Science.gov

Sample records for tooth whitening effect

  1. Tooth Whitening: What We Now Know

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title Current research about tooth whitening shows that it is safe and effective when manufacturer’s protocol is followed, yet there are risks of which the profession and users should be aware. This update provides a summary of current research and assessment of the safety and efficacy of tooth whitening regimens. Background Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures by the public. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening. Methods Current reports in the literature are reviewed that are related to the use of peroxide based whitening methods. These reports include in vitro studies for method optimization and mechanism as well as clinical studies on effects of various whitening regimens. Conclusions When manufacturer’s instructions are followed, hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide based tooth whitening is safe and effective. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with tooth whitening and instructed on identification of adverse occurrences so that they may seek professional help asneeded. PMID:24929591

  2. Present and future technologies of tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Viscio, D; Gaffar, A; Fakhry-Smith, S; Xu, T

    2000-01-01

    Dental stains can be broadly classified as intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsic stains are a result of defects in tooth development, fluorosis, or acquired through the use of tetracycline. Extrinsic stains are localized mainly in the pellicle and are generated by the reaction between sugars and amino acids or acquired from the retention of exogenous chromophores in the pellicle. Three clinical methods are currently used for measuring stain removal and tooth whitening in the development of new whitening technologies: Lobene Stain Index, Shade Guide Color Change, and Minolta ChromaMeter. Professional tooth whitening products rely on proven technologies--35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office power bleaching or 10% to 15% carbamide peroxide for at-home bleaching--to reduce intrinsic stain and change the inherent tooth color. Over-the-counter tooth whitening products use a combination of surfactants, abrasives, anticalculus agents, and low levels of hydrogen peroxide to reduce extrinsic stain and help maintain tooth whiteness after professional treatment. Future technologies for whitening teeth could involve the use of activating agents to enhance the performance of hydrogen peroxide and natural enzymes.

  3. Incidence of tooth sensitivity after home whitening treatment.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Michael G; Carroll, William B

    2002-08-01

    A potential side effect of dentist-dispensed home tooth-whitening systems is tooth sensitivity. The authors conducted a randomized prospective double-blind study to determine the incidence of tooth sensitivity after home whitening treatment. Fifty adult subjects used a gel containing 15 percent carbamide peroxide and 0.11 percent fluoride ion; an additional 50 adult subjects used a placebo gel daily for four weeks. Each subject's plaque index score, gingival recession status, caries status, current dentifrice and smoking history were recorded at baseline. The researchers evaluated sensitivity weekly by interview for four weeks. Fifty-four percent of subjects in both test and control groups reported mild sensitivity; 10 percent of test subjects and 2 percent of control subjects reported moderate sensitivity; 4 percent of test subjects and no control subjects reported severe sensitivity. Sensitivity decreased with time; by the second week, no severe sensitivity was reported, and by the fourth week, no moderate sensitivity was reported. The authors found a statistically significant positive correlation between reported sensitivity and gingival recession. They found no statistically significant correlations between sensitivity and any of the other recorded parameters. Mild tooth sensitivity can be expected in approximately one-half of patients who undergo home whitening treatment using the gel studied. Approximately 10 percent of patients may experience moderate sensitivity, and 4 percent of patients may experience severe sensitivity for one to two weeks. Patients with gingival recession appear more likely to experience tooth sensitivity during home whitening treatment. Patients considering home whitening treatment should be advised that mild tooth sensitivity is a common side effect and that severe tooth sensitivity occasionally occurs. If gingival recession is present, the probability of tooth sensitivity increases, and tooth sensitivity tends to decrease as

  4. Use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to monitor tooth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-04-01

    The changing of tooth shade by whitening agents occurs gradually. Apart from being subjective and affected by the conditions of the surroundings, visual observation cannot detect a very slight change in tooth color. An electronic method, which can communicate the color change quantitatively, would be more reliable. Quantitative Light- induced Fluorescence (QLF) was developed to detect and assess dental caries based on the phenomenon of change of autofluorescence of a tooth by demineralization. However, stains on the tooth surface exhibit the same phenomenon, and therefore QLF can be used to measure the percentage fluorescence change of stained enamel with respect to surrounding unstained enamel. The present study described a technique of assessing the effect of a tooth-whitening agent using QLF. This was demonstrated in two experiments in which either wholly or partially stained teeth were whitened by intermittent immersion in sodium hypochlorite. Following each immersion, the integrated fluorescence change due to the stain was quantified using QLF. In either situation, the value of (Delta) Q decreased linearly as the tooth regained its natural shade. It was concluded that gradual changing of the shade of discolored teeth by a whitening agent could be quantified using QLF.

  5. Tooth whitening evaluation of blue covarine containing toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Danying; Smith, Richard N; Zhang, Qiong; Sun, Jianing N; Philpotts, Carole J; Ricketts, Stephen R; Naeeni, Mojgan; Joiner, Andrew

    2017-12-01

    To measure the tooth whitening effects delivered immediately after brushing with silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine in vitro and in vivo. Salivary pellicle coated human extracted teeth were brushed with either a slurry of a toothpaste containing blue covarine (BC), a formulation containing an increased level of blue covarine (BC+) or a negative control toothpaste containing no blue covarine. The colour of the specimens were measured in vitro using either a Minolta chromameter or a VITA Easyshade spectrophotometer, before and after brushing and changes in CIELAB values and tooth Whiteness Index (WIO) values calculated. In a double-blind cross-over clinical study, subjects brushed with either BC or BC+ toothpaste and tooth colour changes were measured with a digital image analysis system. The in vitro studies demonstrated that toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a significantly (p<0.05) greater change in b* and WIO values than the negative control toothpaste; the BC+ toothpaste gave a significantly greater increase in b* and WIO values than the BC toothpaste, and BC+ gave a significant increase in shade change versus the negative control. Clinical results showed that BC and BC+ gave a significant reduction in b* (p<0.0001) and increase in WIO (p<0.0001) from baseline indicating significant tooth whitening had occurred. The parameter changes were significantly greater when brushing with the BC+ toothpaste than with the BC toothpaste (WIO p=0.006; b* p=0.013). Toothpastes containing blue covarine gave a statistically significant reduction in tooth yellowness and improvement in tooth whiteness immediately after brushing in both in vitro and clinical studies. In addition, the higher concentration blue covarine toothpaste gave statistically significant greater tooth whitening benefits than the lower concentration blue covarine toothpaste. The silica-based toothpastes containing blue covarine evaluated in the current study gave tooth whitening benefits

  6. Effect of four over-the-counter tooth-whitening products on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Majeed, A; Grobler, S R; Moola, M H; Oberholzer, T G

    2011-10-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of four over-the-counter tooth-whitening products on enamel microhardness. Fifty enamel blocks were prepared from extracted human molar teeth. The enamel surfaces were polished up to 1200 grit fineness and the specimens randomly divided into five groups. Enamel blocks were exposed to: Rapid White (n=10); Absolute White (n=10); Speed White (n=10) and White Glo (n=10) whitening products, according to the manufacturers' instructions. As control, ten enamel blocks were kept in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C without any treatment. Microhardness values were obtained before exposure (baseline) and after 1, 7 and 14-day treatment periods using a digital hardness tester with a Vickers diamond indenter. Data were analysed using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Sum Test, one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparison Test (p<0.05). Both Rapid White and Absolute White reduced enamel microhardness. Speed White increased the microhardness of enamel, while White Glo and artificial saliva had no effect on hardness. Over-the-counter tooth-whitening products might decrease enamel microhardness depending on the type of product.

  7. The current status of vital tooth whitening techniques.

    PubMed

    Blankenau, R; Goldstein, R E; Haywood, V B

    1999-08-01

    Tooth whitening of vital teeth continues to have a major impact on the practice of dentistry. The growing public interest in having whiter, brighter teeth is clearly evident in the advertisements from toothpaste manufacturers on "whitening" formulations of their products and by the number of individuals seeking whitening procedures from their dentists. In addition, new over-the-counter whitening products continue to emerge in a marketplace that cannot seem to get teeth white enough, bright enough, fast enough. What new products and procedures have evolved over the past decade to whiten teeth? Are they better, safer, faster, and more effective now? Are dentists meeting public demand for whiter teeth and is this quest having a positive or negative impact on the practice of dentistry or the patient's dental health? I posed these questions to a group of experts on whitening procedures to get their opinions and recommendations.

  8. Comparative clinical evaluation of two professional tooth-whitening products.

    PubMed

    Kowitz, G M; Nathoo, S A; Wong, R

    1994-01-01

    A 2-week study was conducted to compare the tooth-whitening efficacy of two 10% carbamide peroxide products: Colgate Platinum Professional Toothwhitening System and Rembrandt Lighten Bleaching Gel. Fifty subjects were divided into two groups and assigned a product to use for 2 weeks. Change in tooth color was measured by reflectance spectroscopy at the initiation of study, at 1 week, and at 2 weeks into the study. Color change was calculated using the color-difference equation established by the Commission International de L'Eclairage. Results showed that Colgate Platinum was 62% more effective at tooth whitening after 1 week and 83% more effective after 2 weeks of treatment vs Rembrandt. At the termination of the study, the mean color difference (deltaE) for Colgate Platinum was 4.29 and 2.34 for Rembrandt. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the Colgate product is significantly superior at increasing tooth whiteness, increasing tooth lightness, reducing redness, and reducing yellowness. In this study, no adverse reactions were noted on clinical examination and none were reported by panelists with normal healthy dentition.

  9. Effect of Light-Activated Tooth Whitening on Color Change Relative to Color of Artificially Stained Teeth.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran; Kurti, Steven R; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Li, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    There is still controversy as to the efficacy of light activation used in tooth whitening. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light activation on tooth color change relative to the artificial dye color. Extracted human third molars (160) were randomly distributed into eight groups of 20 specimens each based on artificial staining and use of light activation. All groups received three 45-minute sessions of in-office whitening at 3-day intervals. Color measurements were performed with an intraoral spectrophotometer at baseline prior to staining (T0), after artificial staining (T1), 1-day--(T2), and 1-week--(T3) post-whitening. Color differences were calculated relative to after artificial staining color parameters (L*1, a*1, b*1) with the use of a software analysis program enabling synchronization of two images. Within the same staining groups, the light-activated samples exhibited a greater color change than their nonlight-activated counterparts. However, only in the case of the yellow-stained samples at 1-day post-whitening was there a significant difference between the nonlight-activated and light-activated groups (Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test for pairwise comparisons, p < 0.05). Light activation is a valid method for enhancing the efficacy of tooth whitening with respect to overall color change and works best with yellow stains. Light activation is a valid method for enhancing the efficacy of tooth whitening with respect to overall color change and works best with yellow stains.

  10. Efficacy of tooth whitening with different calcium phosphate-based formulations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian; Xu, Xiaohui; Lai, Guangyun; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of tooth whitening using different calcium phosphate-based formulations. Teeth were treated with three different hydroxyapatite preparations at different concentrations and with two control preparations; each tooth was treated a total of three times. After application of the last material, hydrodynamic shear force was applied to mimic mechanical loading. After each treatment, tooth color was measured using a dental spectrophotometer, and the mean changes in L*a*b* values between different measurements were expressed as ∆E. The results indicated significant differences between the materials, but neither dose- nor time-dependent associations were found. The suspension containing tricalcium phosphate (10 wt%) showed the most obvious color change (∆E = 2.20 ± 0.90), while the suspension containing zinc-carbonate-apatite (20 wt%) showed the least obvious color change (∆E = 0.91 ± 0.50). Calcium phosphate-based formulations that can adhere to the enamel surface and contribute to tooth whitening have promising tooth-whitening potential. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  11. In vitro study on tooth enamel lesions related to whitening dentifrice.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Danilo Barral; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Campos, Elisângela de Jesus; Correia de Araújo, Roberto Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The tooth whitening substances for extrinsic use that are available in Brazil contain hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide. Several studies have attributed the appearance of lesions in the enamel morphology, including hypersensitivity, to these substances. Such lesions justify fluoride therapy and application of infrared lasers, among other procedures. However, there is no consensus among researchers regarding the relevance of the severity of lesions detected on the tooth surface. The present study was carried out with an aim of evaluating in vitro the effects of the hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide and sodium bicarbonate contained in dentifrice formulations, on human tooth enamel. After darkening process in laboratory, human premolars were brushed using dentifrice containing the two whitening substances (Rembrandt - carbamide peroxide and Mentadent - hydrogen peroxide) and the abrasive product (Colgate - sodium bicarbonate). The degree of specimen staining before and after this procedure was determined using spectrophotometry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to obtain images, which were analyzed to show the nature of the lesions that appeared on the enamel surface. The effectiveness of the whitening caused by hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide and the abrasion caused by bicarbonate were confirmed, given that the treated test pieces returned to their original coloration. Based on SEM, evaluation of the enamel surfaces subjected to the test products showed that different types of morphologic lesions of varying severity appeared. Whitening dentifrice containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide produced lesions on the enamel surface such that the greatest sequelae were associated with exposure to hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Effects of different preparation procedures during tooth whitening on enamel bonding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dustin; Xu, Changqi; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess effects of some clinically related preparation procedures during tooth whitening on enamel bonding properties. Sixty-two extracted human teeth were cleaned and divided into four groups. Forty-two of the teeth were left with their natural surface intact while 20 teeth were polished to form a flat surface. Half of the tooth served as the experimental side and received one of the two whitening products: Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and Crest Whitestrips (6.5% hydrogen peroxide), for 2 weeks. Post-bleaching intervals included: 1 day, 1 week, and 2 weeks. On these days, tooth (10 mm x 1.5 mm x 1.5 mm) sections were evaluated using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile bond strength tests. T-test, ANOVA test, and mixed model regression analysis were used to assess the differences. No significant difference existed between natural surface and polished surface teeth for all groups at both Day One and Week Two (P > 0.05). On Day One, both treated groups had significant lower bond strength than the control group (P = 0.002). After 2 weeks, no significant difference existed between any group (P = 0.381). SEM indicated that resin-enamel interfaces in bleached enamel exhibited more defects in granular formations when compared to the control. Raman results indicated a lower degree of polymerization (DP) of adhesive at the interface for treated teeth surfaces. In summary, pre-bleaching surface treatments such as polish or non-polish, had no effect on bond strength. Bleaching significantly decreased bond strength initially, but after 2 weeks, bleaching had no significant effect on bond strength. Storage time had significant effect on Opalescence treated enamel, but not on control and Whitestrip treated enamel. The decrease of bond strength may be related to interfacial defects and low DP due to oxygen release after bleaching.

  13. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoommore » activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.« less

  14. Micro-structural integrity of dental enamel subjected to two tooth whitening regimes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Reina; Shibata, Yo; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Colour modification of tooth enamel has proven successful, but it is unclear how various bleaching applications affect micro-structural integrity of the whitened enamel. To investigate the internal structural integrity of human intact tooth enamel with the application of two commonly used whitening regimes (in-office power bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide), evaluations were performed on teeth of identical colour classification. After the bleaching applications, the enamel mineral density was quantified and visualised with micro-computed tomography. The micro-structural differences between the whitened tooth enamel samples were distinctive, though the colour parameter changes within the samples were equivalent. Home bleaching achieved colour modification by demineralisation, whereas in-office bleaching depended on redistribution of the minerals after treatment and subsequent enhanced mineralisation.

  15. Clinical evaluation of a new 10% carbamide peroxide tooth-whitening agent.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D M; Kihn, P W; Romberg, E; George, D; DePaola, L; Medina, E

    1998-10-01

    NUPRO Gold Tooth Whitening System was evaluated for efficacy according to the proposed ADA guidelines for acceptance. Sixty participants with discolored anterior teeth participated in a 14-day, double-blind, clinical trial. The participants were matched for age, gender, and oral health status and were given either a placebo gel without the active agent or the NUPRO Gold active gel, which they wore in a custom-fabricated mouth guard for home use. The shade of each participant's maxillary anterior teeth was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita Lumin Vacuum Shade Guide before the study. The same shade guide was used to determine shade changes. Time of use of the agent and potential side effects, such as tooth and gingival hypersensitivity and tissue irritation, were assessed at all recall examinations and were recorded by participants in daily diaries. The average shade change for the placebo users was less than one shade. The average shade change for the NUPRO Gold users was 6.96 shades. Tooth hypersensitivity varied from none to severe. Tissue irritation was minimal. The results of these evaluations indicate that NUPRO Gold is effective as a tooth-whitening system, when administered properly under the supervision of a dentist, with commonly reported side effects of transient tooth sensitivity and minimal gingival sensitivity. Little or no change in tissue health was noted. This study was supported by Dentsply Preventive Care (York, Pennsylvania).

  16. Efficacy of do-it-yourself whitening as compared to conventional tooth whitening modalities: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S R; Meharry, M; Oyoyo, U; Li, Y

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of do-it-yourself (DIY) whitening as compared to conventional tooth whitening modalities using different shade assessment tools. Extracted human molars (120) were randomly distributed to six groups (n=20). Whitening was performed according to manufacturer's directions for over-the-counter, dentist-dispensed for home use, and in-office whitening. DIY whitening consisted of a strawberry and baking soda mix. Additionally, negative and positive controls were used. Two evaluators used the Vita Classical (VC) and Vita Bleachedguide 3D-Master with interpolated numbers (BGi) for visual assessment at baseline and one-week, one-month, and three-month postwhitening. Instrumental measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer. Kruskal-Wallis procedure was used to assess color changes among groups and intraclass correlation (ICC) to evaluate agreement between evaluators. DIY exhibited lower color change (ΔSGUVC, ΔSGUBGi, ΔE*, where SGU = shade guide unit and E = overall color change) compared to other whitening groups at all time points (p<0.05). ICC demonstrated very good agreement between evaluators with VC and BGi at each time point. Both shade guides were related with each other and strongly related to instrumental measurements (p<0.05). DIY whitening was the least effective whitening modality. Both VC and BGi are related with each other and have good correlation with instrumental measurements.

  17. Effect of tray-based and trayless tooth whitening systems on microhardness of enamel surface and subsurface.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Erica C N; Ritter, André V; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; Leonard, Ralph H; Swift, Edward J

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of tray-based and trayless tooth whitening systems on surface and subsurface microhardness of human enamel. Enamel slabs were obtained from recently extracted human third molars. Specimens were randomly assigned to six groups according to tooth whitening treatment (n = 10): 6.0% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Crest Whitestrips), 6.5% HP (Crest Professional Whitestrips), 7.5% HP (Day White Excel 3), 9.5% HP (Day White Excel 3), 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence), and a control group (untreated). Specimens were treated for 14 days following manufacturers' recommended protocols, and were immersed in artificial saliva between treatments. Enamel surface Knoop microhardness (KHN) was measured immediately before treatment, and at days 1, 7, and 14 of treatment. After treatment, subsurface microhardness was measured at depths of 50-500 microm. Data were analyzed for statistical significance using analysis of variance. Differences in microhardness for treated vs. untreated enamel surface were not statistically significant at any time interval. For 6.5% and 9.5% HP, there was a decrease in surface microhardness values during treatment, but at the end of treatment the microhardness values were not statistically different from the baseline values. For the enamel subsurface values, no differences were observed between treated vs. untreated specimens at each depth. Trayless and tray-based tooth whitening treatments do not significantly affect surface or subsurface enamel microhardness.

  18. A clinical evaluation of 10 percent vs. 15 percent carbamide peroxide tooth-whitening agents.

    PubMed

    Kihn, P W; Barnes, D M; Romberg, E; Peterson, K

    2000-10-01

    Agents with carbamide peroxide, or CP, in various concentrations are widely prescribed for at-home tooth whitening. It is not clear, however, if the more concentrated gels will whitening teeth to a greater extent, as no controlled clinical trials have been reported. The authors conducted a double-blind study of human subjects to evaluate whether a 15 percent CP tooth-whitening system was more effective than a 10 percent CP system, and to determine if tooth sensitivity increased with use of the higher concentration. The authors recruited 57 subjects with maxillary anterior teeth of shade A3 or darker (as gauged against a value-oriented shade guide). The subjects were 18 to 65 years of age and in good general and dental health. After matching the subjects by sex and age, the authors randomly assigned them to either a control group, which used a 10 percent CP whitening agent, or an experimental group, which used a 15 percent CP agent. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in shade change between the groups after one week of treatment (t = 1.455, P = .05), but there was a significant difference at the end of the treatment period (t = 2.303, P < .05), as well as two weeks after treatment concluded (t = 2.248, P < .05). There was no significant difference in sensitivity (t = 1.399, P > .05). There was a significant difference in color change between the 10 percent CP and 15 percent CP groups at the end of the study period. There was no significant difference in level of tooth sensitivity between the two groups, and the incidence was equal; there was, however, a significant difference in variability of tooth sensitivity between the two groups. If performed under the careful guidance of a dentist, at-home whitening is an effective treatment, regardless of whether 10 percent CP or 15 percent CP is used. There may be added color change and varying sensitivity with the use of 15 percent CP.

  19. Effect of Bleaching Gel Viscosity on Tooth Whitening Efficacy and Pulp Chamber Penetration: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Kwon, S R; Pallavi, Fnu; Shi, Y; Oyoyo, U; Mohraz, A; Li, Y

    Whitening efficacy has been related to hydrogen peroxide (HP) diffusion into tooth structure. However, little information is available relating rheological properties to whitening efficacy. The purpose was to evaluate the whitening efficacy and HP penetration level of a 10% HP gel at three different viscosities and to compare them to a strip delivery system. Extracted molars (n=120) were randomly assigned into five groups (n=24/ group): NC_MED (negative control; median): medium viscosity gel without HP; LOW: 10% HP gel (low viscosity experimental gel, Ultradent Products Inc); MED: 10% HP gel (medium viscosity experimental gel, Ultradent); HIGH: 10% HP gel (high viscosity gel, Ultradent); and CWS: Crest 3D Whitestrips 1-Hour Express (Procter & Gamble). All teeth were subjected to five 60-minute whitening sessions. Instrumental color measurements were performed at baseline (T 0 ), and 1-day after each application (T 1 -T 5 ), and 1-month after whitening (T 6 ). HP penetration was estimated with leucocrystal violet and horseradish peroxidase. A Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc Bonferroni test were performed to assess the difference in tooth color change and HP penetration among the groups (α=0.05). Hydrogen peroxide penetration levels and overall color changes at T 6 were 0.24 μg/mL / 2.80; 0.48 μg/mL / 8.48; 0.44 μg/mL / 7.72; 0.35 μg/mL / 8.49; 0.36 μg/mL / 7.30 for groups NC, LOW, MED, HIGH, and CWS, respectively. There was a significant difference for HP penetration, while there was no significant difference among the four experimental groups for tooth color change. Rheological properties should be considered when developing new whitening formulations.

  20. Efficacy of mouth rinses and toothpaste on tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Torres, C R G; Perote, L C C C; Gutierrez, N C; Pucci, C R; Borges, A B

    2013-01-01

    People increasingly desire tooth whitening. Considering the wide range of whitening products on the market, this study evaluated the efficacy of whitening toothpastes and mouth rinses compared with the 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) whitening gel. We obtained 120 cylindrical specimens from bovine teeth, which were darkened for 24 hours in a coffee solution. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* system, and specimens were divided into six groups according to the use of the following agents: group 1, conventional fluoridated toothpaste; group 2, Close Up White Now; group 3, Listerine Whitening; group 4, Colgate Plax Whitening; group 5, experimental mouth rinse with Plasdone; and group 6, 10% CP Whiteness Perfect. After the simulation of 12 weeks of treatment for groups 1 to 5 and 14 days of treatment for group 6, the specimens were subjected to a new color reading. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (α=0.05), which showed significant differences among groups after 12 weeks for ΔE (p=0.001). Results of the Tukey test revealed that groups 3, 4, and 6 presented significantly higher color alteration than groups 1, 2, and 5. The whitening toothpaste Close Up White Now and the experimental mouth rinse with Plasdone showed similar color alteration as conventional toothpaste after a 12-week treatment simulation. These groups presented significantly lower color alteration compared with whitening mouth rinses Listerine and Colgate Plax Whitening, which showed similar results to those observed after 14 days of bleaching with 10% CP treatment.

  1. Whitening the single discolored tooth.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran

    2011-04-01

    This article discusses the possible methods available for whitening of a single discolored tooth. Treatment options can vary from restorative procedures such as crowns, veneers, or bonding to more conservative bleaching treatments. The long-term success of the treatment is dictated by proper diagnosis and treatment planning. The cause and severity of the discoloration has to be carefully evaluated when planning for bleaching options. The vitality of the pulp, presence and absence of symptoms, and periapical pathoses usually determine whether an external or internal bleaching approach will be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Research on the designing method of a special shade guide for tooth whitening].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingxin

    2015-10-01

    To investigate a method of designing an accurate and scientific shade guide, especially used for judging the effect of tooth whitening, by analyzing the colorimetric values of discolored teeth statistically. One hundred thirty-six pictures of patients who had been receiving the Beyond cold light whitening treatment from February 2009 to July 2014 were analyzed, including 25 tetracycline teeth, 61 mottled-enamel teeth, and 50 yellow teeth. The colorimetric values of discolored teeth were measured. The L* values of shade tabs were calculated by hierarchical clustering of those of discolored teeth. The a* and b* values of shade tabs were the mean of those observed for discolored teeth. Accordingly, different shade guides were designed for each type of discolored teeth, and the effects were evaluated. A statistically significant difference in colorimetric values was found among the three types of discolored teeth. Compared with the Vitapan Classical shade guide, the shade guides designed through the present method were more scientific and accurate in judging the effect of tooth whitening. Moreover, the arrangement of shade tabs was more logical, and the color difference between shade tabs and discolored teeth was smaller. The proposed designing method is theoretically feasible, although its clinical effect has yet to be proven.

  3. The influence of a novel in-office tooth whitening procedure using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser on enamel surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Strakas, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of a novel in-office tooth whitening procedure using Er,Cr:YSGG laser radiation on bovine enamel. Forty-eight enamel specimens were prepared from bovine canines and divided into four groups: Group 1 specimens (control) received no whitening treatment; Group 2 received whitening treatment with an at-home whitening agent (22% carbamide peroxide) for 7 days; Group 3 received whitening treatment with a novel in-office whitening agent (35% H(2)O(2)); Group 4 received the same in-office whitening therapy with Group 3 using Er,Cr:YSGG laser in order to accelerate the whitening procedure. The specimens were stored for 10 days after the whitening treatment in artificial saliva. Vickers hardness was determined using a microhardness tester and surface roughness was evaluated using a VSI microscope. Three specimens of each experimental group were examined under SEM and the mineral composition of the specimens was evaluated using EDS. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's post-hoc test, Wilcoxon signed rank and Kruskal-Wallis tests (a = 0.05). The surface microhardness of the enamel was reduced after the in-office whitening treatments (P< 0.05), but not influenced after the at-home whitening treatment (P> 0.05). Moreover, the surface roughness was not significantly changed after tooth whitening. EDS analysis did not show alterations in the enamel mineral composition, while SEM observations indicated changes in the surface morphology, especially after in-office tooth whitening (P< 0.05). The laser-assisted whitening treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG laser did not affect the alterations in enamel surface compared with the conventional in-office whitening technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A study of hydrogen peroxide chemistry and photochemistry in tea stain solution with relevance to clinical tooth whitening.

    PubMed

    Young, Nigel; Fairley, Peter; Mohan, Veena; Jumeaux, Coline

    2012-12-01

    Tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide is a complex process, and there is still some controversy about the roles of pH, temperature, chemical activators, and the use of light irradiation. In this work the basic interactions between whitening agents and stain molecules are studied in simple solutions, thus avoiding the physics of diffusion and light penetration in the tooth to give clarity on the basic chemistry which is occurring. The absorbance of tea stain solution at 450 nm was measured over a period of 40 min, with various compositions of whitening agent added (including hydrogen peroxide, ferrous gluconate and potassium hydroxide) and at the same time the samples were subjected to blue light (465 nm) or infra-red light (850 nm) irradiation, or alternatively they were heated to 37°C. It is shown that the reaction rates between chromogens in the tea solution and hydrogen peroxide can be accelerated significantly using ferrous gluconate activator and blue light irradiation. Infra red irradiation does not increase the reaction rate through photochemistry, it serves only to increase the temperature. Raising the temperature leads to inefficiency through the acceleration of exothermic decomposition reactions which produce only water and oxygen. By carrying out work in simple solution it was possible to show that ferrous activators and blue light irradiation significantly enhance the whitening process, whereas infra red irradiation has no significant effect over heating. The importance of controlling the pH within the tooth structure during whitening is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced tooth whitening: the next-generation technology.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, D; McCombs, G; Lemaster, M; Akman, M A; Laroussi, M

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the plasma pencil (PP) device in conjunction with H2 O2 gel. The purpose of this study was to determine whether LTAPP delivered using the PP would enhance the tooth-whitening process while causing no thermal threat. The study consisted of thirty extracted human teeth that were randomized into two groups: Group I received LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel at 10, 15 and 20 min and Group II received 36% H2 O2 gel only at the same time intervals. Tooth surface temperature was measured periodically throughout the experiment using a non-contact thermometer. Digital photographs were taken pre- and post-treatment and transferred to Adobe Photoshop for comparison, using the CIELAB Color Value System. Only L* (lightness) values were evaluated in this study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and t-test at the 0.05 level. The results revealed a statistically significant difference in mean CIE L* values after exposure to LTAPP plus 36% H2 O2 gel, compared with 36% H2 O2 only, in the 10- and 20-min groups (P = 0.0003 and 0.0103, respectively). The temperature in both treatment groups remained under 80°F throughout the study, which is below the thermal threat for vital tooth bleaching. Utilizing PP device in conjunction with 36% H2 O2 safely accelerates and enhances the tooth-whitening process. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Effects of tooth whitening agents and acidic drinks on the surface properties of dental enamel].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Chen, Zhiqun; Lin, Yao; Shao, Jinquan; Yin, Lu

    2013-10-01

    Using tooth whitening agents (bleaching clip) in vitro and acidic drinks, we conducted a comparative study of the changes in enamel surface morphology, Ca/P content, and hardness. Tooth whitening glue pieces, cola, and orange juice were used to soak teeth in artificial saliva in vitro. Physiological saline was used as a control treatment. The morphology of the four groups was observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) immediately after the teeth were soaked for 7 and 14 d. The changes in Ca/P content and microhardness were analyzed. The enamel surfaces of the teeth in the three test groups were demineralized. The Ca/P ratio and the average microhardness were significantly lower than those of the control group immediately after the teeth were soaked (P < 0.05). The Ca/P ratio and microhardness gradually increased after 7 d. No significant difference was observed between the control group and the test groups after 14 d (P > 0.05). Bleaching agents caused transient demineralization of human enamel, but these agents could induce re-mineralization and repair of enamel over time. Demineralization caused by bleaching covered a relatively normal range compared with acidic drinks and daily drinking.

  7. Effect of various tooth-whitening products on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Grobler, S R; Majeed, A; Moola, M H

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various tooth-whitening products containing carbamide peroxide (CP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP), on enamel microhardness. Enamel blocks were exposed to: Nite White ACP 10% CP (Group 2, n=10); Yotuel Patient 10% CP (Group 3, n=10); Opalescence PF 10% CP (Group 4, n=10); Opalescence PF 20% CP (Group 5, n=10); Opalescence Treswhite Supreme 10% HP (Group 6, n=10); Yotuel 10 Minutes 30% CP (Group 7, n=10); Opalescence Quick 45% CP (Group 8, n=10), Yotuel Special 35% HP (Group 9, n=10), Opalescence Boost 38% HP (Group 10, n=10) according to the instructions of the manufacturers. The control (Group 1, n=10) was enamel blocks kept in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C without any treatment. The microhardness values were obtained before exposure and after a 14-day treatment period. Specimens were kept in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C between treatments. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer Multiple Comparison Test. Indent marks on the enamel blocks were also examined under the Scanning Electron Microscope. All whitening products decreased enamel microhardness except group 10 but only Groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 showed significant decrease in enamel microhardness as compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Groups 2, 3 and 7 differed significantly from all the other groups (p < 0.05). The highest damage was recorded for Group 2 (Nite White ACP 10% CP), which differed significantly from Groups 3 and 7. SEM images also showed damage to enamel. All products tested in this study decreased enamel microhardness except Opalescence Boost 38% HP. The products containing carbamide peroxide were more damaging to enamel because of the longer application times. Nite White ACP 10% CP showed the highest reduction in enamel microhardness as compared to other products tested.

  8. Effects of a Novel Whitening Formulation on Dental Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Takesh, Thair; Sargsyan, Anik; Anbarani, Afarin; Ho, Jessica; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the enamel whitening effects of 2 new test formulations, one of which was a rinse, and the other a whitening strip. Materials and Methods Forty enamel chips were prepared from 20 healthy extracted teeth (2 from each tooth). After pre-staining and colorimetry to measure L* and b* values, 20 matched samples were immersed in either test or control rinses, and then colorimetry was performed again after 1 hr, 2 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 12 hr, 24 hr and 48 hrs (Each hour equates to one month of clinical use at the recommended dosage of 1 minute exposure 2 times a day). The remaining 20 matched samples were exposed to the test or control whitening strips and colorimetry was performed every 30 minutes for a total of 10 treatments. Results Overall, the whitening performance of test and control strips was similar. The test and control rinses had a similar lightening effect over the first 3 hours (equivalent to 3 months of clinical use). Subsequently, the control rinse continued to lighten samples, whereas the test rinse had little further effect. Conclusion Test and control-whitening strips showed similar effects; over time whitening strips showed a greater lightening effect than whitening rinses. PMID:28706755

  9. Effects of a Novel Whitening Formulation on Dental Enamel.

    PubMed

    Takesh, Thair; Sargsyan, Anik; Anbarani, Afarin; Ho, Jessica; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the enamel whitening effects of 2 new test formulations, one of which was a rinse, and the other a whitening strip. Forty enamel chips were prepared from 20 healthy extracted teeth (2 from each tooth). After pre-staining and colorimetry to measure L* and b* values, 20 matched samples were immersed in either test or control rinses, and then colorimetry was performed again after 1 hr, 2 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 12 hr, 24 hr and 48 hrs (Each hour equates to one month of clinical use at the recommended dosage of 1 minute exposure 2 times a day). The remaining 20 matched samples were exposed to the test or control whitening strips and colorimetry was performed every 30 minutes for a total of 10 treatments. Overall, the whitening performance of test and control strips was similar. The test and control rinses had a similar lightening effect over the first 3 hours (equivalent to 3 months of clinical use). Subsequently, the control rinse continued to lighten samples, whereas the test rinse had little further effect. Test and control-whitening strips showed similar effects; over time whitening strips showed a greater lightening effect than whitening rinses.

  10. High levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas: effects on enamel and pulp.

    PubMed

    Pugh, George; Zaidel, Lynette; Lin, Nora; Stranick, Michael; Bagley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the safety of high levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness, pulp penetration, and enamel morphology. Colgate Platinum Professional Overnight Whitening System (Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Canton, MA, USA) (10% carbamide peroxide, equivalent to 3.5% hydrogen peroxide) was compared with two prototype formulations containing either 7.0% or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide. In the pulp chamber studies, human extracted teeth were exposed to 3.5%, 7.0%, or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours. Microhardness, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atomic force microscopy evaluations were made from enamel blocks cut from human extracted molars. The enamel blocks were evaluated following 14 7-hour treatments (98 h total). At 7 hours' post-treatment, hydrogen peroxide penetrated the pulp chamber at 23.12 +/- 10.09, 24.58 +/- 6.90, and 26.39 +/- 5.43 microg for 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% hydrogen peroxide, respectively. With regard to enamel morphology, pulp penetration, microhardness, and elemental composition, no statistically significant differences were observed between treatment groups following 98 hours of treatment. Hydrogen peroxide does not adversely affect enamel morphology or microhardness. The levels recovered in pulp indicate that hydrogen peroxide is not expected to inhibit pulpal enzymes. Overnight tray products containing levels of hydrogen peroxide of 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% are not expected to adversely affect the enamel or pulpal enzymes. Additional safety studies are needed to assess the potential for tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

  11. Effectiveness of a new dentifrice with baking soda and peroxide in removing extrinsic stain and whitening teeth.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, A; Hooper, W; Vorwerk, L; Domke, T; DeSciscio, P; Nathoo, S

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this randomized, controlled, six-week clinical trial was to determine the effectiveness and safety of a new whitening dentifrice in removing extrinsic tooth stain and whitening teeth. An additional two-week exploratory study was conducted to determine whether the whitening or stain-prevention activity of the dentifrice would persist following cessation of use. In the first study (Phase I), one-hundred and forty-six qualifying subjects were randomly assigned to either a sodium bicarbonate whitening dentifrice group (Arm & Hammer Advance White Extreme Whitening Baking Soda and Peroxide Toothpaste) or a silica-based negative control dentifrice group, and brushed twice daily with their assigned dentifrice for six weeks. Tooth shade on the labial surfaces of the eight incisors was assessed using a Vita Classic shade guide, and extrinsic tooth stain was scored using a Modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI) at baseline, week 4, and week 6. In Phase II (after the week 6 examination), volunteers from the Arm & Hammer whitening dentifrice group were randomly assigned to continue using the whitening dentifrice or to use the negative control dentifrice twice daily for two weeks. The six-week shade and stain index scores served as the baseline for this exploratory phase and were rescored after two weeks. The whitening dentifrice group had statistically significant (p < 0.0001) mean shade score reductions of 1.82 and 2.57 from baseline to weeks 4 and 6, respectively. For the same periods, the negative control dentifrice group was virtually unchanged from baseline. For tooth stain, the MLSI total mean scores for the whitening dentifrice group showed statistically significant (p < 0.0001) decreases from baseline of 1.42 (41.6%) and 2.11 (61.6%) at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In contrast, the negative control dentifrice group had a MLSI reduction of 0.07 at week 4 and a 0.06 increase at week 6. Between-group analyses using baseline-adjusted ANCOVA showed the

  12. Stain removal and whitening by baking soda dentifrice: A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2017-11-01

    Tooth discoloration may be caused by intrinsic or extrinsic stains or a combination of both. There are 2 major approaches to removing the stains, including the chemical mechanism using peroxides for tooth bleaching and the mechanical mechanism using abrasives in prophylactic pastes and dentifrices to remove stains, resulting in a whitening effect. Attempts have also been made to add a low concentration of peroxides to dentifrices to enhance their abrasive cleaning to remove tooth stains. This article provides a review of both in vitro and clinical studies on stain removal and whitening effect of dentifrices containing sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). In recent years, whitening dentifrices have become popular because of little additional effort for use, ease of availability, low cost, and accumulated evidence of clinical efficacy and safety in the literature. Advances in research and technology have led to innovative formulations of dentifrices using baking soda as the sole abrasive or a component of an abrasive system. Baking soda is biologically compatible with acid-buffering capacities, antibacterial at high concentrations, and has a relatively lower abrasivity. The evidence available in the literature indicates that baking soda-based dentifrices are effective and safe for tooth stain removal and consequently whitening. A number of clinical studies have also shown that baking soda-based dentifrices are more effective in stain removal and whitening than some non-baking soda-containing dentifrices with a higher abrasivity. So far, research efforts have mainly focused on stain removal and tooth-whitening efficacy and clinical safety of baking soda dentifrices used with manual toothbrushes, with only a few studies investigating their effects using powered toothbrushes, for which further research is encouraged. As part of a daily oral hygiene practice, baking soda-based dentifrice is a desirable, alternative or additional measure for tooth stain removal and whitening

  13. Evaluating the Whitening and Microstructural Effects of a Novel Whitening Strip on Porcelain and Composite Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Takesh, Thair; Sargsyan, Anik; Lee, Matthew; Anbarani, Afarin; Ho, Jessica; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Aims The aim of this project was to evaluate the effects of 2 different whitening strips on color, microstructure and roughness of tea stained porcelain and composite surfaces. Methods 54 porcelain and 72 composite chips served as samples for timed application of over-the-counter (OTC) test or control dental whitening strips. Chips were divided randomly into three groups of 18 porcelain and 24 composite chips each. Of these groups, 1 porcelain and 1 composite set served as controls. The remaining 2 groups were randomized to treatment with either Oral Essentials® Whitening Strips or Crest® 3D White Whitestrips™. Sample surface structure was examined by light microscopy, profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Additionally, a reflectance spectrophotometer was used to assess color changes in the porcelain and composite samples over 24 hours of whitening. Data points were analyzed at each time point using ANOVA. Results In the light microscopy and SEM images, no discrete physical defects were observed in any of the samples at any time points. However, high-resolution SEM images showed an appearance of increased surface roughness in all composite samples. Using profilometry, significantly increased post-whitening roughness was documented in the composite samples exposed to the control bleaching strips. Composite samples underwent a significant and equivalent shift in color following exposure to Crest® 3D White Whitestrips™ and Oral Essentials® Whitening Strips. Conclusions A novel commercial tooth whitening strip demonstrated a comparable beaching effect to a widely used OTC whitening strip. Neither whitening strip caused physical defects in the sample surfaces. However, the control strip caused roughening of the composite samples whereas the test strip did not. PMID:29226023

  14. Effect of four different opalescence tooth-whitening products on enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Majeed, A; Grobler, S R; Moola, M H; Rossouw, R J; van Kotze, T J W

    2008-06-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of various Opalescence tooth-whitening products on enamel. Enamel blocks were exposed to Opalescence PF 10% Carbamide Peroxide (n = 10), Opalescence PF 20% Carbamide Peroxide (n = 10), Opalescence Trèswhite Supreme 10% Hydrogen Peroxide (n = 10) and Opalescence Quick PF 45% Carbamide Peroxide (n = 10) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The control group was enamel blocks (n = 10) kept in artificial saliva. The values were obtained before exposure and after the 14-days treatment period. Enamel blocks were kept in saliva between treatments. Indent marks on enamel blocks were examined using the scanning electron microscope for treatment effects. All four different Opalescence products damaged enamel. The most damage was done when treated for a long period (112 hours). SEM images also showed damage to enamel by all 4 products. Opalescence with 10% and with 20% Carbamide Peroxide showed the highest damage, which also differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the saliva control group (p < 0.05; Tukey-Kramer Multiple comparison test). All 4 Opalescence products damaged enamel. Higher damage was done by the 10% carbamide peroxide and 20% carbamide peroxide products because of the much longer exposure period (112 hours in comparison to 7 hours).

  15. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  16. Tooth color: effects on judgments of attractiveness and age.

    PubMed

    Grosofsky, Alexis; Adkins, Sarah; Bastholm, Robert; Meyer, Leif; Krueger, Lisa; Meyer, Joshua; Torma, Peter

    2003-02-01

    Tooth whitening has become a very popular procedure. Advertisements for whitening products imply that whiter teeth are more attractive than yellower teeth. We tested this idea empirically by manipulating the tooth color of pictures of male and female targets. Participants' ratings of attractiveness were not influenced by tooth color. Exp. 2 yielded a negative correlation between attractiveness and age ratings: targets judged to be older were rated as less attractive. Unless whiter teeth help in some other way, e.g., improved self-esteem or confidence, it seems that tooth whitening procedures or products are not associated with increased attractiveness to others.

  17. Erosion Potential of Tooth Whitening Regimens as Evaluated with Polarized Light Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brambert, Patrick; Qian, Fang; Kwon, So Ran

    2015-11-01

    Tooth whitening is a widely utilized esthetic treatment in dentistry. With increased access to over-the-counter (OTC) systems concerns have been raised as to potential adverse effects associated with overuse of whitening materials. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate enamel erosion due to different whitening regimens when used in excess of recommended guidelines. Extracted human teeth (n = 66) were randomly divided into 11 groups (n = 6/group). Specimens were exposed to OTC products: Crest Whitestrips and 5-minute natural white and a do-it-yourself (DIY) strawberry whitening recipe. Within each regimen, groups were further divided per exposure time: specimens receiving the recommended product dosage; 5 times the recommended dosage; and 10 times the recommended dosage. Negative and positive controls were treated with grade 3 water and 1.0% citric acid, respectively. Specimens were nail-varnished to limit application to a 1 × 4 mm window. Following treatment, specimens were sectioned and erosion (drop in μm) measured using polarized light microscopy. Two-sample t-test was used to detect difference in amount of enamel erosion between negative and positive groups, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was used to detect difference between set of treatment groups and negative control groups or among all experimental groups. There was significant difference in mean amount of enamel erosion (p < 0.0001). Mean enamel erosion for positive control group was significantly greater than that for negative control group (23.50 vs 2.65 μm). There was significant effect for type of treatments on enamel erosion [F(9,50) = 25.19; p < 0.0001]. There was no significant difference between the negative control and each of treatment groups (p > 0.05 for all instances), except for Natural White_10 times treatment group (p < 0.0001) that was significantly greater than the negative control group (14.82 vs 2.65 μm). Caution is advised when

  18. Efficacy of whitening oral rinses and dentifrices on color stability of bleached teeth

    PubMed Central

    Karadas, Muhammet

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of whitening toothpastes and mouthrinses on the color stability of teeth bleached with 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) after immersion in coffee solution. Materials and methods: Specimens obtained from bovine incisors were bleached with 16% CP for 14 days. After bleaching, the specimens were stained in coffee solution for 24 h and randomly divided into eight groups according to the following products (n = 10): distilled water (control group, DW), Scope White mouthrinse (SW), Crest 3D White mouthrinse (CWR), Crest 3D White toothpaste (CWT), Crest 3D White toothpaste and Crest 3D White mouthrinse (CWT + CWR), Listerine Whitening toothpaste (LWT), Listerine Whitening mouthrinse (LWR), and Listerine Whitening mouthrinse and Listerine Whitening toothpaste (LWR + LWT). Color measurements were conducted using a spectrophotometer. The data were assessed by analysis of variance for repeated measures and Tukey’s multiple comparison test (p < 0.05). Results: Immersion in coffee solution after bleaching caused perceptible staining on tooth specimens (ΔE > 3.46). The whitening effect of CWR on teeth stained after bleaching was significantly greater than that in the other groups (p < 0.001). Tooth whitening (ΔE) in each group showed no significant difference from 6 to 12 weeks (p > 0.05). The combination of mouthrinse and toothpaste did not increase the degree of tooth whitening. Conclusion: Whitening mouthrinse and toothpaste had similar effects on the control group in terms of whitening of teeth stained after bleaching. Nevertheless, Crest 3D White mouthrinse produced the greatest recovery whitening effect among all the products tested. PMID:28642898

  19. Calcium release rates from tooth enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents and abrasives.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Danilo Barral; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; de Araujo, Roberto Paulo Correia

    2010-01-01

    Tooth whitening agents containing hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide are used frequently in esthetic dental procedures. However, lesions on the enamel surface have been attributed to the action of these products. Using conventional procedures for separating and isolating biological structures, powdered enamel was obtained and treated with hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, and sodium bicarbonate, ingredients typically found in dentifrices. The enamel was exposed to different pH levels, and atomic emission spectrometry was used to determine calcium release rates. As the pH level increased, the rate of calcium release from enamel treated with dentifrices containing whitening agents decreased. Carbamide peroxide produced the lowest amount of decalcification, while sodium bicarbonate produced the highest release rates at all pH levels.

  20. Effect of a whitening agent application on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masashi; Sato, Hikaru; Sato, Tomomi; Moore, B Keith; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2004-06-01

    Though reduction in bond strength after tooth whitening has been reported, little is known about it's effect on enamel bond strength of two-step bonding systems that exclude phosphoric acid etching prior to bonding agent application. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whitening procedure using an in-office whitening agent on enamel bond strength of self-etching primer systems. Three self-etching primer systems, Imperva Fluoro Bond, Mac Bond II, Clearfil SE Bond, and a one-bottle adhesive system Single Bond as a control material, were used. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in self-curing resin and the facial enamel or dentin surfaces were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper. An in-office whitening agent, Hi-Lite was applied on the tooth surface according to the manufacturer's instruction. Bonding procedures were done soon after rinsing off the whitening agent or after 24 hours storage in distilled water. Specimens without whitening procedure were prepared as controls. Fifteen specimens per test group were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 24 hours, then shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. One-way ANOVA followed by Duncan multiple range test were used for statistical analysis of the results. For the specimens made soon after rinsing off the whitening agent, a significant decrease in enamel bond strength was observed for all the bonding systems used. For the specimens made after 24 hours storage in water, a small decrease in enamel bond strength was observed and no significant differences were found compared to those of controls (without whitening). From the results of this study, enamel bond strengths of the self-etching primer systems might be affected to a lesser degree after rinsing with water followed by 24 hours storage in water.

  1. Conventional and whitening toothpastes: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and effect on the enamel surface.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Jóias, Renata Pilli; Santana-Melo, Gabriela Fátima; Ferreira, Lara Tolentino; El Achkar, Vivian Narana Ribeiro; Rode, Sigmar de Mello

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of whitening and common toothpastes, and the surface roughness of tooth enamel submitted to brushing with both toothpastes. Samples of whitening toothpastes [Colgate Whitening (CW) and Oral-B Whitening (OBW)] and regular (non-whitening) toothpastes (Colgate and Oral-B) were extracted in culture medium. Gingival human fibroblasts (FMM-1) were placed in contact with different dilutions of culture media that had been previously exposed to such materials, and the cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The genotoxicity was assessed by the micronucleus formation assay in Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V79). The cell survival rate and micronuclei number were assessed before and after exposure to the toothpaste extracts. For the surface roughness evaluation, 20 bovine tooth specimens, divided into four groups according to toothpastes, were submitted to 10,000 brushing cycles. The results were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U and two-way ANOVA tests (P < 0.05). MTT assay showed that Colgate was significantly less cytotoxic than CW, Oral-B and OBW at all dilutions (P < 0.01). CW was the most cytotoxic toothpaste (P < 0.01). The whitening toothpastes showed the highest numbers of micronuclei compared to the untreated control (UC) (P < 0.01). Colgate and Oral-B toothpastes were not genotoxic compared to UC (P = 0.326). The OBW toothpaste was statistically significantly abrasive to the enamel surface (P < 0.01). The whitening toothpastes and Oral-B were cytotoxic to the cells. The whitening toothpastes were more genotoxic to cells in vitro than the common toothpastes, and genotoxicity was more pronounced in the OBW toothpaste.

  2. Effect of various tooth whitening modalities on microhardness, surface roughness and surface morphology of the enamel.

    PubMed

    Kwon, So Ran; Kurti, Steven R; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Li, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of four whitening modalities on surface enamel as assessed with microhardness tester, profilometer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Whitening was performed according to manufacturer's directions for over-the-counter (OTC), dentist dispensed for home use (HW) and in-office (OW) whitening. Do-it-yourself (DIY) whitening consisted of a strawberry and baking soda mix. Additionally, negative and positive controls were used. A total of 120 enamel specimens were used for microhardness testing at baseline and post-whitening. Following microhardness testing specimens were prepared for SEM observations. A total of 120 enamel specimens were used for surface roughness testing at baseline and post-whitening (n = 20 per group). Rank-based Analysis of Covariance was performed to compare microhardness and surface roughness changes. Tests of hypotheses were two-sided with α = 0.05. There was a significant difference in Knoop hardness changes (ΔKHN) among the groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.0001). Significant hardness reduction was observed in the positive control and DIY group (p < 0.0001). Mean surface roughness changes (ΔRa) were significantly different among the groups (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.0001). Surface roughness increased in the OTC group (p = 0.03) and in the positive control (p < 0.0001). The four whitening modalities-DIY, OTC, HW and OW induced minimal surface morphology changes when observed with SEM. It can be concluded that none of the four whitening modalities adversely affected enamel surface morphology. However, caution should be advised when using a DIY regimen as it may affect enamel microhardness and an OTC product as it has the potential to increase surface roughness.

  3. The influence of tooth colour on the perceptions of personal characteristics among female dental patients: comparisons of unmodified, decayed and 'whitened' teeth.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, S; Newton, J T; Williams, D M

    2008-03-08

    Physical appearance plays a key role in human social interaction and the smile and teeth are important features in determining the attractiveness of a face. Furthermore, the mouth is thought to be important in social interactions. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between tooth colour and social perceptions. Cross-sectional survey. One hundred and eighty female participants viewed one of six images, either a male or a female digitally altered to display one of three possible dental statuses (unmodified, decayed, or whitened). The images were rated on four personality traits: social competence (SC), intellectual ability (IA), psychological adjustment (PA), and relationship satisfaction (RS). Decayed dental appearance led to more negative judgements over the four personality categories. Whitened teeth led to more positive appraisals. The gender of the image and the demographic background of the participant did not have a significant effect on appraisals. Tooth colour exerts an influence on social perceptions. The results may be explained by negative beliefs about dental decay, such as its link with poor oral hygiene.

  4. A clinical evaluation comparing two H2O2 concentrations used with a light-assisted chairside tooth whitening system.

    PubMed

    Ward, Marilyn; Felix, Heather

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of two different BriteSmile hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) gels in a split-arch protocol for whitening teeth in a clinical setting when used in conjunction with a BriteSmile BS4000 lamp. Fifteen subjects were enrolled into a single-center clinical trial. The efficacy of the BriteSmile BS4000 lamp using both 15% H2O2 and 25% H2O2 gel formulations was tested. Study subjects were concurrently exposed to the whitening lamp with the 15% H2O2 gel placed on half of their anterior teeth and the 25% H2O2 gel on the other half for a total light and gel exposure of 60 minutes. The clinical data collected were shade score, gingival health, and dentinal hypersensitivity self-assessment. Changes in tooth shade were better for subjects exposed to the 25% gel and the dental whitening lamp (average 8.0 shade changes) compared to subjects exposed to the 15% gel and dental whitening lamp (average 7.6 shade changes) immediately after treatment. The same held true at the 7-day follow-up (25% gel average 7.4 shade changes versus 15% gel average 7.3 shade changes). However, these differences were not statistically significant. No reports of irritation of gingival soft tissues were documented. The relative changes in mean sensitivity scores were similar for both groups with no significant differences in mean sensitivity scores between the groups. Both concentrations of H2O2 gel and the whitening lamp combined gave study subjects an average of 8.0 (25% gel) and 7.6 (15% gel) shade changes immediately after treatment. The 7-day follow-up examination resulted in a regression of lightest to an average of 7.4 (25% gel) and 7.3 (15% gel). It was concluded that the use of the chairside whitening light and either 15% or 25% hydrogen peroxide gel is safe and effective for whitening teeth in 1 hour.

  5. Effect of acidity of in-office bleaching gels on tooth sensitivity and whitening: a two-center double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, A D; Servat, F; Stanislawczuk, R; Mena-Serrano, A; Rezende, M; Prieto, M V; Cereño, V; Rojas, M F; Ortega, K; Fernandez, E; Reis, A

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to compare the tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching efficacy of two hydrogen peroxide gels with different pHs (acid pH [Pola Office, SDI] and the neutral pH [Pola Office+, SDI]) used for in-office bleaching. Fifty-four patients from Brazil and Chile, with right superior incisor darker than A2, were selected for this double-blind, split-mouth randomized trial. Teeth were bleached in two sessions, with 1-week interval. Each session had three applications of 8 min each, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The color changes were evaluated by subjective (Vita Classical and Vita Bleachedguide) and objective (Easy shade spectrophotometer) methods. Participants recorded TS with 0-10 visual analog scale. Color change in shade guide units (SGU) and ΔE was analyzed by Student's t test (α = 0.05). The absolute risk and intensity of TS were evaluated by McNemar's test and Wilcoxon-paired test, respectively (α = 0.05). All groups achieved the same level of whitening after 30 days of clinical evaluation. The use of a neutral in-office bleaching gel significantly decreases the absolute risk of TS (28%, 95% CI 18-41) and intensity of TS when compared to the acid bleaching gel (absolute risk of 50%, 95% CI 37-63). The use of a neutral in-office bleaching agent gel produced the same whitening degree than an acid bleaching gel but with reduced risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity. Clinicians should opt to use in-office bleaching with a neutral gel than an acid product because the former causes a significant lower risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity.

  6. Effect of pH on whitening efficacy of 35% hydrogen peroxide and enamel microhardness.

    PubMed

    Jurema, Ana Luiza Barbosa; de Souza, Mauricio Yugo; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide at different pH values and the degree of tooth staining on whitening efficacy and enamel microhardness. 90 enamel-dentin specimens were obtained from bovine incisors. They were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 45), 1 group was immersed in a staining broth for 14 days, and another group was not stained and kept in distilled water at 37°C. Twenty-four hours after the staining procedure, each group was distributed into 3 subgroups that were whitened by 35% hydrogen peroxide with different pH values (5, 7, and 8.4) for 30 minutes. The color was measured at baseline and 7 days after whitening. Microhardness was measured at baseline, immediate, 24 hours, and 1 month after the whitening procedure. Data were submitted to 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test for multiple comparisons for color analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA and the Tukey test were used to analyze microhardness data. The color change of the stained groups (ΔE 00  = 4.6) was significantly higher than that of the nonstained groups (ΔE 00  = 3.7). Microhardness value decreased significantly immediately after whitening for all subgroups and did not return to initial values. For each measurement time, microhardness was not significantly different among subgroups with different pH values. Despite the effectiveness of 35% hydrogen peroxide, changes on gel pH did not affect the whitening efficacy, and the enamel was superficially demineralized, regardless of pH values. Independently of the pH value of whitening gel, enamel undergoes superficial demineralization and with a reduction in superficial microhardness that does not return to the initial values. However, using hydrogen peroxide with different pH values does not alter the whitening effect. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of fluoridated carbamide peroxide whitening gel in the remineralization of demineralized enamel: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Swetha; Janga, Ravi Kumar; Venugopal, L; Reddy, Indukuri Ravikishore; Babu, P Ravisekhar; Kumar, Sunil S

    2014-05-01

    The use of self-administered carbamide peroxide bleaching gels has become increasingly popular for whitening of discolored vital teeth. Studies have reported that its use may induce increased levels of sensitivity and surface roughness of the tooth due to demineralization. This study evaluates the effect of fluoride addition to the bleaching agent - its remineralizing capacity and alterations in the whitening properties. Twenty-four extracted lower third molar teeth, with the pretreatment shade determined, were taken up in the study. Each tooth was sectioned into four and labeled as groups A, B, C, and D. The tooth quadrants in group A-C were demineralized; groups A and B were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide gel (group-A without fluoride and group-B with 0.463% fluoride addition) (no further treatment was carried out for group c) group-D remained as the control. The post-treatment shade was determined. The tooth samples were sectioned (approximately 200 μm) for evaluation under a light microscope. The depth of demineralization was analyzed at five different equidistant points. Statistical analysis was carried out with t-tests, accepting ≤0.05 as significant. Addition of fluoride caused remineralization of demineralized enamel. The tooth whitening system showed that the remineralization properties did not affect the whitening properties.

  8. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P < 0.01). The decreasing range of Deltab* was more than the increasing range of DeltaL* at the cervical site; opposite results were observed at the incisal site. A positive correlation was detected between baseline b* and DeltaE. The spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  9. Effect of tooth whitening strips on fatigue resistance and flexural strength of bovine dentin in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; De Souza, Grace M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of whitening strips on bovine dentin fatigue resistance and flexural strength in vitro. Materials and methods A total of eighty bovine dentin specimens (2x2x17mm) were treated with either: control glycerine gel on plastic film wrap or whitening strips containing 9.5% hydrogen peroxide. Treatment was applied for 30 minutes, twice a day, for 1- or 4-weeks. After the last treatment, ten specimens per group were randomly selected to undergo fatigue testing (106 cycles, 3Hz, 20N) while the other ten were subjected to flexural strength testing after ten days of storage in artificial saliva. Kaplan-Meier method with a log rank test, Wilcoxon test and Cox regression were used to assess fatigue test results (p<0.05). One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests were used to compare the flexural strength results (p<0.05). Results There were significant differences in survival during the fatigue test among the groups (p<0.001). Treatment (control or bleach) was a significant factor for specimen survival (p<0.001, Exp(B) = 33.45). There were significant differences in mean flexural strength (p<0.001). No significant difference was found between “1-wk control” and “4-wk control”. The mean flexural strength and fatigue resistance of the “4-wk bleach” were significantly lower than all the other groups. Conclusions The use of whitening strips reduced the fatigue resistance and flexural strength of bovine dentin in vitro. Until the effect of whitening strips on mechanical properties of human dentin is fully elucidated, it remains prudent to advise patients to avoid excessive direct use of whitening strips on dentin. PMID:28278191

  10. Effects of tooth whitening and orange juice on surface properties of dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yan-Fang; Amin, Azadeh; Malmstrom, Hans

    2009-06-01

    To study the effects of 6% H2O2 activated with LED light on surface enamel as compared to orange juice challenges in vitro. A total of 40 human enamel discs were incubated in saliva overnight to allow pellicle formation and then divided into three groups: 15 for whitening treatments, 15 for orange juice immersions and 10 for normal saline controls. Baseline microhardness was measured with a microhardness Knoop indenter (50g, 10s) and surface topography was evaluated with a focus-variation 3D scanning microscopy. Enamel discs were treated with H2O2 or orange juice for 20 min each cycle for five cycles to simulate daily treatment with the products for 5 days. The discs were stored in saliva between treatment cycles. Microhardness and surface topography were evaluated again after treatments. Changes in microhardness and in surface area roughness (Sa), mean maximum peak-to-valley distance (Sz) and the developed surface area ratio (Sdr) were compared before and after treatments (t-test) and among groups (ANOVA). Enamel surface hardness decreased by 84% after orange juice immersion but no statistically significant changes were observed in the whitening and control groups. Surface topography changed significantly only in the orange juice group as shown by increased Sa (1.2 microm vs. 2.0 microm), Sz (7.7 microm vs. 10.2 microm) and Sdr (2.8% vs. 6.0%). No such changes were observed in the whitening and control groups. In comparison to orange juice challenges, the effects of 6% H2O2 on surface enamel are insignificant. Orange juice erosion markedly decreased hardness and increased roughness of enamel.

