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Sample records for torque converter clutch

  1. Torque Control of a Rehabilitation Teaching Robot Using Magneto-Rheological Fluid Clutches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakogi, Hokuto; Ohaba, Motoyoshi; Kuramochi, Naimu; Yano, Hidenori

    A new robot that makes use of MR-fluid clutches for simulating torque is proposed to provide an appropriate device for training physical therapy students in knee-joint rehabilitation. The feeling of torque provided by the robot is expected to correspond to the torque performance obtained by physical therapy experts in a clinical setting. The torque required for knee-joint rehabilitation, which is a function of the rotational angle and the rotational angular velocity of a knee movement, is modeled using a mechanical system composed of typical spring-mass-damper elements. The robot consists of two MR-fluid clutches, two induction motors, and a feedback control system. In the torque experiments, output torque is controlled using the spring and damper coefficients separately. The values of these coefficients are determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the robot would be suitable for training physical therapy students to experience similar torque feelings as needed in a clinical situation.

  2. Torque coordinating robust control of shifting process for dry dual clutch transmission equipped in a hybrid car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.-G.; Chen, H.-J.; Yang, Y.-Y.; He, L.

    2015-09-01

    For a hybrid car equipped with dual clutch transmission (DCT), the coordination control problems of clutches and power sources are investigated while taking full advantage of the integrated starter generator motor's fast response speed and high accuracy (speed and torque). First, a dynamic model of the shifting process is established, the vehicle acceleration is quantified according to the intentions of the driver, and the torque transmitted by clutches is calculated based on the designed disengaging principle during the torque phase. Next, a robust H∞ controller is designed to ensure speed synchronisation despite the existence of model uncertainties, measurement noise, and engine torque lag. The engine torque lag and measurement noise are used as external disturbances to initially modify the output torque of the power source. Additionally, during the torque switch phase, the torque of the power sources is smoothly transitioned to the driver's demanded torque. Finally, the torque of the power sources is further distributed based on the optimisation of system efficiency, and the throttle opening of the engine is constrained to avoid sharp torque variations. The simulation results verify that the proposed control strategies effectively address the problem of coordinating control of clutches and power sources, establishing a foundation for the application of DCT in hybrid cars.

  3. Development of magneto-rheologial fluid (MRF) based clutch for output torque control of AC motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. Hung; Do, H. M. Hieu; Nguyen, V. Quoc; Nguyen, N. Diep; Le, D. Thang

    2018-03-01

    In industry, the AC motor is widely used because of low price, power availability, low cost maintenance. The main disadvantages of AC motors compared to DC motors are difficulty in speed and torque control, requiring expensive controllers with complex control algorithms. This is the basic limitations in the widespread adoption of AC motor systems for industrial automation. One feasible solution for AC motor control is using MRF (magneto-rheological fluid) based clutches (shortly called MR clutches) Although there have been many studies on MR clutches, most of these clutches used traditional configuration with coils wound on the middle cylindrical part and a compotator is used to supply power to the coils. Therefore, this type of MR clutches possesses many disadvantages such as high friction and unstable applied current due to commutator, complex structure which causes difficulty in manufacture, assembly, and maintenance. In addition, the bottleneck problem of magnetic field is also a challenging issue. In this research, we will develop a new type of MR clutches that overcomes the abovementioned disadvantages of traditional MR clutches and more suitable for application in controlling of AC motor. Besides, in this study, speed and torque control system for AC motors using developed MR clutches is designed and experimental validated.

  4. Method and apparatus for executing an asynchronous clutch-to-clutch shift in a hybrid transmission

    DOEpatents

    Demirovic, Besim; Gupta, Pinaki; Kaminsky, Lawrence A.; Naqvi, Ali K.; Heap, Anthony H.; Sah, Jy-Jen F.

    2014-08-12

    A hybrid transmission includes first and second electric machines. A method for operating the hybrid transmission in response to a command to execute a shift from an initial continuously variable mode to a target continuously variable mode includes increasing torque of an oncoming clutch associated with operating in the target continuously variable mode and correspondingly decreasing a torque of an off-going clutch associated with operating in the initial continuously variable mode. Upon deactivation of the off-going clutch, torque outputs of the first and second electric machines and the torque of the oncoming clutch are controlled to synchronize the oncoming clutch. Upon synchronization of the oncoming clutch, the torque for the oncoming clutch is increased and the transmission is operated in the target continuously variable mode.

  5. Feasibility study for convertible engine torque converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility study has shown that a dump/fill type torque converter has excellent potential for the convertible fan/shaft engine. The torque converter space requirement permits internal housing within the normal flow path of a turbofan engine at acceptable engine weight. The unit permits operating the engine in the turboshaft mode by decoupling the fan. To convert to turbofan mode, the torque converter overdrive capability bring the fan speed up to the power turbine speed to permit engagement of a mechanical lockup device when the shaft speed are synchronized. The conversion to turbofan mode can be made without drop of power turbine speed in less than 10 sec. Total thrust delivered to the aircraft by the proprotor, fan, and engine during tansient can be controlled to prevent loss of air speed or altitude. Heat rejection to the oil is low, and additional oil cooling capacity is not required. The turbofan engine aerodynamic design is basically uncompromised by convertibility and allows proper fan design for quiet and efficient cruise operation. Although the results of the feasibility study are exceedingly encouraging, it must be noted that they are based on extrapolation of limited existing data on torque converters. A component test program with three trial torque converter designs and concurrent computer modeling for fluid flow, stress, and dynamics, updated with test results from each unit, is recommended.

  6. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT V, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--TORQUE CONVERTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF TORQUE CONVERTERS USED ON DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE (1) FLUID COUPLINGS (LOCATION AND PURPOSE), (2) PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION, (3) TORQUE CONVERRS, (4) TORQMATIC CONVERTER, (5) THREE STAGE, THREE ELEMENT TORQUE CONVERTER, AND (6)…

  7. Method and apparatus for operating a powertrain system upon detecting a stuck-closed clutch

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, R. Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A powertrain system includes a multi-mode transmission having a plurality of torque machines. A method for controlling the powertrain system includes identifying all presently applied clutches including commanded applied clutches and the stuck-closed clutch upon detecting one of the torque-transfer clutches is in a stuck-closed condition. A closed-loop control system is employed to control operation of the multi-mode transmission accounting for all the presently applied clutches.

  8. Rotorcraft convertible engines for the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Two rotorcraft studies were executed. The goal was to identify attractive techniques for implementing convertible powerplants for the ABC, Folded Tilt Rotor, and X-wing type high speed, high-L/D rotorcraft; to determine the DOC and fuel savings benefits achieved thereby; and to define research required to bring these powerplants into existence by the 1990's. These studies are reviewed herein and the different methods of approach are pointed out as well as the key findings. Fan shaft engines using variable inlet guide vanes or torque converters, and turboprop powerplants appear attractive. Savings in DOC and fuel consumption of over 15 percent are predicted in some cases as a result of convertible engine use rather than using separate engines for the thrust and the shaft functions. Areas of required research are fan performance (including noise), integrated engine/rotorcraft control, torque converters, turbine design, airflow for rotorcraft torque control, bleed for lift flow, and transmissions and clutches.

  9. Energy-efficient MRF clutch avoiding no-load losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Dirk; Schamoni, Markus; Maas, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    A challenge opposing a commercial use of actuators like brakes and clutches based on magnetorheological fluids (MRF) are durable no-load losses. A complete torque-free separation of these actuators is inherently not yet possible due to the permanent liquid intervention for the fluid engaging parts. Especially for applications with high rotational speeds up to some thousand RPM, this drawback of MRF actuators is not acceptable. In this paper, a novel approach will be presented that allows a controlled movement of the MRF from a torque-transmitting volume of the shear gap into an inactive volume of the shear gap, enabling a complete separation of the fluid engaging surfaces. This behavior is modeled for a novel clutch design by the use of the ferrohydrodynamics and therefore simulations are performed to investigate the transitions between engaged and idle mode. Measurements performed with a realized clutch show that the viscous induced drag torque can be reduced significantly.

  10. Torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fgeppert, E.

    1984-09-01

    Mechanical means for sensing turning torque generated by the load forces in a rotary drive system is described. The sensing means is designed to operate with minimal effect on normal operation of the drive system. The invention can be employed in various drive systems, e.g., automotive engine-transmission power plants, electric motor-operated tools, and metal cutting machines. In such drive systems, the torque-sensing feature may be useful for actuation of various control devices, such as electric switches, mechanical clutches, brake actuators, fluid control valves, or audible alarms. The torque-sensing function can be used for safety overload relief, motor de-energization, engine fuel control transmission clutch actuation, remote alarm signal, tool breakage signal, etc.

  11. Advanced torque converters for robotics and space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the results of the evaluation of a novel torque converter concept. Features of the concept include: (1) automatic and rapid adjustment of effective gear ratio in response to changes in external torque (2) maintenance of output torque at zero output velocity without loading the input power source and (3) isolation of input power source from load. Two working models of the concept were fabricated and tested, and a theoretical analysis was performed to determine the limits of performance. It was found that the devices are apparently suited to certain types of tool driver applications, such as screwdrivers, nut drivers and valve actuators. However, quantiative information was insufficient to draw final conclusion as to robotic applications.

  12. Studies on centrifugal clutch judder behavior and the design of frictional lining materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tse-Chang; Huang, Yu-Wen; Lin, Jen-Fin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the judder behavior of a centrifugal clutch from the start of hot spots in the conformal contact, then the repeated developments of thermoelastic instability, and finally the formation of cyclic undulations in the vibrations, friction coefficient and torque. This behavior is proved to be consistent with the testing results. Using the Taguchi method, 18 kinds of frictional lining specimens were prepared in order to investigate their performance in judder resistance and establish a relationship between judder behavior and the Ts/Td (Ts: static torque; Td: dynamic torque) and dμ/dVx (μ: friction coefficient; Vx: relative sliding velocity of frictional lining and clutch drum) parameters. These specimens are also provided to examine the effects and profitability with regard to the centrifugal clutch, and find the relative importance of the various control factors. Theoretical models for the friction coefficient (μ), the critical sliding velocity (Vc) with clutch judder, and the contact pressure ratio p* /pbar (p*: pressure undulation w.r.t. pbar; pbar: mean contact pressure) and temperature corresponding to judder behavior are developed. The parameters of the contact pressure ratio and temperature are shown to be helpful to explain the occurrence of judder. The frictional torque and the rotational speeds of the driveline, clutch, and clutch drum as functions of engagement time for 100 clutch cycles are obtained experimentally to evaluate dμ/dVx and Ts/Td. A sharp rise in the maximum p* /pbar occurred when the relative sliding velocity reached the critical velocity, Vc. An increase in the maximum p* /pbar generally led to an increase of the (initially negative) dμ/dVx value, and thus the severity of judder. The fluctuation intensity of dμ/dVx becomes a governing factor of the growth of dμ/dVx itself in the engagement process. The mean values of dμ/dVx and Ts/Td for the clutching tests with 100 cycles can be roughly divided into three groups

  13. NLS clutching bearing cavity flow analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Ken; Chan, Daniel C.; Darian, Armen

    1992-01-01

    A flow model of the NLS clutching bearing cavity was built for 2-D axisymmetric viscous analysis. From the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, the tangential force exerted on the surfaces of the inner race was integrated to calculate the dividing torque which, in conjunction with the resistance torque, was used to predict the operating speed of the inner race. In order to further reduce the inner race rotation, the swirling flow at the cavity inlet was partially redirected to generate an opposing torque. Thirty six slanted slots were incorporated into the anti-vortex rib to achieve this goal. A 3-D flow analysis performed on this configuration indicates a drastic reduction of the driving torque and inner race RPM.

