the kinetics of Ba(2+) inhibition of I(sc) indicates that there might be more than one type of K(+) channel carrying the I(sc). This hypothesis was supported by power spectra obtained with a serosa-to-mucosa K(+) gradient, which could be fitted to two Lorentzian components. At present, the K(+) secretory current cannot be localized to taste cells or other cells that might be associated with the secretion of saliva or mucus. Nonetheless, the resulting increase in [K(+)] in fluid bathing the mucosal surface of the tongue could presumably affect the sensitivity of the taste cells. These results contrast with those from the mammalian tongue, in which a mucosa-negative I(sc) results from amiloride-sensitive Na(+) transport.

  6. Osteolipoma of the buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Alvimar-Lima; de Castro, Eni-Vaz-Franco-Lima; Felipini, Renata-Callestini; Ribeiro, Ana-Carolina-Prado; Soubhia, Ana-Maria-Pires

    2010-03-01

    Lipomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms of soft tissue that can be found in any part of the human body. Conversely, their presence in the oral mucosa is rather uncommon, with approximately 4% of the cases occurring in the oral cavity. In such cases, they are likely to have originated from mature adipose tissue and to be among several described histological variants of lipomas, which are identified according to the predominant type of tissue. There is a rare lipoma, known as an osteolipoma or an ossifying lipoma; however, little has been written this type of lipoma characterized by a classical lipoma with areas of osseous metaplasia. Considering the few cases of oral osteolipomas previously described in the English-related literature and the consequent risk of misdiagnosis and overtreatment, this paper describes an extreme case of an osteolipoma affecting the buccal mucosa of an adult patient. This paper focuses particularly on the pathogenesis of this lesion and the discussion of a correct diagnosis.

  7. Perspectives on tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Rosemary; Neiger, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    In light of the recent NCT petition to Health Minister Dr Dan Poulter MP to update guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of tongue-tied babies to avoid stress and difficulties feeding for babies and their families, discussion has been sparked amongst mothers, midwives, health visitors and breastfeeding counsellors as to how exactly services could be improved. Access to evidence-based, family-centred care is vital to address this potentially distressing condition. But are we too quick to jump in with a diagnosis that may ultimately be of no clinical significance? This articles presents two professional perspectives on the issue and highlights the pertinent research available.

  8. Tongue's substance and coating recognition analysis using HSV color threshold in tongue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Nur Diyana; Ooi, Chia Yee; Kawanabe, Tadaaki; Mi, Xiaoyu

    2016-07-01

    In ISO TC249 conference, tongue diagnosis has been one of the most active research and their objectifications has become significant with the help of numerous statistical and machine learning algorithm. Color information of substance or tongue body has kept valuable information regarding the state of disease and its correlation with the internal organs. In order to produce high reproducibility of color measurement analysis, tongue images have to undergo several procedures such as color correction, segmentation and tongue's substance-coating separation. This paper presents a novel method to recognize substance and coating from tongue images and eliminate the tongue coating for accurate substance color measurement for diagnosis. By utilizing Hue, Saturation, Value (HSV) color space, new color-brightness threshold parameters have been devised to improve the efficiency of tongue's substance and coating separation procedures and eliminate shadows. The algorithm offers fast processing time around 0.98 seconds for 60,000 pixels tongue image. The successful tongue's substance and coating separation rate reported is 90% compared to the labelled data verified by the practitioners. Using 300 tongue images, the substance Lab color measurement with small standard deviation had revealed the effectiveness of this proposed method in computerized tongue diagnosis system.

  9. Tongue thrust and its influence in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Cary

    2006-01-01

    The oral myofunctional disorder of tongue thrust has been described in various ways, such as 'deviate swallow' 'infantile swallow, and 'abnormal swallow' to name a few. The term 'tongue thrust' has been adopted, mainly because of its greater usage among authors, and since it gives a more accurate description of the lingual behavior about to be discussed. 'Tongue thrust' and 'tongue thrusting' are used in preference to 'tongue thrust swallow' or 'tongue thrust swallowing' because this behavior is generally thought to be less associated with the act of swallowing and more with the resting posture of the tongue. 'Thrust' is still an inappropriate word since the tongue is not really 'thrusting' during rest. However, it must be remembered that 'thrusting' in this instance is still a mild but continuous lingual pressure factor. The significance lies in whether or not this 'thrust, either during swallowing and other functional behaviors, or during rest, is responsible for, contributes to, or is a consequence of the development of a malocclusion.

  10. Looking Mother Tongue Instruction through Different Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2008-01-01

    Mother Tongue Instruction has been a debatable issue since long. There may be two options in the medium of instruction: either to teach especially primary and preprimary schoolchildren in their own mother tongue or continue using second or foreign language as the medium of instruction. Both of the approaches bear some pros and cons. This article…

  11. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans.

  12. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Vineet Vaman; Padhye, Ashvini

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse. Aims and Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of stabilized chlorine dioxide containing mouthrinse and CHX containing mouthrinse in inhibition of tongue coat accumulation and dental plaque formation using a four day plaque regrowth model clinically and microbiologically in a healthy dental cohort. Materials and Methods A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A – Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor® and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine® were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel’s tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample. Statistical Analysis The Data was analysed using SPSS

  13. Paleoecology of the Niland Tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The swamp or paludal ecosystem is preserved in coals and carbonaceous shales. Remains of organisms of the swamp communities consist of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, ostracodes, and insects; vertebrates such as a hard-shelled turtle and crocodiles; and vascular plant remains. Aquatic communities are found in dark shale and are represented by the remains of bacteria and fungi; algae; invertebrates such as pelecypods, gastropods, and insects; and vertebrates such as crocodiles, fish, and a soft-shelled turtle. No vascular macrophytes (rooted aquatic vegetation) could be identified in the pollen and spore assemblage. Charophytes are abundant and show that colonies of the aquatic alga lived on the lake bottoms. The great variety of organisms suggests that the environment had a high input of nutrients. The phosphate-rich Phosphoria Formation, which could serve as a good source of nutrients, cropped out in the watershed of the Niland Tongue basin. The ostracode-crocodile association, calcareous charophytes, and good preservation of plant tissues and palynomorphs put limits on the alkaline geochemical environment in which the lacustrine rocks were deposited. The palynomorphs in the Niland Tongue rocks are dark yellow and light brown in color. These colors suggest that rocks containing them have been buried deeper in the past than they are today.

  14. Speaking legibly: Qualitative perceptions of altered voice among oral tongue cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Philiponis, Genevieve; Kagan, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment for oral tongue cancer poses unique challenges to restoring and maintaining personally acceptable, intelligible speech. Methods: We report how oral tongue cancer survivors describe their speech after treatment in a qualitative descriptive approach using constant comparative technique to complete a focal analysis of interview data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Interviews were completed with 16 tongue cancer survivors 3 months to 12 years postdiagnosis with stage I-IV disease and treated with surgery alone, surgery and radiotherapy, or chemo-radiation. All interview data from the main study were analyzed for themes describing perceptions of speech as oral tongue cancer survivors. Results: Actual speech impairments varied among survivors. None experienced severe impairments that inhibited their daily lives. However, all expressed some level of concern about speech. Concerns about altered speech began when survivors heard their treatment plans and continued through to survivorship without being fully resolved. The overarching theme, maintaining a pattern and character of speech acceptable to the survivor, was termed “speaking legibly” using one survivor's vivid in vivo statement. Speaking legibly integrate the sub-themes of “fears of sounding unusual”, “learning to talk again”, “problems and adjustments”, and “social impact”. Conclusions: Clinical and scientific efforts to further understand and address concerns about speech, personal presentation, and identity among those diagnosed with oral tongue are important to improving care processes and patient-centered experience. PMID:27981121

  15. Involvement of PI3K and PKA pathways in mouse tongue epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Kwang; Jung, Hye-In; Neupane, Sanjiv; Kim, Ki-Rim; Kim, Ji-Youn; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Cho, Sung-Won; Lee, Youngkyun; Shin, Hong-In; Sohn, Wern-Joo; Kim, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    In mice, tongue epithelial differentiation is mainly regulated by the interactions among various signalling molecules including Fgf signalling pathways. However, the subsequent signalling modulations for epithelial maturation, initiated by Fgf signalling, remain to be elucidated. Therefore, we employed an in vitro tongue organ cultivation system along with the applications of various pharmacological inhibitors against the intracellular signalling molecules of Fgf signalling pathways, including H89, LY294002, PD98059, and U0126. Following treatments with LY294002 and H89, inhibitors for PI3K and PKA, respectively, the decreased thickness of the tongue epithelium was observed along with the alteration in cell proliferative and apoptotic patterns. Meanwhile, cultivated tongues treated with MEK inhibitor U0126 or PD98059 showed significantly decreased cell proliferation in the tongue epithelium and the mesenchyme. Based on these results, we suggest that the tongue epithelium is differentiated into multiple epithelial cell layers via the PI3K and PKA pathways in tissue-specific manner during the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.

  16. Scanning electron microscopic study on the tongue and lingual papillae of the adult Spotted seal, Phoca largha.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ken; Shindo, Junji; Miyawaki, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Kan; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2007-11-01

    We observed the external surface and connective tissue cores (CTCs) of the lingual papillae (filiform, fungiform and vallate papillae) of adult Spotted seals (Phoca largha) using SEM and light microscopy. The tongue was V-shaped and its apex was rather rounded. On the dorsal surface from apex to the one-third posterior of the tongue, the lingual mucosa was densely covered by filiform papillae, with a scatted distribution of dome-like fungiform papillae, which have orthokeratinized epithelium. At the posterior part of the tongue, filiform papillae were totally diminished and their epithelium was parakeratinized. Approximately 6-7 vallate papillae were arranged in a V-shape on the posterior of the tongue. After removal of the epithelium, the CTCs of the filiform papillae that were distributed at apex consisted of a primary core and approximately 5-6 rod-shaped small accessory cores. The CTCs of filiform papillae that were distributed at anterior part of the tongue lacked primary protrusions and possessed approximately 10-15 rod shaped small accessory cores that were arranged in a horseshoe manner. The CTCs offungiform papillae had cylindrical primary cores and were fringed with accessory protrusion. In the Vallate papillae, taste buds were only seen at the dorsal epithelium.

  17. A Case Report of Neisseria Mucosa Peritonitis in a Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Awdisho, Alan; Bermudez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal pain exacerbated during draining of the peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal fluid examination was remarkable for leukocytosis and gramnegative diplococci. Bacterial cultures were positive for N. mucosa growth. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with preservation of the dialysis catheter. This case highlights the rarity and importance of Neisseria mucosa causing peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. There seems to be a unique association between N. mucosa peritonitis and chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. The patient was successfully managed with ciprofloxacin along with salvaging of the dialysis catheter. PMID:28191300

  18. The traits of five types of tongue movement in Han of Shaanxi, China.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Fei; Li, Zeng-Xian; Liu, Cui; Yang, Li-Tao; Wang, Ning; Han, Hua; Qian, Yi-Hua; Wen, You-Feng; Xi, Huan-Jiu

    2012-12-01

    The study sample consisting of 429 people (207 males, 222 females) of Han nationality in Shaanxi, China. Five types of tongue movements were investigated, including tongue rolling, tongue folding, tongue twisting, pointed tongue and clover-leaf tongue. The results revealed that the frequencies of tongue rolling, tongue folding, tongue twisting, pointed tongue and clover-leaf tongue were 63.6, 14.0, 12.6, 54.8 and 0 %, respectively. There were no significant gender differences except with pointed tongue. Compared with other nationalities, tongue rolling, tongue folding, and pointed tongue of Han in Shaanxi had an average frequency. Tongue twisting and clover-leaf tongue had low frequencies. There were significant differences in frequency of clover-leaf tongue between Han and another seven nationalities of China (P < 0.01). Furthermore, only three pairs of trait correlations were exhibited among ten pairs of types of tongue movement combination traits when analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The data indicated that the correlations of tongue movement were between tongue rolling and tongue folding, between pointed tongue and tongue rolling, and also between tongue folding and pointed tongue, respectively. Additionally, there were significant differences in frequency of tongue movements with age. The possible mechanism of variations of tongue movements with aging may involve the degradation of tongue function, and differential gene activation and modulation, or protein translation.

  19. [Infections of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Reibel, Jesper; Kragelund, Camilla

    2010-11-01

    The most common infections of the oral mucosa are those caused by Candida albicans and herpes simplex virus (HSV). Candidosis occurs as pseudomembraneous, erythematous and hyperplastic types with varying symptoms from no to a burning sensation. Treatment most importantly includes elimination of any predisposing factors such as smoking, sub-optimal denture hygiene and hyposalivation. A primary HSV infection results in a life-long latent infection recurring in some infected persons either intraorally or on the lip. If treatment is indicated, topical or systemic aciclovir and related drugs can be used.

  20. Frog tongue acts as muscle-powered adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Frogs are well known to capture fast-moving prey by flicking their sticky tongues out of the mouth. This tongue projection behaviour happens extremely fast which makes frog tongues a biological high-speed adhesive system. The processes at the interface between tongue and prey, and thus the mechanism of adhesion, however, are completely unknown. Here, we captured the contact mechanics of frog tongues by filming tongue adhesion at 2000 frames per second through an illuminated glass. We found that the tongue rolls over the target during attachment. However, during the pulling phase, the tongue retractor muscle acts perpendicular to the target surface and thus prevents peeling during tongue retraction. When the tongue detaches, mucus fibrils form between the tongue and the target. Fibrils commonly occur in pressure-sensitive adhesives, and thus frog tongues might be a biological analogue to these engineered materials. The fibrils in frog tongues are related to the presence of microscopic papillae on the surface. Together with a layer of nanoscale fibres underneath the tongue epithelium, these surface papillae will make the tongue adaptable to asperities. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we are able to integrate anatomy and function to explain the processes during adhesion in frog tongues. PMID:26473054

  1. New method for evaluation of tongue-coating status.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Ueda, T; Sakurai, K

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the viability of Tongue Coating Index, which is a new method for evaluating tongue-coating status. To determine the reliability and reproducibility of our new evaluation criteria (Score 0: Tongue coating not visible; Score 1: Tongue coating thin, papillae of tongue visible; Score 2: Tongue coating very thick, papillae of tongue not visible), 10 observers evaluated 20 photographs of tongues. Each tongue surface was divided into nine sections. Observers evaluated each section according to our new criteria and each score for tongue-coating status was recorded in the pertinent section of the Tongue Coating Record form. They repeated the same evaluation 2 weeks after the first evaluation. The relationship between the scores obtained and number of oral microorganisms was investigated in 50 edentulous patients. Tongue coating was collected from the tongue surface after evaluation of tongue-coating status. The total number of anaerobic bacteria and the number of Candida species were counted from the specimens collected. Interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement were 0.66 and 0.80 by Cohen's kappa, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the number of Candida species among the three scores. The number of total anaerobic bacteria, however, was significantly different among the scores (P < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that our method for evaluating tongue-coating status offers new criteria that are superior in reliability and reproducibility, and that also reflect the total number of anaerobic bacteria present on the dorsum of the tongue.

  2. Electronic Tongue Containing Redox and Conductivity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Electronic Tongue (E-tongue 2) is an assembly of sensors for measuring concentrations of metal ions and possibly other contaminants in water. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings, and detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion. The device includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an oxidation/reduction (redox) sensor pair, an electrical sensor, an array of eight galvanic cells, and eight ion-specific electrodes.

  3. Use of buccal mucosa in hypospadias repair.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Diaz, Omar; Castellan, Miguel; Gosalbez, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Hypospadias is an embryological disorder that results in an abnormal ventral positioning of the urethral meatus. Among multiple surgical techniques described to correct this anomaly, the use of buccal mucosa grafts has gained popularity among pediatric urologists, pediatric surgeons and plastic surgeons. Buccal mucosa grafts have shown favorable histological changes that result in an excellent scaffold for urethral reconstructive surgery. This review describes the evolution of the use of buccal mucosa grafts in hypospadias repair.

  4. Integrating next-generation sequencing and traditional tongue diagnosis to determine tongue coating microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bai; Liang, Xujun; Chen, Yang; Ma, Tao; Liu, Liyang; Li, Junfeng; Jiang, Rui; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xuegong; Li, Shao

    2012-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is a unique method in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This is the first investigation on the association between traditional tongue diagnosis and the tongue coating microbiome using next-generation sequencing. The study included 19 gastritis patients with a typical white-greasy or yellow-dense tongue coating corresponding to TCM Cold or Hot Syndrome respectively, as well as eight healthy volunteers. An Illumina paired-end, double-barcode 16S rRNA sequencing protocol was designed to profile the tongue-coating microbiome, from which approximately 3.7 million V6 tags for each sample were obtained. We identified 123 and 258 species-level OTUs that were enriched in patients with Cold/Hot Syndromes, respectively, representing "Cold Microbiota" and "Hot Microbiota". We further constructed the tongue microbiota-imbalanced networks associated with Cold/Hot Syndromes. The results reveal an important connection between the tongue-coating microbiome and traditional tongue diagnosis, and illustrate the potential of the tongue-coating microbiome as a novel holistic biomarker for characterizing patient subtypes. PMID:23226834

  5. Effect of a repeated tongue-lift motor task for tongue function.

    PubMed

    Honki, Hisae; Iida, Takashi; Komiyama, Osamu; Masuda, Manabu; Svensson, Peter; Kawara, Misao

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue motor tasks on suprahyoid muscle activity and tongue pressure. Fourteen participants performed three series of a standardized tongue-lift training (TLT) task on each of five consecutive days. Electromyographic (EMG) activity from suprahyoid muscles and tongue pressure were recorded. In the first and third TLT series, participants were instructed only to target different force levels. During the second TLT series, visual feedback of the force level was given. One series consisted of three measurements [at 10%, 20%, and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), respectively]. The coefficient of determination of the target force level-EMG curve and the target force level-tongue pressure curve was calculated from all series. There were no statistically significant day-to-day differences in EMG-root mean square (RMS) values and tongue pressure during MVC. The coefficients of determination of tongue pressure in the first series on day 1 were statistically significantly lower than the coefficients of determination in the first series on day 5. These findings suggest that the control of tongue pressure improved, while the maximum force remained constant. These results could have implications for treatment paradigms related to learning for patients with compromised tongue function, such as swallowing disorders or dysphagia.

  6. The human tongue slows down to speak: muscle fibers of the human tongue.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ira; Mu, Liancai; Amirali, Asif; Su, Hungxi; Sobotka, Stanislaw

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the specializations of human tongue muscles. In this study, myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase (mATPase) histochemical staining was used to study the percentage and distribution of slow twitch muscle fibers (slow MFs) within tongue muscles of four neurologically normal human adults and specimens from a 2-year-old human, a newborn human, an adult with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), and a macaque monkey. The average percentage of slow MFs in adult and the 2-year-old muscle specimens was 54%, the IPD was 45%, while the neonatal human (32%) and macaque monkey (28%) had markedly fewer slow MFs. In contrast, the tongue muscles of the rat and cat have been reported to have no slow MFs. There was a marked spatial gradient in the distribution of slow MFs with the highest percentages found medially and posteriorly. Normal adult tongue muscles were found to have a variety of uniquely specialized features including MF-type grouping (usually found in neuromuscular disorders), large amounts of loose connective tissue, and short branching MFs. In summary, normal adult human tongue muscles have by far the highest proportion of slow MFs of any mammalian tongue studied to date. Moreover, adult human tongue muscles have multiple unique anatomic features. As the tongue shape changes that are seen during speech articulation are unique to humans, we hypothesize that the large proportion of slow MFs and the anatomical specializations observed in the adult human tongue have evolved to perform these movements.

  7. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit; Komiyama, Osamu; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Kawara, Misao; Sessle, Barry; Svensson, Peter

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41 min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two pressure levels (5 kPa and 10 kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5. EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5 kPa, 10 kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during maximum voluntary contractions. The amplitudes and thresholds of tongue and masseter MEPs after TLT on Day 5 were respectively higher and lower than before TLT on Day 1 (P<0.005), and there was also a significant increase in tongue and masseter MEP areas; no significant changes occurred in MEP onset latencies. FDI MEP parameters (amplitude, threshold, area, latency) were not significantly different between the four sessions. Our findings suggest that repeated TLT can trigger neuroplasticity reflected in increased excitability of the corticomotor representation of not only the tongue muscles but also the masseter muscles.

  8. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  9. Nuclear changes in oral mucosa of alcoholics and crack cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Webber, L P; Pellicioli, A C A; Magnusson, A S; Danilevicz, C K; Bueno, C C; Sant'Ana Filho, M; Rados, P V; Carrard, V C

    2016-02-01

    The effects of drugs of abuse on oral mucosa are only partly understood. The aims of the present study were to: (1) evaluate the frequency of nuclear changes in normal-appearing oral mucosa of alcoholics and crack cocaine users and (2) assess their association with cell proliferation rate. Oral smears were obtained from the border of the tongue and floor of the mouth of 26 crack cocaine users (24 males and 2 females), 29 alcoholics (17 males and 12 females), and 35 controls (17 males and 18 females). Histological slides were submitted to Feulgen staining to assess the frequency of micronuclei (MN), binucleated cells (BN), broken eggs (BE), and karyorrhexis (KR). A significant increase in the frequency of MN was observed in cells exfoliated from the tongue of crack cocaine users (p = 0.01), and alcoholics showed a higher frequency of KR in cells obtained from the floor of the mouth (p = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the use of crack cocaine induces clastogenic effects, whereas alcoholism is associated with higher degrees of keratinization in the floor of the mouth.

  10. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    HAN, SHUWEN; YANG, XI; QI, QUAN; PAN, YUEFEN; CHEN, YONGCHAO; SHEN, JUNJUN; LIAO, HAIHONG; JI, ZHAONING

    2016-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer. PMID:27035407

  11. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuwen; Yang, Xi; Qi, Quan; Pan, Yuefen; Chen, Yongchao; Shen, Junjun; Liao, Haihong; Ji, Zhaoning

    2016-06-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer.

  12. Huge Tongue Lipoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Damghani, Mohammad Ali; Safari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lipomas are among the most common tumors of the human body. However, they are uncommon in the oral cavity and are observed as slow growing, painless, and asymptomatic yellowish submucosal masses. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is not expected.  Case Report: The case of a 30-year-old woman with a huge lipoma on the tip of her tongue since 3 years, is presented. She had difficulty with speech and mastication because the tongue tumor was filling the oral cavity. Clinical examination revealed a yellowish lesion, measuring 8 cm in maximum diameter, protruding from the lingual surface. The tumor was surgically excised with restoration of normal tongue function and histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed that it was a lipoma. Conclusion: Tongue lipoma is rarely seen and can be a cause of macroglossia. Surgical excision for lipoma is indicated for symptomatic relief and exclusion of associated malignancy. PMID:25938089

  13. Instruction in the Mother Tongues in Yugoslavia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikes, Melanie

    1984-01-01

    Educational practices and problems in Yugoslavia with regard to bilingual education are described. The effect of mother-tongue education on the students' academic achievement and literacy attainment is also examined. (RM)

  14. Tongue tie: the evidence for frenotomy.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Alastair; Bowley, Douglas M

    2014-11-01

    Tongue tie or ankyloglossia is a congenital variation characterised by a short lingual frenulum which may result in restriction of tongue movement and thus impact on function. Tongue tie division (frenotomy) in affected infants with breastfeeding problems yields objective improvements in milk production and breastfeeding characteristics, including objective scoring measures, weight gain and reductions in maternal pain. For the majority of mothers, frenotomy appears to enhance maintenance of breastfeeding. Tongue tie division is a safe procedure with minimal complications. The commonest complication is minor bleeding. Recurrence leading to redivision occurs with rates of 0.003-13% reported; this appears to be more common with posterior than anterior ties. There are limited reports indicating that prophylactic frenotomy may promote subsequent speech development; however, evidence is currently insufficient to condone this practice and further good quality research into this area is warranted.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6230 - Tongue depressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tongue to facilitate examination of the surrounding organs and tissues. (b) Classification. Class I... quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of § 820.180, with respect...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6230 - Tongue depressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... tongue to facilitate examination of the surrounding organs and tissues. (b) Classification. Class I... quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of § 820.180, with respect...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6230 - Tongue depressor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tongue to facilitate examination of the surrounding organs and tissues. (b) Classification. Class I... quality system regulation in part 820 of this chapter, with the exception of § 820.180, with respect...

  18. Tissue-Point Motion Tracking in the Tongue from Cine MRI and Tagged MRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Suo, Yuanming; Murano, Emi Z.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate tissue motion tracking within the tongue can help professionals diagnose and treat vocal tract--related disorders, evaluate speech quality before and after surgery, and conduct various scientific studies. The authors compared tissue tracking results from 4 widely used deformable registration (DR) methods applied to cine magnetic…

  19. How Tongue Size and Roughness Affect Lapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. J.; Hay, K. M.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanics of domestic cat lapping (Felis catus) and domestic dog lapping (Canis familiaris) is currently under debate. Lapping mechanics in vertebrates with incomplete cheeks, such as cats and dogs, is a balance of inertia and the force of gravity likely optimized for ingestion and physical necessities. Physiology dictates vertebrate mass, which dictates vertebrate tongue size, which dictates lapping mechanics to achieve optimum liquid ingestion; with either touch lapping, scooping, or a hybrid lapping method. The physics of this optimized system then determines how high a column of liquid can be raised before it collapses due to gravity, and therefore, lapping frequency. Through tongue roughness model variation experiments it was found that pore-scale geometrical roughness does not appear to affect lapping or liquid uptake. Through tongue size model variation experiments it was found that there is a critical tongue radius in the range of 25 mm to 35 mm above which touch lapping is no longer an efficient way to uptake liquid. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks may use a touch lapping method to ingest water if their tongue radius is less than this critical radius and use an alternative ingestion method if their tongue radius is larger.

  20. Structural characterization of the capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) tongue by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Dos Santos Haemmerle, Carlos Alexandre; Dias, Fernando José; Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Da Silva, Marcelo Cavenaghi Pereira; Sosthines, Marcia Consentino Kronka; Dos Santos, Tatiana Carlesco; Guimarães, Juliana Plácido; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2013-02-01

    Capybara is the largest rodent in the world and displays a seasonally dependent herbivore feeding behavior. Here, we present an anatomical contribution for understand this fact, by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy methodologies for tongue tissue analysis. The histological preparations revealed filiform, fungiform, vallate, and foliate papillae on the dorsal mucosa of the capybara tongue. The epithelial layer exhibited a lining of keratinized stratified squamous epithelial cells. The lamina propria was characterized by a dense connective tissue composed of the primary and secondary papillar projections. We also revealed the original aspects of the connective papillae. The shapes of the papillae varied by region of the tongue, and filiform, fungiform, vallate, and foliate papillae and subjacent layers of muscular fibers were observed. Pyriform taste buds occupying the epithelial layer of fungiform, vallate and foliate papillae were identified and the intracellular components of the taste buds and the intracorpuscular amyelinated nerve fibers were observed. The taste buds were characterized by the distribution of granular endoplasmic reticulum throughout the perinuclear area, the Golgi apparatus, and mitochondrial assemblies of various distinct diameters. Mitochondrial accumulation was also observed in the collagen bundle-surrounded amyelinated nerve fibers beside the basal cells. Therefore, these peculiar anatomical descriptions may contribute to understanding the adaptation of the feeding behavior of capybaras in a seasonally changing environment.

  1. Effects of Tobacco Smoking on the Dorsum of the Tongue and Buccal Epithelium

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Abdullah Faraj; AL Ibrahim, Ibrahim Khalil; Alaauldeen, Amjad Ibrahim; Merza, Randa Fouad; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim

    2016-10-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of tobacco smoking on the dorsum of the tongue and buccal epithelium. Methodology: This case control cross-sectional study was conducted with 174 smoking and non-smoking volunteers living in the city of Hail, Northern KSA. Cytological Materials were obtained from buccal mucosa and dorsum of the tongue, and assessed using cytopathological methods. Results: In buccal smears, cytological atypia was observed in 17 out of 101 (16.8%) smoker cases but only 3/73(4.1%) of the controls. For cytological atypia in buccal and tongue smears, the adjusted odd ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) were found to be 4.7 (1.3-16.8), P < 0.016)) and 4.3 (0.93- 20.2), P <0.06)), respectively, in the two sites. Conclusion: Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for occurrence of cytological atypia, which might subsequently develop into oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. Oral exfoliative cytology is an easy and cheap non-invasive procedure which appears highly suitable for screening populations at risk of developing oral cancer.

  2. A fish that uses its hydrodynamic tongue to feed on land

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Krijn B.; Heiss, Egon; Aerts, Peter; Van Wassenbergh, Sam

    2015-01-01

    To capture and swallow food on land, a sticky tongue supported by the hyoid and gill arch skeleton has evolved in land vertebrates from aquatic ancestors that used mouth-cavity-expanding actions of the hyoid to suck food into the mouth. However, the evolutionary pathway bridging this drastic shift in feeding mechanism and associated hyoid motions remains unknown. Modern fish that feed on land may help to unravel the physical constraints and biomechanical solutions that led to terrestrialization of fish-feeding systems. Here, we show that the mudskipper emerges onto land with its mouth cavity filled with water, which it uses as a protruding and retracting ‘hydrodynamic tongue’ during the initial capture and subsequent intra-oral transport of food. Our analyses link this hydrodynamic action of the intra-oral water to a sequence of compressive and expansive cranial motions that diverge from the general pattern known for suction feeding in fishes. However, the hyoid motion pattern showed a remarkable resemblance to newts during tongue prehension. Consequently, although alternative scenarios cannot be excluded, hydrodynamic tongue usage may be a transitional step onto which the evolution of adhesive mucosa and intrinsic lingual muscles can be added to gain further independence from water for terrestrial foraging. PMID:25788596

  3. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for tongue base tumours.

    PubMed

    Mercante, G; Ruscito, P; Pellini, R; Cristalli, G; Spriano, G

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has been used for the removal of pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers with the objective to improve functional and aesthetic outcomes without worsening the survival. This prospective single-centre cohort study described TORS in selected tumours of the tongue base in order to assess safety, efficacy and functional outcome of the procedure. From October 2010 to February 2012, TORS was performed in 13 consecutive patients affected by T1-T2 tumours of the base of the tongue. This procedure was applicable in all cases. The clinical stage demonstrated 8 T1 tumours and 5 T2 tumours. Neck node metastases were clinically evident in 6 cases (7 N0, 1 N1, 4 N2b and 1 N2c). The final pathology report confirmed malignancy in all cases (11 squamous cell carcinoma and 2 mucoepidermoid carcinoma). Negative-margin resections were obtained in all cases but one with close margins. Synchronous lymph node neck dissections were performed in 7 cases (6 monolateral, 1 bilateral). Patients underwent temporary tracheostomies for a mean time of 6 days. A naso-gastric feeding tube was positioned in 10/13 (76.9%) patients for a mean time of 7.5 days. The average time to carry out the TORS procedure was 95 min (set-up time 25 min; TORS 70 min). No deaths occurred. Surgical complications were observed in 4 cases (postoperative bleedings in 3 cases and intraoperative anaphylactic shock in 1 case). Median hospital stay was 9 days. All patients had good functional outcomes. Adjuvant treatment was indicated in 5/13 cases (35.4%). TORS represents a good tool for staging and treating neoplasm of the base of the tongue. The transoral removal is safe and can radically remove limited oropharyngeal tumours of the tongue base with good functional outcomes. The operating costs can be relatively high but they are related to the number of procedures per year, although the advantages to patients seem to justify the procedure. TORS can represent the definitive

  4. Does bilingualism twist your tongue?

    PubMed

    Gollan, Tamar H; Goldrick, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    The current study investigated whether bilingualism affects the processing of sub-lexical representations specifying the sound structure of words. Spanish-English bilinguals, Mandarin-English bilinguals, and English-only monolinguals repeated English tongue twisters. Twister materials had word or nonword targets (thus varying in whether lexical information did or did not support sound processing), and similar or dissimilar sounds (thus varying in difficulty with respect to competition at a sub-lexical level). Even though bilinguals had learned English at an early age, and spoke English without an accent, Spanish-English bilinguals produced significantly more twister errors than monolinguals, particularly in the absence of lexical support. Mandarin-English bilinguals were also disadvantaged, but more consistently across all twister types. These results reveal that bilingual disadvantages extend beyond the lexical level to affect the processing of sub-lexical representations. More generally, these findings suggest that experience with sound structures (and not simply their intrinsic complexity) shapes sub-lexical processing for all speakers.

  5. The Effect of Propolis in Healing Injured Nasal Mucosa: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Abdelmonem, Said; Abdelsameea, Ahmed A.; AlShawadfy, Mohamed; El-Kashishy, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Mechanical trauma to the nasal mucosa increases the risk of synechia formation, especially after chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal surgeries. Objective  This study was carried to assess the effect of propolis administration in healing injured nasal mucosa in rats. Methods  We randomly divided eighteen rats into three equal experimental groups: (1) non-treated group; (2) gum tragacanth (suspending agent for propolis) treated group; and (3) propolis treated group. The non-treated group received no treatment for 15 days. The second group received gum tragacanth administration (5 ml/kg, orally) once daily for 15 days. The third group received propolis suspension orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg once daily for 15 days. At the beginning of this study, we induced unilateral mechanical nasal trauma on the right nasal mucosa of all rats in the three groups using a brushing technique. A pathologist stained tissue samples using hematoxylin and examined eosin by using a light microscope. Results  The severity of inflammation was milder with the absence of ulcerations in the propolis treated group compared with the non-treated and gum tragacanth groups. Goblet cell and ciliated cell loss was substantially lower in patients treated with propolis compared with groups without treatment and those treated with gum tragacanth. Conclusion  Propolis decreased inflammation and enhanced healing of wounds of the nasal mucosa in rats. PMID:27413403

  6. Tongue piercing and chronic abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting--two cases.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung Kyu; Chung, Danielle; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of unclear etiology are frustrating to patients and physicians alike. The integrative medicine procedures of acupuncture and neural therapy may provide treatment options. Tongue piercing, which is prevalent in 5.6% of the adolescent population, may be a contributing factor in upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To demonstrate the usefulness of an integrative medicine treatment approach in two cases of patients with chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting of unclear etiology who had failed standard medical management. (2) To identify scars from tongue piercings as a possible contributing factor in chronic upper GI symptoms of unclear etiology. Two retrospective case studies are presented of young adult females who were seen in a private multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the US. The patients were treated with neural therapy and acupuncture. The desired outcome was the cessation or reduction of the frequency of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Both patients had resolution of their symptoms. From this study, we have concluded the following: (1) Tongue scars from tongue rings may be causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal symptoms. (2) Neural therapy and acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of chronic upper GI symptoms related to tongue scars.

  7. Tongue base exposure during TORS without the use of a mouth prop.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew C

    2016-12-01

    This study describes a novel exposure technique for base of tongue trans-oral robotic surgery (BOT TORS) and early experience with it. The technique discussed involves placement of a suture through the mobile tongue with distraction and suspension of the tongue to the operating table. TORS is then performed per previously described techniques. In our series, 13 patients with either benign or malignant mass lesions involving the tongue base were treated with TORS at a tertiary academic medical center. We reviewed the rates of adequate exposure, console time, adequacy of resection (in malignant cases), complication rates, and costs associated with this technique. In our series, adequate exposure was achieved in 92.3 % of patients. Mean console time was 36 min. Negative surgical margins were achieved in all cancer resections. Five minor complications (tongue lacerations) were observed. Per-case cost attributable to this technique is $3.81. We conclude that BOT TORS is feasible without the use of a mouth prop. Operative times are consistent with those reported by centers that routinely use mouth props for BOT TORS. This technique does not appear to compromise margin adequacy during oncologic resections. Its use may result in a significant cost savings when compared to the FK and other similar retractors.

  8. Solitary S-100-positive congenital granular cell tumor of the tongue: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-feng; Lin, Yi; Liu, Jian-hua; Li, Zhi-yong

    2014-01-01

    Congenital granular cell tumors (CGCTs), which are rare benign lesions in newborns, locate predominantly on the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge of female neonates. However, this lesion rarely occurs on the tongue, and only 9 cases have been reported in the English literature. Of the 9 cases, which have been tested for S-100 protein, 4 were immunonegative to S-100 protein. In this present case, we reported a rare case of a 4-day-old Chinese girl with a CGCT on the anterior dorsum of the tongue. The lesion was excised under general anesthesia when the newborn was 3 months old. Histologically, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia of the overlying mucosa was noted in this lesion. Immunohistochemical stains showed that the granular cells were diffusely strongly positive to S-100 protein, neuron-specific enolase, and vimentin. Depending on these findings, it was diagnosed as CGCT.

  9. Motivational conditions influence tongue motor performance.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Mohit; Svensson, Peter; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2013-04-01

    Motivation plays an important role in the outcome of motor learning but has not received attention in tongue-training-induced plasticity of the corticomotor pathways. The present study investigated the influence of two different motivational conditions and gender on performance during a complex tongue-training paradigm using the tongue drive system (TDS). In addition, subject-based reports of motivation, fun, pain, and fatigue were compared between groups and genders. Sixteen subjects were randomized into three groups and were asked to use the TDS for 40 min. A motivational condition (monetary reward or self-controlled practice) was introduced in two groups and the third group served as the control. The subjects were instructed to play a computer game using the TDS, having control of the computer cursor through a magnet attached to the tongue, and performance was compared among groups. Performance improved in all groups and in both genders. The monetary reward group tended towards higher performance scores compared with the control group, whereas the self-controlled practice group performed significantly better compared with the control group. There was no significant difference between groups and genders in the subject-based report for level of motivation, fun, pain, or fatigue. In conclusion, introduction of motivational conditions influenced tongue motor performance.

  10. Electronic tongue: An analytical gustatory tool.

    PubMed

    Latha, Rewanthwar Swathi; Lakshmi, P K

    2012-01-01

    Taste is an important organoleptic property governing acceptance of products for administration through mouth. But majority of drugs available are bitter in taste. For patient acceptability and compliance, bitter taste drugs are masked by adding several flavoring agents. Thus, taste assessment is one important quality control parameter for evaluating taste-masked formulations. The primary method for the taste measurement of drug substances and formulations is by human panelists. The use of sensory panelists is very difficult and problematic in industry and this is due to the potential toxicity of drugs and subjectivity of taste panelists, problems in recruiting taste panelists, motivation and panel maintenance are significantly difficult when working with unpleasant products. Furthermore, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-unapproved molecules cannot be tested. Therefore, analytical taste-sensing multichannel sensory system called as electronic tongue (e-tongue or artificial tongue) which can assess taste have been replacing the sensory panelists. Thus, e-tongue includes benefits like reducing reliance on human panel. The present review focuses on the electrochemical concepts in instrumentation, performance qualification of E-tongue, and applications in various fields.

  11. Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Gurkan; Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2014-01-01

    Precancerous lesions of oral mucosa, known as potentially malignant disorders in recent years, are consists of a group of diseases, which should be diagnosed in the early stage. Oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and oral erythroplakia are the most common oral mucosal diseases that have a very high malignant transformation rate. Oral lichen planus is one of the potentially malignant disorders that may be seen in six different subtypes including papular, reticular, plaque-like, atrophic, erosive, and bullous type, clinically. Atrophic and erosive subtypes have the greater increased malignant transformation risk compared to another subtypes. Although there are various etiological studies, the etiology of almost all these diseases is not fully understood. Geographically, etiologic factors may vary. The most frequently reported possible factors are tobacco use, alcohol drinking, chewing of betel quid containing areca nut, and solar rays. Early diagnosis is very important and can be lifesaving, because in late stages, they may be progressed to severe dysplasia and even carcinoma in situ and/or squamous cell carcinoma. For most diseases, treatment results are not satisfactory in spite of miscellaneous therapies. While at the forefront of surgical intervention, topical and systemic treatment alternatives such as corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and retinoids are widely used. PMID:25516862

  12. Progress of Biomimetic Artificial Nose and Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Qingjun

    2009-05-01

    As two of the basic senses of human beings, olfaction and gustation play a very important role in daily life. These two types of chemical sensors are important for recognizing environmental conditions. Electronic nose and electronic tongue, which mimics animals' olfaction and gustation to detect odors and chemical components, have been carried out due to their potential commercial applications for biomedicine, food industry and environmental protection. In this report, the biomimetic artificial nose and tongue is presented. Firstly, the smell and taste sensors mimicking the mammalian olfaction and gustation was described, and then, some mimetic design of electronic nose and tongue for odorants and tastants detection are developed. Finally, olfactory and gustatory biosensors are presented as the developing trends of this field.

  13. Huge congenital haemangioma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Ulku; Pala, Emel Ebru; Bayol, Umit; Cakir, Ebru; Cukurova, Ibrahim; Gumussoy, Murat

    2014-12-01

    Haemangiomas, the most common type of benign vascular tumours, are rare in the oral cavity. Some of these lesions are congenital and show symptoms in late childhood or early adult life. A 32-years-old woman presented with a huge lesion on her tongue which caused dysphagia and dysphasia. She had first noticed the lesion when she was 6. Her obstructive symptoms started when she was 28 and, despite various medical treatments, the size of the lesion gradually increased. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 7 x 5 x 3 cm mass on the right side of the tongue. Because of severe functional and cosmetic problems, the lesion was excised with partial haemiglossectomy. Histopathological examination was consistent with intramuscular haemangioma. Haemangiomas are benign tumours with a benign course and are rarely seen on the tongue. They have clinical importance when localised in the oral cavity. Different treatment modalities exist, but in cases of large tumours, surgery may be the mainstay treatment.

  14. Convergence of macroscopic tongue anatomy in ruminants and scaling relationships with body mass or tongue length.

    PubMed

    Meier, Andrea R; Schmuck, Ute; Meloro, Carlo; Clauss, Marcus; Hofmann, Reinhold R

    2016-03-01

    Various morphological measures demonstrate convergent evolution in ruminants with their natural diet, in particular with respect to the browser/grazer dichotomy. Here, we report quantitative macroanatomical measures of the tongue (length and width of specific parts) of 65 ruminant species and relate them to either body mass (BM) or total tongue length, and to the percentage of grass in the natural diet (%grass). Models without and with accounting for the phylogenetic structures of the dataset were used, and models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion. Scaling relationships followed geometric principles, that is, length measures scaled with BM to the power of 0.33. Models that used tongue length rather than BM as a body size proxy were consistently ranked better, indicating that using size proxies that are less susceptible to a wider variety of factors (such as BM that fluctuates with body condition) should be attempted whenever possible. The proportion of the freely mobile tongue tip of the total tongue (and hence also the corpus length) was negatively correlated to %grass, in accordance with concepts that the feeding mechanism of browsers requires more mobile tongues. It should be noted that some nonbrowsers, such as cattle, use a peculiar mechanism for grazing that also requires long, mobile tongues, but they appear to be exceptions. A larger corpus width with increasing %grass corresponds to differences in snout shape with broader snouts in grazers. The Torus linguae is longer with increasing %grass, a finding that still warrants functional interpretation. This study shows that tongue measures covary with diet in ruminants. In contrast, the shape of the tongue (straight or "hourglass-shaped" as measured by the ratio of the widest and smallest corpus width) is unrelated to diet and is influenced strongly by phylogeny.