  11. Determination of demineralization depth in tooth enamel exposed to abusive use of whitening gel using micro-Energy Dispersive X ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Coutinho, Sara; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Silveira, João Miguel; Mata, António

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we present a methodology for the determination of the depth of demineralization in dental enamel caused by extended use of an Over-The-Counter (OTC) whitening product. Teeth whitening is a very common practice in Dentistry, but concerns have been raised regarding the invasiveness of the treatment, especially regarding OTC products, that can be used without medical supervision and sometimes with concentrations of active agent that exceed the allowed regulations. In this work, we studied tooth enamel samples, treated with a whitening product during an extended period of time, both directly on the enamel surface and in the cross-section. Specimens were analyzed using microbeam X-Ray Fluorescence (micro-XRF) using polycapillary optics to obtain a spot down to 25 μm. Due to the relatively large spot size of our setup point analysis of the cross-sections would be inadequate. This way, line scans were performed instead, before and after whitening, and using appropriate data treatment the depth of demineralization was inferred. The used methodology indicated an average demineralization depth of 25 μm, the same order of magnitude as the aprismatic enamel layer.

  12. A review of the effect of vital teeth bleaching on the mechanical properties of tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Swain, Michael V

    2013-09-01

    Tooth whitening is considered the easiest and most cost-effective procedure for treating tooth discoloration. Contemporary bleaching agents contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. It is either applied directly or produced from its precursor, carbamide peroxide. A review of the published literature was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of whitening products on dental enamel, with a focus on its mechanical properties and the influence of various parameters on study outcomes. There appear to be considerable differences in opinion as to whether changes in mechanical properties occur as a result of tooth whitening. However, the mechanical property findings of those studies appear to be related to the load applied during the indentation tests. Most studies which used loads higher than 500mN to determine enamel hardness showed no effect of bleaching, whereas those using lower loads were able to detect hardness reduction in the surface layer of enamel. In conclusion, bleaching reduces the hardness of the enamel surface of enamel, and that is more readily detected with instrumented low load testing systems. This hardness reduction may arise due to degradation or denaturation of enamel matrix proteins by the peroxide oxidation.

  13. The effect of three whitening oral rinses on enamel micro-hardness.

    PubMed

    Potgieter, E; Osman, Y; Grobler, S R

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect on human enamel micro-hardness of three over-the-counter whitening oral rinses available in South Africa. Enamel fragments were gathered into three groups of 15 each. One group was exposed to Colgate Plax Whitening Blancheur, the second group to White Glo 2 in 1 and the third to Plus White, in each case for periods recommended by the respective manufacturers. Surface micro-hardness of all groups was measured before and after a 14 day treatment period. pH levels of the oral rinses were also determined with a combination pH electrode. Pre- and post- treatment data were analysed by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Sum Test. According to the micro-hardness values no significant (p > 0.05) enamel damage was found as a result of treatment. However, it was observed that Colgate Pax and White Glo decreased the enamel hardness, an early sign of enamel damage, while Plus White showed a small increase in hardness. The three whitening oral rinses on the South African market do not damage the tooth enamel significantly when used as recommended by the manufacturers. However, extending the contact period and increasing the frequency of application might lead to damage of enamel.

  14. Effective of diode laser on teeth enamel in the teeth whitening treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klunboot, U.; Arayathanitkul, K.; Chitaree, R.; Emarat, N.

    2011-12-01

    This research purpose is to investigate the changing of teeth color and to study the surface of teeth after treatment by laser diode at different power densities for tooth whitening treatment. In the experiment, human-extracted teeth samples were divided into 7 groups of 6 teeth each. After that laser diode was irradiated to teeth, which were coated by 38% concentration of hydrogen peroxide, during for 20, 30 and 60 seconds at power densities of 10.9 and 52.1 W/cm2. The results of teeth color change were described by the CIEL*a*b* systems and the damage of teeth surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the power density of the laser diode could affect the whiteness of teeth. The high power density caused more luminous teeth than the low power density did, but on the other hand the high power density also caused damage to the teeth surface. Therefore, the laser diode at the low power densities has high efficiency for tooth whitening treatment and it has a potential for other clinical applications.

  15. Tooth color measurement using Chroma Meter: techniques, advantages, and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming

    2003-01-01

    Tooth whitening has become a popular and routine dental procedure, and its efficacy and safety have been well documented. However, the measurement of tooth color, particularly in the evaluation of the efficacy of a system intended to enhance tooth whiteness, remains a challenge. One of the instruments used for assessing tooth color in clinical whitening studies is the Minolta Chroma Meter CR-321 (Minolta Corporation USA, Ramsey, NJ, USA). This article describes the instrument and discusses various measuring procedures and the Chroma Meter's advantages, limitations, and disadvantages. The available information indicates that, although Minolta Chroma Meter CR-321 provides quantitative and objective measurements of tooth color, it can be tedious to use with a custom alignment device. The Chroma Meter data are inconsistent with the commonly used visual instruments such as Vitapan Classical Shade Guide (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany), although in many cases the general trends are similar. It is also questionable whether the small area measured adequately represents the color of the whole tooth. A more critical challenge is the lack of methods for interpreting the Chroma Meter data regarding tooth color change in studies evaluating the efficacy of whitening systems. Consequently, at present the Chroma Meter data alone do not appear to be adequate for determining tooth color change in whitening research, although the quantitative measurements may be useful as supplemental or supportive data. Research is needed to develop and improve the instrument and technique for quantitative measurement of tooth color and interpretation of the data for evaluating tooth color change. This paper will help readers to understand the advantages and limitations of the Minolta Chroma Meter used for evaluating the efficacy of tooth-whitening systems so that proper judgment can be made in the interpretation of the results of clinical studies.

  16. Crossover clinical investigation of a whitening chewing gum for inhibiting dental stain formation in conjunction with tooth brushing.

    PubMed

    Milleman, Jeffery L; Milleman, Kimberly R; Kleber, Carl J; Proskin, Howard M; Dodds, Michael; Kelley, Michael; Ramirez, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of a marketed whitening chewing gum compared to a no-gum control in preventing the formation of extrinsic stains on the teeth of stain-forming subjects when chewed over a 12-week period of regular unsupervised use in conjunction with daily tooth brushing. This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, 12-week crossover clinical trial. Stain-forming (after smoking or drinking coffee or tea) adults, starting with a stain-free baseline, either chewed the test gum (Orbit White) unsupervised four times per day, 15 minutes/chew, or used no gum along with daily brushing with a commercially available toothbrush and dentifrice for 12 weeks. At the crossover, all procedures were repeated with subjects assigned the opposite treatment. Extrinsic stain was measured at six and 12 weeks by both the Lobene Stain Index (LSI) and the Modified Lobene Stain Index (MLSI) using separate experienced examiners. After 12 weeks, LSI stain scores showed a significant 25% reduction (p = 0.0008) in new stain formation for subjects using the test chewing gum along with tooth brushing versus tooth brushing alone (no-gum control). The corresponding MLSI stain scores demonstrated a 36% reduction (p < 0.0001) in the formation of extrinsic stain on the teeth. The overall findings of this clinical study demonstrated that regular use of Orbit White chewing gum, soon after smoking or drinking coffee or tea, will supplement daily tooth brushing in preventing unsightly stains from forming on the anterior teeth compared to brushing alone.

  17. A comparative clinical study evaluating stain removal efficacy of a new sensitivity whitening dentifrice compared to commercially available whitening dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nathan; Maggio, Brenda; Sufi, Farzana; Mason, Stephen; Kleber, Carl J

    2009-01-01

    To assess the extrinsic stain removal efficacy of a new sensitivity dentifrice containing sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) to marketed whitening toothpastes after six weeks of product use. This was a single-center, double-blind, stratified, six-week clinical study comparing the reduction in stain area and intensity of Sensodyne Extra Whitening to Crest Maximum Strength Sensitivity Protection Whitening plus Scope and Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening Mint dentifrice, as measured by MacPherson's Modification of the Lobene Stain Index (MMLSI) in a forced stain model. Two-hundred and ninety-five subjects completed the study. Tooth stain MMSLI scores showed significant differences between Sensodyne and Crest dentifrices in favor of Sensodyne for all surface sites (p = 0.014), and individually for facial (p = 0.023), lingual (p = 0.027), and interproximal (p = 0.014) surfaces. No significant statistical differences between Sensodyne and Colgate dentifrices were observed for any of the surfaces. Results from this stain removal clinical study demonstrate significant extrinsic stain removal efficacy for all dentifrices relative to baseline. Significant differences between the two marketed sensitivity whitening dentifrices were demonstrated in favor of the new Sensodyne Sensitivity Whitening dentifrice.

  18. In vitro demineralization of tooth enamel subjected to two whitening regimens.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kayoko; Tanaka, Reina; Shibata, Yo; Miyazaki, Takashi; Hisamitsu, Hisashi

    2013-07-01

    The resistance of bleached enamel to demineralization has not been elucidated fully. In this study, the authors aimed to examine the level of in vitro demineralization of human tooth enamel after bleaching by using two common bleaching regimens: home bleaching (HB) and office bleaching (OB) with photoirradiation. The authors bleached teeth to equivalent levels by means of the two bleaching regimens. They used fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the reduction in enamel density and the release of calcium into solution after storing the treated teeth in a demineralizing solution for two weeks. They also visualized and quantified mineral distribution in demineralized bleached enamel over time by using a desktop microcomputed-tomographic analyzer. Enamel subjected to HB or to photoirradiation without bleaching showed increased demineralization. In contrast, enamel treated with OB was more resistant to demineralization. This resistance to demineralization in teeth treated with OB presumably is due to peroxide's permeating to deeper layers of enamel before being activated by photoirradiation, which enhances mineralization. The mineral distribution pattern of enamel after treatment plays a critical role in providing resistance to demineralization in whitened teeth. OB confers to enamel significant resistance to in vitro demineralization. Dentists should supervise the nightguard HB process.

  19. Whitening effect of Sophora flavescens extract.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dae Hyun; Cha, Youn Jeong; Joe, Gi Jung; Yang, Kyeong Eun; Jang, Ik-Soon; Kim, Bo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Min

    2013-11-01

    Sophora flavescens Ait. (Leguminosae) has been proposed as a new whitening agent for cosmetics, because it has a strong ability to inhibit tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the formation of melanin. We conducted a study to determine whether ethanol extract of the roots of S. flavescens has the potential for use as a whitening cosmetic agent by investigating its underlying mechanisms of action. To elucidate the mechanism of action of S. flavescens extract, we used DNA microarray technology. We investigated the changes in the mRNA levels of genes associated with the formation and transport of melanosomes. We also identified the formation and transport of melanosomes with immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. Finally, the skin-whitening effect in vivo of S. flavescens extract was analyzed on human skin. We found that S. flavescens extract strongly inhibited tyrosinase activity (IC50, 10.4 μg/mL). Results also showed that key proteins involved in the formation and transport of melanosomes were dramatically downregulated at both mRNA and protein level in keratinocytes exposed to S. flavescens extract. In addition, a clinical trial of a cream containing 0.05% S. flavescens extract on human skin showed it had a significant effect on skin whitening by mechanical and visual evaluation (1.14-fold). This study provides important clues toward understanding the effects of S. flavescens extract on the formation and transport of melanosomes. From these results, we suggest that naturally occurring S. flavescens extract might be useful as a new whitening agent in cosmetics.

  20. Whitening Efficacy of Whitening Mouth Rinses Used Alone or in Conjunction With Carbamide Peroxide Home Whitening.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jbs; Sarlo, R S; Bresciani, E; Caneppele, Tmf

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of whitening mouth rinses on teeth previously whitened or not, exposed to food dyes. One hundred twenty enamel-dentin specimens, 3 mm in diameter, were obtained from bovine incisors. The specimens were stained for 14 days in staining broth. After staining, the initial color reading was performed via a spectrophotometer CM-2600d (Konica Minolta). Half of specimens were submitted to whitening (10% carbamide peroxide [CP]) for 14 days. They were then divided into three groups and were submitted to cycles of staining (five minutes) and mouth rinses (two minutes) for 12 weeks, with the following: CP-LI, Listerine Whitening; CP-PL, Plax Whitening; CP-BP, bromelain + papain; CP-DW, deionized water. LI, PL, BP, and DW groups were submitted to the same cited cycles but with no prior bleaching. The color measurements were performed after four, eight, and 12 weeks of treatment with mouth rinses. Data were submitted to repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons, with significance level at 5%. The results showed that the CP-LI, CP-PL, LI, and PL groups had greater color change than did the others. The CP-BP and BP groups were similar to CP-DW and DW. We therefore conclude that Listerine Whitening mouth rinse presented the highest bleaching effect, followed by Plax Whitening mouth rinse. Both maintained CP bleaching effect after 12 weeks of dye-rinse cycles. However, none of these rinses were able to produce whitening similar to CP. Bromelain- and papain-containing mouth rinses did not show bleaching effect, being similar to the control groups.

  1. Placebo-controlled clinical trial of use of 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips for medication-induced xerostomia.

    PubMed

    Papas, Athena S; Kugel, Gerard; Singh, Mabi; Barker, Matthew L; Gerlach, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of peroxide-containing strip-based tooth whitening among subjects with medication-induced hyposalivation. Eligibility for this tooth whitening study was limited to dentate adults taking xerogenic medications with an unstimulated salivary flow < or = 0.2 ml/min. After giving informed consent, 42 subjects were randomized using a 2:1 ratio to 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips (Crest Whitestrips Premium) or placebo strips without peroxide. Strips were used for 30 min twice daily for a 14-day period. Usage was unsupervised, and only the maxillary arch was treated. On days 8 and 15, efficacy was assessed from standard digital images of the anterior dentition and quantified using the Cielab color system, while safety was assessed from interviews and clinical examinations. At day 8, the peroxide group experienced significant (p < 0.001) color improvement relative to baseline and placebo. Adjusted means +/- standard errors for yellowness reduction were -1.65 +/- 0.115 units for the peroxide group and -0.32 +/- 0.170 units for the placebo group. For the increase in lightness, adjusted means +/- standard errors on day 8 were 1.53 +/- 0.130 units for the peroxide group and 0.37 +/- 0.191 units for the controls. Continued strip use through day 15 yielded incremental color improvement for the peroxide group. Mild and transient tooth sensitivity represented the most common adverse events. No subject discontinued treatment due to a product-related adverse event. Twice daily use of 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips by adults with medication-induced xerostomia was well tolerated, with significant tooth color improvement evident within 7 days. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Comparison of the color difference between teeth underwent cold light whitening and two kinds of shade guides].

    PubMed

    Xu, Y X

    2018-06-18

    To investigate which shade guide, Vitapan Classical or Vita Bleachedguide 3DMaster, is better matched with the color of teeth in judging whitening effect, by comparing the color difference between shade tabs and corresponding teeth underwent cold light tooth whitening. A total of 60 patients underwent Beyond cold light tooth whitening from May 2014 to April 2016. The patients were divided into two experimental groups according to the shade guide used. Vitapan Classical shade guide was used to judge whitening effect in one group, and Vita Bleachedguide 3DMaster shade guide was used in another. Shade matching was carried out before and after whitening in both the two groups, and the results were recorded by digital photographs. Shade matching procedures were carried out by two doctors independently. If they chose the same tab, it would be seen as the shade matching result; While if they chose different tabs, another doctor would be invited to make a decision. Photographs were taken in preset conditions: intraoral photos of the full dentition in the front, and the proportion of shooting was 1:3; aperture was F22; shutter speed was 1/200; intensity of flash was M/8; ISO value was 200. The photographs were analyzed by Photoshop software. Chromatic values were measured, and color difference values were calculated. Measuring of chromatic values was carried out by three doctors independently, and all the photos were measured twice by each doctor. Six measure results of each photo were recorded, and the maximum and the minimum were excluded, then the mean was seen as the final result. The color difference values were compared by independent-sample t test. Besides, changes of shade tabs after whitening in the two groups were recorded. Color difference value was 5.06±1.71 in Vitapan Classical group, and 3.39±1.36 in Vita Bleachedguide 3D-Master group. There was statistically significant difference between the two groups (t=4.68,P<0.001). Change of shade tabs was 3.63

  3. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Arjmand, Nooshin; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Zakeri, Majid; Maleknejad, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching. Sixty-six patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Following the in-office procedure with 40% hydrogen peroxide, the participants were randomly divided into three groups. The patients in group 1 received irradiation from a low-level red laser (LLRL; 660 nm, 200 mW, 15 s, 12 J/cm(2)), whereas participants in group 2 were subjected to a low-level infrared laser (LLIL; 810 nm) under similar conditions as in group 1. In group 3 (placebo), the laser treatment was the same as that in groups 1 and 2, but without energy output. The degree of tooth sensitivity was recorded at 1, 24, and 48 h after bleaching using a visual analog scale (VAS). The change in tooth shade was measured 30 days after tooth whitening. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at 1 h after bleaching (p > 0.05). At 24 h after therapy, pain level was significantly lower in the LLIL group compared to the LLRL and placebo groups (p < 0.05). At 48 h after bleaching, VAS scores in the LLIL and LLRL groups were comparable to each other (p > 0.05) and both were significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the efficacy of tooth whitening among groups (p > 0.05). LLLT with an infrared diode laser could be recommended as a suitable strategy to reduce the intensity of tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  4. Skin whitening effect of linoleic acid is enhanced by liposomal formulations.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Yasutami; Imanaka, Hiromichi; Ando, Hideya; Ryu, Atsuko; Oku, Naoto; Baba, Naomichi; Makino, Taketoshi

    2004-04-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to have a whitening effect on hyperpigmented skin, and is encapsulated in liposomes for topical application because of its low solubility in aqueous solution, although the effect of liposomalization of LA on the whitening activity has not been evaluated. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of liposomalization on the whitening activity of LA by using LA in ethanol, hydrogel containing LA, and hydrogel containing liposomal LA towards the UV-stimulated hyperpigmented dorsal skin of brownish guinea pigs. The whitening effect was far greater for hydrogel containing liposomal LA (0.1% w/w as a final concentration of LA) than for free LA in ethanol or hydrogel containing LA. Next, the whitening effect of LA was examined with UV-stimulated hyperpigmented human upper arm skin by using a hydrogel containing liposomal LA (0.1% LA) and non-liposomal LA (3.0, 10.0% LA). Liposomal LA (0.1%) showed a whitening effect comparable to 10.0% non-liposomal LA and was far more effective than 3.0% non-liposomal LA. These results indicate that liposomal formulations are favorable for the transdermal application of LA.

  5. Evaluation of a 6% hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening gel on enamel and dentine microhardness in vitro.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Andrew; Thakker, Gopal; Cooper, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of a novel 6% hydrogen peroxide containing tooth whitener, Xtra White (XW), on enamel and dentine microhardness in vitro. Polished human enamel and dentine specimens were prepared and baseline microhardness determined. In study 1, enamel specimens were exposed to 20 min cycles of either water, XW or Sprite Light for up to 28 cycles. In studies 2 and 3, enamel specimens were treated with 20 min cycles of either XW or water and exposed to whole saliva at all other times. In study 3, an additional exposure to a fluoride containing toothpaste was conducted. In total, 28 treatments were conducted in order to simulate a 2 weeks product use. In study 4, dentine specimens were treated as per study 3. Final microhardness measurements were taken and for studies 3 and 4 colour measurements were additionally taken. XW and water gave no statistically significant (p>0.05) changes in enamel and dentine microhardness after 28 treatments. Sprite Light gave a significant (p<0.00002) reduction in enamel microhardness after one 20 min treatment. XW showed significant bleaching of enamel and dentine specimens as compared to the water control. XW does not have any significant effect on enamel and dentine microhardness.

  6. Effect of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening.

    PubMed

    Barry, T N; Bailey, C W; Ashcraft-Olmscheid, D; Vandewalle, K S

    The purpose of this study was to compare the whitening efficacy of a novel bleaching agent containing a unique tribarrel hydremide-peroxide gel (KöR) with a traditional bleaching system of hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (Opalescence). Bovine incisors were mounted into a custom resin, arch-shaped mounting device. Four groups of 10 teeth were created using mounting devices containing five teeth each. The in-office and home bleaching gels of KöR and Opalescence were applied to the teeth alone and in trays to simulate a combination of in-office and home bleaching or home bleaching only. Spectrophotometer readings of L* a* b* were performed at baseline, the end of active bleaching (immediate), and three and six months postbleaching. Immediately postbleaching, the use of Opalescence gel resulted in greater change in ΔE* and Δb* (less yellow) for combined and home bleaching techniques compared with KöR. After six months, Opalescence had significantly greater ΔE* and Δb* compared with KöR for home bleaching only. There was no significant difference in ΔL* between Opalescence and KöR at any time period with either technique.

  7. The abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded enamel.

    PubMed

    Mosquim, Victor; Martines Souza, Beatriz; Foratori Junior, Gerson Aparecido; Wang, Linda; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the in vitro abrasive effect of commercial whitening toothpastes on eroded bovine enamel samples in respect to erosive tooth wear. 72 bovine crowns were embedded, polished and subjected to the baseline profile analysis. The samples were then protected in 2/3 of the enamel surface and were randomly assigned to six groups (n= 12/group): G1: Oral-B 3D White, G2: Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White, G3: Sorriso Xtreme White 4D, G4: Colgate Luminous White, G5: Crest (conventional toothpaste), G6:erosion only (control). All samples were submitted to an erosive pH cycling (4 x 90 seconds in 0.1% citric acid, pH 2.5, per day) and abrasive challenges (2 x 15 seconds, per day) for 7 days. After the first and the last daily cycles, the samples were subjected to abrasive challenges, using a toothbrushing machine, soft toothbrushes and slurry of the tested toothpastes (1.5 N). Between the challenges, the samples were immersed in artificial saliva. The final profile was obtained and overlaid to the baseline profile for the calculation of the erosive tooth wear (μm). The data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (P< 0.05). G1 promoted the highest enamel wear (3.68±1.06 μm), similarly to G3 (3.17± 0.80 μm) and G4 (3.44± 1.29 μm). G3 and G4 performed similarly between them and compared with G5 (2.35± 1.44 μm). G2 (1.51± 0.95 μm) and G6 (0.85± 0.36 μm) showed the lowest enamel wear, which did not differ between them and from G5. Oral-B 3D White showed the highest abrasive potential while Close-up Diamond Attraction Power White showed the lowest abrasive potential on eroded enamel in vitro. This study showed that some commercial whitening toothpastes, especially those containing pyrophosphate associated with hydrated silica, enhanced enamel erosive wear.

  8. Dental whitening--revisiting the myths.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of dental bleaching has increased with the introduction of at-home whitening. Currently available whitening methods include those prescribed by a dental professional for use at home, those applied by the professional in the dental office, a combination of the two, or systems available over the counter. This article reviews the effect, efficacy, and safety of bleaching techniques and materials. Most whitening techniques are considered effective and safe when carried out under the supervision of a dental professional. This article also compares the efficacy and safety of some of the most popular bleaching techniques, including at-home whitening with carbamide peroxide, over-the-counter (OTC) systems, and in-office whitening. Some of these whitening techniques are illustrated in this article.

  9. Effect of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Gabriela Migliorin; da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Menezes, Márcio; do Vale, Hugo Felipe; Regalado, Diego Ferreira; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study verified the influence of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of a nanohybrid composite resin. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two specimens were prepared with Filtek™ Z350 XT (3M/ESPE) and randomly divided into four groups (n = 08) that were subjected to brushing simulation equivalent to the period of 1 month. The groups assessed were a control group with distilled water (G1), Colgate Total 12 Professional Clean (G2), Sensodyne Extra Whitener Extra Fresh (G3), and Colgate Luminous White (G4). A sequence of 90 cycles was performed for all the samples. The initial roughness of each group was analyzed by the Surface Roughness Tester (TR 200-TIME Group Inc., CA, USA). After the brushing period, the final roughness was measured, and the results were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis and Dunn tests for intergroup roughness comparison in the time factor. For intragroup and “Δ Final − Initial” comparisons, the Wilcoxon test and (one-way) ANOVA were, respectively, performed (α = 0.05). Results: The roughness mean values before and after brushing showed no statistically significant difference when the different dentifrices were used. None of the dentifrices analyzed increased significantly the nanohybrid composite resin surface roughness in a 1 month of tooth brushing simulation. Conclusions: These results suggest that no hazardous effect on the roughness of nanohybrid composite resin can be expected when whitening dentifrices are used for a short period. Similar studies should be conducted to analyze other esthetic composite materials. PMID:27095891

  10. Evaluation of a 6% hydrogen peroxide tooth-whitening gel on enamel microhardness after extended use.

    PubMed

    Toteda, Mariarosaria; Philpotts, Carole J; Cox, Trevor F; Joiner, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of a 6% hydrogen peroxide tooth whitener, Xtra White, on sound human enamel microhardness in vitro after an extended and exaggerated simulated 8 weeks of product use. Polished human enamel specimens were prepared and baseline microhardness and color measurements determined. The enamel specimens were exposed to a fluoride-containing toothpaste for 30 seconds and then exposed to water, Xtra White, a control carbopol gel containing no hydrogen peroxide, or a carbonated beverage (each group, n = 8) for 20 minutes. Specimens were exposed to whole saliva at all other times. In order to simulate 8 weeks of extended product use, quadruple the length of the manufacturer's instructions, 112 treatments, were conducted. Microhardness measurements were taken after 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of simulated treatments, and color was measured after 2 and 8 weeks. The Xtra White-treated specimens showed a statistically significant (P < .0001) increase in L* and decrease in b* compared to the water-treated specimens after 2 weeks simulated use, indicating bleaching had occurred. The carbonated beverage-treated specimens were significantly softened (P = .0009) compared to baseline after only 1 treatment. The carbopol gel-treated specimens were significantly softened (P = .0028) after 2 weeks of simulated treatments compared to baseline. There were no statistically significant differences in enamel microhardness between baseline and all treatment times for XW and water groups. Xtra White does not have any deleterious effects on sound human enamel microhardness after an extended and exaggerated simulated 8 weeks of product use.

  11. New method of control of tooth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, I.; Mantareva, V.; Gisbrecht, A.; Valkanov, S.; Uzunov, Tz.

    2010-10-01

    New methods of control of tooth bleaching stages through simultaneous measurements of a reflected light and a fluorescence signal are proposed. It is shown that the bleaching process leads to significant changes in the intensity of a scattered signal and also in the shape and intensity of the fluorescence spectra. Experimental data illustrate that the bleaching process causes essential changes in the teeth discoloration in short time as 8-10 min from the beginning of the application procedure. The continuation of the treatment is not necessary moreover the probability of the enamel destroy increases considerably. The proposed optical back control of tooth surface is a base for development of a practical set up to control the duration of the bleaching procedure.

  12. Effectiveness and mode of action of whitening dentifrices on enamel extrinsic stains.

    PubMed

    Alshara, Salem; Lippert, Frank; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the mode of action and the whitening effect of whitening dentifrices. Two hundred fifty-six bovine enamel specimens (10 × 10 mm(2)) were prepared, partially stained, and assigned into eight groups (n = 32): six whitening dentifrices, one nonwhitening and deionized water (negative control), and further divided in two subgroups (n = 16), according to the test model: chemical (dentifrice slurry treatment only) or chemo-mechanical (slurry + toothbrushing). Specimens were treated with dentifrice slurries 2 ×/day for 1 min and toothbrushed or not, according to each model. In between dentifrice treatments, specimens were artificially stained for 5 h. This protocol was repeated for 5 days and enamel color changes (∆E) were measured after each day (days 1-5). The abrasive level of the dentifrices was determined following the ISO11609 guidelines. In the chemo-mechanical model, the whitening action of all dentifrices was observed after day 1, being higher than the negative control group (p < 0.05). In days 2-5, nonsignificant changes in color were observed for all groups (p > 0.05). Differences on ∆E among dentifrices were observed, and they seemed to correlate well with their abrasive level (r(2) = 0.80). In the chemical model, no significant differences were observed among groups (p > 0.05), with ∆E remaining constant throughout the study. Higher ∆E values were observed in the chemo-mechanical model compared to the chemical (p < 0.05). All tested dentifrices were effective in whitening stained enamel and their mode of action showed to be mainly mechanical (toothbrushing abrasion). The abrasive level of dentifrices seems to determine its whitening effectiveness.

  13. The effect of bleaching gel and (940 nm and 980 nm) diode lasers photoactivation on intrapulpal temperature and teeth whitening efficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Karadaghi, Tamara S; Al-Saedi, Asmaa A; Al-Maliky, Mohammed A; Mahmood, Ali S

    2016-12-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the whitening efficacy of 940 nm and 980 nm diode laser photoactivation in tooth bleaching by analysing pulp chamber temperature, as well as the change in tooth colour. Root canals of thirty extracted human lower premolars were prepared. Laserwhite* 20 bleaching agent containing 38% of hydrogen peroxide was photoactivated with 7 W output power of 940 nm and 980 nm diode lasers for 120 s. Bleaching gel reduced 27-29% of the temperature from reaching the pulp chamber. For shade assessment, only the groups photoactivated using diode lasers showed statistically significant differences from control group P < 0.001. Within the studied parameters, both 940 nm and 980 nm diode lasers produced a safe pulp temperature increase. Diode laser photoactivation of bleaching gel resulted in more efficient teeth whitening. Photoactivation with 940 nm diode laser yielded the highest change in colour with only minor increase in pulp chamber temperature. © 2016 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  14. Whitening effect of salicylic acid peels in Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Il-hwan

    2006-03-01

    Patients with skin of color demand treatment modality suitable for their skin. Salicylic acid peel has effectiveness for both of acne and postinflammatory hyperpigmentation that are common in patients with skin of color. To assess the whitening effect of salicylic acid peels in Asian patients with acne objectively by the colorimetric method. Twenty-four healthy adult patients with acne participated voluntarily in the study. Any other systemic and topical acne treatments were prohibited. They had undergone full-face peels with 30% salicylic acid in absolute ethanol bi-weekly for 3 months. Colorimetric changes of the face were recorded with reflectance spectrophotometer. Paired comparisons with pretreatment CIE L*a*b* showed abrupt descent of L* value after first peel (p=.0286). Then there was continued increase of mean L* value, even though the final L* value did not reach a statistically significant level. The mean a* value decreased continually, and the a* values recorded after the second, third, fourth, fifth, and final peel showed significantly lowered levels (p=.0027, .0005, <.0001, <.0001, <.0001). Salicylic acid peels are beneficial in whitening the face of Asian patients with acne. The whitening effect would be an important factor in choosing the superficial peeling agent for them.

  15. Aesthetic Rehabilitation of Discoloured Nonvital Anterior tooth with Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Badole, Gautam P; Warhadpande, Manjusha M; Bahadure, Rakesh N; Badole, Shital G

    2013-01-01

    Discolouration of teeth, especially the anteriores, can result in considerably cosmetic impairment in person. Combine effects of intrinsic and extrinsic colour determines the appearance of teeth. Whitening of teeth with bleaching is a more conservative therapeutic method than full crowns, veneers or composite restorations which is more invasive and expensive. Among bleaching techniques, in office bleaching with carbamide peroxide provide superior aesthetic result in short period of time with no adverse effects. This paper presents case series of tooth discolouration in non-vital tooth which was successfully bleached using 35 % carbamide peroxide. After 1 year follow up the prognosis was good with no reversal of tooth discolouration. This case report allows the better understanding of the concept of nonvital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide which gives a non-invasive alternative for aesthetic purpose in preserving the natural tooth structure. PMID:24551731

  16. Effect of laser irradiation on crystalline structure of enamel surface during whitening treatment with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Hyun; An, Ji-Hae; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Hwang, In-Nam; Park, Yeong-Joon; Song, Ho-Jun

    2012-11-01

    This study is to evaluate the effect of laser activation on the whitening and crystalline structure of enamel surface during whitening treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Bovine teeth were treated with whitening gel containing 35% hydrogen peroxide. A whitening gel was applied on the enamel surface for a period of 5 min, and then irradiated using a diode laser (740 nm) during whitening treatment for 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180s for the GL0-W, GL30-W, GL60-W, GL120-W and GL180-W groups, respectively. The total whitening application time was 30 min for all groups. Laser-irradiated enamel groups showed a similar lightness compared to the GL0-W group. The thickness of porous layer observed on the enamel surface of GL0-W group was decreased by increasing the laser irradiation time. While the Ca and P contents of the GL0-W group were lower than those of the non-whitening treated group (GL0-C), the Ca and P contents of the GL180-W group were similar to those of the GL180-C group. The enamel crystallinity was dramatically decreased by whitening treatment without laser irradiation. However, the decrease of crystallinity was protected by laser irradiation during whitening treatment. Raman measurement verified that laser irradiation could prevent the loss of mineral compositions on enamel and maintain its crystalline structure. The professional whitening treatment with hydrogen peroxide and diode laser activation improves not only the whitening effect but also protects the change of enamel structure compared to the treatment with only gel. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Age estimation using level of eyebrow and eyelash whitening

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcı, Feride Aylin; Kantarcı, Muhammed Nabi; Bilgi, Sefer

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine whether eyebrow and eyelash whitening is an effective parameter in age estimation. Material/Methods We evaluated 1545 patients. Age groups were 1–10, 11–20, 21–30, 31–40, 41–50, 51–60, 61–70, 71–80, and 81–90 years. Level of whitening was categorized as level 0: no whitening, level 1: 1–3 strands, level 2: 3–10 strands, level 3: 10 strands–2/3 whitening, level 4: >3/4 whitening. Results Mean age was 42.39±20.01. While there was no eyebrow whitening in 87% of the subjects, level 4 whitening of eyebrows was observed in 0,8% of the subjects. There was no eyelash whitening in 97,7% of the subjects and no level 4 eyelash whitening was detected in any subject. Men had significantly more level 1, 2, 3, and 4 eyebrow whitening compared with women. There was no gender difference in terms of eyelash whitening level. There was no eyebrow and eyelash whitening in subjects age 1–40 years; whitening began in the 41–50 years age group and increased with age in other groups. Mean age was 39.59±19.63 years in subjects with no eyebrow whitening; 59 years in level 1, 61 years in level 2, 63 years in level 3, and 69 years in level 4 eyebrow whitening. Mean age was 41.85±19.87 in subjects with no eyelash whitening; and 63.57±10.75 in those with whitening. Conclusions Particularly after 41–50 years of age, level of eyebrow and eyelash whitening may be among a useful age estimation parameter. PMID:24448310

  18. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    PubMed

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Effect of Whitening Toothpastes on Dentin Abrasion: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Gustavo Henrique Apolinario; Nogueira, Marcia Bessa; Gaio, Eduardo Jose; Rosing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Santiago, Sergio Lima; Rego, Rodrigo Otavio

    To compare the effect of toothbrushing abrasion with hydrated silica-based whitening and regular toothpastes on root dentin using contact profilometry. Ninety dentin specimens (4 x 4 x 2 mm) were randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 18) according to the toothpaste: three whitening (W1, W2 and W3) and two regular toothpastes (R1 and R2) produced by two different manufacturers. Using a brushing machine, each specimen was brushed with a constant load of 300 g for 2500 cycles (4.5 cycles/s). The toothpastes were diluted at a ratio of 1:3 w/w (dentifrice:distilled water). The brush diamond tip of the profilometer moved at a constant speed of 0.05 mm/s with a force of 0.7 mN. The average value of brushing abrasion in μm (mean ± SD) was obtained from five consecutive measurements of each specimen: W1 = 8.86 ± 1.58, W2 = 7.59 ± 1.04, W3 = 8.27 ± 2.39, R1 = 2.89 ± 1.05 and R2= 2.94 ± 1.29. There was a significant difference between groups (ANOVA, p<0.0001). Post-hoc Tukey's test for multiple comparisons showed differences between all the whitening and regular toothpastes, but not among the whitening nor among the regular toothpastes. The whitening toothpastes tested can cause more dentin abrasion than the regular ones.

  20. A clinical evaluation of bleaching using whitening wraps and strips.

    PubMed

    Matis, Bruce A; Cochran, Michael; Wang, Ge; Franco, Miguel; Eckert, George J; Carlotti, Ronald J; Bryan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of color change of teeth and the sensitivities of teeth and gums in an in vivo study. Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW2) and Crest Whitestrips Premium (WP2) were used twice a day and Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW1) were used once a day. Color evaluations occurred at baseline, after five and seven-day use of bleaching agent and 14 days post-bleaching. Color change was evaluated objectively and subjectively. Sensitivity evaluations were also accomplished. Seventy-six of the 78 subjects enrolled completed the study. All three products significantly lightened teeth. WW2 lightened more than WP2 and WW1 in L*, a*, b*, E and shade guide value. WP2 lightened more than WW1 in a*, b*, E and shade guide value. There was no difference in tooth sensitivity, but WW1 and WP2 caused less gingival sensitivity than WW2. The mean age of smokers was seven years younger than nonsmokers who qualified.

  1. Physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpaste and evaluation of its effects on enamel roughness.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, Sérgio Paulo; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Santos, Fábio André; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2011-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the physical-chemical characteristics of whitening toothpastes and their effect on bovine enamel after application of a bleaching agent (16% carbamide peroxide). Physical-chemical analysis was made considering mass loss by desiccation, ash content and pH of the toothpastes. Thirty bovine dental enamel fragments were prepared for roughness measurements. The samples were subjected to bleaching treatments and simulated brushing: G1. Sorriso Dentes Brancos (Conventional toothpaste), G2. Close-UP Whitening (Whitening toothpaste), and G3. Sensodyne Branqueador (Whitening toothpaste). The average roughness (Ra) was evaluated prior to the bleaching treatment and after brushing. The results revealed differences in the physical-chemical characteristics of the toothpastes (p < 0.0001). The final Ra had higher values (p < 0.05) following the procedures. The mean of the Ra did not show significant differences, considering toothpaste groups and bleaching treatment. Interaction (toothpaste and bleaching treatment) showed significant difference (p < 0.0001). The whitening toothpastes showed differences in their physical-chemical properties. All toothpastes promoted changes to the enamel surface, probably by the use of a bleaching agent.

  2. Dielectrophoresis enhances the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide on enamel.

    PubMed

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Hottel, Timothy L; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Riga, Alan T

    2011-10-01

    To compare the enamel whitening effect of a 20-minute dielectrophoresis enhanced electrochemical delivery to a 20-minute diffusion treatment. Forty freshly extracted human teeth without detectable caries or restoration were stored in distilled water at 4 degrees C and used within 1 month of extraction. Two different bleaching gels (Plus White 5 Minute Speed Whitening Gel and 35% Opalescence PF gel) were tested. The study had two parts: Part 1--Quantitative comparison of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, HP) absorption--following application of an over-the-counter 35% HP whitening gel (Plus White 5 Minute Speed Whitening Gel) to 30 (n = 30) extracted human teeth by conventional diffusion or dielectrophoresis. The amount of H2O2 that diffused from the dentin was measured by a colorimetric oxidation-reduction reaction kit. HP concentration was measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy at 550 nm. Part 2--HP diffusion in stained teeth--35% carbamide peroxide whitening gel (35% Opalescence PF gel) was applied to 10 extracted human teeth (n = 10) stained by immersion in a black tea solution for 48 hours. The teeth were randomly assigned to the 20-minute dielectrophoresis or diffusion treatment group; whitening was evaluated by a dental spectrophotometer and macro-photography. Part 1: The analysis found significant differences between both groups with relative percent errors of 3% or less (a single outlier had an RPE of 12%). The average absorbance for the dielectrophoresis group in round 1 was 79% greater than the diffusion group. The average absorbance for the dielectrophoresis group in round 2 was 130% greater than the diffusion group. A single-factor ANOVA found a statistically significant difference between the diffusion and dielectrophoresis groups (P = 0.01). Part 2--The average change in Shade Guide Units (SGU) was 0.6 for the diffusion group, well under the error of measurement of 0.82 SGU. The average change in SGU for the dielectrophoresis group was 9, significantly above the

  3. The measurement of enamel and dentine abrasion by tooth whitening products using an in situ model.

    PubMed

    Joiner, A; Collins, L Z; Cox, T F; Pickles, M J; Weader, E; Liscombe, C; Holt, J S

    2005-01-01

    To determine the enamel and dentine wear of two whitening toothpastes using an in situ model with ex vivo brushing. Human enamel/dentine (approximately 50:50) blocks (approximately 4 x 4mm) were placed in the upper buccal aspects of full or partial dentures of a group of 25 subjects. Subjects brushed the specimens ex vivo with either a calcium carbonate/perlite or silica containing whitening toothpaste under exaggerated conditions as compared to normal for 30 s, twice per day. Specimens were removed after 4, 8 and 12 weeks and the wear to the enamel and dentine was determined. Enamel wear was determined by change in Knoop indent length and dentine wear was determined from the enamel-dentine step height, measured using optical profilometry. The mean wear after 12 weeks was for enamel 0.27 and 0.19 microns, and for dentine 34.3 and 61.1 microns, for the calcium carbonate/perlite and silica toothpastes respectively. There were no significant differences between products after 12 weeks. The rate of wear was found to decrease throughout the duration of the study. There were no significant differences between the two whitening toothpastes in terms of enamel and dentine wear after 12 weeks brushing.

  4. Effect of whitening dentifrices on the surface roughness of commercial composites.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Guilherme Machado; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto; Burnett, Luiz Henrique

    2011-10-01

    Our study aimed to test the null hypothesis that whitening and non-whitening dentifrices affect similarly the surface roughness of commercial microhybrid composites, independent of the brushing time. One hundred and ninety-two disc-shaped specimens of Filtek Z250 (3 M/ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) and Rok (SDI, Australia) were built up and randomly assigned to 24 groups, based on the dentifrices used (two whitening dentifrices: Colgate Max White-Colgate-Palmolive, São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brazil and Close Up Extra Whitening-Unilever, Brasil Higiene Pessoal e Limpeza Ltda, Ipojuca, Pernambuco, Brazil; and one non-whitening dentifrice: Colgate Total 12 Clean Mint-Colgate-Palmolive), and on the simulated brushing times (24 hours, 6, 12 and 24 months). The specimens were submitted to the toothbrushing regimens after which the surface roughness (Ra) was measured. Data was submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey test (α=0.05). The composite's surface roughness was significantly affected by the composites (p=0.0007), the dentifrices (p=0.0001), and the simulated brushing time (p=0.0001). Higher roughness was observed when the whitening dentifrices were used and when the brushing time increased. Filtek Z250 was more affected than Rok, especially after 24 months of simulated brushing. Whitening dentifrices produced higher surface roughness in the composites tested. The degree of surface compromising increased with brushing time and depends on the composite's microstructure and composition. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The effect of different drinks on tooth color after home bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Karadas, Muhammet; Seven, Nilgun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the influence of coffee, tea, cola, and red wine staining on the color of teeth after home bleaching. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 samples were obtained from 45 sound maxillary central incisors. The home bleaching procedure was performed using 10% carbamide peroxide gel applied to the sample surface for a period of 6 h each day, for 14 days. After bleaching, baseline color measurements were taken, and the samples were immersed in four staining solutions (coffee, tea, cola, and red wine) or artificial saliva (n = 9). Following 15 min and 6 h of immersion on the first day and next day, respectively, the samples were washed with distilled water for 10 s. After 15 min, 6 h, 1 week, and 1 month immersions, the color values of each sample were remeasured and the color change values (∆E) were calculated. Color change analysis was performed using a spectrophotometer. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference test (P <0.05). Results: Of all the staining solutions, the lowest ∆E values were observed with coffee staining versus artificial saliva (control group), for all time intervals evaluated after whitening. Although no statistically differences were observed between the coffee and control group at all the time points evaluated, there were statistically significant differences between the red wine, cola, and tea solutions. Conclusion: Following tooth whitening, patients should avoid drinks that cause tooth staining, particularly red wine, tea and cola. PMID:24966778

  6. In vitro cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes in human dental enamel-microhardness evaluation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Melina Mayumi; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes. Ninety-five dental fragments were obtained from nonerupted third molars. The fragments were embedded in polystyrene resin and sequentially polished with abrasive papers (400-, 600-, and 1,000-grit) and diamond pastes of 6, 3, and 1 microm. The fragments were assigned in five groups according to toothpaste treatment: G1 = Rembrandt Plus with Peroxide; G2 = Crest Dual Action Whitening; G3 = Aquafresh Whitening Triple Protection; and the control groups: G4 = Sensodyne Original (without fluoride); G5 = Sensodyne Sodium Bicarbonated (with fluoride). The initial enamel microhardness evaluations were done. For 2 weeks the fragments were submitted daily to a de-remineralization cycle followed by a 10-minute toothpaste slurry. After that, the final microhardness tests were done. The percentage of mineral loss of enamel was determined for statistical analysis. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test were applied. The results did not show statistically significant differences in mineral loss among groups G1, G2, G3, and G5, which statistically differ from G4 (toothpaste without fluoride). G4 showed the highest mineral loss (P < or = .05). The whitening toothpastes evaluated showed a cariostatic effect similar to regular, nonwhitening toothpaste.

  7. Bleachorexia-an addictive behavior to tooth bleaching: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denzel Kun-Tsung; Kastl, Cameron; Chan, Daniel C N

    2018-05-01

    Bleachorexia, addiction to tooth bleaching, is a behavioral disorder similar to anorexia. The patient feels that their teeth are always not white enough and continues to use whiteners to obtain a "perfect" smile. Such behavior falls under the category of a body dysmorphic disorder and may need medical counseling.

  8. Effects of regular and whitening dentifrices on remineralization of bovine enamel in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kielbassa, Andrej M; Tschoppe, Peter; Hellwig, Elmar; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas

    2009-02-01

    To compare in vitro the remineralizing effects of different regular dentifrices and whitening dentifrices (containing pyrophosphates) on predemineralized enamel. Specimens from 84 bovine incisors were embedded in epoxy resin, partly covered with nail varnish, and demineralized in a lactic acid solution (37 degrees C, pH 5.0, 8 days). Parts of the demineralized areas were covered with nail varnish, and specimens were randomly assigned to 6 groups. Subsequently, specimens were exposed to a remineralizing solution (37 degrees C, pH 7.0, 60 days) and brushed 3 times a day (1:3 slurry with remineralizing solution) with 1 of 3 regular dentifrices designed for anticaries (group 1, amine; group 2, sodium fluoride) or periodontal (group 3, amine/stannous fluoride) purposes or whitening dentifrice containing pyrophosphates (group 4, sodium fluoride). An experimental dentifrice (group 5, without pyrophosphates/fluorides) and a whitening dentifrice (group 6, monofluorophosphate) served as controls. Mineral loss and lesion depths were evaluated from contact microradiographs, and intergroup comparisons were performed using the closed-test procedure (alpha =.05). Compared to baseline, specimens brushed with the dentifrices containing stannous/amine fluorides revealed significant mineral gains and lesion depth reductions (P < .05). Concerning the reacquired mineral, the whitening dentifrice performed worse than the regular dentifrices (P > .05), while mineral gain, as well as lesion depth, reduction was negligible with the control groups. Dentifrices containing pyrophosphates perform worse than regular dentifrices but do not necessarily affect remineralization. Unless remineralizing efficacy is proven, whitening dentifrices should be recommended only after deliberate consideration in caries-prone patients.

  9. Factors Affecting the Quality of Tooth Enamel for In Vivo EPR-Based Retrospective Biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Céline M.; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance biodosimetry on tooth enamel is likely to be an important technology for triage of overexposed individuals after a major radiological incident. The accuracy and robustness of the technique relies on various properties of the enamel such as the geometry of the tooth, the presence of restorations, whitening treatments or exposition to sunlight. Those factors are reviewed, and their influence on dosimetry specifically for triage purposes is discussed. PMID:27473693

  10. Tooth bleaching and young adults in Nigeria: knowledge, experiences and intention.

    PubMed

    Azodo, C C; Ogbomo, A C; Agbor, M A

    2012-12-01

    To assess the knowledge, experiences and intention to have tooth bleaching among young adults studying in a Nigerian University. A cross-section of part-time undergraduate students of University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria were studied in 2010 using a self-administered questionnaire. About three-quarters 289 (72.4%) of the respondents reported awareness of at least one cause of tooth discoloration. A total of 143 (35.8%) of the respondents have heard of tooth bleaching with main sources of information being friends/relatives, dentists and the internet. One-third 132 (33.1%) of the respondents correctly identified that the aim of tooth bleaching was to make the teeth whiter. The respondents that had correct knowledge about mechanism, duration and complications of tooth bleaching were 51 (12.8%), 25 (6.3%) and 35 (8.8%) respectively. The major perceived benefits of tooth bleaching reported by the respondents were self confidence boost 152 (38.1%) and improvement of one's beauty 107 (26.8%). Out of the 68 (17.0%) respondents that have attempted tooth bleaching, 36 (52.9%) used tooth whitening toothpaste. Out of the 151 (37.8%) respondents that expressed intention of having tooth bleaching procedure, 32 (21.2%) would pursue the course, no matter the cost. In the studied population, knowledge of tooth discoloration was high, awareness and experiences of tooth bleaching were low but significant number expressed intention of having tooth bleaching. It is important that dentists increase oral health information particularly tooth bleaching information accessibility to the young adult population to improve the knowledge and prevent adverse effects.

  11. Influence of in-office whitening gel pH on hydrogen peroxide diffusion through enamel and color changes in bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pignoly, Christian; Camps, Lila; Susini, Guy; About, Imad; Camps, Jean

    2012-04-01

    To assess the influence of in-office whitening gel pH on whitening efficiency. Hydrogen peroxide diffusion and color changes on bovine teeth were assessed. Three gels with close hydrogen peroxide concentrations but with various pH levels were tested: Zoom 2 (Discus Dental), Opalescence Endo and Opalescence Boost (Ultradent). The pH levels were respectively: 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0. Thirty enamel slices and tooth crowns were used for both studies (n = 10 per group per study). Hydrogen peroxide diffusion through the enamel slices and the tooth crowns was spectrophotometrically recorded every 10 minutes for 1 hour to calculate the diffusion coefficients. Color changes were spectrophotometrically recorded every 10 minutes for 1 hour and quantified in term of CIE-Lab. The hydrogen peroxide diffusion coefficient through enamel ranged from 5.12 +/- 0.82 x 10(-9) cm2 s(-1) for pH 3 to 5.19 +/- 0.92 x 10(-9) cm2 S(-1) for pH 7. Through tooth crowns it ranged from 4.80 +/- 1.75 x 10(-10) cm2 s(-1) for pH 5 to 4.85 +/- 1.82 x 10(-10) cm2 s(-1) for pH 3. After 1 hour, the deltaE varied from 5.6 +/- 4.0 for pH 7 to 7.0 +/- 5.0 for pH 3 on enamel slices and from 3.9 +/- 2.5 for pH 5 to 4.9 +/- 3.5 for pH 7 on tooth crowns. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for both parameters.

  12. Double-blind whitening Night-Guard study using ten percent carbamide peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, D; Los, S; Case, H; Healy, R

    1992-01-01

    The conservative technique of professionally dispensed and supervised, home-administered vital bleaching is now a routine treatment in the dental profession. This double-blind study evaluated the Rembrandt Lightening Gel and Whitening Toothpaste for shade change, colorimeter shade change. As well, it evaluated soft tissue health by periodontal probing, plaque index, and bleeding index. A patient questionnaire evaluated perception of whitening, perception of oral hygiene, average hours per day, and average days per week. Bleaching trays were worn over a 4-week period. The bleaching system showed definitive whitening effects as evaluated with the Vita shade guide and the colorimeter. The bleaching system had no deleterious effects on the soft tissue. The Rembrandt toothpaste alone demonstrated two-shade lightening. This vital bleaching system shows definitive whitening of the teeth in short periods of time with no adverse effects.

  13. Study of the temporal evolution of Whitening Teeth immersed in Peroxide of hydrogen (H2O2) Using Digital Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, L.; Morales, Y.; Torres, C.

    2015-01-01

    The esthetic dentistry reference in our society is determined by several factors, including one that produces more dissatisfaction is abnormal tooth color or that does not meet the patient's expectations. For this reason it has been designed and implemented an algorithm in MATLAB that captures, digitizes, pre-processing and analyzed dental imaging by allowing to evaluate the degree of bleaching caused by the use of peroxide of hidrogen. The samples analyzed were human teeth extracted, which were subjected to different concentrations of peroxide of hidrogen and see if they can teeth whitening when using these products, was used different concentrations and intervals of time to analysis or study of the whitening of the teeth with the hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Effect of at-home whitening strips on the surface roughness and color of a composite and an ormocer restorative material.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Ayhan; Ozkan, Pelin; Yilmaz, Kerem; Yilmaz, Burak; Durkan, Rukiye

    2013-01-01

    Oxygenating agents like carbamide peroxide or H(2) O(2) are commonly used whitening agents. They have varying influence on the color and surface roughness of resin-based restorative materials and teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an at-home peroxide whitening agent applied through a whitening strip on the color and surface roughness of a nanofilled composite resin and an ormocer-based resin. Disc-shaped (2 mm thick, 10 mm diameter) nanofilled resin composite (n = 10) and ormocer (n = 10) specimens were prepared. All specimens were treated with a whitening strip. Whitening procedures were performed applying a 6.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strip (Crest White Strips Professional) for 30 minutes twice each day for a period of 21 consecutive days. During the test intervals, the specimens were rinsed under running distilled water for 1 minute to remove the whitening agents and immersed in 37°C distilled water until the next treatment. Surface roughness and color of the specimens were measured with a profilometer and a colorimeter, respectively, before and after whitening. Color changes were calculated (ΔE) using L*, a*, and b* coordinates. Repeated measures of variance analysis and Duncan test were used for statistical evaluation (α= 0.05). The average surface roughness of composite increased from 1.4 Ra to 2.0 Ra, and from 0.8 Ra to 0.9 Ra for the ormocer material; however, these changes in roughness after whitening were not significant (p > 0.05). Also, when two materials were compared, the surface roughness of restorative materials was not different before and after whitening (p > 0.05). L* and b* values for each material changed significantly after whitening (p < 0.05). ΔE values (before/after whitening) calculated for composite (11.9) and ormocer (16.1) were not significantly different from each other (p > 0.05). The tested whitening agent did not affect the surface roughness of either resin-based restorative material. Both materials

  15. A study of the human skin-whitening effects of resveratryl triacetate.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ja Hyun; Seok, Jin Kyung; An, Sang Mi; Baek, Ji Hwoon; Koh, Jae Sook; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-04-01

    Resveratrol has a variety of bioactivities that include its anti-melanogenic effects, but its use in cosmetics has been challenging partly because of its chemical instability. Resveratryl triacetate (RTA) is a prodrug that can enhance stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the skin safety and whitening effects of RTA in human subjects. The primary skin irritation potentials of RTA and resveratrol were tested at 0.1 and 0.5 % on human subjects. Resveratrol at a concentration of 0.5 % induced weak skin irritation, whereas RTA did not induce any skin responses. The skin-whitening efficacy of a cosmetic formulation containing 0.4 % RTA was evaluated in two different test models. In the artificial tanning model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the skin of the forearms of 22 human subjects after pigmentation induction by ultraviolet irradiation. Applying the test and the control products to the artificial tanning model for 8 weeks increased the individual topology angles (ITA°) by 17.06 and 13.81 %, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In the hyperpigmentation model, the test product and the control product were applied twice daily to the faces of 21 human subjects. The averaged intensity of the hyperpigmented spots decreased by 2.67 % in the test group and 1.46 % in the control group, a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Therefore, RTA incorporated into cosmetic formulations can whiten human skin without inducing skin irritation.

  16. Complications related to a cosmetic eye-whitening procedure.

    PubMed

    Vo, Rosalind C; Stafeeva, Ksenia; Aldave, Anthony J; Stulting, R Doyle; Moore, Quianta; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Chungfat, Neil C; Holsclaw, Douglas S; Margolis, Todd P; Deng, Sophie X

    2014-11-01

    To report sight-threatening complications following extensive bulbar conjunctival resection and postoperative mitomycin C therapy for cosmetic eye-whitening in the United States. Retrospective noncomparative case series. Multicenter report of 9 patients referred for evaluation and management of complications following bilateral cosmetic eye whitening. Seventeen eyes of 9 patients underwent cosmetic eye-whitening performed between 2 and 48 months prior to referral to one of the centers. Sixteen of the 17 eyes had persistent conjunctival epithelial defects, with 10 eyes requiring amniotic membrane grafting to facilitate re-epithelialization. Four eyes of 2 patients developed limbal stem cell compromise confirmed with in vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy. One patient developed infectious scleritis and diplopia resulting from Tenon capsule scarring. Another patient developed scleral necrosis, secondary infectious scleritis, and infectious endophthalmitis. This patient subsequently developed noninfectious scleritis that required 3-drug-regimen immunosuppression. Severe adverse effects can occur after extensive cosmetic conjunctival resection followed by topical mitomycin C application. Patients and physicians should be aware of the potential sight-threatening complications associated with this eye-whitening procedure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The skin whitening industry in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2014-05-01

    Skin whitening is a big and booming industry in many developing countries. Its popularity owes mainly to post-colonial, internalized racism. This study examines whether government intervention is necessary and more efficient than market-driven approaches in addressing the health risks and harms associated with skin whitening. We gathered empirical data on the quality and quantity of health-related information about skin whiteners with a multi-stage probability sample of consumers in two cities in the Philippines (n=110; α=0.05). Regardless of their socio-demographic characteristics, we find that cognitive biases and information asymmetries build and sustain consumers' trust in manufacturers and distributors of skin whiteners while, paradoxically, breeding uncertainties over the integrity of these products. The results are product adulteration and misbranding, leading to pricing advantages for toxic whiteners over safer products. This has impeded regulatory efficacy. We recommend anchoring government intervention in transaction cost-reduction, containing the externalities of skin bleaching, and institutionalizing third party partnerships. Failure to do so would leave consumers extremely vulnerable to the forces of supply and demand that favor toxic whiteners, particularly in a market where voluntary collective action is difficult to organize.

  18. Complications of cosmetic eye whitening.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ann Q; Hoppener, Catherine; Venkateswaran, Nandini; Choi, Daniel S; Lee, Wendy W

    2017-09-01

    Introduced in 2008 and subsequently popularized in South Korea, cosmetic eye whitening has been offered as a treatment of chronic conjunctival hyperemia. Patients undergo conjunctivectomy with topical mitomycin C (MMC) 0.02% application to achieve a whitened appearance from bleaching of avascular sclera. Much speculation has arisen from this procedure given the limited available evidence on its efficacy and safety. A literature search was performed to review common complications of cosmetic eye whitening, including chronic conjunctival epithelial defects, scleral thinning, avascular zones in the sclera, dry eye syndrome, and diplopia requiring strabismus surgery. Informing the general public of the risks of this procedure is of great importance for dermatologists and other cosmetic surgeons.

  19. A Game-Theoretic Model of Marketing Skin Whiteners.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Roger Lee

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies consistently find that people in less developed countries tend to regard light or "white" skin, particularly among women, as more desirable or superior. This is a study about the marketing of skin whiteners in these countries, where over 80 percent of users are typically women. It proceeds from the following premises: a) Purely market or policy-oriented approaches toward the risks and harms of skin whitening are cost-inefficient; b) Psychosocial and informational factors breed uninformed and risky consumer choices that favor toxic skin whiteners; and c) Proliferation of toxic whiteners in a competitive buyer's market raises critical supplier accountability issues. Is intentional tort a rational outcome of uncooperative game equilibria? Can voluntary cooperation nonetheless evolve between buyers and sellers of skin whiteners? These twin questions are key to addressing the central paradox in this study: A robust and expanding buyer's market, where cheap whitening products abound at a high risk to personal and societal health and safety. Game-theoretic modeling of two-player and n-player strategic interactions is proposed in this study for both its explanatory and predictive value. Therein also lie its practical contributions to the economic literature on skin whitening.

  20. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate tooth stain reduction with nicotine replacement gum during a smoking cessation program.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Helen; Kingston, Rose; O'Mullane, Denis; Nilsson, Frederick

    2012-06-13

    In addition to its general and periodontal health effects smoking causes tooth staining. Smoking cessation support interventions with an added stain removal or tooth whitening effect may increase motivation to quit smoking. Oral health professionals are well placed to provide smoking cessation advice and support to patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nicorette(®) Freshmint Gum used in a smoking cessation programme administered in a dental setting, on extrinsic stain and tooth shade among smokers. An evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-week parallel-group controlled trial was conducted among 200 daily smokers motivated to quit smoking. Participants were randomised to use either the Nicorette(®) Freshmint Gum or Nicorette(®) Microtab (tablet). Tooth staining and shade were rated using the modified Lobene Stain Index and the Vita(®) Shade Guide at baseline, weeks 2, 6 and 12. To maintain consistency with other whitening studies, the primary end-point was the mean change in stain index between baseline and week 6. Secondary variables included changes in stain measurements and tooth shade at the other time points the number of gums or tablets used per day and throughout the trial period; and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Treatments were compared using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using treatment and nicotine dependence as factors and the corresponding baseline measurement as a covariate. Each comparison (modified intention-to-treat) was tested at the 0.05 level, two-sided. Within-treatment changes from baseline were compared using a paired t-test. At week 6, the gum-group experienced a reduction in mean stain scores whilst the tablet-group experienced an increase with mean changes of -0.14 and +0.12 respectively, (p = 0.005, ANCOVA). The change in mean tooth shade scores was statistically significantly greater in the gum-group than in the tablet group at 2 (p = 0.015), 6 (p = 0.011) and 12 weeks (p = 0.003) with

  1. Factors Affecting the Quality of Tooth Enamel for In Vivo EPR-Based Retrospective Biodosimetry.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Céline M; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    In vivo electron paramagnetic resonance biodosimetry on tooth enamel is likely to be an important technology for triage of overexposed individuals after a major radiological incident. The accuracy and robustness of the technique relies on various properties of the enamel such as the geometry of the tooth, the presence of restorations, whitening treatments or exposition to sunlight. Those factors are reviewed, and their influence on dosimetry specifically for triage purposes is discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Comparison of laser and power bleaching techniques in tooth color change.