  14. An innovative multi-gap clutch based on magneto-rheological fluids and electrodynamic effects: magnetic design and experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an innovative multi-gap magnetorheological clutch is described. It is inspired by a device previously developed by the author’s research group and contains a novel solution based on electrodynamic effects, capable to considerably improve the transmissible torque during the engagement phase. Since this (transient) phase is characterized by a non-zero angular speed between the two clutch shafts, the rotation of a permanent magnets system, used to excite the fluid, induces eddy currents on some conductive material strategically positioned in the device. As a consequence, an electromagnetic torque is produced which is added to the torque transmitted by the magnetorheological fluid only. Once the clutch is completely engaged and the relative speed between the two shafts is zero, the electrodynamic effects vanish and the device operates like a conventional magnetorheological clutch. The system is investigated and designed by means a 3D FEM model and the performance of the device is experimentally validated on a prototype.

  15. Improvement of the limit torque for the torque limiter with magnetic rheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Noritsugu; Kita, Shizuo

    Robots are coming to support and help our life. The robots that work together with human need to avoid sever hitting and holding that force is more than the adequate and comfortable range. In order to keep the force to the safe level in the robot arms, t he limit torque should be controlled on the basis of the case the robot used. Magnetic rheological fluids were tried to be used for the clutch that transmission torque can be controlled continuously because MR fluids can be controlled its viscosity by magnetic field. However those clutch devices were too heavy and large to use for the robot arms. Therefore we tried to increase the sensitivity of magnetic field to viscosity of MR fluids. By applying rough surface for the mating surface, sensitivity of the magnetic field to the shearing torque increase drastically in the case of co-axial torque meter. On the other hand, the changing of the size of the orifice is effective to increase the sensitivity of the magnetic field on the flow resistance in the case of the orifice type equipment.

  16. Optimal control of the gear shifting process for shift smoothness in dual-clutch transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqiang; Görges, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    The control of the transmission system in vehicles is significant for the driving comfort. In order to design a controller for smooth shifting and comfortable driving, a dynamic model of a dual-clutch transmission is presented in this paper. A finite-time linear quadratic regulator is proposed for the optimal control of the two friction clutches in the torque phase for the upshift process. An integral linear quadratic regulator is introduced to regulate the relative speed difference between the engine and the slipping clutch under the optimization of the input torque during the inertia phase. The control objective focuses on smoothing the upshift process so as to improve the driving comfort. Considering the available sensors in vehicles for feedback control, an observer design is presented to track the immeasurable variables. Simulation results show that the jerk can be reduced both in the torque phase and inertia phase, indicating good shift performance. Furthermore, compared with conventional controllers for the upshift process, the proposed control method can reduce shift jerk and improve shift quality.

  17. Optimal control of mode transition for four-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicle with dry dual-clutch transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Lei, Dan; Chen, Jiayi; Li, Hangyu

    2018-05-01

    When the four-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) equipped with a dry dual clutch transmission (DCT) is in the mode transition process from pure electrical rear wheel drive to front wheel drive with engine or hybrid drive, the problem of vehicle longitudinal jerk is prominent. A mode transition robust control algorithm which resists external disturbance and model parameter fluctuation has been developed, by taking full advantage of fast and accurate torque (or speed) response of three electrical power sources and getting the clutch of DCT fully involved in the mode transition process. Firstly, models of key components of driveline system have been established, and the model of five-degrees-of-freedom vehicle longitudinal dynamics has been built by using a Uni-Tire model. Next, a multistage optimal control method has been produced to realize the decision of engine torque and clutch-transmitted torque. The sliding-mode control strategy for measurable disturbance has been proposed at the stage of engine speed dragged up. Meanwhile, the double tracking control architecture that integrates the model calculating feedforward control with H∞ robust feedback control has been presented at the stage of speed synchronization. Finally, the results from Matlab/Simulink software and hardware-in-the-loop test both demonstrate that the proposed control strategy for mode transition can not only coordinate the torque among different power sources and clutch while minimizing vehicle longitudinal jerk, but also provide strong robustness to model uncertainties and external disturbance.

  18. Thermal mechanical analysis of sprag clutches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, Robert L.; Zab, Ronald Joseph; Kurniawan, Antonius S.

    1992-01-01

    Work done at Case Western Reserve University on the Thermal Mechanical analysis of sprag helicopter clutches is reported. The report is presented in two parts. The first part is a description of a test rig for the measurement of the heat generated by high speed sprag clutch assemblies during cyclic torsional loading. The second part describes a finite element modeling procedure for sliding contact. The test rig provides a cyclic torsional load of 756 inch-pounds at 5000 rpm using a four-square arrangement. The sprag clutch test unit was placed between the high speed pinions of the circulating power loop. The test unit was designed to have replaceable inner ad outer races, which contain the instrumentation to monitor the sprag clutch. The torque loading device was chosen to be a water cooled magnetic clutch, which is controlled either manually or through a computer. In the second part, a Generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for non-linear dynamic problems is developed for solid materials. This formulation is derived from the basic laws and axioms of continuum mechanics. The novel aspect of this method is that we are able to investigate the physics in the spatial region of interest as material flows through it without having to follow material points. A finite element approximation to the governing equations is developed. Iterative Methods for the solution of the discrete finite element equations are explored. A FORTRAN program to implement this formulation is developed and a number of solutions to problems of sliding contact are presented.

  19. Torque-Limiting Infinitely-Variable CAM Release Mechanism for a Rotatable Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to a mechanism for permitting convenient manual or servo-powered control of a boom assembly, which is rotatably positionable about yaw and pitch axes by means of releasably locking, yaw and pitch torque-limiting mechanisms, each of which may be locked, unlocked, and positioned by respective yaw and pitch levers. The boom may be longitudinally projected and withdrawn by rotating a boom extension/retraction crank. Torque limiting is provided by spring loaded clutch mechanisms, whereby positioning forces applied to the handles are effective to move the boom unless overcome by greater opposing forces, sufficient to overcome the torque applied by the torque limiting clutch mechanisms. In operation, a structure positionable by the invention (e.g., and end-effector or robot arm) may be rotatably moved about yaw and pitch axes by moving a selected one of the three levers.

  20. Drag Reduction and Performance Improvement of Hydraulic Torque Converters with Multiple Biological Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chunbao, Liu; Li, Li; Yulong, Lei; Changsuo, Liu; Yubo, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Fish-like, dolphin-like, and bionic nonsmooth surfaces were employed in a hydraulic torque converter to achieve drag reduction and performance improvement, which were aimed at reducing profile loss, impacting loss and friction loss, respectively. YJSW335, a twin turbine torque converter, was bionically designed delicately. The biological characteristics consisted of fish-like blades in all four wheels, dolphin-like structure in the first turbine and the stator, and nonsmooth surfaces in the pump. The prediction performance of bionic YJSW335, obtained by computational fluid dynamics simulation, was improved compared with that of the original model, and then it could be proved that drag reduction had been achieved. The mechanism accounting for drag reduction of three factors was also investigated. After bionic design, the torque ratio and the highest efficiencies of YJSW335 were both advanced, which were very difficult to achieve through traditional design method. Moreover, the highest efficiency of the low speed area and high speed area is 85.65% and 86.32%, respectively. By economic matching analysis of the original and bionic powertrains, the latter can significantly reduce the fuel consumption and improve the operating economy of the loader.

  1. Drag Reduction and Performance Improvement of Hydraulic Torque Converters with Multiple Biological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Chunbao, Liu; Changsuo, Liu; Yubo, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Fish-like, dolphin-like, and bionic nonsmooth surfaces were employed in a hydraulic torque converter to achieve drag reduction and performance improvement, which were aimed at reducing profile loss, impacting loss and friction loss, respectively. YJSW335, a twin turbine torque converter, was bionically designed delicately. The biological characteristics consisted of fish-like blades in all four wheels, dolphin-like structure in the first turbine and the stator, and nonsmooth surfaces in the pump. The prediction performance of bionic YJSW335, obtained by computational fluid dynamics simulation, was improved compared with that of the original model, and then it could be proved that drag reduction had been achieved. The mechanism accounting for drag reduction of three factors was also investigated. After bionic design, the torque ratio and the highest efficiencies of YJSW335 were both advanced, which were very difficult to achieve through traditional design method. Moreover, the highest efficiency of the low speed area and high speed area is 85.65% and 86.32%, respectively. By economic matching analysis of the original and bionic powertrains, the latter can significantly reduce the fuel consumption and improve the operating economy of the loader. PMID:27752220

  2. Design and control of electromagnetic clutch actuation system for automated manual transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Ashish; Prasanth, S.; Cherian, Fenin; Baskar, P.

    2017-11-01

    There is a growing interest towards Automatic Transmission in India as it provides better comfort and drivability. But the high cost of this system is limiting itself to be successful in the Indian markets. Due to this, Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) is considered which provides a better solution towards automation as it enhances the drivability and fuel consumption characteristics of a manual transmission at lower costs. However, torque lag and comfort are major issues with AMT which can be addressed by reducing the shift time. In this paper we describe an Electromagnetic Linear Clutch Actuator as a replacement to current electrohydraulic and electromechanical actuator. A control system for the actuator is presented and a clutch engagement strategy is also implemented which reduces the engagement time to 0.78 seconds while reducing jerk and torque lag. The actuator and control system is simulated on a MATLAB Simulink and agreeable results have been obtained.