  15. Infrahyoid myofascial flap for tongue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Remmert, Stephan

    2006-11-01

    For selected cases, reconstruction of the tongue may be required after tumor removal. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a simplified concept of tongue reconstruction with emphasis on infrahyoid myofascial flaps (IMF). The defects of the tongue were classified in 23 patients according to the extent of tumor growth, functional and surgical aspects. The oral tongue (OT; n = 1), base of tongue (BT; n = 12) or both areas (OT and BT; n = 10) were involved, with (n = 14) or without (n = 9) infiltration of adjacent tissues. Minor defects (extent (1/4) or less) required no reconstructive procedure at any area. Major defect closure (extent (1/2)-3/4) was accomplished with a combination of IMF covered by a radial forearm flap (RFF). A complete reconstruction of the OT was achieved with a combination of a bilateral IMF covered by a RFF. Whenever the complete BT has to be removed, interposition of a vein graft to establish a sufficient arterial blood supply to the remaining OT is mandatory. Moreover, a larynx lift to prevent aspiration is recommendable. Resection of adjacent soft tissues requires a larger RFF (OT; BT) or flaps from the shoulder-back region (BT and OT). Whenever the integrity of the mandible has to be sacrificed, a free fibula graft serves as an excellent tool for reconstruction. IMF serves as a reliable tool for minor or major reconstructive procedures of the tongue. Reliability and versatility of IMF may contribute to a reduced time required for surgery since harvesting is performed in the neck area immediately after neck dissection. Moreover, harvesting of the IMF does not result in an increased postoperative morbidity. Hence, functional restoration can be achieved with a more cost-effective procedure.

  16. Malignant Tumors of Tongue in Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Atarbashi Moghadam, Fazele; Bastani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of oral cancers varies from one country to another, which can be clarified by the difference in the distribution of the risk factors and the possible etiologies. Tongue is a main segment of oral cavity and malignant lesions of this region accounts for nearly 30% of all oral cancers. Objectives In the present study, we evaluated the pattern of tongue cancer in Iranian population and compared these findings with those previously reported in the other countries. Methods In this multicenter, retrospective cross-sectional study recorded cases of the malignant tongue tumors in the cancer research center (CRC) of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences were extracted. The patient records and their microscopic reports were retrieved from the archives and age, sex and microscopic types were evaluated. It is to be noted that the CRC has been serving as a cancer registry center for major hospitals all over the country since the year of 2003. Thus, the obtained statistics are highly reliable. Results During the years 2003 to 2008, a total number of 952 new cases of the tongue cancer were recorded in the CRC. Most cases are diagnosed in the sixth and seventh decades of life. 450 cases (47.2%) occurred in men and 489 cases (51.36%) in women. Four different types of malignant lesions (epithelial, salivary gland, hematopoietic and mesenchymal) were diagnosed. Epithelial tumors were the most prevalent malignancies (93%) of which squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) made up 87.39% of all lesions. Salivary gland tumors had the second place with 3.15% of the total lesions. Conclusions In Iranian population, squamous cell carcinoma is the most prevalent malignancy of tongue and it is notable that the ratio of female to male population was equal. These lesions were prevalent in the sixth and seventh decades of life. Thus screening examination of tongue by dentist especially in elderly patients is necessary for early detection of cancerous lesions. PMID:27761209

  17. Identification of lingual glands and ducts ventrally in pigs' tongues.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, S E; Josephson, G K

    1989-01-01

    Hitherto unreported tubulo-acinar mucous lingual glands were located ventrally in the free tip of the tongue, just cranial to the attachment of the frenulum linguae in 186 of 400 (47%) of pigs' tongues. The glands were bilateral in 126 (32%) of the tongues. These glands emptied by several ducts onto the ventral surface of the tongue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2606778

  18. [Regeneration of the gastric and intestinal mucosas].

    PubMed

    Castrup, H J

    1979-05-10

    The physiological cell renewal of gastrointestinal mucosa is regulated in man as in animal through certain mechanisms with measurable kinetic data. Pathologic mucosal alterations, metabolic disorders, pharmacological agents etc. clearly affect the regenerative processes of the gastrointestinal epithelium. Gastrin and pentagastrin stimulate the growth not only of the parietal cells, but also of the superficial epithelium of the gastric mucosa, whereas secretin does not change cell growth. Glucocorticoid steroids inhibit epithelial regeneration in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract. 5-fluorouracil has a similar effect but acts at a different site in the regeneration cycle. Epithelial cell proliferation of the gastric and intestinal mucosa is likewise inhibited in an uremic condition. In inflammatory changes in the human gastric mucosa epithelial cell hyperproliferation relative to the severity of gastritis and anomalous proliferation within regions of dysplasia can be demonstrated. Foveolary hyperplasia in Ménétrier's disease occurs on the basis of excessive hyperproliferation with displacement of regeneration zones.

  19. Bahama Banks, Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Most of the Western Bahama Banks, the Tongue of the Ocean and Andros Island (25.0N, 77.0W) as well as north central Cuba with its fringing reefs can be seen in this one view. The green water over the banks is less than 30 ft. deep but the deep blue of the Tongue is 4000 to 6000 ft. deep. All the sediment on the banks, including the material that forms the islands, is calcium carbonate (lime) precipitated from sea water by animals and plants.

  20. Bahama Banks, Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Most of the Western Bahama Banks, the Tongue of the Ocean and Andros Island (24.0N, 77.0W) as well as north central Cuba with its fringing reefs can be seen in this one view. The green water over the banks is less than 30 ft. deep but the deep blue of the Tongue is 4000 to 6000 ft. deep. All the sediment on the banks, including the material that forms the islands, is calcium carbonate (lime) precipitated from sea water by animals and plants.

  1. Tongue of the ocean, Bahamas Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A portion of the tongue of the ocean (24.0N, 77.0W), and the Bahamas Bank, Bahamas Archipelago. The light blue region is the shalow sea bottom where the Bahama Bank is no more than 30 ft. deep. At the contact between light and dark blue, an underwater shear cliff drops over a mile in depth. The wavey lines of various shades of blue are caused by the differential coral growth relative to the warm/cool water transfer in and out of the tongue.

  2. Two cases of neurilemmoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Batra, Kadambari; Rai, Anil Kumar; Chaudhary, Neena; Topno, Sameer

    2007-11-01

    Neurilemmomas of the tongue are uncommon. When they do occur; treatment is simple. However; diagnosis is invariably delayed because of the vagueness of symptoms. We encountered 2 cases of this unusual tumor within weeks of each other In 1 of these cases, the definitive diagnosis was delayed because of the atypical clinical picture-that is, an abscess in the tongue that had caused respiratory distress. We describe our management of these 2 cases, and we discuss what has been published in the literature regarding the presentation, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prognosis for patients with glossal neurilemmoma.

  3. Tongues in degree 4 Blaschke products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canela, Jordi; Fagella, Núria; Garijo, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the family of Blasche products {{B}a}(z)={{z}3}\\frac{z-a}{1-\\bar{a}z} , which is a rational family of perturbations of the doubling map. We focus on the tongue-like sets which appear in its parameter plane. We first study their basic topological properties and afterwards we investigate how bifurcations take place in a neighborhood of their tips. Finally we see how the fixed tongue extends beyond its natural domain of definition.

  4. Tongue tie and breastfeeding: assessing and overcoming the difficulties.

    PubMed

    Breward, Sharon

    2006-09-01

    Tongue tie, a condition in which the tongue's mobility is restricted, may reduce the ability of babies to breastfeed successfully. In this age of mass artificial feeding, the management of this condition has been, until recently, overlooked. This article highlights the effects of tongue tie on breastfeeding and what health professionals should be doing to assess and manage any difficulties

  5. Tongue Control and Its Implication in Pronunciation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouni, Slim

    2014-01-01

    Pronunciation training based on speech production techniques illustrating tongue movements is gaining popularity. However, there is not sufficient evidence that learners can imitate some tongue animation. In this paper, we argue that although controlling tongue movement related to speech is not such an easy task, training with visual feedback…

  6. Prevalence of tongue lesions in the Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kaswan, Sumita; Rahman, Farzan; Doni, Bharati

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Tongue lesions are a health concern for the dental practitioners and the patients as they constitute a significant proportion of oral mucosal lesions. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of various tongue lesions in the Indian population. Material and methods: 4926 patients attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology were examined for the presence of various tongue lesions during the period from October, 2010 to September, 2012. The age of the patients ranged from 12-80 years with a mean age of 36.51 years. Results: The prevalence of tongue lesions was 12.07%. The most common lesion diagnosed was coated tongue affecting 28.0% of the subjects, followed by geographic tongue (16.4%), fissured tongue (14.9%) and depapillated tongue (11.5%). Males were more frequently affected than females. The most common systemic condition observed in the patients with tongue lesions was anaemia (189), followed by hypertension (47) and diabetes mellitus (38). Conclusion: The high prevalence necessitates adequate awareness of the various tongue lesions in the general population. The dental clinicians should also be knowledgeable about the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions. Key words:Tongue lesions, prevalence, Indian population, coated tongue. PMID:24455067

  7. A three-dimensional atlas of human tongue muscles.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Ira; Mu, Liancai

    2013-07-01

    The human tongue is one of the most important yet least understood structures of the body. One reason for the relative lack of research on the human tongue is its complex anatomy. This is a real barrier to investigators as there are few anatomical resources in the literature that show this complex anatomy clearly. As a result, the diagnosis and treatment of tongue disorders lags behind that for other structures of the head and neck. This report intended to fill this gap by displaying the tongue's anatomy in multiple ways. The primary material used in this study was serial axial images of the male and female human tongue from the Visible Human (VH) Project of the National Library of Medicine. In addition, thick serial coronal sections of three human tongues were rendered translucent. The VH axial images were computer reconstructed into serial coronal sections and each tongue muscle was outlined. These outlines were used to construct a three-dimensional (3D) computer model of the tongue that allows each muscle to be seen in its in vivo anatomical position. The thick coronal sections supplement the 3D model by showing details of the complex interweaving of tongue muscles throughout the tongue. The graphics are perhaps the clearest guide to date to aid clinical or basic science investigators in identifying each tongue muscle in any part of the human tongue.

  8. A Normative-Speaker Validation Study of Two Indices Developed to Quantify Tongue Dorsum Activity from Midsagittal Tongue Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zharkova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    This study reported adult scores on two measures of tongue shape, based on midsagittal tongue shape data from ultrasound imaging. One of the measures quantified the extent of tongue dorsum excursion, and the other measure represented the place of maximal excursion. Data from six adult speakers of Scottish Standard English without speech disorders…

  9. Ex vivo correlation of the permeability of metoprolol across human and porcine buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Meng-Lund, Emil; Marxen, Eva; Pedersen, Anne Marie L; Müllertz, Anette; Hyrup, Birgitte; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2014-07-01

    The pH partition theory proposes a correlation between fraction of unionized drug substance and permeability. The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of metoprolol and mannitol in ex vivo human and porcine buccal mucosa models at varying pH to validate whether the porcine permeability model is predictive for human buccal absorption. Human (n = 9-10) and porcine (n = 6-7) buccal mucosa were mounted in a modified Ussing chamber, and the kinetics of metoprolol and mannitol transport was assessed for a period of 5.5 h with the pH values of donor medium set at 7.4, 8.5, and 9.0. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-van Gieson were used as tissue stains to evaluate the histology and the presence of acidic polysaccharides (e.g., mucins), respectively. The permeability of metoprolol was decreased in human buccal mucosa by almost twofold when compared with porcine buccal mucosa with a positive correlation (r(2) = 0.96) between the permeability assessed in porcine and human buccal mucosa. There was no change in the degree of either epithelial swelling or desquamation when treating with the pH 9.0 donor medium for 5.5 h. These data suggest that buccal mucosa from pigs can be used to predict human buccal absorption.

  10. Role of tongue pressure production in oropharyngeal swallow biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Hiroshige; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Magara, Jin; Minagi, Yoshitomo; Li, Qiang; Ono, Takahiro; Inoue, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The tongue is important for orofacial movements, including swallowing. Although numerous studies have focused on tongue pressure against the palate, its physiological role has not been fully evaluated. The tongue pressure generation may have the temporal coordination with the swallowing relational organs. The aim of this study was to clarify the physiological mechanisms of tongue pressure and to investigate the temporal relationship among tongue pressure, supra-hyoid muscle activity, and videofluorographic (VF) images during swallowing. Fifteen healthy young subjects participated. Tongue pressure measured using a sensor sheet with five channels, electromyographic EMG, and VF was recorded synchronously during 4-ml barium swallowing. Swallowing behavior in VF images with and without the sensor sheet was compared. Furthermore, the temporal relationship between events measured from tongue pressure, EMG, and VF was evaluated. Swallowing behavior on VF images was not affected by placement of the sensor sheet. Tongue pressure at the posterio-lateral point of the hard palate tended to have biphasic peaks. Tongue pressure production with a monophasic pattern appeared during the same period as the second peak in the biphasic pattern. The onset of tongue pressure was later than the start of hyoid movement and onset of EMG, and offset was observed between the hyoid at the up-forward position and reposition. Onset of tongue pressure at the anterior area was correlated with the start of slight hyoid elevation. Offset of tongue pressure at the posterio-lateral points was strongly time locked with the hyoid at the up-forward position. The present results suggested the temporal coordination of tongue pressure generation with the swallowing-related organs. That is, the tongue pressure was produced for bolus propulsion, and was closely related to hyoid movement temporally during swallowing. These results may contribute to clarify the clinical state with the disorder of tongue

  11. Dynamics of posterior tongue during pronunciation and voluntary tongue lift movement in young adults.

    PubMed

    Shirahige, C; Oki, K; Morimoto, Y; Oisaka, N; Minagi, S

    2012-05-01

    The lifting-up movement of the posterior part of the tongue to touch the palate, which is a requirement for performing physiological functions such as deglutition and speech, is an important phenomenon that is difficult to objectively evaluate. The purpose of this study was to develop a new modality to evaluate the tongue-lifting function, especially in the posterior part of the tongue, and to elucidate the dynamic properties of the tongue in normal subjects. Twenty-three healthy volunteers (9 men and 14 women; mean age, 27·6years) participated in this study. A new device was developed that could evaluate the up-down movement of the posterior part of the tongue in a non-invasive manner. The experimental tasks were as follows: (i) /a/ pronunciation for 1s followed by /ka/ pronunciation (a-ka task), (ii) /a/ pronunciation for 1s followed by /ga/ pronunciation (a-ga task) and (iii) /a/ pronunciation for 1s followed by a voluntary push-up movement of the posterior part of the tongue (a-lift task). Maximum upward velocity in the a-ga task was larger than that in the a-ka task (P<0·05). The a-lift task showed the highest tongue lift range among the three tasks, and the a-ga task showed a higher range than that of the a-ka task (P<0·05). This study revealed that precise quantification of the motility of the posterior part of the tongue, which would be useful in rehabilitation of articulation and/or swallowing, could be achieved using this new device in a non-invasive manner.

  12. Stimulated eosinophils and proteinases augment the transepithelial flux of albumin in bovine bronchial mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, C. A.; Edwards, D.; Boot, J. R.; Robinson, C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The apical to basolateral transmucosal flux of albumin has been measured in isolated sheets of bovine bronchial and tracheal mucosa. Under resting conditions the net unidirectional flux in the bronchial mucosa was not significantly different from that measured previously for the basolateral to apical vector. In contrast, the apical to basolateral flux in the tracheal mucosa was significantly lower than that measured in the opposite direction. 2. Addition of guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils to the apical side of the tissues had no significant effect on the transmucosal flux of albumin in either the bronchial or tracheal mucosa. 3. When eosinophils were stimulated with the ionophore A23187 or by opsonic adherence to tissues treated with a guinea-pig anti-bovine airway epithelium antibody, the bronchial mucosal sheets that had been exposed showed a significant increase in the transmucosal flux of albumin. However, tissues from the tracheal mucosa were resistant to the effects of stimulated eosinophils. 4. Histologically, sheets of mucosa from bovine main bronchi that had been exposed to stimulated eosinophils were characterized by epithelial injury consisting of loss of columnar epithelium from the underlying basal cell layer and biomatrix. Much less evidence of cellular injury was observed in tracheal tissues. 5. Bacterial collagenases applied to the apical side of the sheets were shown to increase the permeability of the bronchial mucosa to albumin and to produce histological changes that had similarities with the pattern of damage produced by stimulated eosinophils. 6. These observations demonstrate that the ability of eosinophils to injure the bronchial mucosa is independent of the side of the tissue on which they are present.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8242259

  13. Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors during Swallowing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona M.; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8…

  14. Relation Between Psoriasis and Geographic Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Umair, Ayesha; Babaker, Zynab; SN, Azzeghaiby; Gazal, Giath; Sarraj, Faysal

    2014-01-01

    The aim this article is to investigate the link between geographic tongue and psoriasis skin disease. Our review paper of the literature will handle strict study about the relation between geographic tongue and psoriasis. Our search has identified only limited studies available in English written literature starting from 2006-2013 using pubMed – indexed for MEDLINE. The result of this review suggests that geographic tongue may be an oral manifestation of psoriasis.There is no clear evidence in literature about association with gender and aetiology except one study which shows that benign migratory glossitis is more prevalent in young, nonsmoker and atopic or allergic individuals. Treatment for oral lesions is not standardized. A geographic tongue is significantly more frequent in psoriatic patients but only a limited data is available to date to strongly validate the association between these two entities.We recommend the general practitioner to have a good understanding about the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this lesion. Psoriatic patients should be encouraged to undergo routine dental checkups. PMID:25584342

  15. The Tongue Map, Real or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    Students need practice in proposing hypotheses, developing experiments that will test these hypotheses, and generating data that they will analyze to support or refute them. I describe a guided-inquiry activity based on the "tongue map" concept, appropriate for middle school and high school students.

  16. Between the confusion of tongues and the gift of tongues. Or working as a psychoanalyst in a foreign language.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2004-12-01

    The author worked as a psychoanalyst for 5 years in Germany. In this paper, he attempts to answer the question 'How was it possible that, in spite of his imperfect knowledge of German, notwithstanding a deepening understanding of the language during his residence in the country, he was able to successfully treat so many patients? ' He starts by putting forward some distinctions between the activity of interpretation as translation of the unconscious with the patient in session and the activity of translation of texts. After a brief exegetic review of the myths of Babel and Pentecost, he suggests that the analyst working in a foreign language moves between 'the confusion of tongues' and the 'gift of tongues', that is, between Babel and Pentecost. He presents some vignettes to illustrate typical situations he encountered in his practice. Finally, he draws some conclusions from this experience of psychoanalytic polyglotism, mainly on the basis of the communicative function that modern infant research assigns to affect attunement and verbal language.

  17. Availability of Tongue Diagnosis System for Assessing Tongue Coating Thickness in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jiyoung; Jang, Seungwon; Nam, Dong-Hyun; Han, Gajin; Yeo, Inkwon; Ko, Seok-Jae; Park, Jae-Woo; Ryu, Bongha; Kim, Jinsung

    2013-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is an important procedure in traditional Korean medicine (TKM). In particular, tongue coating thickness (TCT) is deemed to show the progression of the disease. However, conventional tongue diagnosis has limitations because of various external factors. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the availability of tongue diagnosis system (TDS) in the assessment of TCT. This study has been designed as a prospective clinical trial involving 60 patients with functional dyspepsia. Tongue images will be obtained by TDS twice with a 30 min interval. The system will measure the percentage of TCT and classify it as either no coating, thin coating, or thick coating according to the existing diagnostic criteria. After finishing the collection of 60 patients' tongue images, TCT on the images will be simultaneously evaluated by the conventional method to establish the gold standard for assessing TCT by 5 well-trained clinicians. The evaluation will be repeated by the same clinicians after 2 weeks, but the order of the images will be changed. This trial is expected to provide clinical evidence for the availability of TDS as a diagnostic tool and to contribute to the standardization of the diagnosis system used in TKM. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01864837. PMID:24159343

  18. Tongue-surface movement patterns during speech and swallowing.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan R; Wang, Yu-Tsai

    2003-05-01

    The tongue has been frequently characterized as being composed of several functionally independent articulators. The question of functional regionality within the tongue was examined by quantifying the strength of coupling among four different tongue locations across a large number of consonantal contexts and participants. Tongue behavior during swallowing was also described. Vertical displacements of pellets affixed to the tongue were extracted from the x-ray microbeam database. Forty-six participants recited 20 vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) combinations and swallowed 10 ccs of water. Tongue-surface movement patterns were quantitatively described by computing the covariance between the vertical time-histories of all possible pellet pairs. Phonemic differentiation in vertical tongue motions was observed as coupling varied predictably across pellet pairs with place of articulation. Moreover, tongue displacements for speech and swallowing clustered into distinct groups based on their coupling profiles. Functional independence of anterior tongue regions was evidenced by a wide range of movement coupling relations between anterior tongue pellets. The strengths and weaknesses of the covariance-based analysis for characterizing tongue movement are considered.

  19. A soft biomimetic tongue: model reconstruction and motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xuanming; Xu, Weiliang; Li, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    A bioinspired robotic tongue which is actuated by a network of compressed air is proposed for the purpose of mimicking the movements of human tongue. It can be applied in the fields such as medical science and food engineering. The robotic tongue is made of two kinds of silicone rubber Ecoflex 0030 and PDMS with the shape simplified from real human tongue. In order to characterize the robotic tongue, a series of experiments were carried out. Laser scan was applied to reconstruct the static model of robotic tongue when it was under pressurization. After each scan, the robotic tongue was scattered into dense points in the same 3D coordinate system and the coordinates of each point were recorded. Motion tracking system (OptiTrack) was used to track and record the whole process of deformation dynamically during the loading and unloading phase. In the experiments, five types of deformation were achieved including roll-up, roll-down, elongation, groove and twist. Utilizing the discrete points generated by laser scan, the accurate parameterized outline of robotic tongue under different pressure was obtained, which could help demonstrate the static characteristic of robotic tongue. The precise deformation process under one pressure was acquired through the OptiTrack system which contains a series of digital cameras, markers on the robotic tongue and a set of hardware and software for data processing. By means of tracking and recording different process of deformation under different pressure, the dynamic characteristic of robotic tongue could be achieved.

  20. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-06-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels.

  1. Tongue adhesion in the horned frog Ceratophrys sp.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-01-01

    Frogs are well-known to capture elusive prey with their protrusible and adhesive tongues. However, the adhesive performance of frog tongues and the mechanism of the contact formation with the prey item remain unknown. Here we measured for the first time adhesive forces and tongue contact areas in living individuals of a horned frog (Ceratophrys sp.) against glass. We found that Ceratophrys sp. generates adhesive forces well beyond its own body weight. Surprisingly, we found that the tongues adhered stronger in feeding trials in which the coverage of the tongue contact area with mucus was relatively low. Thus, besides the presence of mucus, other features of the frog tongue (surface profile, material properties) are important to generate sufficient adhesive forces. Overall, the experimental data shows that frog tongues can be best compared to pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) that are of common technical use as adhesive tapes or labels. PMID:24921415

  2. Blood flow and epithelial thickness in different regions of feline oral mucosa and skin.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G K; Squier, C A; Johnson, W T; Todd, G L

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between epithelial thickness and blood flow was examined in 6 mucosal and 3 skin regions of the cat. Blood flow to these tissues was determined using the radiolabelled microsphere method. From histologic sections the proportion of the tissue biopsy occupied by epithelium and the average epithelial thickness were calculated. The oral tissues had a significantly higher blood flow than the skin regions (p less than 0.05). In terms of epithelial thickness, the tissues could be divided into 4 groups (p less than 0.05). These were: a) palate; b) gingival regions and dorsum of the tongue; c) lip and buccal mucosa; d) all skin regions. When epithelial thickness was related to blood flow there was a significant positive correlation (p less than 0.005) indicating that a thicker epithelium is associated with a higher blood flow. This finding may reflect the greater metabolic demands of the thicker epithelia.

  3. Anaesthetic Consideration in Macroglossia Due to Lymphangioma of Tongue: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Anurag; Munjal, Munish; Kamakshi; Garg, Shuchita; Sood, Dinesh; Katyal, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Summary Successful airway management of an infant or child with macroglossia prerequisites recognition of a potential airway problem. We describe our experience with a debilitated 13-year-old girl who presented with severe macroglossia, secondary to lymphangioma of the tongue. Along with the social discomfort she had inability to speak, eat or drink properly and exposure-induced dryness. Such patients are a challenge for the anaesthesiologists due to the anticipated difficult intubation associated with the oral mucosa occupying lesion. It also becomes pertinent to rule out any of the associated congenital anomalies. The importance of a thorough preoperative evaluation and attention to difficult intubation and maintenance of airway is emphasized. We endeavor to review the available literature regarding patient's perioperative management of such patients. PMID:20640084

  4. Maxillary deficiency treatment by fixed tongue appliance--a case report.

    PubMed

    Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Jamilian, Abdolreza; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Ghassemi, Alireza; Shayan, Arman

    2013-01-01

    This case illustrates orthopaedic treatment of a 12.1-year-old girl with class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency. The patient was treated by a fixed tongue appliance in the upper jaw. First maxillary molars and premolars were banded and a hyrax was mounted on them in order to achieve lateral expansion. A fixed tongue appliance comprising of a few cribs was soldered to the anterior side of the hyrax with the purpose of pushing the maxilla in forward position. The orthopaedic stage of treatment lasted for 5 months after which favourable correction of the malocclusion was observed. The SNA angle increased by 2 degrees, the IMPA decreased by 10 degrees and mandibular plane angle (GoGn-SN) increased by 20. After this time, the fixed tongue appliance and Hyrax remained in the mouth for 3 more months as retention. This case demonstrates that fixed tongue appliance might be an alternative method to extra oral appliances in class III and maxillary deficient cases.

  5. [Nasal mucosa in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Müller, Maciej; Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrinologic disease all over the world. 150 million people suffer from this disease, in Poland about 2 million. The disease on the basis of the onset and pathophysiology may be divided into type I and type II. Pathophysiologic changes include diabetic microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and neuropathy. The most common presentations in head and neck are otitis externa, hypoacusis, vertigo, disequilibrium, xerostomia, dysphagia, fungal and recurrent infections. The changes in nasal mucosa are not very well known. Only few papers concerned the problem. The main complaints of patients regarding the nose are xeromycteria, hyposmia and various degree of decreased patency of the nose. Chronic atrophic rhinitis, septal perforation, ulceration of nasal mucosa, alar necrosis, symptoms of staphylococcal or fungal infection can be found during otolaryngologic examination. The treatment in this group of patients should consist of systemic therapy of diabetes mellitus and on the other hand focal therapy with the use of a solution to moisten the nasal mucosa.

  6. Rectal mucosa in cows' milk allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, N; Yadav, M; Boey, C G

    1989-01-01

    Eleven infants who were suspected clinically of having cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy were fed with a protein hydrolysate formula for six to eight weeks, after which they had jejunal and rectal biopsies taken before and 24 hours after challenge with cows' milk protein. When challenged six infants (group 1) developed clinical symptoms and five did not (group 2). In group 1 the lesions developed in both the jejunal mucosa (four infants at 24 hours and one at three days), and the rectal mucosa, and the injury was associated with depletion of alkaline phosphatase activity. Infants in group 2 were normal. It seems that rectal injury that develops as a direct consequence of oral challenge with the protein in reactive infants may be used as one of the measurements to confirm the diagnosis of cows' milk protein sensitive enteropathy. Moreover, ingestion of such food proteins may injure the distal colonic mucosa without affecting the proximal small gut in some infants. PMID:2817945

  7. Proposal for a New Noncontact Method for Measuring Tongue Moisture to Assist in Tongue Diagnosis and Development of the Tongue Image Analyzing System, Which Can Separately Record the Gloss Components of the Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kanako; Ishikawa, Yuya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Ueda, Keigo; Nagamine, Koichi; Namiki, Takao; Miyake, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis is a noninvasive diagnosis and is traditionally one of the most important tools for physicians who practice Kampo (traditional Japanese) medicine. However, it is a subjective process, and its results can depend on the experience of the physician performing it. Previous studies have reported how to measure and evaluate the shape and color of the tongue objectively. Therefore, this study focused on the glossy component in order to quantify tongue moisture in tongue diagnosis. We hypothesized that moisture appears as a gloss in captured images and measured the amount of water on the tongue surface in 13 subjects. The results showed a high correlation between the degree of gloss and the amount of water on the tongue surface and suggested that the moisture on the tongue can be estimated by the degree of gloss in a captured image. Because the moisture level on the tongue changes during the course of taking photos, it became clear that we had to wait at least 3 minutes between photos. Based on these results, we established the tongue image analyzing system (TIAS), which can consistently record the gloss and color of the tongue surface simultaneously. PMID:25699260

  8. [Observation of the ultrastructure of the tongue coating].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki

    2006-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to clarify the morphological features of the fine structure of the tongue coating, which is one of the main causes of halitosis. Tongue specimens from cadavers, whom dental students had practiced on for anatomy class, were used as materials to observe the surface structure. Tongue coatings were obtained from patients who were referred to the Fresh Breath Clinic, Dental Hospital, Tokyo Medical and Dental University. After macroscopic observation of the tongue surface, tongue coating and examination of halitosis, the tongue coating was scraped carefully, following which it was observed using a light microscope and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results obtained were as follows. The tongue coating consisted mainly of bacteria and desquamated keratinized epithelium which originated chiefly from the filiform papilla. The desquamated keratinized epithelium was also composed of degenerated epithelium of every level, from a comparatively normal epithelium to a fragmented altered epithelium. In addition, the level of degeneration of the keratinized epithelium differed according to the state of distribution and the revitalization of bacteria located in its surroundings. The intensity of halitosis increased with the amount of tongue coating. Increased amounts of tongue coating, however, did not necessarily correlate with increased halitosis in the patients. It was suggested that the severity of halitosis was probably associated with the level of bacterial invasion-related degeneration of the desquamated keratinized epithelium (tongue coating's quality).

  9. Edema worsens target coverage in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of mobile tongue cancer: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Akiyama, Hironori; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masui, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Uesugi, Yasuo; Shimbo, Taiju; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Hiroto; Arika, Takumi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We report our study on two patients to highlight the risk of underdosage of the clinical target volume (CTV) due to edema during high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) of mobile tongue cancer. Material and methods To treat the lateral side of the CTV, flexible applicator tubes were implanted on the mouth floor. Two-dimensional planning was performed using X-ray images for Case 1, and three-dimensional (3D) planning was performed using computed tomography (CT) for Case 2. Prescribed doses for both cases were 54 Gy in nine fractions. Case reports Case 1 was treated for cancer of the right lateral border of the tongue in 2005. Tongue edema occurred after implantation, and part of the lateral border of the tongue protruded between the applicator tubes. Acute mucosal reaction abated in the protruded area earlier than in the other parts of the CTV. In this case, the tumor recurred in this area 5 months after the treatment. Case 2 was treated for cancer of the left lateral border of the tongue. Because tongue edema occurred in this case also, plastic splints were inserted between the applicator tubes to push the edematous region into the irradiated area. The mucosal surface of the CTV was covered by the 70% isodose, and 100% isodose line for before and after splint insertion. Local control of the tumor was achieved 4 years after treatment. Discussion and conclusions To ensure sufficient target coverage, 3D image-based planning using CT should be performed, followed by re-planning using repeated CT as needed. Also, the development of devices to prevent protrusion of the edematous tissue outside the target area will help to ensure the full dosing of CTV. PMID:28344606

  10. Effects of tongue position and lung volume on voluntary maximal tongue protrusion force in humans.

    PubMed

    Saboisky, Julian P; Luu, Billy L; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2015-01-15

    Maximal voluntary protrusion force of the human tongue has not been examined in positions beyond the incisors or at different lung volumes. Tongue force was recorded with the tongue tip at eight positions relative to the incisors (12 and 4mm protrusion, neutral and 4, 12, 16, 24 and 32mm retraction) at functional residual capacity (FRC), total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV) in 15 healthy subjects. Maximal force occurred between 12mm and 32mm retraction (median 16mm). Maximum force at FRC was reproducible at the optimal tongue position across sessions (P=0.68). Across all positions at FRC the average force was highest at 24mm retraction (28.3±5.3N, mean±95% CI) and lowest at 12mm protrusion (49.1±4.6% maximum; P<0.05). Across all tongue positions, maximal force was on average 9.3% lower at FRC than TLC and RV (range: 4.5-12.7% maximum, P<0.05). Retracted positions produce higher-force protrusions with a small effect of lung volume.

  11. Carcinoma cuniculatum arising in the tongue.

    PubMed

    Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobb, Alistair; Kalavrezos, Nicholas; Beale, Timothy; Walker, Donald Murray; Jay, Amrita

    2012-03-01

    Carcinoma cuniculatum (CC) is a rare, distinct clinico-pathological variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that is defined histologically by the characteristic infiltrative pattern of a deep, broad, and complex proliferation of stratified squamous epithelium with keratin cores and keratin-filled crypts. Herein, we present a case report of CC of the oral tongue and discuss its diagnosis, management, and outcome, as well as briefly review the world literature. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of CC of the tongue to be reported in the English literature. We draw attention to its clinico-pathological features and highlight that awareness of this entity as a distinct variant of SCC facilitates its correct management.

  12. Electronic Noses and Tongues in Wine Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Méndez, María L.; De Saja, José A.; González-Antón, Rocio; García-Hernández, Celia; Medina-Plaza, Cristina; García-Cabezón, Cristina; Martín-Pedrosa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The quality of wines is usually evaluated by a sensory panel formed of trained experts or traditional chemical analysis. Over the last few decades, electronic noses (e-noses) and electronic tongues have been developed to determine the quality of foods and beverages. They consist of arrays of sensors with cross-sensitivity, combined with pattern recognition software, which provide a fingerprint of the samples that can be used to discriminate or classify the samples. This holistic approach is inspired by the method used in mammals to recognize food through their senses. They have been widely applied to the analysis of wines, including quality control, aging control, or the detection of fraudulence, among others. In this paper, the current status of research and development in the field of e-noses and tongues applied to the analysis of wines is reviewed. Their potential applications in the wine industry are described. The review ends with a final comment about expected future developments. PMID:27826547

  13. A 3 dimensional assessment of the depth of tumor invasion in microinvasive tongue squamous cell carcinoma - A case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amit-Byatnal, Aditi; Natarajan, Jayalakshmi; Shenoy, Satish; Kamath, Asha; Hunter, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of the depth of tumor invasion (DI) in microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma (MISCC) of the tongue is critical to prognosis. An arithmetic model is generated to determine a reliable method of measurement of DI and correlate this with the local recurrence. Material and Methods Tumor thickness (TT) and DI were measured in tissue sections of 14 cases of MISCC of the tongue, by manual ocular micrometer and digital image analysis at four reference points (A, B, C, and D). The comparison of TT and DI with relevant clinicopathologic parameters was assessed using Mann Whitney U test. Reliability of these methods and the values obtained were compared and correlated with the recurrence of tumors by Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test. 3D reconstruction of the lesion was done on a Cartesian coordinate system. X face was on the YZ plane and Z face was on the XY plane of the coordinate system. Results Computer generated 3D model of oral mucosa in four cases that recurred showed increased DI in the Z coordinate compared to the XY coordinate. The median DI measurements between XY and Z coordinates in these cases showed no significant difference (Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test, p = 0.068). Conclusions The assessment of DI in 3 dimensions is critical for accurate assessment of MISCC and precise DI allows complete removal of tumor. Key words:Depth of invasion, tumor thickness, microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma, tongue squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26449426

  14. Clinical evaluation of Lugol's iodine staining in the treatment of stage I-II squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Umeda, M; Shigeta, T; Takahashi, H; Minamikawa, T; Komatsubara, H; Oguni, A; Shibuya, Y; Komori, T

    2011-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is often surrounded by epithelial dysplasia; leaving it unresected can result in local recurrence. Staining with Lugol's iodine solution detects epithelial dysplasia in oral mucosa, but whether it decreases local recurrence after OSCC surgery is unknown. This study investigated local recurrence rates in patients with early tongue cancer who underwent surgery using Lugol's staining. 93 patients with T1-2N0 tongue SCC underwent partial glossectomy using Lugol's staining during surgery. Resection was performed at least 5mm from the margin of the unstained area. Patients were investigated retrospectively for local recurrence status. Postoperative histology revealed negative surgical margins for SCC or epithelial dysplasia in 81 patients, close margins for SCC in 5, positive margins for mild epithelial dysplasia in 6, and a positive margin for SCC in one. Those with a positive or a close margin for SCC underwent additional resection 2-4 weeks after surgery; one was proved histologically to have residual SCC. No patients developed local recurrence, but 2 died of neck metastasis and 2 of distant metastasis. The 5-year disease specific survival rate was 93.8%. Lugol's staining during surgery can reduce local recurrence and improve survival in patients with early tongue SCC.

  15. Speech Adaptation to a Self-Inflicted Cosmetic Tongue Split: Perceptual and Ultrasonographic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim

    2006-01-01

    In the cosmetic tongue split operation, the anterior tongue blade is split along the midline of the tongue. The goal of this case study was to obtain preliminary data on speech and tongue motility in a participant who had performed this operation on himself. The participant underwent an articulation test and a tongue motility assessment, as well…

  16. [Coccidioidomycosis with manifestation on the tongue].

    PubMed

    Stich, A; Müller, A; Tintelnot, K

    2013-11-01

    Systemic mycoses are rare but important differential diagnoses in patients with imported infections. We report the case of a 51-year-old German traveller who acquired coccidioidomycosis during a holiday in Arizona, USA. The disease became apparent several months later primarily as a swelling of the tongue. Subsequent diagnostic investigations revealed infiltration of both lungs. The causal agent Coccidioides posadasii could be cultivated from transbronchial biopsy samples.

  17. Sensing Basic Tastes by Electronic Tongue Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Zoltán; Szöllősi, Dániel; Fekete, András; Isz, Sandrine

    2011-09-01

    There is an increasing demand to develop method for simulating the human taste perception by objective instruments1. The task was to develop method for the assessment of definite taste attributes. Therefore, our objective was to develop complete method for sensing different taste attributes. The subject of this work was to test the Specific Sensor Array for taste screening developed by Alpha M.O.S. Different brands of carrot juices were analyzed by an Alpha Astree Electronic Tongue (ET) and a trained sensory panel. The results of the sensory evaluation showed that the different carrot juice samples were significantly different from each other in some taste attributes. The electronic tongue was able to distinguish the tested samples according to the measurement results evaluated by multivariate statistics. Furthermore, the relevant taste attributes of carrot juice samples such as sour taste could be predicted by definite sensors of the electronic tongue. Based on our results we concluded that the selected sensors of the Specific Sensor Array could be an appropriate tool for estimating important taste attributes of the tested carrot juice samples.

  18. A new extended supracricoid laryngectomy technique for tongue base and hyoid bone involvement: crico-glosso-mandibulopexy technique.

    PubMed

    Hafız, Günter; Başaran, Bora; Ulusan, Murat; Comoğlu, Senol

    2014-01-01

    In the conventional supracricoid laryngectomy technique, tumors extending beyond the lingual surface of the epiglottis with tongue base invasion are contraindicated due to the requirement of the hyoid bone resection. The loss of the hyoid bone causes intractable aspiration and renders the cricoidal pexy process impossible. Therefore, surgeons tend to treat such tumors with total or subtotal laryngectomies or organ preservation protocols. In this article, a new supracricoid partial laryngectomy technique for tumors requiring resection of the hyoid bone and the base of the tongue was described.

  19. Bioengineered vocal fold mucosa for voice restoration.

    PubMed

    Ling, Changying; Li, Qiyao; Brown, Matthew E; Kishimoto, Yo; Toya, Yutaka; Devine, Erin E; Choi, Kyeong-Ok; Nishimoto, Kohei; Norman, Ian G; Tsegyal, Tenzin; Jiang, Jack J; Burlingham, William J; Gunasekaran, Sundaram; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2015-11-18

    Patients with voice impairment caused by advanced vocal fold (VF) fibrosis or tissue loss have few treatment options. A transplantable, bioengineered VF mucosa would address the individual and societal costs of voice-related communication loss. Such a tissue must be biomechanically capable of aerodynamic-to-acoustic energy transfer and high-frequency vibration and physiologically capable of maintaining a barrier against the airway lumen. We isolated primary human VF fibroblasts and epithelial cells and cocultured them under organotypic conditions. The resulting engineered mucosae showed morphologic features of native tissue, proteome-level evidence of mucosal morphogenesis and emerging extracellular matrix complexity, and rudimentary barrier function in vitro. When grafted into canine larynges ex vivo, the mucosae generated vibratory behavior and acoustic output that were indistinguishable from those of native VF tissue. When grafted into humanized mice in vivo, the mucosae survived and were well tolerated by the human adaptive immune system. This tissue engineering approach has the potential to restore voice function in patients with otherwise untreatable VF mucosal disease.