    PubMed

    Fekrazad, Reza; Alimazandarani, Shervin; Kalhori, Katayoun Am; Assadian, Hadi; Mirmohammadi, Seyed-Mahdi

    2017-04-01

    Laser-assisted bleaching uses laser beam to accelerate release of free radicals within the bleaching gel to decrease time of whitening procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of power bleaching using Opalescence Xtra Boost® and laser bleaching technique using LaserSmile gel and diode laser as an activator in their tooth whitening capacity. Student t test showed that the laser bleaching group significantly outperformed the power bleaching group in changing ∆E ( p =0.977). Similarly, while comparing the groups in changing ∆L, the laser bleaching group indicated significantly superior results ( p =0.953). Statistical data from student t test while comparing the groups in changing the parameter of yellowness indicated that samples in laser bleaching group underwent a more significant reduction than power-bleached samples ( p =0.85). Correspondingly, changes in whiteness were statistically tested through student t test, showing that laser bleaching technique increased whiteness of the samples significantly more than those treated by power bleaching ( p =0.965). The digital color evaluation data was in accordance with spectrophotometry and showed that laser bleaching outperformed power bleaching technique. Both techniques were able to increase whiteness and decrease yellowness ratio of the samples. ΔE decrease for laser bleaching and power bleaching groups were 3.05 and 1.67, respectively. Tooth color change in laser bleaching group was 1.88 times more than that of power bleaching group ( p <0.001). It could be concluded that under the conditions of this study, both laser-assisted and power bleaching techniques were capable of altering tooth color change, but laser bleaching was deemed a more efficient technique in this regard. Key words: Laser, power bleaching, tooth color introduction.

  3. Preemptive use of etodolac on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vaez, Savil Costa; Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Fernandes, Micaelle Tenório Guedes; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata

    2018-02-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of the preemptive administration of etodolac on risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity and the bleaching effect caused by in-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide. Fifty patients were selected for this tripleblind, randomized, crossover, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. Etodolac (400 mg) or placebo was administrated in a single-dose 1 hour prior to the bleaching procedure. The whitening treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide was carried out in two sessions with a 7-day interval. Tooth sensitivity was assessed before, during, and 24 hours after the procedure using the analog visual scale and the verbal rating scale. Color alteration was assessed by a bleach guide scale, 7 days after each session. Relative risk of sensitivity was calculated and adjusted by session, while overall risk was compared by the McNemar's test. Data on the sensitivity level of both scales and color shade were subjected to Friedman, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). The preemptive administration of etodolac did not affect the risk of tooth sensitivity and the level of sensitivity reported, regardless of the time of evaluation and scale used. The sequence of treatment allocation did not affect bleaching effectiveness, while the second session resulted in additional color modification. The preemptive administration of etodolac in a single dose 1 hour prior to in-office tooth bleaching did not alter tooth color, and the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity reported by patients. A single-dose preemptive administration of 400 mg of etodolac did not affect either risk of tooth sensitivity or level of sensitivity reported by patients, during or after the in-office tooth bleaching procedure.

  4. Concentrations of and application protocols for hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels: effects on pulp cell viability and whitening efficacy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2014-02-01

    To assess the whitening effectiveness and the trans-enamel/trans-dentinal toxicity of experimental tooth-bleaching protocols on pulp cells. Enamel/dentine discs individually adapted to trans-well devices were placed on cultured odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). The following groups were formed: G1 - no treatment (control); G2 to G4 - 35% H2O2, 3 × 15, 1 × 15, and 1 × 5 min, respectively; and G5 to G7 - 17.5% H2O2, 3 × 15, 1 × 15, and 1 × 5 min, respectively. Cell viability and morphology were evaluated immediately after bleaching (T1) and 72 h thereafter (T2). Oxidative stress and cell membrane damage were also assessed (T1). The amount of H2O2 in culture medium was quantified (Mann-Whitney; α=5%) and colour change (ΔE) of enamel was analysed after 3 sessions (Tukey's test; α=5%). Cell viability reduction, H2O2 diffusion, cell morphology alteration, oxidative stress, and cell membrane damage occurred in a concentration-/time-dependent fashion. The cell viability reduction was significant in all groups for HDPCs and only for G2, G3, and G5 in MDPC-23 cells compared with G1. Significant cell viability and morphology recovery were observed in all groups at T2, except for G2 in HDPCs. The highest ΔE value was found in G2. However, all groups presented significant ΔE increases compared with G1. Shortening the contact time of a 35%-H2O2 gel for 5 min, or reducing its concentration to 17.5% and applying it for 45, 15, or 5 min produce gradual tooth colour change associated with reduced trans-enamel and trans-dentinal cytotoxicity to pulp cells. The experimental protocols tested in the present study provided significant tooth-bleaching improvement associated with decreased toxicity to pulp cells, which may be an interesting alternative to be tested in clinical situations intended to reduce tooth sensitivity and pulp damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Masking of Enamel Fluorosis Discolorations and Tooth Misalignment With a Combination of At-Home Whitening, Resin Infiltration, and Direct Composite Restorations.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, J; Lam, V Q; Burseth, B G; Real, C

    This clinical report illustrates a conservative technique to mask enamel discolorations in maxillary anterior teeth caused by hypomineralization associated with enamel fluorosis and subsequent direct resin composite to improve the anterior esthetics. The treatment consisted of at-home whitening with 10% carbamide peroxide gel with potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride in a custom-fitted tray to mask the brown-stained areas, followed by resin infiltration to mask the white spot areas. An existing resin composite restoration in the maxillary right central incisor was subsequently replaced after completion of the whitening and resin infiltration procedures, whereas the two misaligned and rotated maxillary lateral incisors were built up with direct resin composite restorations to provide the illusion of adequate arch alignment, as the patient was unable to use orthodontic therapy.

  6. Randomized clinical study of alterations in the color and surface roughness of dental enamel brushed with whitening toothpaste.

    PubMed

    de Moraes Rego Roselino, Lourenço; Tirapelli, Camila; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2018-03-30

    This clinical study evaluated the influence of whitening toothpaste on color and surface roughness of dental enamel. Initially, the abrasiveness of the toothpastes used (Sorriso Dentes Brancos [SDB]; Colgate Luminous White and Close up White Now) was tested on 30 (n = 10) plexiglass acrylic plates that were submitted to mechanical tooth brushing totalizing 29,200 cycles. Subsequently, 30 participants were selected, and received a toothbrush and nonwhitening toothpaste (SDB). The participants used these products for 7 days and initial color readouts (Spectrophotometer) and surface roughness of one maxillary central incisors was performed after this period of time. For surface roughness readouts, one replica of the maxillary central incisor was obtained by a polyvinyl siloxane impression material (Express) and polyurethane resin. After baseline measurements, participants were separated into three groups (n = 10), according to the toothpaste used. The participants returned after 7, 30, and 90 days when new color readouts and surface roughness were recorded. The measured values were statistically analyzed (2-way-ANOVA, repeated measures, Tukey, P < .05). Whitening toothpastes did not promote significant (P > .05) color alteration and nor increased the surface roughness of the dental enamel in brushing time of the study. The abrasiveness of whitening toothpaste and the brushing trial period did not affect the surface roughness of dental enamel. However, color changes observed on enamel were above the perceptibility and acceptability thresholds reported in the literature. The over-the-counter toothpastes tested had an effect on dental enamel color above the perceptibility and acceptability thresholds but did not change the surface roughness of the teeth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The Hunt for Natural Skin Whitening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Nico; Vicanova, Jana; Pavel, Stan

    2009-01-01

    Skin whitening products are commercially available for cosmetic purposes in order to obtain a lighter skin appearance. They are also utilized for clinical treatment of pigmentary disorders such as melasma or postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. Whitening agents act at various levels of melanin production in the skin. Many of them are known as competitive inhibitors of tyrosinase, the key enzyme in melanogenesis. Others inhibit the maturation of this enzyme or the transport of pigment granules (melanosomes) from melanocytes to surrounding keratinocytes. In this review we present an overview of (natural) whitening products that may decrease skin pigmentation by their interference with the pigmentary processes. PMID:20054473

  8. Influence of whitening and regular dentifrices on orthodontic clear ligature color stability.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê S; Kaizer, Marina R; Salgado, Vinícius E; Soldati, Dener C; Silva, Roberta C; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of brushing orthodontic clear ligatures with a whitening dentifrice containing a blue pigment (Close Up White Now, Unilever, London, UK) on their color stability, when exposed to a staining agent. Ligatures from 3M Unitek (Monrovia, CA, USA) and Morelli (Sorocaba, SP, Brazil) were tested. Baseline color measurements were performed and nonstained groups (control) were stored in distilled water whereas test groups were exposed for 1 hour daily to red wine. Specimens were brushed daily using regular or whitening dentifrice. Color measurements were repeated after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days using a spectrophotometer based on the CIE L*a*b* system. Decreased luminosity (CIE L*), increased red discoloration (CIE a* axis), and increased yellow discoloration (CIE b* axis) were generally observed for ligatures exposed to the staining agent. Color variation was generally lower in specimens brushed with regular dentifrice, but ligatures brushed with whitening dentifrice were generally less red and less yellow than regular dentifrice. The whitening dentifrice led to blue discoloration trend, with visually detectable differences particularly apparent according to storage condition and ligature brand. The whitening dentifrice containing blue pigment did not improve the ligature color stability, but it decreased yellow discoloration and increased a blue coloration. The use of a whitening dentifrice containing blue pigment during orthodontic treatment might decrease the yellow discoloration of elastic ligatures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Preemptive use of etodolac on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaez, Savil Costa; Faria-e-Silva, André Luís; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Fernandes, Micaelle Tenório Guedes; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This study determined the effectiveness of the preemptive administration of etodolac on risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity and the bleaching effect caused by in-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide. Material and methods Fifty patients were selected for this tripleblind, randomized, crossover, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. Etodolac (400 mg) or placebo was administrated in a single-dose 1 hour prior to the bleaching procedure. The whitening treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide was carried out in two sessions with a 7-day interval. Tooth sensitivity was assessed before, during, and 24 hours after the procedure using the analog visual scale and the verbal rating scale. Color alteration was assessed by a bleach guide scale, 7 days after each session. Relative risk of sensitivity was calculated and adjusted by session, while overall risk was compared by the McNemar's test. Data on the sensitivity level of both scales and color shade were subjected to Friedman, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). Results The preemptive administration of etodolac did not affect the risk of tooth sensitivity and the level of sensitivity reported, regardless of the time of evaluation and scale used. The sequence of treatment allocation did not affect bleaching effectiveness, while the second session resulted in additional color modification. The preemptive administration of etodolac in a single dose 1 hour prior to in-office tooth bleaching did not alter tooth color, and the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity reported by patients. Conclusion A single-dose preemptive administration of 400 mg of etodolac did not affect either risk of tooth sensitivity or level of sensitivity reported by patients, during or after the in-office tooth bleaching procedure. PMID:29412363

  10. Necrotizing scleritis as a complication of cosmetic eye whitening procedure.

    PubMed

    Leung, Theresa G; Dunn, James P; Akpek, Esen K; Thorne, Jennifer E

    2013-02-22

    We report necrotizing scleritis as a serious complication of a cosmetic eye whitening procedure that involves the use of intraoperative and postoperative topical mitomycin C. This is a single case report. A 59-year-old Caucasian male with a history of blepharitis status post uncomplicated LASIK refractive surgery reported chronic conjunctival hyperemia for 15 years prior to undergoing a cosmetic eye whitening procedure. He presented to our clinic 12 months after the cosmetic eye whitening procedure with progressive bilateral necrotizing scleritis and scleral calcification. Chronic conjunctival hyperemia may prompt patients to seek surgical correction with cosmetic eye whitening procedures. However, conjunctival hyperemia secondary to tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye may predispose to poor wound healing. Serious complications including necrotizing scleritis may result from cosmetic eye whitening procedures and the use of topical mitomycin C.

  11. Characterization of suspected illegal skin whitening cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, B; Van Hoeck, E; Rogiers, V; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; De Paepe, K; Deconinck, E

    2014-03-01

    An important group of suspected illegal cosmetics consists of skin bleaching products, which are usually applied to the skin of the face, hands and décolleté for local depigmentation of hyper pigmented regions or more importantly, for a generalized reduction of the skin tone. These cosmetic products are suspected to contain illegal active substances that may provoke as well local as systemic toxic effects, being the reason for their banning from the EU market. In that respect, illegal and restricted substances in cosmetics, known to have bleaching properties, are in particular hydroquinone, tretinoin and corticosteroids. From a legislative point of view, all cosmetic products containing a prohibited whitening agent are illegal and must be taken off the EU market. A newly developed screening method using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time off flight-mass spectrometry allows routine analysis of suspected products. 163 suspected skin whitening cosmetics, collected by Belgian inspectors at high risk sites such as airports and so-called ethnic cosmetic shops, were analyzed and 59% were classified as illegal. The whitening agents mostly detected were clobetasol propionate and hydroquinone, which represent a serious health risk when repeatedly and abundantly applied to the skin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Necrotizing scleritis as a complication of cosmetic eye whitening procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report necrotizing scleritis as a serious complication of a cosmetic eye whitening procedure that involves the use of intraoperative and postoperative topical mitomycin C. Findings This is a single case report. A 59-year-old Caucasian male with a history of blepharitis status post uncomplicated LASIK refractive surgery reported chronic conjunctival hyperemia for 15 years prior to undergoing a cosmetic eye whitening procedure. He presented to our clinic 12 months after the cosmetic eye whitening procedure with progressive bilateral necrotizing scleritis and scleral calcification. Conclusions Chronic conjunctival hyperemia may prompt patients to seek surgical correction with cosmetic eye whitening procedures. However, conjunctival hyperemia secondary to tear deficiency and evaporative dry eye may predispose to poor wound healing. Serious complications including necrotizing scleritis may result from cosmetic eye whitening procedures and the use of topical mitomycin C. PMID:23514228

  13. [Pandalao and skin whitening in Mayotte].

    PubMed

    Levang, J; Eygonnet, F; Humbert, P

    2009-10-01

    Skin whitening (SW) is very common in dark-skinned populations and the practice is often named after a popular local brand of product and such is the case in Mayotte where this practice is called "pandalao". We carried out a descriptive epidemiological study in a sample of black Mahoran women aged 15 and over. The survey comprised a questionnaire completed by 163 women between 12 November 2007 and 24 January 2008. The aim of our study was to investigate the practice of SW in Mayotte and to determine its prevalence. Hundred percent of the subjects were aware of SW and 95% knew people practicing this procedure. The prevalence of users of whitening products was 33%, although 74% of these subjects did not use such products on a regular basis and 89% of the women limited application to exposed areas (visible to others). Sixty-three percent simultaneously applied Diproson (betamethasone dipropionate) and Pandalao, the main component of which is salicylic acid. Fifty-four percent of users had presented one or more adverse effects after application of these products and 28% had stopped this practice due to such adverse effects (chiefly acne and dyschromia). Although illegal, the trade in skin whitening products continues to grow because it is profitable and takes full advantage of the success of ethnic cosmetics. In Mayotte, as in metropolitan France and Africa, the existence of SW is acknowledged but is still taboo. However, a number of specific characteristics are seen in Mayotte: SW is rarely performed on the whole body, salicylic acid is added to a topical corticosteroid, and the traditional Mahoran mask, the "mzindzano", is still worn for photoprotection.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial to Evaluate Extrinsic Stain Removal of a Whitening Dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Terézhalmy, Géza; He, Tao; Anastasia, Mary Kay; Eusebio, Rachelle

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the extrinsic stain removal efficacy of a new whitening dentifrice containing sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) over a two-week period. This study used a controlled and randomized, examiner-blind, single-center, two-treatment, parallel group design. Subjects with visible extrinsic dental stain on facial surfaces of their anterior teeth, and meeting all study criteria, were entered into the trial. The test group received the whitening dentifrice with sodium fluoride and SHMP and an ADA reference soft manual toothbrush. Subjects in the control group received a dental prophylaxis after the initial examination at Baseline and were instructed to use their usual oral hygiene products at home. Subjects returned at Day 3 and Week 2 for re-evaluation of extrinsic dental stain. Extrinsic stain was measured using the Interproximal Modified Lobene (IML) Stain Index; safety was assessed based on clinical examination. Fifty subjects (mean age 32.0 years) completed the study, with 25 in each group. Statistically significant reductions in composite stain for whole tooth, as well as interproximal, gingival, and body surfaces were observed for both groups at Day 3 and Week 2 (p < 0.0001) with no significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.3). At Day 3, median percent reductions in composite IML stain from Baseline were 98% for the prophylaxis group and 100% for the test dentifrice group. At Week 2, median percent reductions in composite IML stain were 100% compared to Baseline for both groups. No adverse events were reported for either group. The whitening dentifrice demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in IML stain after three days and two weeks of use relative to baseline. Stain reduction with the toothpaste was comparable to a dental prophylaxis.

  15. Effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate combined with hydrogen peroxide and CPP-ACPF in whitening and microhardness of enamel.

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Rajabi, Omid; Forouzannejad, Zakiyeh

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) combined with 1.5% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) on color and microhardness of enamel. Seventy-five bovine incisors were immersed in a tea solution for 7.5 days. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening agent applied: 1) 94% NaHCO3, 2) a blend of 94% NaHCO3 and CPP-ACPF, 3) a blend of 94% NaHCO3 and 1.5% H2O2, 4) a blend of 94% NaHCO3, 1.5% H2O2 and CPP-ACPF, 5) control. The whitening procedure was performed for 10 times over 10 days. At each day, the buccal surfaces were covered with whitening agents for 5 minutes and then brushed for 30 seconds. After the 10 days, the teeth were again immersed in a tea solution for 10 minutes. Color assessment was performed at baseline (T1), after the first staining process (T2), after the whitening procedure (T3), and after the second staining process (T4). Finally, the specimens were subjected to microhardness test. There was a statistically significant difference in the color change between T2 and T3 stages among the study groups ( p <0.05), with the greatest improvement observed in group 4. Microhardness was significantly greater in groups 2 and 4, as compared to the other groups ( p <0.05). The combination of 94% NaHCO3, 1.5% H2O2 and CPP-ACPF was effective in improving color and microhardness of teeth with extrinsic stains and could be recommended in the clinical situation.

  16. Effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate combined with hydrogen peroxide and CPP-ACPF in whitening and microhardness of enamel

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Nadia; Rajabi, Omid; Forouzannejad, Zakiyeh

    2017-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) combined with 1.5% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) on color and microhardness of enamel. Material and Methods Seventy-five bovine incisors were immersed in a tea solution for 7.5 days. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening agent applied: 1) 94% NaHCO3, 2) a blend of 94% NaHCO3 and CPP-ACPF, 3) a blend of 94% NaHCO3 and 1.5% H2O2, 4) a blend of 94% NaHCO3, 1.5% H2O2 and CPP-ACPF, 5) control. The whitening procedure was performed for 10 times over 10 days. At each day, the buccal surfaces were covered with whitening agents for 5 minutes and then brushed for 30 seconds. After the 10 days, the teeth were again immersed in a tea solution for 10 minutes. Color assessment was performed at baseline (T1), after the first staining process (T2), after the whitening procedure (T3), and after the second staining process (T4). Finally, the specimens were subjected to microhardness test. Results There was a statistically significant difference in the color change between T2 and T3 stages among the study groups (p<0.05), with the greatest improvement observed in group 4. Microhardness was significantly greater in groups 2 and 4, as compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusions The combination of 94% NaHCO3, 1.5% H2O2 and CPP-ACPF was effective in improving color and microhardness of teeth with extrinsic stains and could be recommended in the clinical situation. PMID:28298972

  17. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance ( p ≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration ( p ≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups ( p ≤0,05). In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words: Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate.

  18. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate. PMID:28149472

  19. Automated detection of retinal whitening in malarial retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V.; Agurto, C.; Barriga, S.; Nemeth, S.; Soliz, P.; MacCormick, I.; Taylor, T.; Lewallen, S.; Harding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe neurological complication associated with malarial infection. Malaria affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and claims 600,000 lives annually, 75% of whom are African children under five years of age. Because most of these mortalities are caused by the high incidence of CM misdiagnosis, there is a need for an accurate diagnostic to confirm the presence of CM. The retinal lesions associated with malarial retinopathy (MR) such as retinal whitening, vessel discoloration, and hemorrhages, are highly specific to CM, and their detection can improve the accuracy of CM diagnosis. This paper will focus on development of an automated method for the detection of retinal whitening which is a unique sign of MR that manifests due to retinal ischemia resulting from CM. We propose to detect the whitening region in retinal color images based on multiple color and textural features. First, we preprocess the image using color and textural features of the CMYK and CIE-XYZ color spaces to minimize camera reflex. Next, we utilize color features of the HSL, CMYK, and CIE-XYZ channels, along with the structural features of difference of Gaussians. A watershed segmentation algorithm is used to assign each image region a probability of being inside the whitening, based on extracted features. The algorithm was applied to a dataset of 54 images (40 with whitening and 14 controls) that resulted in an image-based (binary) classification with an AUC of 0.80. This provides 88% sensitivity at a specificity of 65%. For a clinical application that requires a high specificity setting, the algorithm can be tuned to a specificity of 89% at a sensitivity of 82%. This is the first published method for retinal whitening detection and combining it with the detection methods for vessel discoloration and hemorrhages can further improve the detection accuracy for malarial retinopathy.

  20. Whitening non vital teeth – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Moraru, Iren; Ţuculină, Mihaela; Bătăiosu, Marilena; Gheorghiţă, Lelia; Diaconu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    Commonly used in cosmetic dentistry teeth whitening can be used combined with other restorative techniques during dental treatment. Non-vital teeth whitening is necessary whenever we need an improvement of their aspect, as it’s a known fact that these teeth can have a grey or pink-grey coloration when they are not correctly endodontical treated. PMID:24778849

  1. DOMAIN MISMATCH COMPENSATION FOR SPEAKER RECOGNITION USING A LIBRARY OF WHITENERS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-29

    DOMAIN MISMATCH COMPENSATION FOR SPEAKER RECOGNITION USING A LIBRARY OF WHITENERS Elliot Singer and Douglas Reynolds Massachusetts Institute of...development data is assumed to be unavailable. The method is based on a generalization of data whitening used in association with i-vector length...normalization and utilizes a library of whitening transforms trained at system development time using strictly out-of-domain data. The approach is

  2. Comparison of effectiveness of abrasive and enzymatic action of whitening toothpastes in removal of extrinsic stains - a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Patil, P A; Ankola, A V; Hebbal, M I; Patil, A C

    2015-02-01

    To compare the effectiveness of abrasive component (perlite/calcium carbonate) and enzymatic component (papain and bromelain) of whitening toothpaste in removal of extrinsic stains. This study is a randomized, triple blind and parallel group study in which 90 subjects aged 18-40 years were included. At baseline, stains scores were assessed by Macpherson's modification of Lobene Stain Index and subjects were randomly assigned to two groups with 45 subjects in each. Group 1 used whitening toothpaste with enzymatic action and group 2 with abrasive action. After 1 month, stain scores were assessed for the effectiveness of the two toothpastes and 2 months later to check the stain prevention efficacy. Wilcoxson's test was used to compare between baseline 1 and 2 months stain scores, and Mann-Witney U-test was applied for intragroup comparison. The mean baseline total stain score for the subjects allocated to the enzymatic toothpaste was 37.24 ± 2.11 which reduced to 30.77 ± 2.48 in 1 month, and for the abrasive paste, total stain reduced from 35.08 ± 2.96 to 32.89 ± 1.95. The reductions in total stain scores with both the pastes were significant compared with baseline stain scores (at 1 month Group 1, P = 0.0233 and Group 2, P = 0.0324; at 2 months, Group 1 P = 0.0356). Both the toothpastes proved to be equally good in removal of extrinsic stains; however, the enzymatic paste showed better results as compared to abrasive toothpaste. Whitening toothpaste with abrasive action and enzymatic action are equally effective in removal of extrinsic stains; however, whitening toothpaste with abrasive action needs to be used with caution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical study of the safety and effectiveness of a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system

    PubMed Central

    Ghalili, K Michael; Khawaled, Kamal; Rozen, Doran; Afsahi, Veda

    2014-01-01

    We investigated color change, gingival irritation, and tooth sensitivity in patients undergoing at-home vital tooth bleaching with a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system. Tooth color shade in anterior teeth, supragingival plaque and gingivitis in Ramfjord teeth, as well as visual assessment of teeth gingival tissues and mucosa were evaluated in-office prior to treatment, after two consecutive applications of the 9% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product, after eight applications (10 minutes/day for 3 days at home), and after ten applications (50 minutes exposure over 5 days). Color stability was evaluated at 3 months after completing the treatment regimen. Over-the-counter bleaching products can be used by the patient at home without dentist supervision, but are frequently associated with gingival irritation and tooth sensitivity despite low concentrations of peroxide agents. Our investigations showed that the treatment is tolerable and safe with a low incidence of adverse effects. Any adverse effects associated with use of the whitening gel and tray are temporary, easily controlled, and often disappear within minutes of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvement in teeth whitening following treatment (mean color change of seven shades) and at three months after treatment. PMID:24591847

  4. Overview of skin whitening agents with an insight into the illegal cosmetic market in Europe.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, B; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; Rogiers, V; Grosber, M; Deconinck, E; De Paepe, K

    2016-06-01

    Lightening skin tone is an ancient and well-documented practice, and remains common practice among many cultures. Whitening agents such as corticosteroids, tretinoin and hydroquinone are medically applied to effectively lighten the skin tone of hyperpigmented lesions. However, when these agents are used cosmetically, they are associated with a variety of side-effect. Alternative agents, such as arbutin and its derivatives kojic acid and nicotinamide have been subsequently developed for cosmetic purposes. Unfortunately, some cosmetics contain whitening agents that are banned for use in cosmetic products. This article provides an overview of the mode of action and potential side-effects of cosmetic legal and illegal whitening agents, and the pattern of use of these types of products. Finally, an EU analysis of the health problems due to the presence of illegal products on the market is summarized. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Effects of whitening dentifrice on yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surfaces after simulating brushing.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Gimenes Olbera, Amanda Caroline; Candido, Lucas Miguel; Miotto, Larissa Natiele; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi

    2017-01-01

    The changes that occur after brushing yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) are unknown. These changes may favor the retention of microorganisms and chemisorption of water, impairing its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a whitening dentifrice on Y-TZP surfaces after simulating 10 years of brushing. Seventy-two bar-shaped specimens (20×4×1.2 mm) were divided into 4 groups: storage in distilled water (SW, control), brushing with distilled water (BW), brushing with dentifrice (BD), and brushing with whitening dentifrice (BWD). Brushing was conducted using a linear brushing machine (878400 cycles, 0.98 N, soft toothbrush). The mean roughness (Ra) was analyzed with a profilometer and the superficial topography with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at baseline and after treatment. Crystalline phases were characterized using x-ray diffraction. Baseline and posttreatment Ra were analyzed using the 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparison test; the paired t test was used for intragroup comparison (all α=.05). The Ra (μm) means (before/after treatment) were SW 0.28/0.28; BW 0.32/0.31; BD 0.28/0.36; BWD 0.30/0.20. No statistically significant difference was found for Ra at baseline (P=.108) than for posttreatment results (P<.001); the BD group had higher Ra values when compared with baseline (P=.019); the BWD group had the lowest values (P<.001). The BD surfaces showed pronounced scratches and detachment of the surface, while BWD showed smoother surfaces; similar crystallographic results among groups were observed. Brushing Y-TZP with conventional dentifrice increased roughness, while brushing with whitening dentifrice reduced roughness. Neither dentifrice changed the crystallographic phases after brushing. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Social ranking effects on tooth-brushing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maltby, John; Paterson, Kevin; Day, Liz; Jones, Ceri; Kinnear, Hayley; Buchanan, Heather

    2016-05-01

    A tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis is tested suggesting tooth-brushing duration is influenced when individuals position their behaviour in a rank when comparing their behaviour with other individuals. Study 1 used a correlation design, Study 2 used a semi-experimental design, and Study 3 used a randomized intervention design to examine the tooth-brushing social rank hypothesis in terms of self-reported attitudes, cognitions, and behaviour towards tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 surveyed participants to examine whether the perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration could be predicted from the ranking of each person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 2 tested whether manipulating the rank position of the tooth-brushing duration influenced participant-perceived health benefits of tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 used a longitudinal intervention method to examine whether messages relating to the rank positions of tooth-brushing durations causally influenced the self-report tooth-brushing duration. Study 1 demonstrates that perceptions of the health benefits from tooth-brushing duration are predicted by the perceptions of how that behaviour ranks in comparison to other people's behaviour. Study 2 demonstrates that the perceptions of the health benefits of tooth-brushing duration can be manipulated experimentally by changing the ranked position of a person's tooth-brushing duration. Study 3 experimentally demonstrates the possibility of increasing the length of time for which individuals clean their teeth by focusing on how they rank among their peers in terms of tooth-brushing duration. The effectiveness of interventions using social-ranking methods relative to those that emphasize comparisons made against group averages or normative guidelines are discussed. What is already known on this subject? Individual make judgements based on social rank information. Social rank information has been shown to influence positive health behaviours such as exercise

  7. Electromyogram whitening for improved classification accuracy in upper limb prosthesis control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lukai; Liu, Pu; Clancy, Edward A; Scheme, Erik; Englehart

    2013-09-01

    Time and frequency domain features of the surface electromyogram (EMG) signal acquired from multiple channels have frequently been investigated for use in controlling upper-limb prostheses. A common control method is EMG-based motion classification. We propose the use of EMG signal whitening as a preprocessing step in EMG-based motion classification. Whitening decorrelates the EMG signal and has been shown to be advantageous in other EMG applications including EMG amplitude estimation and EMG-force processing. In a study of ten intact subjects and five amputees with up to 11 motion classes and ten electrode channels, we found that the coefficient of variation of time domain features (mean absolute value, average signal length and normalized zero crossing rate) was significantly reduced due to whitening. When using these features along with autoregressive power spectrum coefficients, whitening added approximately five percentage points to classification accuracy when small window lengths were considered.

  8. [Retinal whitening following vitrectomy for epiretinal macular membrane].

    PubMed

    Uemura, A

    1993-09-01

    To investigate the clinical pictures of retinal whitening following epiretinal membrane dissection. I studied retrospectively the records of 18 eyes which had undergone vitrectomy. Two types of retinal whitening were observed: cotton wool-like spots within the superficial retinal layers and a linear or dendritic pattern within the deep retinal layers. The spots were mainly noted in idiopathic cases and resolved completely in a few weeks, and the pattern was observed in macular pucker cases after retinal detachment surgery and persisted for a long time after vitrectomy.

  9. Attitudes of Students of Differenet Schools of University of Zagreb on Tooth Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Diklić, Dinka; Sever, Eva Klarić; Galić, Nada; Spajić, Jelena; Prskalo, Katica

    2016-12-01

    To compare the awareness that students from four different faculties within the University of Zagreb have of oral health and tooth bleaching procedure. The study included 158 subjects (both male and female) - 38 students from the School of Dental Medicine and 40 students from each of the following faculties: the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The respondents were asked to fill out the survey with multiple choices by marking the answers they considered correct. Only 12% of the respondents followed the information on oral health. More than two thirds of all subjects brush their teeth twice a day, but there were no statistically significant differences between the subjects with respect to college or gender. More than half of the participants (55%) were satisfied, and 12% were completely satisfied with their dental appearance. About 80% of the respondents were aware of differences between teeth bleaching and teeth polishing procedures, with greater prevalence among Dental Medicine and Medicine students. 80% of all subjects would go to a dental office if they decided to whiten their teeth while less than a half (46%) of all the subjects believed that a tooth bleaching has some adverse side-effects. There is a difference in knowledge on oral hygiene and tooth bleaching between the students from the School of Dental Medicine, the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and those from the Faculty of Civil Engineering. Dental students have the best knowledge on tooth bleaching and oral health, which was in accordance with their educational guidance and level of education.

  10. Can whitening toothpastes maintain the optical stability of enamel over time?

    PubMed

    Silva, Eduardo Moreira da; Maia, Juliana Nunes da Silva Meirelles Dória; Mitraud, Carine Gnatiuk; Russo, Juliana do Espírito Santo; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2018-02-01

    Besides the effects on the health of individuals, cigarette smoking can also interfere with the appearance of their teeth. To evaluate the effect of cigarette smoking-toothbrushing-cycling (CSTC) with whitening toothpastes on the roughness and optical behavior of bovine enamel for eight weeks. Thirty bovine dentin/enamel discs, 8.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm thick, were randomly divided into three groups according to the toothpastes: whitening (Colgate Luminous White - CW and Oral B 3D White - OW), and a non-whitening (Colgate - C). The roughness, color (CIE L*a*b* system), translucency and gloss were measured before and after the specimens were submitted to CSTC. The topography of the specimens was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. During the first week, the specimens were daily subjected to the consumption of 20 cigarettes and brushed (40 strokes/100 g) with the toothpastes' slurries. Thereafter, the CSTC was weekly applied in an accumulated model (140 cigarettes/280 strokes) for seven weeks. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD test, and paired-t test (α=0.05). The three toothpastes produced significant changes in roughness, color, translucency and gloss (p<0.05). After eight weeks, the roughness and the gloss produced by the three toothpastes were similar (p>0.05), while OW produced the lowest color change and the translucency of C was lower than that of CW (p<0.05). The three toothpastes produced a significant decrease in L* values and a significant increase in a* values after eight weeks (p<0.05). No significant difference in the b* coordinate was found for OW (p=0.13) There were topographic changes in the enamel surfaces. The whitening toothpastes increased the roughness, changed the topography and were not able to maintain the optical stability of enamel exposed over eight weeks.

  11. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  12. Whitening Effect of Black Tea Water Extract on Brown Guinea Pig Skin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, So-Young

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the whitening effect of black tea water extract (BT), BT was topically applied to artificially hyperpigmented spots on the back skins of brown guinea-pigs (weight: 450~500 g) induced by 1,500 mJ/ cm2 of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The test compounds of 30 μl were applied twice a day, six days a week, for four weeks. The artificially hyperpigmented spots were divided into 5 groups: control (UVB + saline, C), vehicle control [UVB + propylene glycol: ethanol: water (5 : 3 : 2), VC], positive control (UVB + 2% hydroquinone, PC), experimental 1 (UVB + 1% BT), experimental 2 (UVB + 2% BT). After 4-week application, the spots were removed by biopsy punch under anesthetic condition and used as specimens for the histological examination. The total polyphenol and flavonoid contents of BT were 104 and 91 mg/g, respectively. The electron-donating ability of BT revealed a dose-dependent response, showing the excellent capacities of 86% at 800 μg/ml. The artificially hyperpigmented spots treated with the PC and BT were obviously lightened compared to the C and VC groups. At the fourth week, the melanin indices for the PC and BT groups were significantly lower (p < 0.00l) than those of the C and VC groups. In histological examination, PC and BT groups were significantly reduced in the melanin pigmentation, the proliferation of melanocytes and the synthesis of melanosomes compared to the C and VC groups. It is found that BT inhibits the proliferation of melanocytes and synthesis of melanosomes in vivo using brown guinea pigs, thereby showing a definite skin whitening effect. PMID:24278566

  13. Studies on preparation of medium fat liquid dairy whitener from buffalo milk employing ultrafiltration process.

    PubMed

    Khatkar, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Khatkar, Anju Boora

    2014-09-01

    A study was conducted to develop good quality medium fat liquid dairy whitener from buffalo milk employing ultrafiltration (UF) process. The buffalo skim milk was UF concentrated to 4.05 to 4.18 (23.63 ± 0.30 % TS) fold and standardized to 10 % fat (on Dry Matter Basis) (i.e. formulation) and homogenized at 175.76 kg/cm(2). The addition of 0.4 % mixture of monosodium and disodium phosphate (2:1 w/w) improved the heat stability of homogenized formulation to an optimum of 66 min. The bland flavour of homogenized formulation with added 0.4 % mixture of monosodium phosphate and disodium phosphate (2:1 w/w) and 18 % sugar (on DMB) (i.e. medium fat liquid dairy whitener) was improved significantly (P < 0.01) with the addition of 0.2 % potassium chloride, but heat stability of medium fat liquid dairy whitener got reduced substantially (i.e. 19 min). With subsequent heat treatment to 85 °C for 5 min, heat stability of medium fat liquid dairy whitener got improved to reasonable level of 27 min. Whitening ability in terms of L* value of medium fat liquid dairy whitener in both tea and coffee was significantly (P < 0.01) better when homogenized at 175.76 kg/cm(2) vis-à-vis 140.61 kg/cm(2). Standardized medium fat liquid dairy whitener had significantly (P < 0.01) greater protein content (i.e. approximately 2.43 times) compared to market dairy whitener samples. At 2 % solids level, standardized medium fat liquid dairy whitener in tea/coffee fetched significantly (P < 0.01) better sensory attributes and instrumental whitening ability compared to market sample at 3 % solids level. There could be clear 33 % solids quantity saving in case of developed product compared to market dairy whitener sample.

  14. Effectiveness of a new non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent after single use - a double-blind placebo-controlled short-term study.

    PubMed

    Bizhang, Mozhgan; Domin, Julia; Danesh, Gholamreza; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Tooth whitening represents perhaps the most common aesthetic procedure in dentistry worldwide. The efficacy of bleaching depends on three aspects: bleaching agent, bleaching method, and tooth color. This in vivo study aimed to examine whitening effects on frontal teeth of the upper and lower jaws using an over-the-counter (OTC) non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent in comparison to a placebo after one single use. Forty subjects (25 female; 15 male) participated in this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups (n=20). The test group received the OTC product (iWhite Instant) and the placebo group received an identically composed product except for the active agents. Each subject was treated with a prefilled tray containing iWhite Instant or the placebo for 20 minutes. The tooth shade of the front teeth (upper and lower jaws) was assessed before (E_0), immediately after (E_1) and 24 h after treatment (E_2), using a shade guide (VITA classical). Statistical testing was accomplished using the Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.001). The dropout rate was 0%. There were no significant differences at E_0 between placebo and test groups regarding the tooth color. Differences in tooth color changes immediately after (ΔE1_0) and 24 h after treatment (ΔE2_0) were calculated for both groups. The mean values (standard deviations) of tooth color changes for ΔE1_0 were 2.26 (0.92) in the test group and 0.01 (0.21) in the placebo group. The color changes for ΔE2_0 showed mean values of 2.15 (1.10) in the test group and 0.07 (0.35) in the placebo group. For ΔE1_0 and ΔE2_0 significant differences were found between the groups. In this short-term study, the results showed that a non-hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent has significant whitening effects immediately and 24 h after a single-use treatment.

  15. The bleaching of teeth: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Andrew

    2006-08-01

    To review current knowledge of tooth whitening with respect to external bleaching methods. The scope is the external bleaching of vital teeth and focuses on mechanisms; in vivo and in vitro measurement methods, and factors influencing the efficacy of the whitening process. "Medline" and "ISI Web of Science" databases from 1966 and 1974, respectively were searched electronically with key words tooth, teeth, colo*r, white*, bleach* and peroxide. The importance of tooth whitening for patients and consumers has seen a dramatic increase in the number of products and procedures over recent years, with a concomitant rise in publications on this topic. Literature suggests that the mechanisms of tooth whitening by peroxide occur by the diffusion of peroxide through enamel to cause oxidation and hence lightening of coloured species, particularly within the dentinal regions. A number of approaches are available for measuring changes in tooth colour. These include visual measurements by trained clinicians and instrumental measurements using spectrophotometry, chromameters and digital image analysis. The key factors that affect tooth whitening efficacy by peroxide containing products are concentration and time. In general, higher concentrations are faster than lower concentrations. However, lower concentrations can approach the efficacy of higher concentrations with extended treatment times. Alternative bleach systems to peroxide have received only minor attention. The efficacy of light activated systems versus non-light activated controls in clinical studies is limited and conflicting. Other factors which can influence tooth bleaching outcome include type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age.

  16. An in vivo study of the effect of a 38 percent hydrogen peroxide in-office whitening agent on enamel.

    PubMed

    Cadenaro, Milena; Navarra, Chiara Ottavia; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Nucci, Cesare; Matis, Bruce A; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2010-04-01

    In an in vivo study, the authors tested the hypothesis that no difference in enamel surface roughness is detectable either during or after bleaching with a high-concentration in-office whitening agent. The authors performed profilometric and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analyses of epoxy resin replicas of the upper right incisors of 20 participants at baseline (control) and after each bleaching treatment with a 38 percent hydrogen peroxide whitening agent, applied four times, at one-week intervals. The authors used analysis of variance for repeated measures to analyze the data statistically. The profilometric analysis of the enamel surface replicas after the in vivo bleaching protocol showed no significant difference in surface roughness parameters (P > .05) compared with those at baseline, irrespective of the time interval. Results of the correlated SEM analysis showed no relevant alteration on the enamel surface. Results of this in vivo study support the tested hypothesis that the application of a 38 percent hydrogen peroxide in-office whitening agent does not alter enamel surface roughness, even after multiple applications. The use of a 38 percent hydrogen peroxide in-office whitening agent induced no roughness alterations of the enamel surface, even after prolonged and repeated applications.

  17. Whitening of endodontically untreated calcified anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Pedorella, C A; Meyer, R D; Woollard, G W

    2000-01-01

    Definitive treatment for whitening endodontically untreated anterior teeth with dystrophic calcification is provided by removing the coronal sclerotic dentin and utilizing internal and external bleaching as necessary.

  18. Attitudes of Students of Differenet Schools of University of Zagreb on Tooth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Diklić, Dinka; Galić, Nada; Spajić, Jelena; Prskalo, Katica

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the awareness that students from four different faculties within the University of Zagreb have of oral health and tooth bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods The study included 158 subjects (both male and female) - 38 students from the School of Dental Medicine and 40 students from each of the following faculties: the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and the Faculty of Civil Engineering. The respondents were asked to fill out the survey with multiple choices by marking the answers they considered correct. Results Only 12% of the respondents followed the information on oral health. More than two thirds of all subjects brush their teeth twice a day, but there were no statistically significant differences between the subjects with respect to college or gender. More than half of the participants (55%) were satisfied, and 12% were completely satisfied with their dental appearance. About 80% of the respondents were aware of differences between teeth bleaching and teeth polishing procedures, with greater prevalence among Dental Medicine and Medicine students. 80% of all subjects would go to a dental office if they decided to whiten their teeth while less than a half (46%) of all the subjects believed that a tooth bleaching has some adverse side-effects. Conclusions There is a difference in knowledge on oral hygiene and tooth bleaching between the students from the School of Dental Medicine, the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Economics and those from the Faculty of Civil Engineering. Dental students have the best knowledge on tooth bleaching and oral health, which was in accordance with their educational guidance and level of education. PMID:28275277

  19. Can whitening toothpastes maintain the optical stability of enamel over time?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Maia, Juliana Nunes da Silva Meirelles Dória; Mitraud, Carine Gnatiuk; Russo, Juliana do Espírito Santo; Poskus, Laiza Tatiana; Guimarães, José Guilherme Antunes

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Besides the effects on the health of individuals, cigarette smoking can also interfere with the appearance of their teeth. Objective To evaluate the effect of cigarette smoking-toothbrushing-cycling (CSTC) with whitening toothpastes on the roughness and optical behavior of bovine enamel for eight weeks. Material and Methods Thirty bovine dentin/enamel discs, 8.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm thick, were randomly divided into three groups according to the toothpastes: whitening (Colgate Luminous White - CW and Oral B 3D White - OW), and a non-whitening (Colgate - C). The roughness, color (CIE L*a*b* system), translucency and gloss were measured before and after the specimens were submitted to CSTC. The topography of the specimens was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. During the first week, the specimens were daily subjected to the consumption of 20 cigarettes and brushed (40 strokes/100 g) with the toothpastes' slurries. Thereafter, the CSTC was weekly applied in an accumulated model (140 cigarettes/280 strokes) for seven weeks. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD test, and paired-t test (α=0.05). Results The three toothpastes produced significant changes in roughness, color, translucency and gloss (p<0.05). After eight weeks, the roughness and the gloss produced by the three toothpastes were similar (p>0.05), while OW produced the lowest color change and the translucency of C was lower than that of CW (p<0.05). The three toothpastes produced a significant decrease in L* values and a significant increase in a* values after eight weeks (p<0.05). No significant difference in the b* coordinate was found for OW (p=0.13) There were topographic changes in the enamel surfaces. Conclusions The whitening toothpastes increased the roughness, changed the topography and were not able to maintain the optical stability of enamel exposed over eight weeks. PMID:29412362

  20. a Test to Prove Cloud Whitening THEORY!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttram, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science researchers believe our planet can possibly tolerate twice the present carbon dioxide levels with no upwards temperature change, IF we could increase the amount of energy reflected back out into space by about 2.0%. (c)Cloudtec basically alters a blend of seawater and applies heat derived from magma to it at a temperature exceeding 2,000 degrees F. The interaction of seawater and magma displaces the oxygen, causing the volume of water to vaporize and expand over 4,000 times - transforming billions of tons of seawater into thousands of cubic miles of white, maritime, stratocumulus clouds to reflect the incident Sun's rays back out into space. A 6 month test to prove Cloud Whitening Theory will cost 6 million dollars. (No profit added.) This study will enable everyone on the planet with a computer the transparency to use satellite imagery and check out for themselves - if and when Cloud Whitening is occurring. If Cloud Whitening Theory is validated, (c)Cloudtec's innovation can strategically create the clouds we need to reflect the Sun's rays back out into space and help neutralize the projected 3.6 degrees F rise in temperature. Based on reasonable calculations of anthropogenic global warming: this one move alone would be comparable to slashing global carbon dioxide emissions by over 60% over the next 40 years.

  1. A whitened face woman with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soo, Yannie Oi-Yan; Chow, Kai-Ming; Lam, Christopher Wai-Kei; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Chan, Michael Ho-Ming; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2003-01-01

    Skin whitening cream from developing countries is a recognized source of chronic mercury poisoning. The authors report on a 34-year-old Indonesian domestic helper who presented with nephrotic syndrome secondary to membranous nephropathy. It was subsequently found that she used a skin whitening cream regularly that was found to contain a mercury level of almost 2,000 times above the allowable limit. Her blood and urinary mercury levels were both grossly elevated. Her symptoms improved after she stopped using the cream. However, she returned to her home country before chelating therapy could be arranged. Because mercury-containing skin products are still widely available in developing countries, the use of these products should be considered a possible cause of membranous nephropathy in immigrants from those countries. Copyright 2003 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  2. Effect of whitening toothpastes on bonding of restorative materials to enamel of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Abdelmegid, F Y

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro investigation was to measure shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin composite and a resin-modified glass ionomer to enamel of primary teeth after application of different whitening toothpastes (WTs). Eighty labial enamel surfaces of primary incisors were randomly distributed into 8 groups of 10 each according to the surface treatment and bonding material. G1 and G2, control (brushed with water without WT); G3 and G4, (brushed with Colgate Optic White WT [Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, NY, USA]), G5 and G6, (brushed with Crest Pro-Health Whitening WT [Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, OH, USA]) and G7 and G8, (brushed with Arm and Hammer Advance White Extreme Whitening with Stain Defense WT [Church and Dwight Co., Princeton, NJ, USA]). SBS was measured at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and the type of bond failure was assessed using a stereomicroscope. There was significant difference between SBS of composite resin in groups 1, 3, 5, and 7 (P < 0.001), but no difference between resin-modified glass ionomer in groups 2, 4, 6, and 8 (P < 0.056). SBS of group 1 (control) was greater than groups 3, 5, and 7. There was a significant difference between group 1 and group 2 as well as group 7 and group 8 (P < 0.001). WTs affect SBS of resin composite, but not resin-modified glass ionomer to enamel of primary teeth. No difference of failure modes between different groups of tested materials.

  3. The Scientification of Skin Whitening and the Entrepreneurial University-Linked Corporate Scientific Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mire, Amina

    2012-01-01

    This work examines the interlocking strategies of scientific entrepreneurialism and academic capitalism in cutting-edge innovations in molecular biology, biomedicine, and other life sciences deployed in research and the development of high-end skin whitening and anti-aging cosmeceuticals. Skin whitening products and anti-aging cosmeceuticals are…

  4. On estimating attenuation from the amplitude of the spectrally whitened ambient seismic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weemstra, Cornelis; Westra, Willem; Snieder, Roel; Boschi, Lapo

    2014-06-01

    Measuring attenuation on the basis of interferometric, receiver-receiver surface waves is a non-trivial task: the amplitude, more than the phase, of ensemble-averaged cross-correlations is strongly affected by non-uniformities in the ambient wavefield. In addition, ambient noise data are typically pre-processed in ways that affect the amplitude itself. Some authors have recently attempted to measure attenuation in receiver-receiver cross-correlations obtained after the usual pre-processing of seismic ambient-noise records, including, most notably, spectral whitening. Spectral whitening replaces the cross-spectrum with a unit amplitude spectrum. It is generally assumed that cross-terms have cancelled each other prior to spectral whitening. Cross-terms are peaks in the cross-correlation due to simultaneously acting noise sources, that is, spurious traveltime delays due to constructive interference of signal coming from different sources. Cancellation of these cross-terms is a requirement for the successful retrieval of interferometric receiver-receiver signal and results from ensemble averaging. In practice, ensemble averaging is replaced by integrating over sufficiently long time or averaging over several cross-correlation windows. Contrary to the general assumption, we show in this study that cross-terms are not required to cancel each other prior to spectral whitening, but may also cancel each other after the whitening procedure. Specifically, we derive an analytic approximation for the amplitude difference associated with the reversed order of cancellation and normalization. Our approximation shows that an amplitude decrease results from the reversed order. This decrease is predominantly non-linear at small receiver-receiver distances: at distances smaller than approximately two wavelengths, whitening prior to ensemble averaging causes a significantly stronger decay of the cross-spectrum.

  5. An in situ investigation into the abrasion of eroded dental hard tissues by a whitening dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Turssi, C P; Faraoni, J J; Rodrigues, A L; Serra, M C

    2004-01-01

    This crossover study aimed to investigate abrasion of previously eroded hard dental tissues by a whitening dentifrice compared to a regular dentifrice. After a 3-day lead-in period, 14 volunteers were randomly assigned to use one of the toothpastes while wearing a removable appliance, containing 3 enamel and 3 root dentine slabs on each side. On the first day salivary pellicle was allowed to form. Twice daily for the following 3 days, one side of each appliance was immersed in an acidic carbonated drink ex vivo while the other side remained unexposed. Specimens were then brushed with the allocated dentifrice. After a 3-day washout period, new sets of enamel and dentine slabs were mounted in the appliances and the participants commenced period 2 using the alternative toothpaste. Acid-treated specimens always showed more wear than untreated specimens. The whitening dentifrice did not significantly increase the wear of softened enamel compared with the regular dentifrice. Brushing with the whitening toothpaste led to significantly greater wear of sound enamel and of both eroded and sound dentine than the regular dentifrice. The results suggest that whitening dentifrices may not increase the wear of acid-softened enamel but may have a more deleterious effect on dentine than regular toothpastes.

  6. Vascular rarefaction mediates whitening of brown fat in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Ippei; Aprahamian, Tamar; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Ayako; Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N.; MacLauchlan, Susan; Maruyama, Sonomi; Walsh, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a highly vascularized organ with abundant mitochondria that produce heat through uncoupled respiration. Obesity is associated with a reduction of BAT function; however, it is unknown how obesity promotes dysfunctional BAT. Here, using a murine model of diet-induced obesity, we determined that obesity causes capillary rarefaction and functional hypoxia in BAT, leading to a BAT “whitening” phenotype that is characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid droplet accumulation, and decreased expression of Vegfa. Targeted deletion of Vegfa in adipose tissue of nonobese mice resulted in BAT whitening, supporting a role for decreased vascularity in obesity-associated BAT. Conversely, introduction of VEGF-A specifically into BAT of obese mice restored vascularity, ameliorated brown adipocyte dysfunction, and improved insulin sensitivity. The capillary rarefaction in BAT that was brought about by obesity or Vegfa ablation diminished β-adrenergic signaling, increased mitochondrial ROS production, and promoted mitophagy. These data indicate that overnutrition leads to the development of a hypoxic state in BAT, causing it to whiten through mitochondrial dysfunction and loss. Furthermore, these results link obesity-associated BAT whitening to impaired systemic glucose metabolism. PMID:24713652

  7. The use of QLF to quantify in vitro whitening in a product testing model.

    PubMed

    Pretty, I A; Edgar, W M; Higham, S M

    2001-11-24

    Professional and consumer interest in whitening products continues to increase against a background of both increased oral health awareness and demand for cosmetic procedures. In the current legal climate, few dentists are providing 'in-office' whitening treatments, and thus many patients turn to home-use products. The most common of these are the whitening toothpastes. Researchers are keen to quantify the effectiveness of such products through clinically relevant trials. Previous studies examining whitening products have employed a variety of stained substrates to monitor stain removal. This study aimed to quantify the removal of stain from human enamel using a new device, quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). The experimental design follows that of a product-testing model. A total of 11 previously extracted molar teeth were coated with transparent nail varnish leaving an exposed window of enamel. The sound, exposed enamel was subject to a staining regime of human saliva, chlorhexidine and tea. Each of the eleven teeth was subjected to serial exposures of a positive control (Bocasan), a negative control (water) and a test product (Yotuel toothpaste). Following each two-minute exposure QLF images of the teeth were taken (a total of 5 applications). Following completion of one test solution, the teeth were cleaned, re-stained and the procedure repeated with the next solution. QLF images were stored on a PC and analysed by a blinded single examiner. The deltaQ value at 5% threshold was reported. ANOVA and paired t-tests were used to analyse the data. The study confirmed the ability of QLF to longitudinally quantify stain reduction from human enamel. The reliability of the technique in relation to positive and negative test controls was proven. The positive control had a significantly (alpha = 0.05) higher stain removal efficacy than water (p = 0.023) and Yotuel (p = 0.046). Yotuel was more effective than water (p = 0.023). The research community, the

  8. Impact of gaps in the asteroseismic characterization of pulsating stars. I. The efficiency of pre-whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Granado, J.; Suárez, J. C.; Garrido, R.; Moya, A.; Hernández, A. García; Rodón, J. R.; Lares-Martiz, M.

    2018-06-01

    Context. It is known that the observed distribution of frequencies in CoRoT and Kepler δ Scuti stars has no parallelism with any theoretical model. Pre-whitening is a widespread technique in the analysis of time series with gaps from pulsating stars located in the classical instability strip, such as δ Scuti stars. However, some studies have pointed out that this technique might introduce biases in the results of the frequency analysis. Aims: This work aims at studying the biases that can result from pre-whitening in asteroseismology. The results will depend on the intrinsic range and distribution of frequencies of the stars. The periodic nature of the gaps in CoRoT observations, only in the range of the pulsational frequency content of the δ Scuti stars, is shown to be crucial to determining their oscillation frequencies, the first step in performing asteroseismology of these objects. Hence, here we focus on the impact of pre-whitening on the asteroseismic characterization of δ Scuti stars. Methods: We select a sample of 15 δ Scuti stars observed by the CoRoT satellite, for which ultra-high-quality photometric data have been obtained by its seismic channel. In order to study the impact on the asteroseismic characterization of δ Scuti stars we perform the pre-whitening procedure on three datasets: gapped data, linearly interpolated data, and data with gaps interpolated using Autoregressive and Moving Average models (ARMA). Results: The different results obtained show that at least in some cases pre-whitening is not an efficient procedure for the deconvolution of the spectral window. Therefore, in order to reduce the effect of the spectral window to a minimum, in addition to performing a pre-whitening of the data, it is necessary to interpolate with an algorithm that is aimed to preserve the original frequency content. Tables 5-49 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http

  9. Premature hair whitening is an independent predictor of carotid intima-media thickness in young and middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Turan; Kocaman, Sinan Altan; Çetin, Mustafa; Durakoğlugil, Murtaza Emre; Uğurlu, Yavuz; Şahin, İsmail; Çanga, Aytun

    2013-01-01

    Premature graying or whitening of the hair may possibly represent premature atherosclerotic changes as a surrogate marker of different host responses to cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs). This study was undertaken to test whether carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT) as a validated surrogate marker of the severity and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD) is higher in subjects with prominent signs of hair whitening, independent of chronological age and other CVRFs. The current study was conducted in young and middle-aged patients (<55 years age) without a history of cardiovascular disease. Two hundred and two eligible patients consecutively admitted to our outpatient clinic for CVRF management were included. A gray/white-hair scale was used to determine the percentage of hair whitening. In the groups determined according to the degree of hair whitening, age (p<0.001), waist circumference (p=0.011), the presence of hypertension (p=0.003), the uric acid levels (p=0.008), the C - reactive protein levels (p=0.002) and CIMT (p<0.001) were significantly different. When we performed multivariate analyses to determine the independent predictors of CIMT and hair whitening, CIMT was found to be related to age, waist circumference, the levels of uric acid, bilirubin and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, the presence of a family history of CAD and hair whitening, while hair whitening was found to be related to age, hypertension, the bilirubin level and CIMT. Our findings suggest that premature hair whitening intensity is independently related to CIMT. In cumulative assessments of CVRFs on the human body, the presence of premature hair whitening may be useful in identifying individuals with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents. PMID:23743618

  11. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents.

  12. Immunofluorescence findings in rapid whitening of scalp hair.

    PubMed

    Guin, J D; Kumar, V; Petersen, B H

    1981-09-01

    Rapid whitening of scalp hair developed during a three-month period along with a diffuse, subtotal alopecia in a patient. Immunofluorescence microscopy of biopsy material showed prominent deposits of IgG and IgM in a granular pattern in the epithelium of the lower portions of hair follicles. Some return of the color and amount of scalp hair occurred within a year, but occasional bouts of hair loss continued to occur. It is theorized that the rapid graying was caused by a selective loss of pigmented hair, which was perhaps caused by an immunologic mechanism. Some of the findings suggest that the cause of this patient's loss of hair color may be different from those of patients who have been previously described as having rapid whitening of scalp hair because of alopecia areata or vitiligo.

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Two Whitening Toothpastes on Microhardness of the Enamel and a Microhybride Composite Resin: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Khamverdi, Z.; Kasraie, Sh.; Rezaei-Soufi, L.; Jebeli, S.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Whitening toothpastes which have been accepted in populations may affect properties of enamel and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of human enamel and Z250 microhybrid composite resin after brushing with two whitening toothpastes. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study of enamel specimens, forty five freshly extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into three groups of control enamel (ClE), Crest enamel (CtE) and Aquafresh enamel (AfE). For composite resin specimens, forty five cylindrical-shaped specimens of light-cured Z250 composite were prepared and divided into three groups of control composite (ClC), Crest composite (CtC) and Aquafresh composite (AfC). The control groups were brushed without toothpaste. Crest and Aquafresh group specimens were brushed with Crest and Aquafresh whitening toothpastes, respectively. Vickers microhardness test was performed for all groups. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: Microhardness values of ClE, CtE, AfE, ClC, CtC and AfC groups were 332.99 ± 26.59, 313.99 ± 20.56, 323.57 ± 27.96, 137.1 ± 3.16, 122.95 ± 3.27 and 130.36 ± 4.8, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed no significant differences among three enamel groups but there was significant difference among composite groups (p<0.01). Conclusion: Crest and Aquafresh whitening toothpastes did not affect enamel hardness but reduced the microhardness value of Z-250 composite resin. However, Crest whitening toothpaste decreased the microhardness more than Aquafresh. PMID:21998788

  14. Effect of two in-office whitening agents on the enamel surface in vivo: a morphological and non-contact profilometric study.

    PubMed

    Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo; Nucci, Cesare; Antoniolli, Francesca; Visintini, Erika; Prati, Carlo; Matis, Bruce A; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the morphological effects produced in vivo by two in-office bleaching agents on enamel surface roughness using a noncontact profilometric analysis of epoxy replicas. The null hypothesis tested was that there would be no difference in the micromorphology of the enamel surface during or after bleaching with two different bleaching agents. Eighteen subjects were selected and randomly assigned to two treatment groups (n=9). The tooth whitening materials tested were 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Opalescence Xtra Boost) and 35% carbamide peroxide (CP) (Rembrandt Quik Start). The bleaching agents were applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The treatments were repeated four times at one-week intervals. High precision impressions of the upper right incisor were taken at baseline as the control (CTRL) and after each bleaching treatment (T0: first application, T1: second application at one week, T2: third application at two weeks and T3: fourth application at three weeks). Epoxy resin replicas were poured from impressions, and the surface roughness was analyzed by means of a non-contact profilometer (Talysurf CLI 1000). Epoxy replicas were then observed using SEM. All data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and differences were determined with a t-test. No significant differences in surface roughness were found on enamel replicas using either 38% hydrogen peroxide or 35% carbamide peroxide in vivo. This in vivo study supports the null hypothesis that two in-office bleaching agents, with either a high concentration of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide, do not alter enamel surface roughness, even after multiple applications.