  3. Sensorless Load Torque Estimation and Passivity Based Control of Buck Converter Fed DC Motor

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. Ganesh; Thilagar, S. Hosimin

    2015-01-01

    Passivity based control of DC motor in sensorless configuration is proposed in this paper. Exact tracking error dynamics passive output feedback control is used for stabilizing the speed of Buck converter fed DC motor under various load torques such as constant type, fan type, propeller type, and unknown load torques. Under load conditions, sensorless online algebraic approach is proposed, and it is compared with sensorless reduced order observer approach. The former produces better response in estimating the load torque. Sensitivity analysis is also performed to select the appropriate control variables. Simulation and experimental results fully confirm the superiority of the proposed approach suggested in this paper. PMID:25893208

  4. Control of a haptic gear shifting assistance device utilizing a magnetorheological clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Min; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a haptic clutch driven gear shifting assistance device that can help when the driver shifts the gear of a transmission system. In order to achieve this goal, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based clutch is devised to be capable of the rotary motion of an accelerator pedal to which the MR clutch is integrated. The proposed MR clutch is then manufactured, and its transmission torque is experimentally evaluated according to the magnetic field intensity. The manufactured MR clutch is integrated with the accelerator pedal to transmit a haptic cue signal to the driver. The impending control issue is to cue the driver to shift the gear via the haptic force. Therefore, a gear-shifting decision algorithm is constructed by considering the vehicle engine speed concerned with engine combustion dynamics, vehicle dynamics and driving resistance. Then, the algorithm is integrated with a compensation strategy for attaining the desired haptic force. In this work, the compensator is also developed and implemented through the discrete version of the inverse hysteretic model. The control performances, such as the haptic force tracking responses and fuel consumption, are experimentally evaluated.

  5. Lock-up control system for an automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, H.; Yashiki, S.; Waki, K.

    A lock-up control system is described for an automatic transmission including a torque converter coupled with the output portion on an engine, and a power transmitting gear arrangement coupled with the output portion of the torque converter and controlled to vary the transmitting gear ratio therein by gear ratio control means in accordance with a shifting up or down command supplied to the latter. A lock-up clutch is provided for locking up the output portion of the torque converter to the output portion of the engine. The lock-up control system comprises: lock-up operation control means for controlling the lock-up clutchmore » to be in its operative state and in its inoperative state selectively, and for causing the lock-up clutch to be in the inoperative state thereof when the gear ratio control means performs the control with the shifting up or down command, and lock-up command means for preventing the lock-up operation control means from causing the lock-up clutch to be in the inoperative state thereof until a predetermined reductive variation in the speed of the output portion of the torque converter arises after the shifting up command is supplied to the gear ratio control means under the condition in which the lock-up clutch is in operation to hold a lock-up state.« less

  6. Bevel Gear Driver and Method Having Torque Limit Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including an axially displaceable gear with a biasing assembly to bias the displaceable gear into an engagement position. A rotatable cap is provided with a micrometer dial to select a desired output torque. An intermediate bevel gear assembly is disposed between an input gear and an output gear. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at a desired torque limit. The torque limit is adjustable and may be adjusted manually or automatically depending on the type of biasing assembly provided. A clutch assembly automatically limits axial force applied to a fastener by the operator to avoid alteration of the desired torque limit.

  7. An experimental investigation on fluid dynamics of an automotive torque converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu

    The objective of the automotive torque converter fluid dynamics experimental investigation is to understand the flow field inside the torque converter, improve the performance, and increase the fuel economy of vehicles. A high-frequency response five-hole probe was developed for the unsteady flow measurement. The dynamic performance of this probe was examined, and the corresponding data processing technique was also developed. The accuracy of this probe unsteady flow measurement was assessed using a hot-film sensor and a high-frequency response total pressure Pitot probe. The pump passage relative flow field was measured by a rotating five-hole probe system at three chord-wise locations. The rotating probe system is designed and developed for both pump and turbine flow measurement, and it was proved to be accurate and successful. A strong secondary flow is observed to dominate the flow structure at the pump mid-chord. At the pump 3/4 chord, the flow concentration on the pressure side is clearly observed. The secondary flow is found to change direction of rotation between the 3/4 chord and the 4/4 chord. High losses are found in the core-suction corner "wake" flow. The pump exit and turbine exit unsteady flow fields were measured by a high-frequency response five-hole probe in the stationary frame. At the pump exit, the flow is concentrated on the pressure side due to the strong secondary flow in the pump passage. A strong secondary flow is observed. At the turbine exit, a fully developed flow is found caused by the turbulent mixing. The stator exit steady flow was measured by a conventional five-hole probe. A strong secondary flow is found due to the inlet vorticity and axial velocity deficit near the core. The radially inward velocity and the secondary flow produce a large radial transport of mass flow in the stator passage. The stator passage flow is found to be turbulent at the normal operating condition by the measurement using the surface hot-film sensors

  8. Control of Mechanotransduction by Molecular Clutch Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2018-05-01

    The linkage of cells to their microenvironment is mediated by a series of bonds that dynamically engage and disengage, in what has been conceptualized as the molecular clutch model. Whereas this model has long been employed to describe actin cytoskeleton and cell migration dynamics, it has recently been proposed to also explain mechanotransduction (i.e., the process by which cells convert mechanical signals from their environment into biochemical signals). Here we review the current understanding on how cell dynamics and mechanotransduction are driven by molecular clutch dynamics and its master regulator, the force loading rate. Throughout this Review, we place a specific emphasis on the quantitative prediction of cell response enabled by combined experimental and theoretical approaches. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of thermoelastic problem of multiple-disc friction clutches applying different thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Oday I.; Schlattmann, Josef; Senatore, Adolfo; Al-Shabibi, Abdullah M.

    2018-05-01

    The designers of friction clutch systems in vehicular applications should always take into account a number of essential criteria. The friction clutch should be able to transfer the torque from the driving shaft to the driven one within a short time and minimum amount of shocks and vibrations to make the engagement (disengagement) as gentle as possible. Furthermore, it is well known that high surface temperatures were noticed during the beginning of engagement period due to slipping between the contacting elements of the friction clutch system with ensuing heat generation. The transient thermoelastic problem of multi-disc systems has been deeply investigated by many scientists and researchers using numerical techniques such as finite element method. In this analysis, the influence of the sliding speed on the thermoelastic behavior when the initial heat generated is constant was studied. For this purpose an axisymmetric finite element models were developed and used in the simulation shown in the paper.

  10. A kinetic clutch governs uncoiling by type IB topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Keir

    2013-03-01

    Type IB topoisomerases (Top1B) are essential enzymes that relax excessive DNA supercoiling associated with replication and transcription and are important drug targets for cancer chemotherapy. The natural compound camptothecin (CPT) and the cancer chemotherapeutics derived from it, irinotecan and topotecan, are highly specific inhibitors of human nuclear Type IB topoisomerase (nTop1). We employed a magnetic-tweezers based single-molecule DNA supercoil relaxation assay to measure the torque dependence of human nuclear Top1 relaxation (nTop1) and inhibition by CPT. For comparison, we examined the human mitochondrial (Top1mt) topoisomerase and an N-terminal deletion mutant of nTop1 (Top68). Despite substantial sequence homology in their core domains, nTop1 and Top1mt exhibit dramatic differences in sensitivity to torque and CPT, with Top68 betraying intermediate characteristics. In particular, nTop1 displays nearly torque-independent religation probability, distinguishing it from other Top1B enzymes studied to date. Kinetic modeling reveals a hitherto unobserved torque-independent transition linking the DNA rotation and religation phases of the enzymatic cycle. The parameters of this transition determine the torque sensitivity of religation, and the efficiency of CPT binding. This ``kinetic clutch'' mechanism explains the molecular basis of CPT sensitivity and more generally provides a framework with which to interpret Top1B activity and inhibition.

  11. Wear forms of heterogeneous electro-rheological fluids working in a hydraulic clutch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabska, E.; Duchowski, J.; Olszak, A.; Osowski, K.; Kesy, A.; Kesy, Z.; Choi, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents experimental results concerning the wear of heterogeneous electro-rheological (ER) fluids operating as working fluids in a complex clutch system consisting of a hydrodynamic clutch and a cylinder viscous clutch. The change of electric field intensity in the clutches results in change of sheer stress values in working fluids what causes the change of transmitted torque. This work shows that the most important factors affecting the wear of the ER fluid are the electric field of high intensity, the accompanying electrical breakdown, and the high temperature of the silicone oil. In addition, the water from the humid air absorbed mainly by hygroscopic particles influences a significant impact on the wear of the working fluid. Various forms of wear particles of the fluid depending on the prevailing conditions such as working mode are observed from the microscopic aspects. It is observed that the particles are flattened, rolled out or smashed into smaller fragments, partially melted, wrinkled and glued or caked. In addition, it is identified that the partial destruction of silicone oil is occurred due to the damage of the hydrocarbon chains, as evidenced by the decrease in its viscosity and the presence of the particle matter newly containing silicon.

  12. Simulation model of an electrohydraulic-actuated double-clutch transmission vehicle: modelling and system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeftner, J.; Ebner, W.

    2017-12-01

    Automated and manual transmissions are the main link between engine and powertrain. The technical term when the transmission provides the desired torque during all possible driving conditions is denoted as powertrain matching. Recent developments in the last years show that double-clutch-transmissions (DCTs) are a reasonable compromise in terms of production costs, shifting quality, drivability and fuel efficiency. They have several advantages compared to other automatic transmissions (AT). Most DCTs nowadays consist of a hydraulic actuation control unit, which controls the clutches of the gearbox in order to induce a desired drivetrain torque into the driveline. The main functions of hydraulic systems are manifold: they initiate gear shifts, they provide sufficient oil for lubrication and they control the shift quality by suitably providing a desired oil flow or pressure for the clutch actuation. In this paper, a mathematical model of a passenger car equipped with a DCT is presented. The objective of this contribution is to get an increased understanding for the dynamics of the hydraulic circuit and its coupling to the vehicle drivetrain. The simulation model consists of a hydraulic and a mechanical domain: the hydraulic actuation circuit is described by nonlinear differential equations and includes the dynamics of the line pressure and the proportional valve, as well as the influence of the pressure reducing valve, pipe resistances and accumulator dynamics. The drivetrain with its gear ratios, moments of inertia, torsional stiffness of the rotating shafts and a simple longitudinal vehicle model represent the mechanical domain. The link between hydraulic and mechanical domain is given by the clutch, which combines hydraulic equations and Newton's laws. The presented mathematical model may not only be used as a simulation model for developing the transmission control software, it may also serve as a virtual layout for the design process phase. At the end of this

  13. High-Torque, Lightweight, Pneumatically Driven Wrench For Small Spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Pneumatically driven wrench provides torque up to 3,000 lb. per ft. in small space. Designed to reach into 2.6 x 2.75 x 6 in. pocket. Weighs approximately 25 lbs. Includes reversible pneumatic motor (electric motor could be used instead) and slip clutch. Also includes device indicating total angle through which wrench turned bolt or nut. This feature used for turn-of-the-nut tightening method.