  20. Amyloidosis of the Tongue-Report of A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; B, Ramya; RV, Subramanyam; V, Aparna; Srivastava, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid involvement of the tongue is almost always secondary to systemic amyloidosis. Isolated amyloidosis of the tongue is relatively rare and it accounts for less than 9% of all types of amyloidosis. We are presenting a case of a 54–year–old male patient who complained of an enlarged tongue and bilateral multiple swellings on the lateral borders of the tongue, which had been there since one year. Bilaterally symmetrical, violaceous, purpuric patches interspersed with nodules were seen surrounding the eyes. Histopathologically, the lesion exhibited homogenous eosinophilic amyloid-like material. Special staining with Congo red showed amyloid material as peach red colour under light microscopy and as apple green birefringence under polarized light. Based on these observations, a definitive diagnosis of amyloidosis of tongue was made. Amyloidosis of tongue is uncommon and its features resemble those of a benign tumour. A battery of tests is necessary to differentiate localized amyloidosis from its systemic forms PMID:24551740

  1. ENTEROBACTERIACEAE AND PSEUDOMONADACEAE ON THE DORSUM OF THE HUMAN TONGUE

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simone; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to correlate the presence of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Xanthomonadaceae on the posterior dorsum of the human tongue with the presence of tongue coating, gender, age, smoking habit and denture use. Material and Methods: Bacteria were isolated from the posterior tongue dorsum of 100 individuals in MacConkey agar medium and were identified by the API 20E system (Biolab-Mérieux). Results: 43% of the individuals, presented the target microorganisms on the tongue dorsum, with greater prevalence among individuals between 40 and 50 years of age (p = 0.001) and non-smokers (p=0.0485). Conclusions: A higher prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae was observed on the tongue dorsum of the individuals evaluated. There was no correlation between these species and the presence and thickness of tongue coating, gender and presence of dentures. PMID:19936511

  2. Tongue movement kinematics in long and short Japanese consonants

    PubMed Central

    Löfqvist, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines tongue movements in stop and fricative consonants where the duration of the oral closure/constriction for the consonant is varied for linguistic purposes. Native speakers of Japanese served as subjects. The linguistic material consisted of Japanese word pairs that only differed in the duration of the lingual consonant, which was either long or short. Recordings were made of tongue movements using a magnetometer system. Results show a robust difference in closure duration between the long and short consonants. Overall, the path of the tongue movement during the consonant was longer for the long than for the short consonant. All speakers decreased the speed of the tongue movement during the long consonant. These adjustments in tongue movements were most likely made to maintain the contact between the tongue and the palate for the closure and constriction. PMID:17614508

  3. Tessier 30 Facial Cleft with Duplication of Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jayanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    A case of midline cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and the neck with complete duplication of the tongue repaired at neonatal period is reported here. Median cleft of the lower lip, mandible, and bifid tongue with ankyloglossia is reported in the literature, but cleft of the neck with complete duplication of the tongue as a part of the Tessier 30 cleft is very rare. We could not find such report in the available English literature. PMID:28082778

  4. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    PubMed

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  5. Optical detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa: autofluorescence characteristics of healthy mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Veld, Diana C. G.; Witjes, Max; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Star, Willem M.; Sterenborg, Hericus J. C. M.

    2001-10-01

    Previous clinical results demonstrate the potential of in vivo autofluorescence spectroscopy for early detection of (pre-)malignant lesions of the oral mucosa. For reliable diagnosis, it is necessary to study autofluorescence spectra of healthy mucosa first. We measured excitation-emission maps in healthy subjects and subjects with a history of cancer in the head -neck region. Our results show that different anatomical locations produce distinct autofluorescence spectra. Influences of, among others, smoking and drinking habits require further investigation.

  6. Nectar uptake in bats using a pumping-tongue mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tschapka, Marco; Gonzalez-Terrazas, Tania P.; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Many insects use nectar as their principal diet and have mouthparts specialized in nectarivory, whereas most nectar-feeding vertebrates are opportunistic users of floral resources and only a few species show distinct morphological specializations. Specialized nectar-feeding bats extract nectar from flowers using elongated tongues that correspond to two vastly different morphologies: Most species have tongues with hair-like papillae, whereas one group has almost hairless tongues that show distinct lateral grooves. Recent molecular data indicate a convergent evolution of groove- and hair-tongued bat clades into the nectar-feeding niche. Using high-speed video recordings on experimental feeders, we show distinctly divergent nectar-feeding behavior in clades. Grooved tongues are held in contact with nectar for the entire duration of visit as nectar is pumped into the mouths of hovering bats, whereas hairy tongues are used in conventional sinusoidal lapping movements. Bats with grooved tongues use a specific fluid uptake mechanism not known from any other mammal. Nectar rises in semiopen lateral grooves, probably driven by a combination of tongue deformation and capillary action. Extraction efficiency declined for both tongue types with a similar slope toward deeper nectar levels. Our results highlight a novel drinking mechanism in mammals and raise further questions on fluid mechanics and ecological niche partitioning. PMID:26601270

  7. Citalopram-induced dyskinesia of the tongue: a video presentation.

    PubMed

    Gaanderse, Marissa; Kliffen, Jasper; Linssen, Wim

    2016-12-23

    We describe a 51-year-old man with sudden onset involuntary movements of the tongue 2 weeks after initiation of citalopram. The movements were continuous and isolated to the tongue. Speech was minimally dysarthric. Further examination revealed no abnormalities. Citalopram was continued and spontaneous improvement was noticed in the following weeks. There was complete recovery 5 weeks after symptoms had started. We argue that the involuntary tongue movements were a side effect of citalopram. Furthermore, our patient used concomitant citalopram and methylphenidate, a combination which potentially elicits side effects. We include a video of the tongue movements in this patient.

  8. Linezolid-induced black hairy tongue: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Linezolid-induced black hairy tongue has been rarely reported. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue and review the literature. Case presentation A 56-year-old Caucasian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia that failed to respond to levofloxacin 750mg daily. He was started on linezolid and meropenem and was subsequently discharged home on oral linezolid 600mg every 12 hours and intravenous ertapenem 1g daily. On a follow-up clinic visit, day 14 of linezolid therapy, he complained of dysgeusia and his tongue examination was consistent with black hairy tongue. After he finished his antibiotic course, his complaints resolved with regular tongue brushing. Conclusion Black hairy tongue is characterized by abnormal hypertrophy and elongation of filiform papillae. Five reported cases of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue were identified in a MEDLINE search (from January 2000 to June 2012). The Naranjo Probability Scale revealed a probable adverse drug reaction of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue. Potential contributing factors included other antibiotics, drug–drug interaction and poor oral hygiene. Health care professionals should be aware of the possibility of linezolid-induced black hairy tongue. Thorough history for other possible contributing factors should be obtained. Patients on linezolid should be counseled to perform good oral hygiene. PMID:23414605

  9. Geographic Tongue and Associated Risk Factors among Iranian Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    HONARMAND, Marieh; FARHAD MOLLASHAHI, Leila; SHIRZAIY, Masomeh; SEHHATPOUR, Marziye

    2013-01-01

    Background Geographic Tongue is a benign disorder involving the dorsal surface of the tongue characterized by depapillated areas with leading and folded edges in yellowish or grayish white color and sometimes with unclear borders. Many studies have reported a relationship between such condition and different risk factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence rate and the risk factors of geographic tongue in the patients referring to the Department of Oral Medicine of Zahedan Dental School, in 2012. Methods: Using Poisson regression model, 2000 patients referred to the Department were selected for this cross-sectional study. Data collection method included an investigation into the medical history as well as doing intraoral examinations. Using SPSS 17 software and Chi-square statistical test, the collected data were analyzed. Result: Among the 2000 patients selected, 7.8% (156 persons) suffered from geographic tongue. The results of our study show that there is a significant relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and a history of allergy and fissured tongue (P<0.001). There was no significant statistical relationship between the occurrence of geographic tongue and gender, smoking and medication. Conclusion: The geographic tongue is more frequently in the patients suffering from atopy or allergy as well as the patients with fissured tongue. PMID:23515238

  10. The role of extensional viscosity in frog tongue projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alexis; Wagner, Caroline; McKinley, Gareth; Mendelson, Joe; Hu, David

    2014-11-01

    Frogs and other amphibians capture insects through high-speed tongue projection, some achieving tongue accelerations of over fifty times gravity. In this experimental study, we investigate how a frog's sticky saliva enables high-speed prey capture. At the Atlanta zoo, we used high-speed video to film the trajectory of frog tongues during prey capture. We have also designed and built a portable extensional rheometer; by following the capillary-driven thinning in the diameter of a thread of saliva we characterize the relaxation time and extensional viscosity and so infer the adhesive force between the frog tongue and prey.

  11. Nectar uptake in bats using a pumping-tongue mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tschapka, Marco; Gonzalez-Terrazas, Tania P; Knörnschild, Mirjam

    2015-09-01

    Many insects use nectar as their principal diet and have mouthparts specialized in nectarivory, whereas most nectar-feeding vertebrates are opportunistic users of floral resources and only a few species show distinct morphological specializations. Specialized nectar-feeding bats extract nectar from flowers using elongated tongues that correspond to two vastly different morphologies: Most species have tongues with hair-like papillae, whereas one group has almost hairless tongues that show distinct lateral grooves. Recent molecular data indicate a convergent evolution of groove- and hair-tongued bat clades into the nectar-feeding niche. Using high-speed video recordings on experimental feeders, we show distinctly divergent nectar-feeding behavior in clades. Grooved tongues are held in contact with nectar for the entire duration of visit as nectar is pumped into the mouths of hovering bats, whereas hairy tongues are used in conventional sinusoidal lapping movements. Bats with grooved tongues use a specific fluid uptake mechanism not known from any other mammal. Nectar rises in semiopen lateral grooves, probably driven by a combination of tongue deformation and capillary action. Extraction efficiency declined for both tongue types with a similar slope toward deeper nectar levels. Our results highlight a novel drinking mechanism in mammals and raise further questions on fluid mechanics and ecological niche partitioning.

  12. Functional morphology of the tongue in the nutcracker (Nucifraga caryocatactes).

    PubMed

    Jackowiak, Hanna; Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Kwieciński, Zbigniew; Trzcielińska-Lorych, Joanna; Godynicki, Szymon

    2010-07-01

    The nutcracker Nucifraga caryocatactes belongs to a group of bird species that use their beak and tongue as tools for obtaining food, such as seeds from hard-to-reach cones or nuts from shells. The aim of the present study, carried out with a scanning electron microscope, was to define the morphological features of the tongue of the nutcracker, which seems to be adapted to its environment through specific methods of obtaining food. One of the characteristic features of the nutcracker's tongue is the unique structure of the anterior part of the tongue, which has two long and highly keratinized processes - a product of the renewable keratinized layer of the epithelium covering the ventral surface of the tongue. These dagger-like processes, which are a modified "lingual nail," take a major role in levering up and shelling seeds, which are transported over the short sulcus-shaped body of the tongue. A unique feature of the nutcracker's tongue is the groove separating the body from the root. Two rows of highly keratinized, mechanical, conical papillae are located at the junction of the body and the root. These papillae are mechanically protective elements for passing food particles in the form of seeds. Among lingual glands, only the posterior lingual glands on the root of the tongue have been observed. Their secretion agglutinates dry food before it is swallowed. Results of the present study indicate that the nutcracker's tongue is an efficient tool resembling a lever that is helpful in shelling seeds.

  13. The hummingbird's tongue: a self-assembling syphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John; Peaudecerf, Francois; Quere, David

    2009-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the drinking technique of the hummingbird. Its long, thin tongue is dipped into nectar approximately 20 times per second. With each insertion, fluid rises along the length of the tongue through capillary action. While the tongue is open in cross-section, resembling a sliced straw, experiments demonstrate that surface tension serves to close it, with the tongue's zipping front corresponding to the rising meniscus. Supporting theoretical and analogue experimental models of this novel, natural example of capillary origami are developed and explored.

  14. Relationship between tongue positions and formant frequencies in female speakers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimin; Shaiman, Susan; Weismer, Gary

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship (1) between acoustic vowel space and the corresponding tongue kinematic vowel space and (2) between formant frequencies (F1 and F2) and tongue x-y coordinates for the same time sampling point. Thirteen healthy female adults participated in this study. Electromagnetic articulography and synchronized acoustic recordings were utilized to obtain vowel acoustic and tongue kinematic data across ten speech tasks. Intra-speaker analyses showed that for 10 of the 13 speakers the acoustic vowel space was moderately to highly correlated with tongue kinematic vowel space; much weaker correlations were obtained for inter-speaker analyses. Correlations of individual formants with tongue positions showed that F1 varied strongly with tongue position variations in the y dimension, whereas F2 was correlated in equal magnitude with variations in the x and y positions. For within-speaker analyses, the size of the acoustic vowel space is likely to provide a reasonable inference of size of the tongue working space for most speakers; unfortunately there is no a priori, obvious way to identify the speakers for whom the covariation is not significant. A second conclusion is that F1 variations reflect tongue height, but F2 is a much more complex reflection of tongue variation in both dimensions.

  15. Further Studies on the Frequency and Length of the Glandulo-Metaplastic Esophageal Mucosa in Baboons

    PubMed Central

    RUBIO, C.A.; DICK, E.J.; ORREGO, A.; HUBBARD, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background In previous studies, the length of the glandulo-metaplastic esophageal mucosa (GMEM) at the gastroesophageal junction was assessed in a selected group of baboons. In this study, the length of the GMEM was measured in the entire esophagus in a cohort of unselected adult baboons. Materials and Methods In 15 female baboons, the entire esophagus was removed en bloc at autopsy, from the tongue to the angle of His. No part of the stomach was included. The length of GMEM was measured using a calibrated ocular microscale. Results GMEM was found in 11 out of the 15 esophagi. The total length of GMEM recorded in the 11 cases was 115 mm (mean 10.5 mm, range 1–45 mm). The mean age for animals with GMEM was 15.5 years (range 7–32 years) and for animals without GMEM was 14.0 years (range 7–20 years); the difference was non-significant (p<0.6). No significant association was found between the length of the GMEM and the age of the animals (p<0.6). Conclusion This study substantiates the notion that GMEM in baboons is a postnatal physiological adaptative process of the esophageal mucosa to daily regurgitation with rumination of gastric juices of low pH. The GMEM apparently progresses upwards, along the esophageal mucosa. The baboon might be an excellent animal model to study the series of histological events that take place in the distal esophagus under the influence of protracted gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:20023239

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Medically Performed Tongue Piercing in People with Tetraplegia for Use with Tongue-Operated Assistive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Jaimee; Minocha, Julia; Rowles, Diane; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis; Kim, Jeonghee; Bruce, Joy; Roth, Elliot. J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with high-level spinal cord injuries need effective ways to perform activities. Objectives: To develop and test a medically supervised tongue-piercing protocol and the wearing of a magnet-containing tongue barbell for use with the Tongue Drive System (TDS) in persons with tetraplegia. Methods: Volunteers with tetraplegia underwent initial screening sessions using a magnet glued on the tongue to activate and use the TDS. This was followed by tongue piercing, insertion of a standard barbell, a 4-week healing period, and an exchange of the standard barbell for a magnet-containing barbell. This was then used twice weekly for 6 to 8 weeks to perform computer tasks, drive a powered wheelchair, accomplish in-chair weight shifts, and dial a phone. Symptoms of intraoral dysfunction, change in tongue size following piercing, and subjective assessment of receiving and wearing a magnet-containing tongue barbell and its usability with the TDS were evaluated. Results: Twenty-one volunteers underwent initial trial sessions. Thirteen had their tongues pierced. One individual’s barbell dislodged during healing resulting in tongue-tract closure. Twelve had the barbell exchanged for a magnet-containing barbell. One subject withdrew for unrelated issues. Eleven completed the TDS testing sessions and were able to complete the assigned tasks. No serious adverse events occurred related to wearing or using a tongue barbell to operate the TDS. Conclusions: Using careful selection criteria and a medically supervised piercing protocol, no excess risk was associated with tongue piercing and wearing a tongue barbell in people with tetraplegia. Participants were able to operate the TDS. PMID:25762861

  17. [4 anthroposcopic markers in the Northern Greece population: hand folding, arm folding, tongue rolling and tongue folding].

    PubMed

    Pentzos-Daponte, A

    1986-03-01

    Four anthroposcopic traits, namely hand clasping, arm folding, tongue rolling and tongue curling have been studied in a total of 7763 individuals from Thessaloniki and its surroundings, representing a sample of the population of Northern Greece. The statistical analysis of the data indicates significant sex differences only concerning tongue rolling. The frequencies obtained for the four traits under study are compared with data from the literature.

  18. Increased vascular permeability in rat nasal mucosa induced by substance P and stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, L; Saria, A; Lundberg, J M; Anggård, A

    1983-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve induced an increase in vascular permeability to macromolecules and an interstitial edema in the nasal mucosa of the rat, as indicated by extravasation of Evans blue. In animals that had been treated neonatally with capsaicin, the effect of trigeminal nerve stimulation was abolished. Local application of capsaicin or substance P (SP) also induced a significant Evans blue extravasation in the nasal mucosa. In capsaicin-pretreated animals the effect of SP was still present, while the permeability increase induced by capsaicin was abolished. In conclusion, chemogenic irritation of the nasal mucosa by capsaicin induces edema probably via a local axon reflex inducing release of SP. Capsaicin-sensitive SP-containing afferents in the nasal mucosa may also be involved in the pathogenesis of nasal congestion seen in various types of rhinitis.

  19. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in early stage mobile tongue cancers in young patients – Gliwice experience

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Składowski, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In early stage mobile tongue cancer radical radiotherapy offers good local control and organ preservation, which is especially important in the group of young patients. In our department, for many years HDR-BT has been performed in mobile tongue cancers as a sole treatment or as a “boost” with EBRT. The aim of the study was to show our experience with HDR-BT in early stage mobile tongue cancers among young patients. Material and methods From 2001 to 2006 in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, five patients under 45 years with mobile tongue cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy (T1N0M0 – 3/5 and T2N0M0 – 2/5); 4 with HDR brachytherapy “boost” and 1 as a sole treatment. One woman was previously treated with tumour resection, but because of positive surgical margins was referred for radiotherapy. All patients had clinically negative lymph nodes, without dissection. They were treated with interstitial HDR-BT (3-8 catheters). In 4 patients treated with HDR-BT as a “boost”, total doses ranged from 18 to 21 Gy given in 6-7 fractions (twice a day, 3 Gy per fraction). Total doses in EBRT (to local lymph nodes and tumour bed) ranged from 50 to 60 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction 5 days/week). One patient, treated with radical HDR brachytherapy, received 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 50 Gy in EBRT to regional lymph nodes. Results We did not notice local recurrences or distant metastases in our group of patients. Median follow-up was 67 months (range 47-79 months). All patients preserved normal tongue function. A severe late complication occurred in 1 patient – fracture of the mandible. Conclusions In the analysed group of young patients with mobile tongue cancer interstitial HDR brachytherapy in combination with EBRT was an effective and well tolerated treatment modality which allowed preservation of the tongue and its function. PMID:27829846

  20. Atypical tongue-tie due to congenital tongue-palate fusion.

    PubMed

    Din, Saif Ud

    2003-08-01

    We are presenting a case report of a male neonate brought in an emergency room with feeding inability and signs of respiratory difficulty due to oral passage blockade - a developmental anomaly caused by tongue-palate fusion. Surgical correction instantly relieved respiratory distress and established the normal oral feeding mechanism.

  1. Cat Got Your Tongue? Using the Tip-of-the-Tongue State to Investigate Fixed Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmann, Emily; Cleland, Alexandra A.; Bull, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that they play a prominent role in everyday speech, the representation and processing of fixed expressions during language production is poorly understood. Here, we report a study investigating the processes underlying fixed expression production. "Tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) states were elicited for well-known idioms…

  2. Temporary tongue thrust: failure during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Piyapattamin, Thosapol; Soma, Kunimichi; Hisano, Masataka

    2002-03-01

    This report presents the case of a 25-year-old male patient who sought orthodontic treatment. Oral examination revealed an Angle Class I relation, with a bimaxillary dento-alveolar protrusion, evidence of anterior crowding, and a large overbite and overjet. Radiographic examination revealed a skeletal Class I occlusion. During the distal movement of the canines, occlusal interferences between the canines occurred and the commencement of a tongue thrust was observed. After correction of the applied forces, the canine movement was completed and the habit was no longer detectable. The incident indicates that an unusual oral habit suspiciously occurring during treatment should lead to an immediate reconsideration of the orthodontic treatment strategy.

  3. Metastatic chordoma of the tongue: Case report.

    PubMed

    Bişkin, Sultan; Erdemir, Rabiye Uslu; Eliçora, Sultan Şevik; Aydınlı, Sevim; Özdamar, Şükrü Oğuz

    2017-03-01

    Chordomas are rare bone tumors that arise from notochord remnants. They most commonly occur in the sacrum, but they also can be seen in the skull base, cervical spine, and thoracolumbar vertebrae. Chordomas account for 1 to 4% of all primary skeletal tumors. They are usually indolent, locally growing tumors. Distant metastasis has been reported in 3 to 48% of cases. When metastasis occurs, it is usually observed in the lung, bone, and liver. To the best of our knowledge, no case of a chordoma metastasis to the tongue has been previously reported in the literature. We report such a case in a 61-year-old man.

  4. Rare tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Monika; Swanson, Paul E

    2016-10-01

    In spite of increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the last few decades, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) still remains the dominant subtype of esophageal cancer worldwide. Apart from conventional SCC, some rare unconventional tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa are also well known. This study provides an introduction to these and presents a brief review of the literature, including the diagnostic and prognostic importance of each variant.

  5. [Optimizing biopsies of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raybaud, H; Voha, C; Cardot-Leccia, N; Monteil, R A

    2012-11-01

    We had for aim to describe and illustrate the artefacts observed in biopsies of the oral mucosa, as well as the impact of sending non-representative histological material to a laboratory. This article was based on an international literature review, as well as on our experience. We analysed the problems raised, for the pathologists and the histology lab-technicians, by these artefacts as well as their impact on the pathology report patient management. We suggest simple solutions.

  6. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  7. Policy and Experiment in Mother Tongue Literacy in Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinnaso, F. Niyi

    1993-01-01

    Assesses Nigeria's efforts to achieve mother-tongue literacy for its citizens. Describes Nigeria's complicated sociolinguistic landscape, national language policies, and the Ife experimental project, studying the use of the mother tongue in primary schools. Points to nonlinguistic factors in educational success, including parental background,…

  8. Girls, Educational Equity and Mother Tongue-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    This study is the expanded version of the advocacy brief "Mother Tongue-Based Teaching and Education for Girls" [ED495413]. It highlights in more detail the correlations between girls, language and marginality, and shows that there are indeed positive links between the use of mother tongue in education and female participation and…

  9. Lingual Electromyography Related to Tongue Movements in Swedish Vowel Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hajime; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In order to investigate the articulatory dynamics of the tongue in the production of Swedish vowels, electromyographic (EMG) and X-ray microbeam studies were performed on a native Swedish subject. The EMG signals were used to obtain average indication of the muscle activity of the tongue as a function of time. (NCR)

  10. Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Green, Jordan R.; Yunusova, Yana; Hanford, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined. Methods: The authors recorded word productions from 11…

  11. Tongue Measures in Individuals with Normal and Impaired Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Youmans, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation sought to add to the extant literature on measures of normal tongue function, to provide information on measures of tongue function in a group of individuals with oral phase dysphagia, and to provide a comparison of these 2 groups matched for age and gender. Method: The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was utilized to…

  12. Evaluation of Manometric Measures during Tongue-Hold Swallows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeltgen, Sebastian H.; Witte, Ulrike; Gumbley, Freya; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Based on visual inspection, prior research documented increased movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall in healthy volunteers during tongue-hold swallows. This manometric study investigated the immediate effects of the tongue-hold maneuver on pharyngeal peak pressure generation, duration of pressure generation, and pressure slope…

  13. Fifteen-minute consultation: the infant with a tongue tie.

    PubMed

    Bowley, Douglas M; Arul, G Suren

    2014-08-01

    Tongue tie is an increasingly common cause for referral of infants to our general paediatric surgery service. In this article, we will explore the indications for tongue tie division in the newborn child, the practicalities of the procedure and the supporting evidence.

  14. Mother Tongue and Education in Africa: Publicising the Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kioko, Angelina N.; Ndung'u, Ruth W.; Njoroge, Martin C.; Mutiga, Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Varied realities surround the use of mother tongue education in Africa. These realities are entrenched in the attitudes and misconceptions that have gone unchallenged due to inadequate literature on the successful use of mother tongues in the classroom and beyond. The realities discussed in this paper include the frustrations of children…

  15. Struggles for Legitimacy in Mother Tongue Instruction in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganuza, Natalia; Hedman, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the pedagogical beliefs, practices and ideological assumptions of 15 teachers who work with mother tongue instruction in Sweden. Despite support through provisions in Swedish laws, mother tongue instruction is clearly a marginalized subject, not least due to its non-mandatory status, the limited time allocated for it and…

  16. Morphological Study of the Persian Leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor) Tongue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghinezhad, J; Sheibani, M T; Memarian, I; Chiocchetti, R

    2017-01-24

    This study described the morphological features of the Persian leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor) tongue using light and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The keratinized filiform papillae were distributed all over the entire dorsal surface of the tongue and contained small processes. They were changed into a cylindrical shape in the body and conical shape in the root. The fungiform papillae were found on the apex and margin of the tongue. Few taste pores were observed on the dorsal surface of each papilla. The foliate papillae on the margins of the tongue were composed of several laminae and epithelial fissures. Taste buds were not seen within the non-keratinized epithelium. The vallate papillae were six in total and arranged in a "V" shape just rostral to the root. Each papilla was surrounded by a groove and pad. Taste buds were seen within their lateral walls. Lyssa was visible on the ventral surface of the tongue tip and was found as cartilaginous tissue surrounded by thin connective tissue fibres. The core of the tongue was composed of lingual glands, skeletal muscle and connective tissue. These glands were confined to the posterior portion of the tongue and were composed of many serous cells and a few mucous cells. The results of this study contributed to the knowledge of the morphological characteristics of the tongue of wild mammals and provided data for the comparison with other mammals.

  17. Pedagogical Competencies for Mother-Tongue Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to elaborate a framework for both the foundation and application of professional standards for mother-tongue teachers. The main issue with which this study is concerned constitutes the lack of a set of clear standards for the initial training of mother-tongue teachers. In terms of theory, that which has currently been analyzed in…

  18. Tongue Fat Infiltration in Obese Versus Lean Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brennick, Michael J.; Delikatny, James; Pack, Allan I.; Pickup, Stephen; Shinde, Sarika; Zhu, Jing-Xu; Roscoe, Ivana; Kim, David Y.; Buxbaum, Laurence U.; Cater, Jacqueline R.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obesity is the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and the effects of obesity may be mediated by tongue fat. Our objective was to examine the effects of obesity on upper airway structures in obese (OBZ) and non-obese (NBZ) Zucker rats. Design: Animal study. Setting: Academic Medical Center. Participants: OBZ (638.2 ± 39 g; 14.9 ± 1.1 w) and age-matched NBZ Zucker (442.6 ± 37 g, 15.1 ± 1.5 w) rats. Interventions: Tongue fat and volume and were assessed using: in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), magnetic resonance imaging including Dixon imaging for tongue fat volume, ex vivo biochemistry (fat quantification; triglyceride (mg)/tissue (g), and histology (Oil Red O stain). Measurements and Results: MRS: overall OBZ tongue fat/water ratio was 2.9 times greater than NBZ (P < 0.002) with the anterior OBZ tongue up to 3.3 times greater than NBZ (P < 0.002). Biochemistry: Triglyceride (TG) in the tongue was 4.4 times greater in OBZ versus NBZ (P < 0.0006). TG was greater in OBZ tongue (3.57 ± 1.7 mg/g) than OBZ masseter muscle (0.28 ± 0.1; P < 0.0001) but tongue and masseter TG were not different in NBZ rats (0.82 ± 0.3 versus 0.28 ± 0.1 mg/g, P = 0.67). Dixon fat volume was significantly increased in OBZ (56 ± 15 mm3) versus NBZ (34 ± 5 mm3, P < 0.004). Histology demonstrated a greater degree of intracellular muscle fat and extramuscular fat infiltration in OBZ versus NBZ rats. Conclusions: Genetically obese rats had a large degree of fat infiltration in the tongue compared to both skeletal muscle and tongue tissues of the non-obese age-matched littermates. The significant fat increase and sequestration in the obese tongue may play a role in altered tongue neuromuscular function, tongue stiffness or metabolic function. Citation: Brennick MJ, Delikatny J, Pack AI, Pickup S, Shinde S, Zhu JX, Roscoe I, Kim DY, Buxbaum LU, Cater JR, Schwab RJ. Tongue fat infiltration in obese versus lean Zucker rats. SLEEP 2014

  19. Rehabilitation of Glossectomy Cases with Tongue Prosthesis: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, Muthu Kumar; Shanmugam, Gokul; Tah, Rajdeep

    2016-01-01

    Tongue is the only movable muscular organ without any bone in the human body. It has very important role in perception of taste and sensations like touch, pressure, heat and cold. The purpose of the article is to review various types of tongue prosthesis and their clinical applications. This review helps the clinician to choose the appropriate type of tongue prosthesis for different clinical situations, retention of tongue prosthesis and material selection for each type of prosthesis. A broad search of published literature was performed using the keyword glossectomy, glossal prosthesis and tongue prosthesis from 1980 to 2014 in Medline, Google scholar, internet and text book. This review gives basic knowledge of glossal prosthesis and selection of the same for various clinical conditions. PMID:27042596

  20. Annular Plaques on the Tongue: What Is Your Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Tuba Çelebĺ; Bĺlaç, Cemal; Bĺlaç, Dilek Bayraktar; Ecemĺş, Talat

    2011-01-01

    Geographic tongue is an inflammatory disorder of the tongue characterized by asymptomatic erythematous patches with serpiginous borders. Candidiasis of the tongue may be confused with geographic tongue. A 63-year-old male patient with painful white annular lesions localized to the left side of his tongue is presented. He applied topical corticosteroid and antiinflammatory agents, but his lesions did not respond to those therapies. Using direct mycologic examination and culture, the patient was diagnosed with candidiasis. After systemic and topical antifungal therapy, clinical improvement was observed. With this case, the clinical forms of oral candidiasis were discussed, and it was suggested that the clinical presentation of mucosal candidiasis may vary according to the stage of infection and individual immunity. PMID:22148032

  1. Visualization techniques for tongue analysis in traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Binh L.; Cai, Yang

    2004-05-01

    Visual inspection of the tongue has been an important diagnostic method of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Clinic data have shown significant connections between various viscera cancers and abnormalities in the tongue and the tongue coating. Visual inspection of the tongue is simple and inexpensive, but the current practice in TCM is mainly experience-based and the quality of the visual inspection varies between individuals. The computerized inspection method provides quantitative models to evaluate color, texture and surface features on the tongue. In this paper, we investigate visualization techniques and processes to allow interactive data analysis with the aim to merge computerized measurements with human expert's diagnostic variables based on five-scale diagnostic conditions: Healthy (H), History Cancers (HC), History of Polyps (HP), Polyps (P) and Colon Cancer (C).

  2. Methods for quantifying tongue shape and complexity using ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Katherine M; Tiede, Mark K; Whalen, D H

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of tongue shape is potentially useful for indexing articulatory strategies arising from intervention, therapy and development. Tongue shape complexity is a parameter that can be used to reflect regional functional independence of the tongue musculature. This paper considers three different shape quantification methods - based on Procrustes analysis, curvature inflections and Fourier coefficients - and uses a linear discriminant analysis to test how well each method is able to classify tongue shapes from different phonemes. Test data are taken from six native speakers of American English producing 15 phoneme types. Results classify tongue shapes accurately when combined across quantification methods. These methods hold promise for extending the use of ultrasound in clinical assessments of speech deficits.

  3. The effect of cola consumption on oral mucosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapicloğlu, S; Baki, A H; Tekelioğlu, Y; Araz, K

    2000-01-01

    Drinks that contain phosphoric acid have been shown to have erosive effects and cola drinks are strongly acidic (pH 2.5). Gingivitis may be caused by dietary acids. Therefore, this study analyses the interaction of Coca Cola consumption and oral mucosal damage. Thirty rats were divided into three groups of 10. The animals received saline (pH 7.0) or HCl acid buffered to pH 2.6 or Coca Cola (pH 2.6) per os with 24-h free access to these solutions. A biopsy was taken from the front of the gingiva and the tongue. Histopathological analysis showed no specific lesion and there were no differences among saline, Coca Cola and HCl groups. Flow cytometric analysis was used to assess proliferative activity. In the HCl acid and Coca Cola groups, cell cycle analysis showed that the effects of Coca Cola and HCl acid in inducing oral mucosal damage are similar. In both Coca Cola [G0/G1, 70.38+/-7.9; S, 28.06+/-10.13; G2/M, 1.62+/-2.80; proliferative index (PI), 28.68+/-7.981 and HCI (G0/G1, 67.7+/-18.9; S, 27.8+/-17.5; G2/M, 4.4+/-3.8; PI, 30.9+/-20.98), the rat cell population G0/G1 and G2/M phases were found to be low (p < 0.05) and the cell population S and PI phases were found to be significantly elevated compared with the control group (p < 0.05) (G0/G1, 86.92+/-8.69; S, 9.8+/-1.21; G2/M, 3.25+/-2.87; P1, 13.2+/-8.7). This result was reflected in the proliferative index, which is used as a measure of the regeneration index. The data show that Coca Cola and HCl acid have similar proliferative and regenerative effects on oral mucosa, and it is possible that their regenerative effects are caused as a result of an irritant effect.

  4. Drift correction of electronic tongue responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmin, Susanne; Krantz-Rülcker, Christina; Lundström, Ingemar; Winquist, Fredrik

    2001-08-01

    In this article, drift correction algorithms were used in order to remove linear drift in multivariate spaces of two data sets obtained by an electronic tongue based on voltammetry. The electronic tongue consisted of various metal electrodes (Au, Ir, Pt, Rh) combined with pattern recognition tools, such as principal component analysis. The first data set contained different types of liquid, from well defined to more complex solutions. The second data set contained different black and green teas. Component correction (CC) was compared to a simple additive correction. In CC, the drift direction of measured reference solutions in a multivariate space was subtracted from other types of solution. In additive correction, responses from reference samples were subtracted from other samples. CC showed similar or better performance in reducing drift compared to additive correction for the two data sets. The additive correction method was dependent on the fact that the differences in between samples of a reference solution were similar to the changes in between samples of other liquids, which was not the case with CC.

  5. Radial free forearm flap versus pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in patients with tongue cancer: Assessment of quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Li, Rui; Liu, Yiming; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with tongue cancer who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap (RFFF) surgery and others who had received pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) surgery. Material and Methods Patients who received RFFF or PMMF reconstruction after primary tongue cancer treated with total and subtotal tongue resection were eligible for the current study. The patients’ demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores (14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires) were collected. Results A total of 41 of 63 questionnaires were returned (65.08%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the gender (p< .05). Patients reconstructed with RFFF performed better in the shoulder domains, in addition to worse appearance domains. Conclusions Using either RFFF or PMMF for reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer resection significantly influences a patient’s quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for tongue cancers. Key words:Quality of life, radial forearm free flaps, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, tongue cancer, oral function. PMID:27694786

  6. Study of factors involved in tongue color diagnosis by kampo medical practitioners using the farnsworth-munsell 100 hue test and tongue color images.

    PubMed

    Oji, Takeshi; Namiki, Takao; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Ueda, Keigo; Takeda, Kanako; Nakamura, Michimi; Okamoto, Hideki; Hirasaki, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    In traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine), tongue color is important in discerning a patient's constitution and medical conditions. However, tongue color diagnosis is susceptible to the subjective factors of the observer. To investigate factors involved in tongue color diagnosis, both color discrimination and tongue color diagnosis were researched in 68 Kampo medical practitioners. Color discrimination was studied by the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test, and tongue color diagnosis was studied by 84 tongue images. We found that overall color discrimination worsened with aging. However, the color discrimination related to tongue color regions was maintained in subjects with 10 or more years of Kampo experience. On the other hand, tongue color diagnosis significantly differed between subjects with <10 years of experience and ≥10 years of experience. Practitioners with ≥10 years of experience could maintain a consistent diagnosis of tongue color regardless of their age.

  7. Are Hyoid Bone and Tongue the Risk Factors Contributing to Postoperative Relapse for Mandibular Prognathism?

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Lai, Steven; Lee, Huey-Er; Chen, Ker-Kong; Chen, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative stability and the correlation between hyoid, tongue, and mandible position following surgery for mandibular prognathism. Materials and Methods. Thirty-seven patients, treated for mandibular prognathism using intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO), were evaluated cephalometrically. A set of four standardized lateral cephalograms were obtained from each subject preoperatively (T1), immediately postoperatively (T2), six weeks to three months postoperatively (T3), and more than one year postoperatively (T4). The Student t-tests, the Pearson correlation coefficient, and the multiple linear regression were used for statistical analysis. Results. Immediately after surgery, menton (Me) setback was 12.8 mm, hyoid (H) setback was 4.9 mm, and vallecula epiglottica (V) setback was 5.8 mm. The postoperative stability significantly correlated (r = −0.512, p < 0.01) with the amount of setback. The hyoid bone and tongue did not have significant effects on postoperative stability. Multiple linear regression model (R2 = 0.2658, p < 0.05) showed predictability: Horizontal Relapse Me (T4-T2) = −6.406 − 0.488Me (T2-T1) + 0.069H (T2-T1) − 0.0619V (T2-T1). Conclusion. Mandibular setback surgery may push the hyoid and tongue significantly backward, but this did not correlate with mandibular relapse. Postoperative stability significantly correlated with the amount of mandibular setback. PMID:27042664

  8. Taste and speech following surgical tongue reduction in children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maas, Saskia M; Kadouch, Daniel J; Masselink, Anne-Claire C M; Van Der Horst, Chantal M A M

    2016-06-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth disorder in which macroglossia is one of the main signs. We investigated the long-term outcome of tongue surgery reduction (TRS) on taste and speech in patients with BWS who were more than 5 years of age and had undergone surgical anterior wedge resection of the tongue. A questionnaire was used to assess medical history and to determine some aspects of speech, taste, psychological well-being, and degree of satisfaction with regard to TRS and tongue mobility. Speech sound error pattern and degree of intelligibility were measured by a speech therapist, and taste was assessed using a validated test. The degree of both intelligibility and satisfaction with the surgery was high. There were some speech errors; especially the interdental 's', addental 't', and addental 'd' were more noticed. We conclude that anterior wedge resection is an effective technique to treat macroglossia in children with BWS, and that it has no long-term consequences for intelligibility and taste perception and only limited consequences for speech.

  9. Duodenal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: Two Cases and the Evaluation of Endoscopic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Choel Woong; Ha, Jong Kun; Hong, Young Mi; Park, Jin Hyun; Park, Soo Bum; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma mainly arises in the stomach, with fewer than 30% arising in the small intestine. We describe here two cases of primary duodenal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma which were evaluated by endoscopic ultrasonography. A 52-year-old man underwent endoscopy due to abdominal pain, which demonstrated a depressed lesion on duodenal bulb. Endoscopic ultrasonographic finding was hypoechoic lesion invading the submucosa. The other case was a previously healthy 51-year-old man. Endoscopy showed a whitish granular lesion on duodenum third portion. Endoscopic ultrasonography image was similar to the first case, whereas abdominal computed tomography revealed enlargement of multiple lymph nodes. The first case was treated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori, after which the mucosal change and endoscopic ultrasound finding were normalized in 7 months. The second case was treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone, and rituximab every 3 weeks. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the patient achieved complete remission. PMID:24143321

  10. Detection of trace levels of organophosphate pesticides using an electronic tongue based on graphene hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Facure, Murilo H M; Mercante, Luiza A; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Correa, Daniel S

    2017-05-15

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds impose significant strains on public health, environmental/food safety and homeland security, once they have been widely used as pesticides and insecticides and also display potential to be employed as chemical warfare agents by terrorists. In this context, the development of sensitive and reliable chemical sensors that would allow in-situ measurements of such contaminants is highly pursued. Here we report on a free-enzyme impedimetric electronic tongue (e-tongue) used in the analysis of organophosphate pesticides comprising four sensing units based on graphene hybrid nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were prepared by reduction of graphene oxide in the presence of conducting polymers (PEDOT:PSS and polypyrrole) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which were deposited by drop casting onto gold interdigitated electrodes. Impedance spectroscopy measurements were collected in triplicate for each sample analyzed, and the electrical resistance data were treated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), revealing that the system was able to discriminate OPs at nanomolar concentrations. In addition, the electronic tongue system could detect OPs in real samples, where relations between the principal components and the variation of pesticides in a mixture were established, proving to be useful to analyze and monitor mixtures of OP pesticides. The materials employed provided sensing units with high specific surface area and high conductivity, yielding the development of a sensor with suitable stability, good reproducibility, and high sensitivity towards pesticide samples, being able to discriminate concentrations as low as 0.1nmolL(-1). Our results indicate that the e-tongue system can be used as a rapid, simple and low cost alternative in the analyses of OPs pesticide solutions below the concentration range permitted by legislation of some countries.

  11. Role of endogenous prostaglandins in protection of rat gastric mucosa by tripotassium dicitrate bismuthate.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, S; Bestetti, A; Fumagalli, G; Borsa, M; Viganó, T; Tonon, G

    1987-10-01

    Gross and microscopic examination of rat gastric mucosa demonstrated that intragastric administration to rats of tripotassium dicitrate bismuthate (TDB), a colloidal bismuth compound, protects against gastric lesions induced by 85% ethanol. Indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, significantly blocked the gastric mucosal protective effect of TDB. The release of gastric mucosal prostaglandins was greater in animals treated with TDB than in control animals, both time- and dose-dependently. These results seem to indicate involvement of prostaglandins in the action of TDB.

  12. Tongue prints: A novel biometric and potential forensic tool

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, T.; Jeddy, Nadeem; Nithya, S.

    2016-01-01

    Tongue is a vital internal organ well encased within the oral cavity and protected from the environment. It has unique features which differ from individual to individual and even between identical twins. The color, shape, and surface features are characteristic of every individual, and this serves as a tool for identification. Many modes of biometric systems have come into existence such as fingerprint, iris scan, skin color, signature verification, voice recognition, and face recognition. The search for a new personal identification method secure has led to the use of the lingual impression or the tongue print as a method of biometric authentication. Tongue characteristics exhibit sexual dimorphism thus aiding in the identification of the person. Emerging as a novel biometric tool, tongue prints also hold the promise of a potential forensic tool. This review highlights the uniqueness of tongue prints and its superiority over other biometric identification systems. The various methods of tongue print collection and the classification of tongue features are also elucidated. PMID:28123263

  13. A new 3D dynamical biomechanical tongue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Jean-Michel; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan; Wilhelms-Tricarico, Reiner

    2004-05-01

    A new dynamical biomechanical tongue model is being developed to study speech motor control. In spite of its computational complexity, a 3D representation was chosen in order to account for various contacts between tongue and external structures such as teeth, palate, and vocal tract walls. A fair representation of tongue muscle anatomy is provided, by designing the finite element mesh from the visible human data set (female subject). Model geometry was then matched to a human speaker, so that simulations can be quantitatively compared to experimental MRI data. A set of 11 muscles is modeled, whose role in speech gestures is well established. Each muscle is defined by a set of elements whose elastic properties change with muscle activation. Muscles forces are applied to the tongue model via macrofibers defined within the mesh by muscle specific sets of nodes. These forces are currently specified as step functions. Boundary conditions are set using zero-displacement nodes simulating attachments of tongue on bony structures. The nonlinear mechanical properties of tongue soft tissues are modeled using a hyperelastic material. Three-dimensional tongue deformations generated by each muscle, using FEM software ANSYS for computation, will be presented. Implications for speech motor control will be proposed.