  15. [Effect of a tooth-brushing education program on oral health of preschool children].

    PubMed

    Kang, Bok-Hee; Park, Sun-Nam; Sohng, Kyeong-Yae; Moon, Jung-Soon

    2008-12-01

    To examine the effect of tooth-brushing education on the oral health of preschoolers. A quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent control group was used. Two kindergartens were selected and 39 preschoolers from one kindergarten were assigned to the experimental group with tooth-brushing education and 39 from the other kindergarten to the control group. The tooth-brushing education program included 1 session on oral health education, individual tooth-brushing instruction for 1 week and supervised tooth-brushing after lunch for 4 weeks. Oral health behavior including use of tooth paste, tooth-brushing time and method of tooth-brushing, plague, streptococcus mutans, lactobacillus and dental caries were measured before and after the education. Fisher's exact test, t-test and paired t-test with the Window SAS 9.1 program were used to analyze the data. A significant increase in the use of tooth paste, tooth-brushing time and the practice of correct tooth-brushing and a decrease in plague and development of dental caries were observed in the experimental group. This tooth-brushing education was partially effective in improving oral health of preschoolers.

  16. Can Whitening Strips interfere with the Bond Strength of Composite Resins?

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Reis, Washington Luís Machado dos; Vieira, Mercêdes Aroucha; Nunes, Adriana Gomes; Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bramante, Fausto Silva; Bhandi, Shilpa H; Roma, Regina Vieira de Oliveira; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the bond strength of composite resins on enamel previously treated with whitening strips. A total of 48 bovine incisors were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 12 each): G1 (WSC)- treated with 9.5% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips (3D White Whitestrips® Advanced Vivid/CREST); G2 (WSO)-treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips (3D WhiteTM/Oral B); G3 (WG)-treated with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide gel with fluorine, calcium and potassium nitrate (White Class®/FGM); and G4 (C)-control not subjected to bleaching treatment. The specimens were subjected to bleaching over 2 weeks following the manufacturers' instructions. Following the elaboration of the composite resin test specimens, the samples were stored in artificial saliva and subsequently subjected to the micro-shear test using the universal testing machine (EMIC®). The bond strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's statistical test (5%). Significant differences were observed among the investigated groups (p < 0.05). The G3-WG exhibited greater values compared with the control group and the groups treated with strips, G1-WSC and G2-WSO. Analysis of the bond interface revealed that a large fraction of the failures occurred at the enamel-resin interface. The bond strength decreased following 14 days of treatment with bleaching strips, whereas the whitening gel with 7.5% hydrogen peroxide, calcium and fluorine increased the bond strength.

  17. Effect of extended tooth contact on the modeling of spur gear transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Coy, John J.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Wang, Jifeng

    1993-01-01

    In some gear dynamic models, the effect of tooth flexibility is ignored when the model determines which pairs of teeth are in contact. Deflection of loaded teeth is not introduced until the equations of motion are solved. This means the zone of tooth contact and average tooth meshing stiffness are underestimated and the individual tooth load is overstated, especially for heavily-loaded gears. The static transmission error and dynamic load of heavily-loaded, low-contact-ratio spur gears is compared with this effect both neglected and included. Neglecting the effect yields an underestimate of resonance speeds and an overestimate of the dynamic load.

  18. Effect of fluoxetine on induced tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Franzon Frigotto, Giovana Carla; Miranda de Araujo, Cristiano; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Batista Rodrigues Johann, Aline Cristina; Camargoa, Elisa Souza

    2015-09-01

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant. Its various effects on bone mineral density are well described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluoxetine on induced tooth movement. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: M (n = 24; 0.9% saline solution and induced tooth movement), FM (n = 24; fluoxetine, 10 mg/kg, and induced tooth movement), and F (n = 24; fluoxetine, 10 mg/kg only). After 30 days of daily saline solution or fluoxetine administration, an orthodontic appliance (30 cN) was used to displace the first molar mesially in groups M and FM. The animals were killed 3, 7, and 14 days after placement of the orthodontic appliances. The animals in group F did not receive induced tooth movement but were killed at the same times. We evaluated tooth movement rates, collagen neoformation rates by polarization microscopy, numbers of osteoclast by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and trabecular bone modeling by microcomputed tomography of the femur. The tooth movement rates were similar in groups M and FM at all studied time points (P >0.05). The rate of newly formed collagen had a reverse pattern in groups M and FM, but the difference was not statistically significant (P >0.05). There were significantly more osteoclasts in group FM than in group F on day 3 (P <0.01). The trabecular spacing was significantly larger in group F compared with group M on day 14 (P <0.05). Fluoxetine did not interfere with induced tooth movement or trabecular bone in rats. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Citric acid compounds of tangerines peel extract (Citrus reticulata) as potential materials teeth whitening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratiwi, F.; Tinata, J. K.; Prakasa, A. W.; Istiqomah; Hartini, E.; Isworo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Peel of citrus fruit (Citrus reticulata) has a variety of possible chemical compounds that may serve as a potential whitening teeth. This research is conducted on a laboratory scale; therefore, it needs to be developed on an application scale. A quasi-experimental was employed in this study. Citric acid extraction was carried out on the type of Sweet Orange (Citrus Aurantium L), Tangerine (Citrus Reticulata Blanco or Citrus Nobilis), Pomelo (Citrus Maxima Merr, Citrus grandis Osbeck), and Lemon (Citrus Limon Linn). Citric acid’s ability test as teeth whitener was performed on premolar teeth with concentrations of 2.5%, 5%, and 10%. The experiments were replicated in 3 times, and teeth whiteness level was measured using Shade Guide VITA Classical. The result of this research showed that citric acid in every kind of orange peel with various concentration has different abilities on whitening teeth. The highest colour level obtained from Tangerine peel’s citric acid concentration of 5%. Orange peel extract has the best teeth whitening abilities tested by the method of Gass Chromatography to know the active ingredients.

  20. Inhibitory effect of interferon-γ on experimental tooth movement in mice.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Haruka; Kitaura, Hideki; Yoshimatsu, Masako; Fujimura, Yuji; Morita, Yukiko; Eguchi, Toshiko; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of interferon (IFN)-γ on experimental tooth movement in mice using a murine experimental tooth movement model. An Ni-Ti closed-coil spring was inserted between the upper-anterior alveolar bones and the upper-left first molars in mice. We evaluated the relationship between local Ifn-γ mRNA levels and orthodontic tooth movement. In other experiments, IFN-γ was injected adjacent to each first molar every other day during tooth movement. After 12 days, the amount of tooth movement was measured. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells at the pressure side of each experimental tooth were counted as osteoclasts. Local Ifn-γ mRNA expression increased with orthodontic tooth movement. The number of TRAP-positive cells increased on the pressure side of the first molar. In contrast, the degree of tooth movement and the number of TRAP-positive cells on the pressure side in IFN-γ-injected mice were less than those of control mice. IFN-γ was induced in experimental tooth movement, and could inhibit mechanical force-loaded osteoclastogenesis and tooth movement. These results suggest that IFN-γ might be useful in controlling orthodontic tooth movement because of its inhibitory action on excessive osteoclastogenesis during this movement.

  1. [Determination of eleven fluorescent whitening agents in paper food packaging materials by UPLC-FLD/PDA with series double-detector].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjiao; Wu, Pinggu; Hu, Zhengyan; Wang, Liyuan; Tang, Jun; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    To establish a new qualitative and quantitative ultraperformance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector / photodiode array detector with series double-detector method for the determination of eleven fluorescent whitening agents in paper food packaging materials. The sample was extracted with 40%acetonitrile water solution, separated by Waters ACQUITY UPLC BEH C_(18)column( 1. 7μm, 2. 1 mm × 100 mm) and eluted gradient. The excitation wavelength and emission wavelength of fluorescence detector( FLD) were 350 nm and 430 nm, and the wavelength of photodiode array detector( PDA) was 350 nm. The detectors were used in series to achieve qualitative and quantitative detection. In the substrates of paper cups, paper bowls, paper trays and paper boxes, those eleven fluorescent whitening agents were separated properly. For both detectors, in the linear range of 25- 1000 ng / m L, the correlation coefficient was greater than 0. 99, and the recoveries of spiked recoveries were between 82. 2%- 104. 1% with the RSD less than 10%( n = 6). The detection limits ofthose eleven fluorescent whitening agents were 0. 20- 0. 28 mg / kg for FLD and 1. 4- 2. 5mg / kg for PDA. The eleven fluorescent whitening agents could be separated properly with complete separation, good shapes and high recovery rate. This method is easy to operate also. Thus it's an effective method to detect the fluorescent whitening agents in paper food packaging materials.

  2. Skin whitening and anti-corrugation activities of glycoprotein fractions from liquid extracts of boiled sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Jung; Park, So Yun; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kwon, Eun-Hye; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2016-10-01

    To determine skin whitening and wrinkle improvement efficacy, glycoprotein fractions were extracted from liquid extracts of boiled sea cucumber and their effects on tyrosine and elastase inhibitory activities were assayed. Fractions above and below 50 kDa (>50 kDa and <50 kDa) were extracted via a series of steps involving: boiling, filtering, desalting and freeze drying. Cytotoxicity, skin whitening and wrinkle-removing effects of boiled liquid were determined. Our MTT data showed that neither glycoprotein fraction of boiled liquid induces cellular cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 10 mg/mL treatment of the mouse melanoma cell line, B16F10, with 10 mg/mL >50 kDa enhanced tyrosinase and elastase inhibitory activities by 50.84% and 28.78%, respectively. Correlations of the >50 kDa concentration with tyrosinase inhibitory (R2 = 0.968) and elastase inhibitory (R2 = 0.983) efficacy were significant. >50 kDa glycoprotein fraction isolated from liquid extracts of boiled sea cucumber, which can serve as a functional cosmetic ingredient for whitening and wrinkle improvement of skin. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of different whitening modalities on bovine enamel and dentin.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Annette; Vollmer, Doreen; Foitzik, Magdalena; Attin, Rengin; Attin, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching treatment may be efficient in both enamel and dentin, but it is still unknown how much the subsurface dentin contributes to the color change of teeth. This in vitro study evaluated the whitening effect of different external bleaching agents on enamel-dentin slabs and subsurface dentin. Ninety bovine teeth were distributed among six groups (A, Opalescence 10%; B, Opalescence PF 15%; C, Opalescence Quick; D, Opalescence Extra Boost; E, Rapid White; F, Whitestrips). Two enamel-dentin specimens were prepared from the labial surface of each teeth. In one of the specimens enamel was removed, resulting in a dentin (CD) disc of 1 mm high. The labial and the pulpal sides of the second specimen were ground until the remaining enamel and dentin layers of the enamel-dentin sample (ED) were 1 mm each. Whitening treatment of the ED specimens was performed according to manufacturers' instructions. Pre- and posttreatment Lab values of ED samples were analyzed using CIE-Lab. Baseline Lab values of dentin were analyzed by evaluation of the CD specimen. Finally, enamel of the ED specimens was removed and color change of the exposed dentin (D) was recorded. For all treatment agents significant color changes (DeltaE) were observed for enamel-dentin samples and subsurface dentin specimens compared to controls. In groups A-D DeltaE was significantly higher in dentin than enamel-dentin. Furthermore, L and b values of bleached enamel-dentin and subsurface dentin samples differed significantly from baseline. Treatment with the tested external whitening bleaching agents resulted in color change of both enamel-dentin and subsurface dentin samples. The results indicate that color change of treated teeth might be highly influenced by color change of the subsurface dentin.

  4. Malnutrition Has No Effect on the Timing of Human Tooth Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Fadil; Liversidge, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutrition on the timing of human tooth formation is poorly understood. Delays and advancements in dental maturation have all been reported as well as no effect. We investigated the effect of severe malnutrition on the timing of human tooth formation in a large representative sample of North Sudanese children. The sample (1102 males, 1013 females) consisted of stratified randomly selected healthy individuals in Khartoum, Sudan, aged 2-22 years using a cross-sectional design following the STROBE statement. Nutritional status was defined using WHO criteria of height and weight. Body mass index Z-scores and height for age Z-scores of ≤−2 (cut-off) were used to identify the malnourished group (N = 474) while the normal was defined by Z-scores of ≥0 (N = 799). Clinical and radiographic examination of individuals, with known ages of birth was performed including height and weight measurements. Mandibular left permanent teeth were assessed using eight crown and seven root established tooth formation stages. Mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were calculated for each available tooth stage in each group and compared using a t-test. Results show the mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were not significantly different between groups affected by severe malnutrition and normal children (p>0.05). This remarkable finding was evident across the span of dental development. We demonstrate that there is little measurable effect of sustained malnutrition on the average timing of tooth formation. This noteworthy finding supports the notion that teeth have substantial biological stability and are insulated from extreme nutritional conditions compared to other maturing body systems. PMID:24023614

  5. Effects of Bleaching Agents Combined with Regular and Whitening Toothpastes on Surface Roughness and Mineral Content of Enamel.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mariana Lerner; Cavalli, Vanessa; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Martin, Airton Abrahão; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; do Rego, Marcos Augusto; Cavalcanti, Andréa Nóbrega; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and changes in the composition of enamel submitted to different bleaching protocols and toothbrushing with regular and whitening toothpastes. Bleaching treatment could promote morphological and chemical changes in enamel surface. Enamel blocks were randomized into nine groups (n=10) according to the bleaching treatment (no bleaching, control group; 6% hydrogen peroxide, HP; or 10% carbamide peroxide, CP) and toothpaste used (placebo, PL; regular, R; or whitening dentifrice, W). Bleaching was performed according to manufacturers' instructions and all groups were submitted to 30,000 cycles of simulated toothbrushing with toothpaste (PL, R, or W). Mineral content evaluation and enamel roughness were evaluated initially (T1), after bleaching (T2), and after toothbrushing (T3), using an energy-dispersive micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and profilometry, respectively. Data were statistically analyzed with two way ANOVA, Tukey, and Dunnett tests (5%). Enamel surface roughness was influenced by bleaching and toothbrushing. Surface roughness increased for the groups that brushed with the placebo dentifrice (CP+PL, HP+PL, C+PL) and for the control group that brushed with whitening dentifrice (C+W). Enamel Ca/P ratio decreased after bleaching, but toothbrushing, regardless of the dentifrice used, did not reduce the enamel mineral content. The bleaching treatment resulted in a decrease of enamel mineral content, but the studied dentifrices did not contribute to surface mineral loss.

  6. Alteration of Dentin-Enamel Mechanical Properties Due to Dental Whitening Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Datko, L.; Cupelli, M.; Alapati, S.; Dean, D.; Kennedy, M.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of dentin and enamel affect the reliability and wear properties of a tooth. This study investigated the influence of clinical dental treatments and procedures, such as whitening treatments or etching prior to restorative procedures. Both autoclaved and non-autoclaved teeth were studied in order to allow for both comparison with published values and improved clinical relevance. Nanoindentation analysis with the Oliver-Pharr model provided elastic modulus and hardness across the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ). Large increases were observed in the elastic modulus of enamel in teeth that had been autoclaved (52.0GPa versus 113.4GPa), while smaller increases were observed in the dentin (17.9GPa versus 27.9GPa). Likewise, there was an increase in the hardness of enamel (2.0GPa versus 4.3GPa) and dentin (0.5GPa versus 0.7GPa) with autoclaving. These changes suggested that the range of elastic modulus and hardness values previously reported in literature may be partially due to the sterilization procedures. Treatment of the exterior of non-autoclaved teeth with Crest Whitestrips™, Opalescence™ or UltraEtch™ caused changes in the mechanical properties of both the enamel and dentin. Those treated with Crest Whitestrips™ showed a reduction in the elastic modulus of enamel (55.3GPa to 32.7GPa) and increase in the elastic modulus of dentin (17.2GPa to 24.3GPa). Opalescence™ treatments did not significantly affect the enamel properties, but did result in a decrease in modulus of dentin (18.5GPa to 15.1GPa). Additionally, as expected, UltraEtch™ treatment decreased the modulus and hardness of enamel (48.7GPa to 38.0GPa and 1.9GPa to 1.5GPa, respectively) and dentin (21.4GPa to 15.0GPa and 1.9GPa to 1.5GPa, respectively). Changes in the mechanical properties were linked to altered protein concentration within the tooth, as evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. PMID:20346902

  7. Alteration of dentin-enamel mechanical properties due to dental whitening treatments.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B; Datko, L; Cupelli, M; Alapati, S; Dean, D; Kennedy, M

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of dentin and enamel affect the reliability and wear properties of a tooth. This study investigated the influence of clinical dental treatments and procedures, such as whitening treatments or etching prior to restorative procedures. Both autoclaved and non-autoclaved teeth were studied in order to allow for both comparison with published values and improved clinical relevance. Nanoindentation analysis with the Oliver-Pharr model provided elastic modulus and hardness across the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ). Large increases were observed in the elastic modulus of enamel in teeth that had been autoclaved (52.0 GPa versus 113.4 GPa), while smaller increases were observed in the dentin (17.9 GPa versus 27.9 GPa). Likewise, there was an increase in the hardness of enamel (2.0 GPa versus 4.3 GPa) and dentin (0.5 GPa versus 0.7 GPa) with autoclaving. These changes suggested that the range of elastic modulus and hardness values previously reported in the literature may be partially due to the sterilization procedures. Treatment of the exterior of non-autoclaved teeth with Crest Whitestrips, Opalescence or UltraEtch caused changes in the mechanical properties of both the enamel and dentin. Those treated with Crest Whitestrips showed a reduction in the elastic modulus of enamel (55.3 GPa to 32.7 GPa) and increase in the elastic modulus of dentin (17.2 GPa to 24.3 GPa). Opalescence treatments did not significantly affect the enamel properties, but did result in a decrease in the modulus of dentin (18.5 GPa to 15.1 GPa). Additionally, as expected, UltraEtch treatment decreased the modulus and hardness of enamel (48.7 GPa to 38.0 GPa and 1.9 GPa to 1.5 GPa, respectively) and dentin (21.4 GPa to 15.0 GPa and 1.9 GPa to 1.5 GPa, respectively). Changes in the mechanical properties were linked to altered protein concentration within the tooth, as evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A Simple Recipe for Whitening Old Newspaper Clippings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a method for experimenting with both whitening and deacidifying old newspaper clippings using sodium borohydride bleaching. Clippings are soaked in distilled water then immersed in sodium borohydride for 15-20 minutes. After rinsing with distilled water, the paper is washed with saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. Readers should not begin…

  9. [Study of influence of endoopalescence on the solid tissue by means of raster microscope].

    PubMed

    Kobakhidze, G D; Vadachkoriia, N R

    2006-05-01

    During the process of endowhitening as a result of penetration of peroxide into dentine tubules the adhesion of tooth tissues sharply decreases, it requires the delay of restoration by filling for several days. Surely it is not comfortable for the patient. The best way out is the application of antioxidants after whitening. Under their influence the sedimentary layer on the hard tissues of the teeth neutralizes much quicker. The urgency of this issue is preconditioned by the fact that under the influence of antioxidant the restored adhesiveness enables the immediate restoration of tooth. Our previous experiment is the good proof of that. In the experiment we studied the level of micro leakage and origination of microfissures by effecting with antioxidant, precisely with 10% sodium ascorbate on the hard tissues of tooth after using the whitening agent. As a result of this experiment we have not obtained any microfissure in the teeth covered with antioxidant unlike those teeth where we had not used the antioxidant. According to the reference data it is known that after acide angraving there occurs the removing of adhesive layer from the enamel and dentin of tooth. As a result of this the prisms of enamel and the dentine tubules are widened and this creates condition for the further penetration of the primer of the adhesive system. This process is followed by the origination of transitional i.e. hybrid layer. The latter one is the best link for the adhesive tar and tooth tissues. Modern investigations in the esthetic stomatology prove that the whitening agents produce the peroxide molecules during the process of whitening. These molecules cause the widening of the tooth enamel prisms. We also studied the results of post endo-whitening influence of peroxidation processes on the enamel and dentine of tooth by means of the raster microscope. Studies by electron microscope showed that the antioxidant - 10% sodium ascorbate was characterized by high penetration and was

  10. Whitening and anti-wrinkle activities of ferulic acid isolated from Tetragonia tetragonioides in B16F10 melanoma and CCD-986sk fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin; Cho, Jun-Hyo; Hong, Shin-Hyub; Kim, Dong-Hee; Jung, Hee-Young; Kang, In-Kyu; Cho, Young-Je

    2018-01-01

    Ferulic acid isolated from Tetragonia tetragonioides was tested for its whitening effect on the B16F10 mouse melanoma cell line and its anti-wrinkle activity on the CCD-986sk human dermal fibroblast cell line. Ferulic acid, one of the primary phenolic compounds that can be isolated from T. tetragonioides, has been reported to show potential as a functional food, for its whitening effect and anti-wrinkle activity. To measure its whitening and anti-wrinkle activities, cells were treated with ferulic acid isolated from T. tetragonioides at concentrations between 5 and 20 μM. Ferulic acid showed no cytotoxicity at concentrations up to 20 μM. Ferulic acid inhibited melanin synthesis, tyrosinase expression, and microphthalmia transcription factor expression in B16F10 cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. Ferulic acid induced procollagen synthesis, hyaluronic acid synthesis, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase synthesis, and inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 expression in CCD-986sk cells stimulated with UV-B. On the basis of these results, we conclude that ferulic acid isolated from T. tetragonioides shows potential for use as a functional food, with whitening and anti-wrinkle activities.

  11. Clinical comparison of Colgate Platinum Toothwhitening System and Rembrandt Gel Plus.

    PubMed

    Kowitz, G M; Nathoo, S A; Rustogi, K N; Chmielewski, M B; Liang, L J; Wong, R

    1994-01-01

    A 2-week, three-cell study was conducted to evaluate the tooth-whitening efficacy of the Colgate Platinum Professional Toothwhitening System vs Rembrandt Gel Plus (a regimen of products consisting of a 10% carbamide peroxide gel, a whitening toothpaste, and a mouthrinse), and a placebo paste. Seventy subjects completed this parallel, single-blind, three-compartment, randomized clinical study. The subjects were balanced into two groups based on a minimal shade of A3 on the Vita shade guide and assigned a product. The duration of product usage was 1 hour twice daily for 2 weeks. Change in tooth color was measured by reflectance spectroscopy using a colorimeter. The readings were taken in the L*, a*, b* color space at the initiation, at 1 week, and at 2 weeks of the study. Calculation of color change (delta E) was performed using the color difference equation established by the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage. Visual evaluation of shade changes was performed using the Vita shade guide. Results from this clinical study showed that Colgate Platinum was 77.7% more effective at tooth whitening after 1 week and 41.8% more effective after 2 weeks of treatment vs the Rembrandt regimen. Results showed that the Colgate product is significantly superior vs Rembrandt at increasing tooth whiteness (increase in delta E). Shade guide changes showed an overall improvement of 7.08 Vita tabs for the Colgate product and 5.12 Vita tabs for the Rembrandt regimen.

  12. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    PubMed

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal ® , Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto ® , and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  13. An Innovations-Based Noise Cancelling Technique on Inverse Kepstrum Whitening Filter and Adaptive FIR Filter in Beamforming Structure

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinsoo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an acoustic noise cancelling technique using an inverse kepstrum system as an innovations-based whitening application for an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filter in beamforming structure. The inverse kepstrum method uses an innovations-whitened form from one acoustic path transfer function between a reference microphone sensor and a noise source so that the rear-end reference signal will then be a whitened sequence to a cascaded adaptive FIR filter in the beamforming structure. By using an inverse kepstrum filter as a whitening filter with the use of a delay filter, the cascaded adaptive FIR filter estimates only the numerator of the polynomial part from the ratio of overall combined transfer functions. The test results have shown that the adaptive FIR filter is more effective in beamforming structure than an adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) structure in terms of signal distortion in the desired signal and noise reduction in noise with nonminimum phase components. In addition, the inverse kepstrum method shows almost the same convergence level in estimate of noise statistics with the use of a smaller amount of adaptive FIR filter weights than the kepstrum method, hence it could provide better computational simplicity in processing. Furthermore, the rear-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure has shown less signal distortion in the desired signal than the front-end kepstrum method and the front-end inverse kepstrum method in beamforming structure. PMID:22163987

  14. Application of a zero-latency whitening filter to compact binary coalescence gravitational-wave searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Leo; Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Keppel, Drew; Meacher, Duncan; Messick, Cody

    2018-05-01

    Joint electromagnetic and gravitational-wave (GW) observation is a major goal of both the GW astronomy and electromagnetic astronomy communities for the coming decade. One way to accomplish this goal is to direct follow-up of GW candidates. Prompt electromagnetic emission may fade quickly, therefore it is desirable to have GW detection happen as quickly as possible. A leading source of latency in GW detection is the whitening of the data. We examine the performance of a zero-latency whitening filter in a detection pipeline for compact binary coalescence (CBC) GW signals. We find that the filter reproduces signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sufficiently consistent with the results of the original high-latency and phase-preserving filter for both noise and artificial GW signals (called "injections"). Additionally, we demonstrate that these two whitening filters show excellent agreement in χ2 value, a discriminator for GW signals.

  15. Preventive Use of a Resin-based Desensitizer Containing Glutaraldehyde on Tooth Sensitivity Caused by In-office Bleaching: A Randomized, Single-blind Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Acs; Lima, Snl; Tavarez, RRdJ; Borges, A H; Pinto, Scs; Tonetto, M R; Loguercio, A D; Bandéca, M C

    2018-03-23

    To evaluate the risk and intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching following topical application of a resin-based glutaraldehyde desensitizer. Thirty-three patients were randomly assigned to the experimental (Gluma Desensitizer Liquid, Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) and placebo groups. The placebo or Gluma Desensitizer Liquid was applied for one minute prior to application of an in-office bleaching gel. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (three applications × 15 minutes each) over two sessions, one week apart. The color of the anterior teeth was evaluated before and 21 days after treatment using the VITA Classical shade guide, Bleachedguide 3D, and Easyshade spectrophotometer. TS during and after the bleaching was recorded according to the visual analog (VAS) and numerical rating (NRS) scales. All data were submitted to statistical analysis (α=0.05). There was no significant difference in absolute risk or intensity of TS between the two groups (risk and VAS, p=0.93 and 0.31, respectively; NRS, p≥0.45). At the end of the bleaching protocol, tooth whitening was observed in both groups, as evident from color change in shade guide units (ΔSGU, 4.1-7.1; both guides) and overall color change (ΔE, 7.4-9.3 units); however, there were no significant differences in whitening between the two groups ( p>0.11). Gluma Desensitizer Liquid was not able to reduce the risk or intensity of TS. Bleaching efficacy was not affected by application of the desensitizer.

  16. Pre-operative use of dexamethasone does not reduce incidence or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. A triple-blind, parallel-design, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    da Costa Poubel, Luiz Augusto; de Gouvea, Cresus Vinicius Deppes; Calazans, Fernanda Signorelli; Dip, Etyene Castro; Alves, Wesley Veltri; Marins, Stella Soares; Barcelos, Roberta; Barceleiro, Marcos Oliveira

    2018-04-25

    This study evaluated the effect of the administration of pre-operative dexamethasone on tooth sensitivity stemming from in-office bleaching. A triple-blind, parallel-design, randomized clinical trial was conducted on 70 volunteers who received dexamethasone or placebo capsules. The drugs were administered in a protocol of three daily 8-mg doses of the drug, starting 48 h before the in-office bleaching treatment. Two bleaching sessions with 37.5% hydrogen peroxide gel were performed with a 1-week interval. Tooth sensitivity (TS) was recorded on visual analog scales (VAS) and numeric rating scales (NRS) in different periods up to 48 h after bleaching. The color evaluations were also performed. The absolute risk of TS and its intensity were evaluated by using Fisher's exact test. Comparisons of the TS intensity (NRS and VAS data) were performed by using the Mann-Whitney U test and a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test, respectively. In both groups, a high risk of TS (Dexa 80% x Placebo 94%) was detected. No significant difference was observed in terms of TS intensity. A whitening of approximately 3 shade guide units of the VITA Classical was detected in both groups, which were statistically similar. It was concluded that the administration pre-operatively of dexamethasone, in the proposed protocol, does not reduce the incidence or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. The use of dexamethasone drug before in-office bleaching treatment does not reduce incidence or intensity of tooth sensitivity. NCT02956070.

  17. Tooth-bleaching procedures and their controversial effects: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mohammed Q.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This review article will help clinicians improve their understanding of the history of bleaching procedures, bleaching types, components, mechanisms, and their effects on soft tissue, tooth structures, resin composite, and bonding. Methods The controversial issues about bleaching procedures and their effects are reviewed. Additionally, the consequences of pre- and post-bleaching on the bonding potential of composite resin restorations to tooth structure are discussed. Conclusion The overall goal of the paper is to help reduce risks for patients. PMID:25408594

  18. Effects of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    that claims "wow’’ results and permanent whiteness unaffected by consumption of coffee, tea, or red wine with low to no sensitivity. KOR has also...bleaching to result in greater lightness {delta L *)than Home bleaching, suggesting no overall benefit from either technique. Two recent clinical

  19. Effect of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-12

    that claims “wow” results and permanent whiteness unaffected by consumption of coffee, tea, or red wine with low to no sensitivity. KöR has also...tendency for Combined bleaching to result in greater lightness (delta L*) than Home bleaching, suggesting no overall benefit from either technique

  20. Toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents: efficacy in reducing extrinsic dental staining.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristina Neves Girao Salgado; Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho do; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Franca, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of toothpastes containing abrasive and chemical whitening agents in reducing the extrinsic discoloration of dental enamel. Sixty slabs of dentin from human teeth were sealed so that only the enamel surface was exposed. The enamel surfaces were photographed for initial color assessment. Staining was performed by immersing the dental slabs in 0.2% chlorhexidine solution for 2 minutes and then in black tea for 60 minutes. This process was repeated 15 times. Photographs were taken at the end of the staining process, and the slabs were divided into 5 groups (n = 12), 3 to be brushed with toothpastes containing chemical whitening agents (2 containing phosphate salts and 1 containing phosphate salts plus hydrogen peroxide) and 2 to represent control groups (ordinary/nonwhitening toothpaste and distilled water). The dental slabs were subjected to mechanical toothbrushing with toothpaste slurry or distilled water, according to each group's specifications. After brushing, more photographs were taken for color analysis. The results showed a significant reduction in luminosity after the staining process in addition to an increase in the colors red and yellow (P < 0.001). After brushing, there was a significant increase in luminosity and a reduction in both red and yellow (P < 0.001). However, there was no observed difference between the changes in color values in dental enamel slabs brushed with whitening toothpastes and the changes found in slabs brushed with ordinary toothpaste. The whitening toothpastes did not outperform an ordinary toothpaste in the removal of extrinsic staining.

  1. Zinc-Containing Hydroxyapatite Enhances Cold-Light-Activated Tooth Bleaching Treatment In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinchang

    2017-01-01

    Cold-light bleaching treatment has grown to be a popular tooth whitening procedure in recent years, but its side effect of dental enamel demineralization is a widespread problem. The aim of this study was to synthesize zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite as an effective biomaterial to inhibit demineralization or increase remineralization. We synthesized zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite containing different zinc concentrations and analysed the product using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The biological assessment of Zn-HA was conducted by CCK-8 assay and bacterial inhibition tests. pH cycling was performed to estimate the effect of Zn-HA on the enamel surface after cold-light bleaching treatment. The XRD, FTIR, and EDS results illustrated that zinc ions and hydroxyapatite combined in two forms: (1) Zn2+ absorbed on the surface of HA crystal and (2) Zn2+ incorporated into the lattice of HA. The results indicated that 2% Zn-HA, 4% Zn-HA, and 8% Zn-HA effectively inhibited the growth of bacteria yet showed poor biocompatibility, whereas 1% Zn-HA positively affected osteoblast proliferation. The XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that the use of Zn-HA in pH cycling is obviously beneficial for enamel remineralization. Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite could be a promising biomaterial for use in cold-light bleaching to prevent enamel demineralization. PMID:29159178

  2. Melatonin effects on hard tissues: bone and tooth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Fang; He, Hong-Wen

    2013-05-10

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone rhythmically produced in the pineal gland under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the light/dark cycle. This indole plays an important role in many physiological processes including circadian entrainment, blood pressure regulation, seasonal reproduction, ovarian physiology, immune function, etc. Recently, the investigation and applications of melatonin in the hard tissues bone and tooth have received great attention. Melatonin has been investigated relative to bone remolding, osteoporosis, osseointegration of dental implants and dentine formation. In the present review, we discuss the large body of published evidence and review data of melatonin effects on hard tissues, specifically, bone and tooth.

  3. The Whitening of Brown Fat and Its Implications for Weight Management in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ippei; Walsh, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Systemic inflammation resulting from dysfunction of white adipose tissue (WAT) accelerates the pathologies of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In contrast to WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is abundant in mitochondria that produce heat by uncoupling respiratory chain process of ATP synthesis. Besides BAT's role in thermogenesis, accumulating evidence has shown that it is involved in regulating systemic metabolism. Studies have analyzed the "browning" processes of WAT as a means to combat obesity, whereas few studies have focused on the impact and molecular mechanisms that contribute to obesity-linked BAT dysfunction--a process that is associated with the "whitening" of this tissue. Compared to WAT, a dense vascular network is required to support the high energy consumption of BAT. Recently, vascular rarefaction was shown to be a significant causal factor in the whitening of BAT in mouse models. Vascular insufficiency leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and loss in BAT and contributes to systemic insulin resistance. These data suggest that BAT "whitening," resulting from vascular dysfunction, can impact obesity and obesity-linked diseases. Conversely, agents that promote BAT function could have utility in the treatment of these conditions.

  4. [The effect of osteogenic inducer on healing of tooth extraction sockets].

    PubMed

    Chen, Junliang; Shan, Chuncheng; He, Yun; Xia, Delin

    2012-06-01

    To study the effect of osteogenic inducer (dexamethasone, beta-sodium glycerophosphate and Vitamin C) carried by gelatin sponge on healing and remodeling of tooth extraction sockets. Fifty rabbits were selected. After extracting the first premolars of bilateral maxillary, the right side tooth extraction sockets were filled with gelatin sponge containing osteogenic inducer as experimental side, tooth extraction sockets on left side were filled with gelatin sponge as control. Every ten rabbits were executed at the end of 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks after tooth extraction. Bone density was measured through digital X-ray images. The specimens were examined by histology. The absorption height of alveolar bone at 12 weeks was measured. X-ray measurement showed that the bone density of experimental side was higher than that of control side at 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks, the difference had statistical significance (P<0.01). The histology examination showed that new bone formation in tooth extraction sockets of experimental side was earlier than that in control side. The absorptional height of alveolar bone had significant difference between experimental side and control side (P<0.01), of which experimental side was less. Filling the osteogenic inducer in tooth extraction sockets can promote the healing and new bone formation and prevent from alveolar bone absorption.

  5. Determinants of inhalant (whitener) use among street children in a South Indian city.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Devarsetty; Maulik, Pallab K; Raghavendra, Bellara; Khan, Maseer; Guggilla, Rama K; Bhatia, Prakash

    2012-08-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2008 among 174 children in observation homes in Hyderabad, India, to estimate the distribution of inhalant (whitener) use among this population. Data were collected using an instrument developed for this purpose. About 61% of the children were boys and their mean age was 12.2 years (range 5-18 years). Whitener use was found in 35% of the children along with concurrent use of other substances. Peer pressure was the commonest cause reported for initiating substance use. The high prevalence is an important concern for the Indian policymakers given the large number of street children in Indian cities.

  6. Effects of different types of tooth movement and force magnitudes on the amount of tooth movement and root resorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takako; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Megumi; Sirisoontorn, Irin; Arita, Kotaro; Kurohama, Takeshi; Darendeliler, M Ali; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2014-11-01

    To investigate differences in the amount of tooth movement and root resorption that occurred after tipping and bodily movement of the maxillary first molar in rats. Ten-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into two groups according to type of tooth movement and subdivided into four subgroups according to the magnitude of applied force. Nickel-titanium closed-coil springs exerting forces of 10, 25, 50, or 100 g were applied to the maxillary left first molars to induce mesial tooth movement. We designed a novel orthodontic appliance for bodily tooth movement. Tooth movement distance and root resorption were measured using microcomputed tomography and scanning electron and scanning laser microscopy. The amount of tooth movement in the bodily tooth movement group was less than half that in the tipping tooth movement group. The greatest amount of tooth movement occurred in the 10-g tipping and 50-g bodily tooth movement subgroups, and the amount of tooth movement decreased with the application of an excessive magnitude of force. Conversely, root resorption increased when the heavier orthodontic force was applied in both groups. Root resorption in the tipping tooth movement group was approximately twice that in the bodily tooth movement group. Root resorption in the tipping tooth movement group was more pronounced than that in the bodily tooth movement group. Although the amount of tooth movement decreased when extremely heavy forces were applied, root resorption increased in both the tipping and bodily tooth movement groups in rats.

  7. A Simple Recipe for Whitening Old Newspaper Clippings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Henry A.

    1995-07-01

    Newspaper clippings tend to brown quickly with aging as the result of chromophores that form during the degradation of one or more components of paper. Newsprint that consists of approximately 40% lignin is particularly susceptible to browning due to the relative ease of the oxidation of lignin. For readers who wish to experiment with both whitening and deacidifying old newspaper clippings, a simple recipe requiring few materials is presented.

  8. Effect of piezopuncture on tooth movement and bone remodeling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Seok; Kim, Su-Jung; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Peter Joohak; Moon, Won; Park, Young-Guk

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate whether a newly developed, minimally invasive procedure, piezopuncture, would be a logical modification for accelerating tooth movement in the maxilla and the mandible. Ten beagle dogs were divided into 2 groups. Traditional orthodontic tooth movement was performed in the control group. In the experimental group, a piezotome was used to make cortical punctures penetrating the gingiva around the moving tooth. Measurements were made in weeks 1 through 6. Tooth movement and bone apposition rates from the histomorphometric analyses were evaluated by independent t tests. The cumulative tooth movement distance was greater in the piezopuncture group than in the control group: 3.26-fold in the maxilla and 2.45-fold in the mandible. Piezopuncture significantly accelerated the tooth movements at all observation times, and the acceleration was greatest during the first 2 weeks for the maxilla and the second week for the mandible. Anabolic activity was also increased by piezopuncture: 2.55-fold in the maxilla and 2.35-fold in the mandible. Based on the different effects of piezopuncture on the maxilla and the mandible, the results of a clinical trial of piezopuncture with optimized protocols might give orthodontists a therapeutic benefit for reducing treatment duration. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative determination of a-Arbutin, ß-Arbutin, Kojic acid, nicotinamide, hydroquinone, resorcinol, 4-methoxyphenol, 4-ethoxyphenol and ascorbic acid from skin whitening Products by HPLC-UV

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of an analytical method for the simultaneous determination of multifarious skin whitening agents will provide an efficient tool to analyze skin whitening cosmetics. An HPLC-UV method was developed for quantitative analysis of six commonly used whitening agents, a-arbutin, ß-arbutin, koji...

  10. Bioengineered Tooth Buds Exhibit Features of Natural Tooth Buds.

    PubMed

    Smith, E E; Angstadt, S; Monteiro, N; Zhang, W; Khademhosseini, A; Yelick, P C

    2018-06-01

    Tooth loss is a significant health issue currently affecting millions of people worldwide. Artificial dental implants, the current gold standard tooth replacement therapy, do not exhibit many properties of natural teeth and can be associated with complications leading to implant failure. Here we propose bioengineered tooth buds as a superior alternative tooth replacement therapy. We describe improved methods to create highly cellularized bioengineered tooth bud constructs that formed hallmark features that resemble natural tooth buds such as the dental epithelial stem cell niche, enamel knot signaling centers, transient amplifying cells, and mineralized dental tissue formation. These constructs were composed of postnatal dental cells encapsulated within a hydrogel material that were implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised rats. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the use of postnatal dental cells to create bioengineered tooth buds that exhibit evidence of these features of natural tooth development. We propose future bioengineered tooth buds as a promising, clinically relevant tooth replacement therapy.

  11. Effects of Carbonated Soft Drink Consumption on Orthodontic Tooth Movements in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Hossein Agha; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Yassaei, Soghra; Fatahi meybodi, Seyed Amirreza; Zaeim, Mohammad Hosein Toudeh; Moghadam, Mahdjoubeh Goldani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the possible effects of Carbonated Soft Drink consumption on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. In the experimental groups (A&B), the water in the dietary regimen was replaced with soft drinks (Fanta® in group A and Cola® in group B) two weeks before placement of orthodontic appliances. Then 5-mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were placed between the maxillary right first molars and first incisors under general anesthesia. This regimen continued for two weeks more and animals drank soft drink ad libitum. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were sacrificed, and interproximal tooth movements were measured. Results: The mean amounts of tooth movement were 0.19mm in group A, 0.22mm in group B and 0.37mm in group C. Statistical analysis with analysis of variance (ANOVA) test showed significant differences between all groups. The least movement occurred in group A that had received Fanta® drink. Conclusion: CSDs consumption decreases the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. The role of soft drinks in decreasing tooth movement might be related to its effects on bone metabolism. PMID:24910686

  12. A mimic study on effects of fluoride on tooth enamel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guobin; Wang, Mu; Liu, Xiang Yang

    2010-03-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in human body, and this superior mechanical property is contributed by its unique microstructures, i.e., oriented growth of rod-like apatite crystals into basic structural units called the prisms Fluoride (F^-) has been recognized to have significant effects on the physical and chemical properties of tooth enamel. However, the role of F^- on microstructures of apatite crystals is not well understood yet. Here we report a detailed investigation on the topic. Mimic in vitro growth of tooth enamel structures is performed at the biophysical conditions in simulated body fluids, using belt-like hydroxyapatite crystals as substrates It shows that F^- on the order of 0.1 mM will dramatically change the morphology of the grown crystals from irregular slabs to nano-needles, and the needles are aligned along the substrate with an average misorientation of ˜12 . Branched growth of bundles of nano-needles occurs with further increase of F^-, and finally, growth of highly porous structures as well as microspheres takes place when the F^- concentration exceeds 5 mM. In comparison with real tooth enamel structures, the relationship between enamel microstructures and tooth caries as well as fluorosis is discussed.

  13. Effect of low-frequency mechanical vibration on orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sumit; Dobie, Thomas; Assefnia, Amir; Gupta, Himank; Kalajzic, Zana; Nanda, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of low-frequency mechanical vibration (LFMV) on the rate of tooth movement, bone volume fraction, tissue density, and the integrity of the periodontal ligament. Our null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in the amount of tooth movement between different values of LFMV. Sixty-four male CD1 mice, 12 weeks old, were used for orthodontic tooth movement. The mice were randomly divided into 2 groups: control groups (baseline; no spring + 5 Hz; no spring + 10 Hz; and no spring + 20 Hz) and experimental groups (spring + no vibration; spring + 5 Hz; spring + 10 Hz; and spring + 20 Hz). In the experimental groups, the first molars were moved mesially for 2 weeks using nickel-titanium coil springs delivering 10 g of force. In the control and experimental groups, LFMV was applied at 5, 10, or 20 Hz. Microfocus x-ray computed tomography analysis was used for tooth movement measurements, bone volume fraction, and tissue density. Additionally, immunostaining for sclerostin, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and picrosirius red staining were used on the histologic sections. Simple descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the outcomes across treatment groups. LFMV did not increase the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Microfocus x-ray computed tomography analysis showed increases in bone volume fractions and tissue densities with applications of LFMV. Sclerostin expression was decreased with 10 and 20 Hz vibrations in both the control and experimental groups. Additionally, the picrosirius staining showed that LFMV helped in maintaining the thickness and integrity of collagen fibers in the periodontal ligament. There was no significant increase in tooth movement by applying LFMV when compared with the control groups (spring + no vibration). Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevention of lingual calculus formation with daily use of 6% H2O2/2% pyrophosphate whitening strips.

    PubMed

    Farrell, S; Barker, M L; Gerlach, R W; Putt, M S; Milleman, J L

    2009-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate whether daily use of a hydrogen peroxide/ pyrophosphate-containing antitartar whitening strip might safely yield clinical reductions in post-prophylaxis calculus accumulation. A three-month, randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare calculus accumulation with a daily 6% hydrogen peroxide/pyrophosphate strip versus regular brushing. After an eight-week run-in phase to identify calculus formers, a prophylaxis was administered, and 77 subjects were randomly assigned to daily strip or brushing only groups. All subjects received an anticavity dentifrice (Crest Cavity Protection) and manual brush for use throughout the three-month study; for subjects assigned to the experimental group, strip application was once daily for five minutes on the facial and lingual surfaces of the mandibular teeth. Efficacy was measured as mm calculus (VMI) before prophylaxis and after six and 12 weeks of treatment, while safety was assessed from examination and interview. Subjects ranged in age from 21-87 years, with groups balanced (p > 0.26) on pertinent demographic and behavioral parameters, and pre-prophylaxis calculus baseline mean scores (16.0 mm). At Week 6, calculus accumulation was lower in the strip group, with adjusted mean (SE) lingual VMI of 12.0 (0.87) for the strip group and 17.0 (0.88) for the brushing control. At Week 12, calculus accumulation was lower in the strip group, with adjusted mean (SE) lingual VMI of 14.3 (0.85) for the strip group and 17.2 (0.86) for the brushing control. Treatments differed significantly (p < 0.02) on calculus accumulation at both time points. A total of three subjects (8%) in the strip group and two subjects (5%) in the brushing control had mild oral irritation or tooth sensitivity during treatment; no one discontinued early due to an adverse event. Daily use of hydrogen peroxide whitening strips with pyrophosphate reduced calculus formation by up to 29% versus

  15. Efficacy of cold light bleaching using different bleaching times and their effects on human enamel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Li, Jiajia; Liao, Susan; Ai, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of cold light bleaching using different bleaching times and the effects thereof on tooth enamel. Before and after bleaching, stained tooth specimens were subjected to visual and instrumental colorimetric assessments using Vita Shade Guide and spectrophotometric shade matching. Enamel surface alterations were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze surface morphology, surface microhardness (SMH) measurement to determine changes in mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize post-bleaching enamel composition. Cold light bleaching successfully improved tooth color, with optimal efficacy when bleaching time was beyond 10 min. Significant differences in surface morphology were observed among the different bleaching times, but no significant differences were observed for enamel composition and surface microhardness among the different bleaching times. Results of this study revealed an association between the bleaching time of cold light bleaching and its whitening efficacy. Together with the results on enamel surface changes, this study provided positive evidence to support cold light bleaching as an in-office bleaching treatment.

  16. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear tooth pitting fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4) were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters performed average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant amount of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  17. Effects of Ion-Releasing Tooth-Coating Material on Demineralization of Bovine Tooth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Koji; Kambara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    We compared the effect of a novel ion-releasing tooth-coating material that contained S-PRG (surface-reaction type prereacted glass-ionomer) filler to that of non-S-PRG filler and nail varnish on the demineralization of bovine enamel subsurface lesions. The demineralization process of bovine enamel was examined using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) measurement. Ion concentrations in demineralizing solution were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic (ICP) emission spectrometry and an ion electrode. The nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization. Although the nail varnish group and the non-S-PRG filler group showed linear demineralization, the S-PRG filler group did not. Further, plane-scanning by EPMA analysis in the S-PRG filler group showed no changes in Ca ion distribution, and F ions showed peak levels on the surface of enamel specimens. Most ions in the demineralizing solution were present at higher concentrations in the S-PRG filler group than in the other two groups. In conclusion, only the S-PRG filler-containing tooth-coating material released ions and inhibited demineralization around the coating. PMID:24578706

  18. Effects of random tooth profile errors on the dynamic behaviors of planetary gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Chao; Long, Xinhua; Hua, Hongxing

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear random model is built to describe the dynamics of planetary gear trains (PGTs), in which the time-varying mesh stiffness, tooth profile modification (TPM), tooth contact loss, and random tooth profile error are considered. A stochastic method based on the method of multiple scales (MMS) is extended to analyze the statistical property of the dynamic performance of PGTs. By the proposed multiple-scales based stochastic method, the distributions of the dynamic transmission errors (DTEs) are investigated, and the lower and upper bounds are determined based on the 3σ principle. Monte Carlo method is employed to verify the proposed method. Results indicate that the proposed method can be used to determine the distribution of the DTE of PGTs high efficiently and allow a link between the manufacturing precision and the dynamical response. In addition, the effects of tooth profile modification on the distributions of vibration amplitudes and the probability of tooth contact loss with different manufacturing tooth profile errors are studied. The results show that the manufacturing precision affects the distribution of dynamic transmission errors dramatically and appropriate TPMs are helpful to decrease the nominal value and the deviation of the vibration amplitudes.

  19. The effect of the buccal corridor and tooth display on smile attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Niaki, Esfandiar Akhavan; Arab, Sepideh; Shamshiri, Ahmadreza; Imani, Mohammad Moslem

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the lay perception of the effect of the buccal corridor and amount of tooth-gingival display on the attractiveness of a smile in different facial types. Using Adobe Photoshop CS3 software, frontal facial images of two smiling Iranian female subjects (one short-faced and one long-faced) were altered to create different magnitudes of buccal corridor display (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%) and tooth-gingival display (2 mm central incisor show, 6 mm central incisor show, total central incisor show, total tooth show with 2 mm gingival show and total tooth show with 4 mm gingival show). Sixty Iranians (30 males and 30 females) rated the attractiveness of the pictures on a 1-5 point scale. Narrower smiles were preferred in long-faced subjects compared with short-faced subjects. Minimal tooth show was more attractive than excessive gingival display in short-faced subjects. There were no gender specific, statistically significant differences found in the ratings given by the lay assessors. Harmonious geometry of the smile and face in both the vertical and transverse dimensions influences smile attractiveness and this should be considered in orthodontic treatment planning.

  20. Ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of eleven fluorescent whitening agents in paper materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Chen, Xianbo; Qiu, Bin; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Juan; Luo, Yan; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, 11 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid based fluorescent whitening agents with different numbers of sulfonic acid groups were separated by using an ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The effects of ionic liquid concentration, pH of mobile phase B, and composition of mobile phase A on the separation of fluorescent whitening agents were systematically investigated. The ionic liquid tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate is superior to tetrabutylammomnium bromide for the separation of the fluorescent whitening agents. The optimal separation conditions were an ionic liquid concentration at 8 mM and the pH of mobile phase B at 8.5 with methanol as mobile phase A. The established method exhibited low limits of detection (0.04-0.07 ng/mL) and wide linearity ranges (0.30-20 ng/mL) with high linear correlation coefficients from 0.9994 to 0.9998. The optimized procedure was applied to analyze target analytes in paper samples with satisfactory results. Eleven target analytes were quantified, and the recoveries of spiked paper samples were in the range of 85-105% with the relative standard deviations from 2.1 to 5.1%. The obtained results indicated that the method was efficient for detection of 11 fluorescent whitening agents. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  2. Analysis of the Color and Fluorescence Alterations of Enamel and Dentin Treated With Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Bresciani, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydrogen peroxide whitening on fluorescence and color of bovine enamel and dentin. Twenty five dentin discs and 25 enamel discs, with 6 mm diameter and 1 mm thick, were obtained. Direct fluorescence (spectrofluorophotometry) and color (spectrophotometry) were assessed. After fluorescence and color baseline measurements, specimens were immersed in a 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) solution for 1 h. This procedure was repeated after 7 days. Final fluorescence and color measurements were performed after the second immersion. Chemical characterization of 5 additional specimens was also performed. Data were submitted to repeated analysis of variance and Tukey's test for fluorescence and unpaired t-test for color and chemical components (p<0.05). Fluorescence decreased significantly in dentin specimens after whitening. Enamel presented lower fluorescence than dentin at baseline, but this parameter did not decrease after whitening. Color changes were observed for both substrates, with significantly greater whitening effect in dentin (ΔE=10.37) (p<0.001). Whitening by hydrogen peroxide induced significant decrease in fluorescence of tooth dentin and promoted significant color changes in dentin and enamel with more accentuated outcomes in dentin.

  3. Assessing the effects of tooth loss in adult crania using geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Small, Candice; Brits, Desiré; Hemingway, Jason

    2016-01-01

    With high numbers of unidentified skeletonised remains recovered annually in South Africa and an increased number of edentate individuals being reported, the question arises as to whether tooth loss would result in craniofacial changes which might alter the accuracy of osteological analyses. Forty-five fixed landmarks together with sliding semilandmarks were collected from 229 white South African crania and were used to capture curve data pertaining to the basicranium, alveoli, zygomatic arches, nasal aperture and orbits. Geometric morphometric methods were employed to assess the effects of tooth loss on these structures. Although a number of effects were seen when the skull was analysed in its entirety, only the alveoli proved to be significantly affected when regions were analysed individually. Both upper facial height and palate shape were affected by tooth loss, which may influence various osteometric measurements and qualitative traits that are used during the assessment of ancestry and sex.

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial to Explore the Effect of Experimental Low Abrasivity Dentifrices on Enamel Gloss and Smoothness, and the Build-up of Extrinsic Tooth Stain.

    PubMed

    Milleman, Kimberly R; Milleman, Jeffery L; Young, Sarah; Parkinson, Charles

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate and compare examiner-assessed changes in enamel gloss, extrinsic dental stain, and surface smoothness following one, two, four, and eight weeks of twice-daily use of an experimental low abrasivity desensitizing dentifrice (relative dentin abrasivity [RDA] ~40) containing 5% sodium tripolyphosphate (STP) chemical cleaning agent and 1% aluminum trioxide abrasive. This was compared with an ultra-low abrasivity dentifrice (5% STP only; RDA ~13), a moderate abrasivity fluoride dentifrice (RDA ~80), and a higher abrasivity marketed whitening dentifrice (RDA ~142). This was a single-center, examiner-blind, randomized, controlled, parallel group study in healthy adults stratified by gloss score and age. Following a washout period with a conventional silica abrasive dentifrice, subjects received a dental scale and polish and were randomized to treatment. Subjects brushed their teeth for two minutes, twice daily, with their assigned dentifrice. Enamel gloss was assessed visually by comparing the facial surfaces of the maxillary incisors to the Sturzenberger gloss standards. Extrinsic dental stain was measured on the 12 anterior teeth (facial and lingual) using the Macpherson modification of the Lobene Stain Index (MLSI). Tooth smoothness was assessed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of a silicone impression of the central incisors. Of 120 screened subjects, 95 were randomized to the study. Subjects using the low abrasivity aluminum trioxide/STP dentifrice demonstrated statistically significant (p < 0.05) and increasing improvements in surface gloss over baseline at all time points, with a significant treatment effect compared to all other study dentifrices from Week 2 (p < 0.05). With respect to dental stain, the low abrasivity dentifrice group had the lowest stain score at each post-treatment time point and demonstrated statistically significantly less stain compared to all study dentifrices at Weeks 2 (p < 0.05) and 8 (p < 0.01). For tooth

  5. How to best smash a snail: the effect of tooth shape on crushing load

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, S. B.; Summers, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms that are durophagous, hard prey consumers, have a diversity of tooth forms. To determine why we see this variation, we tested whether some tooth forms break shells better than others. We measured the force needed with three series of aluminium tooth models, which varied in concavity and the morphology of a stress concentrating cusp, to break a shell. We created functionally identical copies of two intertidal snail shells: the thicker shelled Nucella ostrina and the more ornamented Nucella lamellosa using a three-dimensional printer. In this way, we reduced variation in material properties between test shells, allowing us to test only the interaction of the experimental teeth with the two shell morphologies. We found that for all tooth shapes, thicker shells are harder to break than the thinner shells and that increased ornamentation has no discernible effect. Our results show that for both shell morphologies, domed and flat teeth break shells better than cupped teeth, and teeth with tall or skinny cusps break shells best. While our results indicate that there is an ideal tooth form for shell breaking, we do not see this shape in nature. This suggests a probable trade-off between tooth function and the structural integrity of the tooth. PMID:24430124

  6. Effect of Atorvastatin on Orthodontic Tooth Movement in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    MirHashemi, Amir Hossein; Afshari, Maryam; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Sheikhzade, Sedigheh; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Statins are used as cholesterol-lowering drugs by many patients and have been recently shown to affect bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of atorvastatinon on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 samples each. Group A, served as control with no medication while groups B and C received a daily gavage of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as vehicle and atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) as test substance, respectively. In all three groups, 6mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were ligated between the maxillary incisors and first left molars to deliver an initial force of 60g. Tooth movement was measured following sacrifice, 21 days after appliance insertion. Root resorption, PDL width and osteoclast number were histologically evaluated and compared between the groups. Results: The mean amount of tooth movement was 0.62 mm in group A, 0.59 mm in group B and 0.38 mm in group C. OTM reduction following administration of atorvastatin was statistically significant (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the studied histologic variables among the three groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the current study, atorvastatin appears to reduce tooth movement in rats; however its effect on osteoclasts, especially osteoclastic function, requires further investigation. PMID:24910664

  7. Analysis of tooth brushing cycles.

    PubMed

    Tosaka, Yuki; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Murakami, Nozomi; Ishii, Rikako; Saitoh, Issei; Iwase, Yoko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Ohuchi, Akitsugu; Hayasaki, Haruaki

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of an analysis of tooth brushing cycles using a system that measures tooth brushing motion and brushing force with an accelerometer and strain tension gage attached to a toothbrush. Mechanical plaque removal with a manual toothbrush remains the primary method of maintaining good oral hygiene for the majority of the population. Because toothbrush motion has not been fully understood, it should be clarified by analysis of tooth brushing cycles. Twenty healthy female dental hygienists participated in this study. Their tooth brushing motions were measured and analyzed using an American Dental Association-approved manual toothbrush to which a three-dimensional (3-D) accelerometer and strain tension gage were attached. 3-D motion and brushing force on the labial surface of the mandibular right central incisor and the lingual surface of the mandibular left first molar were measured, analyzed, and compared. Multilevel linear model analysis was applied to estimate variables and compare motion and forces related to the two tooth surfaces. The analysis of tooth brushing cycles was feasible, and significant differences were detected for durations and 3-D ranges of toothbrush motion as well as brushing force between the two tooth surfaces. The analysis used in this study demonstrated an ability to detect characteristics of tooth brushing motion, showing tooth brushing motion to change depending on the brushed location. These results also suggest that more detailed instructions might be required according to patient's oral condition.

  8. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Associations between bacteremia from oral sources and distant-site infections: tooth brushing versus single tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Mougeot, Farah K Bahrani; Saunders, Sabrina E; Brennan, Michael T; Lockhart, Peter B

    2015-04-01

    To determine the impact of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) on the incidence of bacteremia caused by oral bacterial species associated with infective endocarditis (IE) and prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) and to compare the incidence of following tooth brushing versus single tooth extraction. Bacterial species in blood following single tooth extraction, with or without AP, and tooth brushing(1) were compared with IE- and PJI-associated bacteria reported in the literature. Of the 98 bacterial species identified in blood following single tooth extraction and tooth brushing, 32(1) and 12 were species were associated with IE and PJI, respectively. AP decreased the frequency of IE- and PJI-causing oral bacterial species in blood; however, single tooth extraction versus brushing resulted in bacteremia with IE- and PJI-causing species with similar frequencies: 65% versus 56% for IE, and 31% versus 28% for PJI. Although AP significantly decreased the incidence of bacteremia, the similarity between the incidence of bacteremia following brushing and extraction undermines AP as an effective strategy for the prevention of these distant-site infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of tooth profile on the noncircular gear tooth contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, A.; Andrei, L.; Cristescu, B.

    2017-02-01

    With noncircular gears, the continuous modification of the tooth meshing, in terms of variation of the tooth profiles and the line of action position and inclination, makes difficult the implementation of a general standard procedure for the analysis of the noncircular gears tooth contact. In this paper, the authors present a graphical approach that enables the tooth contact static pattern to be produced and evaluated in case of a noncircular gear with complex geometry of the pitch curve. The study is virtually developed, in AutoCAD environment, by animating and investigating the gear solid models in mesh. The tooth static contact analysis enables the path of contact area and distribution to be evaluated in correlation with the following variable initial data: gear pitch curve geometry, tooth profile geometry, as a consequence of different generating procedures, and the gear pressure angle. It was found out that the noncircular gear tooth contact could be improved by choosing different procedures for the tooth flank generation in concave and convex zones and by increasing the gear pressure angle.

  11. Effects of tooth profile modification on dynamic responses of a high speed gear-rotor-bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zehua; Tang, Jinyuan; Zhong, Jue; Chen, Siyu; Yan, Haiyan

    2016-08-01

    A finite element node dynamic model of a high speed gear-rotor-bearing system considering the time-varying mesh stiffness, backlash, gyroscopic effect and transmission error excitation is developed. Different tooth profile modifications are introduced into the gear pair and corresponding time-varying mesh stiffness curves are obtained. Effects of the tooth profile modification on mesh stiffness are analyzed, and the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the gear-rotor-bearing transmission system are given. The dynamic responses with respect to a wide input speed region including dynamic factor, vibration amplitude near the bearing and dynamic transmission error are obtained by introducing the time-varying mesh stiffness in different tooth profile modification cases into the gear-rotor-bearing dynamic system. Effects of the tooth profile modification on the dynamic responses are studied in detail. The numerical simulation results show that both the short profile modification and the long profile modification can affect the mutation of the mesh stiffness when the number of engaging tooth pairs changes. A short profile modification with an appropriate modification amount can improve the dynamic property of the system in certain work condition.