  14. Offspring fitness and individual optimization of clutch size

    PubMed Central

    Both, C.; Tinbergen, J. M.; Noordwijk, A. J. van

    1998-01-01

    Within-year variation in clutch size has been claimed to be an adaptation to variation in the individual capacity to raise offspring. We tested this hypothesis by manipulating brood size to one common size, and predicted that if clutch size is individually optimized, then birds with originally large clutches have a higher fitness than birds with originally small clutches. No evidence was found that fitness was related to the original clutch size, and in this population clutch size is thus not related to the parental capacity to raise offspring. However, offspring from larger original clutches recruited better than their nest mates that came from smaller original clutches. This suggests that early maternal or genetic variation in viability is related to clutch size.

  15. Electromagnetic brake/clutch device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic brake/clutch device includes a drive shaft supported by at least one bearing for transmitting torque, a housing, affixed to prevent its rotation, surrounding the drive shaft, and an electromagnetically activated device within the housing to selectively prevent and allow rotation of the drive shaft. The electromagnetically activated device includes a plurality of cammed rollers to prevent counter-clockwise rotation of the drive shaft. The drive shaft includes a circumferential disk and the housing includes a reaction ring for engagement with the plurality of cammed rollers. The plurality of cammed rollers are released from engagement with the circumferential disk and the reaction ring by a plurality of tripping mechanisms within the housing. The tripping action uses the locking force to act as a release force merely by changing the boundary conditions of the roller interface angles. The tripping mechanisms include trippers for disengaging the plurality of cammed rollers and an anvil shaped portion for providing lateral movement of the trippers. The plurality of cammed rollers is preloaded to engagement with the circumferential disk and reaction ring by a spring, and is located with respect to an adjacent tripping mechanism with another spring.

  16. Magnetic particle clutch controls servo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fow, P. B.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetic clutches provide alternative means of driving low-power rate or positioning servo systems. They may be used over wide variety of input speed ranges and weigh comparatively little. Power drain is good with overall motor/clutch efficiency greater than 50 percent, and gain of clutch is close to linear, following hysteresis curve of core and rotor material.

  17. A Novel Approach for Enhancement of Automobile Clutch Engagement Quality Using Mechatronics Based Automated Clutch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, K.

    2013-01-01

    In automated manual clutch (AMC) a mechatronic system controls clutch force trajectory through an actuator governed by a control system. The present study identifies relevant characteristics of this trajectory and their effects on driveline dynamics and engagement quality. A new type of force trajectory is identified which gives the good engagement quality. However this trajectory is not achievable through conventional clutch control mechanism. But in AMC a mechatronic system based on electro-hydraulic or electro-mechanical elements can make it feasible. A mechatronic system is presented in which a mechatronic add-on system can be used to implement the novel force trajectory, without the requirement of replacing the traditional diaphragm spring based clutch in a vehicle with manual transmission.

  18. Camouflage and Clutch Survival in Plovers and Terns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kupán, Krisztina; Eyster, Harold N.; Rojas-Abreu, Wendoly; Cruz-López, Medardo; Serrano-Meneses, Martín Alejandro; Küpper, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    Animals achieve camouflage through a variety of mechanisms, of which background matching and disruptive coloration are likely the most common. Although many studies have investigated camouflage mechanisms using artificial stimuli and in lab experiments, less work has addressed camouflage in the wild. Here we examine egg camouflage in clutches laid by ground-nesting Snowy Plovers Charadrius nivosus and Least Terns Sternula antillarum breeding in mixed aggregations at Bahía de Ceuta, Sinaloa, Mexico. We obtained digital images of clutches laid by both species. We then calibrated the images and used custom computer software and edge detection algorithms to quantify measures related to three potential camouflage mechanisms: pattern complexity matching, disruptive effects and background color matching. Based on our image analyses, Snowy Plover clutches, in general, appeared to be more camouflaged than Least Tern clutches. Snowy Plover clutches also survived better than Least Tern clutches. Unexpectedly, variation in clutch survival was not explained by any measure of egg camouflage in either species. We conclude that measures of egg camouflage are poor predictors of clutch survival in this population. The behavior of the incubating parents may also affect clutch predation. Determining the significance of egg camouflage requires further testing using visual models and behavioral experiments.

  19. Camouflage and Clutch Survival in Plovers and Terns.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kupán, Krisztina; Eyster, Harold N; Rojas-Abreu, Wendoly; Cruz-López, Medardo; Serrano-Meneses, Martín Alejandro; Küpper, Clemens

    2016-09-12

    Animals achieve camouflage through a variety of mechanisms, of which background matching and disruptive coloration are likely the most common. Although many studies have investigated camouflage mechanisms using artificial stimuli and in lab experiments, less work has addressed camouflage in the wild. Here we examine egg camouflage in clutches laid by ground-nesting Snowy Plovers Charadrius nivosus and Least Terns Sternula antillarum breeding in mixed aggregations at Bahía de Ceuta, Sinaloa, Mexico. We obtained digital images of clutches laid by both species. We then calibrated the images and used custom computer software and edge detection algorithms to quantify measures related to three potential camouflage mechanisms: pattern complexity matching, disruptive effects and background color matching. Based on our image analyses, Snowy Plover clutches, in general, appeared to be more camouflaged than Least Tern clutches. Snowy Plover clutches also survived better than Least Tern clutches. Unexpectedly, variation in clutch survival was not explained by any measure of egg camouflage in either species. We conclude that measures of egg camouflage are poor predictors of clutch survival in this population. The behavior of the incubating parents may also affect clutch predation. Determining the significance of egg camouflage requires further testing using visual models and behavioral experiments.

  20. Camouflage and Clutch Survival in Plovers and Terns

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Mary Caswell; Kupán, Krisztina; Eyster, Harold N.; Rojas-Abreu, Wendoly; Cruz-López, Medardo; Serrano-Meneses, Martín Alejandro; Küpper, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Animals achieve camouflage through a variety of mechanisms, of which background matching and disruptive coloration are likely the most common. Although many studies have investigated camouflage mechanisms using artificial stimuli and in lab experiments, less work has addressed camouflage in the wild. Here we examine egg camouflage in clutches laid by ground-nesting Snowy Plovers Charadrius nivosus and Least Terns Sternula antillarum breeding in mixed aggregations at Bahía de Ceuta, Sinaloa, Mexico. We obtained digital images of clutches laid by both species. We then calibrated the images and used custom computer software and edge detection algorithms to quantify measures related to three potential camouflage mechanisms: pattern complexity matching, disruptive effects and background color matching. Based on our image analyses, Snowy Plover clutches, in general, appeared to be more camouflaged than Least Tern clutches. Snowy Plover clutches also survived better than Least Tern clutches. Unexpectedly, variation in clutch survival was not explained by any measure of egg camouflage in either species. We conclude that measures of egg camouflage are poor predictors of clutch survival in this population. The behavior of the incubating parents may also affect clutch predation. Determining the significance of egg camouflage requires further testing using visual models and behavioral experiments. PMID:27616020

  1. Elevational gradient in clutch size of Red-faced Warblers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, Kristen G.; Conway, Courtney J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of life history evolution has benefited from debates regarding the underlying causes, and geographic ubiquity, of spatial patterns in avian clutch sizes. Past studies have revealed that birds lay smaller clutch sizes at higher elevation. However, in most previous studies, investigators have failed to adequately control for elevational differences in breeding phenology. To better understand the elevational gradient in avian clutch size, we need to know how clutch size changes across the entire elevational breeding range of a species (i.e., the shape of the relationship between elevation and clutch size), and whether the elevational gradient in clutch size is merely an artifact of elevational gradients in breeding phenology or breeding season length. We examined the relationship between breeding elevation and clutch size of Red-faced Warblers (Cardellina rubrifrons) along a 1000-m elevational gradient in Arizona. Our objectives were to determine how clutch size changed with elevation, and if the relationship between clutch size and elevation merely reflected elevational changes in breeding season length or phenology. The proportion of 5-egg clutches decreased and the proportion of 3- and 4-egg clutches increased non-linearly with increasing elevation, even after controlling for the elevational gradient in nest initiation date. Thus, average clutch size declined across the elevational breeding range of Red-faced Warblers, but this decline was not due to elevational variation in breeding phenology. Timing of breeding changed, but the duration of the breeding season did not change appreciably across the elevational gradient. Hence, elevational differences in breeding season length or breeding phenology cannot explain why Red-faced Warblers (and perhaps other birds) breeding at higher elevations have smaller clutches.

  2. Wrap spring clutch syringe ram and frit mixer

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Frank B.

    2006-07-25

    A wrap spring clutch syringe ram pushes at least one syringe with virtually instantaneous starting and stopping, and with constant motion at a defined velocity during the intervening push. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram includes an electric motor, a computer, a flywheel, a wrap spring clutch, a precision lead screw, a slide platform, and syringe reservoirs, a mixing chamber, and a reaction incubation tube. The electric motor drives a flywheel and the wrap spring clutch couples the precision lead screw to the flywheel when a computer enables a solenoid of the wrap spring clutch. The precision lead screw drives a precision slide which causes syringes to supply a portion of solution into the mixing chamber and the incubation tube. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram is designed to enable the quantitative study of solution phase chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly those reactions that occur on the subsecond time scale.

  3. Clutch size declines with elevation in tropical birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyce, A.J.; Freeman, Benjamin G.; Mitchell, Adam E.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Clutch size commonly decreases with increasing elevation among temperate-zone and subtropical songbird species. Tropical songbirds typically lay small clutches, thus the ability to evolve even smaller clutch sizes at higher elevations is unclear and untested. We conducted a comparative phylogenetic analysis using data gathered from the literature to test whether clutch size varied with elevation among forest passerines from three tropical biogeographic regions—the Venezuelan Andes and adjacent lowlands, Malaysian Borneo, and New Guinea. We found a significant negative effect of elevation on variation in clutch size among species. We found the same pattern using field data sampled across elevational gradients in Venezuela and Malaysian Borneo. Field data were not available for New Guinea. Both sets of results demonstrate that tropical montane species across disparate biogeographic realms lay smaller clutches than closely related low-elevation species. The environmental sources of selection underlying this pattern remain uncertain and merit further investigation.