  14. Slip of the tongue: Implications for evolution and language development.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Gillian S; Rodriguez, Alina

    2015-08-01

    A prevailing theory regarding the evolution of language implicates a gestural stage prior to the emergence of speech. In support of a transition of human language from a gestural to a vocal system, articulation of the hands and the tongue are underpinned by overlapping left hemisphere dominant neural regions. Behavioral studies demonstrate that human adults perform sympathetic mouth actions in imitative synchrony with manual actions. Additionally, right-handedness for precision manual actions in children has been correlated with the typical development of language, while a lack of hand bias has been associated with psychopathology. It therefore stands to reason that sympathetic mouth actions during fine precision motor action of the hands may be lateralized. We employed a fine-grained behavioral coding paradigm to provide the first investigation of tongue protrusions in typically developing 4-year old children. Tongue protrusions were investigated across a range of cognitive tasks that required varying degrees of manual action: precision motor action, gross motor action and no motor actions. The rate of tongue protrusions was influenced by the motor requirements of the task and tongue protrusions were significantly right-biased for only precision manual motor action (p<.001). From an evolutionary perspective, tongue protrusions can drive new investigations regarding how an early human communication system transitioned from hand to mouth. From a developmental perspective, the present study may serve to reveal patterns of tongue protrusions during the motor development of typically developing children.

  15. A new 3D dynamical biomechanical tongue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Jean-Michel; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan; Wilhelms-Tricarico, Reiner

    2001-05-01

    A new dynamical biomechanical tongue model is being developed to study speech motor control. In spite of its computational complexity, a 3D representation was chosen in order to account for various contacts between tongue and external structures such as teeth, palate, and vocal tract walls. A fair representation of tongue muscle anatomy is provided, by designing the finite element mesh from the visible human data set (female subject). Model geometry was then matched to a human speaker, so that simulations can be quantitatively compared to experimental MRI data. A set of 11 muscles is modeled, whose role in speech gestures is well established. Each muscle is defined by a set of elements whose elastic properties change with muscle activation. Muscles forces are applied to the tongue model via macrofibers defined within the mesh by muscle specific sets of nodes. These forces are currently specified as step functions. Boundary conditions are set using zero-displacement nodes simulating attachments of tongue on bony structures. The nonlinear mechanical properties of tongue soft tissues are modeled using a hyperelastic material. Three-dimensional tongue deformations generated by each muscle, using FEM software ANSYS for computation, will be presented. Implications for speech motor control will be proposed.

  16. Bacillus as a potential diagnostic marker for yellow tongue coating

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juan; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Hu, Chunping; Xia, Junquan; Shen, Jianping; Su, Kelei; Yan, Huaijiang; Xu, Yuehua; Zhang, Yiyan; Zhang, Sujie; Yang, Lijun; Zhi, Hao; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Yu, Qiang; Hu, Jingqing; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Observation of tongue coating, a foundation for clinical diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), is a major indicator of the occurrence, development, and prognosis of disease. The biological basis of tongue diagnosis and relationship between the types and microorganisms of tongue coating remain elusive. Thirteen chronic erosive gastritis (CEG) patients with typical yellow tongue coating (YTC) and ten healthy volunteers with thin white tongue coating (WTC) were included in this study. Patients were provided a 2-course targeted treatment of a herbal medicine Ban Xia Xie Xin decoction, traditionally prescribed for CEG patients with YTC, to evaluate the relationship between tongue coating microbiota and diagnosis of CEG with typical YTC. The tongue coating segregation structure was determined using Illumina Miseq sequencing of the V4–V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Bacillus was significantly observed only in CEG patients with YTC, but not in patients who received the decoction. YTC (n = 22) and WTC (n = 29) samples were collected for bacterial culturing to illustrate the relationship between Bacillus and YTC. The Bacillus positivity rate of YTC samples was 72.7%; Bacillus was not observed in WTC samples. In conclusion, Bacillus was strongly associated with YTC. PMID:27578261

  17. Molecularly imprinted polymers as recognition materials for electronic tongues.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tan-Phat; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2015-12-15

    For over three decades now, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have successfully been used for selective chemical sensing because the shape and size of their imprinted molecular cavities perfectly matched those of the target analyte molecules. Moreover, orientation of recognizing sites of these cavities corresponded to those of the binding sites of the template molecules. In contrast, electronic tongue (e-tongue) is usually an array of low-affinity recognition units. Its selectivity is based on recognition pattern or multivariate analysis. Merging these two sensing devices led to a synergetic hybrid sensor, an MIP based e-tongue. Fabrication of these e-tongues permitted simultaneous sensing and discriminating several analytes in complex solutions of many components so that these arrays compensated for limitation in cross-reactivity of MIPs. Apparently, analytical signals generated by MIP-based e-tongues, compared to those of ordinary sensor arrays, were more reliable where a unique pattern or 'fingerprint' for each analyte was generated. Additionally, several transduction platforms (from spectroscopic to electrochemical) engaged in constructing MIP-based e-tongues, found their broad and flexible applications. The present review critically evaluates achievements in recent developments of the MIP based e-tongues for chemosensing.

  18. Electronic Tongue for Quantitation of Contaminants in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Marlin; Kuhlman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    An assembly of sensors, denoted an electronic tongue, is undergoing development as a prototype of compact devices for use in measuring concentrations of contaminants in water. Thus far, the electronic tongue has been tested on ions of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Fe and shown to respond to concentrations as low as about 10 parts per million. This electronic tongue is expected to be capable of measuring concentrations of other metal ions and organic compounds. Potential uses for electronic tongues include monitoring the chemical quality of water in a variety of natural, industrial, and laboratory settings; detecting micro-organisms indirectly by measuring microbially influenced corrosion; and characterizing compounds of interest to the pharmaceutical and food industries. This version of the electronic tongue includes a heater, a temperature sensor, an array of ion-specific electrodes, an oxidation/ reduction sensor pair, an electrical-conductivity sensor, and an array of galvanic cells, all on one compact ceramic substrate. Special-purpose electronic excitation and readout circuitry for the sensors has also been constructed. The main advantage of the electronic tongue, relative to electrodes of this type used traditionally to assess water quality, is extreme ruggedness. The types of measurements that can be performed by use of the sensors on the electronic tongue are quite varied. The best combination of types of measurements for a given application depends on the specific contaminants that one seeks to detect. Experimental studies to identify such combinations were in progress at the time of reporting the information for this article.

  19. Tongue prints: A novel biometric and potential forensic tool.

    PubMed

    Radhika, T; Jeddy, Nadeem; Nithya, S

    2016-01-01

    Tongue is a vital internal organ well encased within the oral cavity and protected from the environment. It has unique features which differ from individual to individual and even between identical twins. The color, shape, and surface features are characteristic of every individual, and this serves as a tool for identification. Many modes of biometric systems have come into existence such as fingerprint, iris scan, skin color, signature verification, voice recognition, and face recognition. The search for a new personal identification method secure has led to the use of the lingual impression or the tongue print as a method of biometric authentication. Tongue characteristics exhibit sexual dimorphism thus aiding in the identification of the person. Emerging as a novel biometric tool, tongue prints also hold the promise of a potential forensic tool. This review highlights the uniqueness of tongue prints and its superiority over other biometric identification systems. The various methods of tongue print collection and the classification of tongue features are also elucidated.

  20. Tongue resting pressure of the tongue anchorage pad in different body positions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, J; Xu, K; Gao, X; Xu, T

    2015-06-01

    We designed a modified transpalatal arch (tongue anchorage pad, TAP) to help control the vertical dimension. This study aimed to evaluate its efficiency by measuring the tongue resting pressure at different anteroposterior positions of the TAP in the upright and supine positions and to investigate the effect of changes in body position. Our study recruited 17 volunteers with individual normal occlusion (4 males, 13 females, age 22-33 years). An individualised TAP was designed for each subject. With a miniature sensor (FSS1500NS) installed in the device, we measured the pressure at the level of the distal second premolar (PM2), the first molar (M1) and the second molar (M2) in both the upright and supine positions. Nonparametric analysis was applied with the level of significance set at 0.05. In the upright position, tongue pressures obtained at PM2, M1 and M2 were 183.94, 130.81 and 113.07 Pa, respectively, with the maximum value detected at PM2 (P = 0.001). While in the supine position, pressures of 187.03, 156.87 and 201.69 Pa were detected at the same sites, with significantly higher values for M1 (P = 0.002) and M2 (P = 0.004). Tongue resting pressure decreases from the anterior aspect to the posterior aspect in the upright position. In the supine position, the pressure is consistent across the midline with pressure enhancement at M1 and M2. As many questions remain about this appliance and appropriate intruding force, further clinical and basic studies are required prior to its clinical implementation.

  1. The Effect of Jaw Position on Measures of Tongue Strength and Endurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Munson, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of tongue strength and endurance is common in research and clinical contexts. It is unclear whether the results reveal discrete function by the tongue or combined abilities of the tongue and jaw. One way to isolate the movement of the tongue is to constrain the jaw kinematically by using a bite block. In this study, 10 neurologically…

  2. Congenital benign teratoma of the tongue with bifid tip, ankyloglossia and polydactyly: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Neelam N; Raikwar, Kanchan

    2010-09-01

    Teratomas of the tongue are rare, and often accompany other anomalies within the head and neck. We describe a combination of anomalies in a 6-week-old infant with teratoma and bifid tip of the tongue, severe tongue tie, and polydactyly. The teratoma was excised and the tongue tie released with no complications.

  3. A three-dimensional kinematic analysis of tongue flicking in Python molurus.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jurriaan H; van der Sluijs, Inke; Snelderwaard, Peter Ch; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2004-02-01

    The forked snake tongue is a muscular organ without hard skeletal support. A functional interpretation of the variable arrangement of the intrinsic muscles along the tongue requires a quantitative analysis of the motion performance during tongue protrusion and flicking. Therefore, high-speed fluoroscopy and high-speed stereo photogrammetry were used to analyse the three-dimensional shape changes of the tongue in Python molurus bivittatus (Boidae). The posterior protruding part of the tongue elongated up to 130% while the flicking anterior portion elongated maximally 60%. The differences in tongue strains relate to the absence or presence, respectively, of longitudinal muscle fibres in the peripheral tongue. Maximum overall protrusion velocity (4.3 m s(-1)) occurred initially when the tongue tip left the mouth. Maximum tongue length of approximately 0.01 body length (20 mm) was reached during the first tongue flick. These observations are discussed within the scope of the biomechanical constraints of hydrostatic tongue protrusion: a negative forward pressure gradient, longitudinal tongue compliance and axial tongue stiffness. The three-dimensional deformation varied along the tongue with a mean curvature of 0.06 mm(-1) and a maximum value of 0.5 mm(-1). At the basis of the anterior forked portion of the tongue tips, extreme curvatures up to 2.0 mm(-1) were observed. These quantitative results support previously proposed inferences about a hydrostatic elongation mechanism and may serve to evaluate future dynamic models of tongue flicking.

  4. Tongue Growth during Prenatal Development in Korean Fetuses and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soo Jeong; Cha, Bong Geun; Kim, Yeon Sook; Lee, Suk Keun; Chi, Je Geun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prenatal tongue development may affect oral-craniofacial structures, but this muscular organ has rarely been investigated. Methods: In order to document the physiology of prenatal tongue growth, we histologically examined the facial and cranial base structures of 56 embryos and 106 fetuses. Results: In Streeter’s stages 13–14 (fertilization age [FA], 28 to 32 days), the tongue protruded into the stomodeal cavity from the retrohyoid space to the cartilaginous mesenchyme of the primitive cranial base, and in Streeter’s stage 15 (FA, 33 to 36 days), the tongue rapidly swelled and compressed the cranial base to initiate spheno-occipital synchondrosis and continued to swell laterally to occupy most of the stomodeal cavity in Streeter’s stage 16–17 (FA, 37 to 43 days). In Streeter’s stage 18–20 (FA, 44 to 51 days), the tongue was vertically positioned and filled the posterior nasopharyngeal space. As the growth of the mandible and maxilla advanced, the tongue was pulled down and protruded anteriorly to form the linguomandibular complex. Angulation between the anterior cranial base (ACB) and the posterior cranial base (PCB) was formed by the emerging tongue at FA 4 weeks and became constant at approximately 124°–126° from FA 6 weeks until birth, which was consistent with angulations measured on adult cephalograms. Conclusions: The early clockwise growth of the ACB to the maxillary plane became harmonious with the counter-clockwise growth of the PCB to the tongue axis during the early prenatal period. These observations suggest that human embryonic tongue growth affects ACB and PCB angulation, stimulates maxillary growth, and induces mandibular movement to achieve the essential functions of oral and maxillofacial structures. PMID:26471340

  5. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kyoo; Jo, Hyang Jeong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Sang-wook Sohn, Jung Sook; Moon, Soo Young; Yang, Sei Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Lee, Sang Ho; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Moon, Sun Rock

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation.

  6. Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi-smokers' tongue.

    PubMed

    Farman, A G; Van Wyk, C W

    1977-12-01

    "Leukokeratosis nicotina glossi" or "smokers' tongue" is a homogeneous leukoplakia with evenly distributed pin-point hemispherical depressions. Histologically, there is a loss of glossal papillae, hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and the formation of large drop-shaped rete pegs with central clefting and occasional parakeratotic plugging. Mitotic activity and atypia are not marked and there is no evidence of Candida species infection. In some respects the lesion histologically resembles verrucous carcinoma but, unlike that condition, papillomatosis is not clinically noticeable and an invasive "leading edge" is not apparent. All but one of the subjects in which the lesion was seen were men, all had concurrent leukokeratosis nicotina palati and two gave histories of laryngeal carcinoma.

  7. [Tuberculous ulcer of the tongue: clinical case].

    PubMed

    Ladron de Guevara, R

    1989-12-01

    A 26 year-old female was seeking treatment for a painless ulcerated lesion of the tongue developing 30 days before. No history of a sef biting in that area was told by the patient. Following a provisional diagnosis of tuberculous ulcer or a neoplasm, under local anesthesia, a segment of the lesion was excised and sent to histological diagnosis, which confirmed the existence of a tuberculous ulcer. Additionally, a chest roentgenogram disclosed the presence of an undiagnosed pulmonar tuberculous lesion. The patient underwent a successful treatment with rifampicin, isoniazide and pirazinamide, and two month after the initial diagnosis the oral lesion was almost absent, although the pulmonar lesion was still detected on the roentgenogram. Finally, a total disappearance of the pulmonar lesion was detected six month following drug treatment.

  8. Enhanced levels of glutathione and protein glutathiolation in rat tongue epithelium during 4-NQO-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhishan; Komninou, Despina; Kleinman, Wayne; Pinto, John T; Gilhooly, Elaine M; Calcagnotto, Ana; Richie, John P

    2007-04-01

    High glutathione (GSH) levels are commonly found in oral tumors and are thought to play an important role in tumorigenesis. While posttranslational binding of GSH to cellular proteins (protein glutathiolation) has recently been recognized as an important redox-sensitive regulatory mechanism, no data currently exist on this process during carcinogenesis. Our goal was to determine the effects of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis on tongue levels of protein-bound and free GSH and related thiols in the rat. Male F-344 rats (6 weeks of age) were administered either 4-NQO (20 ppm) in drinking water or tap water alone (controls) for 8 weeks. Twenty-four weeks after cessation of 4-NQO, squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue were observed in all rats. The levels of both free and bound GSH in tumors, as well as in adjacent tissues, were 2- to 3-fold greater than in tongue epithelium from control rats (p < 0.05). Prior to tumor formation, at 8 weeks after cessation of 4-NQO, hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were observed in 100%, 25% and 12.5% of 4-NQO-treated rats, respectively. At this early stage of carcinogenesis, levels of free and bound GSH were increased 50% compared with tongue tissues from control rats (p<0.05). Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were also 2-fold greater in tongue tissues from 4-NQO treated vs. control rats (p<0.05). Altogether, these results suggest that protein glutathiolation, together with GSH and GSSG levels, are induced during oral carcinogenesis in the rat possibly as a result of enhanced levels of oxidative stress.

  9. Tongue infarction as first symptom of temporal arteritis.

    PubMed

    Husein-Elahmed, Husein; Callejas-Rubio, Jose-Luis; Rios-Fernández, Raquel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto

    2012-03-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis affecting people over 50 years. This disease is a diagnostic challenge with a range of clinical symptoms and findings due to different affected vessels. Because of this, the initial diagnosis can be tricky, and some of the patients present at first time with a real unusual initial manifestation. One of these can be tongue necrosis, which is according to the literature in accordance with scalp necrosis, the rarest initial manifestation of GCA We describe a patient who presented with tongue necrosis as initial symptom of GCA. The belated diagnose resulted in subtotal necrosis of the mobile part of the tongue.

  10. [Studies of hereditary mode on three tongue moving types].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ling; Lu, Shun-Hua; Zheng, Lian-Bin

    2003-09-01

    The data of 72 families were analyzed by the method of proband's sib and the method of segregation analysis. The results showed that the hereditary mode of rolling tongue or pointed tongue is the dominant heredity of single gene of autosome, and the positive type of them is the dominant character. Twisting tongue is the recessive heredity of single gene of autosome,while the positive type is the recessive character. Present study suggested, although environmental might affect these characters,hereditary factors seemed to be dominant.

  11. Left-handedness and tongue-rolling ability.

    PubMed

    Fry, C J

    1988-08-01

    948 undergraduates at The Ohio State University were administered the 10-item Edinburgh Handedness Inventory and asked to indicate the extent to which they could turn up the sides of their tongues. Significantly fewer left-handers than right-handers (62.8% and 74.8%, respectively) reported being able to turn up either or both sides. Sex differences in tongue-rolling ability were also noted. Among the 403 men included in the final sample, 77.4% could roll their tongues, whereas only 69.7% of the 491 women could do so.

  12. Paediatric Geographic Tongue: A Case Report, Review and Recent Updates

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, Shivanand Bagalad; Deepak, Byathnal Suryakanth; Ashwini, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Geographic tongue is a benign recurrent condition of uncertain aetiology affecting the tongue characterized by loss of epithelium especially filiform papillae giving a characteristic appearance. The clinical presentation may vary from asymptomatic to painful and burning ulceration. The condition is commonly seen in adults but few cases are reported in children. A case of asymptomatic geographic tongue in three-year-old male child and literature review with new insight in aetiology is presented here. Management depends on the clinical condition and underlying aetiology. PMID:27042597

  13. Classic tongue lipoma: a common tumour at a rare site

    PubMed Central

    Magadum, Dilip; Sanadi, Appasab; Agrawal, Jiwanasha Manish; Agrawal, Manish Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Lipoma is the commonest benign tumour occurring at any anatomical site where fat is present, but occurrence in the oral cavity is rare. Tongue which is totally devoid of fat cells is a rare site for lipoma. This is one such rare case of the universal tumour, presenting at the lateral margin of the tongue, for which complete tumour excision was done. Macroscopically the mass had a hard consistency and measured 3.0×2.0 cm. From microscopic examination, diagnosis of lipoma was made. Recurrence of tongue lipoma is rare. PMID:23370950

  14. Portal hypertensive gastric mucosa: an endoscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Papazian, A; Braillon, A; Dupas, J L; Sevenet, F; Capron, J P

    1986-01-01

    The endoscopic features of the gastric mucosa in patients with cirrhosis have not been systematically investigated. In these patients, we observed an endoscopic aspect, consisting of multiple small erythematous areas, outlined by a subtle yellowish network (resembling a mosaic), mainly located in the proximal part of the stomach. We tested the value of this sign by comparing two groups: 100 patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis, and 300 control patients without signs of liver disease or portal hypertension. This endoscopic pattern was observed in 94 of the patients with cirrhosis, whereas oesophageal varices were seen in 78 only. In contrast, only one patient of the control group had this aspect. Moreover, this sign was also found in seven of eight patients with non cirrhotic portal hypertension, but was seen neither in 100 patients with chronic alcoholism but without liver disease, nor in 10 cirrhotic patients with end-to-side portacaval shunts. These endoscopic changes might be because of mucosal and/or submucosal oedema and congestion highlighting the normal areae gastricae pattern and related to raised portal pressure. We conclude that the mosaic pattern of the gastric mucosa is a sensible and specific sign for diagnosis of portal hypertension, whatever the cause. Images Figure PMID:3781334

  15. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning; Bonderup, Ole Kristian; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Meyer, Michael Kruse; Bøgsted, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2017-01-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were extracted by colonoscopy and analyzed by label-free quantitative proteomics, enabling the quantitation of 5366 proteins. The abundance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was statistically significantly increased in RA-patient biopsies compared with controls and correlated with the administered dosage of methotrexate (MTX), the most frequently prescribed immunosuppressive drug for RA. Additionally, our data suggest that treatment with Leflunomide, a common alternative to MTX, increases DHFR. The findings were supported by immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy, which furthermore demonstrated that DHFR was located in the cytosol of the intestinal epithelial and interstitial cells. Finally, we identified 223 citrullinated peptides from 121 proteins. Three of the peptides were unique to RA. The list of citrullinated proteins was enriched in extracellular and membrane proteins and included known targets of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Our findings support that the colon mucosa could trigger the production of ACPAs, which could contribute to the onset of RA. The MS data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001608 and PXD003082.

  16. Mucoadhesion dependence of pharmaceutical polymers on mucosa characteristics.

    PubMed

    Accili, Daniela; Menghi, Giovanna; Bonacucina, Giulia; Martino, Piera Di; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2004-07-01

    Well known mucoadhesive polymers such as Carbopol 974P and Pharmacoat 606 and three different mucosas (sublingual, oesophageal and duodenal bovine) were used to verify how the mucoadhesive properties of materials may depend on the mucosa characteristics and if a polymer may reveal more mucoadhesive than another and vice versa by changing the type of interacting mucosa. So, tablets of Carbopol 974P and Pharmacoat 606 were prepared and their mucoadhesion on the three mucosas was set in terms of maximum load and work of detachment, using a texture analyzer. At the same time, mucosas were characterized by immunohistochemical techniques and lectin histochemistry. Results obtained from the Tensile test analyses show that the adhesive power of the two polymers is different in the three mucosas. Particularly, in the sublingual mucosa, Carbopol was more mucoadhesive than Pharmacoat. On the contrary, Pharmacoat was more mucoadhesive than Carbopol in duodenal mucosa. The significantly different behavior of polymers was correlated with the desquamation layer thickness and the differential sialic acid and fucose exposition in the targeted mucosas.

  17. Squamous-cell carcinoma of the tongue: preoperative interstitial radium and external irradiation. Part II. Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vermund, H.; Breenhovd, I.O.; Kaalhus, O.; Poppe, E.

    1984-05-01

    The authors evaluated 300 cases of squamous-cell carcinoma of the anterior two thirds of the tongue treated from 1958 through 1972. Effects of treament on absolute and relative survival were determined by the log rank method. Selection was non-random, based on the extent of the primary tumor, age and general condition. Surgery, irradiation, or a combination of preoperative interstitial high-intensity radium needles and resection gave similar results in patients with tumor smaller than 4 cm. In patients with larger tumor or mobile, unilateral neck metastases, irradiation plus surgery produced better survival than irradiation alone. Different radiation techniques are analyzed.

  18. Congenital mucocele of the tongue: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; De Hoyos Parra, Ricardo; Cuestas, Giselle; Cambi, Jacopo; Passali, Desiderio

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are benign lesions of the oral cavity that develop as a result of retention or extravasation of mucous material from minor salivary glands. Congenital mucoceles are very rare. These lesions in newborns may interfere with breastfeeding and may even compromise respiratory function. A patient with a congenital mucocele diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound screening showing a cystic lesion of the tongue is presented herein. The physical examination, lesion evolution and imaging are described, together with the surgical management, histopathology and two-year follow-up. Early clinical assessment, differential diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging allow clinicians to diagnose and treat this rare congenital condition with surgery in early infancy.

  19. Dynamic changes in cell-surface expression of mannose in the oral epithelium during the development of graft-versus-host disease of the oral mucosa in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of cell-surface glycoconjugates in oral mucosal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still unclear, even though molecular changes in the oral epithelium are essential for the pathogenesis of these lesions. In this study, we investigated changes in the binding of mannose (Man)-specific Lens culinaris lectin (LCA) in the oral mucosa of rats with GVHD. Methods Lewis rat spleen cells were injected into (Lewis x Brown Norway) F1 rats to induce systemic GVHD, including oral mucosal lesions. Tongue and spleen samples were evaluated using lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, transwell migration assays and Stamper-Woodruff binding assays. Results Binding of Man-specific LCA expanded to the epithelial layers of the tongue in GVHD-rats. An expansion of LCA binding was related to the increased expression of mannosyltransferase in the oral mucosa. CD8+ cells, effector cells of oral mucosal GVHD, expressed mannose-binding protein (MBP) and migrated to the medium containing Man in the transwell migration assay. Adherence of CD8+ cells to the oral epithelium could be inhibited by pretreating CD8+ cells with MBP antibody and/or by pretreating sections with Man-specific LCA. Conclusions Increased expression of Man on keratinocytes leads to the migration and/or adhesion of CD8+ cells in the surface epithelium, which is mediated in part by the MBP/Man-binding pathway during the development of oral mucosal GVHD. PMID:24433462

  20. Morphological analysis of the tongue and the digestive tube of saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola brasiliensis, LINNAUES 1766) apprehended by CETAS/IBAMA-PB.

    PubMed

    Silva Siqueira, R A; Luna, A C L; Cavalcanti, T A; Rici, R E G; Miglino, M A; Guerra, R R

    2014-02-01

    The saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola brasiliensis) is a Passeriforme of the Brazilian wildlife. There are scarcely any morphological studies on it, although it is frequently trafficked for its birdsong abilities. Its peculiarities, such as territorialism and developed syrinx that provides outstanding song, draw attention towards its domestication. Thus, this study aimed to morphologically describe the tongue and digestive tube organs of this species to furnish subsidies for nutritional, clinical and conservation studies. Forty-one birds from the Wild Animal Screening Center (CETAS)/Brazilian Institute of Environment (IBAMA)/city of Cabedelo, state of Paraíba (PB) were used. Samples were collected, identified and sent to standard light microscopy; samples of proventriculus and gizzard were sent to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The samples showed stratification similar to that of other domestic and wild birds, confirmed in the scanning electron microscopy; however, they differed in the absence of dermal papillae in the tongue, lack of ingluvial glands and lack of muscular mucosa and sub-mucosa in the large intestine.

  1. Mucosal varicosities: case report treated with monoethanolamine oleate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira; Castro, Wagner Henriques; Gala-García, Alfonso; Mesquita, Ricardo Alves

    2006-01-01

    We reported a case of varicosities in the buccal mucosa treated with sclerotherapy. The sclerosant agent used was the monoethanolamine oleate. After three sessions the lesions disappeared and the patient is follow-up.

  2. E-tongue 2 REDOX response to heavy metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Kuhlman, G. M.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    E-Tongue 2 an array of electrochemical sensors including REDOX electrodes for Cylic Voltammetry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry measurements, Galvanic cells for corrosion measurements, and Ion Selective Electrodes.

  3. 4. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLE TONGUE AND GROOVE CRIBBING USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW OF TRIPLE TONGUE AND GROOVE CRIBBING USED IN DAM CONSTRUCTION, NORTH EAST OF EAST DAM, LOOKING NORTH - Three Bears Lake & Dams, East Dam, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  4. Improving breastfeeding outcomes: the impact of tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rosemary

    2012-06-01

    A tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is defined as a lingual frenulum that is short, tight and restricts normal tongue movement. The tongue-tied newborn baby then has a mechanical difficulty attaching to his mum's breast and maintaining attachment to feed effectively. In the hands of skilled carers, this mechanical problem can be resolved by releasing the frenulum (frenulotomy) and the baby's access to his/her mother's breast milk be preserved. Published research on this subject has undergone justifiable criticism. Robust methodology was lacking in earlier studies. An overview of the course of researchers' response to critique is discussed. The care pathway in place in mid-Norfolk for mother and baby dyads where the baby's tongue-tie compromises efficient breastfeeding is outlined.

  5. The hummingbird's tongue: a self-assembling capillary syphon

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonjung; Peaudecerf, François; Baldwin, Maude W.; Bush, John W. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of drinking in ruby-throated hummingbirds. In vivo observations reveal elastocapillary deformation of the hummingbird's tongue and capillary suction along its length. By developing a theoretical model for the hummingbird's drinking process, we investigate how the elastocapillarity affects the energy intake rate of the bird and how its open tongue geometry reduces resistance to nectar uptake. We note that the tongue flexibility is beneficial for accessing, transporting and unloading the nectar. We demonstrate that the hummingbird can attain the fastest nectar uptake when its tongue is roughly semicircular. Finally, we assess the relative importance of capillary suction and a recently proposed fluid trapping mechanism, and conclude that the former is important in many natural settings. PMID:23075839

  6. 11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIP TOP MINE. DETAIL OF TONGUE AND GROOVE INTERIOR SIDING IN LIVING QUARTERS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  7. Congenital Midline Tongue Base Mass in An Infant: Lingual Hamartoma

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Mawaddah; See, Goh Bee

    2016-01-01

    Lingual hamartoma is a rare finding of congenital midline posterior tongue mass. The lesion may be seen as a single anomaly or maybe associated with syndrome especially the Oral Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS). Here, we report an otherwise normal and healthy two-month-old boy with a congenital midline base of tongue mass presented with snoring and episodic vomiting since the age of 1 month. Tumour excision from the area of foramen of caecum recovered a pinkish pedunculated tumour. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyomatous lingual hamartoma. Differential diagnosis, especially for midline tongue mass and other paediatric tongue lesions are discussed. We also discuss the epidemiology, histopathologic features, treatment and prognosis of lingual hamartoma based on the literature review. PMID:27790477

  8. The hummingbird's tongue: a self-assembling capillary syphon.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonjung; Peaudecerf, François; Baldwin, Maude W; Bush, John W M

    2012-12-22

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of drinking in ruby-throated hummingbirds. In vivo observations reveal elastocapillary deformation of the hummingbird's tongue and capillary suction along its length. By developing a theoretical model for the hummingbird's drinking process, we investigate how the elastocapillarity affects the energy intake rate of the bird and how its open tongue geometry reduces resistance to nectar uptake. We note that the tongue flexibility is beneficial for accessing, transporting and unloading the nectar. We demonstrate that the hummingbird can attain the fastest nectar uptake when its tongue is roughly semicircular. Finally, we assess the relative importance of capillary suction and a recently proposed fluid trapping mechanism, and conclude that the former is important in many natural settings.

  9. Expression of FGFs during early mouse tongue development

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wen; Prochazka, Jan; Prochazkova, Michaela; Klein, Ophir D.

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute one of the largest growth factor families, and several ligands and receptors in this family are known to play critical roles during tongue development. In order to provide a comprehensive foundation for research into the role of FGFs during the process of tongue formation, we measured the transcript levels by quantitative PCR and mapped the expression patterns by in situ hybridization of all 22 Fgfs during mouse tongue development between embryonic days (E) 11.5 and E14.5. During this period, Fgf5, Fgf6, Fgf7, Fgf9, Fgf10, Fgf13, Fgf15, Fgf16 and Fgf18 could all be detected with various intensities in the mesenchyme, whereas Fgf1 and Fgf2 were expressed in both the epithelium and the mesenchyme. Our results indicate that FGF signaling regulates tongue development at multiple stages. PMID:26748348

  10. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  11. Evidence for an elastic projection mechanism in the chameleon tongue.

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Jurriaan H.; van Leeuwen, Johan L.

    2004-01-01

    To capture prey, chameleons ballistically project their tongues as far as 1.5 body lengths with accelerations of up to 500 m s(-2). At the core of a chameleon's tongue is a cylindrical tongue skeleton surrounded by the accelerator muscle. Previously, the cylindrical accelerator muscle was assumed to power tongue projection directly during the actual fast projection of the tongue. However, high-speed recordings of Chamaeleo melleri and C. pardalis reveal that peak powers of 3000 W kg(-1) are necessary to generate the observed accelerations, which exceed the accelerator muscle's capacity by at least five- to 10-fold. Extrinsic structures might power projection via the tongue skeleton. High-speed fluoroscopy suggests that they contribute less than 10% of the required peak instantaneous power. Thus, the projection power must be generated predominantly within the tongue, and an energy-storage-and-release mechanism must be at work. The key structure in the projection mechanism is probably a cylindrical connective-tissue layer, which surrounds the entoglossal process and was previously suggested to act as lubricating tissue. This tissue layer comprises at least 10 sheaths that envelop the entoglossal process. The outer portion connects anteriorly to the accelerator muscle and the inner portion to the retractor structures. The sheaths contain helical arrays of collagen fibres. Prior to projection, the sheaths are longitudinally loaded by the combined radial contraction and hydrostatic lengthening of the accelerator muscle, at an estimated mean power of 144 W kg(-1) in C. melleri. Tongue projection is triggered as the accelerator muscle and the loaded portions of the sheaths start to slide over the tip of the entoglossal process. The springs relax radially while pushing off the rounded tip of the entoglossal process, making the elastic energy stored in the helical fibres available for a simultaneous forward acceleration of the tongue pad, accelerator muscle and retractor

  12. MFAP5 and TNNC1: Potential markers for predicting occult cervical lymphatic metastasis and prognosis in early stage tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Kailiu; Li, Siyi; Hu, Longwei; Han, Jing; Zhu, Dongwang; Tian, Xuerui; Liu, Wei; Tian, Zhen; Zhong, Laiping; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study is to identify candidate genes that could predict prognosis of early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) and its occult cervical lymphatic metastasis by large-scale gene expression profiling. Tumor tissue and matched normal mucosa samples were collected from patients with TSCC and analyzed with Affymetrix HTA2.0 high-density oligonucleotide array. Differentially expressed genes in TSCC with cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) were further analyzed with Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes for their functions and related pathways. A total of 107 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) were identified by microarray in TSCC samples with CLNM (n = 6) compared to those without CLNM (n = 6). Genes involved in the cell-matrix adherens junction and migration function including MFAP5, TNNC1, MGP, FBFBP1 and FBXO32 were selected and validated by RT-PCR in TSCC samples (n = 32). Of the five genes, MFAP5 and TNCC1 expressions were further validated by immohistochemistry (n = 61). The significant positive correlation between MFAP5 and TNNC1 expression (p<0.001) was observed. Notably, over-expression of MFAP5 and TNNC1 were correlated with CLNM, metastasis relapse-free survival and overall survival. Our findings indicated that MFAP5 and TNNC1 may be potential markers for predicting occult cervical lymphatic metastasis and prognosis of oral tongue carcinoma.

  13. Human Papillomavirus in the Lesions of the Oral Mucosa According to Topography

    PubMed Central

    Mravak-Stipetić, Marinka; Sabol, Ivan; Kranjčić, Josip; Knežević, Marjana; Grce, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) types and oral lesions has been shown in many studies. Considering the significance that HPV has in the development of malignant and potentially malignant disorders of the oral mucosa, the purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV DNA in different oral lesions. In addition, we wanted to elucidate whether the HPV infection is associated predominantly with either the lesion or a particular anatomic site of the oral cavity. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included 246 subjects with different oral lesions, and 73 subjects with apparently healthy oral mucosa (controls). The oral lesions were classified according to their surface morphology and clinical diagnosis. The epithelial cells were collected with a cytobrush from different topographic sites in the oral cavity of the oral lesions and controls. The presence of HPV DNA was evaluated by consensus and type-specific primer-directed polymerase chain reaction. The HPV positivity was detected in 17.7% of oral lesions, significantly more than in apparently healthy mucosa (6.8%), with a higher presence in benign proliferative mucosal lesions (18.6%). High-risk HPV types were predominantly found in potentially malignant oral disorders (HPV16 in 4.3% and HPV31 in 3.4%), while benign proliferative lesions as well as healthy oral mucosa contained mainly undetermined HPV type (13.6 and 6.8%, respectively). Conclusions/Significance The distribution of positive HPV findings on the oral mucosa seems to be more associated with a particular anatomical site than the diagnosis itself. Samples taken from the vermilion border, labial commissures, and hard palate were most often HPV positive. Thus, topography plays a role in HPV prevalence findings in oral lesions. Because of the higher prevalence of the high-risk HPV types in potentially malignant oral disorders, these lesions need to be continuously controlled and treated. PMID:23922786

  14. Psoriasis of the dorsal surface of the tongue.

    PubMed

    De Biase, A; Guerra, F; Polimeni, A; Ottolenghi, L; Pezza, M; Richetta, A G

    2005-09-01

    Psoriasis is primarily an inherited inflammatory skin disease, it is characterized by erythemato-squamous lesions that usually involve elbows, knees and the scalp. Oral manifestations are rare in psoriasis, infact, oral psoriasis involves 2% of psoriatic patients and usually it is observed with the onset of cutaneous lesions and progresses with them. Differential diagnosis should be done for Reiter's syndrome, leukoplakia and geographic tongue. The authors describe a case of tongue psoriasis without cutaneous lesions.

  15. Frog tongue surface microstructures: functional and evolutionary patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Summary Frogs (Lissamphibia: Anura) use adhesive tongues to capture fast moving, elusive prey. For this, the tongues are moved quickly and adhere instantaneously to various prey surfaces. Recently, the functional morphology of frog tongues was discussed in context of their adhesive performance. It was suggested that the interaction between the tongue surface and the mucus coating is important for generating strong pull-off forces. However, despite the general notions about its importance for a successful contact with the prey, little is known about the surface structure of frog tongues. Previous studies focused almost exclusively on species within the Ranidae and Bufonidae, neglecting the wide diversity of frogs. Here we examined the tongue surface in nine different frog species, comprising eight different taxa, i.e., the Alytidae, Bombinatoridae, Megophryidae, Hylidae, Ceratophryidae, Ranidae, Bufonidae, and Dendrobatidae. In all species examined herein, we found fungiform and filiform papillae on the tongue surface. Further, we observed a high degree of variation among tongues in different frogs. These differences can be seen in the size and shape of the papillae, in the fine-structures on the papillae, as well as in the three-dimensional organization of subsurface tissues. Notably, the fine-structures on the filiform papillae in frogs comprise hair-like protrusions (Megophryidae and Ranidae), microridges (Bufonidae and Dendrobatidae), or can be irregularly shaped or absent as observed in the remaining taxa examined herein. Some of this variation might be related to different degrees of adhesive performance and may point to differences in the spectra of prey items between frog taxa. PMID:27547606

  16. Tongue color changes within a menstrual cycle in eumenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shu-Feng; Shen, Li-Ling; Su, Shan-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Tongue color ( shé sè) has been used to diagnose abnormal body conditions for thousands of years in traditional Chinese Medicine ( zhōng yī). However, it is not clear whether tongue color alters with physiological changes within a normal menstrual cycle ( yuè jīng zhōu qī). This study investigated difference in tongue color between the follicular phase and luteal phase in eumenorrheic women. Tongue surface photographs were taken in the follicular phase and the luteal phase of thirty-two volunteers with biphasic basal body temperature. Color values on five areas of the tongue surface were examined and comparisons of color values were made between the two phases according to the red-green-blue (RGB), hue-saturation-brightness (HSB), luminance-a-b (Lab), and cyan-magenta-yellow-black (CMYK) models. Based on the RGB model, the values of green and blue in the tip area were larger in the follicular phase than both in the luteal phase. The values of magenta and yellow based in the CMYK model were smaller in the tip area in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. The saturation in the tip area was smaller in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. Based on the Lab model, b value in the middle area was smaller in the follicular phase than that in the luteal phase. The data revealed that tongue color varied within a eumenorrheic menstrual cycle, suggesting that tongue color differences between the follicular and luteal phases need to be considered while practicing tongue diagnosis ( shé zhěn) or performing clinical studies among childbearing women.

  17. Linezolid induced black hairy tongue: a rare side effect.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid induced black hairy tongue is a rare benign reversible side effect of linezolid therapy. We report a case of a 61 year old diabetic lady who developed thrombocytopenia and black hairy discoloration of the tongue after being prescribed linezolid for foot osteomyelitis by the orthopaedic surgeon. Patient was encouraged to practice good oral dental hygiene, advised to use a soft tooth brush, regular mouth wash and baking soda containing tooth paste. The condition resolved four weeks after cessation of the antibiotic therapy.

  18. Expression of DMP1 in the developing mouse tongue embryo.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hidetaka; Sunohara, Msataka; Sato, Iwao

    2015-07-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP-1) is an important factor in the mineralization of hard tissues. However, it has many other functions in addition to the regulation of mineralized tissues. We analyzed the expression and localization of DMP-1 by immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization in the developing mouse tongue during embryonic days 12.5 (E12.5), E14.5, E17.5, and E18.5. We also detected the mRNA abundance of tongue morphogenesis markers such as FGF6, TGF-β1, Collagen I, osteocalcin, chondromodulin 1, tenomodulin, Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), caspase-3, and Aifm from embryonic stages by real-time RT-PCR. The antisense probe for DMP-1 was detected in a few mesenchymal cells surrounding blood vessels at E12.5, and faint localization was seen at E18.5 in the embryonic mouse tongue by in situ hybridization. The DMP-1 and osteocalcin abundance levels gradually increased compared with the other tongue markers from E12.5 to E18.5 (p<0.001). Cluster analyses identified the following distinct clusters for mRNA abundance in the tongue: cluster 1, E12.5; cluster 2, E14.5 and E17.5; and cluster 3, E18.5. The positive correlation between DMP-1 and osteocalcin (Pearson's r=0.685; p<0.05) and negative correlation between DMP-1 and Caspase-3 (Pearson's r=-0.632; p<0.05) were analyzed. These data suggested that DMP-1 potentially influences osteocalcin and Caspase-3 during mouse tongue development and morphogenesis. DMP-1 also affects the angiogenic marker VEGF in specific stages and areas, terminating the differentiation of the tongue from other developing tissues. We conclude that DMP-1 may be involved in regulating the temporal expression at embryonic stages in the mouse tongue.

  19. Successful treatment of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the rectum with radiation therapy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Foo, Marcus; Chao, Michael W T; Gibbs, Peter; Guiney, Michael; Jacobs, Rodney

    2008-11-01

    We report a case of Stage IE mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma arising in the rectum, which was successfully treated with radiotherapy. A 60-year-old man had several months of altered bowel habit with rectal bleeding and was found to have a large rectal tumor with no evidence of distant spread. Histologic studies showed this to be a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The patient received 45 Gy in 25 fractions with external beam radiotherapy during 5 weeks. The treatment was well tolerated and review at 41 months revealed no evidence of recurrence.

  20. Passive wireless tags for tongue controlled assistive technology interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rakibet, Osman O; Horne, Robert J; Kelly, Stephen W; Batchelor, John C

    2016-03-01

    Tongue control with low profile, passive mouth tags is demonstrated as a human-device interface by communicating values of tongue-tag separation over a wireless link. Confusion matrices are provided to demonstrate user accuracy in targeting by tongue position. Accuracy is found to increase dramatically after short training sequences with errors falling close to 1% in magnitude with zero missed targets. The rate at which users are able to learn accurate targeting with high accuracy indicates that this is an intuitive device to operate. The significance of the work is that innovative very unobtrusive, wireless tags can be used to provide intuitive human-computer interfaces based on low cost and disposable mouth mounted technology. With the development of an appropriate reading system, control of assistive devices such as computer mice or wheelchairs could be possible for tetraplegics and others who retain fine motor control capability of their tongues. The tags contain no battery and are intended to fit directly on the hard palate, detecting tongue position in the mouth with no need for tongue piercings.