  12. [Perivenular whitening in central retinal vein occlusion demonstrated by "en-face" OCT].

    PubMed

    Marc, C; Gire, J; Boulicot, C; Guigou, S

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with a central vein occlusion associated with perivenular whitening. The "en-face" spectral domain OCT precisely demonstrated the ischemic area. This case underscores the utility of the "en-face" mode in the follow-up CRVO. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Effects of toothbrushing with fluoride abrasive and whitening dentifrices on both unbleached and bleached human enamel surface in terms of roughness and hardness: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bolay, Sukran; Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Gurgan, Sevil

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness and hardness of both unbleached and bleached (opalescence; 10% carbamide peroxide) human enamel brushed with water (without dentifrice), fluoride abrasive dentifrice (Colgate Total) and whitening dentifrice (Natural White). Human enamel samples were obtained from third molars and randomly divided into five groups (n = 8): G1 - Control (brushed with water without dentifrice), G2 - Colgate Total (fluoride abrasive dentifrice), G3 - Natural White (whitening dentifrice), G4 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Colgate Total, G5 - Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide) and then brushed with Natural White. Bleaching regimen was applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The brushing process was performed with a modified Nyffenegger's brushing machine. Surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Microhardness testing was performed with a Brinell hardness tester. Results were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, one-way ANOVA analysis and Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks tests. There were significant differences in surface roughness values for all groups, which showed an increase in roughness (p < 0.05). When the bleaching treatment combined with brushing with whitening dentifrice was performed (G5), there was a significant decrease in hardness values (p < 0.05). The other groups (G1, G2, G3, G4) showed no significant hardness differences (p > 0.05). It was concluded that toothbrushing procedures increased the enamel surface roughness, and that bleaching regimen performed with cleaning treatment, through brushing with whitening dentifrice decreased hardness values. When applied together, bleaching and cleaning treatments may alter the enamel surface roughness and hardness values.

  14. Paleobiology: A Tooth for a Tooth.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Zerina

    2017-02-06

    Many vertebrates replace teeth through shedding of the functional tooth. New analyses of a fossil fish demonstrate that shedding involved tooth resorption, a primitive feature in bony fishes, but absent in sharks and their relatives. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Occlusal tooth wear in the general population of Germany: effects of age, sex, and location of teeth.

    PubMed

    Schierz, Oliver; Dommel, Sandra; Hirsch, Christian; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2014-09-01

    Tooth wear is an increasing problem in a society where people are living longer. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age, sex, and location of teeth on the severity of tooth wear and to determine the prevalence of dentin exposure in the general population of Germany. Tooth wear was measured in casts of both jaws of 836 persons with a 6-point (0-5) ordinal rating scale. Linear random-intercept regression models with the covariates of age, sex, jaw, and tooth group (with the participant as a grouping variable) were computed to determine the association of these covariates with tooth wear of a single tooth. The mean tooth wear score across all age groups, both sexes, and all teeth was 2.9 (standard deviation, 0.8), and the prevalence of teeth with exposed dentin was 23.4%. The participants' age was correlated with the mean tooth wear scores (r=0.51). The tooth wear level among women was on average 0.15 units lower than among men, and tooth wear was on average 0.59 units higher for anterior teeth than for posterior teeth. Increased tooth wear in anterior teeth may be due to the initially predominant guidance by anterior teeth, with age-related linear progress in tooth wear. Occlusal tooth wear scores and dentin exposure increase with age. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Electro therapy facial and laser skin whitening: Clients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, D; Manimaran, S; Bhagyalakshmi, K

    2018-01-01

    There are so many beauty salons in Metropolis who provide services to women exclusively [1]. These beauty salons depend mostly on electricity for their services to customers, without it there is no effective means of operation [2]. These beauty salons are definitely leading to women empowerment. The beauty salons are run by the women for women. Since they fall under the category of micro and small enterprises, these salons may avail so many financial and non- financial advantages from the Government of India. They also provide employment opportunities to the women employees. The development of such beauty salons rests on the clients' satisfaction on the provision of their services. Hence it is essential to measure the clients attitude towards the services offered by the beauty salons, especially electro therapy facial, laser skin whitening and laser hair removal treatments, which are coming under micro current treatment as a cosmetic tool.

  17. Effects of tooth scaling reminders for dental outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Chia J; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Yih-Jin; Shen, Hsi-Che; Huang, Shay-Min

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the effect of sending reminders for patients to attend appointments for tooth scaling. A total of 389 outpatients were assigned to three intervention groups (reminders sent by postcard, mobile-phone text message or telephone call) and one control group. Reminders accompanied by short health education messages were sent to patients in each of the intervention groups. The outpatient revisiting behaviour of the patients was monitored. Patients who were reminded to come in for tooth scaling were 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-5.4) to 2.9 (CI 1.1-7.8) times more likely to revisit compared to those who were not reminded. For every one point increase in the patient satisfaction score, patients were 3.8 (CI 1.2-11.6) times more likely to revisit. Patients with a high level of patient satisfaction and who had also received a reminder had the highest return rates (26%). Most patients (89-96%) had good feelings regarding the reminders; 65% of the patients agreed that reminders had enhanced their intention to revisit; 91% of patients hoped to continue to receive reminders concerning broader dental health information. A reminder combined with health education is an effective way of improving preventative dental visiting behaviour.

  18. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  19. Automated acoustic intensity measurements and the effect of gear tooth profile on noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atherton, William J.; Pintz, Adam; Lewicki, David G.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic intensity measurements were made at NASA Lewis Research Center on a spur gear test apparatus. The measurements were obtained with the Robotic Acoustic Intensity Measurement System developed by Cleveland State University. This system provided dense spatial positioning, and was calibrated against a high quality acoustic intensity system. The measured gear noise compared gearsets having two different tooth profiles. The tests evaluated the sound field of the different gears for two speeds and three loads. The experimental results showed that gear tooth profile had a major effect on measured noise. Load and speed were found to have an effect on noise also.

  20. Flexibility effects on tooth contact location in spiral bevel gear transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altidis, P. C.; Savage, M.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical method to predict the shift of the contact ellipse between the meshing teeth in a spiral bevel gear set is presented in this report. The contact ellipse shift of interest is the motion of the nominal tooth contact location on each tooth from the ideal pitch point to the point of contact between the two teeth considering the elastic motions of the gears and their supporting shafts. This is the shift of the pitch point from the ideal, unloaded position on each tooth to the nominal contact location on the tooth when the gears are fully loaded. It is assumed that the major contributors of this motion are the elastic deflections of the gear shafts, the slopes of the shafts under load and the radial deflections of the four gear shaft bearings. The motions of the two pitch point locations on the pinion and the gear tooth surfaces are calculated in a FORTRAN program which also calculates the size and orientation of the Hertzian contact ellipse on the tooth faces. Based on the curvatures of the two spiral bevel gear teeth and the size of the contact ellipse, the program also predicts the basic dynamic capacity of the tooth pair. A complete numerical example is given to illustrate the use of the program.

  1. In vitro Dermal Absorption of Hydroquinone: Protocol Validation and Applicability on Illegal Skin-Whitening Cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Bart; Ates, Gamze; Courselle, Patricia; De Beer, Jacques O; Rogiers, Vera; Hendrickx, Benoit; Deconinck, Eric; De Paepe, Kristien

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, hydroquinone is a forbidden cosmetic ingredient. It is, however, still abundantly used because of its effective skin-whitening properties. The question arises as to whether the quantities of hydroquinone used become systemically available and may cause damage to human health. Dermal absorption studies can provide this information. In the EU, dermal absorption has to be assessed in vitro since the Cosmetic Regulation 1223/2009/EC forbids the use of animals. To obtain human-relevant data, a Franz diffusion cell protocol was validated using human skin. The results obtained were comparable to those from a multicentre validation study. The protocol was applied to hydroquinone and the dermal absorption ranged between 31 and 44%, which is within the range of published in vivo human values. This shows that a well-validated in vitro dermal absorption study using human skin provides relevant human data. The validated protocol was used to determine the dermal absorption of illegal skin-whitening cosmetics containing hydroquinone. All samples gave high dermal absorption values, rendering them all unsafe for human health. These results add to our knowledge of illegal cosmetics on the EU market, namely that they exhibit a negative toxicological profile and are likely to induce health problems. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Functional tooth restoration utilising split germs through re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naomi; Oshima, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Chie; Ogawa, Miho; Nakajima, Kei; Ishida, Kentaro; Moriyama, Keiji; Tsuji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The tooth is an ectodermal organ that arises from a tooth germ under the regulation of reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Tooth morphogenesis occurs in the tooth-forming field as a result of reaction-diffusion waves of specific gene expression patterns. Here, we developed a novel mechanical ligation method for splitting tooth germs to artificially regulate the molecules that control tooth morphology. The split tooth germs successfully developed into multiple correct teeth through the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field, which is regulated by reaction-diffusion waves in response to mechanical force. Furthermore, split teeth erupted into the oral cavity and restored physiological tooth function, including mastication, periodontal ligament function and responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study presents a novel tooth regenerative technology based on split tooth germs and the re-regionalisation of the tooth-forming field by artificial mechanical force. PMID:26673152

  3. Tooth brushing among 11- to 15-year-olds in Denmark: combined effect of social class and migration status.

    PubMed

    Bast, L S; Nordahl, H; Christensen, L B; Holstein, B E

    2015-03-01

    Regular tooth brushing in adolescence predicts stable tooth brushing habits later in life. Differences in tooth brushing habits by ethnic background and socioeconomic position have been suggested. We investigated migration status and social class in relation to infrequent tooth brushing both separately and combined. The study population was 11-15 year-olds chosen from a clustered random sample of schools. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses estimated the separate and combined effects of migration status and social class on less than twice daily tooth brushing. 10,607 respondents: a response rate of 88.3%. Boys of lower social class had higher odds ratio (OR) of infrequent tooth brushing than girls: 1.98 (95% confidence interval 1.62-2.41) vs 1.80 (1.53-2.24). Immigrants and descendants had higher odds compared to adolescents of Danish origin: immigrant boys OR 1.39 (1.05-1.89), girls OR 1.92 (1.47-2.50); descendant boys OR 2.53 (1.97-3.27), girls OR 2.56 (2.02-3.35). Analyses of the combined effect of social class and migration status showed that the social gradient in tooth brushing habits observed among ethnic Danes cannot be found among groups of immigrants and descendants. The study shows that both non-Danish origin and low social class increases the risk of infrequent tooth brushing among school-aged children. The study calls for in depth analyses of the processes which influence young people's tooth brushing habits. Further, there is a need to strengthen the promotion of appropriate tooth brushing habits of minority and low social class youths.

  4. Enhanced effect of fluorescent whitening agent on peroral infection for recombinant baculovirus in the host Bombyx mori L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Shang, Jinyan; Liu, Xunli; Cui, Weizheng; Wu, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Na

    2007-01-01

    The low efficiency of the oral infectivity of recombinant polyhedrin-negative baculovirus is a major bottleneck in the application of the baculovirus expression system in the silkworm (Bombyx mori L). In this study, the effects of a fluorescent whitening agent on improving the oral infection for the recombinant Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus in silkworm larva and their possible mechanism were investigated. The results showed that the peroral infection can be remarkably enhanced by adding VBL into the larval artificial diet. The maximum infection rate reached as high as 90% with the concentration of VBL (1%), which was then considered as optimal. The total protease activity and pH value of the larval intestinal juice were found to be lower when compared to the control, indicating an abnormal physiological change of the larval digestive system by VBL, which, in turn, resulted in improved peroral infection of recombinant virus.

  5. Investigation of water-soluble elastin as a multifunctional cosmetic material: Moisturizing and whitening effects.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Asako; Hikima, Tomohiro; Taniguchi, Suguru; Nose, Takeru; Maeda, Iori

    Elastin and collagen are extracellular matrix proteins that are widely distributed in the body. Although elastin essentially functions as a skin moisturizer, there have been few reports on its other fundamental chemical and biological functions. In this study, we investigated the moisturizing and whitening (tyrosinase inhibition) effects of elastin to examine its usefulness as a cosmetic material. Water-soluble hot alkali pig aorta (HAPA)-elastin was prepared from pig aorta using the hot alkali method. HAPA-elastin showed a widely distributed molecular weight and had a coacervation property that mediated reversible self-assembly of its molecules with increasing temperature. Amino acid analysis of HAPA-elastin showed a high content (81.5%) of hydrophobic amino acids such as Gly, Ala, Val, and Pro. Des (desmosine) and Ide (isodesmosine), which are characteristic amino acids of elastin, accounted for more than 0.4% of the total amino acid content. HAPA-elastin showed a moisture-retaining property. The water content of skin samples treated with and without HAPA-elastin was 77.2% ± 7.8% and 49.4% ± 10.1%, respectively. HAPA-elastin also inhibited tyrosinase activity by 11.3% ± 3.9%. The results obtained indicate that elastin has a useful function as a cosmetic material.

  6. Power and Socioscientific Issues: The Pedagogy of Mire's Critique of Skin Whitening Cosmeceuticals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blades, David

    2012-01-01

    In her article, "The Scientification of Skin Whitening and the Entrepreneurial University- Linked Corporate Scientific Officer," published in this issue, Amina Mire (2012) deconstructs the tacit investments implicit in such discourses of beauty, in particular those linked to cosmetic products that purport to fight the "war on aging" through the…

  7. The Effect of Ovariectomy and Orchiectomy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement and Root Resorption in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Massoud; Ezzati, Baharak; Saedi, Sara; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Root resorption (RR) after orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is known as a multifactorial complication of orthodontic treatments. Hormonal deficiencies and their effect on bone turnover are reported to have influences on the rate of tooth movement and root resorption. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of female and male steroid sex hormones on tooth movement and root resorption. Orthodontic appliances were placed on the right maxillary first molars of 10 ovariectomized female and 10 orchiectomized male Wistar rats as experimental groups and 10 female and 10 male healthy Wistar rats as control groups. NiTi closed-coil springs (9mm, Medium, 011"×.030", Ortho Technology(®); Tampa, Florida) were placed between the right incisors and the first right maxillary molars to induce tipping movement in the first molars with the application of a 60g force. After 21 days, the rats were sacrificed and tooth movement was measured by using a digital caliper (Guanglu, China). Orthodontic induced root resorption (OIRR) was assessed by histomorphometric analysis after hematoxylin and eosin staining of sections of the mesial root. The rate of tooth movement was significantly higher in all female rats, with the root resorption being lower in the experimental group. The rate of tooth movement in experimental male rats was significantly higher than the control group (p= 0.001) and the rate of root resorption was significantly lower in the experimental group (p= 0.001). It seems that alterations in plasma levels of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone hormones can influence the rate of OTM and RR. The acceleration in tooth movement increased OTM and decreased RR.

  8. Effect of a static magnetic field on orthodontic tooth movement in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tengku, B S; Joseph, B K; Harbrow, D; Taverne, A A; Symons, A L

    2000-10-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement may be enhanced by the application of a magnetic field. Bone remodelling necessary for orthodontic tooth movement involves clastic cells, which are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive and which may also be regulated by growth hormone (GH) via its receptor (GHR). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a static magnetic field (SMF) on orthodontic tooth movement in the rat. Thirty-two male Wistar rats, 9 weeks old, were fitted with an orthodontic appliance directing a mesial force of 30 g on the left maxillary first molar. The appliance incorporated a weight (NM) or a magnet (M). The animals were killed at 1, 3, 7, or 14 days post-appliance insertion, and the maxillae processed to paraffin. Sagittal sections of the first molar were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), for TRAP activity or immunohistochemically for GHR. The percentage body weight loss/gain, magnetic flux density, tooth movement, width of the periodontal ligament (PDL), length of root resorption lacunae, and hyalinized zone were measured. TRAP and GHR-positive cells along the alveolar bone, root surface, and in the PDL space were counted. The incorporation of a SMF (100-170 Gauss) into an orthodontic appliance did not enhance tooth movement, nor greatly alter the histological appearance of the PDL during tooth movement. However significantly greater root resorption (P = 0.016), increased width of the PDL (P = 0.017) and greater TRAP activity (P = 0.001) were observed for group M at day 7 on the compression side. At day 14 no differences were observed between the appliance groups.

  9. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  10. Application of tooth brushing behavior to active rest.

    PubMed

    Sadachi, Hidetoshi; Murakami, Yoshinori; Tonomura, Manabu; Yada, Yukihiro; Simoyama, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of tooth brushing with toothpaste as active rest using the flicker value as a physiological parameter and a subjective questionnaire as a psychological parameter. Seventeen healthy, right-handed subjects (12 males and 5 females) aged 22.5 +/- 1.5 yr (mean +/- standard deviation) were randomly divided into tooth brushing with toothpaste (N=9) and non-tooth brushing groups (N=8). The subjects performed a serial calculation task for 20 min using personal computers. Subsequently, the tooth brushing group brushed their teeth, and the flicker value and mood were compared before and after the tooth brushing. The flicker value significantly increased in the tooth brushing group compared with the non-tooth brushing group (p<0.05). Concerning the mood, in the tooth brushing group, the incidence of a "feeling of being refreshed" significantly increased (p<0.05), that of "concentration power" or a "feeling of clear-headedness" tended to increase (p<0.1), and that of "lassitude" or "sleepiness" significantly decreased (p<0.01). Somatosensory stimulation and intraoral tactile stimulation during tooth brushing activated cerebral activity, producing refreshing effects. These results suggest the applicability of tooth brushing to active rest.

  11. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  12. Associations between smoking and tooth loss according to reason for tooth loss

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaodan; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Hovey, Kathleen M.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Chen, Chaoru; Tezal, Mine; Genco, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Smoking is associated with tooth loss. However, smoking's relationship to the specific reason for tooth loss in postmenopausal women is unknown. Methods Postmenopausal women (n = 1,106) who joined a Women's Health Initiative ancillary study (The Buffalo OsteoPerio Study) underwent oral examinations for assessment of the number of missing teeth, as well as the self-reported reasons for tooth loss. The authors obtained information about smoking status via a self-administered questionnaire. The authors calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs) by means of logistic regression to assess smoking's association with overall tooth loss, as well as with tooth loss due to periodontal disease (PD) and with tooth loss due to caries. Results After adjusting for age, education, income, body mass index (BMI), history of diabetes diagnosis, calcium supplement use and dental visit frequency, the authors found that heavy smokers (≥ 26 pack-years) were significantly more likely to report having experienced tooth loss compared with never smokers (OR = 1.82; 95 percent CI, 1.10-3.00). Smoking status, packs smoked per day, years of smoking, pack-years and years since quitting smoking were significantly associated with tooth loss due to PD. For pack-years, the association for heavy smokers compared with that for never smokers was OR = 6.83 (95 percent CI, 3.40-13.72). The study results showed no significant associations between smoking and tooth loss due to caries. Conclusions and Practical Implications Smoking may be a major factor in tooth loss due to PD. However, smoking appears to be a less important factor in tooth loss due to caries. Further study is needed to explore the etiologies by which smoking is associated with different types of tooth loss. Dentists should counsel their patients about the impact of smoking on oral health, including the risk of tooth loss due to PD. PMID:23449901

  13. Insights into an adipocyte whitening program

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G

    2015-01-01

    White adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating systemic metabolism and can remodel rapidly in response to changes in nutrient availability. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the metabolic changes occurring in adipocytes during obesity. Our laboratory recently addressed this issue in a commonly used, high-fat-diet mouse model of obesity. We found remarkable changes in adipocyte metabolism that occur prior to infiltration of macrophages in expanding adipose tissue. Results of metabolomic analyses, adipose tissue respirometry, electron microscopy, and expression analyses of key genes and proteins revealed dysregulation of several metabolic pathways, loss of mitochondrial biogenetic capacity, and apparent activation of mitochondrial autophagy which were followed in time by downregulation of numerous mitochondrial proteins important for maintaining oxidative capacity. These findings demonstrate the presence of an adipocyte whitening program that may be critical for regulating adipose tissue remodeling under conditions of chronic nutrient excess. PMID:26167407

  14. Effect of topical application of dipyrone on dental sensitivity reduction after in-office dental bleaching: A randomized, triple-blind multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Márcia; Chemin, Kaprice; Vaez, Savil Costa; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Rabelo, Jéssica de Freitas; Braga, Stella Sueli Lourenço; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Soares, Carlos José; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-05-01

    Tooth sensitivity commonly occurs during and immediately after dental bleaching. The authors conducted a trial to compare tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching after the use of either a topical dipyrone or placebo gel. A split-mouth, triple-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial was conducted among 120 healthy adults having teeth that were shade A2 or darker. The facial tooth surfaces of the right or left sides of the maxillary arch of each patient were randomly assigned to receive either topical dipyrone or placebo gel before 2 in-office bleaching sessions (35% hydrogen peroxide) separated by 2 weeks. Visual analog and numerical rating scales were used to record tooth sensitivity during and up to 48 hours after bleaching. Tooth color change from baseline to 1 month after bleaching was measured with shade guide and spectrophotometer measures. The primary outcome variable was absolute risk of tooth sensitivity. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to analyze data from all patients who were randomly assigned to receive the dipyrone and placebo gels. No statically significant difference was found in the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity between the dipyrone and placebo gels (83% and 90%, respectively, P = .09; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0). A whitening effect was observed in both groups with no statistically significant difference (P > .05) between them. No adverse effects were observed. Topical use of dipyrone gel before tooth bleaching, at the levels used in this study, did not reduce the risk or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Topical application of dipyrone gel does not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactive effects of periodontitis and orthodontic tooth movement on dental root resorption, tooth movement velocity and alveolar bone loss in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kirschneck, Christian; Fanghänel, Jochen; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Wolf, Michael; Roldán, J Camilo; Proff, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Many adult orthodontic patients suffer from chronic periodontitis with recurrent episodes of active periodontal inflammation. As their number is steadily increasing, orthodontists are more and more frequently challenged by respective treatment considerations. However, little is currently known regarding interactive effects on undesired dental root resorption (DRR), tooth movement velocity, periodontal bone loss and the underlying cellular and tissue reactions. A total of 63 male Fischer344 rats were used in three consecutive experiments employing 21 animals each (A/B/C), randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups (n=7, 1/2/3), respectively: (A) CBCT; (B) histology/serology; (C) RT-qPCR-(1) control; (2) orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) of the first/second upper left molars (NiTi coil spring, 0.25N); (3) OTM with experimentally induced periodontitis (cervical silk ligature). After 14days of OTM, we quantified blood leukocyte level, DRR, osteoclast activity and relative gene expression of inflammatory and osteoclast marker genes within the dental-periodontal tissue as well as tooth movement velocity and periodontal bone loss after 14 and 28 days. The experimentally induced periodontal bone loss was significantly increased by concurrent orthodontic force application. Periodontal inflammation during OTM on the other hand significantly augmented the extent of DRR, relative expression of inflammatory/osteoclast marker genes, blood leukocyte level and periodontal osteoclast activity. In addition, contrary to previous studies, we observed a significant increase in tooth movement velocity. Although accelerated tooth movement would be favourable for orthodontic treatment, our results suggest that orthodontic interventions should only be performed after successful systematic periodontal therapy and paused in case of recurrent active inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of buccal corticotomy on accelerating orthodontic tooth movement of maxillary canine

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbakhshi, Mohammad Reza; Motamedi, Ali Mohammad Kalantar; Feizbakhsh, Masoud; Mogharehabed, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Selective alveolar corticotomy is defined as an intentional injury to cortical bone. This technique is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of buccal corticotomy in accelerating maxillary canine retraction. Materials and Methods: The sample in this clinical trial study consisted of 15 adult female patients with therapeutic need for extraction of maxillary first premolars and maximum canine retraction. By use of split-mouth design, at the time of premolars extraction, buccal corticotomy was performed around the maxillary first premolar, randomly on one side of maxilla, and the other side was reserved as the control side. Canine retraction was performed by use of friction – less mechanic with simple vertical loop. Every 2 weeks, distance between canines and second premolars was measured until complete space closure. The velocity of space closure was calculated to evaluate the effect of this technique in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. The obtained data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test, and the significance was set at 0.05. Results: The rate of canine retraction was significantly higher on the corticotomy side than the control side by an average of 1.8 mm/month versus 1.1 mm/month in the corticotomy side and control side, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Based on result of this study, corticotomy can accelerates the rate of orthodontic tooth movement about two times faster than conventional orthodontics and it is significant in early stages after surgical porsedure. Therefore Buccal corticotomy is a useful adjunct technique for accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. PMID:27605986

  17. Tooth anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... whole tooth. This area is known as the "pulp" of the tooth. The jawbone is attached to ... JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  18. Acoustic tooth cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An acoustic oral hygiene unit is described that uses acoustic energy to oscillate mild abrasive particles in a water suspension which is then directed in a low pressure stream onto the teeth. The oscillating abrasives scrub the teeth clean removing food particles, plaque, calculous, and other foreign material from tooth surfaces, interproximal areas, and tooth-gingiva interface more effectively than any previous technique. The relatively low power output and the basic design makes the invention safe and convenient for everyday use in the home without special training. This invention replaces all former means of home dental prophylaxis, and requires no augmentation to fulfill all requirements for daily oral hygienic care.

  19. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Paulo Maurício Batista; ACOSTA, Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez; JACOBINA, Matheus; PINTO, Luciana de Rezende; PORTO, Vinícius Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. Material and Methods Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5) and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group) and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. Results There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. Conclusions Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ∆E* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye. PMID:22230997

  20. Can dead man tooth do tell tales? Tooth prints in forensic identification.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Vineetha; Murthy, Sarvani; Ashwinirani, S R; Prasad, Kulkarni; Girish, Suragimath; Vinit, Shashikanth Patil

    2017-01-01

    We know that teeth trouble us a lot when we are alive, but they last longer for thousands of years even after we are dead. Teeth being the strongest and resistant structure are the most significant tool in forensic investigations. Patterns of enamel rod end on the tooth surface are known as tooth prints. This study is aimed to know whether these tooth prints can become a forensic tool in personal identification such as finger prints. A study has been targeted toward the same. In the present in-vivo study, acetate peel technique has been used to obtain the replica of enamel rod end patterns. Tooth prints of upper first premolars were recorded from 80 individuals after acid etching using cellulose acetate strips. Then, digital images of the tooth prints obtained at two different intervals were subjected to biometric conversion using Verifinger standard software development kit version 6.5 software followed by the use of Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) software for comparison of the tooth prints. Similarly, each individual's finger prints were also recorded and were subjected to the same software. Further, recordings of AFIS scores obtained from images were statistically analyzed using Cronbach's test. We observed that comparing two tooth prints taken from an individual at two intervals exhibited similarity in many cases, with wavy pattern tooth print being the predominant type. However, the same prints showed dissimilarity when compared with other individuals. We also found that most of the individuals with whorl pattern finger print showed wavy pattern tooth print and few loop type fingerprints showed linear pattern of tooth prints. Further more experiments on both tooth prints and finger prints are required in establishing an individual's identity.

  1. Can dead man tooth do tell tales? Tooth prints in forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Vineetha; Murthy, Sarvani; Ashwinirani, S. R.; Prasad, Kulkarni; Girish, Suragimath; Vinit, Shashikanth Patil

    2017-01-01

    Background: We know that teeth trouble us a lot when we are alive, but they last longer for thousands of years even after we are dead. Teeth being the strongest and resistant structure are the most significant tool in forensic investigations. Patterns of enamel rod end on the tooth surface are known as tooth prints. Aim: This study is aimed to know whether these tooth prints can become a forensic tool in personal identification such as finger prints. A study has been targeted toward the same. Settings and Design: In the present in-vivo study, acetate peel technique has been used to obtain the replica of enamel rod end patterns. Materials and Methods: Tooth prints of upper first premolars were recorded from 80 individuals after acid etching using cellulose acetate strips. Then, digital images of the tooth prints obtained at two different intervals were subjected to biometric conversion using Verifinger standard software development kit version 6.5 software followed by the use of Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) software for comparison of the tooth prints. Similarly, each individual's finger prints were also recorded and were subjected to the same software. Statistical Analysis: Further, recordings of AFIS scores obtained from images were statistically analyzed using Cronbach's test. Results: We observed that comparing two tooth prints taken from an individual at two intervals exhibited similarity in many cases, with wavy pattern tooth print being the predominant type. However, the same prints showed dissimilarity when compared with other individuals. We also found that most of the individuals with whorl pattern finger print showed wavy pattern tooth print and few loop type fingerprints showed linear pattern of tooth prints. Conclusions: Further more experiments on both tooth prints and finger prints are required in establishing an individual's identity. PMID:28584483

  2. Impacted tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tooth that does not break through the gum. ... Teeth start to pass through the gums (emerge) during infancy. This happens again when permanent teeth replace the primary (baby) teeth. If a tooth does not come in, or ...

  3. [The management of 126 cases of posterior cracked crown of tooth and its effective observation].

    PubMed

    Chen, L L

    2000-06-01

    To detect the treatment and effect of posterior cracked tooth. 162 posterior cracked teeth of 158 cases, including enamel fissure and dentin fissure, all there cases undergone the synthetical treatment and follow up in different period, the longest observation period was 2.5 years. The healing and improved rate of 162 cracked teeth 90.74%. Among cases of failure, we have founded 6 cases of acute pulpitis (3.7%), 3 cases of alveodental abscess (1.85%), 2 cases of chronic apical periodontitis (1.24%), 4 cases of tooth fracture (2.4%). Cracked tooth was caused by multiple factors. Early diagnosis, synthetical treatment, and follow up in different period are 3 main factors in treatment.

  4. Power Consumption Optimization in Tooth Gears Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanatnikov, N.; Harlamov, G.; Kanatnikova, P.; Pashmentova, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reviews the issue of optimization of technological process of tooth gears production of the power consumption criteria. The authors dwell on the indices used for cutting process estimation by the consumed energy criteria and their applicability in the analysis of the toothed wheel production process. The inventors proposed a method for optimization of power consumptions based on the spatial modeling of cutting pattern. The article is aimed at solving the problem of effective source management in order to achieve economical and ecological effect during the mechanical processing of toothed gears. The research was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project No. 17-79-10316).

  5. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future. PMID:23345536

  6. Effect of deep pressure input on parasympathetic system in patients with wisdom tooth surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yung; Yang, Hsiang; Meng, Ling-Fu; Chan, Pei-Ying Sarah; Yang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Deep pressure input is used to normalize physiological arousal due to stress. Wisdom tooth surgery is an invasive dental procedure with high stress levels, and an alleviation strategy is rarely applied during extraction. In this study, we investigated the effects of deep pressure input on autonomic responses to wisdom tooth extraction in healthy adults. A randomized, controlled, crossover design was used for dental patients who were allocated to experimental and control groups that received treatment with or without deep pressure input, respectively. Autonomic indicators, namely the heart rate (HR), percentage of low-frequency (LF) HR variability (LF-HRV), percentage of high-frequency (HF) HRV (HF-HRV), and LF/HF HRV ratio (LF/HF-HRV), were assessed at the baseline, during wisdom tooth extraction, and in the posttreatment phase. Wisdom tooth extraction caused significant autonomic parameter changes in both groups; however, differential response patterns were observed between the two groups. In particular, deep pressure input in the experimental group was associated with higher HF-HRV and lower LF/HF-HRV during extraction compared with those in the control group. LF/HF-HRV measurement revealed balanced sympathovagal activation in response to deep pressure application. The results suggest that the application of deep pressure alters the response of HF-HRV and facilitates maintaining sympathovagal balance during wisdom tooth extraction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Effects of Tooth Brushing on Whole Salivary Flow Rate in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, K.; Garrick, R.; Mascarenhas, T.; Jang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives (1) To determine whether manual (MTB), or electric, tooth brushing (ETB) modulates whole salivary flow rate in older adults who are free of systemic disease. (2) To determine the duration of the brushing-related modulation of salivary flow rate. (3) To compare salivary flow rate modulation associated with MTB and ETB. Method Twenty-one adults aged 60 years and older participated in two experimental sessions during which they used a manual, or electric, toothbrush to brush their teeth, tongue, and palate. Whole salivary flow rates were determined using the draining method before, during, and after brushing. Differences in salivary flow rates across time periods, and between conditions, were examined using paired samples t-tests applying a Holm-Bonferroni sequential procedure (pcorr < 0.0045). The relationship between tooth brushing and age with respect to maximum salivary flow rate increase was examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient (p < 0.05). Results/Conclusion Whole salivary flow rates increased during, and for up to 5 minutes following, tooth brushing in adults aged 60 years and older who were free of systemic disease. The salivary effects of MTB and ETB were not significantly different. A moderate, positive correlation was observed between tooth-brushing-related maximum salivary flow rate increase and age. PMID:29682540

  8. The tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth: tooth shape and ontogenetic shift dynamics in the white shark Carcharodon carcharias.

    PubMed

    French, G C A; Stürup, M; Rizzuto, S; van Wyk, J H; Edwards, D; Dolan, R W; Wintner, S P; Towner, A V; Hughes, W O H

    2017-10-01

    Results from this study of the white shark Carcharodon carcharias include measurements obtained using a novel photographic method that reveal significant differences between the sexes in the relationship between tooth cuspidity and shark total length, and a novel ontogenetic change in male tooth shape. Males exhibit broader upper first teeth and increased distal inclination of upper third teeth with increasing length, while females do not present a consistent morphological change. Substantial individual variation, with implications for pace of life syndrome, was present in males and tooth polymorphism was suggested in females. Sexual differences and individual variation may play major roles in ontogenetic changes in tooth morphology in C. carcharias, with potential implications for their foraging biology. Such individual and sexual differences should be included in studies of ontogenetic shift dynamics in other species and systems. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. Influence of five home whitening gels and a remineralizing gel on the enamel and dentin ultrastructure and hardness.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Helena Burlamaqui; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the influence of calcium phosphate enhanced home whitening agents on human enamel and dentin surface microhardness and ultramorphology. Five intact molars crowns were used for ultrastructural analysis and five for microhardness test. Each resulting coronal structure was cut in slices. After measuring baseline Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) of the enamel and dentin, the slices were divided into six experimental groups and one control (n= 5). G1= 15% carbamide peroxide (CP); G2= 16% CP; G3= Ca and PO4 (remineralizing agent); G4= 16% CP with Ca and PO4; G5= 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) with Ca and PO4; G6=7.5% HP with Ca. After each daily session of treatment, specimens were stored in distilled water (37 degrees C) until the next session. Products were applied for 2 weeks, according to manufacturers' instructions. Additional KHN weredetermined. Conventional whitening agents (G1; G2) and the gel with Ca (G6), caused KHN decrease (P< 0.05).The remineralizing and whitening agents with Ca and PO4 (G3; G4; G5) did not change KHN. A change of morphology was observed on enamel and dentin surfaces in G1; G2; G5.

  10. Potential effects of tooth-brushing on human dentin wear following exposure to acidic soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Choi, S; Park, K-H; Cheong, Y; Moon, S W; Park, Y-G; Park, H-K

    2012-08-01

    This study used scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to examine the short-term potential effects of brushing time and the start-time of tooth-brushing after demineralization on primary dentin wear in vitro. Thirty-six noncarious primary central incisors were assigned to 12 experimental groups. Exposure to cola drinks was used to initiate the demineralization process. Three brushing times (5, 15 and 30 s) and four start-times of brushing (0, 30, 60 and 120 min) after an erosive attack were used for the abrasion process. Tooth-brushing the softened dentin surface led to increases in the open tubular fraction and microstructural changes on the dentin surface. Brushing immediately after exposure to cola resulted in the greatest irreversible dentin loss, whereas brushing 60 or 120 min after pretreatment resulted in the least irreversible dentin loss. However, brushing time had no effect on the irreversible loss of dentin wear. Based on these experimental results, tooth-brushing should be performed at least 60 min after consuming a cola drink to achieve the desired tooth cleaning and avoid the introduction of surface lesions on dentin. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health.

  11. Effect of Age on Tooth Shade, Skin Color and Skin-Tooth Color Interrelationship in Saudi Arabian Subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-08-01

    Dental restoration or prosthesis in harmony with adjacent natural teeth color is indispensable part for the successful esthetic outcome. The studies indicate is existence of correlation between teeth and skin color. Teeth and skin color are changed over the aging process. The aim of the study was to explore the role of age on the tooth and skin color parameters, and to investigate the effect of ageing on teeth-skin color correlation. Total of 225 Saudi Arabian ethnic subjects was divided into three groups of 75 each. The groups were divided according to participant's age. The participant's age for Group I, Group II, and Group III was 18-29 years, 30-50 years, and above 50 years, respectively. The tooth color was identified by spectrophotometer in CIE Lab parameters. The skin color was registered with skin surface photography. The data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and correlation tests with SPSS 18 software. The Group I had the highest 'L' value of 80.26, Group III recorded the least value of 76.66. The Group III had highest yellow value 'b' at 22.72, while Group I had 19.19. The skin 'L' value was highest in the young population; the elder population had the increased red value 'a' in comparison to younger subjects. The 'L' tooth color parameter had a strong positive linear correlation with skin color in young and adult subjects. While Group III teeth showed the strong positive correlation with 'b' parameter at malar region. The elder subjects had darker and yellow teeth in comparison with younger subjects. The reddening of the skin was observed as age-related skin color change. The age had a strong influence on the teeth-skin color correlation.

  12. The effects of systemic stress on orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Nouer, Darcy Flávio; Pereira-Neto, Joáo Sarmento; Urtado, Marília Bertoldo; Novaes, Pedro Duarte; de Castro, Margaret; Veiga, Maria Cecília Ferraz Arruda

    2008-11-01

    To determine if systemic stress affects the biological reactions occurring during orthodontic tooth movement. Four groups of male 10 week-old Wistar rats were used. Group A animals (N=10) were restrained for one hour per day for 40 days; Group B animals (N=10) were restrained for one hour per day for three days; Group C (N=10) and Group D (N=8) animals were unrestrained. The upper left first molars in the rats in Groups A (long-term stress), B (short-term stress) and C (control) were moved mesially during the last 14 days of the experiment. The animals in Group D (N=8) were used for body weight and hormonal dosage comparisons only. They were not subjected to any stress and did not have appliances fitted. All animals were killed at 18 weeks of age and blood collected for measurement of plasma corticosterone. Tooth movement was measured with an electronic caliper. The right and left hemi-maxillae of five rats from each group were removed and the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cells, defined as osteoclasts, adjacent to the mesial roots of the upper first molars counted. The contralateral side in each animal served as the control (split-mouth design). Corticosterone levels were significantly higher in the stressed groups (Groups A and B) than in the control group (Group C). Tooth movement was significantly greater in Group A (long-term stress) compared with Group B (short-term stress) and Group C (control), which did not differ from each other. There were significantly more osteoclasts in the long-term stress group than in the short-term stress and control groups. Persistent systemic stress increases bone resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. Systemic stress may affect the rate of tooth movement during orthodontic treatment.

  13. Tooth colour change with Ozicure Oxygen Activator: a comparative in vitro tooth bleaching study.

    PubMed

    Grundlingh, A A; Grossman, E S; Witcomb, M J

    2012-08-01

    This in vitro study compared a new tooth bleaching product, Ozicure Oxygen Activator (O3, RSA) with Opalescence Quick (Ultradent, USA) using a randomised block design to assess tooth colour change. Colour change, stability and relapse in canine, incisor and premolar teeth was assessed following three bleach treatments and subsequent tooth colour assessment. Ninety nine teeth (canines, incisors and premolars), which were caries free, had no surface defects and were within the colour range 1M2 and 5M3 were selected. Teeth were randomly divided into the three experimental groups: Opalescence Quick, Ozicure Oxygen Activator and control. The three experimental groups received three treatments of one hour each over three consecutive days. Tooth colour was assessed using the Vitapan 3D Master Tooth Guide (VITA, Germany). A General Linear Models test for analysis of variance for a fractional design with significance set at P < 0.05 was used to test for significance. Both bleaching methods significantly lightened the teeth (P < 0.0001). Tooth colour change was mainly after the first hour of tooth bleaching. The tooth type was significant in tooth colour change (P = 0.0416). Tooth colour relapse and resistance to colour change were observed. Ozicure Oxygen Activator bleached teeth in a manner and to an extent similar to Opalescence Quick.

  14. A Study for Tooth Bleaching via Carbamide Peroxide-Loaded Hollow Calcium Phosphate Spheres.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tao; Mellgren, Torbjörn; Jefferies, Steven; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-12-26

    The objective of this study was to investigate if a prolonged bleaching effect of carbamide peroxide-loaded hollow calcium phosphate spheres (HCPS) can be achieved. HCPS was synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction method. Carbamide peroxide (CP) was-loaded into HCPS by mixing with distilled water as solvent. We developed two bleaching gels containing CP-loaded HCPS: one gel with low HP concentration as at-home bleaching gel, and one with high HP concentration as in-office gel. Their bleaching effects on stained human permanent posterior teeth were investigated by measuring the color difference before and after bleaching. The effect of gels on rhodamine B degradation was also studied. To investigate the potential effect of remineralization of using HCPS, bleached teeth were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) containing calcium and magnesium ions. Both bleaching gels had a prolonged whitening effect, and showed a strong ability to degrade rhodamine B. After soaking in PBS for 3 days, remineralization was observed at the sites where HCPS attached to the teeth surface. CP-loaded HCPS could prolong the HP release behavior and improve the bleaching effect. HCPS was effective in increasing the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide and improving remineralization after bleaching process.

  15. Effect of corticosteroids on orthodontic tooth movement in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, M; Shafaee, H; Saghravania, N; Peel, S; Giddon, D; Sohrabi, K

    2014-01-01

    While there are a growing number of studies on the effects of medications on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM), only few studies have investigated the role of corticosteroids, despite their widespread use. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of triamcinolone acetonide injection on OTM in a rabbit model. Sixteen one-month old rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: Eight rabbits had triamcinolone acetonide (1 mg/kg/day) administered IM daily for 21 days (test group) while the remaining eight rabbits received no drug (control group). The rabbits in both groups had a tube bonded to the upper central incisors and a stainless steel helical spring was inserted in tube slot to apply 50 cN distal force. After 3 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed and the distance between mesial corners of incisors was measured The incisors are associated tissue was processed for histology and the apical and cervical area of the roots evaluated. An observer who was blind to the study groups evaluated the specimens. All appliance-treated incisors in test and control groups showed evidence of tooth movement. The distance between the incisors was significantly greater in the triamcinolone acetonide treated group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Histological examination revealed an increased number of resorption lacunae and decreased number of cuboidal osteoblastic cells around the apical and cervical area of the Incisor roots in the test compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Treatment with triamcinolone acetonide is associated with increased tooth movement in rabbits via increased resorptive activity in the alveolar bone.

  16. Analysis of the Chemical Modification of Dental Enamel Submitted to 35% Hydrogen Peroxide “In-Office” Whitening, with or without Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fábio Pinheiro; Santos, Estevão Antero; dos Santos, Ramon Silva; dos Anjos, Marcelino José; de Miranda, Mauro Sayão

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in calcium and phosphorus content in dental enamel when subjected to “in-office” whitening for an extended time by using a 35% hydrogen peroxide solution, with and without calcium. Materials and Methods 10 human teeth, from which the roots had been removed, were embedded in epoxy resin, and their surfaces were smoothed. The specimens were divided into two groups; in group 1, a whitening solution without calcium was used, while in group 2, the solution included calcium. Each specimen was evaluated at 6 different points before the bleaching treatment, and these points were reassessed after each session. A total of five sessions were carried out. Concentrations of calcium and phosphorus were measured by using the technique of X-ray fluorescence. Results After performing a statistical analysis, it was found that there was no statistically significant loss of calcium and phosphorus during the whitening treatment, and the groups showed no statistical differences. Conclusion Excessive use of hydrogen peroxide, with or without calcium, causes no loss of calcium and phosphorus. PMID:28932242

  17. Effect of cyclical forces on the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement

    PubMed Central

    Kalajzic, Zana; Peluso, Elizabeth Blake; Utreja, Achint; Dyment, Nathaniel; Nihara, Jun; Xu, Manshan; Chen, Jing; Uribe, Flavio; Wadhwa, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of externally applied cyclical (vibratory) forces on the rate of tooth movement, the structural integrity of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone remodeling. Methods Twenty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were divided into four groups: CTRL (unloaded), VBO (molars receiving a vibratory stimulus only), TMO (molars receiving an orthodontic spring only), and TMO+VB (molars receiving an orthodontic spring and the additional vibratory stimulus). In TMO and TMO+VB groups, the rat first molars were moved mesially for 2 weeks using Nickel-Titanium coil spring delivering 25 g of force. In VBO and TMO+VB groups, cyclical forces at 0.4 N and 30 Hz were applied occlusally twice a week for 10 minutes. Microfocus X-ray computed tomography analysis and tooth movement measurements were performed on the dissected rat maxillae. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and collagen fiber assessment were performed on histological sections. Results Cyclical forces significantly inhibited the amount of tooth movement. Histological analysis showed marked disorganization of the collagen fibril structure of the periodontal ligament during tooth movement. Tooth movement caused a significant increase in osteoclast parameters on the compression side of alveolar bone and a significant decrease in bone volume fraction in the molar region compared to controls. Conclusions Tooth movement was significantly inhibited by application of cyclical forces. PMID:23937517

  18. Effects of loxoprofen on the apical root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taeko; Kaku, Masato; Sumi, Hiromi; Yashima, Yuka; Izumino, Jin; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2018-01-01

    Studies have revealed that severe apical root resorption during tooth movement is caused by the noninfective inflammatory reaction of apical root tissues. We hypothesized that loxoprofen can suppress apical root resorption during tooth movement. Cyclic tensile force (CTF) of 10 kPa was applied to the human pulp cells for 48 hours by the Flexcell Strain Unit. Loxoprofen (10 and 100 μM) was added to the culture cells, and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were examined. To determine the effects of loxoprofen sodium on apical root reabsorption during tooth movement, the upper first molars of 7-week-old rats were subjected to mesial movement by 10g force for 30 days with or without the oral administration of loxoprofen. Gene expression and protein concentration of COX-1, COX-2, IL-1β, TNF-α, RANKL and M-CSF were significantly higher in the CTF group than in the control group. However, these levels were decreased by loxoprofen administration. After orthodontic tooth movement, the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, RANKL and M-CSF decreased in the loxoprofen group than in the control group by immunohistochemical staining. In comparison to control group, less number of odontoclasts and a decrease in the amount of apical root resorption was observed in the loxoprofen group. Many osteoclasts became visible on the pressure side of the alveolar bone in the both groups, and the amount of tooth movement did not show a significant difference. These findings demonstrate that severe apical root resorption may be suppressed by loxoprofen administration, without a disturbance of tooth movement.

  19. Effects of loxoprofen on the apical root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sumi, Hiromi; Yashima, Yuka; Izumino, Jin

    2018-01-01

    Studies have revealed that severe apical root resorption during tooth movement is caused by the noninfective inflammatory reaction of apical root tissues. We hypothesized that loxoprofen can suppress apical root resorption during tooth movement. Cyclic tensile force (CTF) of 10 kPa was applied to the human pulp cells for 48 hours by the Flexcell Strain Unit. Loxoprofen (10 and 100 μM) was added to the culture cells, and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) were examined. To determine the effects of loxoprofen sodium on apical root reabsorption during tooth movement, the upper first molars of 7-week-old rats were subjected to mesial movement by 10g force for 30 days with or without the oral administration of loxoprofen. Gene expression and protein concentration of COX-1, COX-2, IL-1β, TNF-α, RANKL and M-CSF were significantly higher in the CTF group than in the control group. However, these levels were decreased by loxoprofen administration. After orthodontic tooth movement, the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, RANKL and M-CSF decreased in the loxoprofen group than in the control group by immunohistochemical staining. In comparison to control group, less number of odontoclasts and a decrease in the amount of apical root resorption was observed in the loxoprofen group. Many osteoclasts became visible on the pressure side of the alveolar bone in the both groups, and the amount of tooth movement did not show a significant difference. These findings demonstrate that severe apical root resorption may be suppressed by loxoprofen administration, without a disturbance of tooth movement. PMID:29694352

  20. Graph-based normalization and whitening for non-linear data analysis.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we construct a graph-based normalization algorithm for non-linear data analysis. The principle of this algorithm is to get a spherical average neighborhood with unit radius. First we present a class of global dispersion measures used for "global normalization"; we then adapt these measures using a weighted graph to build a local normalization called "graph-based" normalization. Then we give details of the graph-based normalization algorithm and illustrate some results. In the second part we present a graph-based whitening algorithm built by analogy between the "global" and the "local" problem.

  1. The Rachitic Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nociti, Francisco H.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are mineralized organs composed of three unique hard tissues, enamel, dentin, and cementum, and supported by the surrounding alveolar bone. Although odontogenesis differs from osteogenesis in several respects, tooth mineralization is susceptible to similar developmental failures as bone. Here we discuss conditions fitting under the umbrella of rickets, which traditionally referred to skeletal disease associated with vitamin D deficiency but has been more recently expanded to include newly identified factors involved in endocrine regulation of vitamin D, phosphate, and calcium, including phosphate-regulating endopeptidase homolog, X-linked, fibroblast growth factor 23, and dentin matrix protein 1. Systemic mineral metabolism intersects with local regulation of mineralization, and factors including tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase are necessary for proper mineralization, where rickets can result from loss of activity of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase. Individuals suffering from rickets often bear the additional burden of a defective dentition, and transgenic mouse models have aided in understanding the nature and mechanisms involved in tooth defects, which may or may not parallel rachitic bone defects. This report reviews dental effects of the range of rachitic disorders, including discussion of etiologies of hereditary forms of rickets, a survey of resulting bone and tooth mineralization disorders, and a discussion of mechanisms, known and hypothesized, involved in the observed dental pathologies. Descriptions of human pathology are augmented by analysis of transgenic mouse models, and new interpretations are brought to bear on questions of how teeth are affected under conditions of rickets. In short, the rachitic tooth will be revealed. PMID:23939820

  2. Practical whole-tooth restoration utilizing autologous bioengineered tooth germ transplantation in a postnatal canine model

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Mitsuaki; Oshima, Masamitsu; Ogawa, Miho; Sonoyama, Wataru; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Oida, Yasutaka; Shinkawa, Shigehiko; Nakajima, Ryu; Mine, Atsushi; Hayano, Satoru; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Kasugai, Shohei; Yamaguchi, Akira; Tsuji, Takashi; Kuboki, Takuo

    2017-01-01

    Whole-organ regeneration has great potential for the replacement of dysfunctional organs through the reconstruction of a fully functional bioengineered organ using three-dimensional cell manipulation in vitro. Recently, many basic studies of whole-tooth replacement using three-dimensional cell manipulation have been conducted in a mouse model. Further evidence of the practical application to human medicine is required to demonstrate tooth restoration by reconstructing bioengineered tooth germ using a postnatal large-animal model. Herein, we demonstrate functional tooth restoration through the autologous transplantation of bioengineered tooth germ in a postnatal canine model. The bioengineered tooth, which was reconstructed using permanent tooth germ cells, erupted into the jawbone after autologous transplantation and achieved physiological function equivalent to that of a natural tooth. This study represents a substantial advancement in whole-organ replacement therapy through the transplantation of bioengineered organ germ as a practical model for future clinical regenerative medicine. PMID:28300208

  3. [Determination of fluorescent whitening agents in plastic food contact materials by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yanna; Ding, Li; Zhu, Shaohua; Fu, Shanliang; Gong, Qiang; Li, Hui; Wang, Libing

    2013-01-01

    A method for the determination of fluorescent whitening agents in plastic food contact materials by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector was developed. The samples were extracted with trichloromethane by sonication for 30 min at 40 degrees C. The HPLC method was performed on a column of Eclipse XDB-C18 (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) by gradient elution using 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate and acetonitrile as the mobile phases, and detected by the fluorescence detector at an excitation wavelength of 350 nm and an emission wavelength of 430 nm. The experimental results indicated that the four fluorescent whitening agents were separated well. The limits of detection (LOD) (S/N = 3) were 0.3, 0.1, 0.05, 0.14 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQ) (S/N = 10) were 1.0, 0.4, 0.2, 0.5 mg/L for 1,4-bis (4-cyanostyryl) benzene (C. I. 199), 1,4-bis (2-benzoxazolyl) naphthalene (C. I. 367), 4,4'-bis(2-methoxystyryl) biphenyl (C. I. 378) and 2,5-thiophenediylbis (5-tert-butyl-1,3-benzoxazole) (C. I. 184), respectively. Good linearities with correlation coefficients (r2) not less than 0.991 were obtained. The proposed method is simple, accurate, sensitive and can meet the requirements of the routine determination of fluorescent whitening agents in entry-exit products.

  4. Effects of diabetes on tooth movement and root resorption after orthodontic force application in rats.

    PubMed

    Arita, K; Hotokezaka, H; Hashimoto, M; Nakano-Tajima, T; Kurohama, T; Kondo, T; Darendeliler, M A; Yoshida, N

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effects of diabetes on orthodontic tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption in rats. Twenty-three 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into control (n = 7), diabetes (n = 9), and diabetes + insulin (n = 7) groups. Diabetes was induced by administering a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats with a blood glucose level exceeding 250 mg/dl were assigned to the diabetes group. Insulin was administered daily to the diabetes + insulin group. A nickel-titanium closed-coil spring of 10 g was applied for 2 weeks to the maxillary left first molar in all rats to induce mesial tooth movement. Tooth movement was measured using microcomputed tomography images. To determine the quantity of root resorption, the mesial surfaces of the mesial and distal roots of the first molar were analyzed using both scanning electron microscopy and scanning laser microscopy. After 2 weeks, the amount of tooth movement in the diabetic rats was lower than that in the control rats. Root resorption was also significantly lower in the diabetic rats. These responses of the rats caused by diabetes were mostly diminished by insulin administration. Diabetes significantly reduced orthodontic tooth movement and orthodontically induced root resorption in rats. The regulation of blood glucose level through insulin administration largely reduced these abnormal responses to orthodontic force application. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effective teaching of tooth-brushing to preschool children.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Almut; Reschke, Konrad; Rupf, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare artificial tooth-brushing models (TBM) and individual modeling regarding their efficacy in teaching the correct brushing movements to younger preschool children. A total of 141 30- to 50-month-old preschool children who had not been previously instructed on tooth-brushing were enrolled in the present trial. Four different model types/groups were compared: (1) giant TBM; (2) animal TBM puppet; (3) child him/herself in front of the mirror; (4) another person with the child in the mirror. Parameters of imitational learning were investigated by means of single-person monitoring on the basis of a standardized observational method. The subjects were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups, which were comparable regarding gender and age. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. This study demonstrated that behavioral modeling types 3 and 4 were more suitable as a methodological basis than TBM. Correct tooth-brushing position and movement were correlated with the attractiveness of the model and its similarity to the child. It was shown that human models achieved greatest learning success. It is important to find a "helper" and an attractive model person assisting in guiding the brush with a feedback in a mirror.

  6. HPLC-UV Method for the Identification and Screening of Hydroquinone, Ethers of Hydroquinone and Corticosteroids Possibly Used as Skin-Whitening Agents in Illicit Cosmetic Products.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Pascal; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Bancilhon, Marjorie; Lassu, Nelly; Gornes, Hervé; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids, hydroquinone and its ethers are regulated in cosmetics by the Regulation 1223/2009. As corticosteroids are forbidden to be used in cosmetics and cannot be present as contaminants or impurities, an identification of one of these illicit compounds deliberately introduced in these types of cosmetics is enough for market survey control. In order to quickly identify skin-whitening agents present in illegal cosmetics, this article proposes an HPLC-UV method for the identification and screening of hydroquinone, 3 ethers of hydroquinone and 39 corticosteroids that may be found in skin-whitening products. Two elution gradients were developed to separate all compounds. The main solvent gradient (A) allows the separation of 39 compounds among the 43 compounds considered in 50 min. Limits of detection on skin-whitening cosmetics are given. For compounds not separated, a complementary gradient elution (B) using the same solvents is proposed. Between 2004 and 2009, a market survey on "skin-whitening cosmetic" was performed on 150 samples and highlights that more than half of the products tested do not comply with the Cosmetic Regulation 1223/2009 (amending the Council Directive 76/768/EEC). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... More print this article enlarge text Glossary of Dental Terms Oral Health Defined Amalgam silver/mercury alloy ... to fill cavities | More Bleaching cosmetic whitening of teeth using peroxide | More Caries cavities, tooth decay | More ...

  8. The prevalence of tooth discolouration and the self-satisfaction with tooth colour in a Chinese urban population.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Zhou, X D; Zhu, W C; Zhang, B; Li, J Y; Xu, X

    2007-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth discolouration, self-satisfaction with tooth colour, and correlation with socio-demographic-behavioural factors in adults and teenagers in Chengdu, China. A cross-sectional survey. 405 Chinese urban adults and teenagers from a multistage random probability sample. Tooth colour was measured on the maxillary central incisors using a colorimeter. Tooth discolouration was determined according to the discolouration level figure and evaluation criteria. Self-satisfaction with tooth colour was assessed on a five-point qualitative scale. Data were coded and analyzed using SPSS software. The mean values for L*, a* and b* were 70.67 (s.d. 1.91), 4.29 (s.d. 2.05) and 17.51 (s.d. 4.13), respectively. Age and sex were the most important factors associated with tooth colour (P < 0.05). About half of the study population (48.9%) suffered from some tooth discolouration, and 52.6% were dissatisfied with their tooth colour. Education and smoking were significant factors affecting self-satisfaction with tooth colour (P < 0.05). Tooth discolouration is common among the Chinese, and many Chinese are dissatisfied with their tooth colour. Self-satisfaction with tooth colour decreased with increasing severity of discolouration. Further research is needed to determine types of tooth discolouration among broader regions in China.

  9. Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Gareth J.; Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Streelman, J. Todd

    2013-01-01

    In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry. PMID:23422830

  10. [Tooth decay and its complication prognosis in smokers].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, L Iu; Osipova, M V

    2014-01-01

    The study focuses on complicated and non-complicated tooth decay course and prognosis in smokers. Oral status, prevention and treatment effectiveness was assessed in 330 non-smokers and 345 smoking patients. The results allowed concluding with guidelines for tooth decay prevention and treatment in smokers.

  11. Cultural Resources Survey of Five Mississippi River Revetment Items.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    children’s shoes. 551.42 Lot No. Fourteen, Notions: pens, needles, thimbles, suspenders, handkerchiefs, trimmings, lace, gloves, tooth -brushes, fans, match...to produce a green opaque glaze. Usually, tin glazed, or tin enameled , earthenwares received hand painted decoration; this class of decoration is a...creamware gives a yellowish appearance, cobalt has the effect of whitening pearlware. Like creamware, pearlware was popular through the 163 a 7

  12. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... appear as spots or lines in the tooth enamel. Enamel is the hard outer layer of the tooth. ... Infections Inherited diseases may affect the thickness of enamel or the calcium or protein content of the ...

  13. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  14. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  15. Effect of light irradiation on tooth whitening: enamel microhardness and color change.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Francci, Carlos; Medeiros, Igor Studart; De Godoy Froes Salgado, Nívea Regina; Riehl, Heraldo; Marasca, José Milton; Muench, Antônio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of light exposure associated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office, SDI, Melbourne, Vic., Australia) or 15% hydrogen peroxide (BriteSmile, Discus, Culver City, CA, USA) on the microhardness and color changes of bovine enamel. Experimental groups were Britesmile + Light (BL) (15% hydrogen peroxide + plasm arc; 4 x 20 minutes), Britesmile + No Light (BN) (BL, no light), Pola office + Light (PL) (35% hydrogen peroxide + LED; 4 x 8 minutes), and Pola office + No light (PN) (PL, no light). Color changes (DeltaE) and the CIELAB (Commission Internationale de l' Eclairage, L* a* b* color system) parameters (L*, a*, and b*) were assessed with a spectrophotometer before (B), immediately (A), 1 day and 7 days after bleaching. The microhardness was measured before (B) and after (A), the obtained data were submitted to a two-way analysis of variance, and DeltaE were submitted to t-test for each period. Only Pola Office, in which the peroxide is associated with the light, improved DeltaE when evaluated immediately after bleaching (p < 0.001). Light exposure did not influence DeltaE after 1 day or 7 days for either bleaching system. The enamel microhardness was not altered after bleaching for BriteSmile. However, enamel microhardness was reduced after bleaching for Pola Office, 283 MPa (+/-21) and 265 MPa (+/-27), respectively. It was concluded that these two bleaching systems were efficient regardless of the light systems used. However, the 35% hydrogen peroxide altered the enamel microhardness. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Enamel microhardness was affected by a 35% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching therapy. Moreover, the in-office bleaching outcome was not improved by using the light associated with systems tested in this study. (J Esthet Restor Dent 21:387-396, 2009).