  4. How Fo-ATPase generates rotary torque.

    PubMed

    Oster, G; Wang, H; Grabe, M

    2000-04-29

    The F-ATPases synthesize ATP using a transmembrane ionmotive force (IMF) established by the electron transport chain. This transduction involves first converting the IMF to a rotary torque in the transmembrane Fo portion. This torque is communicated from Fo to the F1 portion where the energy is used to release the newly synthesized ATP from the catalytic sites according to Boyer's binding change mechanism. Here we explain the principle by which an IMF generates this rotary torque in the Fo ion engine.

  5. Installation Torque Tables for Noncritical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera-Rosario, Hazel T.; Powell, Joseph S.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project is to define torque values for bolts and screws when loading is not a concern. Fasteners require a certain torque to fulfill its function and prevent failure. NASA Glenn Research Center did not have a set of fastener torque tables for non-critical applications without loads, usually referring to hand-tight or wrench-tight torqueing. The project is based on two formulas, torque and pullout load. Torque values are calculated giving way to preliminary data tables. Testing is done to various bolts and metal plates, torqueing them until the point of failure. Around 640 torque tables were developed for UNC, UNF, and M fasteners. Different lengths of thread engagement were analyzed for the 5 most common materials used at GRC. The tables were put together in an Excel spreadsheet and then formatted into a Word document. The plan is to later convert this to an official technical publication or memorandum.

  6. The Evolution of Clutch Size in Hosts of Avian Brood Parasites.

    PubMed

    Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi E; Lanfear, Robert; Kokko, Hanna

    2017-11-01

    Coevolution with avian brood parasites shapes a range of traits in their hosts, including morphology, behavior, and breeding systems. Here we explore whether brood parasitism is also associated with the evolution of host clutch size. Several studies have proposed that hosts of highly virulent parasites could decrease the costs of parasitism by evolving a smaller clutch size, because hosts with smaller clutches will lose fewer progeny when their clutch is parasitized. We describe a model of the evolution of clutch size, which challenges this logic and shows instead that an increase in clutch size (or no change) should evolve in hosts. We test this prediction using a broad-scale comparative analysis to ask whether there are differences in clutch size within hosts and between hosts and nonhosts. Consistent with our model, this analysis revealed that host species do not have smaller clutches and that hosts that incur larger costs from raising a parasite lay larger clutches. We suggest that brood parasitism might be an influential factor in clutch-size evolution and could potentially select for the evolution of larger clutches in host species.

  7. Clutch size of the clapper rail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, R.E.; Meanley, B.

    1960-01-01

    Incidental information concerning the clutch size of the Clapper Rail (Rallus longirostris) was obtained during other studies of this species in the extensive salt marshes near Chincoteague, Virginia. Clutches were considered complete when repeated visits to the nest showed no additional eggs or when embryonic development could be clearly detected.

  8. Allocation of limited reserves to a clutch: A model explaining the lack of a relationship between clutch size and egg size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Grand, James B.; Sedinger, James S.

    1996-01-01

    Lack (1967, 1968) proposed that clutch size in waterfowl is limited by the nutrients available to females when producing eggs. He suggested that if nutrients available for clutch formation are limited, then species producing small eggs would, on average, lay more eggs than species with large eggs. Rohwer (1988) argues that this model should also apply within species. Thus, the nutrition-limitation hypothesis predicts a tradeoff among females between clutch size and egg size (Rohwer 1988). Field studies of single species consistently have failed to detect a negative relationship between clutch size and egg size (Rohwer 1988, Lessells et al. 1992, Rohwer and Eisenhauer 1989, Flint and Sedinger 1992, Flint and Grand 1996). The absence of such a relationship within species has been regarded as evidence against the hypothesis that nutrient availability limits clutch size (Rohwer 1988, 1991, 1992; Rohwer and Eisenhauer 1989).

  9. Hydromechanical transmission with hydrodynamic drive

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1979-01-01

    This transmission has a first planetary gear assembly having first input means connected to an input shaft, first output means, and first reaction means, and a second planetary gear assembly having second input means connected to the first input means, second output means, and second reaction means connected directly to the first reaction means by a reaction shaft. First clutch means, when engaged, connect the first output means to an output shaft in a high driving range. A hydrodynamic drive is used; for example, a torque converter, which may or may not have a stationary case, has a pump connected to the second output means, a stator grounded by an overrunning clutch to the case, and a turbine connected to an output member, and may be used in a starting phase. Alternatively, a fluid coupling or other type of hydrodynamic drive may be used. Second clutch means, when engaged, for connecting the output member to the output shaft in a low driving range. A variable-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the input shaft, and a fixed-displacement hydraulic unit is mechanically connected to the reaction shaft. The hydraulic units are hydraulically connected together so that when one operates as a pump the other acts as a motor, and vice versa. Both clutch means are connected to the output shaft through a forward-reverse shift arrangement. It is possible to lock out the torque converter after the starting phase is over.

  10. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Dynamometer torque cell calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a... (a)(6) of this section with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or...

  11. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Dynamometer torque cell calibration. 91....306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a force... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be used...

  12. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be used...

  13. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be used...

  14. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be used...

  15. 40 CFR 91.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Provisions § 91.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used to convert a weight or a... with the adjusted or repaired system. (b) Option. A master load-cell or transfer standard may be used...

  16. Does clutch size evolve in response to parasites and immunocompetence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Moller, A.P.; Merino, S.; Clobert, J.

    2001-01-01

    Parasites have been argued to influence clutch size evolution, but past work and theory has largely focused on within-species optimization solutions rather than clearly addressing among-species variation. The effects of parasites on clutch size variation among species can be complex, however, because different parasites can induce age-specific differences in mortality that can cause clutch size to evolve in different directions. We provide a conceptual argument that differences in immunocompetence among species should integrate differences in overall levels of parasite-induced mortality to which a species is exposed. We test this assumption and show that mortality caused by parasites is positively correlated with immunocompetence measured by cell-mediated measures. Under life history theory, clutch size should increase with increased adult mortality and decrease with increased juvenile mortality. Using immunocompetence as a general assay of parasite-induced mortality, we tested these predictions by using data for 25 species. We found that clutch size increased strongly with adult immunocompetence. In contrast, clutch size decreased weakly with increased juvenile immunocompetence. But, immunocompetence of juveniles may be constrained by selection on adults, and, when we controlled for adult immunocompetence, clutch size decreased with juvenile immunocompetence. Thus, immunocompetence seems to reflect evolutionary differences in parasite virulence experienced by species, and differences in age-specific parasite virulence appears to exert opposite selection on clutch size evolution.

  17. Uncoupling clutch size, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone using experimental egg removal.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Williams, Tony D

    2015-03-01

    Clutch size is a key avian fitness and life history trait. A physiological model for clutch size determination (CSD), involving an anti-gonadal effect of prolactin (PRL) via suppression of luteinizing hormone (LH), was proposed over 20 years ago, but has received scant experimental attention since. The few studies looking at a PRL-based mechanistic hypothesis for CSD have been equivocal, but recent experiments utilizing a pharmacological agent to manipulate PRL in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) found no support for a role of this hormone in clutch size determination. Here, we take a complementary approach by manipulating clutch size through egg removal, examining co-variation in PRL and LH between two breeding attempts, as well as through experimentally-extended laying. Clutch size increased for egg removal females, but not controls, but this was not correlated with changes in PRL or LH. There were also no differences in PRL between egg removal females and controls, nor did PRL levels during early, mid- or late-laying of supra-normal clutches predict clutch size. By uncoupling PRL, LH and clutch size in our study, several key predictions of the PRL-based mechanistic model for CSD were not supported. However, a positive correlation between PRL levels late in laying and days relative to the last egg (clutch completion) provides an alternative explanation for the equivocal results surrounding the conventional PRL-based physiological model for CSD. We suggest that females coordinate PRL-mediated incubation onset with clutch completion to minimize hatching asynchrony and sibling hierarchy, a behavior that is amplified in females laying larger clutches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling and Prototyping of Automatic Clutch System for Light Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Vishal, S.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, recycling or regenerating the waste in to something useful is appreciated all around the globe. It reduces greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change. This study deals with provision of the automatic clutch mechanism in vehicles to facilitate the smooth changing of gears. This study proposed to use the exhaust gases which are normally expelled out as a waste from the turbocharger to actuate the clutch mechanism in vehicles to facilitate the smooth changing of gears. At present, clutches are operated automatically by using an air compressor in the four wheelers. In this study, a conceptual design is proposed in which the clutch is operated by the exhaust gas from the turbocharger and this will remove the usage of air compressor in the existing system. With this system, usage of air compressor is eliminated and the riders need not to operate the clutch manually. This work involved in development, analysation and validation of the conceptual design through simulation software. Then the developed conceptual design of an automatic pneumatic clutch system is tested with proto type.

  19. Modeling and simulation of clutch pressure plate casting using alternate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuraj, H. N.; Bharath, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    Clutch Pressure Plate is a stress bearing component in the clutch assembly. Cast iron alloys like FG300, G2500 are commonly used for clutch pressure plate castings. These materials have high compressive strength, low tensile strength & no ductility but these cost high for the manufacturers. There is a need for alternate material so as to reduce cost, defects in castings without losing the life and effectiveness of the clutch plate. The work carried out here is modeling the clutch pressure plate using CAD tool. And then the casting process is simulated by casting simulation for fluid flow and solidification analysis by trying alternate material. Here the castability of the alternate material En-Gjs-400-15 and the commonly used material FG300 for the clutch pressure plate component is analyzed by designing and optimizing a proper gating system.