  1. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown.

  2. Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Jaffe, Debra M.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Finnegan, Eileen M.; Van Daele, Douglas J.; Luschei, Erich S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tongue-to-palate pressure and the electromyography (EMG) measured from the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, medial pterygoid, velum, genioglossus, and intrinsic tongue muscles. Methods: Seven healthy adults performed tongue-to-palate pressure…

  3. Products used on female genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Farage, Miranda A; Lennon, Lisa; Ajayi, Funmi

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of products are used by women in the genital area and, therefore, come into contact with the genital mucosa. The largest category of such products would be those used for cleanliness and odor control, such as soaps and body washes, douches, premoistened wipes and towelettes, dusting powder and deodorant sprays. A second large category of products are those intended to absorb fluids, such as products used for menstrual protection (tampons, pads and panty liners) and incontinence protection. Lubricants and moisturizers, and aesthetic products (hair removal products and dyes) are also fairly common. In addition, over the counter medications are now available for the treatment of fungal infections. This chapter briefly discusses the products women use on or around the genital area, the perceived or real benefits, and the potential health effects of these products.

  4. A disguised tuberculosis in oral buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kanwar Deep Singh; Mehta, Anurag; Marwaha, Mohita; Kalra, Manpreet; Nanda, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is a chronic granulomatous disease that can affect any part of the body, including the oral cavity. Oral lesions of tuberculosis, though uncommon, are seen in both the primary and secondary stages of the disease. This article presents a case of tuberculosis of the buccal mucosa, manifesting as non-healing, non-painful ulcer. The diagnosis was confirmed based on histopathology, sputum examination and immunological investigation. The patient underwent anti-tuberculosis therapy and her oral and systemic conditions improved rapidly. Although oral manifestations of tuberculosis are rare, clinicians should include them in the differential diagnosis of various types of oral ulcers. An early diagnosis with prompt treatment can prevent complications and potential contaminations.

  5. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the tongue – clinicopathological study and survival analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Carmona-Luna, Tania; Cano-Valdez, Ana María; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto; Herrera-Gómez, Angel; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica

    2009-01-01

    Background To review the demographic data of a series of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the tongue, as well as to analyze c-kit expression, histopathologic patterns, prognostic factors, evolution, recurrences and/or persistence and survival. Methods Retrospective study from 1986 to 2006, which reviews a database of 68 patients with diagnosis of head and neck ACC. Results We found eight cases of ACC of the tongue (11.7% of all head and neck ACCs). There were 7 female (87.5%) and 1 male (12.5%) patients, with an average age of 51 years (range 33 to 67 years). Seven patients were surgically treated, three of which required adjuvant treatment. Only one female patient did not accept treatment. Average follow-up time was 5.3 years. Metastases developed in 37% of cases during the follow-up period. Histopathologically, the cribriform pattern predominated (6/8 cases). All cases presented perineural invasion, and one patient also presented vascular invasion. c-kit positivity was observed in all cases. Global survival in the seven treated cases was 51% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively, while the disease-free period was of 64% at 3 years and 42% at 10 years. Conclusion ACC of the tongue is a rare neoplasm, in which early diagnosis is important because these are slowly-growing tumors that produce diffuse invasion. As the role of c-kit could not be assesed in this series, surgery continues to be the cornerstone of treatment and radiotherapy is indicated when surgical margins are compromised. Metastatic disease is still hard to handle because of the lack of adequate therapies for these tumors. Hence, survival has not changed in the last years. PMID:19480697

  6. Cysteamine-induced inhibition of acid neutralization and the increase in hydrogen ion back-diffusion in duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, K.; Okada, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Inoue, M.; Miyoshi, A.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate the possible impairment of defensive mechanisms in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulceration, the effect of cysteamine on the neutralization of acid by the duodenum and the back-diffusion of hydrogen ions into the duodenal mucosa has been studied. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The intraduodenal pH started to decrease between 3 and 4 hr after cysteamine injection. (2) By perfusion of the duodenal loop excluding the opening of bile and pancreatic ducts, the amount of hydrogen ions (H+) neutralized was found to be significantly lower in cysteamine-treated animals than in the controls. (3) the back-diffusion of luminal H+ into the duodenal mucosa, estimated by measuring the H+ disappearance from the test solution including 100 mM HCl, was significantly increased by cysteamine. From these findings, it has been concluded that cysteamine reduces the resistance of duodenal mucosa to acid coming from the stomach.

  7. Potential applications of oral brush cytology with liquid-based technology: results from a cohort of normal oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kujan, Omar; Desai, Mina; Sargent, Alexandra; Bailey, Andrew; Turner, Andrew; Sloan, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Fifty healthy volunteers were studied to assess the potential applications of oral brush sampling using liquid-based cytology. Three specimens from the buccal mucosa and lateral border of tongue were collected from each subject by using cervical brushes and brooms. The brush was immersed in a preservative fluid. The sample in the preservative fluid was processed according to the manufacturer's directions (SurePath, UK). Slides were stained by the Papanicolaou method and assessed for squamous cell adequacy by the same criteria used for cervical cytology screening. Immunocytochemical staining for FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad) was applied in liquid-based preparations following the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method. Human papillomavirus (HPV) detection was performed using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay (Digene) and the PCR-based Roche AMPLICOR HPV Test. LBC preparation slides showed good sample preservation, specimen adequacy and visualization of cell morphology. Interestingly, nine cases showed borderline cytological abnormalities from apparently normal oral mucosa. All cases showed good quality positive FHIT immunoreactivity staining. All studied cases were high-risk HPV negative using HC2 assay method. However, the AMPLICOR Roche Test detected four samples with positive results for high-risk HPVs. Liquid-based cytology has potential as a screening tool for oral cancer and precancer. The method may also have applications for research and practice in the field of oral cancer and precancer. However a special custom-designed oral cytobrush is required.

  8. Defining Structure in Tongues of Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, C. M.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Knipp, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    The Utah State University (USU) Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) simulates the high latitude ionosphere for the storm study day of January 14, 1988, based upon inputs of electric field convection patterns using the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) technique. The quasi-steady state development of tongues of ionization (TOIs) emerges in the simulation at the peak of storm time forcing. A three-dimensional analysis of the structure of the TOIs is presented in this paper, with morphological features closely tied to convection pattern traits. An unambiguous bifurcated density pattern develops in the polar cap consisting of two independent TOIs, one related to the dusk convection cell and the other related to the dawn convection cell, with a narrow low density trough between them. This newly predicted feature is given the name Polar Dayside Upward Convecting Trough (Polar DUCT). The structural definition of the TOIs also includes a definite altitude profile along the extent of the high density plasma flowing into the polar cap. The height of the F-layer peak (NmF_2) in the extended TOI first rises dramatically at the point of entry into the cusp/throat region, then drops steadily as plasma approaches the pole. The altitude profiles of the dusk and dawn TOI are independent, with differences due to distinctions in the characteristics of the dawn and dusk convection cells.

  9. Aniseed-induced nocturnal tongue angioedema.

    PubMed

    Gázquez García, V; Gaig Jané, P; Bartolomé Zavala, B

    2007-01-01

    Aniseed is a spice native to the eastern Mediterranean region. Cases of simultaneous hypersensitivity to celery, mugwort pollen, and spices of the Umbelliferae family have been described as the celery-mugwort-spices syndrome. We report a case of aniseed-induced tongue angioedema. Skin prick tests to foods proved positive only to aniseed. Serum-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E determination by enzyme allergosorbent test was 0.4 kU/L to aniseed extract and 0.6 kU/L to tare and cumin seeds. The molecular mass of the IgE-binding proteins studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) immunoblotting revealed a broad IgE-binding band of 12.9-13.7 kd in aniseed and tare extract assays and a broad band of 15-17.5 kd in cumin extract. This is the first case of type I hypersensitivity due to aniseed liqueur ingestion reported. SDS-PAGE immunoblotting study showed a broad specific IgE-binding band of 12.9-13.7 kd when aniseed extract was incubated with the patient's serum; this band might correspond to the protein responsible for the described symptoms.

  10. Functional reconstruction after subtotal glossectomy in the surgical treatment of an uncommon and aggressive neoplasm in this location: Primary malignant melanoma in the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo-de-Zaldívar, Damián; Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; Hernández-Vila, Cristina; Ramírez-Pérez, Francisco-Alejandro; González-Ballester, David; Ruíz-Laza, Luis; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm, especially on the tongue. We report a case of mucosal melanoma at the base of the tongue, an extremely rare location (only about 30 cases have been reported in literature). The extension study doesn´t revealed distant metastatic lesions. The patient was treated by subtotal glossectomy and bilateral functional neck dissection. Tongue is one of the most difficult structures to reconstruct, because of their central role in phonation, swallowing and airway protection. The defect was reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flap. Surgical treatment was supplemented with adjuvant immunotherapy. The post-operative period was uneventful. At present, 24 months after surgery, patient is asymptomatic, there isn´t evidence of recurrence of melanoma and he hasn´t any difficulty in swallowing or phonation. Key words:Malignant mucosal melanoma, anterolateral thigh free flap, phonation, swallowing. PMID:25593674

  11. Reconstruction of nasal tip support in primary, open approach septorhinoplasty : A retrospective analysis between the tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut.

    PubMed

    Karaiskakis, Periklis; Bromba, Michael; Dietz, Andreas; Sand, Michael; Dacho, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The reconstruction of the nasal tip support is one of the most essential issues in septorhinoplasty. A comparison of the results after using the tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut technique was the target of this study. Thirty-three patients who underwent a primary, open approach septorhinoplasty using the above-mentioned techniques were retrospectively analyzed. The gain in tip rotation postoperatively, the sensitivity and the rigidity of the nasal tip and the aesthetic outcome after surgery were examined and evaluated. Both techniques led to an increase in nasal tip rotation postoperatively. The gain in rotation was higher in patients, treated with the tongue-in-groove technique (p = 0.0052). The sensitivity of the tip region in the tongue-in-groove group of patients was significantly lower than that in the columellar strut group of patients (p = 0.0424). Both techniques led to high percentages of tip rigidity after surgery with satisfactory aesthetic results though. The tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut technique are both reliable techniques for reconstructing the nasal tip support and correcting a droopy tip. Although the tongue-in-groove technique might result in a more significant increase in tip rotation, it leads to less sensitivity in the tip region.

  12. Photodynamic detection in visualisation of cutaneous and oral mucosa premalignant and malignant lesions: two clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczyszyn, Kamil; Ziólkowski, Piotr; Osiecka, Beata; Gerber, Hanna; Dziedzic, Magdalena

    2008-11-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is promising method of visualisation of premalignant and malignant lesions. PDD is consisted of two main agents: special chemical compound which is called photosensitizer and light. Photosensitizer has affinity to fast proliferating cells such as pre- or malignant. During light irradiation (with proper wavelength - corresponding to absorption peak of photosensitizer) photosensitizer gains energy and passes into excited singlet state S1. Returning to basic singlet state Sn, leads to fluorescence. Due to difference between concentration of photosensitizer in lesion and normal tissue it is possible to obtain high contrast image of lesion. Case #1: 53 years old woman with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in nasal region; 20% delta-aminolevulinic acid as a precursor of photosensitizer on eucerin base was used. Case #2: 57 years old woman with multifocal oral leukoplakia on cheek mucosa and tongue; 2% chlorophyll gel as photosesitizer was used. All photographs were taken in white light without any filter and in blue and UV light with orange filter: in both cases the total area of the lesions appeared to be larger than it has been clinically observed. Thus, the PDD might be helpful in evaluation of margins of surgical excision of such lesions.

  13. Evaluation of oral mucosa epithelium in type II diabetic patients by an exfoliative cytology method.

    PubMed

    Jajarm, Hassan Hosseinpour; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Rangiani, Afsaneh

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disease that causes chronic hyperglycemia and disturbances in carbohydrate, lipid, and protein metabolism. Although diabetes can cause considerable cellular changes, this field has attracted little research. We therefore decided to evaluate the quantitative and qualitative changes in oral epithelial cells using an exfoliative cytology method. In 30 control individuals and 30 patients with type II diabetes, smears were obtained from two distinct oral sites: the buccal mucosa and tongue dorsum. The oral smears were stained using Papanicolaou solution. Quantitative and qualitative changes were evaluated in each slide. For this purpose, 50 clearly defined cells in each slide were microscopically evaluated, and photographs were subjected to computerized morphometric analysis. Cytoplasmic and nuclear areas in the diabetic group were significantly higher than in the control group. The cytoplasmic/nuclear ratio was lower in the control group. At both smear sites, the proportion of cells with nuclear changes was higher in the diabetic group. Diabetes mellitus can cause alterations in the oral epithelium that are detectable with this exfoliative cytology method. The method may be viable in evaluating this disease.

  14. Exfoliative cytology of the oral mucosa: comparison of two collection methods.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Juliana Brusadin; Lima, Celina Faig; Burim, Rafael Augusto; Brandao, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck; Cabral, Luiz Antonio Guimaraes; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the sampling efficacy of a cytobrush and metal spatula for exfoliative cytology of the oral mucosa. Thirty students with no detectable oral alterations upon clinical examination were submitted to exfoliative cytology of the lateral border of the tongue, using a metal spatula on the left side and a cytobrush on the right side. The smears were stained using the Papanicolaou technique and evaluated for cellularity, cell type, cell distribution, homogeneity, and cellular distortion, as well as the presence of mucus, inflammatory infiltrate, and hemorrhage. A statistical test (Z-test) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) showed a significant difference between the metal spatula and cytobrush in terms of cellularity (p = 0.02) and homogeneity (p = 0.01). No difference between the two methods was observed regarding cell type (p = 0.4, Z-test) or cell distribution for the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.2, Fisher's test). Cell distortion and the presence of mucus were observed in five cases that used the metal spatula and in two cases that used the cytobrush. No hemorrhage or inflammatory infiltrate was detected in any of the slides. Based on the results of this study, the cytobrush produced qualitatively better smears in terms of cellularity and homogeneity compared to the metal spatula.

  15. IL-1 Coordinates the Neutrophil Response to C. albicans in the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Altmeier, Simon; Toska, Albulena; Sparber, Florian; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal infections with Candida albicans belong to the most frequent forms of fungal diseases. Host protection is conferred by cellular immunity; however, the induction of antifungal immunity is not well understood. Using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) we show that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical for fungal control at the onset of infection through its impact on neutrophils at two levels. We demonstrate that both the recruitment of circulating neutrophils to the site of infection and the mobilization of newly generated neutrophils from the bone marrow depended on IL-1R. Consistently, IL-1R-deficient mice displayed impaired chemokine production at the site of infection and defective secretion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the circulation in response to C. albicans. Strikingly, endothelial cells were identified as the primary cellular source of G-CSF during OPC, which responded to IL-1α that was released from keratinocytes in the infected tissue. The IL-1-dependent crosstalk between two different cellular subsets of the nonhematopoietic compartment was confirmed in vitro using a novel murine tongue-derived keratinocyte cell line and an established endothelial cell line. These data establish a new link between IL-1 and granulopoiesis in the context of fungal infection. Together, we identified two complementary mechanisms coordinating the neutrophil response in the oral mucosa, which is critical for preventing fungal growth and dissemination, and thus protects the host from disease. PMID:27632536

  16. [Local complications of lip and tongue piercing -- report of the cases].

    PubMed

    Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Olszewska-Czyz, Iwona; Kantorowicz, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Piercing, which is the form of puncturing parts of the human body and creating openings where jewelry can be worn, is together with tattoos, body drawings or make-up, one of the oldest way of decorating of the human body. Piercing can be performed in each part of the body. In the recent years face piercing (nose, eyebrows, lip region) and in the oral cavity (tongue, lips, cheek, mentolabial sulcus, labial frenulum) is becoming particularly popular. The procedure of piercing itself may potentially lead to serious systemic and local complications. The aim of the study was to present three clinical cases of the patients who referred to the Dental University Clinic in Krakow for the treatment of lesions on the oral mucosa after piercing. Clinicians who examine patients with such body decorations should pay particular attention to the sites which can be injured by the jewelry. Medical staff should also make patients realize the risk of general complications after piercing. This will allow on the early removal of the jewelry and prevention of possible complications.

  17. Role of MRI in Evaluation of Malignant Lesions of Tongue and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amandeep; Thukral, Chuni Lal; Gupta, Kamlesh; Sood, Arvinder Singh; Singla, Hanish; Singh, Kunwarpal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of MRI in staging of malignant lesions of the oral cavity and to correlate MRI findings with clinical/surgical and anatomical-pathological findings, wherever possible. Material/Methods The study included 50 patients who presented with malignant lesions of the oral cavity and were referred to radiology departments for MRI. All patients included were subjected to a detailed physical examination following which MRI was carried out on Philips Gyroscan Achieva 1.5 Tesla unit. Results In the study, the highest number of patients were found to have tongue malignancy (82%) followed by buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus malignancy (18%). The highest number of patients was in the age group of 51–60 years (32%). The incidence was higher in males (96%). There was moderate agreement (k=0.537) for T stage between the clinical and MRI staging assessments. The agreement for N stage between clinical and MRI staging assessments was fair (k=0.328). The final diagnosis was made by histopathology in 22 patients. The agreement for T stage was good/substantial (k=0.790) and for N stage was moderate (k=0.458) between MRI and histopathology staging assessments. Conclusions MRI provides satisfactory accuracy for preoperative estimation of tumor thickness and predicting occult cervical nodal metastasis. MRI is the preferred modality in evaluation and staging of oral cavity malignancy which helps a clinician for planning of treatment. PMID:28289481

  18. Osteogenic cell fractions isolated from mouse tongue muscle.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Harada, Toyoko; Ferdous, Tarannum; Takenawa, Takanori; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2015-07-01

    The use of stem cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of bone defects. However, successful treatments rely upon the availability of cells that are easily obtained and that appropriately differentiate into osteoblasts. The tongue potentially represents a source of autologous cells for such purposes. In the present study, the ability of stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) positive cells derived from tongue muscle to differentiate into osteoblasts was investigated. The tongue muscles were excised from Jcl-ICR mice and tongue muscle-derived Sca-1-positive cells (TDSCs) were isolated from the tongue muscle using a magnetic cell separation system with microbeads. TDSCs were cultured in plastic dishes or gelatin sponges of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) with bone differentiation-inducing medium. The expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, fibronectin, osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin) was investigated in cultured TDSCs by western blot analysis. The formation of mineralized matrices was examined using alizarin red S and Von Kossa staining. Bone formation was investigated in cultured TDSCs by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. In the present study, the expression of Sca-1 in mouse tongue muscle was demonstrated and TDSCs were isolated at high purity. TDSCs differentiated into cells of osteoblast lineage, as demonstrated by the upregulation of osteoblastic marker expression. The formation of mineralized matrices was confirmed by alizarin red S or Von Kossa staining in vitro. Bone formation was observed in the gelatin sponges of β-TCP, which were subsequently implanted under the skin of the backs of nude mice. These results suggested that TDSCs retain their osteogenic differentiation potential and therefore the tongue muscle may be used as a source of stem cells for bone regeneration.

  19. Living in limbo: Being diagnosed with oral tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Philiponis, Genevieve; Malloy, Kelly M.; Kagan, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Oral tongue cancer presents clinical challenges to effective diagnosis that affect patient experience. Patient experience of the diagnostic process is poorly described, making opportunities for nursing intervention unclear. Methods: We qualitatively describe, using constant comparative analysis, oral tongue cancer diagnosis using data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Using constant comparative analysis — in keeping with the methodology of the main study — we analyzed 16 survivor interviews for themes explaining the patient experience of oral tongue cancer diagnosis. Results: We termed the broader diagnostic process “living in limbo.” This process includes the themes describing the peri-diagnostic process itself — “self-detected lesion,” “lack of concern,” “seeking help,” “not a straightforward diagnosis,” and “hearing the diagnosis.” Entry into treatment concludes “Living in Limbo” and is described by the theme “worry and trust.” Conclusions: Our findings are limited by retrospective interviews and participant homogeneity among other features. Future research with prospective designs and diverse groups of people at risk for and diagnosed with oral tongue cancer, as well as targeting those who have had negative biopsies with no eventual diagnosis of oral tongue cancer, will build on our findings. Further, study of patient experience in other sociocultural context and healthcare systems is needed to inform nursing science and practice. Finally, “living in limbo” suggests that clinician and public education about oral tongue cancer diagnosis is needed. PMID:27981120

  20. Evolution of the structure and function of the vertebrate tongue

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Studies of the comparative morphology of the tongues of living vertebrates have revealed how variations in the morphology and function of the organ might be related to evolutional events. The tongue, which plays a very important role in food intake by vertebrates, exhibits significant morphological variations that appear to represent adaptation to the current environmental conditions of each respective habitat. This review examines the fundamental importance of morphology in the evolution of the vertebrate tongue, focusing on the origin of the tongue and on the relationship between morphology and environmental conditions. Tongues of various extant vertebrates, including those of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, were analysed in terms of gross anatomy and microanatomy by light microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Comparisons of tongue morphology revealed a relationship between changes in the appearance of the tongue and changes in habitat, from a freshwater environment to a terrestrial environment, as well as a relationship between the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium and the transition from a moist or wet environment to a dry environment. The lingual epithelium of amphibians is devoid of keratinization while that of reptilians is keratinized to different extents. Reptiles live in a variety of habitats, from seawater to regions of high temperature and very high or very low humidity. Keratinization of the lingual epithelium is considered to have been acquired concomitantly with the evolution of amniotes. The variations in the extent of keratinization of the lingual epithelium, which is observed between various amniotes, appear to be secondary, reflecting the environmental conditions of different species. PMID:12171472

  1. Properties of Magnetic Tongues over a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; Démoulin, Pascal; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.

    2016-08-01

    The photospheric spatial distribution of the main magnetic polarities of bipolar active regions (ARs) present during their emergence deformations are known as magnetic tongues. They are attributed to the presence of twist in the toroidal magnetic-flux tubes that form the ARs. The aim of this article is to study the twist of newly emerged ARs from the evolution of magnetic tongues observed in photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. We apply the procedure described by Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015a) to ARs observed over the full Solar Cycle 23 and the beginning of Cycle 24. Our results show that the hemispherical rule obtained using the tongues as a proxy of the twist has a weak sign dominance (53 % in the southern hemisphere and 58 % in the northern hemisphere). By defining the variation of the tongue angle, we characterize the strength of the magnetic tongues during different phases of the AR emergence. We find that there is a tendency of the tongues to be stronger during the beginning of the emergence and to become weaker as the AR reaches its maximum magnetic flux. We compare this evolution with the emergence of a toroidal flux-rope model with non-uniform twist. The variety of evolution of the tongues in the analyzed ARs can only be reproduced when using a broad range of twist profiles, in particular having a large variety of twist gradients in the direction vertical to the photosphere. Although the analytical model used is a special case, selected to minimize the complexity of the problem, the results obtained set new observational constraints to theoretical models of flux-rope emergence that form bipolar ARs.

  2. [Methodological study on digitalization of tongue image in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Yang, Jie; Shen, Li

    2004-12-01

    This is a research aimed at proposing a computerized tongue analysis method based on computerized image processing for quantizing the tongue properties in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis. The chromatic algorithm and 2-D Gabor wavelet transformation are applied to segmenting tongue from original image. The statistical method is adopted in identifying the colors of each pixel, which are attributed to the tongue substance and coating respectively. Thickness of tongue coating is determined by energy of 2-D Gabor wavelet coefficients (GWTE). The distribution of GWTE and invariant moment algorithm are used to judge the tongue texture. The experiment result shows that all methods proposed in this paper are effective.

  3. Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue as a rare complication of cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Hulstaert, E; Roggeman, E; Beeckman, A-S; Moerman, M; Vanderstraeten, E; Rasquin, K; Monsaert, E; Baert, D; Dewint, P; Burvenich, P; Van Steenkiste, C

    2015-12-01

    Ischaemic necrosis of the tongue is an unusual clinical finding. In most cases it is associated with vasculitis, particularly giant cell arteritis (GCA). Other causes include profound cardiogenic shock. We report a case of tongue necrosis in an 81-year-old Caucasian woman. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for cardiogenic shock. Swelling of the tongue was reported before intubation and evolved into tongue ischaemia and necrosis of the tip of the tongue. After surgical debridement the patient recovered. To our knowledge, this is the second report of a patient surviving tongue necrosis resulting from cardiogenic shock.

  4. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  5. Effects of Change in Tongue Pressure and Salivary Flow Rate on Swallow Efficiency Following Chemoradiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M.; Larson, Charles; Mittal, Bharat B; Pierce, Marge; Zecker, Steven; Kennelty, Korey; Kind, Amy; Connor, Nadine P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer frequently develop dysphagia. Tissue damage to the oral tongue causing weakness and decreases in saliva production may contribute to dysphagia. Yet, effects of these variables on swallowing-related measures are unclear. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine effects of chemoradiation on tongue pressures, as a surrogate for strength, and salivary flow rates and (2) to elucidate relationships among tongue pressures, saliva production, and swallowing efficiency by bolus type. Methods and Materials 21 patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation were assessed before and after treatment and matched with 21 healthy control participants who did not receive chemoradiation. Each participant was given a questionnaire to rate dysphagia symptoms. Videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing was used to determine swallowing efficiency; the Saxon test measured salivary flow rate; and the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) was used for oral tongue maximum and endurance measures. Results Results revealed significantly lower tongue endurance measures for patients post-treatment as compared to controls (p=.012). Salivary flow rates also were lower compared to pre-treatment (p=.000) and controls (p=.000). Simple linear regression analyses showed that change in salivary flow rate was predictive of change in swallow efficiency measures from pre- to post-treatment for 1mL thin liquid (p=.017), 3mL nectar-thick liquid (p=.026), and 3mL standard barium pudding (p=.011) boluses. Conclusions Based on these findings, it appears that chemoradiation treatment affects tongue endurance and salivary flow rate and these changes may impact swallow efficiency. These factors should be considered when planning treatment for dysphagia. PMID:27492408

  6. Upregulated Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Receptors in Mucosae of Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Patients with a History of Alcohol Consumption or Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Kusumoto, Junya; Takeda, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Takumi; Akashi, Masaya; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Terashi, Hiroto; Komori, Takahide

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Transient receptor potential cation channel (subfamily V, members 1–4) (TRPV1–4) are expressed in skin and neurons and activated by external stimuli in normal mucosae of all oral cavity sites. The oral cavity is exposed to various stimuli, including temperature, mechanical stimuli, chemical substances, and changes in pH, and, notably, the risk factors for oncogenic transformation in oral squamous epithelium are the same as the external stimuli received by TRPV1–4 receptors. Hence, we examined the relationship between oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and TRPV1–4 expression. Materials and Methods Oral SCC patients (n = 37) who underwent surgical resection were included in this study. We investigated the expression of TRPV1–4 by immunohistochemical staining and quantification of TRPV1–4 mRNA in human oral mucosa. In addition, we compared the TRPV1–4 levels in mucosa from patients with SCC to those in normal oral mucosa. Results The receptors were expressed in oral mucosa at all sites (tongue, buccal mucosa, gingiva, and oral floor) and the expression was stronger in epithelia from patients with SCC than in normal epithelia. Furthermore, alcohol consumption and tobacco use were strongly associated with the occurrence of oral cancer and were found to have a remarkable influence on TRPV1–4 receptor expression in normal oral mucosa. In particular, patients with a history of alcohol consumption demonstrated significantly higher expression levels. Conclusion Various external stimuli may influence the behavior of cancer cells. Overexpression of TRPV1-4 is likely to be a factor in enhanced sensitivity to external stimuli. These findings could contribute to the establishment of novel strategies for cancer therapy or prevention. PMID:28081185

  7. Diagnosis and indications for low-intensity laser therapy of the pathology of the oral cavity mucosa of patients with hematologic and gastroenteric diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Minakov, E. V.; Sutscenko, A. V.; Vornovsky, V. A.; Dunaeva, S. V.; Stepanov, Nicolay N.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.

    1996-11-01

    In the recent years low intensity laser irradiation is made use of in stomatology with the view of treating numerous diseases of the oral cavity mucosa and parodontium. The oral cavity mucosa lesions caused by the internal organs diseases, especially those of blood and the gastroenteric tract, constitute a particular group. Such diseases are usually manifested by an inflammation, erosions, ulcers, hemorrhages. An abundant microflora of the oral cavity and diminished immunity of the patients contribute to the possibility of septicaemia development. Laser therapy of the oral cavity mucosa lesions according to strictly defined indications promotes rapid healing of ulcers, arresting the oral cavity mucosa inflammation, providing a reduction in bleeding and presents a safe prophylactic means of stomatogenic sepsis.

  8. Policy and experiment in mother tongue literacy in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinnaso, F. Niyi

    1993-07-01

    The advocacy for initial mother tongue literacy in elementary schools and in adult education has been intensified within the past three decades, reflecting new attitudes to cultural diversity, especially to multilingual and multicultural education. This paper assesses the efforts made in one country, Nigeria, to achieve mother tongue literacy for its citizens, through a comparative analysis of the national policy on mother tongue literacy and the Ife experimental project, whose major purpose was to test the effectiveness of the use of the mother tongue as a medium of instruction throughout the six years of primary education. Although, like the Ife project, many experimental projects on mother tongue literacy in other countries are shown to have succeeded in realizing their objectives, the findings highlight the mediating effects of several non-linguistic variables. The findings indicate that its use as the medium of instruction in schools cannot compensate for the deficiencies in the educational system, particularly poor quality instructional facilities, or the social barriers in the wider society which prevent certain groups of minority children from learning well in school. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Morphometric growth relationships of the immature human mandible and tongue.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Erin F; Kieser, Jules A; Kramer, Beverley

    2014-06-01

    The masticatory apparatus is a highly adaptive musculoskeletal complex comprising several relatively independent structural components, which assist in functions including feeding and breathing. We hypothesized that the tongue is elemental in the maintenance of normal ontogeny of the mandible and in its post-natal growth and development, and tested this using a morphometric approach. We assessed tongue and mandibular measurements in 174 (97 male) human cadavers. Landmark lingual and mandibular data were gathered individuals aged between 20 gestational weeks and 3 yr postnatal. In this analysis, geometric morphometrics assisted in visualizing the morphometrical growth changes in the mandible and tongue. A linear correlation in conjunction with principal component analysis further visualized the growth relationship between these structures. We found that the growth of the tongue and mandible were intrinsically linked in size and shape between 20 gestational weeks and 24 months postnatal. However, the mandible continued to change in shape and size into the 3rd yr of life, whereas the tongue only increased in size over this same period of time. These findings provide valuable insights into the allometric growth relationship between these structures, potentially assisting the clinician in predicting the behaviour of these structures in the assessment of malocclusions.

  10. Pleomorphic adenoma of the tongue base: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Vilela, Thais Gonçalves Pinheiro

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Pleomorphic adenoma, also known as mixed tumor, is the most common benign tumor of the major and minor salivary glands. The occurrence of pleomorphic adenoma of the tongue base is very rare, and very few cases have been reported in the literature. Objective The authors present a rare case of pleomorphic adenoma of the tongue base and a review of the literature. Case Report A 55-year-old woman had an extensive cervical mass, with little pain, from the submental level to the level below the hyoid bone. Fiberoptic endoscopic examination showed an extensive mass at the base of the tongue with considerable reduction in the airway. Magnetic resonance image scan revealed a contrast-enhancing mass of heterogeneous density over the base of the tongue of 8 × 8 × 7 cm and a reduction of the hypopharyngeal airway. Biopsy of the lesion was performed along with a tracheostomy due to the bulging tongue base and acute respiratory failure. Histologic examination with an immunohistochemistry study revealed a diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma. The excision of the tumor was performed by a lateral pharyngotomy approach and the total mass was excised. Conclusion The authors consider the rarity of this case and show that this is the 11th and the largest pleomorphic adenoma reported in the English-language medical literature.

  11. Automatic extraction and tracking of the tongue contours.

    PubMed

    Akgul, Y S; Kambhamettu, C; Stone, M

    1999-10-01

    Computerized analysis of the tongue surface movement can provide valuable information to speech and swallowing research. Ultrasound technology is currently the most attractive modality for the tongue imaging mainly because of its high video frame rate. However, problems with ultrasound imaging, such as noise and echo artifacts, refractions, and unrelated reflections pose significant challenges for computer analysis of the tongue images and hence specific methods must be developed. This paper presents a system that is developed for automatic extraction and tracking of the tongue surface movements from ultrasound image sequences. The ultrasound images are supplied by the head and transducer support system (HATS), which was developed in order to fix the head and support the transducer under the chin in a known position without disturbing speech. In this work, we propose a novel scheme for the analysis of the tongue images using deformable contours. We incorporate novel mechanisms to 1) impose speech related constraints on the deformations; 2) perform spatiotemporal smoothing using a contour postprocessing stage; 3) utilize optical flow techniques to speed up the search process; and 4) propagate user supplied information to the analysis of all image frames. We tested the system's performance qualitatively and quantitatively in consultation with speech scientists. Our system produced contours that are within the range of manual measurement variations. The results of our system are extremely encouraging and the system can be used in practical speech and swallowing research in the field of otolaryngology.

  12. Changes in normal speech after fatiguing the tongue.

    PubMed

    Solomon, N P

    2000-12-01

    Detrimental effects of tongue fatigue on speech have been assumed to exist based on neuromotor speech disorders. However, to address whether fatigue is a contributing cause to impaired speech requires an experimental protocol with an uncomplicated population. This study induced tongue fatigue in eight neurologically normal persons and examined changes in speech perceptually and acoustically. The fatigue task consisted of repeated cycles of 6 s of sustained maximum voluntary contraction and 4 s of rest until 50% of maximum strength could not be achieved for three consecutive cycles. Participants then produced speech that was weighted heavily with lingual-palatal consonants. Perceptual analyses of the speech revealed a statistically significant deleterious effect of induced tongue fatigue on speech precision and an incomplete reversal of this effect after a recovery period. Acoustically, the first and third spectral moments (mean and skewness) of the spectral energy for /see text/, /see text/, and /see text/ differed significantly after fatigue but in directions opposite to a priori predictions. Tendencies were found for decreased stop-closure duration and increased voice onset time for /see text/ after fatigue. Supplemental analyses revealed decreased second formant (F2) frequency for /see text/ and /see text/ and flattened F2 transition for the diphthong /see text/ after fatigue. These results indicate disruption of tongue positioning and transitioning for lingual-palatal consonants during speech after prolonged strenuous tongue exercises.

  13. Solitary Encapsulated Neurofibroma Not Associated with Neurofibromatosis-1 Affecting Tongue in a 73-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Sk. Abdul; Chattaraj, Moumita; Gayen, Swagata

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromas are benign tumors of nerve cell origin arising due to proliferation of Schwann cells and fibroblasts. They are usually asymptomatic and hence remain undiagnosed. They are commonly found on the skin and intraorally tongue is the most common site for their occurrence. Here, we present a unique case of solitary encapsulated neurofibroma in the oral cavity without any clinical manifestations or family history of Neurofibromatosis type 1 in a 73-year-old female patient who presented with a painless swelling on the tongue. The histopathologic findings closely mimicked benign fibrous histiocytoma. In our case, definitive diagnosis of neurofibroma was made based on clinical findings, family history, and histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Through this case report we want to emphasize the role of biopsy and immunohistochemistry in arriving at a confirmatory diagnosis. The patient was treated by surgical excision and showed no signs of recurrence over a follow-up period of 12 months. PMID:27525129

  14. Building sensory receptors on the tongue.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Bruce; Witt, Martin

    2004-12-01

    Neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors and sensory neurons are required for the development of lingual sense organs. For example, neurotrophin 3 sustains lingual somatosensory neurons. In the traditional view, sensory axons will terminate where neurotrophin expression is most pronounced. Yet, lingual somatosensory axons characteristically terminate in each filiform papilla and in each somatosensory prominence within a cluster of cells expressing the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), rather than terminating among the adjacent cells that secrete neurotrophin 3. The p75NTR on special specialized clusters of epithelial cells may promote axonal arborization in vivo since its over-expression by fibroblasts enhances neurite outgrowth from overlying somatosensory neurons in vitro. Two classical observations have implicated gustatory neurons in the development and maintenance of mammalian taste buds--the early arrival times of embryonic innervation and the loss of taste buds after their denervation in adults. In the modern era more than a dozen experimental studies have used early denervation or neurotrophin gene mutations to evaluate mammalian gustatory organ development. Necessary for taste organ development, brain-derived neurotrophic factor sustains developing gustatory neurons. The cardinal conclusion is readily summarized: taste buds in the palate and tongue are induced by innervation. Taste buds are unstable: the death and birth of taste receptor cells relentlessly remodels synaptic connections. As receptor cells turn over, the sensory code for taste quality is probably stabilized by selective synapse formation between each type of gustatory axon and its matching taste receptor cell. We anticipate important new discoveries of molecular interactions among the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and gustatory innervation that build the gustatory papillae, their specialized epithelial cells, and the resulting taste buds.

  15. Influence of microcystin-LR on the activity of membrane enzymes in rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Moreno, I M; Mate, A; Repetto, G; Vázquez, C M; Cameán, A M

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of microcystin-LR (MCLR) on the activity of membrane enzymes from intestinal mucosa. In addition, serum chemistry and peroxidative status of both serum and intestinal homogenate were evaluated after treatment with MCLR. Wistar rats were treated with intraperitoneal injection of either 100 microg pure MCLR/Kg body weight or saline solution. A significant increase in liver weight and altered serum enzyme activities were found in MCLR-treated rats, indicating damage to the liver in these rats, as previously suggested. A higher specific activity of sucrase (1.5-fold) was observed after the administration of MCLR, whereas other intestinal apical membrane enzymes, such as lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase were not modified by the treatment. The specific activities of acid phosphatase and succinate dehydrogenase, markers for lysosomal and mitochondrial membranes, respectively, were also increased (32% and 60%, respectively) in treated rats. The analysis of lipid peroxidation showed that the peroxidative status was increased in both serum and intestinal mucosa from MCLR-treated rats, reflecting an excess production of oxygen free radicals induced by this cyanobacterial toxin. In conclusion, this study shows that acute exposure to MCLR affects the intestinal physiology by modifying the intestinal peroxidation status as well as the activity of membrane enzymes.

  16. Microvasculature of the gastric mucosa in dogs.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alguacil, N; Gaspar-Simón, I; Martín, R; Gomez-García, J; Martín-Orti, R

    1997-01-01

    A corrosion casting technique was used to study differences in the microvascular architecture of the pars cardiaca, the fundus ventriculi, the corpus ventriculi and the pars pylorica of the canine gastric mucosa. This technique revealed an unusual arrangement of the microvascular architecture in the nonglandular region surrounding the esophageal opening. Capillaries run tortuously along the mucosal surface parallel to the long axis of the esophagus, and some capillaries form a polygonal network that extends around the seromucous glands. In contrast, the mucosal capillaries of the glandular regions of the stomach are arranged in a symmetric pattern associated with the gastric glands. There are also differences in the mucosal microvessels of the cardiac and fundic areas compared to the corpus and the antrum. In the cardiac and fundic regions, a sparse microvascular pattern was observed and fewer capillaries drained into a single venule. However, the vessels surrounding the gastric glands in the corpus and antral areas drained into venules perpendicular to the hexagonal arrangement of the capillaries.

  17. Cell volume regulation in goldfish intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Groot, J A

    1981-11-01

    1. Ion and water content of goldfish intestinal mucosa, stripped free from muscular layers were measured under various incubation conditions. 2. Ouabain induces an increase in cation content that is electrically compensated for by chloride. The increase in solute content is accompanied by an increase in water content. 3. When extracellular chloride is partially replaced by sulphate, ouabain does induce cell shrinkage. 4. Anoxia induces a rapid increase in cell volume that is restored by oxygenation of the incubation solution. Ouabain prevents the restoration of volume. 5. It is concluded that the classical ouabain-sensitive Na/K pump participates in the maintenance of cellular volume. We suggest that the constancy in volume after ouabain poisoning as is reported for many tissues might be due to a low chloride conductance of its membranes. 6. Anisotonic media (range: 0.6-1.2 isotonicity), made by variation on mannitol concentration, induce changes in cell water content that deviates from the simplified van't Hoff equation by about 10%. No change in water content after the initial increase was found. 7. We conclude that goldfish enterocytes do not possess a mechanism for rapid volume readjustment.

  18. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  19. Microstructure imaging of human rectal mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.; Zhuo, S. M.; Zheng, L. Q.; Jiang, X. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has high resolution and sensitivity. In this study, MPM was used to image microstructure of human rectal mucosa. The morphology and distribution of the main components in mucosa layer, absorptive cells and goblet cells in the epithelium, abundant intestinal glands in the lamina propria and smooth muscle fibers in the muscularis mucosa were clearly monitored. The variations of these components were tightly relevant to the pathology in gastrointestine system, especially early rectal cancer. The obtained images will be helpful for the diagnosis of early colorectal cancer.

  20. PIXE analysis of elements in gastric cancer and adjacent mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qixin; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Lingnuo; Xu, Yongling; Ye, Simao

    1990-04-01

    The elemental regional distributions in 20 resected human stomach tissues were obtained using PIXE analysis. The samples were pathologically divided into four types: normal, adjacent mucosa A, adjacent mucosa B and cancer. The targets for PIXE analysis were prepared by wet digestion with a pressure bomb system. P, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se were measured and statistically analysed. We found significantly higher concentrations of P, K, Cu, Zn and a higher ratio of Cu compared to Zn in cancer tissue as compared with normal tissue, but statistically no significant difference between adjacent mucosa and cancer tissue was found.

  1. Collagen fibril arrangement and size distribution in monkey oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    OTTANI, V.; FRANCHI, M.; DE PASQUALE, V.; LEONARDI, L.; MOROCUTTI, M.; RUGGERI, A.