  16. Effects of calcitonin on orthodontic tooth movement and associated root resorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Lin, Suai; Yan, Weijun; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Our main aim was to evaluate the effects of calcitonin (CT) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) and orthodontic root resorption in a rat model. Eighty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups. Rats in the negative control group were not given any appliances or injections. All the remaining rats were used to establish a model of OTM. The positive control group were then injected with normal saline, while rats in the three experimental groups were injected with 0.2 IU, 1 IU or 5 IU/kg/day CT. Nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were used to deliver an initial 50 g mesial force to the left maxillary first molar for 14 days in rats in the positive control group and the experimental groups. Each group was randomly subdivided into two groups, one for analysis of tooth movement, tissue changes and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone, the other to examine root resorption by scanning electron microscopy. The OTM distance, the number of force-induced osteoclasts and root resorption areas were significantly decreased in CT-injected rats in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of CT reduces the root resorption area and may therefore be effective as a novel adjunctive orthodontic approach to diminish undesired tooth movement via enhancing anchorage or preventing relapse after OTM.

  17. Effects of IL6 C-634G polymorphism on tooth loss and their interaction with smoking habits.

    PubMed

    Suma, S; Naito, M; Wakai, K; Sasakabe, T; Hattori, Y; Okada, R; Kawai, S; Hishida, A; Morita, E; Nakagawa, H; Tamura, T; Hamajima, N

    2015-09-01

    To examine the association between an IL6 (Interleukin-6) polymorphism (C-634G or rs1800796) and tooth loss, and an interaction between the polymorphism and smoking habits for the loss. Our subjects were 4917 check-up examinees ages 35-69. They reported tooth loss and lifestyle in a questionnaire. We regressed the number of teeth on the IL6 genotype, gender, age, smoking, drinking, diabetes, hypertension, physical activity, energy intake, education, and brushing. We further estimated multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for having <20 teeth. Participants with a GG genotype tended to have less teeth than those with CC; β = -0.798 (95% confidence interval [CI] = -1.501--0.096). Subjects with a GG genotype were more likely to have <20 teeth than those with CC; OR was 1.56 (95% CI = 1.08-2.25). Association between current smoking and tooth loss was stronger among those with GG than among those with CC. In a multiple regression analysis, a significant interaction was found between GG genotype and current smoking in the prediction of tooth loss (P = 0.018). The IL6 C-634G polymorphism was significantly associated with tooth loss. Our results suggest greater effects of smoking on tooth loss in GG genotype individuals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effect of hybrid layer on stress distribution in a premolar tooth restored with composite or ceramic inlay: an FEM study.

    PubMed

    Belli, Sema; Eskitaşcioglu, Gürcan; Eraslan, Oguz; Senawongse, Pisol; Tagami, Junji

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this finite elemental stress analysis study was to evaluate the effect of hybrid layer on distribution and amount of stress formed under occlusal loading in a premolar tooth restored with composite or ceramic inlay. The mandibular premolar tooth was selected as the model based on the anatomical measurements suggested by Wheeler. The analysis is performed by using a Pentium II IBM compatible computer with the SAP 2000 structural analysis program. Four different mathematical models including the following structures were evaluated: 1) composite inlay, adhesive resin, and tooth structure; 2) composite inlay, adhesive resin, hybrid layer, and tooth structure; 3) ceramic inlay, adhesive resin, and tooth structure; 4) ceramic inlay, adhesive resin, hybrid layer, and tooth structure. Loading was applied from the occlusal surface of the restoration, and shear stresses under loading were evaluated. The findings were drawn by the Saplot program, and the results were analyzed by graphical comparison method. The output indicated that the hybrid layer acts as a stress absorber in models 2 and 4. The hybrid layer has also changed mathematical values of stress on cavity floors in both restoration types. Ceramic inlay collected the stress inside the body of the material, but the composite inlay directly transferred the stress through dental tissues. As a result, it was concluded that the hybrid layer has an effect on stress distribution under loading in a premolar tooth model restored with composite or ceramic inlay. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Molecularly imprinted covalent organic polymers for the selective extraction of benzoxazole fluorescent whitening agents from food samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Wang, Rongyu; Wang, Xiao; Ji, Wenhua

    2018-06-21

    Molecularly imprinted covalent organic polymers were constructed by an imine-linking reaction between 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and 2,6-diaminopyridine and used for the selective solid-phase extraction of benzoxazole fluorescent whitening agents from food samples. Binding experiments showed that imprinting sites on molecularly imprinted polymers had higher selectivity for targets compared with those of the corresponding non-imprinted polymers. Parameters affecting the solid-phase extraction procedure were examined. Under optimal conditions, actual samples were treated and the eluent was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection. The results showed that the established method owned the wide linearity, satisfactory detection limits and quantification limits, and acceptable recoveries. Thus, this developed method possesses the practical potential to the selectively determine benzoxazole fluorescent whitening agents in complex food samples. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching--an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats.

    PubMed

    Paula, Anabela Baptista; Dias, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Manuel Marques; Carrilho, Teresa; Marto, Carlos Miguel; Casalta, João; Cabrita, António Silvério; Carrilho, Eunice

    2015-10-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.

  1. Tooth-meshing-harmonic static-transmission-error amplitudes of helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, William D.

    2018-01-01

    The static transmission errors of meshing gear pairs arise from deviations of loaded tooth working surfaces from equispaced perfect involute surfaces. Such deviations consist of tooth-pair elastic deformations and geometric deviations (modifications) of tooth working surfaces. To a very good approximation, the static-transmission-error tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes of helical gears are herein expressed by superposition of Fourier transforms of the quantities: (1) the combination of tooth-pair elastic deformations and geometric tooth-pair modifications and (2) fractional mesh-stiffness fluctuations, each quantity (1) and (2) expressed as a function of involute "roll distance." Normalization of the total roll-distance single-tooth contact span to unity allows tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes to be computed for different shapes of the above-described quantities (1) and (2). Tooth-meshing harmonics p = 1, 2, … are shown to occur at Fourier-transform harmonic values of Qp, p = 1, 2, …, where Q is the actual (total) contact ratio, thereby verifying its importance in minimizing transmission-error tooth-meshing-harmonic amplitudes. Two individual shapes and two series of shapes of the quantities (1) and (2) are chosen to illustrate a wide variety of shapes. In most cases representative of helical gears, tooth-meshing-harmonic values p = 1, 2, … are shown to occur in Fourier-transform harmonic regions governed by discontinuities arising from tooth-pair-contact initiation and termination, thereby showing the importance of minimizing such discontinuities. Plots and analytical expressions for all such Fourier transforms are presented, thereby illustrating the effects of various types of tooth-working-surface modifications and tooth-pair stiffnesses on transmission-error generation.

  2. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    PubMed Central

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  3. Molecular Genetics of Supernumerary Tooth Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiu-Ping; Fan, Jiabing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, relatively little is known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. A small number of supernumerary teeth may be a common developmental dental anomaly, while multiple supernumerary teeth usually have a genetic component and they are sometimes thought to represent a partial third dentition in humans. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition, with very few mouse models exhibiting supernumerary teeth similar to those in humans. Inactivation of Apc or forced activation of Wnt/β(catenin signalling results in multiple supernumerary tooth formation in both humans and in mice, but the key genes in these pathways are not very clear. Analysis of other model systems with continuous tooth replacement or secondary tooth formation, such as fish, snake, lizard, and ferret, is providing insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying succesional tooth development, and will assist in the studies on supernumerary tooth formation in humans. This information, together with the advances in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, will pave ways for the tooth regeneration and tooth bioengineering. PMID:21309064

  4. Promoting positive health behaviours--'tooth worm' phenomenon and its implications.

    PubMed

    Gao, X L; Hsu, C Y S; Xu, Y C; Loh, T; Koh, D; Hwarng, H B

    2012-03-01

    'Tooth worm' is a traditional belief about the pathogen of dental caries (tooth decay). Nevertheless, in our previous study, parental 'tooth worm' belief was linked to a reduced caries risk of their children. This study aimed to further characterize the impact of parental 'tooth worm' belief on their children's caries experience and its psychobehavioural mechanisms. analytic observational study. Thirteen randomly selected kindergartens in Singapore. 1,782 preschoolers aged 3-6 years. Each child received an oral examination and microbiological tests. Parents completed a self-administered questionnaire on their socio-demographic background, oral health knowledge/attitude and child's oral health habits. Multivariate analysis confirmed a reduced chance of 'high caries rate' (number of affected teeth > 2) among children whose parents held the 'tooth worm' belief (Odds Ratio = 0.41; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.19-0.89). With such perception among parents, children brushed their teeth more frequently (p = 0.042). Since no difference in oral hygiene was observed, the health benefit of the "tooth worm" perception may be acquired through the delivery of fluoride (an agent with proven anti-caries effect) during frequent toothbrushing episodes. This study revealed a 'tooth worm' phenomenon, indicating that parental 'tooth worm' belief is associated with early establishment of regular toothbrushing habit and reduction of dental caries in children. This phenomenon and its psychobehavioural mechanisms, enriching our understanding of oral health behaviours, have implications for effective health education.

  5. Biological Effects of Orthodontic Tooth Movement Into the Grafted Alveolar Cleft.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Li, Renmei; Chen, Zhengxi; Huang, Yuanliang; Chen, Zhenqi

    2018-03-01

    Functional stimulus during orthodontic tooth movement into the grafted bone can lead to better alveolar bone grafting outcomes. The aim of this study was to analyze the biological effects of orthodontic tooth movement into the grafted alveolar cleft area with histologic staining, fluorescence staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An animal model of orthodontic tooth movement into the grafted alveolar cleft area was established in 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were divided into the experimental group and the control group. Four checkpoints were observed: before orthodontic stimuli, day 1 after orthodontic stimuli, day 3 after orthodontic stimuli, and day 5 after orthodontic stimuli. The cleft bone formation conditions, including the collagen fibers and the activities of the osteoclasts and osteoblasts, were evaluated by histologic staining. The expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), receptor activator nuclear factor κB ligand, and Runt-related transcription factor 2 was detected by real-time PCR in both groups. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that the remodeling process of iliac autografts was completed when the orthodontic stress was applied, whereas the bone tissues first showed osteoclastogenesis and then osteogenesis. On the basis of TRAP staining, the osteoclasts increased to the maximal amount on day 3 and decreased thereafter. Evidence from tetracycline fluorescence staining indicated that no obvious changes in osteoblast activity were detected at the early stage; however, it gradually increased, especially in the region close to the root surface. According to real-time PCR, the expression of TRAP increased in both the early and middle stages, that of receptor activator nuclear factor κB ligand increased in the early stage, and that of Runt-related transcription factor 2 increased in the late stage. Moreover, the results showed significant differences between the experimental and control groups

  6. The Effects of Inflammatory Tooth Pain on Anxiety in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Maryam; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Amirkhosravi, Ladan; Raoof, Ramin; Esmaeili Mahani, Saeed; Ramazani, Mohsen; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to examine the effects of induced inflammatory tooth pain on anxiety level in adult male rats. Methods: The mandibular incisors of 56 adult male rats were cut off and prefabricated crowns were fixed on the teeth. Formalin and capsaicin were injected intradentally to induce inflammatory tooth pain. Diazepam treated group received diazepam 30 minutes before intradental injection. The anxiety-related behavior was evaluated with elevated plus maze test. Results: Intradental application of chemical noxious stimuli, capsaicin and formalin, significantly affected nociceptive behaviors (P<0.001). Capsaicin (P<0.001) and formalin (P<0.01) significantly increased the anxiety levels in rats by decrease in the duration of time spent in open arm and increase in the duration of time spent in closed arm. Rats that received capsaicin made fewer open arm entries compared to the control animals (P<0.05). Capsaicin (P<0.001) and formalin (P<0.01) treated rats showed more stretch attend postures compared to the control and sham operated animals. In diazepampretreated rats, capsaicin induced algesic effect was prevented (P<0.001). Conclusion: Inflammatory pulpal pain has anxiogenic effect on rats, whereas diazepam premedication showed both anxiolytic and pain reducing effects. PMID:27563419

  7. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The clinical anticalculus efficacy of a tartar control whitening dentifrice for the prevention of supragingival calculus in a three-month study.

    PubMed

    Sowinski, J; Petrone, D M; Battista, G; Petrone, M E; Crawford, R; Patel, S; DeVizio, W; Chaknis, P; Volpe, A R; Proskin, H M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this double-blind clinical study was to compare the effect of a new dentifrice (Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening Fluoride Toothpaste) for the prevention of supragingival calculus, with that of a commercially available calculus-inhibiting dentifrice (Crest Tartar Control Toothpaste). The study involved adult male and female subjects who had pre-qualified for participation by developing sufficient supragingival calculus (greater than 7.0 on the Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index) during an eight-week screening period. Subjects received a full oral prophylaxis, and were stratified into two treatment groups balanced for age, sex and qualifying calculus score. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth twice daily (morning and evening) for one minute with their assigned dentifrice using a soft-bristled toothbrush. Examinations for dental calculus were performed after twelve weeks' use of the study dentifrices, using the Volpe-Manhold Calculus Index, Fifty-eight (58) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the entire study. The Colgate Tartar Control Plus Whitening group exhibited a statistically significant (p < 0.001) 34.6% reduction in mean calculus score compared to the Crest Tartar Control group.

  9. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Variants for Tooth Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Dinckan, N; Du, R; Petty, L E; Coban-Akdemir, Z; Jhangiani, S N; Paine, I; Baugh, E H; Erdem, A P; Kayserili, H; Doddapaneni, H; Hu, J; Muzny, D M; Boerwinkle, E; Gibbs, R A; Lupski, J R; Uyguner, Z O; Below, J E; Letra, A

    2018-01-01

    Tooth agenesis is a common craniofacial abnormality in humans and represents failure to develop 1 or more permanent teeth. Tooth agenesis is complex, and variations in about a dozen genes have been reported as contributing to the etiology. Here, we combined whole-exome sequencing, array-based genotyping, and linkage analysis to identify putative pathogenic variants in candidate disease genes for tooth agenesis in 10 multiplex Turkish families. Novel homozygous and heterozygous variants in LRP6, DKK1, LAMA3, and COL17A1 genes, as well as known variants in WNT10A, were identified as likely pathogenic in isolated tooth agenesis. Novel variants in KREMEN1 were identified as likely pathogenic in 2 families with suspected syndromic tooth agenesis. Variants in more than 1 gene were identified segregating with tooth agenesis in 2 families, suggesting oligogenic inheritance. Structural modeling of missense variants suggests deleterious effects to the encoded proteins. Functional analysis of an indel variant (c.3607+3_6del) in LRP6 suggested that the predicted resulting mRNA is subject to nonsense-mediated decay. Our results support a major role for WNT pathways genes in the etiology of tooth agenesis while revealing new candidate genes. Moreover, oligogenic cosegregation was suggestive for complex inheritance and potentially complex gene product interactions during development, contributing to improved understanding of the genetic etiology of familial tooth agenesis.

  10. Raman spectroscopy analysis of dental enamel treated with whitening product - Influence of saliva in the remineralization.

    PubMed

    Silveira, J; Coutinho, S; Marques, D; Castro, J; Mata, A; Carvalho, M L; Pessanha, S

    2018-06-05

    In this work we present the analysis of dental enamel treated with an over-the-counter whitening product, bought in e-commerce at a very low cost, used without medical supervision in an abusive manner, in order to evaluate its demineralization action. Moreover, we studied the influence of renewal or non-renewal of saliva solution in which the specimens were stored throughout the study. The Degree of Demineralization was determined through the evaluation of the PO 4 3- symmetric stretching band (~959cm -1 ) in Raman spectra of the specimens in different days during the course of the study. Results showed that a maximum of demineralization occurred between days 27 and 34 of application. Titration of the whitening product revealed a content of hydrogen peroxide 170-fold higher than what is allowed in Europe, according with legislation. Despite this extreme concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the demineralization was not as great as could be expected suggesting an important role of the pH of the solution in this demineralization mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Raman spectroscopy analysis of dental enamel treated with whitening product - Influence of saliva in the remineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, J.; Coutinho, S.; Marques, D.; Castro, J.; Mata, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Pessanha, S.

    2018-06-01

    In this work we present the analysis of dental enamel treated with an over-the-counter whitening product, bought in e-commerce at a very low cost, used without medical supervision in an abusive manner, in order to evaluate its demineralization action. Moreover, we studied the influence of renewal or non-renewal of saliva solution in which the specimens were stored throughout the study. The Degree of Demineralization was determined through the evaluation of the PO43- symmetric stretching band ( 959 cm-1) in Raman spectra of the specimens in different days during the course of the study. Results showed that a maximum of demineralization occurred between days 27 and 34 of application. Titration of the whitening product revealed a content of hydrogen peroxide 170-fold higher than what is allowed in Europe, according with legislation. Despite this extreme concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the demineralization was not as great as could be expected suggesting an important role of the pH of the solution in this demineralization mechanism.

  12. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  13. Noise Whitening in Airborne Wind Profiling With a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Arthur, Grant E.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Two different noise whitening methods in airborne wind profiling with a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia are presented. In order to provide accurate wind parameter estimates from the airborne lidar data acquired during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign in 2010, the adverse effects of background instrument noise must be compensated properly in the early stage of data processing. The results of the two methods are presented using selected GRIP data and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes.

  14. Positioning the actual interference fringe pattern on the tooth flank in measuring gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Suping; Wang, Leijie; Liu, Shiqiao; Komori, Masaharu; Kubo, Aizoh

    2011-05-01

    In measuring form deviation of gear tooth flanks by laser interferometry, the collected interference fringe pattern (IFP) is badly distorted, in the case of shape, relative to the actual tooth flank. Meanwhile, a clear and definite mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank is indispensable for both transforming phase differences into deviation values and positioning the measurement result on the actual tooth flank. In order to solve these problems, this paper proposes a method using the simulation tooth image as a bridge connecting the actual tooth flank and the collected IFP. The mapping relationship between the simulation tooth image and the actual tooth flank has been obtained by ray tracing methods [Fang et al., Appl. Opt. 49(33), 6409-6415 (2010)]. This paper mainly discusses how to build the relationship between the simulation tooth image and the collected IFP by using a matching algorithm of two characteristic point sets. With the combination of the two above-mentioned assistant mapping relationships, the mapping relationship between the collected IFP and the actual tooth flank can be built; the collected IFP can be positioned on the actual tooth flank. Finally, the proposed method is employed in a measurement of the form deviation of a gear tooth flank and the result proves the feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Interactive Tooth Separation from Dental Model Using Segmentation Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tooth segmentation on dental model is an essential step of computer-aided-design systems for orthodontic virtual treatment planning. However, fast and accurate identifying cutting boundary to separate teeth from dental model still remains a challenge, due to various geometrical shapes of teeth, complex tooth arrangements, different dental model qualities, and varying degrees of crowding problems. Most segmentation approaches presented before are not able to achieve a balance between fine segmentation results and simple operating procedures with less time consumption. In this article, we present a novel, effective and efficient framework that achieves tooth segmentation based on a segmentation field, which is solved by a linear system defined by a discrete Laplace-Beltrami operator with Dirichlet boundary conditions. A set of contour lines are sampled from the smooth scalar field, and candidate cutting boundaries can be detected from concave regions with large variations of field data. The sensitivity to concave seams of the segmentation field facilitates effective tooth partition, as well as avoids obtaining appropriate curvature threshold value, which is unreliable in some case. Our tooth segmentation algorithm is robust to dental models with low quality, as well as is effective to dental models with different levels of crowding problems. The experiments, including segmentation tests of varying dental models with different complexity, experiments on dental meshes with different modeling resolutions and surface noises and comparison between our method and the morphologic skeleton segmentation method are conducted, thus demonstrating the effectiveness of our method. PMID:27532266

  16. Tooth wear in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bell, E J; Kaidonis, J; Townsend, G C

    2002-03-01

    Several studies have described the impact that dental caries and periodontitis may have on the dentitions of individuals with Down syndrome, but there are few reports about the effects of tooth wear. This investigation aimed to compare the aetiology, prevalence and severity of tooth wear in 49 cytogenetically confirmed Down syndrome children with 49 non-Down syndrome controls. This study involved three aspects: an oral examination, including obtaining dental impressions; a dietary analysis spanning three days; and a questionnaire seeking information about habits, medical problems and medications. Tooth wear severity was scored on a 4-grade scale (none-to-little; moderate; severe; very severe), while aetiology was classified as being due to attrition mainly, erosion mainly, or a combination of both. Double determinations established scoring method reliability and chi-square tests assessed associations between samples. Tooth wear was significantly more frequent (p<0.01) in the Down syndrome than the non-Down syndrome sample (67.4 per cent cf 34.7 per cent), with more of the Down syndrome children showing severe to very severe wear (59.2 per cent cf 8.2 per cent). Significantly more Down syndrome children (p<0.05) displayed a multifactorial aetiology of tooth wear, i.e., both attrition and erosion (46.7 per cent cf 28.6 per cent), although no particular dietary link was established. Gastric reflux and vomiting were reported in over 20 per cent of the Down syndrome sample. Given the potential consequences of high levels of tooth wear, associated with tooth grinding and an acidic oral environment in Down syndrome children, educational programmes aimed at increasing awareness of carers and health professionals are needed urgently.

  17. Shade changing effectiveness of plasdone and blue covarine-based whitening toothpaste on teeth stained with chlorhexidine and black tea.

    PubMed

    Bergesch, Vania; Baggio Aguiar, Flávio Henrique; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Gomes França, Fabiana Mantovani; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Botelho Amaral, Flávia Lucisano

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of toothbrushing with whitening toothpaste in altering the shade of stained human enamel. Thirty fragments of human enamel, stained with chlorhexidine/black tea underwent 1000 and 5000 brushing cycles (BC) with ( n = 10): PLS (Gel Dental Day, Bitufo), Close Up White Now, Unilever (COVB) and regular (Gel Dental Night, Bitufo) toothpaste. Images were taken before staining (baseline), after staining (STN) and following 1000 and 5000 BC and were analyzed using the CIELAB parameters (ΔE, Δb and ΔL). Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). ΔE was higher from STN to baseline; 1000 BC to STN and 5000 BC to STN ( P < 0.001). Significant differences in Δb values were found from 1000 BC to STN and 5000 BC to STN. For COVB, greater ΔL was observed from 1000 BC to STN, what differed statistically from the regular toothpaste ( P < 0.05). There was no difference between toothpaste when ΔL was calculated from 5000 CB to STN. Toothpaste containing COVB or PLS in association with 5000 BCs showed similar effectiveness in changing enamel shade; but after the first 1000 toothbrushing cycles, the use of COVB toothpaste promoted higher lightness in stained enamel.

  18. The whitening effect of bleaching agents on tetracycline-stained rat teeth.

    PubMed

    Shin, D H; Summitt, J B

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the whitening effect of three bleaching agents on the teeth of rats and demonstrated differences in bleaching where dentin was exposed or enamel was thin. Thirty Albino rats were peritoneally injected with tetracycline solution daily for two weeks. Thirty-two disc-shaped specimens were cut from the crowns of incisors removed from sacrificed rats and were irradiated with UV light for 16 hours. Sections were stored in saline. Eight sections served as controls and were not bleached. Three bleaching agents (Opalescence, Rembrandt and Nite White) were applied to eight specimens each, five times a day for two weeks, and images of the sections were recorded at the following times: before bleaching (baseline), day 1, day 3, day 5, day 7, day 9, day 11 and day 14. Mean colors to demonstrate any change (deltaE) from baseline for each time period were as follows: control-9.78 (baseline), 9.17, 9.36, 9.65, 9.40, 9.99, 10.57, 11.36; Opalescence-10.08, (baseline) 7.63, 6.72, 6.04, 5.10, 4.87, 4.89, 4.27; Rembrandt-9.83 (baseline), 11.27, 9.55, 8.36, 7.75, 6.94, 7.11, 7.04; Nite White-10.44 (baseline), 9.92, 7.58, 6.80, 5.45, 5.05, 4.73, 4.01. All bleached teeth were lightened (p<.01). Another 56 tetracycline-stained rat incisors were UV irradiated for three days. Three different penetration depths were tested: penetration through lingual dentin and labial enamel (DN group), penetration through labial enamel only (RE group) and penetration through labial enamel covered with 1.0 mm human enamel (HE group). Specimens were bleached with Opalescence for one hour five times a day for one week or four weeks. A control group of unbleached teeth was also examined. Results (deltaE) were as follows: control--11.67; 1-week DN--13.55; 1-week RE--12.80; 1-week HE--12.07; 4-week DN--7.48; 4-week RE--7.50; 4-week HE--11.69. The color change in the 4-week DN and the 4-week RE groups showed the greatest reduction (p<.01).

  19. The effect of McInnes solution on enamel and the effect of Tooth mousse on bleached enamel: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, H E; Shashikiran, N D

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of McInnes bleaching agent on the micro hardness of enamel before and after bleaching and to evaluate the effect of G C Tooth Mousse on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Materials and Methods: McInnes bleaching solution, Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate CCP-ACP (G C Tooth mousse) artificial saliva (Dept of Oral Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davengere), deionized water, Vickers Micro Hardness tester (Zwick/ZHV, Germany), freshly extracted teeth, cold cure acrylic, Diamond disc (Horico - PFINGST New jersey USA, KAVO- Germany), straight handpiece (kavo peca reta) and plastic moulds (6.5 × 2 mm). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microhardness of the sound enamel surface by Vickers Hardness Number before and after bleaching with McInnes solution, and to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (G C Tooth Mousse) on the bleached enamel surface for its microhardness. Statistical analysis: The data obtained from the test were subjected for statistical analysis and are presented as range, mean and standard deviation. P value of 0.05 or less was considered for statistical significance. The changes in microhardness at different times of assessment were analyzed using the paired ‘t’ test Results: All the samples showed decrease in the microhardness after two cycles of bleaching, though immediately after bleaching the decrease in the microhardness was not significant (P = 0.34). However, after the second cycles, it showed a significant decrease (P<0.01) in the microhardness. After application of remineralization solution (GC Tooth mousse), the samples showed a marginal increase in the microhardness (P<0.05) after seven days and a marked increase after fourteen days (P<0.001). Conclusion: McInnes bleaching agent does decrease the microhardness of enamel by causing enamel demineralization and GC Tooth mousse used in the study causes an increase in the

  20. Experience of racism and tooth brushing among pregnant Aboriginal Australians: exploring psychosocial mediators.

    PubMed

    Ben, J; Jamieson, L M; Priest, N; Parker, E J; Roberts-Thomson, K F; Lawrence, H P; Broughton, J; Paradies, Y

    2014-09-01

    Despite burgeoning evidence regarding the pathways by which experiences of racism influence health outcomes, little attention has been paid to the relationship between racism and oral health-related behaviours in particular. We hypothesised that self-reported racism was associated with tooth brushing, and that this association was mediated by perceived stress and sense of control and moderated by social support. Data from 365 pregnant Aboriginal Australian women were used to evaluate tooth brushing behaviour, sociodemographic factors, psychosocial factors, general health, risk behaviours and racism exposure. Bivariate associations were explored and hierarchical logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for tooth brushing. Perceived stress and sense of control were examined as mediators of the association between self-reported racism and tooth brushing using binary mediation with bootstrapping. High levels of self-reported racism persisted as a risk indicator for tooth brushing (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.27,0.98) after controlling for significant covariates. Perceived stress mediated the relationship between self-reported racism and tooth brushing: the direct effect of racism on tooth brushing was attenuated, and the indirect effect on tooth brushing was significant (beta coefficient -0.09; bias-corrected 95%CI -0.166,-0.028; 48.1% of effect mediated). Sense of control was insignificant as a mediator of the relationship between racism and tooth brushing. High levels of self-reported racism were associated with non-optimal tooth brushing behaviours, and perceived stress mediated this association among this sample of pregnant Aboriginal women.. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  1. Does at-home bleaching induce systemic oxidative stress in healthy subjects?

    PubMed

    Akbari, M; Nejat, A H; Farkhondeh, N; Mehraban Moghadam, S; Hashemy, S I; Mohammadipour, H S

    2017-03-01

    At-home bleaching is a technique characterized by the use of carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide as a tooth-whitening agent. However, no data exist regarding systemic safety of this technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of at-home bleaching on serum redox homeostasis. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers who requested tooth-whitening participated in this study. Specified bleaching trays were fabricated for the maxilla and mandible arches. Each participant was given two syringes containing 9% hydrogen peroxide gel to use for 30 min/night for 14 nights consecutively. To evaluate the redox status, the serum concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) were measured. Blood samples were obtained in the morning prior to initiation of study and the morning after expiration of the bleaching period. The collected data were analyzed using Student's t-test with 95% confidence interval. Twenty-three subjects completed the study. MDA, PAB and TAC were significantly increased after the bleaching period (P = 0.001, 0.001 and 0.002, respectively). At-home bleaching revealed the potential to disturb oxidant-antioxidant balance and induce oxidative stress. Its clinical relevance is unfavourable and potential side-effects of at-home bleaching should be considered. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  2. The effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Nakajima, M; Seki, N; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tooth age on colour adjustment potential of resin composite restorations in human teeth. Twenty extracted human premolars with an A2 shade, extracted for orthodontic reasons from younger patients (20-28yrs) (younger teeth) and periodontal reasons from older patients (45-69yrs) (older teeth), were used in this study. Cylindrical shaped cavities (3.0mm depth; 2.0mm diameter) were prepared in the centre of the crowns on the buccal surface. One of four resin composites of A2 shade (Kalore, KA; Solare, SO; Clearfil Majesty, MJ; Beautifil II, BF) was placed in the cavity, and the colour was measured at four areas (0.4mm×0.4mm) on the restored teeth (area 1; tooth area 1.0mm away from the border of resin composite restoration: area 2; tooth border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 3; resin composite border area 0.3mm away from margin of resin composite restoration: area 4; resin composite area at the centre of resin composite restoration) using a spectrophotometer (Crystaleye). The colour of each area was determined according to the CIELAB colour scale. Colour differences (ΔE*) between the areas of 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4 and 1 and 4 were calculated, and also the ratio of ΔE*area2-3 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area2-3/1-4), ΔE*area3-4 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area3-4/1-4) and ΔE*area1-2 to ΔE*area1-4 (ΔE*area1-2/1-4) as a parameter of the colour shift in resin composite restoration, were determined. Moreover, the light transmission characteristics of the resin materials and dentine discs from the younger and older teeth were measured using a goniophotometer. The data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, and Dunnett's T3 and t-test for the post hoc test. ΔE*area2-3 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth at the border) and ΔE*area1-4 (colour difference between resin composite and tooth) of the older teeth groups were significantly larger than those of younger

  3. Effect of CPP-ACP on the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel: nanomechanical properties and microtribological behaviour study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Y. F.; Qian, L. M.; Zhou, Z. R.

    2013-10-01

    Casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been used to enhance tooth remineralization in the dental clinic. But the contribution of CPP-ACP to the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel is of widespread controversy. To confirm the application potential of CPP-ACP in the remineralization repair of tooth erosion caused by acid-attack, the effect of remineralization in vitro in 2% w/v CPP-ACP solution on the acid-eroded human tooth enamel was investigated in this study. The repair of surface morphology and the improvement of nanomechanical and microtribological properties were characterized with laser confocal scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope, nanoindentation tester and nanoscratch tester. Results showed that a layer of uneven mineral deposits, which were mainly amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in all probability, was observed on the acid-eroded enamel surface after remineralization. Compared with the acid-eroded enamel surface, the nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus of the remineralized enamel surface obviously increased. Both the friction coefficient and wear volume of the acid-eroded enamel surface decreased after remineralization. However, both the nanomechanical and the anti-wear properties of the remineralized enamel surface were still inferior to those of original enamel surface. In summary, tooth damage caused by acid erosion could be repaired by remineralization in CPP-ACP solution, but the repair effect, especially on the nanomechanical and anti-wear properties of the acid-eroded enamel, was limited. These results would contribute to a further exploration of the remineralization potential of CPP-ACP and a better understanding of the remineralization repair mechanism for acid-eroded human tooth enamel.

  4. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  5. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field vibration on tooth movement induced by magnetic and mechanical forces: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Darendeliler, M Ali; Zea, A; Shen, G; Zoellner, H

    2007-12-01

    This study was designed to determine whether or not high-frequency and low-magnitude vibration affects orthodontic tooth movement caused by magnetic or/and mechanical forces. Forty-four 7-week-old Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, with each group further divided into experimental and control subgroups. Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets and Sentalloy closed coil springs were placed between maxillary or mandibular first molars and incisors to activate tooth movement. The animals of experimental subgroups were exposed to the vibration induced by pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) whilst the control subgroups were under normal atmosphere. The experiment lasted for 14 days and all of the animals were sacrificed for examination. The changes in the space between the molar and incisor were measured to indicate the amount of tooth movement. The coil springs, either with sham or active magnets, move molar much more than magnets alone, regardless of absence or presence of PEMF (p < 0.001). Under PEMF, the coil spring moved significantly more amount of tooth movement than that of coil-magnet combination (p < 0.01), as did the magnets compared to sham magnets (p < 0.019). Under a non-PEMF scenario, there was no significant difference in tooth movement between coil spring and coil-magnets combination, nor was there difference between magnets and sham magnets. It is suggested that the PEMF-induced vibration may enhance the effect of mechanical and magnetic forces on tooth movement.

  6. Aggravated loss of tooth structure.

    PubMed

    Barsby, M J

    1989-09-01

    Self-inflicted tooth modification other than ritual mutilation practised in some countries is a rare occurrence. The author reports a case of aggravated loss of tooth structure where a patient has contributed to loss of tooth structure by the novel method of adjusting his natural teeth with a 'knife'. Subsequent management of the case is discussed.

  7. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  8. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  9. Effect of rotary cutting instruments on the resin-tooth interfacial ultra structure: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sherawat, Sudhir; Tewari, Sanjay; Duhan, Jigyasa; Gupta, Alpa; Singla, Rakesh

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of cutting teeth with different types of burs at various speeds on surface topography of tooth surface and interfacial gap formation at resin-tooth interface. The human molars were divided into seven groups: Diamond bur in airrotor (DA) & micromotor (DM), crosscut carbide bur in airrotor (CCA) & micromotor (CCM), plain carbide bur in airrotor (CA) & micromotor (CM) and #600-grit silicon carbide paper (SiC). In five samples from each group Class II box-only cavities were restored. The occlusal surface of four teeth per group was flattened. Two out of four teeth were acid etched. Teeth were subjected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Interfacial gap was observed in all groups with no significant difference. SEM observations revealed CA, CCA & DA were coarser than CM, CCM, DM and SiC. SEM of etched tooth surfaces revealed complete removal of amorphous smear layer in CA & CM, partial removal in CCA, CCM, DA & DM and no removal in SiC. Selecting an appropriate bur and its speed may not play an important role in bonding in terms of interfacial gap formation. Variable changes were observed in surface topography with different burs before and after acid etching. Key words:Surface topography, resin-tooth interface, interfacial gap, bonding.

  10. Effect of rotary cutting instruments on the resin-tooth interfacial ultra structure: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Sherawat, Sudhir; Tewari, Sanjay; Duhan, Jigyasa; Singla, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of cutting teeth with different types of burs at various speeds on surface topography of tooth surface and interfacial gap formation at resin-tooth interface. Material and Methods: The human molars were divided into seven groups: Diamond bur in airrotor (DA) & micromotor (DM), crosscut carbide bur in airrotor (CCA) & micromotor (CCM), plain carbide bur in airrotor (CA) & micromotor (CM) and #600-grit silicon carbide paper (SiC). In five samples from each group Class II box-only cavities were restored. The occlusal surface of four teeth per group was flattened. Two out of four teeth were acid etched. Teeth were subjected for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Interfacial gap was observed in all groups with no significant difference. SEM observations revealed CA, CCA & DA were coarser than CM, CCM, DM and SiC. SEM of etched tooth surfaces revealed complete removal of amorphous smear layer in CA & CM, partial removal in CCA, CCM, DA & DM and no removal in SiC. Conclusions: Selecting an appropriate bur and its speed may not play an important role in bonding in terms of interfacial gap formation. Variable changes were observed in surface topography with different burs before and after acid etching. Key words:Surface topography, resin-tooth interface, interfacial gap, bonding. PMID:25674310

  11. Fgf signaling is required for zebrafish tooth development.

    PubMed

    Jackman, William R; Draper, Bruce W; Stock, David W

    2004-10-01

    We have investigated fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling during the development of the zebrafish pharyngeal dentition with the goal of uncovering novel roles for FGFs in tooth development as well as phylogenetic and topographic diversity in the tooth developmental pathway. We found that the tooth-related expression of several zebrafish genes is similar to that of their mouse orthologs, including both epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Additionally, significant differences in gene expression between zebrafish and mouse teeth are indicated by the apparent lack of fgf8 and pax9 expression in zebrafish tooth germs. FGF receptor inhibition with SU5402 at 32 h blocked dental epithelial morphogenesis and tooth mineralization. While the pharyngeal epithelium remained intact as judged by normal pitx2 expression, not only was the mesenchymal expression of lhx6 and lhx7 eliminated as expected from mouse studies, but the epithelial expression of dlx2a, dlx2b, fgf3, and fgf4 was as well. This latter result provides novel evidence that the dental epithelium is a target of FGF signaling. However, the failure of SU5402 to block localized expression of pitx2 suggests that the earliest steps of tooth initiation are FGF-independent. Investigations of specific FGF ligands with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides revealed only a mild tooth shape phenotype following fgf4 knockdown, while fgf8 inhibition revealed only a subtle down-regulation of dental dlx2b expression with no apparent effect on tooth morphology. Our results suggest redundant FGF signals target the dental epithelium and together are required for dental morphogenesis. Further work will be required to elucidate the nature of these signals, particularly with respect to their origins and whether they act through the mesenchyme.

  12. Influence of enamel/dentin thickness on the toxic and esthetic effects of experimental in-office bleaching protocols.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Duque, C C; Soares, D G; Basso, F G; Hebling, J; de Souza Costa, C A

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to assess the whitening effectiveness and toxicity of tooth-bleaching protocols applied to enamel/dentin disks simulating mandibular incisors (ICs) and premolars (PMs). A 10% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) gel was applied for 3 × 15, 1 × 15, or 1 × 5 min to enamel/dentin disks simulating mandibular ICs and PMs, and the trans-enamel and trans-dentinal diffusion products were applied to human dental pulp cells (1 h). Professional therapy (35% H 2 O 2 -3 × 15 min) was used as positive control, and non-bleached samples were used as negative control. Cell viability and morphology, oxidative stress generation, and odontoblastic marker expression were assessed. The H 2 O 2 diffusion and enamel color change (ΔE) were also analyzed. The 10% H 2 O 2 gel induced significant cell viability reduction only when applied 3 × 15 min, with the intensity of oxidative stress and down-regulation of odontoblastic markers being higher in the IC group. The other experimental bleaching protocols caused slight alterations regarding the cell parameters evaluated, with intensity being related to enamel/dentin thickness. These effects were also correlated with higher H 2 O 2 diffusion in the IC group. ΔE values similar as positive control were found for the 10% 3 × 15 and 1 × 15 protocols on IC group, after 4 and 6 sessions. Application of a 10% H 2 O 2 bleaching gel for 15 or 45 min to thin dental substrate significantly minimizes cell toxicity in comparison with highly concentrated gels associated with similar esthetic outcomes by increasing the number of bleaching sessions. Bleaching gels with 10% H 2 O 2 applied in small teeth for short periods may be an interesting alternative to obtain whitening effectiveness without causing toxicity to pulp cells, which may be able to reduce the tooth hypersensitivity claimed by patients.

  13. The In vitro Evaluation of the effect of xyliwhite, probiotic, and the conventional toothpastes on the enamel roughness and microhardness.

    PubMed

    Maden, E Arat; Altun, C; Polat, G Guven; Basak, F

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride, Xylitol, Probiotic, and Whitening toothpastes on the permanent teeth enamel roughness and microhardness. One hundred and twenty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups, each group having 60 samples. G1: The group in which enamel roughness was examined (n = 60). G2: The group in which enamel microhardness was examined (n = 60). Then, these groups were randomly divided into 4 groups among themselves (n = 15). Each group was brushed using four different toothpastes for 1 week with a battery-powered toothbrush in the morning and evening for 2 min. Vicker's hardness tester was used to measure the changes in microhardness, and the profilometer was used to measure the changes in surface roughness. No statistically significant differences were found on surface roughness and microhardness values measured after tooth brushing process in group brushed with Colgate MaxFresh toothpaste (P > 0.01). Statistically significant decrease was observed on Vicker's hardness values measured after tooth brushing process in groups brushed with Ipana White Power Carbonate toothpaste, Xyliwhite Toothpaste Gel, and Periobiotic Probiotic Toothpaste (P < 0.01). Statistically significant increase was observed on surface roughness values in groups brushed with Ipana White Power Carbonate toothpaste, Xyliwhite Toothpaste Gel, Periobiotic Probiotic Toothpaste (P < 0.01). As a result, Colgate MaxFresh abrasive-free toothpaste with fluoride has no effect on permanent tooth enamel surface roughness and microhardness. Xyliwhite, Periobiotic, and Ipana White Power Carbonate-containing abrasive toothpastes led to changes negatively on permanent tooth enamel surface roughness and microhardness.

  14. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes. PMID:27025262

  15. Effectiveness of and Dental Sensitivity to At-home Bleaching With 4% and 10% Hydrogen Peroxide: A Randomized, Triple-blind Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chemin, K; Rezende, M; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A; Kossatz, S

    To evaluate the risk for and intensity of tooth sensitivity and color change of at-home dental bleaching with 4% and 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP). For this study, 78 patients were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and randomized into two groups: HP 4 (White Class 4%, FGM) and HP 10 (White Class 10%, FGM). In both groups, the at-home bleaching was performed for a period of 30 minutes twice a day for two weeks. The color was assessed by Vita Classical, Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER and spectrophotometer Vita Easyshade (Vita Zahnfabrik) at baseline, during bleaching (first and second weeks) and after bleaching (one month). Patients recorded their tooth sensitivity using a numeric rating scale (0-4) and visual analog scale (0-10). Data from color change (DeltaE data) was submitted to two-way analysis of variance. The color change data in Delta SGU from the two shade guide units were compared with the Mann Whitney test. The risk of tooth sensitivity was evaluated by χ 2 test and the intensity of tooth sensitivity from both scales was evaluated by a Mann-Whitney test (α=0.05). The absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity was higher in the group that used HP 10 than the one that used HP 4. Data from change in the number of shade guide units and color variation after one month of bleaching for both groups showed significant whitening, with no difference between groups. At-home bleaching is effective with 4% and 10% HP concentrations, but 10% HP increased the absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity during at-home bleaching.

  16. A Randomized Clinical Study to Evaluate the Effect of Two Experimental Toothpastes on Tooth Enamel Gloss and Smoothness.

    PubMed

    Milleman, Kimberly R; Milleman, Jeffery L; Creeth, Jonathan E; Butler, Andrew; Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2016-03-01

    The study compared the effects on examiner-assessed tooth gloss and smoothness of two experimental toothpastes (1% or 2% alumina abrasive) with a reference, silica-based toothpaste used twice daily for one, four, and eight weeks. The study also monitored the safety of the products. This was a randomized, examiner-blind study, stratified by gloss score and age, three-treatment, parallel-group using healthy adult volunteers. Following a two-week washout period where subjects brushed with a conventional silica-abrasive toothpaste, 169 subjects began the trial period after receiving a dental scaling and polishing using the washout toothpaste. Subjects brushed for two minutes, twice daily, with their assigned toothpaste. The experimental toothpastes contained 927 ppm fluoride as NaF with either 1% or 2% alumina as the sole abrasive. The reference toothpaste contained 927 ppm fluoride as NaF in a conventional amorphous silica abrasive base. Enamel polish (i.e., gloss) was assessed visually by comparing the facial surfaces of the maxillary incisors with a set of standards. Tooth smoothness was assessed by lightly dragging a dental explorer over the surface. Subjects using the 2% alumina toothpaste had significantly higher gloss compared to the reference toothpaste at Weeks 1 and 4, but the difference was of borderline significance at Week 8 (one-covariate analysis: p = 0.0529; two-covariate analysis: p = 0.0494). Subjects using the 1% alumina toothpaste had significantly higher gloss improvement scores than the reference toothpaste at Weeks 4 and 8, but not at Week 1. All three treatment groups' gloss scores improved during the study. Regarding tooth smoothness, the effects of the experimental toothpastes followed a broadly similar profile to the effects on tooth gloss. After four weeks' use, both experimental toothpastes were superior to the reference. After eight weeks' use, however, only the 2% alumina toothpaste approached significant superiority versus the reference

  17. The effects of local administration of Zoledronate solution on the tooth movement and periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Sun, Xinhua; Chen, Yuanping; Hu, Min; Liang, Tang

    2002-07-01

    To investigate the effects of local administration of Zoledronate solution on the tooth movement and periodontal ligament. Orthodontic tooth movement of upper first molar was performed in 42 rats with coil spring. Zoledronate solution was injected into the palatal submucosal area adjacent to the left upper first molar in experimental group 3 days prior to the use of the appliance. In control group, same amount of 0.9% NaCl solution was injected into the palatal submucosal area adjacent to the left and right upper first molar. The injection was applied every third day. The application of mesial force lasted 0.3, 7, 14, 21 days respectively. After the rats were sacrificed, the distance of tooth movement was measured. Sections were stained and then observed with microscope. 1. The distance of tooth movement in the experimental group was significantly smaller than that in the control group. 2. The number of osteoclast on the pressure side in the experiment group was significantly smaller than that in the control group through the experimental period, but there was no distinct difference between experimental group and control group (except for 14 days) for the number of odontoclast in interradicular area. 3. The osteoclasts and odontoclasts were the main target cell of Zoledronate in periodontal tissue. Zoledronate may be a useful agent for anchorage control and reducing the number of osteoclast on pressure side of alveolar bone.

  18. Effects of pulpectomy on the amount of root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Masato; Sumi, Hiromi; Shikata, Hanaka; Kojima, Shunichi; Motokawa, Masahide; Fujita, Tadashi; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Tanne, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed that orthodontic force affects dental pulp via the rupture of blood vessels and vacuolization of pulp tissues. We hypothesized that pulp tissues express inflammatory cytokines and regulators of odontoclast differentiation after excess orthodontic force. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tensile force in human pulp cells and to measure inflammatory root resorption during tooth movement in pulpless rat teeth. After cyclic tensile force application in human pulp cells, gene expression and protein concentration of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand, interleukin-1 beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoassay. Moreover, the role of the stretch-activated channel was evaluated by gadolinium (Gd(3+)) treatment. The upper right first molars of 7-week Wistar rats were subjected to pulpectomy and root canal filling followed by mesial movement for 6 months. The expression of cytokine messenger RNAs and proteins in the experimental group peaked with loading at 10-kPa tensile force after 48 hours (P < .01). Gd(3+) reduced the expression of these cytokine messenger RNAs and protein concentrations (P < .01). The amount of inflammatory root resorption was significantly larger in the control teeth than the pulpectomized teeth (P < .05). This study shows that tensile forces in the pulp cells enhance the expression of various cytokines via the S-A channel, which may lead to inflammatory root resorption during tooth movement. It also suggests that root canal treatment is effective for progressive severe inflammatory root resorption during tooth movement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Tooth wear, a proposal for an evaluation system].

    PubMed

    Wetselaar, P; van der Zaag, J; Lobbezoo, F

    2011-06-01

    The present-day terminology and definitions of tooth wear are not unambiguous. For diagnosing tooth wear, however, it is essential that they are unambiguous. In this article a proposal is presented for a tooth wear evaluation system with simplified definitions. This system consists ofa number of modules and can be used for various aspects of the diagnostic procedure. It can be used for the quantification of tooth wear, both for periodic screening and for the monitoring of tooth wear in individual patients. The scoring of occlusal/incisal tooth wear as well as of non-occlusal/non-incisal tooth wear is possible. The evaluative system is also suitable for determining which type of tooth wear, such as attrition, abrasion and erosion, is most likely to have caused any observed loss of hard tooth tissue.

  20. Carbamide peroxide whitening of nonvital single discolored teeth: case reports.

    PubMed

    Caughman, W F; Frazier, K B; Haywood, V B

    1999-03-01

    Patients who present with a single discolored tooth represent a significant restorative challenge. These case reports describe an economic and conservative treatment option for these patients. The situations presented demonstrate techniques for bleaching with carbamide peroxide in a traditional nightguard or with an inside-outside technique to achieve acceptable esthetic results on isolated nonvital discolored teeth. Although these techniques may not be effective in all cases, they do not compromise or eliminate any future treatment options.

  1. Automating digital leaf measurement: the tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.

    PubMed

    Corney, David P A; Tang, H Lilian; Clark, Jonathan Y; Hu, Yin; Jin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Many species of plants produce leaves with distinct teeth around their margins. The presence and nature of these teeth can often help botanists to identify species. Moreover, it has long been known that more species native to colder regions have teeth than species native to warmer regions. It has therefore been suggested that fossilized remains of leaves can be used as a proxy for ancient climate reconstruction. Similar studies on living plants can help our understanding of the relationships. The required analysis of leaves typically involves considerable manual effort, which in practice limits the number of leaves that are analyzed, potentially reducing the power of the results. In this work, we describe a novel algorithm to automate the marginal tooth analysis of leaves found in digital images. We demonstrate our methods on a large set of images of whole herbarium specimens collected from Tilia trees (also known as lime, linden or basswood). We chose the genus Tilia as its constituent species have toothed leaves of varied size and shape. In a previous study we extracted c.1600 leaves automatically from a set of c.1100 images. Our new algorithm locates teeth on the margins of such leaves and extracts features such as each tooth's area, perimeter and internal angles, as well as counting them. We evaluate an implementation of our algorithm's performance against a manually analyzed subset of the images. We found that the algorithm achieves an accuracy of 85% for counting teeth and 75% for estimating tooth area. We also demonstrate that the automatically extracted features are sufficient to identify different species of Tilia using a simple linear discriminant analysis, and that the features relating to teeth are the most useful.

  2. Quantitative Determination of α-Arbutin, β-Arbutin, Kojic Acid, Nicotinamide, Hydroquinone, Resorcinol, 4-Methoxyphenol, 4-Ethoxyphenol, and Ascorbic Acid from Skin Whitening Products by HPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Avonto, Cristina; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Mei; Rua, Diego; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    An HPLC-UV method was developed for the quantitative analysis of nine skin whitening agents in a single injection. These compounds are α-arbutin, β-arbutin, kojic acid, nicotinamide, resorcinol, ascorbic acid, hydroquinone, 4-methoxyphenol, and 4-ethoxyphenol. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column within 30 min. The mobile phase was composed of water and methanol, both containing 0.1% acetic acid (v/v). The stability of the analytes was evaluated at different pH values between 2.3 and 7.6, and the extraction procedure was validated for different types of skin whitening product matrixes, which included two creams, a soap bar, and a capsule. The best solvent system for sample preparation was 20 mM NaH2PO4 containing 10% methanol at pH 2.3. The analytical method was validated for accuracy, precision, LOD, and LOQ. The developed HPLC-UV method was applied for the quantitation of the nine analytes in 59 skin whitening products including creams, lotions, sera, foams, gels, mask sheets, soap bars, tablets, and capsules.

  3. Long-chain ionic liquid based mixed hemimicelles and magnetic dispersed solid-phase extraction for the extraction of fluorescent whitening agents in paper materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Xianbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2017-06-01

    A novel mixed hemimicelles and magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction method based on long-chain ionic liquids for the extraction of five fluorescent whitening agents was established. The factors influenced on extraction efficiency were investigated. Under the optimal conditions, namely, the pH of sample solution at 8.0, the concentration of long chain ionic liquid at 0.5 mmol/L, the amount of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle at 12 mg, extraction time at 10 min, pH 6.0 of methanol as eluent, and the desorption time at 1 min, satisfactory results were obtained. Wide linear ranges (0.02-10 ng/mL) and good linearity were attained (0.9997-0.9999). The intraday and interday RSDs were 2.1-8.3%. Limits of detection were 0.004-0.01 ng/mL, which were decreased by almost an order of magnitude compared to direct detection without extraction. The present method was applied to extract the fluorescent whitening agents in two kinds of paper samples, obtaining satisfactory results. All showed results illustrated that the detection sensitivity was improved and the proposed method was a good choice for the enriching and monitoring of trace fluorescent whitening agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behavior of human tooth dentin.

    PubMed

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, ShanShan; Qian, LinMao; Yu, HaiYang

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behavior of human tooth dentin in terms of possible alterations in crystallinity, grain size, and composition. Human premolars (n = 19) were collected to obtain the perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the dentin tubule specimens. Each specimen was subjected to 60 Gy of gamma irradiation, in daily increments of 2 Gy. The nanoscratch tests were conducted. The scratch traces were observed via scanning electron microscope (SEM) and surface profilometer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the alteration of crystallography and chemical composition of dentin after irradiation. The change of surface microhardness (SMH) was also evaluated. The nanoscratch results showed that the friction coefficient of dentin after irradiation became higher, and the depths and widths of scratch were greater than that of dentin before irradiation. Additionally, irradiation decreased the crystallinity of dentin and induced the formation of bigger crystals. The carbonate/mineral ratio was increased. Furthermore, a significant reduction in microhardness after irradiation was observed. The main damage mechanisms consisted of the formation of delamination and crack in both the specimens cut perpendicular and parallel to tubule dentin after irradiation. Irradiation affected directly the wear behavior of tooth dentin, accompanied by the alterations in crystallography, chemical composition, and surface microhardness of dentin. This would help extend understanding the influence of irradiation on dentin and provide suggestions for selecting more suitable materials for irradiated tooth.

  5. Effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Ping; Huang, Shengbin; Gao, Shanshan; Qian, Linmao; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a frequently used treatment for oral cancer. Extensive research has been conducted to detect the mechanical properties of dental hard tissues after irradiation at the macroscale. However, little is known about the influence of irradiation on the tribological properties of enamel at the micro- or nanoscale. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma irradiation on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel in relation to prism orientation. Nanoscratch tests, surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis were used to evaluate the friction behaviour of enamel slabs before and after treatment with identical irradiation procedures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were performed to analyse the changes in crystallography and chemical composition induced by irradiation. Surface microhardness (SMH) alteration was also evaluated. The results showed that irradiation resulted in different scratch morphologies, friction coefficients and remnant depth and width at different loads. An inferior nanoscratch resistance was observed independent of prism orientation. Moreover, the variation of wear behaviours was closely related to changes in the crystallography, chemical composition and SMH of the enamel. Together, these measures indicated that irradiation had a direct deleterious effect on the wear behaviour of human tooth enamel.

  6. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  7. Evolution of High Tooth Replacement Rates in Sauropod Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathlyn M.; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. Methodology/Principal Findings We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Conclusions/Significance Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently

  8. In Vitro Comparison of Zinc Phosphate and Glass Ionomers Ability to Inhibit Decalcification under and Adjacent to Orthodontic Bands.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    confer the ability to leach fluoride ions into the surrounding tooth enamel . Kidd 3 7 using an artifical caries tec- hnique with a diffusion controlled...5 - Enamel Changes Scoring System- 1. NONE: No color change evident 2. MILD: Slight change in enamel color 3.MODERATE: Definate whitening of enamel ...to adhere to stainless steel and to tooth enamel with a chemical bond 51 . Zinc phosphate, on the other hand, does not chemically adhere to enamel or

  9. Smile restoration through use of enamel microabrasion associated with tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Rahal, Vanessa; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    in 1989, correction of the color pattern of teeth can be obtained through the use of whitening products containing carbamide peroxide in custom trays. A considerable margin of clinical success has been shown when diligence to at-home protocols is achieved by the patient and supervised by the professional. Considering these possibilities, this article presents the microabrasion technique for removal of stains on dental enamel, followed by tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide and composite resin restoration, if required.

  10. Tooth movements in foxhounds after one or two alveolar corticotomies.

    PubMed

    Sanjideh, Payam A; Rossouw, P Emile; Campbell, Phillip M; Opperman, Lynne A; Buschang, Peter H

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this split-mouth experimental study was to determine (1) whether corticotomy procedures increase tooth movement and (2) the effects of a second corticotomy procedure after 4 weeks on the rate of tooth movement. The mandibular third and maxillary second premolars of five skeletally mature male foxhounds, approximately 2 years of age, were extracted. One randomly selected mandibular quadrant had buccal and lingual flaps and corticotomies performed around the second premolar; the other quadrant served as the control. Both maxillary quadrants had initial buccal flaps and corticotomies; one randomly selected quadrant had a second buccal flap surgery and corticotomy after 28 days. Coil springs (200 g force), along with a 0.045 mm diameter tube on a 0.040 mm diameter guiding wire, were used to move the mandibular second and maxillary third premolars. Records, including digital calliper measurements and radiographs, were taken on days 0, 10, 14, 28, 42, and 56. Multilevel statistical procedures were used to model longitudinal tooth movements. The radiographic measurements initially showed increasing mandibular tooth movement rates, peaking between 22 and 25 days, and then decelerating. Total mandibular tooth movements were significantly (P < 0.05) greater on the experimental (2.4 mm) than on the control (1.3 mm) side. The rates of maxillary tooth movement slowed over time, with significantly (P < 0.05) more overall tooth movement on the side that had two (2.3 mm) than one (2.0 mm) corticotomy procedure. Alveolar corticotomy significantly increases orthodontic tooth movement. Performing a second corticotomy procedure after 4 weeks maintained higher rates of tooth movement over a longer duration and produced greater overall tooth movement than performing just one initial corticotomy, but the difference was small.

  11. Hedgehog signaling is required at multiple stages of zebrafish tooth development.

    PubMed

    Jackman, William R; Yoo, James J; Stock, David W

    2010-11-30

    The accessibility of the developing zebrafish pharyngeal dentition makes it an advantageous system in which to study many aspects of tooth development from early initiation to late morphogenesis. In mammals, hedgehog signaling is known to be essential for multiple stages of odontogenesis; however, potential roles for the pathway during initiation of tooth development or in later morphogenesis are incompletely understood. We have identified mRNA expression of the hedgehog ligands shha and the receptors ptc1 and ptc2 during zebrafish pharyngeal tooth development. We looked for, but did not detect, tooth germ expression of the other known zebrafish hedgehog ligands shhb, dhh, ihha, or ihhb, suggesting that as in mammals, only Shh participates in zebrafish tooth development. Supporting this idea, we found that morphological and gene expression evidence of tooth initiation is eliminated in shha mutant embryos, and that morpholino antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of shha, but not shhb, function prevents mature tooth formation. Hedgehog pathway inhibition with the antagonist compound cyclopamine affected tooth formation at each stage in which we applied it: arresting development at early stages and disrupting mature tooth morphology when applied later. These results suggest that hedgehog signaling is required continuously during odontogenesis. In contrast, over-expression of shha had no effect on the developing dentition, possibly because shha is normally extensively expressed in the zebrafish pharyngeal region. We have identified previously unknown requirements for hedgehog signaling for early tooth initiation and later morphogenesis. The similarity of our results with data from mouse and other vertebrates suggests that despite gene duplication and changes in the location of where teeth form, the roles of hedgehog signaling in tooth development have been largely conserved during evolution.

  12. New Perspectives on Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Peter W.; Omar, Ridwaan

    2012-01-01

    Some of the efforts that have been made to document tooth wear are reviewed here with an emphasis on nonhuman mammals, literature with which dentists may not be very familiar. We project a change in research strategy from the description of wear at various scales of measurement towards investigation of the mechanical mechanisms that actually create the texture of a worn surface. These studies should reveal exactly how tooth tissue is lost and what aspects of the structure of dental tissues affect this. The most important aspects of the interaction between the tooth surface and wear particles would appear to be particle size, particle shape, their mechanical properties with respect to those of tooth tissues, and the influence of saliva. PMID:22536239

  13. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  14. Endodontic Treatment of an Anomalous Anterior Tooth with the Aid of a 3-dimensional Printed Physical Tooth Model.