  20. Elbow functional compensation using a lightweight magnetorheological clutch.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alejandro Martín; Caballero, Antonio Flores; Rojas, Dolores Blanco; Copaci, Dorin-Sabin; Lorente, Luis Moreno

    2011-01-01

    There are many applications for which a patient needs functional compensation due to motor disorders in daily activities. Classic research has focused on robotics solutions in terms of actuators or motors, but the point of this paper is to analyze new solutions combining both biological and artificial structures, in order to improve standard developments. Nowadays wearable Robots are taking an important role in rehabilitation purposes, due to this issue lots of new designs are emerging, but most of them are not still prepared to be used in terms of autonomy, weight, etc. Under the Hybrid Neuroprosthetic and Neurorobotic devices for Functional Compensation and Rehabilitation (HYPER) project, new actuator technologies have been developed in order to improve the adaptability and portability of rehabilitation devices. The designed device is based on a lightweight magnetorheological (MR) clutch which is able to transmit torque from a motor to the injured joint. Though it is intended to work in human upper limb (elbow mainly), other future designs will also be studied for other human joints. Simulation results using Simulink®, MSC Adams®and MSMS®are reported to illustrate the viability of the proposed device.

  1. Melatonin delays clutch initiation in a wild songbird

    PubMed Central

    Greives, Timothy J.; Kingma, Sjouke A.; Beltrami, Giulia; Hau, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    The hormone melatonin is known to play an important role in regulating many seasonal changes in physiology, morphology and behaviour. In birds, unlike in mammals, melatonin has thus far been thought to play little role in timing seasonal reproductive processes. This view is mainly derived from laboratory experiments on male birds. This study tests whether melatonin is capable of influencing the timing of clutch initiation in wild female songbirds. Free-living female great tits (Parus major) treated with melatonin-filled implants prior to the breeding season initiated their first clutch of the season significantly later than females carrying an empty implant. Melatonin treatment did not affect clutch size. Further, melatonin treatment did not delay the onset of daily activity in the wild nor adversely affect body mass in captivity compared with controls. These data suggest a previously unknown role for this hormone in regulating the timing of clutch initiation in the wild. PMID:22171024

  2. Fitness cost of incubation in great tits (Parus major) is related to clutch size

    PubMed Central

    de Heij, Maaike E; van den Hout, Piet J; Tinbergen, Joost M

    2006-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that parents produce the number of offspring that maximizes their fitness. In birds, natural selection on parental decisions regarding clutch size may act during egg laying, incubation or nestling phase. To study the fitness consequences of clutch size during the incubation phase, we manipulated the clutch sizes during this phase only in three breeding seasons and measured the fitness consequences on the short and the long term. Clutch enlargement did not affect the offspring fitness of the manipulated first clutches, but fledging probability of the subsequent clutch in the same season was reduced. Parents incubating enlarged first clutches provided adequate care for the offspring of their first clutches during the nestling phase, but paid the price when caring for the offspring of their second clutch. Parents that incubated enlarged first clutches had lower local survival in the 2 years when the population had a relatively high production of second clutches, but not in the third year when there was a very low production of second clutches. During these 2 years, the costs of incubation were strong enough to change positive selection, as established by brood size manipulations in this study population, into stabilizing selection through the negative effect of incubation on parental fitness. PMID:16928638

  3. Magnetic fluid control for viscous loss reduction of high-speed MRF brakes and clutches with well-defined fail-safe behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Dirk; Schamoni, Markus; Maas, Jürgen

    2013-09-01

    No-load losses within brakes and clutches based on magnetorheological fluids are unavoidable and represent a major barrier towards their wide-spread commercial adoption. Completely torque free rotation is not yet possible due to persistent fluid contact within the shear gap. In this paper, a novel concept is presented that facilitates the controlled movement of the magnetorheological fluid from an active, torque-transmitting region into an inactive region of the shear gap. This concept enables complete decoupling of the fluid engaging surfaces such that viscous drag torque can be eliminated. In order to achieve the desired effect, motion in the magnetorheological fluid is induced by magnetic forces acting on the fluid, which requires an appropriate magnetic circuit design. In this investigation, we propose a methodology to determine suitable magnetic circuit designs with well-defined fail-safe behavior. The magnetically induced motion of magnetorheological fluids is modeled by the use of the Kelvin body force, and a multi-physics domain simulation is performed to elucidate various transitions between an engaged and disengaged operating mode. The modeling approach is validated by captured high-speed video frames which show the induced motion of the magnetorheological fluid due to the magnetic field. Finally, measurements performed with a prototype actuator prove that the induced viscous drag torque can be reduced significantly by the proposed magnetic fluid control methodology.

  4. Road deicing salt irreversibly disrupts osmoregulation of salamander egg clutches.

    PubMed

    Karraker, Nancy E; Gibbs, James P

    2011-03-01

    It has been postulated that road deicing salts are sufficiently diluted by spring rains to ameliorate any physiological impacts to amphibians breeding in wetlands near roads. We tested this conjecture by exposing clutches of the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) to three chloride concentrations (1 mg/L, 145 mg/L, 945 mg/L) for nine days, then transferred clutches to control water for nine days, and measured change in mass at three-day intervals. We measured mass change because water uptake by clutches reduces risks to embryos associated with freezing, predation, and disease. Clutches in controls sequestered water asymptotically. Those in the moderate concentrations lost 18% mass initially and regained 14% after transfer to control water. Clutches in high concentration lost 33% mass and then lost an additional 8% after transfer. Our results suggest that spring rains do not ameliorate the effects of deicing salts in wetlands with extremely high chloride concentrations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. High renesting rates in arctic-breeding Dunlin (Calidris alpina): A clutch-removal experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, H. River; Lanctot, Richard B.; Powell, Abby N.

    2013-01-01

    The propensity to replace a clutch is a complex component of avian reproduction and poorly understood. We experimentally removed clutches from an Arctic-breeding shorebird, the Dunlin (Calidris alpina arcticola), during early and late stages of incubation to investigate replacement clutch rates, renesting interval, and mate and site fidelity between nesting attempts. In contrast to other Arctic studies, we documented renesting by radiotracking individuals to find replacement clutches. We also examined clutch size and mean egg volume to document changes in individual females’ investment in initial and replacement clutches. Finally, we examined the influence of adult body mass, clutch volume, dates of clutch initiation and nest loss, and year on the propensity to renest. We found high (82–95%) and moderate (35–50%) rates of renesting for early and late incubation treatments. Renesting intervals averaged 4.7–6.8 days and were not different for clutches removed early or late in incubation. Most pairs remained together for renesting attempts. Larger females were more likely to replace a clutch; female body mass was the most important parameter predicting propensity to renest. Clutches lost later in the season were less likely to be replaced. We present evidence that renesting is more common in Arctic-breeding shorebirds than was previously thought, and suggest that renesting is constrained by energetic and temporal factors as well as mate availability. Obtaining rates of renesting in species breeding at different latitudes will help determine when this behavior is likely to occur; such information is necessary for demographic models that include individual and population-level fecundity estimates.

  6. Control system for a hybrid powertrain system

    DOEpatents

    Naqvi, Ali K.; Demirovic, Besim; Gupta, Pinaki; Kaminsky, Lawrence A.

    2014-09-09

    A vehicle includes a powertrain with an engine, first and second torque machines, and a hybrid transmission. A method for operating the vehicle includes operating the engine in an unfueled state, releasing an off-going clutch which when engaged effects operation of the hybrid transmission in a first continuously variable mode, and applying a friction braking torque to a wheel of the vehicle to compensate for an increase in an output torque of the hybrid transmission resulting from releasing the off-going clutch. Subsequent to releasing the off-going clutch, an oncoming clutch which when engaged effects operation of the hybrid transmission in a second continuously variable mode is synchronized. Subsequent to synchronization of the oncoming clutch, the oncoming clutch is engaged.

  7. Reconstructing the intermittent dynamics of the torque in wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Pedro G.; Wächter, Matthias; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    We apply a framework introduced in the late nineties to analyze load measurements in off-shore wind energy converters (WEC). The framework is borrowed from statistical physics and properly adapted to the analysis of multivariate data comprising wind velocity, power production and torque measurements, taken at one single WEC. In particular, we assume that wind statistics drives the fluctuations of the torque produced in the wind turbine and show how to extract an evolution equation of the Langevin type for the torque driven by the wind velocity. It is known that the intermittent nature of the atmosphere, i.e. of the wind field, is transferred to the power production of a wind energy converter and consequently to the shaft torque. We show that the derived stochastic differential equation quantifies the dynamical coupling of the measured fluctuating properties as well as it reproduces the intermittency observed in the data. Finally, we discuss our approach in the light of turbine monitoring, a particular important issue in off-shore wind farms.

  8. Nest predation risk explains variation in avian clutch size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, Kristen G.; Conway, Courtney J.

    2018-01-01

    Questions about the ecological drivers of, and mechanistic constraints on, productivity have driven research on life-history evolution for decades. Resource availability and offspring mortality are considered among the 2 most important influences on the number of offspring per reproductive attempt. We used a factorial experimental design to manipulate food abundance and perceived offspring predation risk in a wild avian population (red-faced warblers; Cardellina rubrifrons) to identify the mechanistic cause of variation in avian clutch size. Additionally, we tested whether female quality helped explain the extant variation in clutch size. We found no support for the Food Limitation or Female Quality Hypotheses, but we did find support for both predictions of the Nest Predation Risk Hypothesis. Females that experienced an experimentally heightened perception of offspring predation risk responded by laying a smaller clutch than females in the control group. Additionally, predation rates at artificial nests were highest where red-faced warbler clutch size was smallest (at high elevations). Life-history theory predicts that an individual should invest less in reproduction when high nest predation risk reduces the likely benefit from that nesting attempt and, indeed, we found that birds exhibit phenotypic plasticity in clutch size by laying fewer eggs in response to increasing nest predation risk.

  9. Performing under pressure: Exploring the psychological state underlying clutch performance in sport.

    PubMed

    Swann, Christian; Crust, Lee; Jackman, Patricia; Vella, Stewart A; Allen, Mark S; Keegan, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Clutch performance is improved performance under pressure. However, little research has examined the psychological state experienced by athletes in these situations. Therefore, this study qualitatively examined the subjective experience underlying clutch performance across a range of sports (e.g., team, individual) and standards (Olympic to recreational athletes). Sixteen athletes (M age  = 27.08 years; SD = 6.48) took part in in-depth, semi-structured interviews primarily after an exceptional performance (M = 4.38 days later; SD = 3.14). Data were analysed inductively and thematically. Clutch states involved 12 characteristics, including heightened and deliberate concentration, intense effort, and heightened awareness, which distinguished the experience of clutch from other optimal psychological states such as flow. Other characteristics, such as perceptions of control, were also reported and supported previous experimental research on clutch. These findings present in-depth qualitative insights into the psychological state underlying clutch performance, and are discussed in relation to the existing literature on optimal psychological states in sport.