    1998-01-01

    Collagen fibre organisation and fibril size were studied in the buccal gingival and hard palate mucosa of Macacus rhesus monkey. Light and electron microscopy analysis showed connective papillae exhibiting a similar inner structure in the different areas examined, but varying in distribution, shape and size. Moving from the deep to surface layers of the buccal gingival mucosa (free and attached portions), large collagen fibril bundles became smaller and progressively more wavy with decreasing collagen fibril diameter. This gradual diameter decrease did not occur in the hard palate mucosa (free portion, rugae and interrugal regions) where the fibril diameter remained constant. A link between collagen fibril diameter and mechanical function is discussed. PMID:9688498

  2. Comparison of fiber delivered CO2 laser and electrocautery in transoral robot assisted tongue base surgery.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Murat; Gün, Taylan; Temelkuran, Burak; Aynacı, Engin; Kaya, Cem; Tekin, Ahmet Mahmut

    2017-02-11

    To compare intra-operative and post-operative effectiveness of fiber delivered CO2 laser to monopolar electrocautery in robot assisted tongue base surgery. Prospective non-randomized clinical study. Twenty moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, non-compliant with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), underwent Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) using the Da Vinci surgical robot in our University Hospital. OSA was treated with monopolar electrocautery in 10 patients, and with flexible CO2 laser fiber in another 10 patients. The following parameters in the two sets are analyzed: Intraoperative bleeding that required cauterization, robot operating time, need for tracheotomy, postoperative self-limiting bleeding, length of hospitalization, duration until start of oral intake, pre-operative and post-operative minimum arterial oxygen saturation, pre-operative and post-operative Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, postoperative airway complication and postoperative pain. Mean follow-up was 12 months. None of the patients required tracheotomy and there were no intraoperative complications related to the use of the robot or the CO2 laser. The use of CO2 laser in TORS-assisted tongue base surgery resulted in less intraoperative bleeding that required cauterization, shorter robot operating time, shorter length of hospitalization, shorter duration until start of oral intake and less postoperative pain, when compared to electrocautery. Postoperative apnea-hypopnea index scores showed better efficacy of CO2 laser than electrocautery. Comparison of postoperative airway complication rates and Epworth sleepiness scale scores were found to be statistically insignificant between the two groups. The use of CO2 laser in robot assisted tongue base surgery has various intraoperative and post-operative advantages when compared to monopolar electrocautery.

  3. Cytoprotective activity of deboxamet: a possible interference with prostaglandin and prostacyclin metabolism in rat gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Franzone, J S; Cirillo, R; Cravanzola, C

    1988-01-01

    Deboxamet (5-methoxy-2-methyl-3-indolyl-acetohydroxamic acid) is a new synthetic drug with anti-ulcer and anti-secretory activity. The authors evaluated the ability of deboxamet to protect the rat gastric mucosa against the intensive necroses induced experimentally by absolute ethanol, NaCl (25%), HCl (0.6 N), acetylsalicylic acid plus HCl, and sodium taurocholate plus HCl. Deboxamet, as compared with pirenzepine, sulglycotide and PGE2, displayed a cytoprotective activity against these necrotizing agents. The involvement of deboxamet with prostacyclin metabolism was also investigated. In order to assess the presence of PGI2-like substances, extracts of mucosa from rats treated orally with deboxamet and sulglycotide were assayed i) on isolated rabbit mesenteric artery, ii) for hypotensive effect in anaesthetized rat, and iii) for anti-platelet activity. Deboxamet, like sulglycotide, was able to raise the availability of prostacyclins in the rat gastric mucosa, which is an important action in maintaining its cellular integrity. However, our results cannot determine whether this activity is due to an enhanced biosynthesis or a decreased degradation of prostacyclins.

  4. Carvedilol-loaded nanocapsules: Mucoadhesive properties and permeability across the sublingual mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Paula Dos Santos; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Frank, Luiza Abrahão; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2017-05-01

    Carvedilol is a drug used to treat heart failure, hypertension, and coronary artery diseases . However, it has low oral bioavailability (25-35%) due to its high first-pass hepatic metabolism. The objective of this study was to develop carvedilol-loaded mucoadhesive nanocapsules as delivery systems for the sublingual administration of the drug. Nanocapsules were prepared using poly(ε-caprolactone) (CAR-LNC) and Eudragit® RS 100 (CAR-NC) as polymeric wall. In vitro interaction of formulations with mucin was performed to predict their mucoadhesion capacity. The permeability and washability profiles of carvedilol were evaluated using porcine sublingual mucosa. The mean diameter of particles in formulations was in the nanometric range, and particles had low polydispersity and slightly acidic pH. Zeta potential values were positive for CAR-NC and negative for CAR-LNC. Encapsulation efficiency was higher than 87% and 99% for CAR-NC and CAR-LNC, respectively. Both formulations presented controlled drug release profiles and mucoadhesive properties. Carvedilol was able to permeate through the sublingual mucosa. Nanoencapsulation improved retention time on the mucosa and permeation in presence of simulated salivary flux. This study highlighted the suitability of using CAR-loaded nanocapsules in the development of innovative sublingual dosage forms.

  5. Frogs use a viscoelastic tongue and non-Newtonian saliva to catch prey.

    PubMed

    Noel, Alexis C; Guo, Hao-Yuan; Mandica, Mark; Hu, David L

    2017-02-01

    Frogs can capture insects, mice and even birds using only their tongue, with a speed and versatility unmatched in the world of synthetic materials. How can the frog tongue be so sticky? In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we perform a series of high-speed films, material tests on the tongue, and rheological tests of the frog saliva. We show that the tongue's unique stickiness results from a combination of a soft, viscoelastic tongue coupled with non-Newtonian saliva. The tongue acts like a car's shock absorber during insect capture, absorbing energy and so preventing separation from the insect. The shear-thinning saliva spreads over the insect during impact, grips it firmly during tongue retraction, and slides off during swallowing. This combination of properties gives the tongue 50 times greater work of adhesion than known synthetic polymer materials such as the sticky-hand toy. These principles may inspire the design of reversible adhesives for high-speed application.

  6. 76 FR 5649 - Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.-Construction and Operation-Western Alignment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Tongue River Railroad Company, Inc.--Construction and Operation-- Western... Tongue River Railroad Company's (TRRC) application to construct and operate a rail line in...

  7. Impact of self-tongue brushing on taste perception in Thai older adults: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Madiloggovit, Jirakate; Chotechuang, Nattida; Trachootham, Dunyaporn

    2016-01-01

    Oral hygiene influences taste, affecting appetite and nutrition in older adults. However, the impact of self-administered tongue brushing on their taste perceptions was unclear. This pilot study (N = 44) was aimed to observe the changes in taste thresholds using Filter Paper Disc after tongue brushing in Thai older adults. Based on the results, continuous tongue brushing for 3 months reduced tongue coat (p < 0.01) and improved subjective taste in 74% of participants. Sweet and salty recognition thresholds were reduced in both anterior and posterior tongue, while sour and bitter thresholds were reduced only in posterior tongue. No changes in umami (savory) were observed. Daily brushing was more effective than weekly brushing in improving the sweet and bitter tastes. The data suggested that tongue brushing could improve perception of multiple tastes and daily tongue brushing was recommended as routine personal care for older adults. This study supports further investigation in a randomized-controlled setting.

  8. Robust contour tracking in ultrasound tongue image sequences.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kele; Yang, Yin; Stone, Maureen; Jaumard-Hakoun, Aurore; Leboullenger, Clémence; Dreyfus, Gérard; Roussel, Pierre; Denby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    A new contour-tracking algorithm is presented for ultrasound tongue image sequences, which can follow the motion of tongue contours over long durations with good robustness. To cope with missing segments caused by noise, or by the tongue midsagittal surface being parallel to the direction of ultrasound wave propagation, active contours with a contour-similarity constraint are introduced, which can be used to provide 'prior' shape information. Also, in order to address accumulation of tracking errors over long sequences, we present an automatic re-initialization technique, based on the complex wavelet image similarity index. Experiments on synthetic data and on real 60 frame per second (fps) data from different subjects demonstrate that the proposed method gives good contour tracking for ultrasound image sequences even over durations of minutes, which can be useful in applications such as speech recognition where very long sequences must be analyzed in their entirety.

  9. Tongue-tie and breastfeeding: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Janet; Miles, Sandra C; Fulbrook, Paul

    2011-03-01

    In Australia, initial exclusive breastfeeding rates are 80%, reducing to 14% at 6 months. One factor that contributes to early breastfeeding cessation is infant tongue-tie, a congenital abnormality occurring in 2.8-10.7% of infants, in which a thickened, tightened or shortened frenulum is present. Tongue-tie is linked to breastfeeding difficulties, speech and dental problems. It may prevent the baby from taking enough breast tissue into its mouth to form a teat and the mother may experience painful, bleeding nipples and frequent feeding with poor infant weight gain; these problems may contribute to early breastfeeding cessation. This review of research literature analyses the evidence regarding tongue-tie to determine if appropriate intervention can reduce its impact on breastfeeding cessation, concluding that, for most infants, frenotomy offers the best chance of improved and continued breastfeeding. Furthermore, studies have demonstrated that the procedure does not lead to complications for the infant or mother.

  10. Modeling of Transient Nectar Flow in Hummingbird Tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rico-Guevara, Alejandro; Fan, Tai-Hsi; Rubega, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate that hummingbirds do not pick up floral nectar via capillary action. The long believed capillary rise models were mistaken and unable to predict the dynamic nectar intake process. Instead, hummingbird's tongue acts as an elastic micropump. Nectar is drawn into the tongue grooves during elastic expansion after the grooves are squeezed flat by the beak. The new model is compared with experimental data from high-speed videos of 18 species and tens of individuals of wild hummingbirds. Self-similarity and transitions of short-to-long time behaviours have been resolved for the nectar flow driven by expansive filling. The transient dynamics is characterized by the relative contributions of negative excess pressure and the apparent area modulus of the tongue grooves.

  11. Tongue-tie in the newborn: what, when, who and how? Exploring tongue-tie division.

    PubMed

    Todd, David A

    2014-07-01

    The division of tongue-tie (TT) in babies with feeding problems has become a more accepted procedure in recent years (Bowley & Arul 2013). Although case series reports had described the benefits of division in problematic breastfeeding (Ballard, Auer & Khoury et al 2002; Notestine 1990), it was not until randomised controlled trials (RCTs) provided significant evidence of improvement that the procedure became more accepted (Berry, Griffiths & Westcott 2012; Buryk, Bloom & Shope 2011; Dollberg et al 2006; Emond et al 2014; Hogan, Westcott & Griffiths 2005). However there are still several areas of debate. These include: 1) what type of TT produces problems with feeding and thus what type of TT should be divided, 2) who should have the procedure, 3) when should the TT division be performed and 4) how should the TT be divided. In this review I will discuss these areas of debate and shed some light on this very common but often devastating congenital condition.

  12. Incidence of tongue carcinoma in Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    RAMDASS, MICHAEL J.; HARRACKSINGH, AVIND; MAHARAJ, KHEMANAND; SING, QUILLAN YOUNG; MOOTEERAM, JUSTIN; BARROW, SHAHEEBA

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of tongue carcinoma in Trinidad and Tobago and the greater West Indies is unknown; therefore, the present study examines the frequency of tongue carcinoma cases, drawing comparisons to worldwide and regional data. A retrospective analysis of all confirmed cases of tongue carcinoma was conducted using eight years of data from the pathology records at the Port of Spain General Hospital (Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago). A total of 26 cases were confirmed, of which 21 were male (81%) and five were female (19%). The age range was 29–86 years, with a mean age of 57 years, and the most common group affected was the 61–70 years age group. In addition, the number of newly diagnosed cases per year ranged between one and seven, with an average of 3.25 new cases per year and a peak incidence of seven new cases in the year of 2009. In the 19 cases where the degree of differentiation was recorded, histological analysis revealed the extent of differentiation as follows: Five cases (26%) were poorly-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); eight cases (42%) were moderately-differentiated SCC; and six cases (32%) were well-differentiated SCC. In addition, one case of chronic inflammatory process and one case of mucoepidermoid adenocarcinoma of the tongue in a 57-year-old female were identified. Overall, the incidence of tongue carcinoma in Trinidad and Tobago appears to be low, estimated at 0.46/100,000 individuals/year. The male:female ratio is 4:1 and SCC is the dominant cancer type (96% of cases). The peak age of occurrence is at 61–70 years. These findings are in agreement with previously determined global data, however, additional research of the risk factors and outcomes of surgery as a treatment strategy for tongue carcinoma is required. PMID:25663924

  13. Dislocated Tongue Muscle Attachment and Cleft Palate Formation.

    PubMed

    Kouskoura, T; El Fersioui, Y; Angelini, M; Graf, D; Katsaros, C; Chiquet, M

    2016-04-01

    In Pierre Robin sequence, a retracted tongue due to micrognathia is thought to physically obstruct palatal shelf elevation and thereby cause cleft palate. However, micrognathia is not always associated with palatal clefting. Here, by using the Bmp7-null mouse model presenting with cleft palate and severe micrognathia, we provide the first causative mechanism linking the two. In wild-type embryos, the genioglossus muscle, which mediates tongue protrusion, originates from the rostral process of Meckel's cartilage and later from the mandibular symphysis, with 2 tendons positive for Scleraxis messenger RNA. In E13.5 Bmp7-null embryos, a rostral process failed to form, and a mandibular symphysis was absent at E17.5. Consequently, the genioglossus muscle fibers were diverted toward the lingual surface of Meckel's cartilage and mandibles, where they attached in an aponeurosis that ectopically expressed Scleraxis. The deflection of genioglossus fibers from the anterior-posterior toward the medial-lateral axis alters their direction of contraction and necessarily compromises tongue protrusion. Since this muscle abnormality precedes palatal shelf elevation, it is likely to contribute to clefting. In contrast, embryos with a cranial mesenchyme-specific deletion of Bmp7 (Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre) exhibited some degree of micrognathia but no cleft palate. In these embryos, a rostral process was present, indicating that mesenchyme-derived Bmp7 is dispensable for its formation. Moreover, the genioglossus appeared normal in Bmp7:Wnt1-Cre embryos, further supporting a role of aberrant tongue muscle attachment in palatal clefting. We thus propose that in Pierre Robin sequence, palatal shelf elevation is not impaired simply by physical obstruction by the tongue but by a specific developmental defect that leads to functional changes in tongue movements.

  14. Robot tongues in space: continuum surfaces for robotic grasping and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caleb; Hiott, Brandon; Kapadia, Apoorva D.; Walker, Ian D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel, continuously bending "robot tongue." The tongue replaces the existing parallel jaw gripper at the end of a KUKA industrial robot manipulator. The resulting system augments the precise positioning of the KUKA with unique capabilities for adaptive grasping afforded by the new robot tongue. We demonstrate the ability of the system to grasp and manipulate objects over a wide range of scales and geometries and evaluate the potential for use of such tongues in various applications.

  15. Oral mucosa alterations in chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis due to HBV or HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Sulka, Agnieszka; Simon, Krzysztof; Piszko, Paweł; Kalecińska, Ewa; Dominiak, Marzena

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the character of lesions within oral mucosa in patients suffering from chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the liver due to either HBV or HCV infection. A total of 74 patients treated at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases in Wrocław for chronic hepatitis B (20 patients, group I) and for chronic hepatitis C (23 patients group III) and cirrhosis of the liver due to HBV (15 patients , group II) and HCV (16 patients, group IV) infection. The control group comprised 29 healthy subjects. Lesions within the oral mucosa found on clinical examinations were confirmed with a histopathological evaluation. Patients suffering from chronic hepatitis B revealed leukoplakia (1/20), melanoplakia (1/20), petechiae (1/20), 17 patients from this group did not show any changes. Patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C revealed leukoplakia (6/23), Delbanco's disease (2/23), melanoplakia (1/23), lichen planus (1/23), petechiae (1/23), 12 patients from this group did not show any changes. Patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver due of HBV infection revealed leukoplakia (3/15) petechiae (2/15), Delbanco's disease (1/15), angular cheilitis (1/15), aphthae (1/15), 7 patients from this group did not reveal any changes. Patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver due of HCV infection revealed petechiae (2/16), melanoplakia (1/16), candidosis (1/16), labial herpes (1/16), 11 patients from this group did not reveal any changes. In control group we observed leukoplakia (3/29), Delbanco's disease (1/29), labial herpes (1/29), petechiae (1/29), and 23 subjects did not present pathological lesions within the oral mucosa. Results indicate the lack of connection between chronic HBV and HCV infection as well as the stage of the disease with the incidence and character of oral lesions in oral mucosa.

  16. Lichen sclerosus of the oral mucosa: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Yolanda; Gavaldá, Carmen; Carbonell, Enrique; Margaix, María; Sarrión, Gracia

    2008-07-01

    Lichen sclerosus or lichen sclerosus et atrophicus is a chronic inflammatory disease predominantly affecting the genital mucosa and skin. Clinically, it is characterized by white atrophic plaques in the anogenital region. The lesions are generally asymptomatic, but may cause discomfort with itching and pain. Extragenital mucosal involvement is very unusual, and lesions limited to the oral mucosa are even less frequent. Knowledge of such lesions is important in order to establish a differential diagnosis with other white oral lesions, and histological confirmation is required. We present the case of a 31-year-old woman with a well delimited, pearly white lesion located in the upper gingival mucosa, lip mucosa and adjacent skin. The lesion had led to loss of periodontal attachment of the affected tooth, causing pain in response to tooth brushing. The biopsy confirmed lichen sclerosus, and treatment was provided in the form of intralesional corticoid injections, followed by improvement of the mucosal lesion, though without recovery of the periodontal loss.

  17. A Tongue Lesion as a Sign of a Systemic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liakou, Chrysoula I.; Koh, Joan; Tsimpidakis, Antonios; Rios, Katrina; Paskalis, Charalabos; Pipilis, Athanasios; Kantianis, Dimitrios; Georgiadis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the extracellular fibril deposition of a variety of proteins, many of which circulate as plasma ingredients. It is a disease difficult to identify due to its nonspecific symptoms and manifestations. Amyloidosis of the tongue, either isolated or part of the systemic disease, is rare and its features resemble those of a tumor. We report the case of a patient with amyloidosis who presented with a tongue lesion, weakness, nonspecific arthritis, and dyspnea on exertion that resulted in multiorgan system failure. PMID:27092182

  18. Code-Switching in a Bilingual History Lesson: The Mother Tongue as a Conversational Lubricant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butzkamm, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Discusses use of the mother tongue in bilingual content teaching as well as in conventional foreign-language classes. The controversy over mother tongue is examined by analyzing a history lesson taught in English as a foreign language. Suggests brief use of the mother tongue can function as a learning aid to enhance communicative competence in the…

  19. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  20. Tongue-Pressure and Hyoid Movement Timing in Healthy Liquid Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Catriona; Sasse, Caroline; Bressmann, Tim

    2012-01-01

    It was hypothesized that tongue-palate pressure generation might directly facilitate hyoid movement in swallowing through the anatomical connections of the extrinsic tongue muscles. If true, non-invasive measures of tongue-palate pressure timing might serve as a proxy measure of hyoid excursion. The timing relationships between events in the…

  1. Effect of Tongue Exercise on Protrusive Force and Muscle Fiber Area in Aging Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Wang, Hao; Jackson, Michelle A.; Mann, Laura; Kluender, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Age-related changes in tongue function may contribute to dysphagia in elderly people. The authors' purpose was to investigate whether aged rats that have undergone tongue exercise would manifest increased protrusive tongue forces and increased genioglossus (GG) muscle fiber cross-sectional areas. Method: Forty-eight young adult,…

  2. Scap is required for sterol synthesis and crypt growth in intestinal mucosa[S

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Matthew R.; Cantoria, Mary Jo; Linden, Albert G.; January, Brandon A.; Liang, Guosheng; Engelking, Luke J.

    2015-01-01

    SREBP cleavage-activating protein (Scap) is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein required for cleavage and activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which activate the transcription of genes in sterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Liver-specific loss of Scap is well tolerated; hepatic synthesis of sterols and fatty acids is reduced, but mice are otherwise healthy. To determine whether Scap loss is tolerated in the intestine, we generated a mouse model (Vil-Scap−) in which tamoxifen-inducible Cre-ERT2, a fusion protein of Cre recombinase with a mutated ligand binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, ablates Scap in intestinal mucosa. After 4 days of tamoxifen, Vil-Scap− mice succumb with a severe enteropathy and near-complete collapse of intestinal mucosa. Organoids grown ex vivo from intestinal crypts of Vil-Scap− mice are readily killed when Scap is deleted by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Death is prevented when culture medium is supplemented with cholesterol and oleate. These data show that, unlike the liver, the intestine requires Scap to sustain tissue integrity by maintaining the high levels of lipid synthesis necessary for proliferation of intestinal crypts. PMID:25896350

  3. Oral lining mucosa development depends on mesenchymal microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Otsuka-Tanaka, Y; Oommen, S; Kawasaki, M; Kawasaki, K; Imam, N; Jalani-Ghazani, F; Hindges, R; Sharpe, P T; Ohazama, A

    2013-03-01

    The oral mucosa plays critical roles in protection, sensation, and secretion and can be classified into masticatory, lining, and specialized mucosa that are known to be functionally, histologically, and clinically distinct. Each type of oral mucosa is believed to develop through discrete molecular mechanisms, which remain unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19 to 25nt non-coding small single-stranded RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression by binding target mRNAs. miRNAs are crucial for fine-tuning of molecular mechanisms. To investigate the role of miRNAs in oral mucosa development, we examined mice with mesenchymal (Wnt1Cre;Dicer(fl/fl)) conditional deletion of Dicer. Wnt1Cre;Dicer(fl/fl) mice showed trans-differentiation of lining mucosa into an epithelium with masticatory mucosa/ skin-specific characteristics. Up-regulation of Fgf signaling was found in mutant lining mucosal epithelium that was accompanied by an increase in Fgf7 expression in mutant mesenchyme. Mesenchyme miRNAs thus have an indirect effect on lining mucosal epithelial cell growth/differentiation.

  4. Phagocytes in cell suspensions of human colon mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Beeken, W; Northwood, I; Beliveau, C; Gump, D

    1987-01-01

    Because little is known of the phagocytes of the human colon we enumerated these cells in mucosal suspensions and studied their phagocytic activity. Phagocyte rich suspensions were made by EDTA collagenase dissociation followed by elutriation centrifugation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring cellular radioactivity after incubation of phagocytes with 3H-adenine labelled E coli ON2 and checked microscopically. Dissociation of normal mucosa from colorectal neoplasms yielded means of 1.9 X 10(6) eosinophils, 1.4 X 10(6) macrophages and 2 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Visually normal mucosa of inflammatory states yielded 2.2 X 10(6) eosinophils, 2.3 X 10(6) macrophages and 7 X 10(5) neutrophils per gram of mucosa. Phagocyte rich suspensions of normal mucosa from tumour patients phagocytosed 21.8% of a pool of opsonised tritiated E coli ON2 and by microscopy 100% of mucosal neutrophils ingested bacteria, 83% of eosinophils were phagocytic, and 53% of macrophages contained bacteria. These results suggest that in the human colonic mucosa, the eosinophil is more abundant than the macrophage and the per cent of those cells exhibiting phagocytosis is intermediate between that of the macrophage and the neutrophil. Thus these three types of cells are actively phagocytic and share the potential for a major role in host defence against invasive enteric bacteria. PMID:3666566

  5. Alveolar soft-part sarcoma of the tongue in a 17-month-old.

    PubMed

    Hillyer, Shahab; Vicens, Jose C; Levinson, Howard; Bhayani, Rajendra; Mesea, Lilia; Chaudhry, Rashid; Fayans, Edgar; Fogler, Richard

    2009-10-01

    Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare and often fatal tumor. Overall survival rates have been reported to be 62% after 5 years, 42% after 10 years, and 18% after 20 years. ASPS accounts for 5% of all pediatric soft-tissue sarcomas other than rhabdomyosarcomas. In children, ASPS rarely occurs in the oral cavity, and to the best of our knowledge, only 12 cases of ASPS of the tongue occurring during the first decade of life have been previously reported in the literature. Because of the rarity of lingual ASPS in children, no specific treatment protocols have been developed, which makes its management difficult. We report a new case of lingual ASPS in a young child. Our patient was a 17-month-old girl whose tumor was located at the base of the tongue. She was successfully treated with surgical excision without adjuvant radiation or chemotherapy. Postoperatively, she has remained disease-free during 4 years of follow-up.

  6. [Cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gastric mucosa: injury of the mucosa and the protective action of antacids].

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, A

    1995-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to many substances, some made by their own body as HCl, pepsin, etc, others from exogenous origin as NSAIDs, alcohol etc. that injury the mucosa. The body has build protective mechanism against the injury that we describe in the article. We know antacids acts neutralizing the acid a now we know it work as a powerful stimulant of the mucosal protection. This is called cytoprotection and is described in the article.

  7. Odd-skipped related-1 controls neural crest chondrogenesis during tongue development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Lan, Yu; Xu, Jingyue; Chang, Ching-Fang; Brugmann, Samantha A; Jiang, Rulang

    2013-11-12

    The tongue is a critical element of the feeding system in tetrapod animals for their successful adaptation to terrestrial life. Whereas the oral part of the mammalian tongue contains soft tissues only, the avian tongue has an internal skeleton extending to the anterior tip. The mechanisms underlying the evolutionary divergence in tongue skeleton formation are completely unknown. We show here that the odd-skipped related-1 (Osr1) transcription factor is expressed throughout the neural crest-derived tongue mesenchyme in mouse, but not in chick, embryos during early tongue morphogenesis. Neural crest-specific inactivation of Osr1 resulted in formation of an ectopic cartilage in the mouse tongue, reminiscent in shape and developmental ontogeny of the anterior tongue cartilage in chick. SRY-box containing gene-9 (Sox9), the master regulator of chondrogenesis, is widely expressed in the nascent tongue mesenchyme at the onset of tongue morphogenesis but its expression is dramatically down-regulated concomitant with activation of Osr1 expression in the developing mouse tongue. In Osr1 mutant mouse embryos, expression of Sox9 persisted in the developing tongue mesenchyme where chondrogenesis is subsequently activated to form the ectopic cartilage. Furthermore, we show that Osr1 binds to the Sox9 gene promoter and that overexpression of Osr1 suppressed expression of endogenous Sox9 mRNAs and Sox9 promoter-driven reporter. These data indicate that Osr1 normally prevents chondrogenesis in the mammalian tongue through repression of Sox9 expression and suggest that changes in regulation of Osr1 expression in the neural crest-derived tongue mesenchyme underlie the evolutionary divergence of birds from other vertebrates in tongue morphogenesis.

  8. Is There a Correlation between Languages Spoken and Intricate Movements of Tongue? A Comparative Study of Various Movements of Tongue among the Three Ethnic Races of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Satheesha B; Awal, Mahfuzah Binti; Han, Chang Wei; Sivaram, Ganeshram; Vigneswaran, Thimesha; Choon, Tee Lian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tongue is mainly used for taste, chewing and in speech. In the present study, we focused on the secondary function of the tongue as to how it is used in phonetic pronunciation and linguistics and how these factors affect tongue movements. Objective To compare all possible movements of tongue among Malaysians belonging to three ethnic races and to find out if there is any link between languages spoken and ability to perform various tongue movements. Materials and Methods A total of 450 undergraduate medical students participated in the study. The students were chosen from three different races i.e. Malays, Chinese and Indians (Malaysian Indians). Data was collected from the students through a semi-structured interview following which each student was asked to demonstrate various tongue movements like protrusion, retraction, flattening, rolling, twisting, folding or any other special movements. The data obtained was first segregated and analysed according to gender, race and types and dialects of languages spoken. Results We found that most of the Malaysians were able to perform the basic movements of tongue like protrusion, flattening movements and very few were able to perform twisting and folding of the tongue. The ability to perform normal tongue movements and special movements like folding, twisting, rolling and others was higher among Indians when compared to Malay and Chinese. Conclusion Languages spoken by Indians involve detailed tongue rolling and folding in pronouncing certain words and may be the reason as to why Indians are more versatile with tongue movements as compared to the other two races amongst Malaysians. It may be a possibility that languages spoken by a person serves as a variable that increases their ability to perform special tongue movements besides influenced by the genetic makeup of a person. PMID:26894051

  9. 9. DETAIL VIEW OF 2' TONGUE AND GROOVE PLANKING IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL VIEW OF 2' TONGUE AND GROOVE PLANKING IN WATER CONTROL BOX. THIS SAME PLANKING IS USED AS CRIBBING FOR BOTH EAST DAM AND WEST DAM - Three Bears Lake & Dams, Water Control Box, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  10. How Children Learn Their Mother Tongue: They Don't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new solution is offered to the Infant Language Acquisition Problem, rejecting both of Chomsky's alternatives. It proposes that the infant does not acquire his mother tongue by mastering its grammar, whether by inference from personal experience or via an innate Language Acquisition Device such as the UG, but that the language he hears is all…

  11. Mother Tongue Use in Task-Based Language Teaching Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Nguyen Viet

    2012-01-01

    Researches of English language teaching (ELT) have focused on using mother tongue (L1) for years. The proliferation of task-based language teaching (TBLT) has been also occurred. Considerable findings have been made in the existing literature of the two fields; however, no mentions have been made in the combination of these two ELT aspects, i.e.,…

  12. Cat Got Your Tongue? Teaching Idioms to English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mcpherron, Paul; Randolph, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Why do questions about idioms often leave us "tongue-tied" in our classrooms? This book takes a look at learning and teaching idioms from two perspectives. First is a survey of recent work on learning and teaching idioms from diverse perspectives in the linguistics and educational research literature. The survey includes definitions of…

  13. Foreign-Language Grammar Instruction via the Mother Tongue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradowski, Michal B.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter reports the results of a controlled experiment which suggest that foreign-language grammar instruction that forges explicit connections with the grammar of the students' mother tongue aids learning, at least as far as students' application of discrete-point grammar rules is concerned. (Contains 2 figures and 3 notes.) [This document…

  14. Punctate Vascular Papules on the Tongue and Scrotum

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Pooja; Meena, Dilip; Tanveer, Nadeem; Sharma, Vinod K; Sethuraman, Gomathy

    2012-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old man who presented with a 2-year history of painless red raised lesions involving the tongue and scrotum. Histopathology was suggestive of angiokeratoma. Oral angiokeratomas are most commonly found as a component of the generalized systemic disorder in Fabry's disease or fucosidosis. Our patient had isolated mucosal angiokeratomas which is very rare. PMID:22707780

  15. Vision of tongue movements bias auditory speech perception.

    PubMed

    D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Bartoli, Eleonora; Maffongelli, Laura; Berry, Jeffrey James; Fadiga, Luciano

    2014-10-01

    Audiovisual speech perception is likely based on the association between auditory and visual information into stable audiovisual maps. Conflicting audiovisual inputs generate perceptual illusions such as the McGurk effect. Audiovisual mismatch effects could be either driven by the detection of violations in the standard audiovisual statistics or via the sensorimotor reconstruction of the distal articulatory event that generated the audiovisual ambiguity. In order to disambiguate between the two hypotheses we exploit the fact that the tongue is hidden to vision. For this reason, tongue movement encoding can solely be learned via speech production but not via others׳ speech perception alone. Here we asked participants to identify speech sounds while matching or mismatching visual representations of tongue movements which were shown. Vision of congruent tongue movements facilitated auditory speech identification with respect to incongruent trials. This result suggests that direct visual experience of an articulator movement is not necessary for the generation of audiovisual mismatch effects. Furthermore, we suggest that audiovisual integration in speech may benefit from speech production learning.

  16. Girls, Educational Equity and Mother Tongue-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Mother tongue-based education perpetuates equity in education, especially among girls who are often regarded as disadvantaged in access to education. The Asia and Pacific region is characterized by its rich ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity. Such diversity is found missing in many school systems in the region which often leads to gaps in…

  17. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  18. Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education in Papua New Guinea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Susan; Paraide, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG), an independent state in the southwest Pacific, is the most linguistically diverse country in the world. Its roughly six million people speak over 800 distinct languages. In spite of this diversity, in 1995 the Papua New Guinean government established a mother tongue-based bilingual education programme in which community…

  19. Teaching Tongue-Tied Students: Ankyloglossia in the Instrumental Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dovel, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Ankyloglossia is a significant medical condition that has not been adequately addressed in music education literature. While practically every instructor will have students who struggle with ankyloglossia, many teachers are entirely unaware of this condition's various symptoms and treatments. Ankyloglossia, more commonly known as tongue-tie, is a…

  20. Tongue-Palate Contact of Perceptually Acceptable Alveolar Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice; Gibbon, Fiona E.; O'Donovan, Cliona

    2013-01-01

    Increased tongue-palate contact for perceptually acceptable alveolar stops has been observed in children with speech sound disorders (SSD). This is a retrospective study that further investigated this issue by using quantitative measures to compare the target alveolar stops /t/, /d/ and /n/ produced in words by nine children with SSD (20 tokens of…

  1. BEDROOM 2 SHOWING THE CANEC PANEL CEILING AND TONGUE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BEDROOM 2 SHOWING THE CANEC PANEL CEILING AND TONGUE AND GROOVE WALL BOARDS. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Three-Bedroom Duplex Type 2, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  2. HALL WITH FOYER IN BACKGROUND. NOTE THE TONGUE AND GROOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HALL WITH FOYER IN BACKGROUND. NOTE THE TONGUE AND GROOVE WALL BOARDS, CANEC PANEL CEILING AND LINEN CLOSET WITH BUILT-IN SHELVES. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, M-Shaped Four-Bedroom Duplex Type 5, Birch Circle, Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Rabies viral antigen in human tongues and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Feng, Z; Ye, H

    1995-10-01

    Lingual and major salivary tissue samples from three cases of rabies were stained with the immunoperoxidase (ABC) technique. All tissue blocks had been embedded in paraffin 4-10 years before. The first antibody used was monoclonal antirabies nucleocapsin (N) mouse antibody (HAM). Four out of five pieces of tongue from two cases showed a large amount of granular staining indicating rabies antigen (RVAg) inside serous glandular cells, terminal nerves, muscle cells and covering epithelial cells including taste cells. In the tissue probes from the third case only minimal granular staining was found, probably due to complete absence of the serous gland. In contrast to the tongue, only a little weakly reacting material was found in 4 out of 9 probes of salivary gland, either in acini or in nerve fibres. The amount of RVAg is evidently much greater in the human tongue than in major salivary glands, whereas major salivary glands from infected dogs, foxes and skunks reportedly contain much RVAg. As the human tongue's serous gland appears to be a preferred location for RVAg, it may be a source of oral infection.

  4. Achievement in Mother Tongue Literature: Some Strategies of Causal Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulcock, Jeffrey W.

    Three stages of linear causal model building procedures (conceptual, main theory, and auxiliary theory) were used to examine the cultural and personality resources of individuals and their school-related skills as determinants of achievement in mother tongue literature. A path analytic approach was used to test a popular model of literature…

  5. Mother Tongue Education in Singapore: Concerns, Issues and Controversies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chin Leong Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, the Singapore Government implemented the English-knowing bilingual policy which made it mandatory for all Chinese students to study English as a "First Language" and the Chinese language (CL) as a "Mother Tongue Language" in Singapore schools. Using key literature relevant to Singapore's bilingual educational policy…

  6. Detecting the Edge of the Tongue: A Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskarous, Khalil

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a tutorial introduction to the topic of edge detection of the tongue from ultrasound scans for researchers in speech science and phonetics. The method introduced here is Active Contours (also called snakes), a method for searching for an edge, assuming that it is a smooth curve in the image data. The advantage…

  7. Super-resolution reconstruction for tongue MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jonghye; Bai, Ying; Roy, Snehashis; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the tongue have been used in both clinical medicine and scientific research to reveal tongue structure and motion. In order to see different features of the tongue and its relation to the vocal tract it is beneficial to acquire three orthogonal image stacks-e.g., axial, sagittal and coronal volumes. In order to maintain both low noise and high visual detail, each set of images is typically acquired with in-plane resolution that is much better than the through-plane resolution. As a result, any one data set, by itself, is not ideal for automatic volumetric analyses such as segmentation and registration or even for visualization when oblique slices are required. This paper presents a method of super-resolution reconstruction of the tongue that generates an isotropic image volume using the three orthogonal image stacks. The method uses preprocessing steps that include intensity matching and registration and a data combination approach carried out by Markov random field optimization. The performance of the proposed method was demonstrated on five clinical datasets, yielding superior results when compared with conventional reconstruction methods.

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of gold interdigitated electrodes for electronic tongues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoli, Alexandra; de Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Filho, José A.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Riul, Antonio; Mendonca, Cleber R.; Correa, Daniel S.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic tongue (e-tongue) sensors based on impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a potential technology to evaluate the quality and chemical composition of food, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. E-tongues usually employ transducers based on metal interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) coated with a thin layer of an active material, which is capable of interacting chemically with several types of analytes. IDEs are usually produced by photolithographic methods, which are time-consuming and costly, therefore, new fabrication technologies are required to make it more affordable. Here, we employed femtosecond laser ablation with pulse duration of 50 fs to microfabricate gold IDEs having finger width from 2.3 μm up to 3.2 μm. The parameters used in the laser ablation technique, such as light intensity, scan speed and beam spot size have been optimized to achieve uniform IDEs, which were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The electrical properties of gold IDEs fabricated by laser ablation were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy, and compared to those produced by conventional photolithography. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation is a promising alternative to conventional photolithography for fabricating metal IDEs for e-tongue systems.

  9. Artificial tongue based on metal-biomolecule coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pu, Fang; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-02-25

    We construct an array-based recognition system (the so-called artificial tongue) through the self-assembly of nucleotides, dyes and lanthanide ions. Metal ions are selected as model analytes for verifying its discrimination ability. The work provides valuable insights into the application and development of biomolecule-based materials.

  10. Morphology of the tongue in a newborn Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri).

    PubMed

    Shindo, Junji; Yamada, Tadasu K; Yoshimura, Ken; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2008-02-01

    This light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) study on the tongue of a newborn Stejneger's beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) demonstrated a clear difference in its form from than that of other cetacean and adult Stejneger's beaked whales. This newborn Stejneger's beaked whale had a spoon-like shaped tongue. The dorsal surface in the center part of the tongue was flat and did not have papillae, but there were marginal papillae and small papillae on the anterior part of the tongue. In the posterior of the tongue, hillock-shaped papillae with taste buds on the epithelium were observed.

  11. [Hyperspectral acquisition system for tongue inspection based on X-Y scanning galvanometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2011-12-01

    Hyperspectral was used for tongue inspection in the present work to resolve the problem that information of current research for tongue inspection was inadequate. A hyperspectral acquisition system based on X-Y scanning galvanometer was also proposed due to the high cost of the current hyperspectral apparatus. An experiment was made to test the ability of this system. By collecting the hyperspectral information of color pictures with size similar to the tongue, the results of experiment showed that this system can acquire more information of tongue than other methods, and this method can provide a new way for tongue inspection.

  12. Why is the tongue of blue-tongued skinks blue? Reflectance of lingual surface and its consequences for visual perception by conspecifics and predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramjan, Andran; Bauerová, Anna; Somerová, Barbora; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Blue-tongued skinks of the genus Tiliqua (Scincidae) are characterized by their large blue melanin-pigmented tongues, often displayed during open-mouth threats, when the animal feels endangered. It is not clear whether this unusual coloration is a direct anti-predation adaptation or it may rather serve intraspecific communication, as ultraviolet-blue color is a frequent visual signal in a number of lizard species. We used spectrophotometry and visual modeling to compare blue tongues of Tiliqua gigas with tongues and skin coloration of other lizard species, and to examine their appearance through the eyes of both the conspecifics and avian predators. Our results show that (1) the tongue coloration is probably not substantially influenced by the amount of melanin in the skin, (2) lingual and oral tissues are UV-reflective in general, with blue colored tongues having chromatic qualities similar to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species, (3) UV-blue tongues are more conspicuous than pink tongues, especially in the visual model of conspecifics. We hypothesize that blue tongues may possibly serve as a semantic (honest) signal analogous to UV-blue skin patches of other lizard species due to greater UV-bias in the vision of diurnal lizards. Regarding the social behavior and high aggressiveness in Tiliqua and their relatives, such signal might serve, e.g., in intraspecific long-distance communication between conspecifics in order to avoid aggression, and its anti-predation effect may only be a secondary function (exaptation).

  13. Separate and distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue, lingual tissue and taste papilla development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Grosse, Ann S.; Iwatsuki, Ken; Mishina, Yuji; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Although canonical Wnt signaling is known to regulate taste papilla induction and numbers, roles for noncanonical Wnt pathways in tongue and taste papilla development have not been explored. With mutant mice and whole tongue organ cultures we demonstrate that Wnt5a protein and message are within anterior tongue mesenchyme across embryo stages from the initiation of tongue formation, through papilla placode appearance and taste papilla development. The Wnt5a mutant tongue is severely shortened, with an ankyloglossia, and lingual mesenchyme is disorganized. However, fungiform papilla morphology, number and innervation are preserved, as is expression of the papilla marker, Shh. These data demonstrate that the genetic regulation for tongue size and shape can be separated from that directing lingual papilla development. Preserved number of papillae in a shortened tongue results in an increased density of fungiform papillae in the mutant tongues. In tongue organ cultures, exogenous Wnt5a profoundly suppresses papilla formation and simultaneously decreases canonical Wnt signaling as measured by the TOPGAL reporter. These findings suggest that Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt signaling to dictate papilla number and spacing. In all, distinctive roles for Wnt5a in tongue size, fungiform papilla patterning and development are shown and a necessary balance between non-canonical and canonical Wnt paths in regulating tongue growth and fungiform papillae is proposed in a model, through the Ror2 receptor. PMID:22024319

  14. Short faces, big tongues: developmental origin of the human chin.

    PubMed

    Coquerelle, Michael; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Rojo, Rosa; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Bastir, Markus

    2013-01-01

    During the course of human evolution, the retraction of the face underneath the braincase, and closer to the cervical column, has reduced the horizontal dimension of the vocal tract. By contrast, the relative size of the tongue has not been reduced, implying a rearrangement of the space at the back of the vocal tract to allow breathing and swallowing. This may have left a morphological signature such as a chin (mental prominence) that can potentially be interpreted in Homo. Long considered an autopomorphic trait of Homo sapiens, various extinct hominins show different forms of mental prominence. These features may be the evolutionary by-product of equivalent developmental constraints correlated with an enlarged tongue. In order to investigate developmental mechanisms related to this hypothesis, we compare modern 34 human infants against 8 chimpanzee fetuses, whom development of the mandibular symphysis passes through similar stages. The study sets out to test that the shared ontogenetic shape changes of the symphysis observed in both species are driven by the same factor--space restriction at the back of the vocal tract and the associated arrangement of the tongue and hyoid bone. We apply geometric morphometric methods to extensive three-dimensional anatomical landmarks and semilandmarks configuration, capturing the geometry of the cervico-craniofacial complex including the hyoid bone, tongue muscle and the mandible. We demonstrate that in both species, the forward displacement of the mental region derives from the arrangement of the tongue and hyoid bone, in order to cope with the relative horizontal narrowing of the oral cavity. Because humans and chimpanzees share this pattern of developmental integration, the different forms of mental prominence seen in some extinct hominids likely originate from equivalent ontogenetic constraints. Variations in this process could account for similar morphologies.