    PubMed

    Byun, Chanhee; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong; Baek, Seung Hoon; Kim, Gyutae; Kim, Sahng G; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-06-01

    Endodontic treatment of tooth formation anomalies is a challenge to clinicians and as such requires a complete understanding of the aberrant root canal anatomy followed by careful root canal disinfection and obturation. Here, we report the use of a 3-dimensional (3D) printed physical tooth model including internal root canal structures for the endodontic treatment of a challenging tooth anomaly. A 12-year-old boy was referred for endodontic treatment of tooth #8. The tooth showed class II mobility with swelling and a sinus tract in the buccal mucosa and periapical radiolucency. The tooth presented a very narrow structure between the crown and root by distal concavity and a severely dilacerated root. Moreover, a perforation site with bleeding and another ditching site were identified around the cervical area in the access cavity. A translucent physical tooth model carrying the information on internal root canal structures was built through a 3-step process: data acquisition by cone-beam computed tomographic scanning, virtual modeling by image processing, and manufacturing by 3D printing. A custom-made guide jig was then fabricated to achieve a safe and precise working path to the root canal. Endodontic procedures including access cavity preparation were performed using the physical tooth model and the guide jig. At the 7-month follow-up, the endodontically treated tooth showed complete periapical healing with no clinical signs and symptoms. This case report describes a novel method of endodontic treatment of an anomalous maxillary central incisor with the aid of a physical tooth model and a custom-made guide jig via 3D printing technique. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Toothpaste Application Prior to Dental Bleaching on Whitening Effectiveness and Enamel Properties.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Junior, W F; Lima, D A N L; Tabchoury, C P M; Ambrosano, G M B; Aguiar, F H B; Lovadino, J R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the enamel properties and effectiveness of bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) when applying toothpastes with different active agents prior to dental bleaching. Seventy enamel blocks (4 × 4 × 2 mm) were submitted to in vitro treatment protocols in a tooth-brushing machine (n=10): with distilled water and exposure to placebo gel (negative control [NC]) or HP bleaching (positive control [PC]); and brushing with differing toothpastes prior to HP bleaching, including potassium nitrate toothpaste (PN) containing NaF, conventional sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste (FT), arginine-based toothpastes (PA and SAN), or a toothpaste containing bioactive glass (NM). Color changes were determined using the CIE L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), and a roughness (Ra) analysis was performed before and after treatments. Surface microhardness (SMH) and cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) were analyzed after treatment. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA for Ra, one-way ANOVA (SMH, ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), split-plot ANOVA (CSMH), and Tukey post hoc test (α<0.05). The relationship between the physical surface properties and color properties was evaluated using a multivariate Canonical correlation analysis. Color changes were statistically similar in the bleached groups. After treatments, SMH and CSMH decreased in PC. SMH increased significantly in the toothpaste groups vs the negative and positive control (NM > PA = SAN > all other groups) or decreased HP effects (CSMH). Ra increased in all bleached groups, with the exception of NM, which did not differ from the NC. The variation in the color variables (ΔL, Δa, and Δb) explained 21% of the variation in the physical surface variables (Ra and SMH). The application of toothpaste prior to dental bleaching did not interfere with the effectiveness of treatment. The bioactive glass based toothpaste protected the enamel against the deleterious

  16. Effect of alveolar ridge preservation after tooth extraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ortiz, G; Elangovan, S; Kramer, K W O; Blanchette, D; Dawson, D V

    2014-10-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation strategies are indicated to minimize the loss of ridge volume that typically follows tooth extraction. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effect that socket filling with a bone grafting material has on the prevention of postextraction alveolar ridge volume loss as compared with tooth extraction alone in nonmolar teeth. Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized clinical trials that fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Literature screening and article selection were conducted by 3 independent reviewers, while data extraction was performed by 2 independent reviewers. Outcome measures were mean horizontal ridge changes (buccolingual) and vertical ridge changes (midbuccal, midlingual, mesial, and distal). The influence of several variables of interest (i.e., flap elevation, membrane usage, and type of bone substitute employed) on the outcomes of ridge preservation therapy was explored via subgroup analyses. We found that alveolar ridge preservation is effective in limiting physiologic ridge reduction as compared with tooth extraction alone. The clinical magnitude of the effect was 1.89 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41, 2.36; p < .001) in terms of buccolingual width, 2.07 mm (95% CI: 1.03, 3.12; p < .001) for midbuccal height, 1.18 mm (95% CI: 0.17, 2.19; p = .022) for midlingual height, 0.48 mm (95% CI: 0.18, 0.79; p = .002) for mesial height, and 0.24 mm (95% CI: -0.05, 0.53; p = .102) for distal height changes. Subgroup analyses revealed that flap elevation, the usage of a membrane, and the application of a xenograft or an allograft are associated with superior outcomes, particularly on midbuccal and midlingual height preservation. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  17. Tooth enamel remineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arends, J.; Ten Cate, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    In this paper a survey is given on tooth remineralization from remineralizing solutions and from saliva. The substrate, sound tooth enamel, is described from a chemical as well as from an ultrastructural point of view. Because saliva plays a crucial role in in vivo remineralizations, the most relevant properties of saliva, such as the thermodynamic stabilities with respect to calcium phosphates of interest, are considered. Tooth remineralization can be divided into three main types: lesion remineralization, surface softened remineralization and etched enamel remineralization. The main emphasis in this survey is given to lesion and surface softened remineralization which are the most important from a practical view point. In these two cases, the reaction order, the activation energy and the mechanism are discussed as well as the ultrastructure of remineralized material, the influence of various agents (especially F -)and differences between in vitro and in vivo data.

  18. Comparison of two low sensitivity whiteners.

    PubMed

    Callan, Richard S; Browning, William D; Downey, Mary C; Brackett, Martha G

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate two commercially available doctor-supplied, patient-applied, bleaching systems for their ability to whiten the maxillary anterior teeth while at the same time not causing sensitivity. 46 participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups: One group received Rembrandt Xtra-Comfort and the other group Nite White Excel 2Z. Bleaching stents were fabricated and the bleaching systems were used following manufacturers' instructions. Participants recorded tray use and any sensitivity on a daily basis. Participants bleached for 2 weeks followed by 2 weeks of no bleaching. Color was evaluated at the first, second and fourth week following the initial delivery of bleaching trays. Color change was measured using the Vita Classic Shade Guide arranged by value. As a group, participants in the NW2Z group bleached for 302 days with a total of 48 days (16%) of sensitivity recorded. The Rembrandt Xtra Comfort group bleached for 313 total days with 97 days (31%) of sensitivity recorded. The difference in sensitivity between the two products proved to be statistically significant (Chi-square analysis, P < or = 0.0001). The median shade change for both products following 2 weeks of active treatment was six tabs. At the 4-week evaluation, the median shade change was 5.5 and 6.0 tabs respectively for Rembrandt and Nite White. There was no statistical difference between the products in respect to shade change.

  19. Functional Tooth Regeneration Using a Bioengineered Tooth Unit as a Mature Organ Replacement Regenerative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Aya; Ogawa, Miho; Yasukawa, Masato; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Morita, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Etsuko; Nakao, Kazuhisa; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kasugai, Shohei; Saito, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Donor organ transplantation is currently an essential therapeutic approach to the replacement of a dysfunctional organ as a result of disease, injury or aging in vivo. Recent progress in the area of regenerative therapy has the potential to lead to bioengineered mature organ replacement in the future. In this proof of concept study, we here report a further development in this regard in which a bioengineered tooth unit comprising mature tooth, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, was successfully transplanted into a properly-sized bony hole in the alveolar bone through bone integration by recipient bone remodeling in a murine transplantation model system. The bioengineered tooth unit restored enough the alveolar bone in a vertical direction into an extensive bone defect of murine lower jaw. Engrafted bioengineered tooth displayed physiological tooth functions such as mastication, periodontal ligament function for bone remodeling and responsiveness to noxious stimulations. This study thus represents a substantial advance and demonstrates the real potential for bioengineered mature organ replacement as a next generation regenerative therapy. PMID:21765896

  20. Tooth Avulsion in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause-Parello, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    Tooth avulsions occur when a tooth is displaced from its socket. Tooth avulsions are common dental injuries that may occur before, during, or after school. Therefore, it is essential that school nurses be well prepared to intervene when such a dental emergency arises. It is also imperative that school nurses and school personnel are fully equipped…

  1. Extraction of the geomagnetic activity effect from TEC data: A comparison between the spectral whitening method and 28 day running median

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhou; Wang, Jing-Song; Deng, Yue; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2017-03-01

    The spectral whitening method (SWM) has been previously proved to be very effective at identifying ionospheric disturbances on foF2 (the critical frequency of ionospheric F2 layer). To continuously investigate the strength of the new method, in this paper SWM has been used to extract the effect of geomagnetic activity on total electron content (TEC) and has been compared with the traditional 28 day running median centered (RMC) method. First, ionospheric variations during quiet and disturbed conditions are analyzed by both SWM and RMC. The results from RMC, compared with those from SWM, overestimate the disturbance occurrence by about 5-20% during the geomagnetic storms and up to 35% during the quiet time. The possible reason is that the results can be contaminated by the residuals of periodic components in the RMC identified disturbances. Meanwhile, the power spectral analysis of the disturbance field shows that the annual and diurnal variations are still significant in RMC results but very weak in SWM results, which indicates that SWM has some advantage to clean up the background variation. Finally, the analysis of the spatial correlation of the disturbance field with F10.7 and Ap illustrates that the effects of solar and geomagnetic activities from SWM are significantly reduced and enhanced, respectively. It suggests that the SWM is more effective in extracting the effect of geomagnetic activity from TEC than RMC. The relative deviation of TEC derived by SWM is more sensitive to geomagnetic activity than solar activity.

  2. [Effect of gap size between tooth and restorative materials on microbiolism based caries in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen-bin; Li, Yun

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of gap size between tooth and restorative materials on microbiolism based caries in vitro. Tooth blocks made of human molars without caries and the same size composite resin blocks were selected and prepared. Tooth-resin matrix was mounted on resin base with a gap size of 0, 25, 50, 100, 190, 250 µm and a control group was dealed with adhesive system. Six experimental groups and one control group were included, with 8 samples in one group and a total of 56 samples. The samples were cultured by a 14-day sequential batch culture technique. The development of outer surface lesion and wall lesion was assessed with confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) by measuring the maximum lesion depth, fluorescence areas and average fluorescence value. The data were collected and statistically analyzed. The deposits of the tooth-restoration interface and the development of the carious lesion were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Most groups showed outer surface lesion and wall surface lesions observed by CLSM and SEM except 2 samples in control group. There was no significant difference on the outer surface lesion (P > 0.05). The maximum lesion depth [(1145.37 ± 198.98), (1190.12 ± 290.80) µm respectively], the maximum lesion length, fluorescence areas and average fluorescence value of 190 and 250 µm groups' wall lesions were significantly higher than the 0, 25, 50 and 100 µm groups [the maximum lesion depth was (205.25 ± 122.61), (303.87 ± 118.80), (437.75 ± 154.88), (602.87 ± 269.13) µm respectively], P < 0.01. With the increase of the gap size, the demineralization developed more seriously. While the maximum lesion depth, the maximum lesion length and fluorescence areas of 0, 25, 50 µm groups' wall lesions were of no significant difference. There was close relationship between gap size and wall lesion when the gap was above 100 µm at tooth-composite resin interface. The existence of gap was the main influencing factor on the

  3. Timeframe of socket cortication after tooth extraction: A retrospective radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Bertl, Kristina; Kukla, Edmund Benjamin; Albugami, Rajaa; Beck, Florian; Gahleitner, André; Stavropoulos, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    To assess the timeframe between tooth extraction and radiographically detectable socket cortication in humans. Two hundred and fifty patients with a CT scan ≤36 months after tooth extraction were included. First, three orthoradial multiplanar reconstruction slices, representing the major part of the extraction socket, were scored regarding the degree of bone healing as (i) healed, that is, complete/continuous cortication of the socket entrance, or (ii) non-healed. Thereafter, based on the results of all three slices, the stage of cortication of the extraction socket, as one unit, was classified as (i) non-corticated, that is, all three slices judged as non-healed, (ii) partially corticated, that is, 1 or 2 slices judged as non-healed, or (iii) completely corticated, that is, all three slices judged as healed. The possible effect of several independent parameters, that is, age, gender, timeframe between tooth extraction and CT scan, tooth type, extent of radiographic bone loss of the extracted tooth, tooth-gap type, smoking status, presence of any systemic disease, and medication intake, on cortication status was statistically evaluated. Three to 6 months after tooth extraction, 27% of the sockets were judged as non-corticated and 53% were judged as partially corticated. After 9-12 months, >80% of the sockets were corticated, while some incompletely corticated sockets were detected up to 15 months after extraction. Each additional month after tooth extraction contributed significantly to a higher likelihood of a more advanced stage of cortication, while radiographic bone loss ≥75% significantly prolonged cortication time; no other independent variable had a significant effect. The results indicate a considerably long timeframe until complete cortication of an extraction socket, that is, 3-6 months after tooth extraction 3 of 4 sockets were still not completely corticated, and only after 9-12 months, complete cortication was observed in about 80% of the

  4. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Andréa Abi Rached; Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Roncolato, Ávery; Merchan, Hugo; Floros, Michael Christopher; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista de

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC - Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC - Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 - At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 - immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  5. Titanium dioxide in dental enamel as a trace element and its variation with bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Sedó, Randall; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Background Titanium is a less studied trace element in dental enamel. Literature relates an increased Titanium concentration with a decreased enamel crystal domain size, which in turn is related to a higher color value. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of tooth bleaching agents on its concentration in dental enamel by means of confocal Raman spectroscopy. Material and Methods Human teeth were randomly distributed in six experimental groups (n=10) and submitted to different bleaching protocols according to the manufacturer´s instructions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy was carried out in order to identify and quantify the presence of titanium dioxide molecules in enamel prior to and during whitening. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results Titanium dioxide concentration was negatively affected by the longer bleaching protocols (at-home bleaching gels). All in-office whitening products increased significantly the studied molecule (p≤0,05). Conclusions All dental specimens depicted the presence of titanium dioxide as a trace element in dental enamel. Bleaching gels that have to be applied at higher concentrations but for shorter periods of time increase the concentration of titanium dioxide, whilst at-home whitening gels used for longer periods of time despite the lower concentration caused a loss in titanium. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, titanium dioxide. PMID:29930771

  6. Titanium dioxide in dental enamel as a trace element and its variation with bleaching.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Durán-Sedó, Randall; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2018-06-01

    Titanium is a less studied trace element in dental enamel. Literature relates an increased Titanium concentration with a decreased enamel crystal domain size, which in turn is related to a higher color value. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of tooth bleaching agents on its concentration in dental enamel by means of confocal Raman spectroscopy. Human teeth were randomly distributed in six experimental groups (n=10) and submitted to different bleaching protocols according to the manufacturer´s instructions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy was carried out in order to identify and quantify the presence of titanium dioxide molecules in enamel prior to and during whitening. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance ( p ≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Titanium dioxide concentration was negatively affected by the longer bleaching protocols (at-home bleaching gels). All in-office whitening products increased significantly the studied molecule ( p ≤0,05). All dental specimens depicted the presence of titanium dioxide as a trace element in dental enamel. Bleaching gels that have to be applied at higher concentrations but for shorter periods of time increase the concentration of titanium dioxide, whilst at-home whitening gels used for longer periods of time despite the lower concentration caused a loss in titanium. Key words: Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, titanium dioxide.

  7. Analysis of the effect of CPP-ACP tooth mousse on enamel remineralization by circularly polarized images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guotao; Liu, Xinqiang; Hou, Yongfu

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate tooth mousse on the remineralization of bovine incisor by circularly polarized images. Eighty bovine incisors, each with a 4 x 4 mm artificially demineralized area, were used. The samples were divided into four groups: Group A, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate tooth mousse; Group B, fluoride toothpaste; Group C, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate tooth mousse and fluoride toothpaste; and Group D, no treatment. Circularly polarized images were taken after the specimens were treated for 3, 6, 9, or 12 weeks, and the size of the demineralized area and the mean grey level were measured. Data analysis was done using repeated measures variance analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients were computed to evaluate the correlation between the size of the demineralized area and the mean grey level. In all four groups, the size of the demineralized area and the mean grey level declined with time. The size of the demineralized area of Group C was significantly smaller than that of Group A at the end of the third and sixth weeks (P = .039, P = .000, respectively), and the mean grey level of Group C was lower than that of Group A at the end of the 6th and 12th weeks (P = .037, P = .004, respectively). At the end of the 6th, 9th, and 12th weeks, the size of the demineralized area of Group C was smaller (P = .000, P = .005, P = .005, respectively) and the mean grey level was lower (P = .000) than those of Group B. No statistically significant correlations were detected between the size of the demineralized area and the mean grey level. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate tooth mousse can reduce the size and mean grey level of demineralized areas and promote the remineralization of bovine enamel. Combined application with fluoride toothpaste strengthens the effect.

  8. Effect of a School-Based Supervised Tooth Brushing Program In Mexico City: A Cluster Randomized Intervention.

    PubMed

    Borges-Yáñez, S Aída; Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    Large-scale school-based programs effectively provide health education and preventive strategies. SaludARTE is a school-based program, including supervised tooth brushing, implemented in 51 elementary schools in Mexico City. To assess the three-month efficacy of supervised tooth brushing in reducing dental plaque, gingival inflammation, and bleeding on probing in schoolchildren participating in SaludARTE. This was a pragmatic cluster randomized intervention, with two parallel branches. Four randomly selected schools participating in SaludARTE (n=200) and one control school, which did not participate in the program (CG) (n=50), were assessed. Clusters were not randomly allocated to intervention. The main outcomes were as follows: mean percentage gingival units with no inflammation, dental surfaces with no dental plaque, and gingival margins with no bleeding. The independent variable was supervised tooth brushing at school once a day after a meal. Guardians and children responded to a questionnaire on sociodemographic and oral hygiene practices, and children were examined dentally. Mean percentage differences were compared (baseline and follow-up). A total of 75% of guardians from the intervention group (IG) and 77% from the CG answered the questionnaire. Of these, 89.3% were women, with a mean age of 36.9±8.5 years. No differences in sociodemographic variables were observed between groups, and 151 children from the IG and 35 from the CG were examined at baseline and follow-up. Mean percentage differences for plaque-free surfaces (8.8±28.5%) and healthy gingival units (23.3%±23.2%) were significantly higher in the IG. The school-supervised tooth brushing program is effective in improving oral hygiene and had a greater impact on plaque and gingivitis than on gingival bleeding. It is necessary to reinforce the oral health education component of the program.

  9. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    MedlinePlus

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  10. Effect of low level laser and low intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy on bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Alazzawi, Mohammed Mahmood Jawad; Husein, Adam; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Hassan, Rozita; Shaari, Rumaizi; Azlina, Ahmad; Salzihan, M S

    2018-04-16

    Quality bone regeneration, which leads to the improvement of bone remodeling, is essential for orthodontic treatment. In order to improve bone regeneration and increase the amount of tooth movement, different techniques have been implemented. The object of this study is to compare the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), and their combination on bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement. Eighty (80) male, 6-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were grouped in to four groups, the first group was irradiated with (940 nm) diode laser, second group with LIPUS, and third group with combination of both LLLT and LIPUS. A forth group used was a control group in an incomplete block split-mouth design. The LLLT and LIPUS were used to treat the area around the moving tooth once a day on days 0-7, then the experiment was ended in each experimental endpoint (1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days). For amount of tooth movement, models were imaged and analyzed. Histological examination was performed after staining with (hematoxylin and eosin) and (alizarin red and Alcian Blue) stain. One step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR was also performed to elucidate the gene expression of RANK, RANKL, OPG, and RUNX-2. The amount of tooth movement, the histological bone remodeling, and the RT-PCR were significantly greater in the treatment groups than that in the control group. Among the treatment groups, the combination group was the highest and the LIPUS group was the lowest. These findings suggest that LLLT and LIPUS can enhance the velocity of tooth movement and improve the quality of bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement.

  11. Facile synthesis of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@ porous hollow yeast-based carbonaceous microspheres for fluorescent whitening agent-VBL wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Pei; Tong, Zhiqing; Bai, Bo, E-mail: baibochina@163.com

    Porous hollow carbonaceous microspheres (PHCMs) fabricated from yeast cells by hydrothermal treatment have stimulated interest because of their outstanding chemical and physical properties. Herein, the functionalizations of PHCMs by further coating of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles onto the surface were carried out. The structure of resulted α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@PHCMs products were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and BET specific surface area measurements (BET), respectively. Its promising application was evaluated by the Fenton-like degradation of fluorescent whitening agent-VBL from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: In thismore » work, novel α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@porous hollow carbonaceous microspheres (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@PHCMs) were synthesized through a combination of hydrothermal method and calcinations route and achieved excellent removal efficiency for fluorescent whitening Agent-VBL. - Highlights: • The hybrid α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@ porous hollow microspheres (PHCMs) were firstly fabricated. • The formation mechanism of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@PHCMs microspheres was proposed and verified. • Dithizone played a key role in the synthesis of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@PHCMs composites. • A favorable removal for the fluorescent whitening agent-VBL were achieved.« less

  12. Tooth Discoloration in Patients With Neonatal Diabetes After Transfer Onto Glibenclamide

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraguru, Janani; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Greeley, Siri Atma W.; Nuboer, Roos; Støy, Julie; Philipson, Louis H.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess if tooth discoloration is a novel side effect of sulfonylurea therapy in patients with permanent neonatal diabetes due to mutations in KCNJ11. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 67 patients with a known KCNJ11 mutation who had been successfully transferred from insulin injections onto oral sulfonylureas were contacted and asked about the development of tooth discoloration after transfer. RESULTS Altered tooth appearance was identified in 5 of the 67 patients. This was variable in severity, ranging from mild discoloration/staining (n = 4) to loss of enamel (n = 1) and was only seen in patients taking glibenclamide (glyburide). CONCLUSIONS These previously unreported side effects may relate to the developing tooth and/or to the high local concentrations in the children who frequently chewed glibenclamide tablets or took it as a concentrated solution. Given the multiple benefits of sulfonylurea treatment for patients with activating KCNJ11 mutations, this association warrants further investigation but should not preclude such treatment. PMID:19435956

  13. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption

    PubMed Central

    Wimer, H.F.; Yamada, S.S.; Yang, T.; Holmbeck, K.; Foster, B.L.

    2016-01-01

    indicate that MT1-MMP activity in the dental mesenchyme, and not in epithelial-derived HERS, is essential for proper tooth root formation and eruption. In summary, our studies point to an indispensable role for MT1-MMP-mediated matrix remodeling in tooth eruption through effects on bone formation, soft tissue remodeling and organization of the follicle/PDL region. PMID:26780723

  14. Guide for Inspection of Coatings Applied to Hydraulic Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    observed, many specifiers provide that the surfaces must be sweep blasted to provide a " tooth " before topcoating, or wiped with some strong solvent. CW...termed anchor pattern, profile, or " tooth ," and is essentially a pattern of peaks and valleys on the steel surface. This pattern is obtained by abrasive...situation, a sealer must be applied. Blushing Blushing is the hazing or whitening of the finish as a result of the absorption and "" retention of

  15. [The effect of fluoride-containing tooth paste on dental plaque and on fluoride level in the mouth].

    PubMed

    Oomori, H

    1989-01-01

    Various kinds of fluoride have been used for a long time and there are many reports concerning fluorides and their effects. Recently, the caries-inhibiting action of fluoride-containing tooth paste has been given much attention. In this study, I tried to clarify the residual time and amount of fluoride derived from the fluoride-containing tooth paste in the mouth, as well as to assess possible variation in bacterial composition in the dental plaque bacteriologically and biochemically. In the study on the fluoride clearance from the mouth, both 1.0 g and 0.5 g of paste showed the same reduction rates; and about an 80% reduction was recognized between the value at 3 minutes and that at 30 minutes, and about a 40% reduction from the 30-minute to the 60-minute interval. Next, a study on the variation in plaque bacteria was carried out. The total number of the CFU on each plate was not different between samples obtained before and after the use of the tooth paste; moreover, no difference was noted between aerobic and anaerobic culture. However, when plaque before and after brushing with fluoride-containing tooth paste were cultured in 10% sucrose solution, the differences of acid production such as lactic acid, acetic acid, and formic acid were demonstrated. Namely, these acid productions were inhibited after the use of fluoride, especially lactic acid was strongly inhibited. On the other hand, when Str. mutans from the plaque obtained after the use of fluoride-containing tooth paste was cultured in fluoride-free BHI broth, the inhibition of acid from carbohydrates was not shown clearly.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. UV EFFECTS IN TOOTH ENAMEL AND THEIR POSSIBLE APPLICATION IN EPR DOSIMETRY WITH FRONT TEETH

    PubMed Central

    Sholom, S.; Desrosiers, M.; Chumak, V.; Luckyanov, N.; Simon, S.L.; Bouville, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on ionizing radiation biodosimetry were studied in human tooth enamel samples using the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in X-band. For samples in the form of grains, UV-specific EPR spectra were spectrally distinct from that produced by exposure to gamma radiation. From larger enamel samples, the UV penetration depth was determined to be in the 60–120 μm range. The difference in EPR spectra from UV exposure and from exposure to gamma radiation samples was found to be a useful marker of UV equivalent dose (defined as the apparent contribution to the gamma dose in mGy that results from UV radiation absorption) in tooth enamel. This concept was preliminarily tested on front teeth from inhabitants of the region of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (Kazakhstan) who might have received some exposure to gamma radiation from the nuclear tests conducted there as well as from normal UV radiation in sunlight. The technique developed here to quantify and subtract the UV contribution to the measured tooth is currently limited to cumulative dose measurements with a component of UV equivalent dose equal to or greater than 300 mGy. PMID:20065706

  17. Beneficial effects of hydroxyapatite on enamel subjected to 30% hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Zhejun; Tong, Hua; Hu, Jiming; Wang, Yining

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of combination of hydroxyapatite (HA) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) on color, microhardness and morphology of human tooth enamel. Forty-eight human dental blocks were obtained from 12 pairs of premolars and were randomly divided into four groups. Group DW was treated with distilled water, group HP with 30% HP, group HA+DW with HA mixed with distilled water and group HA+HP with HA mixed with 30% HP. Baseline and final color measurements and microhardness test were carried out before and after bleaching experiments. Two specimens from each group were selected for morphological investigation after final tests. The DeltaE of group HP and HA+HP were significantly higher than those of group DW (p=0.000 and p=0.000) and group HA+DW (p=0.000 and p=0.000). The percentage microhardness loss of group HA+HP was significantly lower than that of group HP (p=0.047), but significantly higher than those of group DW (p=0.000) and group HA+DW (p=0.000). The obvious variation of morphology was only observed on enamel surfaces in group HP. This study suggested that combination of HA and HP was effective in tooth whitening. HA could significantly reduce the microhardness loss of enamel caused by 30% HP and keep enamel surface morphology almost unchanged.

  18. Evidence to Support Tooth Brushing in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully. PMID:21532045

  19. Evidence to support tooth brushing in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ames, Nancy J

    2011-05-01

    Tooth brushing in critically ill patients has been advocated by many as a standard of care despite the limited evidence to support this practice. Attention has been focused on oral care as the evidence accumulates to support an association between the bacteria in the oral microbiome and those respiratory pathogens that cause pneumonia. It is plausible to assume that respiratory pathogens originating in the oral cavity are aspirated into the lungs, causing infection. A recent study of the effects of a powered toothbrush on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia was stopped early because of a lack of effect in the treatment group. This review summarizes the evidence that supports the effectiveness of tooth brushing in critically ill adults and children receiving mechanical ventilation. Possible reasons for the lack of benefit of tooth brushing demonstrated in clinical trials are discussed. Recommendations for future trials in critically ill patients are suggested. With increased emphasis being placed on oral care, the evidence that supports this intervention must be evaluated carefully.

  20. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth.

  1. Delayed manifestation of bilateral scleral thinning after I-BRITE(®) procedure and review of literature for cosmetic eye-whitening procedures.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; McCaughey, Michael V; Fenzl, Carlton R; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Kramer, Gregory D; Mamalis, Nick

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of delayed-onset bilateral scleral thinning and calcium deposition following a cosmetic ocular-whitening procedure (I-BRITE(®)). A 33-year-old male patient with a history of right-sided ptosis repair and left-sided anterior uveitis had previously undergone bilateral I-BRITE treatment for chronic conjunctival hyperemia. Four years after the procedure, the patient was referred to our institution with bilateral scleral thinning and overlying calcific depositions. A literature review was performed through PubMed from 1980 through 2014 using the search terms 'cosmetic', 'ocular', 'conjunctivectomy', 'regional conjunctivectomy', 'I-BRITE', 'eye-whitening', 'scleritis', 'necrotizing scleritis', 'anterior uveitis', 'mitomycin C', '5-fluorouracil', and 'bevacizumab', along with associated cross-referencing from relevant articles. Examination of the patient revealed bilateral necrotizing scleritis within the nasal region of both eyes. Calcified plaques were also present within the areas of scleromalacia, along with epithelial defects demonstrated with fluorescein staining. Although evidence of previous intraocular inflammation was apparent within the left eye, there were no active signs of inflammation evident within either eye on initial presentation. Complication rates reported in the literature include: scleral thinning (1.8%), calcific plaque formation (2.9%), fibrovascular proliferation (13%), diplopia (1.2%), elevation of intraocular pressure (4.2%), and recurrence of conjunctival hyperemia (2.1%). Cosmetic ocular whitening procedures have an attendant high complication rate, and have been associated with several adverse postoperative complications, which have in turn generated several reservations regarding the veritable benefit of the procedure. Many postsurgical complications may demonstrate delayed apparition, varying from several months to several years after primary surgical intervention as in the case reported here.

  2. Economic evaluation of single-tooth replacement: dental implant versus fixed partial denture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younhee; Park, Joo-Yeon; Park, Sun-Young; Oh, Sung-Hee; Jung, YeaJi; Kim, Ji-Min; Yoo, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Seong-Kyun

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a dental implant compared with a three-unit tooth-supported fixed partial denture (FPD) for the replacement of a single tooth in 2010. A decision tree was developed to estimate cost-effectiveness over a 10-year period. The survival rates of single-tooth implants and FPDs were extracted from a meta-analysis of single-arm studies. Medical costs included initial treatment costs, maintenance costs, and costs to treat complications. Patient surveys were used to obtain the costs of the initial single-tooth implant or FPD. Maintenance costs and costs to treat complications were based on surveys of seven clinical experts at dental clinics or hospitals. Transportation costs were calculated based on the number of visits for implant or FPD treatment. Patient time costs were estimated using the number of visits and time required, hourly wage, and employment rate. Future costs were discounted by 5% to convert to present values. The results of a 10-year period model showed that a single dental implant cost US $261 (clinic) to $342 (hospital) more than an FPD and had an average survival rate that was 10.4% higher. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $2,514 in a clinic and $3,290 in a hospital for a prosthesis in situ for 10 years. The sensitivity analysis showed that initial treatment costs and survival rate influenced the cost-effectiveness. If the cost of an implant were reduced to 80% of the current cost, the implant would become the dominant intervention. Although the level of evidence for effectiveness is low, and some aspects of single-tooth implants or FPDs, such as satisfaction, were not considered, this study will help patients requiring single-tooth replacement to choose the best treatment option.

  3. Auditory function in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Rance, Gary; Ryan, Monique M; Bayliss, Kristen; Gill, Kathryn; O'Sullivan, Caitlin; Whitechurch, Marny

    2012-05-01

    The peripheral manifestations of the inherited neuropathies are increasingly well characterized, but their effects upon cranial nerve function are not well understood. Hearing loss is recognized in a minority of children with this condition, but has not previously been systemically studied. A clear understanding of the prevalence and degree of auditory difficulties in this population is important as hearing impairment can impact upon speech/language development, social interaction ability and educational progress. The aim of this study was to investigate auditory pathway function, speech perception ability and everyday listening and communication in a group of school-aged children with inherited neuropathies. Twenty-six children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease confirmed by genetic testing and physical examination participated. Eighteen had demyelinating neuropathies (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1) and eight had the axonal form (Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2). While each subject had normal or near-normal sound detection, individuals in both disease groups showed electrophysiological evidence of auditory neuropathy with delayed or low amplitude auditory brainstem responses. Auditory perception was also affected, with >60% of subjects with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 and >85% of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 suffering impaired processing of auditory temporal (timing) cues and/or abnormal speech understanding in everyday listening conditions.

  4. Effect of the crown design and interface lute parameters on the stress-state of a machined crown-tooth system: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Shahrbaf, Shirin; vanNoort, Richard; Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Ghassemieh, Elaheh; Martin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    The effect of preparation design and the physical properties of the interface lute on the restored machined ceramic crown-tooth complex are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to determine, by means of three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) the effect of the tooth preparation design and the elastic modulus of the cement on the stress state of the cemented machined ceramic crown-tooth complex. The three-dimensional structure of human premolar teeth, restored with adhesively cemented machined ceramic crowns, was digitized with a micro-CT scanner. An accurate, high resolution, digital replica model of a restored tooth was created. Two preparation designs, with different occlusal morphologies, were modeled with cements of 3 different elastic moduli. Interactive medical image processing software (mimics and professional CAD modeling software) was used to create sophisticated digital models that included the supporting structures; periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The generated models were imported into an FEA software program (hypermesh version 10.0, Altair Engineering Inc.) with all degrees of freedom constrained at the outer surface of the supporting cortical bone of the crown-tooth complex. Five different elastic moduli values were given to the adhesive cement interface 1.8GPa, 4GPa, 8GPa, 18.3GPa and 40GPa; the four lower values are representative of currently used cementing lutes and 40GPa is set as an extreme high value. The stress distribution under simulated applied loads was determined. The preparation design demonstrated an effect on the stress state of the restored tooth system. The cement elastic modulus affected the stress state in the cement and dentin structures but not in the crown, the pulp, the periodontal ligament or the cancellous and cortical bone. The results of this study suggest that both the choice of the preparation design and the cement elastic modulus can affect the stress state within the restored crown-tooth

  5. A review of tooth colour and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Andrew; Hopkinson, Ian; Deng, Yan; Westland, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    To review current knowledge on the definition of tooth whiteness and its application within dentistry, together with the measured range of tooth colours. 'Medline' and 'ISI Web of Sciences' databases were searched electronically with key words tooth, teeth, colour, colour, white and whiteness. The application of colour science within dentistry has permitted the measurement of tooth colour in an objective way, with the most common colour space in current use being the CIELAB (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). Indeed, many investigators from a range of different countries have reported L*, a* and b* values for teeth measured in vivo using instrumental techniques such as spectrophotometers, colorimeters and image analysis of digital images. In general, these studies show a large range in L*, a* and b* values, but consistently show that there is a significant contribution of b* value or yellowness in natural tooth colour. Further developments in colour science have lead to the description of tooth whiteness and changes in tooth whiteness based on whiteness indices, with the most relevant and applicable being the WIO whiteness index, a modified version of the CIE whiteness index.

  6. Effect of Different Ceramic Crown Preparations on Tooth Structure Loss: An In Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, Ashkan

    Objective: To quantify and compare the amount of tooth-structure reduction following the full-coverage preparations for crown materials of porcelain-fused-to-metal, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic and yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline for three tooth morphologies. Methods: Groups of resin teeth of different morphologies were individually weighed to high precision, then prepared following the preparation guidelines. The teeth were re-weighed after preparation and the amount of structural reduction was calculated. Statistical analyses were performed to find out if there was a significant difference among the groups. Results: Amount of tooth reduction for zirconia crown preparations was the lowest and statistically different compared with the other two materials. No statistical significance was found between the amount of reduction for porcelain-fused-to-metal and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic crowns. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, more tooth structure can be saved when utilizing zirconia full-coverage restorations compared with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic and porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns in maxillary central incisors, first premolars and first molars.

  7. Effect of interleukin-4 on orthodontic tooth movement and associated root resorption.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Zaki; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Ishida, Masahiko; Sugisawa, Haruki; Ida, Hiroto; Jafari, Saeed; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a recognized immunomodulatory cytokine that regulates bone homeostasis. However, the influence of IL-4 on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) and subsequent root resorption is still unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IL-4 on tooth movement and its associated root resorption in a mouse model. The maxillary first molars of four male mice for each experimental group were subjected to mesial force by a nickel titanium coil spring for 12 days. Control mice were not given appliances and injections. Varying doses of IL-4 were injected locally, adjacent to the first molar. Two sets of experiments were designed. The first set was composed of three groups: the control, treatment with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or 1.5 µg/day of IL-4. The second set was composed of five groups: the control, treatment with 0 (PBS only), 0.015, 0.15, or 1.5 µg/day of IL-4. The distance of OTM was measured and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive cells along the loaded alveolar bone and root surface were identified. The root resorption associated with OTM was evaluated by a scanning electron microscope. The amount of OTM and the number of osteoclasts were significantly decreased in the IL-4-treated mice. Moreover, IL-4 significantly suppressed force-induced odontoclasts and root resorption. IL-4 inhibits tooth movement and prevents root resorption in the mouse model. These results suggest that IL-4 could be used as a useful adjunct to regulate the extent of OTM and also to control root resorption. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A windowing and mapping strategy for gear tooth fault detection of a planetary gearbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xihui; Zuo, Ming J.; Liu, Libin

    2016-12-01

    When there is a single cracked tooth in a planet gear, the cracked tooth is enmeshed for very short time duration in comparison to the total time of a full revolution of the planet gear. The fault symptom generated by the single cracked tooth may be very weak. This study aims to develop a windowing and mapping strategy to interpret the vibration signal of a planetary gear at the tooth level. The fault symptoms generated by a single cracked tooth of the planet gear of interest can be extracted. The health condition of the planet gear can be assessed by comparing the differences among the signals of all teeth of the planet gear. The proposed windowing and mapping strategy is tested with both simulated vibration signals and experimental vibration signals. The tooth signals can be successfully decomposed and a single tooth fault on a planet gear can be effectively detected.

  9. Ritual tooth modification among the Baka pygmies in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Agbor, A M; Azodo, C C; Naidoo, S

    2015-09-01

    Ritual tooth mutilation is a relatively understudied human body mutilatory practices. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of ritual tooth modification, teeth cleaning measures and herbal medications for their oral health problems among the Baka pygmies in Cameroon. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and March, 2012 using semi-structured questionnaire as the tool of data collection. Intra-oral examinations were carried out to determine the dental hard tissue loss using Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Fifty-six pygmies with ritual tooth modification made of 34 males (60.7%) and 22 females (39.3%) with a mean age of 31 years were interviewed and had oral health examination. The reported age at which the tooth modification was done was between 10 and 15 years with mean age as 12 ± 1.66 years. More than half (58.9%) of the participants reported the tooth filing as painful and nearly two-thirds (64.3%) of the participants reported having persistent pain afterwards. The upper right central and lateral incisors were the most commonly modified teeth. A total of 42.9%, 12.5% and 7.1% of the participants had Smith and Knight TWI scores of 2, 3 and 4 respectively. All the participants reported cleaning their teeth at least once-daily with about two-thirds (66.1%) of them doing so with chewing stick. The majority (67.9%) of the participants reported cleaning their teeth for cosmetic reasons [to remove dirt' (60.7%) and 'to remove stains' (7.1%)]. The oral health problems among the participants in form of tooth sensitivity, toothache and dental abscess were treated with plant-based traditional medicines from Irvingia gabonensis, Ricinodendron heudoletti, Pterocarpus soyauxii, Alchornea cordifolia and Piptadeniastrum africanum. Ritual tooth modification is a painful mutilatory practice which is culturally significant for the Baka pygmies without health benefit. There is need for intervention to stop this harmful traditional

  10. The effects of relative food item size on optimal tooth cusp sharpness during brittle food item processing

    PubMed Central

    Berthaume, Michael A.; Dumont, Elizabeth R.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Grosse, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Teeth are often assumed to be optimal for their function, which allows researchers to derive dietary signatures from tooth shape. Most tooth shape analyses normalize for tooth size, potentially masking the relationship between relative food item size and tooth shape. Here, we model how relative food item size may affect optimal tooth cusp radius of curvature (RoC) during the fracture of brittle food items using a parametric finite-element (FE) model of a four-cusped molar. Morphospaces were created for four different food item sizes by altering cusp RoCs to determine whether optimal tooth shape changed as food item size changed. The morphospaces were also used to investigate whether variation in efficiency metrics (i.e. stresses, energy and optimality) changed as food item size changed. We found that optimal tooth shape changed as food item size changed, but that all optimal morphologies were similar, with one dull cusp that promoted high stresses in the food item and three cusps that acted to stabilize the food item. There were also positive relationships between food item size and the coefficients of variation for stresses in food item and optimality, and negative relationships between food item size and the coefficients of variation for stresses in the enamel and strain energy absorbed by the food item. These results suggest that relative food item size may play a role in selecting for optimal tooth shape, and the magnitude of these selective forces may change depending on food item size and which efficiency metric is being selected. PMID:25320068

  11. Factors Affecting Oral Hygiene and Tooth Brushing in Preschool Children, Shiraz/Iran.

    PubMed

    S, Shaghaghian; M, Zeraatkar

    2017-06-01

    Inadequate tooth brushing and inappropriate oral hygiene can lead to dental caries, the most common chronic diseases of childhood with several side effects. To evaluate factors affecting on preschool children's oral hygiene and tooth brushing in Shiraz, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, we selected 453 children registered in Shiraz kindergartens in 2013 by randomized cluster sampling. The children's tooth brushing and oral hygiene were assessed using a reliable and valid questionnaire and Simplified Debris Index (DI-S), respectively. A dental student examined all the children in each kindergarten to determine their DI-S. The relationship between the children's demographic variables and their oral hygiene and tooth brushing status were evaluated. Tooth brushing for 272 children (71.2%) had been started after the age of 2 years. The teeth in 96 children (24.2%) had been brushed lower than once daily. The mean of the children's DI-S was 1.19 ± (0.77). The DI-S of only 126 children (31.8%) was found to be good and very good. After controlling the effect of confounding factors, we found that the children's tooth brushing frequency was significantly associated with the number of children in the family and mothers' employment status. The age at which tooth brushing had been started was significantly associated with the fathers' education. Furthermore, the DI-S was associated with children's age, number of the children in the family, and their mothers' education. Oral hygiene and tooth brushing of the preschool children were not in a desirable status. Interventional procedures, especially educational programs, are recommended for children and their parents. These programs seem to be more necessary for older children, low socioeconomic families, and families with more than one child.

  12. Factors Affecting Oral Hygiene and Tooth Brushing in Preschool Children, Shiraz/Iran

    PubMed Central

    S, Shaghaghian; M, Zeraatkar

    2017-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Inadequate tooth brushing and inappropriate oral hygiene can lead to dental caries, the most common chronic diseases of childhood with several side effects. Objectives: To evaluate factors affecting on preschool children’s oral hygiene and tooth brushing in Shiraz, Iran Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we selected 453 children registered in Shiraz kindergartens in 2013 by randomized cluster sampling. The children’s tooth brushing and oral hygiene were assessed using a reliable and valid questionnaire and Simplified Debris Index (DI-S), respectively. A dental student examined all the children in each kindergarten to determine their DI-S. The relationship between the children’s demographic variables and their oral hygiene and tooth brushing status were evaluated. Results: Tooth brushing for 272 children (71.2%) had been started after the age of 2 years. The teeth in 96 children (24.2%) had been brushed lower than once daily. The mean of the children’s DI-S was 1.19 ± (0.77). The DI-S of only 126 children (31.8%) was found to be good and very good. After controlling the effect of confounding factors, we found that the children’s tooth brushing frequency was significantly associated with the number of children in the family and mothers’ employment status. The age at which tooth brushing had been started was significantly associated with the fathers’ education. Furthermore, the DI-S was associated with children’s age, number of the children in the family, and their mothers’ education. Conclusions: Oral hygiene and tooth brushing of the preschool children were not in a desirable status. Interventional procedures, especially educational programs, are recommended for children and their parents. These programs seem to be more necessary for older children, low socioeconomic families, and families with more than one child. PMID:28959771

  13. Dental Cell Sheet Biomimetic Tooth Bud Model

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Nelson; Smith, Elizabeth E.; Angstadt, Shantel; Zhang, Weibo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies offer promising therapies for both medicine and dentistry. Our long-term goal is to create functional biomimetic tooth buds for eventual tooth replacement in humans. Here, our objective was to create a biomimetic 3D tooth bud model consisting of dental epithelial (DE) – dental mesenchymal (DM) cell sheets (CSs) combined with biomimetic enamel organ and pulp organ layers created using GelMA hydrogels. Pig DE or DM cells seeded on temperature-responsive plates at various cell densities (0.02, 0.114 and 0.228 cells 106/cm2) and cultured for 7, 14 and 21 days were used to generate DE and DM cell sheets, respectively. Dental CSs were combined with GelMA encapsulated DE and DM cell layers to form bioengineered 3D tooth buds. Biomimetic 3D tooth bud constructs were cultured in vitro, or implanted in vivo for 3 weeks. Analyses were performed using micro-CT, H&E staining, polarized light (Pol) microscopy, immunofluorescent (IF) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses. H&E, IHC and IF analyses showed that in vitro cultured multilayered DE-DM CSs expressed appropriate tooth marker expression patterns including SHH, BMP2, RUNX2, tenascin and syndecan, which normally direct DE-DM interactions, DM cell condensation, and dental cell differentiation. In vivo implanted 3D tooth bud constructs exhibited mineralized tissue formation of specified size and shape, and SHH, BMP2 and RUNX2and dental cell differentiation marker expression. We propose our biomimetic 3D tooth buds as models to study optimized DE-DM cell interactions leading to functional biomimetic replacement tooth formation. PMID:27565550

  14. [Study on the appropriate parameters of automatic full crown tooth preparation for dental tooth preparation robot].

    PubMed

    Yuan, F S; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y P; Sun, Y C; Wang, D X; Lyu, P J

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To further study the most suitable parameters for automatic full crown preparation using oral clinical micro robot. Its purpose is to improve the quality of automated tooth preparing for the system and to lay the foundation for clinical application. Methods: Twenty selected artificial resin teeth were used as sample teeth. The micro robot automatic tooth preparation system was used in dental clinic to control the picosecond laser beam to complete two dimensional cutting on the resin tooth sample according to the motion planning path. Using the laser scanning measuring microscope, each layer of cutting depth values was obtained and the average value was calculated. The monolayer cutting depth was determined. The three-dimensional (3D) data of the target resin teeth was obtained using internal scanner, and the CAD data of full-crown tooth preparation was designed by CAD self-develged software. According to the depth of the single layer, 11 complete resin teeth in phantom head were automatically prepared by the robot controlling the laser focused spot in accordance with the layer-cutting way. And the accuracy of resin tooth preparation was evaluated with the software. Using the same method, monolayer cutting depth parameter for cutting dental hard tissue was obtained. Then 15 extracted mandibular and maxillary first molars went through automatic full crown tooth preparation. And the 3D data of tooth preparations were obtained with intra oral scanner. The software was used to evaluate the accuracy of tooth preparation. Results: The results indicated that the single cutting depth of cutting resin teeth and in vitro teeth by picosecond laser were (60.0±2.6) and (45.0±3.6) μm, respectively. Using the tooth preparation robot, 11 artificial resin teeth and 15 complete natural teeth were automatically prepared, and the average time were (13.0±0.7), (17.0±1.8) min respectively. Through software evaluation, the average preparation depth of the occlusal surface

  15. Dentinal permeation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunina, Natalia; Derbov, Vladimir; Tuchin, Valery; Altshuler, Gregory

    2008-06-01

    Dentinal permeation is of interest in a wide context of tooth care and treatment, in particular, tooth color improvement using combination of chemical whitening agents and light activation. A simple model of dentinal permeation accounting for the morphology of human tooth dentine and including dentinal tubules, more dense and homogeneous peritubular dentine, and less dense and less homogeneous intertubular dentin is proposed. Calculation of permeability of dentine layer is carried out for H IIO and H IIO II versus the tubule diameter and tubule density taken from the microphotograph analysis. This opens the possibility to calculate the distribution of permeability over the tooth surface taking into account the variations of tubule diameter and density as well as those of the diffusion coefficients and layer thickness

  16. A numerical simulation of tooth movement by wire bending.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yukio; Fukui, Hisao

    2006-10-01

    In orthodontic treatment, wires are bent and attached to teeth to move them via elastic recovery. To predict how a tooth will move, the initial force system produced from the wire is calculated. However, the initial force system changes as the tooth moves and may not be used to predict the final tooth position. The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive mechanical, 3-dimensional, numerical model for predicting tooth movement. Tooth movements produced by wire bending were simulated numerically. The teeth moved as a result of bone remodeling, which occurs in proportion to stress in the periodontal ligament. With an off-center bend, a tooth near the bending position was subjected to a large moment and tipped more noticeably than the other teeth. Also, a tooth far from the bending position moved slightly in the mesial or the distal direction. With the center V-bend, when the second molar was added as an anchor tooth, the tipping angle and the intrusion of the canine increased, and movement of the first molar was prevented. When a wire with an inverse curve of Spee was placed in the mandibular arch, the calculated tendency of vertical tooth movements was the same as the measured result. In these tooth movements, the initial force system changed as the teeth moved. Tooth movement was influenced by the size of the root surface area. Tooth movements produced by wire bending could be estimated. It was difficult to predict final tooth positions from the initial force system.

  17. A new method for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Ai, M; Mizutani, H

    1993-09-01

    A new portable system for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts has been devised. This system was suitable for patients to take home and record tooth contacts by themselves. A micro photo sensor using optical fibres was applied to detect tooth contacts. The sensor and the target were accurately fixed to opposed molars, respectively on the same side, with removable metal attachments. Patients were instructed to set the attachment to their tooth each experimental night. In the present study, data was assembled for four or five nights in three subjects who were free of masticatory pain and dysfunction. Each subject showed an individual tooth contact pattern. It is suggested that this new system is useful and convenient for measuring nocturnal tooth contacts.

  18. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticle-Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrodes for the Evaluation of Hydrogen Peroxide Content in Teeth Whitening Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popa, Adriana; Abenojar, Eric C.; Vianna, Adam; Buenviaje, Czarina Y. A.; Yang, Jiahua; Pascual, Cherrie B.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment in which students synthesize Ag, Au, and Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and use them to modify screen printed carbon electrodes for the electroanalysis of the hydrogen peroxide content in commercially available teeth whitening strips is described. This experiment is designed for two 3-h laboratory periods and can be adapted for…

  19. Sodium hyaluronate accelerates the healing process in tooth sockets of rats.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Renato M; Silva, Gerluza A B; Lima, Miguel F; Calliari, Marcelo V; Almeida, Alvair P; Alves, José B; Ferreira, Anderson J

    2008-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY) in the healing process of tooth sockets of rats. Immediately after the extraction of the upper first molars of male Holtzman rats, right sockets were treated with 1% HY gel (approximately 0.1 ml), while left sockets were used as control (blood clot). The animals were sacrificed at 2, 7, and 21 days after tooth extraction and upper maxillaries processed for histological and morphometric analysis of the apical and medium thirds of the sockets. Carbopol, an inert gel, was used to evaluate the mechanical effect of gel injection into sockets. Expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) was determined by immunohistochemistry at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days after tooth extraction. Histological analysis showed that HY treatment induced earlier trabecular bone deposition resulting in a bone matrix more organized at 7 and 21 days after tooth extraction. Also, HY elicited significant increase in the amount of bone trabeculaes at 7 and 21 days after tooth extraction (percentage of trabecular bone area at 7 days: 13.21+/-4.66% vs. 2.58+/-1.36% in the apical third of control sockets) and in the vessels counting at 7 days. Conversely, the number of cell nuclei was decreased in HY-treated sockets. Additionally, expression of BMP-2 and OPN was enhanced in HY-treated sockets compared with control sockets. These findings suggest that HY accelerates the healing process in tooth sockets of rats stimulating the expression of osteogenic proteins.

  20. Comparison of in vitro fluoride uptake from whitening toothpastes and a conventional toothpaste in demineralised enamel.

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Markus J; Bernhart, Jasmin; Schicha, Thurid D; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Hellwig, Elmar

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the compatibility of abrasives and fluoride compounds deal exclusively with fluoride uptake and remineralization after storing the enamel specimens in a toothpaste-saliva mixture. The influence of brushing on the fluoride uptake when highly abrasive toothpastes are used has hardly been investigated so far. The aim of the present study was to investigate fluoride uptake in initially demineralised dental enamel after storage in, or brushing with, whitening toothpaste slurries, compared to a conventional toothpaste. For this purpose two widely available whitening toothpastes with ionically bound fluoride (sodium fluoride NaF), two with covalently-bound fluoride toothpastes (sodium monofluorophosphate, NaMFP) and a conventional amine fluoride toothpaste (AmF) were compared. The fluoride uptake after use of the AmF toothpaste was shown to be statistically significantly higher than that after application of the NaF toothpastes, which in turn was statistically significantly higher than the uptake resulting from NaMFP application. The fluoride uptake was slightly higher when the enamel samples were brushed with NaF toothpaste, rather than just stored in the respective toothpaste slurry. Brushing with highly abrasive toothpastes did not negatively influence fluoride uptake in demineralised dental enamel. The ionic form of the fluoride in toothpastes appears to be critical for increased fluoride uptake. The acidic components of the AmF toothpaste improved fluoride uptake compared to alkaline NaF toothpastes.

  1. A saw-tooth plasma actuator for film cooling efficiency enhancement of a shaped hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guozhan; Yu, Jianyang; Liu, Huaping; Chen, Fu; Song, Yanping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the large eddy simulations of the effects of a saw-tooth plasma actuator and the laidback fan-shaped hole on the film cooling flow characteristics, and the numerical results are compared with a corresponding standard configuration (cylindrical hole without the saw-tooth plasma actuator). For this numerical research, the saw-tooth plasma actuator is installed just downstream of the cooling hole and a phenomenological plasma model is employed to provide the 3D plasma force vectors. The results show that thanks to the downward force and the momentum injection effect of the saw-tooth plasma actuator, the cold jet comes closer to the wall surface and extends further downstream. The saw-tooth plasma actuator also induces a new pair of vortex which weakens the strength of the counter-rotating vortex pair (CRVP) and entrains the coolant towards the wall, and thus the diffusion of the cold jet in the crossflow is suppressed. Furthermore, the laidback fan-shaped hole reduces the vertical jet velocity causing the disappearance of downstream spiral separation node vortices, this compensates for the deficiency of the saw-tooth plasma actuator. Both effects of the laidback fan-shaped hole and the saw-tooth plasma actuator effectively control the development of the CRVP whose size and strength are smaller than those of the anti-counter rotating vortex pair in the far field, thus the centerline and the spanwise-averaged film cooling efficiency are enhanced. The average film cooling efficiency is the biggest in the Fan-Dc = 1 case, which is 80% bigger than that in the Fan-Dc = 0 case and 288% bigger than that in the Cyl-Dc = 0 case.

  2. Effect of supplementary zinc on orthodontic tooth movement in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh, Ahmad Akhoundi Mohammad; Rezvaneh, Ghazanfari; Shahroo, Etemad-Moghadam; Mojgan, Alaeddini; Azam, Khorshidian; Shahram, Rabbani; Reza, Shamshiri Ahmad; Nafiseh, Momeni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Osteoclasts and osteoblasts are responsible for regulating bone homeostasis during which the trace element zinc has been shown to exert a cumulative effect on bone mass by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc (Zn) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in a rat model. Material and Methods: A total of 44 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of 11 animals each and received 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm Zn in distilled water for 60 days. In the last 21 days of the study, nickel-titanium closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary right incisors and first molars of all rats, and tooth movement was measured at the end of this period. Histological analysis of hematoxylin/eosin slides was performed to assess root resorption lacunae, osteoclast number and periodontal ligament (PDL) width. Results: Mean OTM was calculated as 51.8, 49.1, 35.5 and 45 µm in the 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm zinc-receiving groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in neither OTM nor histological parameters among the study groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the current investigation, increase in supplementary zinc up to 50 ppm does not affect the rate of OTM neither bone and root resorption in rats. PMID:27275614

  3. Developing a tooth restorability index.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ailbhe; Setchell, Derrick

    2005-01-01

    It is generally agreed that the inherent strength of a tooth is dependent on the remaining dentine. It therefore seems logical that preservation of coronal dentine is important to the survival of intra- and extra-coronal restorations. The clinical assessment of the amount of dentine needed for functional requirements and the strategic value of remaining tooth structure is currently based on clinical opinion. This paper discusses what recommendations have been published and proposes an index that may be useful in assessing the restorability of a tooth. An index used to assess the amount and contribution of remaining coronal dentine to resistance and retention form could be of value in treatment planning.

  4. Tooth quality in dental fluorosis genetic and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A P G F; Hanocock, R; Eggertsson, H; Everett, E T; Grynpas, M D

    2005-01-01

    Dental fluorosis (DF) affects the appearance and structure of tooth enamel and can occur following ingestion of excess fluoride during critical periods of amelogenesis. This tooth malformation may, depending on its severity, influence enamel and dentin microhardness and dentin mineralization. Poor correlation between tooth fluoride (F) concentration and DF severity was shown in some studies, but even when a correlation was present, tooth fluoride concentration explained very little of DF severity. This fact calls into question the generally accepted hypothesis that the main factor responsible for DF severity is tooth fluoride concentration. It has been shown previously that genetic factors (susceptibility to DF) play an important role in DF severity although DF severity relates to individual susceptibility to fluoride exposure (genetics), tooth fluoride concentration relates to fluoride ingestion (environmental). The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between tooth fluoride concentration, DF severity, and tooth mechanical and materials properties. Three strains of mice (previously shown to have different susceptibility to DF) at weaning were treated with four different levels of F in their water (0, 25, 50, and 100 ppm) for 6 weeks. Mice teeth were tested for fluoride by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), DF severity determined by quantitative light-induced fluorescence [QLF], and tooth quality (enamel and dentin microhardness and dentin mineralization). Tooth fluoride concentration (environment factor) correlated positively with DF severity (QLF) (rs=0.608), fluoride treatment group (rs=0.952). However, tooth fluoride concentration correlated negatively with enamel microhardness (rs=-0.587), dentin microhardness (rs=-0.268) and dentin mineralization (rs=-0.245). Dental fluorosis (genetic factor) severity (QLF) correlated positively with fluoride treatment (rs=0.608) and tooth fluoride concentration (rs=0.583). DF severity

  5. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    ... cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole ... or abscess. To help prevent cavities Brush your teeth every day with a fluoride toothpaste Clean between ...

  6. Diagnosing and treatment planning inadequate tooth display.

    PubMed

    Spear, F

    2016-10-21

    Some of the most challenging patients to produce a pleasing smile for are those who present with inadequate tooth display (either due to tooth position, the patient has normal size teeth, but they aren't exposed adequately to fill out the smile) or due to tooth size (the teeth are small, often due to tooth wear). The key to understanding how to manage these patients is to learn to understand the possible aetiologies that could produce the condition, and learn how to diagnose which aetiologies exist for your patient. Potential aetiologies for inadequate tooth display in patients with normal length unworn anterior teeth: excessive lip length; inadequate lip mobility; inadequate vertical eruption of the anterior teeth; inadequate facial prominence of the maxillary anterior teeth; vertical maxillary deficiency; and anterior maxillary deficiency.This article, the first in a British Dental Journal series on the topic of aesthetic dentistry, reviews the clinical findings consistent with diagnosing each of the above etiologies, and then reviews the treatment options available for correcting the inadequate tooth display.

  7. Tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lee, A; He, L H; Lyons, K; Swain, M V

    2012-03-01

    Tooth wear has been recognised as a major problem in dentistry. Epidemiological studies have reported an increasing prevalence of tooth wear and general dental practitioners see a greater number of patients seeking treatment with worn dentition. Although the dental literature contains numerous publications related to management and rehabilitation of tooth wear of varying aetiologies, our understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of tooth wear is still limited. The wear behaviour of dental biomaterials has also been extensively researched to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for the development of restorative materials with good wear resistance. The complex nature of tooth wear indicates challenges for conducting in vitro and in vivo wear investigations and a clear correlation between in vitro and in vivo data has not been established. The objective was to critically review the peer reviewed English-language literature pertaining to prevalence and aetiology of tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry identified through a Medline search engine combined with hand-searching of the relevant literature, covering the period between 1960 and 2011. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. How to Prevent Tooth Decay in Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening infections. Tooth decay (called early childhood caries) is the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood. Tooth decay may also be called nursing caries or baby bottle tooth decay . Healthy dental habits ...

  9. Effect of low-temperature degradation on the mechanical and microstructural properties of tooth-colored 3Y-TZP ceramics.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Harada, A; Ono, M; Shibasaki, H; Kanno, T; Niwano, Y; Adolfsson, E; Milleding, P; Örtengren, U

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of low-temperature degradation (LTD) induced by autoclaving on the mechanical and microstructural properties of tooth-colored 3 mol% yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP). In total, 162 disc-shaped 3Y-TZP specimens were prepared. Two-thirds of the specimens were shaded by either the infiltration or powder mixing methods while the remaining specimens were used without coloring. The specimens were autoclaved at 134 °C for 0, 10, and 100 h to induce LTD (n=18 for each group). Chemical compositions were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Biaxial flexural strength was measured using a piston-on-three-ball test. The surface fraction and penetration depth of the monoclinic phase were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The tooth-colored 3Y-TZP specimens contained Fe2O3 and Er2O3 (infiltration technique), and Fe2O3 (powder mixing method) at concentrations of<0.5 wt%. The tooth-colored 3Y-TZP had higher strength than the non-colored material after 100 h of autoclaving. In terms of surface fraction and penetration depth, the generation of monoclinic phase was significantly lower in the tooth-colored 3Y-TZP than in the non-colored material. The tooth-colored 3Y-TZP possessed equivalent biaxial flexural strength to that of the non-colored material and higher resistance to LTD regardless of the coloring technique (infiltration technique or powder mixing method) when the coloring pigments were contained at concentrations used in the present study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Is frequency of tooth brushing a risk factor for periodontitis? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Heiko; Zimmermann, Nils; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Veile, Annette; Kim, Ti-Sun; Becher, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The epidemiology of periodontitis regarding oral-hygiene practices particularly the frequency of tooth brushing has been the subject of relatively few dedicated studies. This paper provides a systematic review of available relevant epidemiological studies and a meta-analysis of the effect of tooth brushing frequency on periodontitis. To review and to quantify the risk for periodontitis associated with frequency of tooth brushing. Systematic literature search was conducted in nine online resources (PUBMED, ISI and 7 additional databases). Related and cross-referencing publications were reviewed. Papers published until end of March 2013 reporting associations between tooth brushing frequency and periodontitis were considered. A meta-analysis was performed to quantify this association. Fourteen studies were identified. The test of heterogeneity for cross-sectional studies was not significant (P = 0.31). A fixed-effects model yielded a significant overall odds ratio estimate of 1.41 (95%CI: 1.25-1.58, P < 0.0001) for infrequent compared to frequent tooth brushing. For all fourteen studies, there was a slight indication for heterogeneity (I² = 48%, P = 0.02) and the corresponding result with a random-effects model was 1.44 (95%CI: 1.21-1.71, P < 0.0001). There are relatively few studies evaluating the association between tooth brushing frequency and periodontitis. A clear effect was observed, indicating that infrequent tooth brushing was associated with severe forms of periodontal disease. Further epidemiological studies are needed to precisely estimate the effect of key risk factors for periodontitis and their interaction effects. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Establishing the Effect of Brushing and a Day’s Diet on Tooth Tissue Loss in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Forbes-Haley, Claire; Jones, Siân Bodfel; Davies, Maria; West, Nicola X.