  10. Microgrid Restraining Strategy Based on Improved DC Grid Connected DFIG Torque Ripple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xia; Yang, Zhixiong; Zongze, Xia

    2017-05-01

    Aiming to the voltage of the stator side is generated by the modulation of the SSC in the improved topology, especially under the circumstance with the asymmTeric fault of stator side, DFIG’s electromagnTeic torque, amplifies ripple of grid-connected power for the grid side. The novel control mTehod suitable to stator side converter and rotor side converter based on reduced-order resonant controller (RORC) is proposed in this thesis, DFIG’s torque and output power performance are improved. Under the RORC control conditions the transfer functions of stator current and torque control system are established, the amplitude characteristic and the system stability of RORC control are analysed. The simulation results in Matlab/Simulink verify the correctness and validity of the proposed mTehod.

  11. 3-D Modelling of Megaloolithid Clutches: Insights about Nest Construction and Dinosaur Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Bernat; Jackson, Frankie D.; Fortuny, Josep; Sellés, Albert G.; Galobart, Àngel

    2010-01-01

    Background Megaloolithid eggs have long been associated with sauropod dinosaurs. Despite their extensive and worldwide fossil record, interpretations of egg size and shape, clutch morphology, and incubation strategy vary. The Pinyes locality in the Upper Cretaceous Tremp Formation in the southern Pyrenees, Catalonia provides new information for addressing these issues. Nine horizons containing Megaloolithus siruguei clutches are exposed near the village of Coll de Nargó. Tectonic deformation in the study area strongly influenced egg size and shape, which could potentially lead to misinterpretation of reproductive biology if 2D and 3D maps are not corrected for bed dip that results from tectonism. Methodology/Findings Detailed taphonomic study and three-dimensional modelling of fossil eggs show that intact M. siruguei clutches contained 20–28 eggs, which is substantially larger than commonly reported from Europe and India. Linear and grouped eggs occur in three superimposed levels and form an asymmetric, elongate, bowl-shaped profile in lateral view. Computed tomography data support previous interpretations that the eggs hatched within the substrate. Megaloolithid clutch sizes reported from other European and Indian localities are typically less than 15 eggs; however, these clutches often include linear or grouped eggs that resemble those of the larger Pinyes clutches and may reflect preservation of incomplete clutches. Conclusions/Significance We propose that 25 eggs represent a typical megaloolithid clutch size and smaller egg clusters that display linear or grouped egg arrangements reported at Pinyes and other localities may represent eroded remnants of larger clutches. The similarity of megaloolithid clutch morphology from localities worldwide strongly suggests common reproductive behaviour. The distinct clutch geometry at Pinyes and other localities likely resulted from the asymmetrical, inclined, and laterally compressed titanosaur pes unguals of the female

  12. The role of nutrient reserves for clutch formation by Northern Pintails in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel N.; Grand, James B.

    1994-01-01

    We analyzed carcass composition of female Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) in Alaska to assess the importance of nutrient reserves for formation of first clutches (n = 85) and renests (n = 39). Habitat (tundra vs. boreal forest), hen age (yearling vs. adult), and year (1990 vs. 1991) did not affect nutrient reserve use. During formation of first clutches, Northern Pintail hens relied on lipid reserves more than any other duck species that has been studied. For much of the nesting season, lipid reserves were used to meet costs beyond those incurred by clutch formation. Date of initiation of rapid follicle growth was related to lipid reserve dynamics; lipid reserves at initiation and the rate of lipid use both declined through the season. Protein reserves declined slightly with commitment of protein to the clutch and with date of initiation of rapid follicle growth. Use of mineral reserves for first nests was negligible. Renesting females did not use nutrient reserves. Lipid reserve levels were positively related to the amount of lipid reserves needed to complete the clutch and clutch sizes predicted from a lipid dynamics model were consistent with known clutch sizes. Similar relationships did not exist for protein. We suggest that lipid reserve levels affect timing of nesting and proximately limit clutch size of Northern Pintails.

  13. MAGIC: Model and Graphic Information Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    MAGIC is a software tool capable of converting highly detailed 3D models from an open, standard format, VRML 2.0/97, into the proprietary DTS file format used by the Torque Game Engine from GarageGames. MAGIC is used to convert 3D simulations from authoritative sources into the data needed to run the simulations in NASA's Distributed Observer Network. The Distributed Observer Network (DON) is a simulation presentation tool built by NASA to facilitate the simulation sharing requirements of the Data Presentation and Visualization effort within the Constellation Program. DON is built on top of the Torque Game Engine (TGE) and has chosen TGE's Dynamix Three Space (DTS) file format to represent 3D objects within simulations.

  14. Method of converting an existing vehicle powertrain to a hybrid powertrain system

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Jr., Richard G.; Boberg, Evan S.; Lawrie, Robert E.; Castaing, Francois J.

    2001-12-25

    A method of converting an existing vehicle powertrain including a manual transmission to a hybrid powertrain system with an automated powertrain transmission. The first step in the method of attaching a gear train housing to a housing of said manual transmission, said gear train housing receiving as end of drive shaft of said transmission and rotatably supporting a gear train assembly. Secondly, mounting an electric motor/generator to said gear train housing and attaching a motor/generator drive shaft of said electric motor/generator to said gear train assembly. Lastly, connecting an electro-mechanical clutch actuator to a friction clutch mechanism of said manual transmission.

  15. Intraspecific variation in nutrient reserve use during clutch formation by Lesser Scaup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esler, Daniel N.; Grand, James B.; Afton, Alan D.

    2001-01-01

    We studied nutrient reserve dynamics of female Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) to identify sources of intraspecific variation in strategies of nutrient acquisition for meeting the high nutritional and energetic costs of egg formation. We collected data from interior Alaska and combined these with data for Lesser Scaup from midcontinent breeding areas (Afton and Ankney 1991), allowing a rangewide analysis for the species. We found little evidence that nutrient reserve use differed between Alaskan and midcontinent Lesser Scaup, except that subarctic birds used a small amount of protein reserves when forming eggs, whereas midcontinent birds did not. Mineral reserves contributed relatively little to the clutch, but endogenous lipid accounted for approximately two-thirds of the lipid in the clutch. Levels of endogenous lipid and protein at initiation of clutch formation declined with date of initiation. Also, absolute amounts of lipid and protein reserves used declined through the season, corresponding to smaller clutch sizes. Our data are consistent with a seasonally variable threshold of lipid reserves for initiation of clutch formation and considerable reliance on lipid reserves, suggestive of lipid control of productivity via effects on clutch size and initiation dates. However, our data cannot refute the hypothesis that clutch size or initiation dates are set by other factors that in turn dictate the amount of lipid reserves that are stored and used. Despite uncertainty regarding the role of nutrient limitations on productivity, maintenance of adequate food resources on winter, migration, and breeding areas should be a management concern, given the high costs of clutch formation by Lesser Scaup, evidence of recent population declines, and potential links between nutrition and productivity.

  16. Patterns of variation in clutch sizes in a guild of temperate-nesting dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Reynolds, R.E.; Sargeant, G.A.; Renner, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Clutch sizes of temperate-nesting dabbling ducks vary widely within and between years. Biologists have long been interested in why such patterns exist but have had difficulty separating intrinsic effects from environmental influences. In an attempt to gain greater insight into the roles of intrinsic and environmental influences on clutch sizes of dabbling ducks, we compared clutch-size patterns of mallard, northern pintail, gadwall, northern shoveler, and blue-winged teal in North Dakota and South Dakota over a 3-year period. The study was conducted during 1993-1995 when wetland habitat conditions were exceptionally consistent within time intervals but varied widely from the onset to the end of the study. We found that clutch sizes of gadwall and blue-winged teal were significantly smaller at the onset of nesting in 1993, when water conditions remained relatively poor following a 5-year drought (1988-1992), and pintail clutch sizes were larger late in the breeding season in 1993 after wetland conditions became exceptionally productive following heavy rains in late May and June. These findings were associated with gadwall and teal relying primarily on nutrients acquired on the breeding grounds to produce early clutches, and pintails using an exceptionally high proportion of their body lipids to produce early clutches, making this species highly dependent on abundant local sources of lipids for clutches produced later. Mallard, pintail, and shoveler rely largely on endogenous lipids carried to the breeding grounds to produce early clutches, and at least in the years of study, clutch sizes exhibited minimal variation at the onset of nesting. Our findings, when examined in context with existing information, suggest that interspecific variation in clutch sizes results from innate differences in several traits -- including body size, diet, timing of lipid acquisition, and nesting-- that affect the amount of lipid available for egg production. Annual differences in clutch

  17. Finite element fatigue analysis of rectangular clutch spring of automatic slack adjuster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen-jie; Luo, Zai; Hu, Xiao-feng; Jiang, Wen-song

    2015-02-01

    The failure of rectangular clutch spring of automatic slack adjuster directly affects the work of automatic slack adjuster. We establish the structural mechanics model of automatic slack adjuster rectangular clutch spring based on its working principle and mechanical structure. In addition, we upload such structural mechanics model to ANSYS Workbench FEA system to predict the fatigue life of rectangular clutch spring. FEA results show that the fatigue life of rectangular clutch spring is 2.0403×105 cycle under the effect of braking loads. In the meantime, fatigue tests of 20 automatic slack adjusters are carried out on the fatigue test bench to verify the conclusion of the structural mechanics model. The experimental results show that the mean fatigue life of rectangular clutch spring is 1.9101×105, which meets the results based on the finite element analysis using ANSYS Workbench FEA system.

  18. Detection technology research on the one-way clutch of automatic brake adjuster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wensong; Luo, Zai; Lu, Yi

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we provide a new testing method to evaluate the acceptable quality of the one-way clutch of automatic brake adjuster. To analysis the suitable adjusting brake moment which keeps the automatic brake adjuster out of failure, we build a mechanical model of one-way clutch according to the structure and the working principle of one-way clutch. The ranges of adjusting brake moment both clockwise and anti-clockwise can be calculated through the mechanical model of one-way clutch. Its critical moment, as well, are picked up as the ideal values of adjusting brake moment to evaluate the acceptable quality of one-way clutch of automatic brake adjuster. we calculate the ideal values of critical moment depending on the different structure of one-way clutch based on its mechanical model before the adjusting brake moment test begin. In addition, an experimental apparatus, which the uncertainty of measurement is ±0.1Nm, is specially designed to test the adjusting brake moment both clockwise and anti-clockwise. Than we can judge the acceptable quality of one-way clutch of automatic brake adjuster by comparing the test results and the ideal values instead of the EXP. In fact, the evaluation standard of adjusting brake moment applied on the project are still using the EXP provided by manufacturer currently in China, but it would be unavailable when the material of one-way clutch changed. Five kinds of automatic brake adjusters are used in the verification experiment to verify the accuracy of the test method. The experimental results show that the experimental values of adjusting brake moment both clockwise and anti-clockwise are within the ranges of theoretical results. The testing method provided by this article vividly meet the requirements of manufacturer's standard.