  15. Manipulators inspired by the tongue of the chameleon.

    PubMed

    Debray, Alexis

    2011-06-01

    Chameleons have developed a specialized ballistic tongue which elongates more than six times its rest length at speeds higher than 3.5 m s(-1) and accelerations 350 m s(-2), with a highly flexible mobile part, and which applies no continuous force during forward motion. These characteristics are possible because this tongue consists of two highly specialized systems, an ejection system for the forward motion and an accordion-like system for the retraction. Four manipulators inspired by the tongue of the chameleon and based on this design have been developed, resulting in three characteristics similar to the tongue of the chameleon: extensibility of the manipulator, flexibility of the mobile part, and absence of continuous force during the forward motion. The first manipulator mimics the basic mechanism of the tongue of the chameleon and reproduced its basic performances. A second manipulator performs a catching function at a speed of 3.5 m s(-1) with an acceleration of 573 m s(-2) while elongating seven times its rest length. The design of this manipulator is such that the dc motor used for retraction applies a torque 25 times its rated torque. Moreover, during the retraction, the mobile part of the manipulator moves due to its own inertia, allowing the dc motor to rotate at full velocity. In another manipulator, the addition of an elastomer in the mobile part allows for control of the retraction velocity. A model for these two manipulators compares well with the experimental data. Finally, the addition of wings on the mobile part allows us to take the advantage of aerodynamic effects, which is unusual for manipulators.

  16. Establishing a reliable protocol to measure tongue sensation.

    PubMed

    Boliek, C A; Rieger, J M; Li, S Y Y; Mohamed, Z; Kickham, J; Amundsen, K

    2007-06-01

    The relationship between tongue sensation and tongue function for speech, mastication and deglutition are growing areas of interest among rehabilitative professionals. To determine the potential effect that sensation has on function, it is imperative that, first, reliable and valid measures of tongue sensation be established. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol to test tongue sensation across a spectrum of sensory functions that included two-point discrimination, light-touch discrimination, thermal sensation, texture recognition, oral stereognosis and taste recognition. Materials tested within each domain respectively included: (i) the MacKinnon-Dellon Disk-criminator, paperclip and caliper; (ii) the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament and cotton wisp; (iii) dental mirrors and glass test tubes; (iv) spheres of textured acrylic resin on rods; (v) acrylic resin forms with differing shapes on rods and (vi) salty, sweet, sour, bitter and neutral solutions. Materials were tested on 40 healthy subjects between the ages of 20 and 55. The results from this study indicated that thermal, texture and taste sensations appear robust for accuracy and discrimination. Two-point discrimination and light touch seem to be influenced by location of stimulation on the tongue and force applied, whereas stereognosis was influenced by stimulus complexity. The results of this study indicate that clinicians may choose instruments as practical as paperclips and test tubes for testing two-point discrimination and thermal sensation, respectively. For the other sensations, it may be important to use more sophisticated instrumentation to control variables of force, surface area stimulated and assessing sensations in graded steps.

  17. Effects of chlorhexidine on the structure and permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, B.V.; Squier, C.A.; Hall, B.K.

    1984-10-01

    This study examined the effects of chlorhexidine (CHD) on the clinical appearance, morphology, and in vitro permeability of hamster cheek pouch mucosa. The cheek pouches were treated daily for 3 weeks with topical applications of saline, 0.2% CHD, or 2.0% CHD. Treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in the formation of discrete white lesions in every animal in the group, whereas no changes were identified in any animal treated with 0.2% CHD or saline. Upon microscopic examination it was determined that treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in a statistically significant increase in epithelial thickness, when compared to the other groups, and the lesions were found to consist of hyperplastic areas of epithelium with associated inflammatory cell accumulations. Daily treatments with 2.0% CHD, 0.2% CHD or saline had no effect on the very low permeability of cheek pouch mucosa to /sup 14/C-CHD. However, treatment with 2.0% CHD resulted in decreased permeability to /sup 3/H/sub 2/O when compared to the other groups. Treatment with 2.0% CHD also resulted in a thickened permeability barrier, as determined using a tracer, horseradish peroxidase. It is concluded that topical applications of 0.2% T CHD have no detectable effect on cheek-pouch mucosa while applications of 2.0% CHD result in hyperplasia and a decrease in mucosal permeability. Results suggest that CHD should be used with caution clinically and at a concentration of 0.2% or less.

  18. Perceptual, durational and tongue displacement measures following articulation therapy for rhotic sound errors.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Harper, Susan; Zhylich, Irina; Kulkarni, Gajanan V

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes of articulation therapy for rhotic errors are usually assessed perceptually. However, our understanding of associated changes of tongue movement is limited. This study described perceptual, durational and tongue displacement changes over 10 sessions of articulation therapy for /ɹ/ in six children. Four of the participants also received ultrasound biofeedback of their tongue shape. Speech and tongue movement were recorded pre-therapy, after 5 sessions, in the final session and at a one month follow-up. Perceptually, listeners perceived improvement and classified more productions as /ɹ/ in the final and follow-up assessments. The durations of VɹV syllables at the midway point of the therapy were longer. Cumulative tongue displacement increased in the final session. The average standard deviation was significantly higher in the middle and final assessments. The duration and tongue displacement measures illustrated how articulation therapy affected tongue movement and may be useful for outcomes research about articulation therapy.

  19. The Tip-of-the-Tongue Heuristic: How Tip-of-the-Tongue States Confer Perceptibility on Inaccessible Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Anne M.; Claxton, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that the presence of a tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) state--the sense that a word is in memory when its retrieval fails--is used as a heuristic for inferring that an inaccessible word has characteristics that are consistent with greater word perceptibility. When reporting a TOT state, people judged an unretrieved word as more likely to…

  20. Morphology of the tongue of the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae). II. Histological features.

    PubMed

    Crole, M R; Soley, J T

    2009-12-01

    Although a number of brief, fragmented descriptions have been provided on the gross morphology of the ratite tongue, very few studies have documented the histological structure of this organ. This paper presents the first definitive histological description of the emu tongue and reviews, consolidates and compares the scattered information on the histology of the ratite tongue available in the literature. Five tongues were removed from heads obtained from birds at slaughter and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Appropriate longitudinal and transverse segments were removed, routinely processed for light microscopy, and sections examined after staining with H & E and PAS. The entire tongue (body and root) is invested by a non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. The supporting connective tissue of the tongue dorsum displays only large, simple branched tubular mucus-secreting glands, whereas the caudal tongue body ventrum and tongue root, in addition to these glands, also exhibits small, simple tubular mucus-secreting glands. Herbst corpuscles are associated with the large, simple branched glands. Lymphoid tissue is restricted to the tongue ventrum and is particularly obvious at the junction of the ventral tongue body and frenulum where a large aggregation of diffuse lymphoid tissue, with nodular tissue proximally, was consistently observed. A structure resembling a taste bud was located in the epithelium on the caudal extremity of the tongue root of one bird. This is the first reported observation of taste buds in ratites. Forming the core of the tongue body is the cartilaginous paraglossum lying dorsal to the partially ossified rostral projection of the basihyale. The histological features of the emu tongue are generally similar to those described for the greater rhea and ostrich, except that taste buds were not identified in these species. The results would suggest that the emu tongue functions as a sensory organ, both for taste and touch (by virtue of

  1. Tongue Pressure Modulation for Initial Gel Consistency in a Different Oral Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Sumiko; Hori, Kazuhiro; Tamine, Ken-ichi; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Inoue, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Funami, Takahiro; Ishihara, Sayaka; Ono, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background In the recent hyper-aged societies of developed countries, the market for soft diets for patients with dysphagia has been growing and numerous jelly-type foods have become available. However, interrelationships between the biomechanics of oral strategies and jelly texture remain unclear. The present study investigated the influence of the initial consistency of jelly on tongue motor kinetics in different oral strategies by measuring tongue pressure against the hard palate. Methods Jellies created as a mixture of deacylated gellan gum and psyllium seed gum with different initial consistencies (hard, medium or soft) were prepared as test foods. Tongue pressure production while ingesting 5 ml of jelly using different oral strategies (Squeezing or Mastication) was recorded in eight healthy volunteers using an ultra-thin sensor sheet system. Maximal magnitude, duration and total integrated values (tongue work) of tongue pressure for size reduction and swallowing in each strategy were compared among initial consistencies of jelly, and between Squeezing and Mastication. Results In Squeezing, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both the magnitude and duration of tongue pressure over a wide area of hard palate, but tongue work for swallowing increased at the posterior-median and circumferential parts by modulating only the magnitude of tongue pressure. Conversely, in Mastication, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both magnitude and duration of tongue pressure mainly at the posterior part of the hard palate, but tongue work as well as other tongue pressure parameters for swallowing showed no differences by type of jelly. Conclusions These results reveal fine modulations in tongue-palate contact according to the initial consistency of jelly and oral strategies. PMID:24643054

  2. Prediction of Pneumonia in Acute Stroke Patients Using Tongue Pressure Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Masahiro; Hosomi, Naohisa; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Imamura, Eiji; Shishido, Takeo; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Mineka; Tsuga, Kazuhiro; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction caused by stroke is a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia. Tongue pressure measurement is a simple and noninvasive method for evaluating swallowing dysfunction. We have hypothesized that low tongue pressure may be able to predict pneumonia occurrence in acute stroke patients. Tongue pressure was measured using balloon-type equipment in 220 acute stroke patients. The modified Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) score was evaluated independently on the same day. Tongue pressure was measured every week thereafter. An improvement in tongue pressure was observed within the first 2 weeks. Receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine the ability of tongue pressure to predict modified MASA score <95, which suggests swallowing dysfunction. The optimal cutoff for tongue pressure was 21.6 kPa (χ2 = 45.82, p<0.001, sensitivity 95.9%, specificity 91.8%, area under the curve = 0.97). The tongue pressure was significantly lower in patients with pneumonia than in those without pneumonia. Using a Cox proportional hazard model for pneumonia onset with a cutoff tongue pressure value of 21.6 kPa and adjustment for age, sex, and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission, the tongue pressure had additional predictive power for pneumonia onset (hazard ratio, 7.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.09 to 52.11; p = 0.0013). In the group with low tongue pressure, 27 of 95 patients showed improvement of tongue pressure within 2 weeks. Pneumonia occurred frequently in patients without improvement of tongue pressure, but not in patients with improvement (31/68 and 2/27, p<0.001). Tongue pressure is a sensitive indicator for predicting pneumonia occurrence in acute stroke patients. PMID:27802333

  3. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lamme, E N; Steegers-Theunissen, R P M; Krapels, I P C; Bian, Z; Marres, H; Spauwen, P H M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W

    2008-08-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes from cleft palate cells, and to compare these with substitutes from normal palatal cells, and with native palatal mucosa. Biopsies from the palatal mucosa of eight children with cleft palate and eight age-matched control individuals were taken. Three biopsies of both groups were processed for (immuno)histochemistry; 5 were used to culture mucosal substitutes. Histology showed that the substitutes from cleft-palate and non-cleft-palate cells were comparable, but the number of cell layers was less than in native palatal mucosa. All epithelial layers in native palatal mucosa and mucosal substitutes expressed the cytokeratins 5, 10, and 16, and the proliferation marker Ki67. Heparan sulphate and decorin were present in the basal membrane and the underlying connective tissue, respectively. We conclude that mucosal cells from children with cleft palate can regenerate an oral mucosa in vitro.

  4. Cat got your tongue? Using the tip-of-the-tongue state to investigate fixed expressions.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Emily; Cleland, Alexandra A; Bull, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that they play a prominent role in everyday speech, the representation and processing of fixed expressions during language production is poorly understood. Here, we report a study investigating the processes underlying fixed expression production. "Tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) states were elicited for well-known idioms (e.g., hit the nail on the head) and participants were asked to report any information they could regarding the content of the phrase. Participants were able to correctly report individual words for idioms that they could not produce. In addition, participants produced both figurative (e.g., pretty for easy on the eye) and literal errors (e.g., hammer for hit the nail on the head) when in a TOT state, suggesting that both figurative and literal meanings are active during production. There was no effect of semantic decomposability on overall TOT incidence; however, participants recalled a greater proportion of words for decomposable rather than non-decomposable idioms. This finding suggests there may be differences in how decomposable and non-decomposable idioms are retrieved during production.

  5. Hypermethylation of the p16 gene in normal oral mucosa of smokers.

    PubMed

    von Zeidler, S Ventorin; Miracca, E C; Nagai, M A; Birman, E G

    2004-11-01

    The oral cavity is the sixth most common anatomical localization of head and neck carcinoma in men. Detection of oral carcinomas in the early asymptomatic stages improves cure rates and the quality of life. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking are the most important known risk factors for the development of head and neck tumors, suggesting that the exposure to these risk factors may increase the predisposition for genetic and epigenetic alterations, such as DNA methylation. The presence of methylated CpG islands in the promoter region of human genes can suppress their expression due to the presence of 5-methylcytosine that interferes with the binding of transcription factors or other DNA-binding proteins repressing transcription activity. Hypermethylation leading to the inactivation of some tumor suppressor genes, such as p16, has been pointed out as an initial event in head and neck cancer. Our aim was to evaluate an early diagnostic method of oral pre-cancerous lesions through the analysis of methylation of the p16 gene. DNA samples from normal oral mucosa and posterior tongue border from 258 smokers, without oral cancer, were investigated for the occurrence of p16 promoter hypermethylation. The methylation status of the p16 gene was analyzed using MS-PCR (methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes and PCR amplification), MSP (Methylation-specific PCR) or direct DNA sequence of bisulfite modified DNA. Hyper-methylation was detected in 9.7% (25/258) of the cases analyzed. These findings provide further evidence that epigenetic alteration, leading to the inactivation of the p16 tumor suppressor gene is an early event that might confer cell growth advantages contributing to the tumorigenic process. Thus, the detection of abnormal p16 methylation pattern may be a valuable tool for early oral cancer detection.

  6. Asymmetric Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy With Unilateral Tongue Swelling Mimicking Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chi, Man Sum; Ng, Shi Hon; Chan, Lok Yiu

    2016-11-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with acute onset of left hemiparesis and left hypoglossal nerve palsy with ipsilateral tongue swelling. He then progressed to tetraparesis in a few days. Cerebrospinal fluid showed cell protein dissociation. A nerve conduction study showed motor axonal neuropathy with sensory sparing. A subsequent blood test revealed anti-GD1b IgG antibody positivity. He was diagnosed to have acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) and treated with a course of intravenous immunoglobulin with slow improvement. This is probably the first AMAN with asymmetrical presentation mimicking stroke reported in the literature in detail. The anti-GD1b IgG antibody is also not commonly associated with AMAN.

  7. [Brachytherapy in the management of the initial stage of the mobile tongue carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Bolner, A; Campolongo, F; Segatta, P; Fellin, G; Bauer, M; Nocini, P F

    1999-04-01

    From 1986 to 1994, 61 patients with oral tongue epidermoid carcinoma were treated using low dose rate iridium brachytherapy. Eleven patients treated with combined external beam and brachytherapy and 8 with nodal metastases at presentation were excluded from the study. The results in 42 fully evaluable and regularly followed patients here retrospectively reviewed. In 22 cases clinical stage was T1 greater than 1 cm and in the remaining 20 T2, N0 M0; all were cases of epidermoid carcinoma. The patients received definitive brachytherapy to the primary site using plastic tube technique at a dose of 5067 Gy (median 60 Gy) at reference isodose. The dose rate ranged from 35 cGy/h to 80 cGy/h (median 53 cGy/h). Elective neck dissection was performed in 24 patients, whereas a surveillance protocol was adopted in the remaining 18 cases. After an average follow-up of 40 months, 5 year absolute and disease specific survival (Kaplan Meier) was 61% and 88% respectively. Two patients failed at the primary site (local control probability 96%). Nodal metastases were found in 6 of 24 electively dissected patients and developed subsequently in 3 of 18 pN0 cases and in 4 of 18 non dissected patients. Four patients died of uncontrolled neck disease (regional control probability 76%). A severe necrosis developed in 9 patients (soft tissue in 4 and bone in 5 patients), but only 3 cases required surgery. This study confirms brachytherapy as an effective treatment modality for the early stage of oral tongue carcinoma.

  8. Ultrastructure observation of middle ear mucosa with laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mengkui; Yang, Shulan; Fang, Yaoyun; Sun, Jianhe

    1998-08-01

    In order to study the effects of He-Ne laser on the mucosa of middle ear mucosa from 9 patients with chronic otitis media, all of who had slight damp eardrum, were irradiated by low power He-Ne laser ten minutes per day for ten days. Specimen was taken before and after irradiation and observed under scanning electron microscope. It was found that the surface structure of the mucosa was more integral, the arrangement of the epithelial cell was closer together and microvilli arose among the noncilliated cells after irradiation. The inflammatory cell disappeared arid the morphologic structure appeared normal. These data provided the therapeutic evidence for the lower power He-Ne laser irradiation on patients with chronic purulent otitis midia.

  9. [Oral mucosa reaction in patients adapting to removable dentures].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatova, L N; Pikhur, O L; Mikhailova, E S; Peremyshlenko, A S; Soldatov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucosa reaction of prosthetic bed to the removable acrylic dentures was evaluated in 43 patients (12 male and 31 female) aged 56-69 years with partial and full teeth loss in one or both jaws. Patients of the first (control) group (17 patients) were not using additional tools improving fixation of the removable dentures during adaptation period, while patients of the second (main) group (26 patients) used Corega cream for dentures fixation for 30 days follow-up. Oral mucosa assessment was carried out on 3-4 and 28-30 day of dentures use by 3 end points: pain syndrome, moisture level, inflammation of a prosthetic bed. The results proved Corega cream to improve prosthetic bed mucosa condition reducing inflammatory response to polymeric materials of removable dentures basis.

  10. Effects of tongue volume reduction on craniofacial growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zi-Jun; Shcherbatyy, Volodymyr; Gu, Gaoman; Perkins, Jonathan A.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between tongue size/volume and craniofacial skeletal growth is essential for understanding the mechanism of specific types of malocclusion and objectively measuring outcomes of various surgical and/or orthodontic treatments. Currently available information on this interaction is limited. This study was designed to examine how tongue body volume reduction affects craniofacial skeleton and dental arch formation during the rapid growth period in five 12-week-old Yucatan minipig sibling pairs. One of each pair received a standardized reduction glossectomy to reduce tongue volume by 15-17% (reduction group), and the other had the reduction glossectomy incisions without tissue removal (sham group). Before surgery, five stainless steel screws were implanted into standardized craniofacial skeletal locations. A series of cephalograms, lateral and axial, were obtained longitudinally at 1 week preoperative, and 2 and 4 weeks postoperative. These images were traced using superimposition, and linear and angular variables were measured digitally. Upon euthanasia, direct osteometric measurements were obtained from harvested skulls. Five en-bloc bone pieces were further cut for bone mineral examination by dual photon/energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The results indicate that: (1) while daily food consumption and weekly body weight were not significantly affected, tongue volume reduction showed an overall negative effect on the linear expansion of craniofacial skeletons; (2) premaxilla and mandibular symphysis lengths, and anterior dental arch width were significantly less in reduction than sham animals at 2 and/or 4 weeks after the surgery; (3) both premaxilla/maxilla and mandible bone mineral density and content were lower in reduction than sham animals, significantly lower in anterior mandible; (4) craniofacial skeletal and dental arch size were significantly smaller in reduction than sham animals, being most significant in the mandibular anterior length and

  11. LM and TEM study of the orthokeratinized and parakeratinized epithelium of the tongue in the domestic duck (Anas platyrhynchos f. domestica).

    PubMed

    Skieresz-Szewczyk, Kinga; Jackowiak, Hanna; Ratajczak, Marlena

    2014-12-01

    The previous histological studies of the lingual mucosa in birds characterized two types of keratinized epithelium, i.e. orthokeratinized and parakeratinized. These epithelia are composed of three layers: basal, intermediate and keratinized. The present study showed detailed ultrastructural features of cells in particular layers of two types of keratinized epithelia on the tongue in the domestic duck and defined structural differences. TEM observations showed a gradual reduction in cell organelles in the following layers, at increasing amounts of keratin fibers. The characteristic feature of the ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium is the presence of sub-layers in the intermediate layer, i.e. the upper and lower part, which results from the different shape of cell nuclei and dye affinity of the cytoplasm. The keratinized layer of ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium is built of two types of cells such as electron dark and light cells, which undergo exfoliation. The basic difference between the keratinized epithelia is the presence of flattened cell nuclei in the keratinized layer of the parakeratinized epithelium. The differentiating feature is also an arrangement of keratin fibers in the cell cytoplasm of the keratinized layer. The analysis of the thickness of the epithelium and the keratinized layer, indicated differences between keratinized epithelia, which result from two variants of performing protective functions, either through a thick keratinized layer or by a higher epithelium. Differences in the ultrastructure of the ortho- and parakeratinized epithelium are associated with mechanical functions of the epithelium resulting from different forces acting on the tongue during feeding activities.

  12. Diagnostic Method of Diabetes Based on Support Vector Machine and Tongue Images

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Qingguang; Tu, Liping; Huang, Jingbin; Cui, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM). Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC) were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA), while substantially saving the training time. During the training for selecting SVM parameters by genetic algorithm (GA), the accuracy rate of cross-validation was grown from 72% or so to 83.06%. Finally, we compare with several state-of-the-art algorithms, and experimental results show that our algorithm has the best predictive accuracy. Conclusions. The diagnostic method of diabetes on the basis of tongue images in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is of great value, indicating the feasibility of digitalized tongue diagnosis. PMID:28133611

  13. The Classification of Tongue Colors with Standardized Acquisition and ICC Profile Correction in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Li-ping; Chen, Jing-bo; Hu, Xiao-juan; Zhang, Zhi-feng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Goal. The application of digital image processing techniques and machine learning methods in tongue image classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been widely studied nowadays. However, it is difficult for the outcomes to generalize because of lack of color reproducibility and image standardization. Our study aims at the exploration of tongue colors classification with a standardized tongue image acquisition process and color correction. Methods. Three traditional Chinese medical experts are chosen to identify the selected tongue pictures taken by the TDA-1 tongue imaging device in TIFF format through ICC profile correction. Then we compare the mean value of L*a*b* of different tongue colors and evaluate the effect of the tongue color classification by machine learning methods. Results. The L*a*b* values of the five tongue colors are statistically different. Random forest method has a better performance than SVM in classification. SMOTE algorithm can increase classification accuracy by solving the imbalance of the varied color samples. Conclusions. At the premise of standardized tongue acquisition and color reproduction, preliminary objectification of tongue color classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is feasible. PMID:28050555

  14. Prevalence and subjective knowledge of tongue lesions in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Sinha, Rupam; Pal, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Aim The current study was designed to determine prevalence of various tongue lesions and their association with age, gender, systemic illness, deleterious habits, and distribution over the surfaces of tongue. It also explored the awareness and knowledge of subjects in relation to presence of tongue lesions, etiological factor, symptoms, and treatment received if any. Methods The present study was conducted on 1360 randomly selected dental outpatients from 1/10/2013 to 30/09/2014. Examination of tongue included surface changes, size, movements, and the presence of mucosal lesions. The subjects were asked about the knowledge, symptoms, and treatment obtained in case of awareness regarding the lesion. Results The prevalence of tongue lesions was found to be 13.75%. The most prevalent lesion was found to be coated tongue. The majority of the lesions were located on dorsum of tongue and not related with age, gender, habit, and systemic condition. A considerable number of subjects were aware of the changes on their tongue but negligible number sought any treatment. Conclusions The presence of tongue lesions in the study population was found be significant. Hence, general dental practitioners and health care providers should be educated about the diagnosis, etiology, investigations, and proper management of such tongue lesions. PMID:27195210

  15. Association between tongue and lip functions and masticatory performance in young dentate adults.

    PubMed

    Yamada, A; Kanazawa, M; Komagamine, Y; Minakuchi, S

    2015-11-01

    Motor functions of masticatory organs such as the tongue, lips, cheeks and mandible are known to deteriorate with age, thereby influencing masticatory performance. However, there are few reports on the relationships between tongue and lip functions and masticatory performance. To investigate the relationship between tongue and lip functions and comprehensive masticatory performance, by evaluating crushing, mixing and shearing abilities in young dentate adults. Participants comprised 51 dentate adults with a mean age of 25 years. Maximum tongue pressure and oral diadochokinesis were measured to evaluate tongue and lip functions. A multiple sieving method using peanuts was performed to evaluate crushing ability. A colour-changeable chewing gum was performed to evaluate mixing ability. A test gummy jelly was performed to evaluate shearing ability. The relationship between tongue and lip functions and each masticatory performance was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficients. In addition, stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of crushing ability. Crushing ability was significantly correlated with maximum tongue pressure and the number of repetitions of the syllables /pa/, /ta/ and /ka/. Maximum tongue pressure and number of repetitions of the syllable /pa/ were identified as significant predictors for crushing ability. Mixing ability was significantly correlated with the number of repetitions of the syllable /pa/. Shearing ability was not significantly correlated with tongue and lip functions. Masticatory performance during the chewing of brittle foods such as peanuts and solid foods such as chewing gum appears to be correlated with tongue and lip functions.

  16. The Classification of Tongue Colors with Standardized Acquisition and ICC Profile Correction in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhen; Tu, Li-Ping; Chen, Jing-Bo; Hu, Xiao-Juan; Xu, Jia-Tuo; Zhang, Zhi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Goal. The application of digital image processing techniques and machine learning methods in tongue image classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been widely studied nowadays. However, it is difficult for the outcomes to generalize because of lack of color reproducibility and image standardization. Our study aims at the exploration of tongue colors classification with a standardized tongue image acquisition process and color correction. Methods. Three traditional Chinese medical experts are chosen to identify the selected tongue pictures taken by the TDA-1 tongue imaging device in TIFF format through ICC profile correction. Then we compare the mean value of L(*)a(*)b(*) of different tongue colors and evaluate the effect of the tongue color classification by machine learning methods. Results. The L(*)a(*)b(*) values of the five tongue colors are statistically different. Random forest method has a better performance than SVM in classification. SMOTE algorithm can increase classification accuracy by solving the imbalance of the varied color samples. Conclusions. At the premise of standardized tongue acquisition and color reproduction, preliminary objectification of tongue color classification in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is feasible.

  17. Diagnostic Method of Diabetes Based on Support Vector Machine and Tongue Images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xu, Jiatuo; Hu, Xiaojuan; Chen, Qingguang; Tu, Liping; Huang, Jingbin; Cui, Ji

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this research is to develop a diagnostic method of diabetes based on standardized tongue image using support vector machine (SVM). Methods. Tongue images of 296 diabetic subjects and 531 nondiabetic subjects were collected by the TDA-1 digital tongue instrument. Tongue body and tongue coating were separated by the division-merging method and chrominance-threshold method. With extracted color and texture features of the tongue image as input variables, the diagnostic model of diabetes with SVM was trained. After optimizing the combination of SVM kernel parameters and input variables, the influences of the combinations on the model were analyzed. Results. After normalizing parameters of tongue images, the accuracy rate of diabetes predication was increased from 77.83% to 78.77%. The accuracy rate and area under curve (AUC) were not reduced after reducing the dimensions of tongue features with principal component analysis (PCA), while substantially saving the training time. During the training for selecting SVM parameters by genetic algorithm (GA), the accuracy rate of cross-validation was grown from 72% or so to 83.06%. Finally, we compare with several state-of-the-art algorithms, and experimental results show that our algorithm has the best predictive accuracy. Conclusions. The diagnostic method of diabetes on the basis of tongue images in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is of great value, indicating the feasibility of digitalized tongue diagnosis.

  18. Effects of varying fixed lingual apex positions on tongue pressure during straw drinking.

    PubMed

    Hara, M; Ishida, R; Ohkubo, M; Sugiyama, T; Abe, S

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the impact of tongue-thrusting on lingual pressure during fluid intake with a straw. In this study, 12 healthy young dentate individuals (two women and 10 men; 19-33 years) were instructed to drink 15 mL of water with a regular drinking straw at 37 °C, when indicated by the investigator. Participants drank after adjusting tongue position to one of the following patterns: (i) Holding the tip of the straw between the lips (Normal Position: NP), (ii) Sticking out the tongue to the vermilion zone of the lower lip and inserting the straw 1 cm past the front teeth (Tongue-thrusting Position: TP). Five recordings were conducted for each participant in a randomised order. To measure tongue pressure during swallowing, a specially designed 0.1-mm thick sensor sheet (Nitta, Osaka, Japan) with a tactile system for measurement of pressure distribution (I-SCAN; Nitta) was used. Duration, maximal magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure were analysed based on the wave of tongue pressure recorded while water was swallowed. Magnitude, duration and integrated value of tongue pressure were significantly lower in TP than in NP at the median line (Ch1-3). Magnitude and integrated value of tongue pressure at the lateral part of the tongue (Ch5) were significantly lower in TP than in NP. When duration, maximal magnitude and integrated values were compared by channel, no significant differences were observed in NP, but a significant difference was found between Ch3 and the lateral areas Ch4/Ch 5 in TP. When the tongue was thrust forward, movement dynamics of the entire tongue changed and influenced contact between the tongue and palate during liquid intake with a straw. The impact was noticeably weaker on the median line than in lateral areas.

  19. Histology of the mucosa of gastric antrum and body before and after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Resende, L M; Queiroz, D M; Barbosa, A J; Mendes, E N; Rocha, G A; Coelho, L G; Passos, M C; Castro, L P; Oliveira, C A; Lima Júnior, G F

    1993-12-01

    1. Helicobacter pylori status and the histology of the antral and oxyntic mucosa were evaluated in 25 patients with duodenal ulcer treated with a triple schedule of furazolidone, metronidazole and amoxicillin, and in 16 patients treated only with cimetidine. 2. Before treatment, H. pylori was detected in all patients. One month after treatment with the antimicrobial agents, H. pylori was not found in 18 (72.0%) of 25 patients treated with the triple schedule. In the patients treated with cimetidine (N = 16) the H. pylori tests continued to be positive after treatment. 3. Inflammatory activity and intensity of gastritis were significantly reduced in patients treated with the antimicrobial agents but not in cimetidine-treated patients. Three patients who had negative cultures and improvement of gastritis 1 month after treatment became H. pylori positive again within 2 months, with concomitant reappearance of gastritis. 4. This study provides additional evidence that histological gastritis observed in H. pylori-positive patients with duodenal ulcer is due to the presence of the microorganism.

  20. Bilateral lymphoepithelial cyst of the tongue: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silva, Igor Henrique Morais; Romanach, Mario Jose; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; de Almeida, Oslei Paes; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2013-01-01

    A lymphoepithelial cyst (LC) is a rare occurrence in the oral cavity, lined by a keratinized stratified squamous epithelium that is surrounded by diffuse lymphoid tissue, that often contains lymphoid follicles. The clinical aspect of oral LC includes an asymptomatic yellowish nodule (less than 10 mm) with regular surface and soft consistency. It usually affects the floor of the mouth and the ventral and posterolateral surfaces of the tongue in adult male patients. To date, approximately 280 cases of LC in the oral cavity have been reported in the literature; however, none of them appear bilaterally. This article presents the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of a unique bilateral LC in the posterolateral region of the tongue.

  1. Dynamic multileaf collimation without `tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Santvoort, J. P. C.; Heijmen, B. J. M.

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a `tongue-and-groove' - or similar - construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each `tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  2. Dynamic multileaf collimation without 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage effects.

    PubMed

    van Santvoort, J P; Heijmen, B J

    1996-10-01

    In all commercially available multileaf collimators, a 'tongue-and-groove'--or similar--construction is used for reduction of leakage radiation between adjacent leaves. These constructions can cause serious underdosages in intensity-modulated photon beams. A method for leaf trajectory calculation for dynamic multileaf collimation, which fully avoids these underdosage effects, is presented. The method is based on pairwise synchronizations of trajectories of adjacent leaf pairs, such that the delivered beam intensity in each 'tongue-and-groove' region is always equal to the smallest of the two prescribed intensities for the two corresponding leaf pairs. The effectiveness of the method has been proven for a large number of intensity-modulated fields, using the dynamic multileaf collimation mode of our MM50 Racetrack Microtron. Compared to dynamic multileaf collimation without synchronization, beam-on times are always equal or longer. For the cases that we studied, the beam-on time was typically increased by 5 to 15%.

  3. Tongue necrosis as first symptom of giant cell arteritis (GCA).

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Dorr, A; Hafner, F; Gary, T; Pilger, E

    2009-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis affecting people over the age of 50 years, especially in the western world. Nevertheless, the initial diagnosis can be tricky, as some of the patients present at first time with a real unusual initial manifestation. One of these can be tongue necrosis, which is according to the literature in accordance with scalp necrosis, the rarest initial manifestation form of GCA. We describe two patients who presented with tongue necrosis as initial symptom of GCA. The diagnosis was made by the American College of Rheumatology criteria, biopsy and duplex sonography of their temporal arteries. A typical halo was seen as a sign of intimal edema. The patients were put on corticosteroids immediately after diagnosis was proven and their symptoms improved quickly.

  4. Parasomnia with rhythmic movements manifesting as nocturnal tongue biting.

    PubMed

    Tuxhorn, I; Hoppe, M

    1993-06-01

    The case of a healthy 2-year-old girl with repeated nocturnal tongue biting as a result of rhythmic movements of the jaw associated with body rocking in non-REM sleep is described. Parasomnias manifesting with rhythmic, stereotyped movements of the head, trunk and extremities are well described in healthy children. The term rhythmic movement disorders (RMD) was introduced for these repetive movements in sleep which may appear as head banging (jactatio capitis), body rocking or leg rolling. Severe injuries including fractures, subdural effusions and eye injures are reported. Repeated tongue injuries have not been described as a consequence of RMD. The differential diagnosis from nocturnal seizures is crucial to avoid overtreatment of this benign albeit dramatically presenting condition.

  5. Measurement Of Beer Taste Attributes Using An Electronic Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshin, Evgeny; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Nicolaï, Bart; Saison, Daan; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Delvaux, Filip; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-01

    The present work deals with the results of the application of an electronic tongue system as an analytical tool for rapid assessment of beer flavour. Fifty samples of Belgian and Dutch beers of different types, characterized with respect to sensory properties and bitterness, were analyzed using the electronic tongue (ET) based on potentiometric chemical sensors. The ET was capable of predicting 10 sensory attributes of beer with good precision including sweetness, sourness, intensity, body, etc., as well as the most important instrumental parameter—bitterness. These results show a good promise for further progressing of the ET as a new analytical technique for the fast assessment of taste attributes and bitterness, in particular, in the food and brewery industries.

  6. Cavernous Hemangioma of Tongue: Management of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Niharika; Deshmukh, Sudhanwa N; B, Jagadesh; S, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Hemangiomas are benign tumours of infancy and childhood, most commonly located in the head and neck region and occur more frequently in the lips, tongue and palate. The treatment depends upon lesion location, size and evolution stage and the patient’s age. This paper describes the management of cavernous hemangioma in a 2 -year -old child and 14 -year -old child using different approaches. PMID:25478463

  7. BrainPort(Registered trademark) Technology Tongue Interface Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    whether electrode arrays with sub-millimeter diameter electrodes and associated circuitry could be could be fabricated and safely driven such that...millimeter diameter range The results of this program clearly demonstrate that the human tongue is capable of temporal/spatial detection of electrical...with 2 Data subject to restrictions on Cover and Notice Page. Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited. electrode diameters and

  8. Familial ankyloglossia (tongue-tie): a case report.

    PubMed

    Morowati, Saeid; Yasini, Mobin; Ranjbar, Reza; Peivandi, Ali Asghar; Ghadami, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) is a congenital anomaly with a prevalence of 4-5% and characterized by an abnormally short lingual frenulum. For unknown reasons the abnormality seems to be more common in males. The pathogenesis of ankyloglossia is not known. The authors report a family with isolated ankyloglossia inherited as an autosomal dominant or recessive trait. The identification of the defective gene(s) in these patients might reveal novel information on the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  9. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Mucoadhesive Film Containing Acmella oleracea Extract for Oral Mucosa Topical Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Santana de Freitas-Blanco, Verônica; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Serpe, Luciano; Oliveira Sousa, Ilza Maria; Guilherme Damasio, Viviane Aparecida; Yamane, Lais Thiemi; de Paula, Eneida; Ferreira Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop an anesthetic mucoadhesive film containing Acmella oleracea (jambu) extract for topical use on oral mucosa. Methods Ethanolic extracts from aerial parts of jambu were prepared by maceration. Pigment removal was obtained by adsorption with activated carbon. Three mucoadhesive films were developed using a film casting method: 10 or 20% of crude jambu extract (10% JB and 20% JB), and 10% of crude jambu extract treated with activated carbon (10% JBC). The mucoadhesive films were characterized regarding their uniformity, thickness, pH, and spilanthol content, and their stability was evaluated during 120 days. Gas chromatography was used to quantify the amount of spilanthol. In vitro tests determined the permeation of spilanthol across pig esophageal epithelium mucosa in Franz diffusion cells. Topical anesthetic efficacy was assessed in vivo using a tail flick test in mice. Results The three mucoadhesive films showed physical stability and visual appearances suitable for use on oral mucosa. The permeation study revealed that the spilanthol from 10% JBC presented higher flux and permeability coefficient values, compared to 10% or 20% JB (p < 0.001). Moreover, 10% JBC showed better topical anesthetic efficacy than the other films (p < 0.01). Conclusion Mucoadhesive film containing crude extract of jambu treated with activated carbon is a potential alternative for oral, topical use, encouraging future clinical studies. PMID:27626796

  11. Sensory intensity assessment of olive oils using an electronic tongue.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Ana C A; Dias, Luís G; Rodrigues, Nuno; Pereira, José A; Peres, António M

    2016-01-01

    Olive oils may be commercialized as intense, medium or light, according to the intensity perception of fruitiness, bitterness and pungency attributes, assessed by a sensory panel. In this work, the capability of an electronic tongue to correctly classify olive oils according to the sensory intensity perception levels was evaluated. Cross-sensitivity and non-specific lipid polymeric membranes were used as sensors. The sensor device was firstly tested using quinine monohydrochloride standard solutions. Mean sensitivities of 14±2 to 25±6 mV/decade, depending on the type of plasticizer used in the lipid membranes, were obtained showing the device capability for evaluating bitterness. Then, linear discriminant models based on sub-sets of sensors, selected by a meta-heuristic simulated annealing algorithm, were established enabling to correctly classify 91% of olive oils according to their intensity sensory grade (leave-one-out cross-validation procedure). This capability was further evaluated using a repeated K-fold cross-validation procedure, showing that the electronic tongue allowed an average correct classification of 80% of the olive oils used for internal-validation. So, the electronic tongue can be seen as a taste sensor, allowing differentiating olive oils with different sensory intensities, and could be used as a preliminary, complementary and practical tool for panelists during olive oil sensory analysis.

  12. Two cross-linguistic factors underlying tongue shapes for vowels

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, D.A.; Papcun, G.; Hogden, J.; Zlokarnik, I.

    1996-06-01

    Desirable characteristics of a vocal-tract parametrization include accuracy, low dimensionality, and generalizability across speakers and languages. A low-dimensional, speaker-independent linear parametrization of vowel tongue shapes can be obtained using the PARAFAC three-mode factor analysis procedure. Harshman et al. applied PARAFAC to midsagittal x-ray vowel data from five English speakers, reporting that two speaker-independent factors are required to accurately represent the tongue shape measured along anatomically normalized vocal-tract diameter grid lines. Subsequently, the cross-linguistic generality of this parametrization was brought into question by the application of PARAFAC to Icelandic vowel data, where three nonorthogonal factors were reported. This solution is shown to be degenerate; a reanalysis of Jackson`s Icelandic data produces two factors that match Harshman et al.`s factors for English vowels, contradicting Jackson`s distinction between English and Icelandic language-specific `articulatory primes.` To obtain vowel factors not constrained by artificial measurement grid lines, x-ray tongue shape traces of six English speakers were marked with 13 equally spaced points. PARAFAC analysis of this unconstranied (x,y) coordinate data results in two factors that are clearly interpretable in terms of the traditional vowel quality dimensions front/back, high/low. 14 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Visual Feedback of Tongue Movement for Novel Speech Sound Learning

    PubMed Central

    Katz, William F.; Mehta, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Pronunciation training studies have yielded important information concerning the processing of audiovisual (AV) information. Second language (L2) learners show increased reliance on bottom-up, multimodal input for speech perception (compared to monolingual individuals). However, little is known about the role of viewing one's own speech articulation processes during speech training. The current study investigated whether real-time, visual feedback for tongue movement can improve a speaker's learning of non-native speech sounds. An interactive 3D tongue visualization system based on electromagnetic articulography (EMA) was used in a speech training experiment. Native speakers of American English produced a novel speech sound (/ɖ/; a voiced, coronal, palatal stop) before, during, and after trials in which they viewed their own speech movements using the 3D model. Talkers' productions were evaluated using kinematic (tongue-tip spatial positioning) and acoustic (burst spectra) measures. The results indicated a rapid gain in accuracy associated with visual feedback training. The findings are discussed with respect to neural models for multimodal speech processing. PMID:26635571

  14. [Microscopic innervation and vascularization of the tongue. General study].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, A; Sanchiz, O

    1992-01-01

    Our study deals with 23 prenatal human tongues, and a comparative study was carried out on one neonatal tongue and a few human and animal postnatal tongues. Sagittal and coronal sections were stained with various techniques. After the 7th week, the development of the nerves and their relationships with the neighboring structures can be observed. There are very few capillaries making up the superficial vascular network under the epithelium. The vessels whose walls are beginning to develop include the future red blood cells with their basophilic nuclei. During the whole process of evolution, there is a tight correlation between the collagen fibers and the neighboring structures. The innervation and vascularization--the latter with changes in the vascular walls--progressively increase. A short time before birth, the nerve fibers include their characteristic components, except for the Schmidt-Lantermann fissures. A considerable innervation advances towards the papillae, and anterior and posterior nerve networks enter the papillae, whose connective tissue includes groups of corpuscles on serial sections.