    2016-01-01

    To develop an in vitro model to mimic the effects of meals equivalent to a day’s diet on tooth tissue loss (TTL). To identify how diet effects tooth wear and to test the efficacy of dental products designed to reduce tooth wear in a more realistic environment. A typical Friday diet was devised comprising: Breakfast then brushing, lunch, dinner then brushing. Groups of enamel samples were exposed to one meal, or all three in series, a control group was exposed to water and brushed. The daily cycle was repeated to represent two days’ consumption; TTL was quantified by non-contact profilometry. This pilot study highlighted adaptions that could be made to the model such as human enamel and saliva to further replicate natural eating habits. The sum of the TTL measured after Breakfast, lunch and dinner (bovine enamel specimens exposed to single meals) was less than that exhibited by the group of samples exposed to the series of meals but this difference was not significant (p = 0.09).In the absence and presence of brushing, TTL caused by breakfast and dinner was similar, but significantly greater than that caused by lunch (p < 0.05). While brushing increased TTL, this increase was not significant. It is possible to model a daily diet in vitro, and the data obtained confirms that the combination of food and drink affects the degree of TTL. This supports the further development of an in vitro model that includes alternative foodstuffs. This would aid understanding of the effects different diets have on TTL and could test new products designed to prevent TTL. PMID:29563467

  12. Management of premature primary tooth loss in the child patient.

    PubMed

    Law, Clarice S

    2013-08-01

    Premature loss of primary teeth can result in a loss of arch length and have a negative effect on occlusion and alignment, often increasing the need for orthodontic treatment. Use of space maintainers can reduce the severity of problems such as crowding, ectopic eruption, tooth impaction and poor molar relationship. This article presents a review of the consequences of premature tooth loss and discusses the appliances commonly used for space maintenance.

  13. The effectiveness of a novel infant tooth wipe in high caries-risk babies 8 to15 months old.

    PubMed

    Galganny-Almeida, Anna; Queiroz, Mellissa C; Leite, Alvaro Jorge M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess baby and parental satisfaction and plaque-removal efficacy of a novel infant tooth wipe (Spiffies) in high caries-risk babies. Thirty-five healthy and caries-free infants were selected. Babies had never had their teeth cleaned and no primary molars were yet present. Subjects were identified with the risk factor of nightly feeding behaviors. Pre- and postcleaning oral hygiene plaque measurements were recorded and then analyzed by a blinded examiner. A manual toothbrush (Ultra Kids) was used as the control method. Infants' caregivers used their randomly assigned cleaning method without instruction. Babies returned to the clinic after a 48- to 72-hour washout period, and the procedures were repeated before and after use of the alternate method. Parental satisfaction and baby-perceived acceptance were evaluated by a questionnaire and were analyzed at the time of the visit and at bedtime. Both the infant tooth wipe and conventional brushing significantly reduced plaque levels (P < .001). Parents were more satisfied with the wipes when compared to toothbrushing, particularly after nightly feeding habits (P < .001). Similarly, infant's acceptance was higher with the wipes at daytime and significantly higher at night-time (P = .002). The Novel novel Infant infant Tooth tooth Wipe wipe provides an effective method of plaque removal before the eruption of primary molars.

  14. Pre-existing Periapical Inflammatory Condition Exacerbates Tooth Extraction–induced BRONJ Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Minju; Alshaikh, Abdullah; Kim, Terresa; Kim, Sol; Dang, Michelle; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Kang, Mo; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical interventions such as tooth extraction increase a chance of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) in patients receiving bisphosphonates (BPs) for treatment of bone-related diseases. Tooth extraction is often performed to eliminate pre-existing pathological inflammatory conditions that make the tooth unsalvageable; however, the role of such conditions on bisphosphonate-related ONJ (BRONJ) development following tooth extraction is not clearly defined. Here, we examined the effects of periapical periodontitis on tooth extraction-induced BRONJ development in mice. Methods Periapical periodontitis was induced by exposing the pulp of the maxillary first molar for 3 weeks in C57/BL6 mice that were intravenously administered with BP. The same tooth was extracted, and after 3 additional weeks, the mice were harvested for histological, histomorphometric, and histochemical staining analyses. Results Pulp exposure induced periapical radiolucency as demonstrated by increased inflammatory cells, TRAP+ osteoclasts, and bone resorption. When BP was administered, pulp exposure did not induce apical bone resorption despite the presence of inflammatory cells and TRAP+ osteoclasts. While tooth extraction alone induced BRONJ lesions, pulp exposure further increased tooth extraction-induced BRONJ development as demonstrated by the presence of more bone necrosis. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that pre-existing pathological inflammatory condition such as periapical periodontitis is a predisposing factor that may exacerbate BRONJ development following tooth extraction. Our study further provides a clinical implication whereby periapical periodontitis should be controlled before performing tooth extraction in BP-users in order to reduce the risk of developing BRONJ. PMID:27637460

  15. Accelerated tooth eruption in children with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shantanu; Cheng, Bin; Kaplan, Selma; Softness, Barney; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Lalla, Evanthia; Lamster, Ira B

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate tooth eruption in 6- to 14-year-old children with diabetes mellitus. Tooth eruption status was assessed for 270 children with diabetes and 320 control children without diabetes. Data on important diabetes-related variables were collected. Analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Children with diabetes exhibited accelerated tooth eruption in the late mixed dentition period (10-14 years of age) compared to healthy children. For both case patients and control subjects the odds of a tooth being in an advanced eruptive stage were significantly higher among girls than boys. There was also a trend associating gingival inflammation with expedited tooth eruption in both groups. No association was found between the odds of a tooth being in an advanced stage of eruption and hemoglobin A(1c) or duration of diabetes. Patients with higher body mass index percentile demonstrated statistically higher odds for accelerated tooth eruption, but the association was not clinically significant. Children with diabetes exhibit accelerated tooth eruption. Future studies need to ascertain the role of such aberrations in dental development and complications such as malocclusion, impaired oral hygiene, and periodontal disease. The standards of care for children with diabetes should include screening and referral programs aimed at oral health promotion and disease prevention.

  16. The effects of modeling simplifications on craniofacial finite element models: the alveoli (tooth sockets) and periodontal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Wood, Sarah A; Strait, David S; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R

    2011-07-07

    Several finite element models of a primate cranium were used to investigate the biomechanical effects of the tooth sockets and the material behavior of the periodontal ligament (PDL) on stress and strain patterns associated with feeding. For examining the effect of tooth sockets, the unloaded sockets were modeled as devoid of teeth and PDL, filled with teeth and PDLs, or simply filled with cortical bone. The third premolar on the left side of the cranium was loaded and the PDL was treated as an isotropic, linear elastic material using published values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The remaining models, along with one of the socket models, were used to determine the effect of the PDL's material behavior on stress and strain distributions under static premolar biting and dynamic tooth loading conditions. Two models (one static and the other dynamic) treated the PDL as cortical bone. The other two models treated it as a ligament with isotropic, linear elastic material properties. Two models treated the PDL as a ligament with hyperelastic properties, and the other two as a ligament with viscoelastic properties. Both behaviors were defined using published stress-strain data obtained from in vitro experiments on porcine ligament specimens. Von Mises stress and strain contour plots indicate that the effects of the sockets and PDL material behavior are local. Results from this study suggest that modeling the sockets and the PDL in finite element analyses of skulls is project dependent and can be ignored if values of stress and strain within the alveolar region are not required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gingival condition and tooth-brushing behavior after alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S; Ekuni, D; Tomofuji, T; Yamane, M; Azuma, T; Iwasaki, Y; Morita, M

    2015-08-01

    Various studies have reported the relationship between alcohol consumption and gingival condition. However, they focus on the direct effects of alcohol consumption or alcohol sensitivity on gingival condition, and it is unclear how oral health behaviors relate these relationships. The aims of this study were to assess the inter-relationships between gingival condition, tooth-brushing behavior after drinking alcohol and alcohol sensitivity in university students who drink more than once per week on average. A total of 808 students (541 males, 267 females) that habitually consume alcohol were analyzed. The disease activity of gingival condition was assessed as the percentage of bleeding on probing (%BOP). Additional information regarding alcohol sensitivity and oral health behaviors, including tooth-brushing behavior after drinking, were also collected. Thirteen percent of the current participants reported neglecting tooth-brushing after drinking, and their alcohol consumption was higher than those who did not neglect tooth-brushing. Logistic regression analysis showed that high %BOP (%BOP ≥ 20) was associated with male (OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.33), neglect of tooth-brushing after drinking (OR = 2.60; 95% CI, 1.20-5.61) and debris index (OR = 8.38; 95% CI, 4.24-16.60) in participants with low alcohol sensitivity. In participants with high alcohol sensitivity, high %BOP was associated with debris index (OR = 7.60; 95% CI, 3.12-18.51), but not with any oral health behaviors. The study revealed that alcohol consumption was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the neglect of tooth-brushing after drinking alcohol in university students with low alcohol sensitivity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Does common prescription medication affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannakis, Militiadis A; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2018-03-06

    As the taking of any medication may theoretically affect the complex pathways responsible for periodontal tissue homeostasis and the events leading to orthodontic tooth movement, it is considered important for the orthodontist to be able to identify prospective patients' history and patterns of pharmaceutical consumption. To systematically investigate and appraise the quality of the available evidence regarding the effect of commonly prescribed medications on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Search without restrictions in eight databases and hand searching until June 2017. Controlled studies investigating the effect of commonly prescribed medications with emphasis on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Following study retrieval and selection, relevant data was extracted and the risk of bias was assessed using the SYRCLE's Risk of Bias Tool. Twenty-seven animal studies, involving various pharmacologic and orthodontic interventions, were finally identified. Most studies were assessed to be at unclear or high risk of bias. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement was shown to increase after the administration of diazepam, Vitamin C and pantoprazole, while simvastatin, atorvastatin, calcium compounds, strontium ranelate, propranolol, losartan, famotidine, cetirizine, and metformin decreased the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. No interference with the rate of orthodontic tooth movement was reported for phenytoin, phenobarbital and zinc compounds, whereas, inconsistent or conflicting effects were noted after the administration of L-thyroxine, lithium compounds, fluoxetine and insulin. The quality of the available evidence was considered at best as low. Commonly prescribed medications may exhibit variable effects on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Although the quality of evidence was considered at best as low, raising reservations about the strength of the relevant recommendations, the clinician should be capable of identifying patients taking

  19. Minimizing the extra-oral time in autogeneous tooth transplantation: use of computer-aided rapid prototyping (CARP) as a duplicate model tooth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jong; Kim, Euiseong

    2012-08-01

    The maintenance of the healthy periodontal ligament cells of the root surface of donor tooth and intimate surface contact between the donor tooth and the recipient bone are the key factors for successful tooth transplantation. In order to achieve these purposes, a duplicated donor tooth model can be utilized to reduce the extra-oral time using the computer-aided rapid prototyping (CARP) technique. Briefly, a three-dimensional digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image with the real dimensions of the donor tooth was obtained from a computed tomography (CT), and a life-sized resin tooth model was fabricated. Dimensional errors between real tooth, 3D CT image model and CARP model were calculated. And extra-oral time was recorded during the autotransplantation of the teeth. The average extra-oral time was 7 min 25 sec with the range of immediate to 25 min in cases which extra-oral root canal treatments were not performed while it was 9 min 15 sec when extra-oral root canal treatments were performed. The average radiographic distance between the root surface and the alveolar bone was 1.17 mm and 1.35 mm at mesial cervix and apex; they were 0.98 mm and 1.26 mm at the distal cervix and apex. When the dimensional errors between real tooth, 3D CT image model and CARP model were measured in cadavers, the average of absolute error was 0.291 mm between real teeth and CARP model. These data indicate that CARP may be of value in minimizing the extra-oral time and the gap between the donor tooth and the recipient alveolar bone in tooth transplantation.

  20. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    PubMed Central

    DANTAS, Andréa Abi Rached; BORTOLATTO, Janaina Freitas; RONCOLATO, Ávery; MERCHAN, Hugo; FLOROS, Michael Christopher; KUGA, Milton Carlos; de OLIVEIRA, Osmir Batista

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home). Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15): C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE), luminosity (ΔL), green-red axis (Δa), and blue-yellow axis (Δb). The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments. PMID:26814462

  1. Influence of Tooth Spacing Error on Gears With and Without Profile Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmasolala, Giri; Lin, Hsiang H.; Oswald, Fred B.

    2000-01-01

    A computer simulation was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of profile modification for reducing dynamic loads in gears with different tooth spacing errors. The simulation examined varying amplitudes of spacing error and differences in the span of teeth over which the error occurs. The modification considered included both linear and parabolic tip relief. The analysis considered spacing error that varies around most of the gear circumference (similar to a typical sinusoidal error pattern) as well as a shorter span of spacing errors that occurs on only a few teeth. The dynamic analysis was performed using a revised version of a NASA gear dynamics code, modified to add tooth spacing errors to the analysis. Results obtained from the investigation show that linear tip relief is more effective in reducing dynamic loads on gears with small spacing errors but parabolic tip relief becomes more effective as the amplitude of spacing error increases. In addition, the parabolic modification is more effective for the more severe error case where the error is spread over a longer span of teeth. The findings of this study can be used to design robust tooth profile modification for improving dynamic performance of gear sets with different tooth spacing errors.

  2. Reproducibility of electronic tooth colour measurements.

    PubMed

    Ratzmann, Anja; Klinke, Thomas; Schwahn, Christian; Treichel, Anja; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2008-10-01

    Clinical methods of investigation, such as tooth colour determination, should be simple, quick and reproducible. The determination of tooth colours usually relies upon manual comparison of a patient's tooth colour with a colour ring. After some days, however, measurement results frequently lack unequivocal reproducibility. This study aimed to examine an electronic method for reliable colour measurement. The colours of the teeth 14 to 24 were determined by three different examiners in 10 subjects using the colour measuring device Shade Inspector. In total, 12 measurements per tooth were taken. Two measurement time points were scheduled to be taken, namely at study onset (T(1)) and after 6 months (T(2)). At either time point, two measurement series per subject were taken by the different examiners at 2-week intervals. The inter-examiner and intra-examiner agreement of the measurement results was assessed. The concordance for lightness and colour intensity (saturation) was represented by the intra-class correlation coefficient. The categorical variable colour shade (hue) was assessed using the kappa statistic. The study results show that tooth colour can be measured independently of the examiner. Good agreement was found between the examiners.

  3. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Martin G. D.; Bomfim, Deborah I.; Austin, Rupert S.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles. PMID:22315608

  4. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Ahmet; Arpağ, Osman Fatih; Atilgan, Serhat; Yaman, Ferhan; Atalay, Yusuf; Acikan, İzzet

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on palatal mucosal defects and tooth extraction sockets in an experimental model. Materials and methods Forty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats with a mean age of 7 weeks and weighing 280–490 g were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into two groups: group A (the control group, n=21) and group B (the experimental group, n=21). Under anesthesia with ketamine (8 mg/100 g, intraperitoneally), palatal mucosal defects were created and tooth extraction was performed in the rats in groups A and B. Group A received no treatment, whereas group B received CAPE. CAPE was injected daily (10 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally). The rats were killed on days 7, 14, and 30 after the procedures. Palatal mucosa healing and changes in bone tissue and fibrous tissue were evaluated histopathologically. Result Pairwise comparisons showed no statistically significant difference between days 7 and 14 in either group (P>0.05). At day 30, bone healing was significantly better in group B (CAPE) than in group A (control) (P<0.05). Fibrinogen levels at day 30 were significantly higher in group A (control) than in group B (CAPE) (P<0.05). Pairwise comparisons showed no statistically significant difference in palatal mucosa healing levels between days 7 and 14 in both groups (P>0.05). Conclusion In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that CAPE can significantly improve tooth socket healing. PMID:25364232

  5. Elderly complete denture wearers: a social approach to tooth loss.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Eftychia; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    To correlate emotional reactions to tooth loss with denture satisfaction attributes in elderly complete denture wearers. Total tooth loss is a serious life event, and poor oral health has an impact on daily life. Edentulism treated by rehabilitation with dentures can have a positive effect on patients' self-image and social behaviour. A group of 80 edentulous subjects undergoing routine prosthetic care in a Greek Department of Prosthetic Dentistry were interviewed using two structured questionnaires. The first questionnaire explored reactions to tooth loss, whereas the second measured their subjective experience of complete dentures. The responses to both questionnaires were compared using the statistical package SPSS v.17. The results showed significant correlation between aspects of tooth loss experience and complete denture satisfaction. Despite the fact that a substantial proportion of patients were satisfied with their complete dentures, some patients experienced increased social and psychological problems related to their edentulousness and the wearing of complete dentures. The aesthetic and functional aspects of complete dentures affected both patients' social behaviour and self-confidence. Total tooth loss was not only reflected in patient's social behaviour and self-image, but it had a complex and multifaceted impact on satisfaction from complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The range of potential morphologies resulting from evolution is limited by complex interacting processes, ranging from development to function. Quantifying these interactions is important for understanding adaptation and convergent evolution. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of carnivoran and dasyuromorph tooth rows, we compared statistical models of the relationship between tooth row shape and the opposing tooth row, a static feature, as well as measures of mandibular motion during chewing (occlusion), which are kinetic features. This is a new approach to quantifying functional integration because we use measures of movement and displacement, such as the amount the mandible translates laterally during occlusion, as opposed to conventional morphological measures, such as mandible length and geometric landmarks. By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals. Results Statistical model comparisons demonstrate that the best performing models always include some measure of mandibular motion, indicating that functional and statistical models of tooth shape as purely a function of the opposing tooth row are too simple and that increased model complexity provides a better understanding of tooth form. The predictors of the best performing models always included the opposing tooth row shape and a relative linear measure of mandibular motion. Conclusions Our results provide quantitative support of long-standing hypotheses of tooth row shape as being influenced by mandibular motion in addition to the opposing tooth row. Additionally, this study illustrates the utility and necessity of including kinetic features in analyses of morphological integration. PMID:22899809

  7. Cosmetic Dentistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... want a whiter shade. ; Discoloration occurs in the enamel and can be caused by medication, coffee, tea ... on the desired shade you wish to achieve. Whitening in the office may call for one or more 45-minute to one-hour visits to your dentist's ... ; Bonding is tooth-colored material used to fill in gaps or ...

  8. Association of parental education with tooth loss among Korean Elders.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Hun; Khang, Young-Ho; Choi, Ho-Jun

    2015-12-01

    There are few reports showing an association between childhood socioeconomic circumstances and tooth loss among the elderly. The purpose of this study was (i) to examine the association between early childhood socioeconomic position (parental education level) and tooth loss and (ii) to determine the relative effects of the subjects' education level, occupation, and income on tooth loss in Korean elders. Data from the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey on 8814 Korean elders (age ≥65 years) were analyzed. Demographic factors (age, survey year, marital status, and residence area), health behaviors (dental check-up during the past year and cigarette smoking), and the presence of a somatic health problem (diabetes) were included in our gender-specific analyses. Tooth loss was defined as edentulism or severe tooth loss (<20 teeth). For our analyses, chi-square test and Student's t-tests and multiple logistic regressions were performed. A low parental education level was associated with elevated odds of edentulism (OR = 1.87 for father's education and 1.52 for mother's education among male elders and OR = 1.73 for father's education and 1.55 for mother's education among female elders) and with severe tooth loss (OR = 1.58 for father's education and 1.53 for mother's education among male elders and OR = 1.25 for father's education and 1.48 for mother's education among female elders). The association between parental education level and tooth loss was attenuated after adjusting for the subject's education level, occupation, and income. Relative magnitude of attenuation varied with personal factors (education > income > occupation). In a fully adjusted model, father's education level was significantly associated with edentate status (OR = 1.96 for male elders and 1.46 for female elders), but not with severe tooth loss. Our results indicate that early life socioeconomic circumstances measured by the father's education

  9. Adult tooth loss for residents of US coal mining and Appalachian counties.

    PubMed

    Hendryx, Michael; Ducatman, Alan M; Zullig, Keith J; Ahern, Melissa M; Crout, Richard

    2012-12-01

    The authors compared rates of tooth loss between adult residents of Appalachian coal-mining areas and other areas of the nation before and after control for covariate risks. The authors conducted a cross-sectional secondary data analysis that merged 2006 national Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data (BRFSS) (N = 242 184) with county coal-mining data and other county characteristics. The hypothesis tested was that adult tooth loss would be greater in Appalachian mining areas after control for other risks. Primary independent variables included main effects for coal-mining present (yes/no) residence in Appalachia (yes/no), and their interaction. Data were weighted using the BRFSS final weights and analyzed using SUDAAN Proc Multilog to account for the multilevel complex sampling structure. The odds of two measures of tooth loss were examined controlling for age, race\\ethnicity, drinking, smoking, income, education, supply of dentists, receipt of dental care, fluoridation rate, and other variables. After covariate adjustment, the interaction variable for the residents of Appalachian coal-mining counties showed a significantly elevated odds for any tooth loss [odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.38], and greater tooth loss measured by a 4-level edentulism scale (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.36). The main effect for Appalachia was also significant for both measures, but the main effect for coal mining was not. Greater risk of tooth loss among adult residents of Appalachian coal-mining areas is present and is not explained by differences in reported receipt of dental care, fluoridation rates, supply of dentists or other behavioral or socioeconomic risks. Possible contributing factors include mining-specific disparities related to access, behavior or environmental exposures. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. [Simultaneous determination of six fluorescent whitening agents in plastic and paper packaging materials by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juzhou; Ji, Shuilin; Cai, Huimei; Li, Jing; Wang, Yongxin; Wang, Jingqiu

    2017-11-08

    A novel analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of six fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs:FWA 135, FWA 184, FWA 185, FWA 199, FWA 378 and FWA 393) in paper and plastic food packaging materials by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). The sample was extracted with mixed solution of chloroform and acetonitrile (3:7, v/v), then cleaned up by HLB solid phase extraction column. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out by HPLC. The sample was separated on a Phenomenex C18 column using acetonitrile and 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate aqueous solution as mobile phases. The results indicated that the linear range of FWA393 was 15-1500 μg/L and the linear ranges of the other five FWAs were 5-500 μg/L with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999. The recoveries in spiked samples were between 80.4% and 125.0% with RSDs ( n =6) of 1%-13%. Furthermore, this method was applied to analyze 12 samples in the market to verify the practicality of the method. The method showed the advantages of simplicity, high recovery and good precision, and is suitable for the detection of the six fluorescent whitening agents in food packaging materials.

  11. Energy harvesting from mastication forces via a smart tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani-Hani, Muath; Karami, M. Amin

    2016-04-01

    The batteries of the current pacing devices are relatively large and occupy over 60 percent of the size of pulse generators. Therefore, they cannot be placed in the subtle areas of human body. In this paper, the mastication force and the resulting tooth pressure are converted to electricity. The pressure energy can be converted to electricity by using the piezoelectric effect. The tooth crown is used as a power autonomous pulse generator. We refer to this envisioned pulse generator as the smart tooth. The smart tooth is in the form of a dental implant. A piezoelectric vibration energy harvester is designed and modeled for this purpose. The Piezoelectric based energy harvesters investigated and analyzed in this paper initially includes a single degree of freedom piezoelectric based stack energy harvester which utilizes a harvesting circuit employing the case of a purely resistive circuit. The next step is utilizing and investigating a bimorph piezoelectric beam which is integrated/embedded in the smart tooth implant. Mastication process causes the bimorph beam to buckle or return to unbuckled condition. The transitions results in vibration of the piezoelectric beam and thus generate energy. The power estimated by the two mechanisms is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. Both scenarios of the energy harvesters are analytically modeled. The exact analytical solution of the piezoelectric beam energy harvester with Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions is presented. The electro-mechanical coupling and the geometric nonlinearities have been included in the model for the piezoelectric beam.

  12. Minimum intervention dentistry and the management of tooth wear in general practice.

    PubMed

    Meyers, I A

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of tooth wear, or non-carious tooth surface loss (NCTSL), is increasing and oral rehabilitation of patients with non-carious tooth loss requires strategies that address all the factors relevant to the aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition. The multifactorial nature of tooth wear and the variability in its clinical presentation provides treatment challenges for the clinician and successful management must be more than just restoration. Management must include an appropriate mix of preventive and restorative strategies and an understanding that long-term restorative success is affected by the patient's oral environment, and how diet, lifestyle and medical status can modify this environment. Ultimately, the success of any restorative intervention is very dependent on the stability of the oral environment and the condition of the remaining tooth structure. Minimum intervention dentistry (MID) philosophies are ideally suited to tooth wear cases and an overall MID strategy involving diagnosis, recognition and control of predisposing factors, stabilization of the oral environment, remineralization and restoration of the tooth structure, and ongoing maintenance can be implemented. When restorative treatment is required, contemporary materials and techniques are available that can provide cost-effective and conservative restorative alternatives for patients unable to undergo the complex indirect restorative techniques that are both costly and time consuming to implement. These minimally invasive approaches are not only an economically viable solution, but can provide aesthetic and functional rehabilitation and maintain tooth structure as a precursor to more complex restorative options when required. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Autogenous Transplantation for Replacing a Hopeless Tooth.

    PubMed

    Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Khalilak, Zohreh; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation (ATT) is a simple and reasonable choice for replacing the missing teeth when a proper donor tooth is available. This report presents a case of successful ATT of a maxillary right third molar for replacement of mandibular right second molar with a concomitant endodontic-periodontal disease. The mandibular second molar was believed to be hopeless due to a severe damage to coronal tooth structure, inappropriate root canal treatment and apical radiolucency. After extraction of mandibular second molar and maxillary third molar (the donor), the tooth was re-implanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. Root canal therapy was then performed. After 3 years, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed satisfying results, with no signs and symptoms. The patient is asymptomatic and the transplanted tooth is still functional with no signs of marginal periodontal pathosis. Radiographies showed bone regeneration in the site of previous extensive periapical lesion, normal periodontal ligament with no signs of root resorption.

  14. Amyloidosis presented with whitening and loss of hair which improved after dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S D; Yamamoto, R; Saito, K; Iwamoto, Y; Kuzuya, T; Ohba, S; Kobori, S; Saito, K

    1987-08-01

    A 67-year-old male patient presented with rapid progression of whitening and loss of hair in past 2 months was consulted due to the suspicion of hypothyroidism. He had been told to have cardiomegaly for 3 years. Thyroid function was within normal limit. Prostate biopsy was performed because of prostatic hypertrophy and mild elevation of serum acid phosphatase. Amyloid accumulation was observed in the biopsy specimen. Subsequent skin biopsies revealed the same result. The scalp hair and beard grew and turned to black gradually several months after dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment. These findings suggest that some of the manifestation of amyloidosis may respond to DMSO treatment.

  15. Chlorhexidine and tooth-brushing as prevention strategies in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia rates.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nesta; Moule, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common complication of mechanical ventilation after endotracheal intubation. The role of chlorhexidine and tooth-brushing has been considered as a clinical intervention to reduce infection rates, however, evidence to inform this needs appraising. This paper presents a critical review on the effect of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and tooth-brushing in decreasing rates of VAP in mechanically ventilated adult patients cared for in intensive care settings. A literature search was conducted using a number of bibliographic databases (n = 6). A number of parameters were used to exclude irrelevant papers. A total n = 17 papers were located and accessed, which were directly related to the field. Eight studies that met the criteria and addressed the study aims were reviewed. CHX was successful in reducing the rate of VAP and using a combination of CHX and colistine resulted in better oropharyngeal decontamination which reduced and delayed VAP. Chlorhexidine was also effective in reducing dental plaque in patients cared for in intensive care and had the potential to reduce nosocomial infections. Results of studies investigating the use of tooth-brushing in reducing VAP incidence proved inconsistent, although all recommend tooth-brushing as important in maintaining good oral hygiene. The use of chlorhexidine has been proven to be of some value in reducing VAP, although may be more effective when used with a solution which targets gram-negative bacteria. Tooth-brushing is recommended in providing a higher standard of oral care to mechanically ventilated patients and reducing VAP when used with chlorhexidine. However, limitations in study design and inconsistency in results suggest that further research is required into the effects of tooth-brushing. © 2011 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2011 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  16. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  17. Consideration of Moving Tooth Load in Gear Crack Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2001-01-01

    Robust gear designs consider not only crack initiation, but crack propagation trajectories for a fail-safe design. In actual gear operation, the magnitude as well as the position of the force changes as the gear rotates through the mesh. A study to determine the effect of moving gear tooth load on crack propagation predictions was performed. Two-dimensional analysis of an involute spur gear and three-dimensional analysis of a spiral-bevel pinion gear using the finite element method and boundary element method were studied and compared to experiments. A modified theory for predicting gear crack propagation paths based on the criteria of Erdogan and Sih was investigated. Crack simulation based on calculated stress intensity factors and mixed mode crack angle prediction techniques using a simple static analysis in which the tooth load was located at the highest point of single tooth contact was validated. For three-dimensional analysis, however, the analysis was valid only as long as the crack did not approach the contact region on the tooth.

  18. Orbital penetration associated with tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark M; Smith, Eric M; La Croix, Noelle; Mould, John

    2003-03-01

    Three cats and 2 dogs were evaluated for ophthalmologic complications associated with tooth extraction procedures. Orbital penetration leading to ocular and, in one case, brain trauma was secondary to iatrogenic injury from a dental elevator. Outcomes included enucleation of the affected eye in 3 cases, and death from brain abscessation in 1 case. Early treatment or, preferably, referral to a veterinary ophthalmology specialist may prevent such outcomes. Awareness of the anatomical proximity of caudal maxillary tooth roots and the orbit, appropriate interpretation of diagnostic intraoral dental radiographs, and technical proficiency in tooth extraction techniques will minimize these complications in veterinary dental practice.

  19. Second-harmonic generation microscopy of tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Fu-Jen; Wang, Yung-Shun; Huang, Mao-Kuo; Huang, Sheng-Lung; Cheng, Ping C.

    2000-07-01

    In this study, we have developed a high performance microscopic system to perform second-harmonic (SH)imaging on a tooth. The high sensitivity of the system allows an acquisition rate of 300 seconds/frame with a resolution at 512x512 pixels. The surface SH signal generated from the tooth is also carefully verified through micro-spectroscopy, polarization rotation, and wavelength tuning. In this way, we can ensure the authenticity of the signal. The enamel that encapsulates the dentine is known to possess highly ordered structures. The anisotrophy of the structure is revealed in the microscopic SH images of the tooth sample.

  20. Complete tooth loss as status passage.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Barry John; Sussex, Philip V; Fitzgerald, Ruth P; Thomson, William Murray

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this article is to add to the literature on the sociology of oral health and dentistry by presenting the relevance of status passage to the study of complete tooth loss. The article reports on an analysis of data taken from participants residing in the Nelson region of New Zealand. In total the data include interviews from 20 participants, all of whom had their remaining natural teeth removed before 1960. In total, 12 women and eight men were interviewed. All were from a European background with an age range of 71 to 101 years. Following a narrative approach, participants were interviewed on the nature of the social factors that resulted in complete tooth loss by starting with their family history and then focusing on the factors and events leading up to their total tooth loss. Data were analysed using the methods and techniques of grounded theory. This article provides an outline of the importance of scheduling, prescribing, social factors, 'compound awareness contexts' and reversibility to the status passage into complete tooth loss. We conclude by arguing that the theory of status passage may enable a detailed analysis of the 'time-space extensionality' of trajectories into complete tooth loss. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  1. Kinematics of the tooth tapping movement.

    PubMed

    Widmalm, S E; Hedegård, B

    1977-07-01

    Electrical activity in the masseter muscles and tooth contact vibrations were recorded simultaneously from subjects tapping their teeth slowly into maximal intercuspidation and again with maximal frequency. High speed cinephotography was also used with four of the ten subjects. Three main parts could be distinguished on the obtained graphical representation of the tooth tapping movement: tooth contact phase (TCP), opening phase (OP) and closing phase (CP). Tapping frequency was increased by decreasing the jaw opening degree and the durations of TCP, OP and CP. The jaw velocity immediately before tooth contact, which may be of significance for the reflex response, was however not increased. The average jaw speed was nevertheless increased from 10 to 15 cm/s since the turning from OP to CP was more abrupt in high than in low frequency tapping. The duration of electrical activity after tooth contact was significantly shorter at tapping with high than with low frequency. The teeth maintained contact without detectable rebound between each open-close cycle. The OP started about 100 ms after the cessation of electrical activity both at low and high tapping frequency. The time between end of electrical activity and the start of a new OP was supposed to be dependent upon the relaxation time of the masseter muscles.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed gold denture tooth is a device composed of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3590 - Preformed plastic denture tooth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed plastic denture tooth. 872.3590 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3590 Preformed plastic denture tooth. (a) Identification. A preformed plastic denture tooth is a prefabricated device, composed of materials such as methyl...

  12. Effect of a leaflet given to parents on knowledge of tooth avulsion.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, F; Adl, A; Ranjbar, Z

    2013-03-01

    Parents can play an important role in improving the prognosis of avulsed permanent teeth if they are properly informed about the necessary dental first-aid steps at the time of an accident. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of Shirazi parents in traumatic a simple leaflet on improving their knowledge about this topic. One hundred and fifty parents of children receiving dental care at the Shiraz Dental School participated in this study. Half of the participants received an informative leaflet with the possibility of asking questions about it to an operator, while the other half did not receive any leaflets and served as a control group. Using a questionnaire and a scoring system, the level of knowledge of parents was measured in the following categories: general knowledge of tooth avulsion, knowledge of replantation and primary/permanent teeth, knowledge of how to clean an avulsed tooth, knowledge of extra- oral time, and knowledge of storage, methods and transporting media. The results showed that knowledge level was low among Shirazi parents. Improvements were observed in all the categories of knowledge as a result of reading the leaflet and answering the questions. A simple leaflet is a suitable tool to impart knowledge to parents and improve awareness about tooth avulsion.

  13. Computer-aided design of bevel gear tooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuo, Hung Chang; Huston, Ronald L.; Coy, John J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided design procedure for generating bevel gears. The development is based on examining a perfectly plastic, cone-shaped gear blank rolling over a cutting tooth on a plane crown rack. The resulting impression on the plastic gear blank is the envelope of the cutting tooth. This impression and envelope thus form a conjugate tooth surface. Equations are presented for the locus of points on the tooth surface. The same procedures are then extended to simulate the generation of a spiral bevel gear. The corresponding governing equations are presented.

  14. Computer aided design of bevel gear tooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Huston, R. L.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided design procedure for generating bevel gears. The development is based on examining a perfectly plastic, cone-shaped gear blank rolling over a cutting tooth on a plane crown rack. The resulting impression on the plastic gear blank is the envelope of the cutting tooth. This impression and envelope thus form a conjugate tooth surface. Equations are presented for the locus of points on the tooth surface. The same procedures are then extended to simulate the generation of a spiral bevel gear. The corresponding governing equations are presented.

  15. Autocrine and paracrine Shh signaling are necessary for tooth morphogenesis, but not tooth replacement in snakes and lizards (Squamata).

    PubMed

    Handrigan, Gregory R; Richman, Joy M

    2010-01-01

    Here we study the role of Shh signaling in tooth morphogenesis and successional tooth initiation in snakes and lizards (Squamata). By characterizing the expression of Shh pathway receptor Ptc1 in the developing dentitions of three species (Eublepharis macularius, Python regius, and Pogona vitticeps) and by performing gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that Shh signaling is active in the squamate tooth bud and is required for its normal morphogenesis. Shh apparently mediates tooth morphogenesis by separate paracrine- and autocrine-mediated functions. According to this model, paracrine Shh signaling induces cell proliferation in the cervical loop, outer enamel epithelium, and dental papilla. Autocrine signaling within the stellate reticulum instead appears to regulate cell survival. By treating squamate dental explants with Hh antagonist cyclopamine, we induced tooth phenotypes that closely resemble the morphological and differentiation defects of vestigial, first-generation teeth in the bearded dragon P. vitticeps. Our finding that these vestigial teeth are deficient in epithelial Shh signaling further corroborates that Shh is needed for the normal development of teeth in snakes and lizards. Finally, in this study, we definitively refute a role for Shh signaling in successional dental lamina formation and conclude that other pathways regulate tooth replacement in squamates.

  16. Oral diagnosis and treatment planning: part 4. Non-carious tooth surface loss and assessment of risk.

    PubMed

    Kaidonis, J A

    2012-08-01

    Non-carious tooth surface loss or tooth wear is becoming an increasingly significant factor affecting the long-term health of the dentition. The adverse effects of tooth wear are becoming increasingly apparent both in young persons and, as more people retain their teeth, into old age. This situation challenges the preventive and restorative skills of dental practitioners.

  17. Natural Tooth Pontic: An Instant Esthetic Option for Periodontally Compromised Teeth—A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Rishi; Narayan, Ipshita; Gowda, Triveni Mavinakote; Mehta, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden tooth loss in the esthetic zone of the maxillary or mandibular anterior region can be due to trauma, periodontal disease, or endodontic failure. The treatment options for replacing the missing tooth can vary between removable prosthesis, tooth-supported prosthesis, and implant-supported prosthesis. Irrespective of the final treatment, the first line of management would be to provisionally restore the patient's esthetic appearance at the earliest, while functionally stabilizing the compromised arch. Using the patient's own natural tooth as a pontic offers the benefits of being the right size, shape, and color and provides exact repositioning in its original intraoral three-dimensional position. Additionally, using the patient's platelet concentrate (platelet rich fibrin) facilitates early wound healing and preservation of alveolar ridge shape following tooth extraction. The abutment teeth can also be preserved with minimal or no preparation, thus keeping the technique reversible, and can be completed at the chair side thereby avoiding laboratory costs. This helps the patient better tolerate the effect of tooth loss psychologically. The article describes a successful, immediate, and viable technique for rehabilitation of three different patients requiring replacement of a single periodontally compromised tooth in an esthetic region. PMID:27994892

  18. Incisal tooth wear and self-reported TMD pain in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Christian; John, Mike T; Lobbezoo, Frank; Setz, Juergen M; Schaller, Hans-Guenter

    2004-01-01

    Incisal tooth wear may be a sign of long-term bruxing behavior. Bruxism is purported to be a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this population-based cross-sectional study was to determine if anterior tooth wear is associated with the self-report of TMD pain in children and adolescents. In a population sample of 1,011 children and adolescents (mean age 13.1 years, range 10 to 18 years; female 52%; response rate 85%), TMD cases were defined as subjects reporting pain in the face, jaw muscles, and temporomandibular joint during the last month according to RDC/TMD. All other subjects were considered controls. Incisal tooth wear was assessed in the clinical examination using a 0 to 2 scale (no wear, enamel wear, dentin wear) for every anterior permanent tooth. The mean wear score for the individuals was categorized into 0, 0.01 to 0.20, 0.21 to 0.40, and 0.41+. A multiple logistic regression analysis, controlling for the effects of age and gender, analyzed the association between the categorized summary wear score and TMD. Specifically, the hypothesis of a trend between higher tooth wear scores and higher risk of TMD was tested. An odds ratio of 1.1 indicated, after adjusting for gender and age, no statistically significantly higher risk of TMD pain with higher tooth wear scores. Incisal tooth wear was not associated with self-reported TMD pain in 10- to 18-year-old subjects.

  19. [Destructive and protective factors in the development of tooth-wear].

    PubMed

    Jász, Máté; Varga, Gábor; Tóth, Zsuzsanna

    2006-12-01

    The experience of the past decade proves that tooth wear occurs in an increasing number of cases in general dental practice. Tooth wear may have physical (abrasion and attrition) and/or chemical (erosion) origin. The primary physical causes are inadequate dental hygienic activities, bad oral habits or occupational harm. As for dental erosion, it is accelerated by the highly erosive foods and drinks produced and sold in the past decades, and the number of cases is also boosted by the fact that bulimia, anorexia nervosa and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease prevalence have become more common. The most important defensive factor against tooth wear is saliva, which protects teeth from the effect of acids. Tertiary dentin formation plays an important role in the protection of the pulp. Ideally, destructive and protective factors are in balance. Both an increase in the destructive forces, and the insufficiency of defense factors result in the disturbance of the equilibrium. This results in tooth-wear, which means an irreversible loss of dental hard tissue. The rehabilitation of the lost tooth material is often very difficult, irrespectively of whether it is needed because of functional or esthetic causes. For that reason, the dentist should carry out primary and secondary dental care and prevention more often, i.e. dental recall is indispensable every 4-6 months.

  20. Comparison of Three types of Tooth Brushes on Plaque and Gingival Indices: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Moeintaghavi, Amir; Sargolzaie, Naser; Rostampour, Mehrnoosh; Sarvari, Sara; Kargozar, Sanaz; Gharaei, Shideh

    2017-01-01

    To compare clinical results of three types of manual tooth brushes on plaque removal efficacy and gingivitis. This study is a single blind randomized trial with crossover design which involved 30 periodontaly healthy individuals. Professional plaque removal and oral hygiene instruction were performed for all the participants in the first step of our study followed by asking them to avoid brushing for 2 days. Thereafter plaque and gingivitis scores were measured using plaque and gingival indices (PI and GI). Then subjects were instructed to use Pulsar tooth brush for a two-week period and then, GI and PI indices were assessed again. After passing one-week period for wash out, subjects didn't brush for 2 days and indices were recorded again. The same procedure was done for CrossAction, and Butler 411 tooth brushes respectively and at the end of the study these variables were analyzed using SPSS software ver.16. Repeated measurement ANOVA test was used to compare the scores between different brushes. Finding of this study reveals that using all three types of tooth brushes resulted in significant plaque and gingivitis reduction compared to baseline levels. Pulsar tooth brush was significantly more effective in diminishing PI and GI than Butler tooth brush (p=0.044 and 0.031 respectively). According to our findings all 3 types of tooth brushes are effective in reduction of plaque and gingivitis and this reduction is significantly greater for Pulsar tooth brush compared to Butler and CrossAction tooth brushes.

  1. Development of a device to simulate tooth mobility.

    PubMed

    Erdelt, Kurt-Jürgen; Lamper, Timea

    2010-10-01

    The testing of new materials under simulation of oral conditions is essential in medicine. For simulation of fracture strength different simulation devices are used for test set-up. The results of these in vitro tests differ because there is no standardization of tooth mobility in simulation devices. The aim of this study is to develop a simulation device that depicts the tooth mobility curve as accurately as possible and creates reproducible and scalable mobility curves. With the aid of published literature and with the help of dentists, average forms of tooth classes were generated. Based on these tooth data, different abutment tooth shapes and different simulation devices were designed with a CAD system and were generated with a Rapid Prototyping system. Then, for all simulation devices the displacement curves were created with a universal testing machine and compared with the tooth mobility curve. With this new information, an improved adapted simulation device was constructed. A simulations device that is able to simulate the mobility curve of natural teeth with high accuracy and where mobility is reproducible and scalable was developed.

  2. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  3. Evaluation of tablet PC as a tool for teaching tooth brushing to children.

    PubMed

    Salama, F; Abobakr, I; Al-Khodair, N; Al-Wakeel, M

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a single time tooth brushing instruction using video on a tablet PC (Apple iPad) compared to operator presentation using jaw model for plaque removal. This cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 100 children divided into two groups. For Group 1 brushing was demonstrated to the child by the operator with the use of a jaw model. This demonstration was videotaped for subsequent use in Group 2 using a tablet PC (Apple iPad). Plaque index was recorded before and after demonstration of the assigned method of teaching tooth brushing. The results showed a significant difference using the two methods. The difference between the mean plaque index values with the jaw model and tablet PC at baseline and after tooth brushing represented 17.27% (50% improvement) and 11.56% (34% improvement) respectively. Boys showed a 18.3%. higher improvement in tooth brushing compared to girls. Seventy-five percent of the children reported using tablet computers in their daily life. CONCLUSION Teaching children by using a jaw model was more effective in improving plaque index score than using video on tablet PC by 16%. Both methods of tooth brushing teaching were fully accepted by all children.

  4. Effects of applying anchovy (Stolephorus insularis) substrates on the microhardness of tooth enamel in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrik, Y. C.; Puspitawati, R.; Gunawan, H. A.

    2017-08-01

    Anchovies (Stolephorus insularis) contain high levels of fluor in the form of CaF2. The aim of this study is to analyze changes in tooth enamel microhardness after application of anchovy substrates by feeding or as a topical fluoridation material. An in vivo study of the lower left incisors of nine Sprague-Dawley rats was conducted. The sample was comprised of baseline and treatment groups, including feeding application, topical application, negative control feeding, and negative control topical groups. The treatment groups were given 5% anchovy substrates through feeding and topical applications. After treatment, tooth samples were extracted from each of the rats for examination, and statistical analyses were performed after determining hardness numbers for enamel surfaces using Vickers microhardness tester. Vickers hardness numbers (VHNs) for anchovy substrate application and consumption by feeding (440.3 ± 24.72) were higher than for the negative control (315.80 ± 17.51). VHNs for the topical application group were higher than for the negative control (347.28 ± 28.56) and for the feeding group. The use of anchovy as a fluoridation material in form of topical application is potentially an effective method for increasing the microhardness of the tooth enamel surface

  5. Detecting Tooth Damage in Geared Drive Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtsheim, Philip R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a method that was developed to detect gear tooth damage that does not require a priori knowledge of the frequency characteristic of the fault. The basic idea of the method is that a few damaged teeth will cause transient load fluctuations unlike the normal tooth load fluctuations. The method attempts to measure the energy in the lower side bands of the modulated signal caused by the transient load fluctuations. The method monitors the energy in the frequency interval which excludes the frequency of the lowest dominant normal tooth load fluctuation and all frequencies above it. The method reacted significantly to the tooth fracture damage results documented in the Lewis data sets which were obtained from tests of the OH-58A transmission and tests of high contact ratio spiral bevel gears. The method detected gear tooth fractures in all four of the high contact ratio spiral bevel gear runs. Published results indicate other detection methods were only able to detect faults for three out of four runs.

  6. Evidence for a neural influence on tooth germ generation in a polyphyodont species.

    PubMed

    Tuisku, F; Hildebrand, C

    1994-09-01

    It has been suggested that nerve endings emanating from the dental nerve plexus of the jaw might be involved in the formation of tooth germs. In the present study we examine the effect of unilateral denervation on the formation of tooth germs in the lower jaw of a polyphyodont teleost--the cichild Tilapia mariae. Repeated inspection of the lower jaw dentition in normal animals over a period of about 300 days showed that the functional time of an average individual tooth is 101 days. In operated animals, the functional time was normal on the unoperated side, but on the denervated side tooth turnover ceased about 100 days after surgery. Radiographic plates from lower jaw specimens revealed that mineralized replacement teeth were present on the unoperated side, but not on the denervated side, 300 days after denervation. Light microscopic examination of semi-thin transverse sections from decalcified plastic-embedded lower jaws showed that soft-tissue tooth primordia and nerves were lacking on the denervated side, while present within the undisturbed half-jaw. It is concluded that the local presence of mandibular nerve branches is necessary for the formation of tooth germs in the lower jaw of the cichlid T. mariae.

  7. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  8. Age-related effects on osteoclastic activities after orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Li, M; Lu, J; Hu, Y; Cui, L; Zhang, D; Yang, Y

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the effects of age on the expression levels of the receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoclasts in the periodontal ligament during orthodontic mechanical loading and post-orthodontic retention. The study included 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats, ten in the young group (aged four to five weeks) and ten in the adult group (aged 18 to 20 weeks). In each rat, the upper-left first molar was subjected to a seven-day orthodontic force loading followed by a seven-day retention period. The upper-right first molar served as a control. The amount of orthodontic tooth movement was measured after seven-day force application and seven-day post-orthodontic retention. The expression levels of RANKL and the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts were evaluated on day 7 (end of mechanical force loading) and day 14 (after seven days of post-orthodontic retention). Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test, and significance was set at p < 0.05. There was no significant difference between the amount of tooth movement in the young group (0.96, standard deviation (sd) 0.30mm) and that in the adult group (0.80mm, sd 0.28) (p > 0.05) after the seven-day force application. On the compression side, the expression of RANKL and TRAP-positive osteoclasts in both the young and the adult groups increased after the application of force for seven days, and then decreased at the end of the seven-day retention period. However, by the end of the period, the expression of RANKL on the compression side dropped to the control level in the young group (p > 0.05), while it was still higher than that on the control side in the adult group (p < 0.05). The expression of RANKL on the compression side did not show significant difference between the young and the adult groups after seven-day force application (p > 0.05), but it was significantly higher in the adult group than that in the young group after seven-day post

  9. A probability distribution model of tooth pits for evaluating time-varying mesh stiffness of pitting gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Liu, Zongyao; Wang, Delong; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Huan; Lin, Jing

    2018-06-01

    Tooth damage often causes a reduction in gear mesh stiffness. Thus time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) can be treated as an indication of gear health conditions. This study is devoted to investigating the mesh stiffness variations of a pair of external spur gears with tooth pitting, and proposes a new model for describing tooth pitting based on probability distribution. In the model, considering the appearance and development process of tooth pitting, we model the pitting on the surface of spur gear teeth as a series of pits with a uniform distribution in the direction of tooth width and a normal distribution in the direction of tooth height, respectively. In addition, four pitting degrees, from no pitting to severe pitting, are modeled. Finally, influences of tooth pitting on TVMS are analyzed in details and the proposed model is validated by comparing with a finite element model. The comparison results show that the proposed model is effective for the TVMS evaluations of pitting gears.

  10. A numerical algorithm of tooth profile of non-circular cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan

    2017-08-01

    Non-circular cylindrical gear (NCCG) is a common form of non-circular gear. Different from the circular gear, the tooth profile equation of NCCG cannot be obtained. So it is necessary to use a numerical algorithm to calculate the tooth profile of NCCG. For this reason, this paper presents a simple and highly efficient numerical algorithm to obtain the tooth profile of NCCG. Firstly, the mathematical model of tooth profile envelope of NCCG is established based on the principle of gear shaping, and the tooth profile envelope of NCCG is obtained. Secondly, the polar radius and polar angle of shaper cutter tooth profile are chosen as the criterions, by which the points of NCCG tooth cogging can be screened out. Finally, the boundary of tooth cogging points is extracted by a distance criterion and correspondingly the tooth profile of NCCG is obtained.

  11. Grey-Markov prediction model based on background value optimization and central-point triangular whitenization weight function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Dang, Yaoguo; Li, Bingjun

    2018-01-01

    Grey-Markov forecasting model is a combination of grey prediction model and Markov chain which show obvious optimization effects for data sequences with characteristics of non-stationary and volatility. However, the state division process in traditional Grey-Markov forecasting model is mostly based on subjective real numbers that immediately affects the accuracy of forecasting values. To seek the solution, this paper introduces the central-point triangular whitenization weight function in state division to calculate possibilities of research values in each state which reflect preference degrees in different states in an objective way. On the other hand, background value optimization is applied in the traditional grey model to generate better fitting data. By this means, the improved Grey-Markov forecasting model is built. Finally, taking the grain production in Henan Province as an example, it verifies this model's validity by comparing with GM(1,1) based on background value optimization and the traditional Grey-Markov forecasting model.

  12. Automated model selection in covariance estimation and spatial whitening of MEG and EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Engemann, Denis A; Gramfort, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography (M/EEG) measure non-invasively the weak electromagnetic fields induced by post-synaptic neural currents. The estimation of the spatial covariance of the signals recorded on M/EEG sensors is a building block of modern data analysis pipelines. Such covariance estimates are used in brain-computer interfaces (BCI) systems, in nearly all source localization methods for spatial whitening as well as for data covariance estimation in beamformers. The rationale for such models is that the signals can be modeled by a zero mean Gaussian distribution. While maximizing the Gaussian likelihood seems natural, it leads to a covariance estimate known as empirical covariance (EC). It turns out that the EC is a poor estimate of the true covariance when the number of samples is small. To address this issue the estimation needs to be regularized. The most common approach downweights off-diagonal coefficients, while more advanced regularization methods are based on shrinkage techniques or generative models with low rank assumptions: probabilistic PCA (PPCA) and factor analysis (FA). Using cross-validation all of these models can be tuned and compared based on Gaussian likelihood computed on unseen data. We investigated these models on simulations, one electroencephalography (EEG) dataset as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG) datasets from the most common MEG systems. First, our results demonstrate that different models can be the best, depending on the number of samples, heterogeneity of sensor types and noise properties. Second, we show that the models tuned by cross-validation are superior to models with hand-selected regularization. Hence, we propose an automated solution to the often overlooked problem of covariance estimation of M/EEG signals. The relevance of the procedure is demonstrated here for spatial whitening and source localization of MEG signals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Al-Zarea, Bader K

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To identify participants' satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics. Materials and Methods. 220 participants (127 males and 93 females, mean age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years) were recruited into the study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' satisfaction with appearance and what treatment they desire to improve aesthetics. Participants scored the level of satisfaction with appearance using visual analogue scale. Results. The VAS mean score of satisfaction with general appearance was 6.8 ± 2.3. Half participants were dissatisfied with tooth appearance and 65.9% were dissatisfied with tooth colour. Higher VAS scores were associated with higher desire for all treatments that improve tooth appearance (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance increased with increased dissatisfaction with teeth colour, feeling of poor tooth alignment, presence of fractured anterior teeth, and increased desire for orthodontic, crowns, and dentures treatments (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth colour was associated with increased desire for tooth whitening and tooth coloured fillings (P < .05). Conclusions. Participants had high levels of dissatisfaction with tooth appearance and tooth colour. Dissatisfaction with tooth colour contributed to the increased dissatisfaction with tooth appearance. Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance, colour, alignment, and condition was significantly related to high desire for aesthetic treatments.

  14. Longitudinal study of gastroesophageal reflux and erosive tooth wear.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Materna, Andrea; Martig, Lukas; Lussi, Adrian

    2017-10-25

    Approximately 60% of patients presenting to dentists with erosive tooth wear have significant gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), despite minor reflux symptoms. No longitudinal studies of reflux-associated erosive tooth wear and of reflux characteristics have been reported to date. The aim of this study was to characterize the longitudinal course of GERD and of associated erosive tooth wear, as well as factors predictive of its progression, in a large group of patients. Seventy-two patients presenting to dentists with clinically significant erosive tooth wear and increased esophageal acid exposure by 24-h multichannel intraluminal pH-impedance measurement (MII-pH) were re-assessed clinically and by MII-pH after 1 year treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg twice-daily. Predictive factors for erosive tooth wear were assessed by logistic regression. At follow-up, no further progression in erosive tooth wear was observed in 53 (74%) of patients. The percentage of time with a pH < 4, the number of acid reflux episodes and the percentage of proximal esophageal reflux off-PPI did not change significantly after one year, but the number of weakly acidic reflux episodes decreased significantly in the large subgroup without progression. None of the baseline demographic, clinical, endoscopic or esophageal acid exposure characteristics were significantly associated with progression of erosive tooth wear at follow-up. In this longitudinal study in patients with erosive tooth wear and oligosymptomatic GERD receiving esomeprazole for one year, erosive tooth wear did not progress further in the majority of patients. Background acidic esophageal reflux exposure appeared stable over time, whereas weakly acidic exposure decreased significantly in patients without erosion progression. MII-pH measurements on-PPI and with healthy controls will be useful in the further elucidation of the causal role of reflux in erosive tooth wear. ClinicalTrials.gov , retrospectively registered: NCT02087345 .

  15. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Twice Whitening for MIMO Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Mitra, Pramita; Barhen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    While many techniques exist for local spectrum sensing of a primary user, each represents a computationally demanding task to secondary user receivers. In software-defined radio, computational complexity lengthens the time for a cognitive radio to recognize changes in the transmission environment. This complexity is even more significant for spatially multiplexed receivers, e.g., in SIMO and MIMO, where the spatio-temporal data sets grow in size with the number of antennae. Limits on power and space for the processor hardware further constrain SDR performance. In this report, we discuss improvements in spatio-temporal twice whitening (STTW) for real-time local spectrum sensing by demonstratingmore » a form of STTW well suited for MIMO environments. We implement STTW on the Coherent Logix hx3100 processor, a multicore processor intended for low-power, high-throughput software-defined signal processing. These results demonstrate how coupling the novel capabilities of emerging multicore processors with algorithmic advances can enable real-time, software-defined processing of large spatio-temporal data sets.« less

  16. Effect of dental wear, stabilization appliance and anterior tooth reconstruction on mandibular movements during speech.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Priscila de Oliveira; Faot, Fernanda; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2008-01-01

    This study described changes in mandibular movements during pronunciation of /m/ and /s/ sounds in Portuguese, in patients presenting dental wear before and after appliance insertion and tooth reconstruction. Subjects were divided into a control group of dentate patients and an experimental group of patients with incisal tooth wear due to bruxism. A magnetic jaw tracking device measured the jaw opening, and translations to left and right sides of the mandible during pronunciation of phonemes. Evaluations were carried out 1 week and immediately before appliance insertion; 24 h, 7, 30 and 60 days after appliance insertion; and 1 week and 1 month after tooth reconstruction. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney and Friedman tests (p<0.05). Jaw opening was different (p<0.05) for both sounds in all periods. The anteroposterior amplitude for /s/ showed differences immediately before and 1 month after appliance insertion (p<0.05). Lateral amplitude for the right side showed differences between groups after appliance insertion for /s/, and 1 and 2 months after appliance insertion for the /m/ (p<0.05). Volunteers with anterior tooth wear had a wider opening movement, and the movements during speech of /m/ and /s/ sounds were not changed after appliance insertion and reconstruction of teeth.

  17. Role of computer-based learning in tooth carving in dentistry: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Saurabh; Juneja, Manjushree

    2016-01-01

    Tooth carving is an important practical preclinical exercise in the curriculum in Indian dental education setup. It forms the basis of introduction to tooth anatomy, morphology and occlusion of primary and permanent teeth through practical approach. It requires enormous time and manpower to master the skill. Therefore, there is an imminent necessity to incorporate computer-based learning of the art of tooth carving for effective teaching and efficient student learning. This will ensure quality time to be spent on other academic and research activities by students and faculty in addition to adding value as a teaching aid.

  18. One-stage tooth-borne distraction versus two stage bone-borne distraction in surgically assisted maxillary expansion (SARME).

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Robin; Abe-Nickler, Dorothee; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Kunzmann, Kevin; Zingler, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the effects of tooth-borne and bone-borne distraction devices in surgically assisted maxillary expansion (SARME) on dental and skeletal structures. A sample of 33 skeletally mature patients with transverse maxillary deficiencies was examined with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) before and 3 months after surgery. Fourteen patients were treated with tooth-borne devices and 19 patients with bone-borne devices. Dental crown expansion in the first premolars did not differ significantly between the two groups, and median expansion was 5.55 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 5.23) in the tooth-borne device group and 4.6 mm (IQR 3.4) in the bone-borne device group. In the first molars, crown expansion and lateral tipping were significantly greater in the tooth-borne device group (P ≤ .02). The median skeletal nasal isthmus increase was significantly more in the bone-borne device group at 3.0 mm than in the tooth-borne device group at 0.98 mm (P ≤ .02). Both tooth-borne and bone-borne devices are effective treatment modalities to correct maxillary transverse deficiencies. Bone-borne devices produced greater widening of the skeletal nasal floor and fewer dental side effects in the first molars. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of spiral bevel gears with conjugate tooth surfaces and tooth contact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Tsung, Wei-Jiung; Lee, Hong-Tao

    1987-01-01

    A new method for generation of spiral bevel gears is proposed. The main features of this method are as follows: (1) the gear tooth surfaces are conjugated and can transform rotation with zero transmission errors; (2) the tooth bearing contact is localized; (3) the center of the instantaneous contact ellipse moves in a plane that has a fixed orientation; (4) the contact normal performs in the process of meshing a parallel motion; (5) the motion of the contact ellipse provides improved conditions of lubrication; and (6) the gears can be manufactured by use of Gleason's equipment.

  20. The Effect of Hierarchical Micro/Nanotextured Titanium Implants on Osseointegration Immediately After Tooth Extraction in Beagle Dogs.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian; Bellare, Anuj; Cui, Yajun; Cheng, Bingkun; Xu, Shanshan; Kong, Liang

    2017-06-01

    Owing to simplify the operation and shorten the overall duration of treatment, immediate implantation earned much satisfactory from patients and dentists. The results of immediate implantation determined by osseointegration, we fabricated a micro/nanotextured titanium implants to improve osseointegration immediately after tooth extraction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hierarchical micro/nanotextured titanium implant on osseointegration immediately after tooth extraction. The micro/nanotextured titanium implants were fabricated by etching with 0.5 wt% hydrofluoric (HF) acid followed by anodization in HF electrolytes. Implants with a machined surface as well as implants a microtextured surface prepared by 0.5 wt% HF etching served as control groups. The machined, microtextured, and micro/nanotextured implants were inserted into fresh sockets immediately after tooth extraction in beagle dogs. Twelve weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed for micro-CT scanning, histological analysis and biomechan