  15. Tongue muscle plasticity following hypoglossal nerve stimulation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Jackson, Michelle A.; Kletzien, Heidi; Wang, Hao; Schaser, Allison J.; Leverson, Glen E.; Zealear, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Age-related decreases in tongue muscle mass and strength have been reported. It may be possible to prevent age-related tongue muscle changes using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Our hypothesis was that alterations in muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain composition would be found following NMES. Methods Fifty-four young, middle-aged and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats were included. Twenty-four rats underwent bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves for 8 weeks and were compared with control or sham rats. Muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain (MHC) in the genioglossus (GG), styloglossus (SG) and hyoglossus (HG) muscles were examined. Results In comparison with unstimulated control rats, we found reduced muscle fatigue, increased contraction and half decay times and increased twitch and tetanic tension. Increased Type I MHC was found, except for GG in old and middle-aged rats. Discussion Transitions in tongue muscle contractile properties and phenotype were found following NMES. PMID:23169566

  16. Sublingual vein extraction algorithm based on hyperspectral tongue imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Guan, Yana; Xu, Liang

    2011-04-01

    Among the parts of the human tongue surface, the sublingual vein is one of the most important ones which may have pathological relationship with some diseases. To analyze this information quantitatively, one primitive work is to extract sublingual veins accurately from tongue body. In this paper, a hyperspectral tongue imaging system instead of a digital camera is used to capture sublingual images. A hidden Markov model approach is presented to extract the sublingual veins from the hyperspectral sublingual images. This approach characterizes the spectral correlation and the band-to-band variability using a hidden Markov process, where the model parameters are estimated by the spectra of the pixel vectors forming the observation sequences. The proposed algorithm, the pixel-based sublingual vein segmentation algorithm, and the spectral angle mapper algorithm are tested on a total of 150 scenes of hyperspectral sublingual veins images to evaluate the performance of the new method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can extract the sublingual veins more accurately than the traditional algorithms and can perform well even in a noisy environment.

  17. Epigenetic maturation in colonic mucosa continues beyond infancy in mice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monozygotic twin and other epidemiologic studies indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases that commonly affect the colonic mucosa. The peak onset of these disorders in young adulthood, suggests that epigenetic changes normally o...

  18. Micro- and Nanosized Particles in Nasal Mucosa: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this prospective study is to evaluate presence and quantity of micro- and nanosized particles (NPs) and interindividual differences in their distribution and composition in nasal mucosa. Methods. Six samples of nasal mucosa obtained by mucotomy from patients with chronic hypertrophic rhinosinusitis were examined. Samples divided into 4 parts according to the distance from the nostrils were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy to detect solid particles and characterize their morphology and composition. A novel method of quantification of the particles was designed and used to evaluate interindividual differences in distribution of the particles. The findings were compared with patients' employment history. Results. In all the samples, NPs of different elemental composition were found (iron, barium, copper, titanium, etc.), predominantly in the parts most distant from nostrils, in various depths from the surface of the mucosa and interindividual differences in their quantity and composition were found, possibly in relation to professional exposition. Conclusions. This study has proven the possibility of quantification of distribution of micro- and nanosized particles in tissue samples and that the NPs may deposit in deeper layers of mucosa and their elemental composition may be related to professional exposition to the sources of NPs. PMID:26125023

  19. Trombone tongue: a new clinical sign for significant medullary compression at the craniovertebral junction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheong H; Casey, Adrian T H; Allibone, James B; Chelvarajah, Ramesh

    2006-12-01

    The authors describe a previously unreported clinical sign that may indicate the onset of significant compression of the medulla oblongata in cases of craniovertebral junction abnormalities. This 17-year-old boy presented with mild bilateral leg weakness. Imaging studies revealed severe basilar invagination and a marked Chiari malformation. While awaiting surgery, his tongue developed an involuntary constant protrusion-intrusion repetitive motion. The onset of this so-named "trombone tongue" sign was followed shortly afterward by rapidly progressive spastic tetraparesis. After the authors performed a transmaxillary clivectomy, foramen magnum decompression, and occipitocervical fusion, they noted that the abnormal tongue motion promptly resolved and the tetraparesis gradually improved. The authors discuss their current understanding of the central control of tongue movements and present a hypothesis on the pathogenesis of trombone tongue based on the neuroanatomical basis of another abnormal tongue movement sign, lingual myoclonus.

  20. Electrical Impedance Myography (EIM) in the Evaluation of the Tongue Musculature in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    Shellikeri, Sanjana; Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Pattee, Gary L.; Berry, James D.; Rutkove, Seward B.; Zinman, Lorne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Electrical impedance myography (EIM) quantifies muscle health and is used as a biomarker of muscle abnormalities in neurogenic and myopathic diseases. EIM has yet to be evaluated in the tongue musculature in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), who often show clinical bulbar signs. Methods The lingual musculature of 19 subjects with motor neuron disease and 21 of normal participants were assessed using EIM, strength and endurance testing, and clinical observation. Results Tongue musculature in the ALS group was characterized by significantly smaller phase (Ph) and larger resistance (R) when compared to the healthy cohort. Ph and tongue endurance were correlated in the ALS group. Discussion EIM of tongue musculature could distinguish people with ALS from healthy controls. The demonstrated relationship between tongue function and Ph supports further testing of EIM of the tongue as a potential biomarker in ALS. PMID:25580728

  1. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RAT MUCOUS MEMBRANE OF THE TONGUE EARLY AFFECTED BY ACRYLIC RESIN MONOMER].

    PubMed

    Davydenko, V; Nidzelskiy, M; Starchenko, I; Davydenko, A; Kuznetsov, V

    2016-03-01

    Base materials, made on the basis of various derivatives of acrylic and methacrylic acids, have been widely used in prosthetic dentistry. Free monomer, affecting the tissues of prosthetic bed and the whole body, is always found in dentures. Therefore, study of the effect of acrylic resins' monomer on mucous membrane of the tongue is crucial. Rat tongue is very similar to human tongue, and this fact has become the basis for selecting these animals to be involved into the experiment. The paper presents the findings related to the effect of "Ftoraks" base acrylic resin monomer on the state of rat mucous membrane of the tongue and its regeneration. The microscopy has found that the greatest changes in the mucous membrane of the tongue occur on day 3 and 7 day after applying the monomer and are of erosive and inflammatory nature. Regeneration of tongue epithelium slows down.

  2. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine.

  3. Partial amputation of the tongue--self-inflicted or physical assault?

    PubMed

    Morgenthal, S; Bayer, R; Doerre, A; Dreßler, J

    2016-05-01

    Injuries of the tongue are generally self-inflicted lesions and occur during different diseases or external incidents. The amputation of the tongue is a rare event. In this article, we report about a woman presenting with a complete amputation of the anterior third of the tongue. The morphological findings, which are essential for the differentiation of self-inflicted injuries and injuries caused by a third party, are demonstrated.

  4. Immunohistochemistry of lymphocytes in benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Li, S-X; Li, Q; Yang, Y-Q; Jin, L-J; Sun, Z; Yu, S-F

    2015-06-29

    Benign lymphoadenosis of oral mucosa (BLOM) is a common oral mucosa disease and may be regarded as a precancerous lesion. However, the association between its biological behavior and lymphocyte distribution remains unclear. Therefore, to investigate the characteristics of BLOM, we studied the infiltration of lymphocytes associated with it. The expression levels of CD74, CD20, CD3, and CD45RO were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining in 14 sam-ples from BLOM, 9 samples from BLOM with atypia hyperplasia, 11 samples from BLOM with canceration, and 10 samples from normal oral mucosa tissues. The results were analyzed by two-sample t-test using SPSS 10.0 for Windows, and P < 0.05 was considered to be sig-nificant. In normal oral mucosa, positive expression levels of CD3 and CD45RO were presented in the extra-lymphoid follicle, and the expres-sion levels of CD74 and CD20 were negative. In all BLOM groups, the expression level of CD20 was positive except for one case of BLOM with canceration; the expression levels of CD74 were all positive. Posi-tive expression levels of CD3 and CD45RO could be found not only in extra-lymphoid follicles but also in inner-lymphoid follicles in the BLOM groups. The expression levels of CD74 and CD20 in extra-lym-phoid follicles, and CD3 and CD45RO in inner-lymphoid follicles in BLOM were significantly higher than in BLOM with canceration. The infiltrated lymphocytes in BLOM comprise T- and B-cells. This indi-cates that the lymphoid tissue in BLOM is mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and BLOM is a proliferative lesion.

  5. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  6. Results of brachytherapy for cancer of the tongue with special emphasis on local prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, J.; Okuyama, T.; Shibuya, H.; Takeda, M.

    1982-05-01

    One hundred and sixty-six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were treated with radiation. Treatment modalities were mainly interstitial implant with or without external beam irradiation, except for early lesions, which were treated with intraoral electron beam therapy. Analysis was made on the local prognosis of the lesion to clarify the indications for interstitial therapy, especially the combined program with external beam therapy, and the time-dose relationship of the brachytherapy. Local recurrence-free rates (two years) were 94% in T1, 77% in T2 and 32% in T3 lesions, respectively. For T1 and surperficial or exophytic T2 lesions, the local recurrence-free rate was excellent with the interstitial therapy alone using either permanent implants of gold grain or radium implants. Therefore, prior external beam therapy seemed to be unnecessary for these lesions. When the treated area was less than 10 cm/sup 2/, subsequent complications were not likely even if the TDF (time-dose factor) value was high. Most of the patients who received combined external beam and interstitial therapy showed infiltrative T2 and a majority of the T3 lesions. In these patients, it was apparent that most of the total dose should be given from the interstitial implant after a small prior dose with external irradiation, because these lesions could not be cured even if the external dose was increased.

  7. Verruca vulgaris of the tongue: a case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ahmet; Arslan, Selçuk; Ersöz, Şafak; Değer, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Verruca vulgaris (common warts) is a benign lesion of skin and mucous membranes caused by human papillomovirus (HPV). The lesions are typically self-limited but may vary in size and number. The occurrence on the tongue is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only one verruca vulgaris existing in the tongue had been reported in the literature. Case presentation: A rare case of verruca vulgaris of the tongue occurring in a 36-year-old Caucasian male is presented with a discussion on ethiopathogenesis and the treatment methods. Verruca vulgaris must be remembered in the differential diagnosis of tongue lesions and surgical treatment may provide satisfactory outcomes. PMID:25172971

  8. The Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Tongue Cleaning on Existing Plaque Levels in Children

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, J Jasmin; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Reddy, Venugopal; Prasad Rao, Arun

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study compared and evaluated the effects of tongue scraping and tongue brushing on existing plaque levels in children. The investigation was a single blind, stratified comparison of three parallel groups of children who performed either tongue scraping or tongue brushing along with tooth brushing or only tooth brushing twice daily under professional supervision for a 21 day period. Dental plaque was recorded using the plaque index described by Silness and Loe at baseline, on day 10 and on day 21. All data was subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon's Signed Ranks Sum Test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The results of the present study show that the tongue scraping and tongue brushing groups showed statistically significant reductions in plaque levels after 10 days and also after 21 days. It was also noted that both tongue scraping and tongue brushing were equally effective in reducing the plaque load in children. How to cite this article: Winnier JJ, Rupesh S, Nayak UA, Reddy V, Rao AP. The Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Tongue Cleaning on Existing Plaque Levels in Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(3):188-192. PMID:25206220

  9. Change in tongue pressure in patients with head and neck cancer after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Sugahara, Kazuma; Fukuoka, Tatsuyuki; Saito, Shota; Sakuramoto, Ayumi; Horii, Nobuhide; Sano, Saori; Hasegawa, Kana; Nakao, Yuta; Nanto, Tomoki; Kadoi, Kanenori; Moridera, Kuniyasu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Domen, Kazuhisa; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-14

    Tongue pressure is reportedly associated with dysphagia. This study investigated relationships among characteristics of head and neck cancer, tongue pressure and dysphagia screening tests performed in patients with head and neck cancer during the acute phase after surgical resection. Fifty-seven patients (36 men, 21 women; age range 26-95 years) underwent surgical resection and dysphagia screening tests (Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test, Water Swallowing Test, Modified Water Swallowing Test and Food Test) and pre- and postoperative measurement of tongue pressure at 5 time points (preoperatively, and 1-2 weeks and 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively). Progression of cancer (stage), tracheotomy, surgical reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and neck dissection were factors associated with postoperative tongue pressure. Data were analyzed by linear mixed-effect model, Spearman correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Tongue pressure was significantly reduced 1-2 weeks after surgery, and recovered over time. Changes in tongue pressure were significantly associated with stage, radiotherapy and reconstruction. All screening tests showed a significant relationship with tongue pressure. Analysis of ROC and area under the effect curve suggested that a tongue pressure of 15 kPa can be used as a cut-off value to detect dysphagia after surgery for head and neck cancer. Our results suggest that tongue pressure evaluation might offer a safe, useful and objective tool to assess dysphagia immediately postoperatively in patients with head and neck cancer.

  10. Tongue-coating as risk indicator for aspiration pneumonia in edentate elderly.

    PubMed

    Abe, Shu; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Adachi, Mieko; Okuda, Katsuji

    2008-01-01

    Silent aspiration of oral microorganisms is a major cause of aspiration pneumonia. To establish oral hygiene criteria for the prevention of aspiration pneumonia in edentulous elderly persons, we investigated the relationship between presence of tongue-coating and number of oral bacteria in saliva and episodes of pneumonia. A total of 71 edentulous Japanese people aged 65 years or older living in nursing homes were enrolled in the study. A tongue plaque index (TPI) was used to evaluate quantity of tongue-coating, with TPI0 signifying no tongue-coating and TPI1 signifying presence of tongue-coating. Edentate elderly with TPI1 demonstrated significantly higher salivary bacterial counts than those with TPI0 (p<0.05). The number of elderly patients developing aspiration pneumonia was larger (p<0.005) in patients with TPI-based poor scores (average TPI>0.5) than in those with TPI-based good scores. The relative risk of developing pneumonia in the good tongue hygiene group compared with in the poor tongue hygiene group was 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02-0.9. The results demonstrate that tongue-coating is associated with number of viable salivary bacterial cells and development of aspiration pneumonia, suggesting that tongue-coating is a risk indicator of aspiration pneumonia in edentate subjects.

  11. Fast marching over the 2D Gabor magnitude domain for tongue body segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenchao; Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, David; Li, Naimin; Zuo, Wangmeng

    2013-12-01

    Tongue body segmentation is a prerequisite to tongue image analysis and has recently received considerable attention. The existing tongue body segmentation methods usually involve two key steps: edge detection and active contour model (ACM)-based segmentation. However, conventional edge detectors cannot faithfully detect the contour of the tongue body, and the initialization of ACM suffers from the edge discontinuity problem. To address these issues, we proposed a novel tongue body segmentation method, GaborFM, which initializes ACM by performing fast marching over the two-dimensional (2D) Gabor magnitude domain of the tongue images. For the enhancement of the contour of the tongue body, we used the 2D Gabor magnitude-based detector. To cope with the edge discontinuity problem, the fast marching method was utilized to connect the discontinuous contour segments, resulting in a closed and continuous tongue body contour for subsequent ACM-based segmentation. Qualitative and quantitative results showed that GaborFM is superior to the other methods for tongue body segmentation.

  12. The effects of tongue loading and auditory feedback on vowel production.

    PubMed

    Leung, Man-Tak; Ciocca, Valter

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the role of sensory feedback during the production of front vowels. A temporary aftereffect induced by tongue loading was employed to modify the somatosensory-based perception of tongue height. Following the removal of tongue loading, tongue height during vowel production was estimated by measuring the frequency of the first formant (F1) from the acoustic signal. In experiment 1, the production of front vowels following tongue loading was investigated either in the presence or absence of auditory feedback. With auditory feedback available, the tongue height of front vowels was not modified by the aftereffect of tongue loading. By contrast, speakers did not compensate for the aftereffect of tongue loading when they produced vowels in the absence of auditory feedback. In experiment 2, the characteristics of the masking noise were manipulated such that it masked energy either in the F1 region or in the region of the second and higher formants. The results showed that the adjustment of tongue height during the production of front vowels depended on information about F1 in the auditory feedback. These findings support the idea that speech goals include both auditory and somatosensory targets and that speakers are able to make use of information from both sensory modalities to maximize the accuracy of speech production.

  13. Olfactory Mucosa Autografts in Human Spinal Cord Injury: A Pilot Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Carlos; Pratas-Vital, José; Escada, Pedro; Hasse-Ferreira, Armando; Capucho, Clara; Peduzzi, Jean D

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: Olfactory mucosa is a readily accessible source of olfactory ensheathing and stem-like progenitor cells for neural repair. To determine the safety and feasibility of transplanting olfactory mucosa autografts into patients with traumatically injured spinal cords, a human pilot clinical study was conducted. Methods: Seven patients ranging from 18 to 32 years of age (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] class A) were treated at 6 months to 6.5 years after injury. Olfactory mucosa autografts were transplanted into lesions ranging from 1 to 6 cm that were present at C4–T6 neurological levels. Operations were performed from July 2001 through March 2003. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and ASIA neurological and otolaryngological evaluations were performed before and after surgery. Results: MRI studies revealed moderate to complete filling of the lesion sites. Two patients reported return of sensation in their bladders, and one of these patients regained voluntary contraction of anal sphincter. Two of the 7 ASIA A patients became ASIA C. Every patient had improvement in ASIA motor scores. The mean increase for the 3 subjects with tetraplegia in the upper extremities was 6.3 ± 1.2 (SEM), and the mean increase for the 4 subjects with paraplegia in the lower extremities was 3.9 ± 1.0. Among the patients who improved in their ASIA sensory neurological scores (all except one patient), the mean increase was 20.3 ± 5.0 for light touch and 19.7 ± 4.6 for pinprick. Most of the recovered sensation below the initial level of injury was impaired. Adverse events included sensory decrease in one patient that was most likely caused by difficulty in locating the lesion, and there were a few instances of transient pain that was relieved by medication. EMG revealed motor unit potential when the patient was asked to perform movement. Conclusion: This study shows that olfactory mucosa autograft transplantation into the human injured

  14. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    PubMed

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  15. Nucleocytoplasmic distribution of opioid growth factor and its receptor in tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Ruth, Torre B; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions of the opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met(5)]-enkephalin, and opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) in the epithelium of the rat tongue were determined in order to reveal structure-function relationships. Laser scanning confocal microscopic analysis showed that both OGF and OGFr were colocalized in the paranuclear cytoplasm and in the nuclei of keratinocytes in the stratum basale. Using immunoelectron microscopy and postembedding techniques, double labeling experiments disclosed that complexes of OGF-OGFr were colocalized on the outer nuclear envelope, in the paranuclear cytoplasm, perpendicular to the nuclear envelope in a putative nuclear pore complex, and in the nucleus adjacent to heterochromatin. Anti-OGF IgG alone was detected in the cytoplasm, and anti-OGFr IgG alone was associated with the outer nuclear envelope. Study of chronic treatment with the opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), which blocks opioid-receptor binding, revealed the presence of OGFr immunoreactivity alone in the cytoplasm and the nucleus; some OGF-OGFr complexes were also observed. Colocalization of OGFr and karyopherin (importin) beta was recorded in the cytoplasm and nucleus. These results in tongue epithelium are the first to suggest that OGFr resides on the outer nuclear envelope, where OGF interacts with OGFr; that the OGF-OGFr complex translocates between cytoplasm and nucleus at the nuclear pore; and that the nuclear localization signal of OGFr interacts with karyopherin beta for nuclear transport. These novel data also indicate that signal transduction for cell proliferation appears to involve an OGF-OGFr complex that interfaces with chromatin in the nucleus. Moreover, the unique finding that OGFr was found in the cytoplasm and nucleus in NTX-treated specimens may suggest that NTX-OGFr complexes have the same pathway as OGF-OGFr.

  16. Combined-modality treatment for advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.-H.; Lin, C.-Y. |; Kang, C.-J.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T. |; Wang, H.-M. |; Cheng, A.-J. |; Chang, J.T.-C. ||. E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prognostic factors in advanced-stage oral tongue cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant therapy and to identify indications for adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 201 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue managed between January 1995 and November 2002. All had undergone wide excision and neck dissection plus adjuvant radiotherapy or CCRT. Based on postoperative staging, 123 (61.2%) patients had Stage IV and 78 (38.8%) had Stage III disease. All patients were followed for at least 18 months after completion of radiotherapy or until death. The median follow-up was 40.4 months for surviving patients. The median dose of radiotherapy was 64.8 Gy (range, 58.8-72.8 Gy). Cisplatin-based regimens were used for chemotherapy. Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 48% and 50.8%, respectively. Stage, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, and extracapsular spread (ECS) significantly affected disease-specific survival on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, ECS, and CCRT were independent prognostic factors. If ECS was present, only CCRT significantly improved survival (3-year RFS with ECS and with CCRT = 48.2% vs. without CCRT = 15%, p = 0.038). In the presence of other poor prognostic factors, results of the two treatment strategies did not significantly differ. Conclusions: Based on this study, ECS appears to be an absolute indication for adjuvant CCRT. CCRT can not be shown to be statistically better than radiotherapy alone in this retrospective series when ECS is not present.

  17. Effects of acute alcohol consumption and vitamin E co-treatment on oxidative stress parameters in rats tongue.

    PubMed

    Carrard, V C; Pires, A S; Mendez, M; Mattos, F; Moreira, J C F; Sant'Ana Filho, M

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute alcohol consumption and vitamin E co-treatment upon oxidative stress parameters in rats tongue. Thirty-eight, Wistar rats were separated into five groups (alcohol, alcohol/vitamin E, control, Tween, vitamin E). Alcohol and alcohol vitamin E groups had the standard diet, and 40% alcohol on drinking water. Other groups were fed with the same standard diet and water ad libitum. Vitamin E was given by gavage to vitamin E and alcohol/vitamin E rats twice a week. Alcohol and control groups were subjected to saline gavage and Tween group to 5% Tween 80 solution, the vitamin E vehicle. At day 14, the animals were anesthetized and specimens were obtained from tongue. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidative damage, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were quantified. Alcohol group decreased TBARS in relation to control group and alcohol vitamin-treated animals decreased TBARS when compared to Tween and vitamin E groups. SOD activity was lower and CAT activity was higher in animals treated with both alcohol and vitamin E. These results suggest that short-term alcohol consumption decreases lipid peroxidation levels. Alternatively, alcohol/vitamin E group increased CAT, showing the toxicity of this association.

  18. MZC Gel Inhibits SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in Macaque Vaginal Mucosa and SHIV-RT in Rectal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Calenda, Giulia; Villegas, Guillermo; Barnable, Patrick; Litterst, Claudia; Levendosky, Keith; Gettie, Agegnehu; Cooney, Michael L; Blanchard, James; Fernández-Romero, José A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Teleshova, Natalia

    2017-03-01

    The Population Council's microbicide gel MZC (also known as PC-1005) containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate dihydrate (ZA) in carrageenan (CG) has shown promise as a broad-spectrum microbicide against HIV, herpes simplex virus (HSV), and human papillomavirus. Previous data show antiviral activity against these viruses in cell-based assays, prevention of vaginal and rectal simian-human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) infection, and reduction of vaginal HSV shedding in rhesus macaques and also excellent antiviral activity against HSV and human papillomavirus in murine models. Recently, we demonstrated that MZC is safe and effective against SHIV-RT in macaque vaginal explants. Here we established models of ex vivo SHIV-RT/HSV-2 coinfection of vaginal mucosa and SHIV-RT infection of rectal mucosa in macaques (challenge of rectal mucosa with HSV-2 did not result in reproducible tissue infection), evaluated antiviral activity of MZC, and compared quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay readouts for monitoring SHIV-RT infection. MZC (at nontoxic dilutions) significantly inhibited SHIV-RT in vaginal and rectal mucosas and HSV-2 in vaginal mucosa when present during viral challenge. Analysis of SHIV-RT infection and MZC activity by 1-step simian immunodeficiency virus gag quantitative RT-PCR and p27 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated similar virus growth dynamics and MZC activity by both methods and higher sensitivity of quantitative RT-PCR. Our data provide more evidence that MZC is a promising dual compartment multipurpose prevention technology candidate.

  19. [The role of hormones from the mucosa of the gastric antrum in regulating gastric secretion].

    PubMed

    Groĭsman, S D; Gubkin, V A; Babenkov, G D

    1993-09-01

    Removal of antral mucosa obviously reduced the sensitivity of glandulocytes to pentagastrin in dogs with Basov-Pavlov fistulae. Activation of the endocrinal cells of the antral mucosa after fundal and antral parts separation exerted an opposite effect. The data obtained suggest that, along with gastrin, there is another hormonal factor facilitating the action of gastrin in the antral mucosa.

  20. Morphology and fibre-type distribution in the tongue of the Pogona vitticeps lizard (Iguania, Agamidae).

    PubMed

    Zghikh, Leïla-Nastasia; Vangysel, Emilie; Nonclercq, Denis; Legrand, Alexandre; Blairon, Bernard; Berri, Cécile; Bordeau, Thierry; Rémy, Christophe; Burtéa, Carmen; Montuelle, Stéphane J; Bels, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Agamid lizards use tongue prehension for capturing all types of prey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functional relationship between tongue structure, both surface and musculature, and function during prey capture in Pogona vitticeps. The lack of a detailed description of the distribution of fibre-types in the tongue muscles in some iguanian lizards has hindered the understanding of the functional morphology of the lizard tongue. Three methodological approaches were used to fill this gap. First, morphological analyses were performed (i) on the tongue surface through scanning electron microscopy, and (ii) on the lingual muscle by histological coloration and histochemistry to identify fibre-typing. Secondly, kinematics of prey capture was quantified by using high-speed video recordings to determine the movement capabilities of the tongue. Finally, electromyography (EMG) was used to identify the motor pattern tongue muscles during prey capture. Morphological and functional data were combined to discuss the functional morphology of the tongue in agamid lizards, in relation to their diet. During tongue protraction, M. genioglossus contracts 420 ± 96 ms before tongue-prey contact. Subsequently, Mm. verticalis and hyoglossus contract throughout tongue protraction and retraction. Significant differences are found between the timing of activity of the protractor muscles between omnivorous agamids (Pogona sp., this study) and insectivorous species (Agama sp.), despite similar tongue and jaw kinematics. The data confirm that specialisation toward a diet which includes more vegetal materials is associated with significant changes in tongue morphology and function. Histoenzymology demonstrates that protractor and retractor muscles differ in fibre composition. The proportion of fast glycolytic fibres is significantly higher in the M. hyoglossus (retractor muscle) than in the M. genioglossus (protractor muscle), and this difference is proposed to be associated

  1. Rapid development and persistence of a massive Antarctic sea ice tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.; Sokolov, Serguei; Massom, Robert A.

    2008-07-01

    An extraordinary sea ice tongue developed near 85°E over a period of 30 days in April-May 2002. The ice tongue extended to the north more than 800 km from the surrounding ice edge and covered an area greater than 200,000 km2. Satellite measurements of ice extent and roughness characteristics demonstrate that the tongue persisted as a distinct feature throughout the winter. Remote sensing observations between 1978 and 2004 confirm that ice tongues occur frequently at this location, although the 2002 tongue was particularly pronounced. We show that ocean currents and winds conspire to favor the development of ice tongues at this location. Mean streamlines of the southern part of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current turn sharply to the north near 85°E after passing through the Princess Elisabeth Trough. The edge and northern limit of the ice tongue correspond well with the pattern of mean streamlines. Mean winds in April-May have a dominant southerly component in this location, favoring offshore advection of ice; year-to-year variability in the prominence of the tongue is largely caused by variations in the wind, with northerly (southerly) anomalies inhibiting (promoting) development of a sea ice tongue. Ice drift is strongly northward along the axis of the tongue, suggesting the feature is formed by advection of ice from the south rather than by in situ thermodynamic ice formation. The northward current and sea ice tongue at 85°E are associated with higher biomass at all trophic levels than observed elsewhere in east Antarctica.

  2. The radiation-induced changes in rectal mucosa: Hyperfractionated vs. hypofractionated preoperative radiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Starzewski, Jacek J.; Pajak, Jacek T.; Pawelczyk, Iwona; Lange, Dariusz; Golka, Dariusz . E-mail: dargolka@wp.pl; Brzeziska, Monika; Lorenc, Zbigniew

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of acute radiation-induced rectal changes in patients who underwent preoperative radiotherapy according to two different irradiation protocols. Patients and Methods: Sixty-eight patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent preoperative radiotherapy; 44 and 24 patients underwent hyperfractionated and hypofractionated protocol, respectively. Fifteen patients treated with surgery alone served as a control group. Five basic histopathologic features (meganucleosis, inflammatory infiltrations, eosinophils, mucus secretion, and erosions) and two additional features (mitotic figures and architectural glandular abnormalities) of radiation-induced changes were qualified and quantified. Results: Acute radiation-induced reactions were found in 66 patients. The most common were eosinophilic and plasma-cell inflammatory infiltrations (65 patients), erosions, and decreased mucus secretion (54 patients). Meganucleosis and mitotic figures were more common in patients who underwent hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The least common were the glandular architectural distortions, especially in patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy. Statistically significant differences in morphologic parameters studied between groups treated with different irradiation protocols were found. Conclusion: The system of assessment is a valuable tool in the evaluation of radiation-induced changes in the rectal mucosa. A greater intensity of regenerative changes was found in patients treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

  3. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  4. Slit2-Robo1 signaling promotes the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells via upregulating matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and downregulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Zhou, Feng-Li; Li, Wei-Ping; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Whether Slit homologue 2 (Slit2) inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration remains controversial, and the role of Slit2-Roundabout 1 (Robo1) signaling in oral cancer remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of Slit2-Robo1 signaling in the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells, and the mechanism by which Slit2-Robo1 signaling inhibits or promotes tumor cell migration. Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were treated with the monoclonal anti-human Robo1 antibody, R5, to inhibit the Slit2-Robo1 signaling pathway, with immunoglobulin (Ig)G2b treatment as a negative control. The expression levels of Slit2 and Robo1 were determined using flow cytometry. The effects of R5 on the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 tongue carcinoma cells were investigated. Gelatin zymography was used to investigate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of E-cadherin in Tca8113 cells treated with 10 µg/ml of either R5 or IgG2b. Slit2 and Robo1 proteins were found to be expressed in the Tca8113 cells. R5 significantly inhibited the adhesion, invasion and migration of Tca8113 cells in vitro. R5 also inhibited the activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and increased the expression of E-cadherin in the Tca8113 cells. These results suggested that Slit2-Robo1 signaling promoted the adhesion, invasion and migration of tongue carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 and, downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:27431199

  5. Metallic ion content and damage to the DNA in oral mucosa cells patients treated dental implants.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Perrez, Francisco Parra; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Ros-Llor, Irene; LLor-Ros, Irene; Ramírez-Fernández, Piedad

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential genotoxicity of dental implants, evaluating biomarkers of DNA damage (micronuclei and/or nuclear buds), cytokinetic defects (binucleated cells) and the presence of trace metals in gingival cells of patients with implants, comparing these with a control group. A total of 60 healthy adults (30 patients with dental implants and 30 control patients without) were included in the study. Medical and dental histories were made for each including life-style factors. Genotoxicity effects were assessed by micronucleus assays in the gingival epithelial cells of each patient; 1,000 epithelial cells were analyzed, evaluating the frequency of micronucleated cells and other nuclear anomalies. The concentration of metals (Al(27), Ag(107), Co (59), Cr (52), Cu(63), Fe(56), Sn(118), Mn(55), Mo(92), Ni(60), Pb(208), Ti(47)) were assayed by means of coupled plasma-mass spectrophotometry (ICP-MS). The frequency of micronuclei in the patient group with implants was higher than in the control group but without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). Similar results were found for binucleated cells and nuclear buds (P > 0.05). For metals assayed by ICP-MS, significant differences were found for Ti(47) (P ≤ 0.045). Univariate analysis identified a significant association between the presence of micronuclei and age. Dental implants do not induce DNA damage in gingival cells, the slight effects observed cannot be indicated as biologically relevant.

  6. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in T1/T2 squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sagheb, Keyvan; Sagheb, Kawe; Rahimi-Nedjat, Roman; Taylor, Kathy; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Walter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used staging procedures often cannot predict the absence of cervical metastases (CM) in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the oral cavity. Due to the high incidence of occult CM in numerous N0 cases in the clinic, an elective neck dissection (ND) is performed. The sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) is a common concept in the modern surgical therapy of malignancies. The present study evaluates the applicability of this concept for T1/T2-SCC of the tongue. In a prospective clinical study, 10 consecutive patients with T1/T2-SCC of the tongue and cN0 necks, were enrolled. Following sentinel lymph node (SLN) scintigraphy, all patients underwent SNB with a γ-probe and a subsequent ND. SNB specimens were compared with histopathological assessments of surgical specimens from the ND. A total of 5 female and 5 male patients (mean age, 52 years; women, 62 years; men, 42 years), with a median follow-up time of 33.5 months (range, 10-40 months), were treated. All patients presented with detectable SLNs. In 7 cases, the SLN(s) and the residual ND were negative for CM. In 3 cases, the SLN(s) were positive without further CM in the other neck nodes. Furthermore, 1 patient showed additional CMs after 10 months in the contralateral neck and lung metastasis after 18 months, but none at the time of the initial treatment. The concept of an SNB appears to be applicable to the management of the cN0 neck in small SCC of the tongue. The role of SNB in the management of SCC requires further investigation by prospective trials with larger patient numbers.

  7. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  8. Extreme Microstomia in an 8-Month-Old Infant: Bilateral Commissuroplasty Using Rhomboid Buccal Mucosa Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Jaminet, Patrick; Werdin, Frank; Kraus, Armin; Pfau, Matthias; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Becker, Stephan; Sinis, Nektarios

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A case of extreme microstomia in an 8-month-old infant is presented. As a result of caustic acid ingestion at the age of a few weeks, the male infant developed progressive stricture of the perioral region preventing him from normal food intake. Methods: The patient was treated by bilateral commissurotomies and a total of 4 rhomboid flaps based in the buccal mucosa. Results: We were able to enlarge the mouth aperture and subsequently cover the created soft tissue defects, with good esthetic result. The patient learned to suck the feeding bottle and was able to demonstrate oral dynamics, including laughing and crying. Conclusion: We present our surgical technique, the postoperative functional and esthetic outcome, and a brief literature review. Only few publications deal with the same matter and none with a similar life-threatening case. PMID:20076787

  9. AB057. Intravesical laparoscopic harvest of bladder mucosa for urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Son Fat; Lao, Hio Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background It is difficult to perform urethroplasty for recurrent hypospadia and/or urethral stricture. In the case of not enough prepuce, traditionally, the most often use free graft is “buccal mucosa” and “bladder mucosa”. The bladder mucosa for urethroplasty is harvested by means of open surgery. That is quite traumatic, and causes post-operation abdominal wall pain, big scar, and is difficult to repeat the procedure due to scaring. We harvested the bladder mucosa by means of intravesical laparoscopy for urethroplasty. This is minimal invasive, cause minimal post-operation abdominal wall pain and small scar, and the procedure is repeatable. And the result of the urethroplasty is good. Methods The 7 years old boy was admitted in to our ward in September, 2007, due to recurrent peno-scrotal junction urethral severe stricture about 5 mm in length, the fistula was proximal to the severe stricture, and the urethra distal to the severe stricture was mild stricture (can but not easy to put a 10 Fr catheter). There was no prepuce available the repair. We removed the 5 mm severe stricture, the fistula and repair the urethra with bladder mucosa harvested by means of intravesical laparoscopy, and put a 10 Fr silicon urethral catheter as a stent for 10 days. After operation, the urethra distal to the repaired zone became more stricture (can but difficult to put an 8 Fr catheter). So we repair the distal urethral stricture with bladder mucosa harvested by means of intravesical laparoscopy in July, 2008. And put a 12 Fr catheter as a stent. The intravesical laparoscopy procedure as the follow: general anesthesia, supine position. Open the distal narrow urethra with a longitudinal midline incision. Put a 12 Fr Foley catheter. Full fill the bladder with NS via the catheter. US confirm that no intestine between the abdominal wall and the bladder wall in the position of the cephalic end of bladder dome in the midline. Put a 5 mm trocar in this position for the lens. Then

  10. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun; Lee, Won Kil

    2016-07-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  11. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:27139611

  12. [A mouth cavity mucosa membrane illnesses and haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Gvazava, T; Abashidze, M

    2006-12-01

    To reveal the frequency of parodontitis, parodontosis and gingivitis among patients with haemophilia the structure of inflammatory diseases of mouth cavity mucosa was investigated. 224 patients (aged 2-64 years old) with the various forms of haemophilia were examined. The investigation showed that the occurrence of parodontitis, parodontosis and gingivitis in patients with haemophilia was significantly higher than in control group. In case of haemophilia relative and attributic risk of inflammatory diseases of mouth cavity mucosa rises: parodontitis (RR=2,15; 95%CI: 1,75-2,63; AR=0,48; 95%CI: 0,39-1,04); parodontosis (RR=1,41; 95%CI: 1,251,60; AR=0,26; 95%CI: 0,17-0,85) and gingivitis (RR=2,26; 95%CI: 1,86-2,74; AR=0,53; 95%CI: 0,44-0,96), but they do not correlate with the severity of illness.

  13. Ulcerated Lesion of the Tongue as Manifestation of Systemic Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Luis A; Flores, Sergio A; Martinez, Ricardo; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2017-01-01

    Systemic mycoses and their oral manifestations are very rare. We present a case of a 60-year-old man with an ulcerated lesion on the lateral border of the tongue. Histologic studies revealed a granulomatous fungal infection by Coccidioides immitis. After pharmacological treatment, the lesion resolved. Recently, northern Mexico has been reported to be an endemic zone of C. immitis infections; therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mouth lesions. A comprehensive clinical history, physical exploration, and complementary studies are essential for an accurate diagnosis.

  14. Ulcerated Lesion of the Tongue as Manifestation of Systemic Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sergio A.; Martinez, Ricardo; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2017-01-01

    Systemic mycoses and their oral manifestations are very rare. We present a case of a 60-year-old man with an ulcerated lesion on the lateral border of the tongue. Histologic studies revealed a granulomatous fungal infection by Coccidioides immitis. After pharmacological treatment, the lesion resolved. Recently, northern Mexico has been reported to be an endemic zone of C. immitis infections; therefore it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mouth lesions. A comprehensive clinical history, physical exploration, and complementary studies are essential for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:28386282

  15. Dermatitis artifacta of tongue: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Surjeet; Choudhury, Snehalata

    2016-01-01

    Dermatitis artifacta is a psychiatric disorder in which the patient deliberately produces self-inflicted skin lesions to satisfy an unconscious psychological or emotional need, often a desire to receive medical treatment. We present a case of a 20-year-old female with pain in abdomen, pain during urination, and multiple skin lesions, mostly in the reach of her dominant hand and in tongue. She gave a history of several episodes of similar illnesses with admission in various hospitals. She was improved with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, supportive and insight-oriented psychotherapy. PMID:27385859

  16. Electronic Tongue on a way towards the universal bitterness scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legin, Andrey; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Seleznev, Boris; Legin, Evgeny; Papieva, Irina; Clapham, David; Saunders, Ken; Richardson, Marie

    2011-09-01

    The present work deals with the development and application of the artificial sensory system (Electronic Tongue) to quantification of the bitter taste of various chemically dissimilar substances and suggests a universal approach for artificial sensory evaluation of bitterness, irrespective of chemical nature of the substance eliciting bitter taste. This approach to artificial quantification of bitterness is practically feasible and may be particularly useful on the early stages of development of novel API in pharmaceutical research and for flavour control of various pharmaceutical compositions, healthcare products and food ingredients.

  17. Vowel distortion in traumatic dysarthria: lip rounding versus tongue advancement.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, W; von Cramon, D

    1983-01-01

    Formant analysis of tense, high, German vowels was performed to the end of obtaining information about the role of insufficient lip rounding in distorted vowel production of 8 traumatic dysarthrics. A comparison was made between two allophones of /y/ in different consonantal contexts. Noticeable undershoot in lip rounding or protrusion proved to occur in a context of conflicting labial gestures. Where the articulatory realization of a CVC sequence required gross tongue movements, a lingual undershoot resulted as the prevailing deficit. No evidence for dyscoordinative defects was obtained from the results.

  18. [Use of new solcoseryl-containing Diplan-denta C film in the treatment of injuries of the buccal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Abakarova, D S

    2004-01-01

    Clinical efficiency of bilayer adhesive dental film Diplan-denta C with solcoseryl in the treatment of postoperative wounds of the buccal mucosa and the effects of this film on the course of wound process were evaluated. The course of wound process in 39 patients with postoperative injuries of the buccal mucosa treated with Diplan-denta XD and Diplan-denta C films and traditional local therapy (0.05% chlorohexidine bigluconate solution and solcoseryl dental adhesive paste) was compared. In the study group Diplan-denta XD film with chlorohexidine was used for local therapy during the first 1-3 days after the injury and Diplan-denta C film with solcoseryl was used in subsequent days until epithelialization; in controls irrigations of the oral cavity with chlorohexidine bigluconate solution (0.05%) were carried out during the first 1-3 days and applications of solcoseryl dental adhesive paste were made during subsequent days until epithelialization. The results indicate that the use of Diplan-denta C film optimized the treatment of the buccal mucosa wounds.

  19. Method of expression of certain bacterial microflora mucosa olfactory area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrunin, Oleg G.; Nosova, Yana V.; Shushlyapina, Natalia O.; Surtel, Wojciech; Burlibay, Aron; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    The article is devoted to the actual problem - the development of new express diagnostic methods, based on which a doctor-otolaryngologist can quickly and efficiently determine a violation of smell. The work is based on the methods of processing and analysis of medical images and signals. We have also identified informative indicators of endoscopic image of the olfactory region of the nasal mucosa of the upper course.

  20. Evaluation of Microbial Load in Oropharyngeal Mucosa from Tannery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Arévalo, Diana C.; Castellanos-Arévalo, Andrea P.; Camarena-Pozos, David A.; Colli-Mull, Juan G.; Maldonado-Vega, María

    2014-01-01

    Background Animal skin provides an ideal medium for the propagation of microorganisms and it is used like raw material in the tannery and footware industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate and identify the microbial load in oropharyngeal mucosa of tannery employees. Methods The health risk was estimated based on the identification of microorganisms found in the oropharyngeal mucosa samples. The study was conducted in a tanners group and a control group. Samples were taken from oropharyngeal mucosa and inoculated on plates with selective medium. In the samples, bacteria were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA analysis and the yeasts through a presumptive method. In addition, the sensitivity of these microorganisms to antibiotics/antifungals was evaluated. Results The identified bacteria belonged to the families Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Neisseriaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Moraxellaceae, and Xanthomonadaceae, of which some species are considered as pathogenic or opportunistic microorganisms; these bacteria were not present in the control group. Forty-two percent of bacteria identified in the tanners group are correlated with respiratory diseases. Yeasts were also identified, including the following species: Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, and Candida krusei. Regarding the sensitivity test of bacteria identified in the tanners group, 90% showed sensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam, 87% showed sensitivity to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, 74% showed sensitivity to ampicillin/sulbactam, and 58% showed sensitivity to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion Several of the bacteria and yeast identified in the oropharyngeal mucosa of tanners have been correlated with infections in humans and have already been reported as airborne microorganisms in this working environment, representing a health risk for workers. PMID:25830072