  19. Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders P; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Góźdź, Iga; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Järvinen, Antero; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morales-Fernaz, Judith; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Priedniece, Ilze; Quidoz, Marie-Claude; Remeš, Vladimir; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; da Silva, Luís P; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Török, János; Tryjanowski, Piotr; van Noordwijk, Arie J; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wiesław; Lambrechts, Marcel M

    2014-01-01

    Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of egg-laying. Parent birds should be selected to choose nest sites and to build optimally sized nests, yet our current understanding of clutch size-nest size relationships is limited to small-scale studies performed over short time periods. Here, we quantified the relationship between clutch size and nest size, using an exhaustive database of 116 slope estimates based on 17,472 nests of 21 species of hole and non-hole-nesting birds. There was a significant, positive relationship between clutch size and the base area of the nest box or the nest, and this relationship did not differ significantly between open nesting and hole-nesting species. The slope of the relationship showed significant intraspecific and interspecific heterogeneity among four species of secondary hole-nesting species, but also among all 116 slope estimates. The estimated relationship between clutch size and nest box base area in study sites with more than a single size of nest box was not significantly different from the relationship using studies with only a single size of nest box. The slope of the relationship between clutch size and nest base area in different species of birds was significantly negatively related to minimum base area, and less so to maximum base area in a given study. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that bird species have a general reaction norm reflecting the relationship between nest size and clutch size. Further, they suggest that scientists may influence the clutch size decisions of hole-nesting birds through the provisioning of nest boxes of varying sizes. PMID:25478150

  20. Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders P; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Góźdź, Iga; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Järvinen, Antero; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morales-Fernaz, Judith; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Priedniece, Ilze; Quidoz, Marie-Claude; Remeš, Vladimir; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; da Silva, Luís P; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Török, János; Tryjanowski, Piotr; van Noordwijk, Arie J; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wiesław; Lambrechts, Marcel M

    2014-09-01

    Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of egg-laying. Parent birds should be selected to choose nest sites and to build optimally sized nests, yet our current understanding of clutch size-nest size relationships is limited to small-scale studies performed over short time periods. Here, we quantified the relationship between clutch size and nest size, using an exhaustive database of 116 slope estimates based on 17,472 nests of 21 species of hole and non-hole-nesting birds. There was a significant, positive relationship between clutch size and the base area of the nest box or the nest, and this relationship did not differ significantly between open nesting and hole-nesting species. The slope of the relationship showed significant intraspecific and interspecific heterogeneity among four species of secondary hole-nesting species, but also among all 116 slope estimates. The estimated relationship between clutch size and nest box base area in study sites with more than a single size of nest box was not significantly different from the relationship using studies with only a single size of nest box. The slope of the relationship between clutch size and nest base area in different species of birds was significantly negatively related to minimum base area, and less so to maximum base area in a given study. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that bird species have a general reaction norm reflecting the relationship between nest size and clutch size. Further, they suggest that scientists may influence the clutch size decisions of hole-nesting birds through the provisioning of nest boxes of varying sizes.

  1. Quantifying anti-gravity torques in the design of a powered exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ragonesi, Daniel; Agrawal, Sunil; Sample, Whitney; Rahman, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Designing an upper extremity exoskeleton for people with arm weakness requires knowledge of the passive and active residual force capabilities of users. This paper experimentally measures the passive gravitational torques of 3 groups of subjects: able-bodied adults, able bodied children, and children with neurological disabilities. The experiment involves moving the arm to various positions in the sagittal plane and measuring the gravitational force at the wrist. This force is then converted to static gravitational torques at the elbow and shoulder. Data are compared between look-up table data based on anthropometry and empirical data. Results show that the look-up torques deviate from experimentally measured torques as the arm reaches up and down. This experiment informs designers of Upper Limb orthoses on the contribution of passive human joint torques.

  2. Traction drive automatic transmission for gas turbine engine driveline

    DOEpatents

    Carriere, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    A transaxle driveline for a wheeled vehicle has a high speed turbine engine and a torque splitting gearset that includes a traction drive unit and a torque converter on a common axis transversely arranged with respect to the longitudinal centerline of the vehicle. The drive wheels of the vehicle are mounted on a shaft parallel to the turbine shaft and carry a final drive gearset for driving the axle shafts. A second embodiment of the final drive gearing produces an overdrive ratio between the output of the first gearset and the axle shafts. A continuously variable range of speed ratios is produced by varying the position of the drive rollers of the traction unit. After starting the vehicle from rest, the transmission is set for operation in the high speed range by engaging a first lockup clutch that joins the torque converter impeller to the turbine for operation as a hydraulic coupling.

  3. Operant learning of Drosophila at the torque meter.

    PubMed

    Brembs, Bjoern

    2008-06-16

    For experiments at the torque meter, flies are kept on standard fly medium at 25 degrees C and 60% humidity with a 12hr light/12hr dark regime. A standardized breeding regime assures proper larval density and age-matched cohorts. Cold-anesthetized flies are glued with head and thorax to a triangle-shaped hook the day before the experiment. Attached to the torque meter via a clamp, the fly's intended flight maneuvers are measured as the angular momentum around its vertical body axis. The fly is placed in the center of a cylindrical panorama to accomplish stationary flight. An analog to digital converter card feeds the yaw torque signal into a computer which stores the trace for later analysis. The computer also controls a variety of stimuli which can be brought under the fly's control by closing the feedback loop between these stimuli and the yaw torque trace. Punishment is achieved by applying heat from an adjustable infrared laser.

  4. A conceptual framework for clutch-size evolution in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas E

    2014-03-01

    Causes of evolved differences in clutch size among songbird species remain debated. I propose a new conceptual framework that integrates aspects of traditional life-history theory while including novel elements to explain evolution of clutch size among songbirds. I review evidence that selection by nest predation on length of time that offspring develop in the nest creates a gradient in offspring characteristics at nest leaving (fledging), including flight mobility, spatial dispersion, and self-feeding rate. I postulate that this gradient has consequences for offspring mortality rates and parental energy expenditure per offspring. These consequences then determine how reproductive effort is partitioned among offspring, while reproductive effort evolves from age-specific mortality effects. Using data from a long-term site in Arizona, as well as from the literature, I provide support for hypothesized relationships. Nestling development period consistently explains fledgling mortality, energy expenditure per offspring, and clutch size while accounting for reproductive effort (i.e., total energy expenditure) to thereby support the framework. Tests in this article are not definitive, but they document previously unrecognized relationships and address diverse traits (developmental strategies, parental care strategies, energy requirements per offspring, evolution of reproductive effort, clutch size) that justify further investigations of hypotheses proposed here.

  5. A conceptual framework for clutch size evolution in songbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Causes of evolved differences in clutch size among songbird species remain debated. I propose a new conceptual framework that integrates aspects of traditional life history theory, while including novel elements, to explain evolution of clutch size among songbirds. I review evidence that selection by nest predation on length of time that offspring develop in the nest creates a gradient in offspring characteristics at nest-leaving (fledging), including flight mobility, spatial dispersion, and self-feeding rate. I postulate that this gradient has consequences for offspring mortality rates and parental energy expenditure per offspring. These consequences then determine how reproductive effort is partitioned among offspring, while reproductive effort evolves from age-specific mortality effects. Using data from a long-term site in Arizona, as well as from the literature, I provide support for hypothesized relationships. Nestling development period consistently explains fledgling mortality, energy expenditure per offspring, and clutch size while accounting for reproductive effort (i.e., total energy expenditure) to thereby support the framework. Tests in this paper are not definitive, but they document previously unrecognized relationships and address diverse traits (developmental strategies, parental care strategies, energy requirements per offspring, evolution of reproductive effort, clutch size) that justify further investigations of hypotheses proposed here.

  6. Modeling and analysis of friction clutch at a driveline for suppressing car starting judder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liping; Lu, Zhaijun; Liu, Xue-Lai; Sun, Tao; Jing, Xingjian; Shangguan, Wen-Bin

    2018-06-01

    Car judder is a kind of back-forth vibration during vehicle starting which caused by the torsional oscillation of the driveline. This paper presents a systematic study on the dynamic response characteristics of the clutch driven disc for suppression of the judder during vehicle starting. Self-excited vibration behavior of the clutch driven disc is analyzed based on the developed 4DOF non-linear multi-body dynamic model of the clutch driving process considering stick-slip characteristics and using Karnopp friction models. Physical parameters of a clutch determining the generations of the judder behaviors are discussed and the revised designs of the driven disc of a clutch for suppression of the judder are consequently investigated and validated with experiments for two real cars.

  7. Test and Evaluation of an Eddy Current Clutch/Brake Propulsion System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-01-01

    This report covers the Phase II effort of a program to develop and test a 15 hp eddy-current clutch propulsion system. Included in the Phase 2 effort are the test and evaluation of the eddy-current clutch propulsion system on board a test vehicle. Th...

  8. Does increasing daylength control seasonal changes in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (Anas acuta)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Sargeant, G.A.; Perkins, A.E.H.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated spatiotemporal variation in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (pintails; Anas acuta) nesting in California (1985 to 1996), North Dakota (1982 to 1985), Saskatchewan (1982 to 1985) and Alaska (1991 to 1993) to determine whether seasonal declines in clutch size varied in ways that were consistent with a controlling influence of increasing day length. Pintails began nesting in mid-March in California, mid-April in North Dakota and Saskatchewan, and mid-May in Alaska. Observed durations of nesting were 70 ± 2.6 days (SE) in California, 60 ± 6.3 days in North Dakota, 66 ± 1.3 days in Saskatchewan, and 42 ± 0.7 days in Alaska. Annual differences were the principal source of variation in mean clutch sizes (σ̂Y2 = 0.15, SE = 0.049), which varied little among study locations (σ̂A2 = 0.002, SE = 0.013). Predicted rates of seasonal decline in clutch sizes increased with latitude early in the nesting season, but declined as the nesting season progressed, except in California. Rates of decline in clutch sizes thus were not directly related to rates of increase in day length. Predicted declines in numbers of eggs per clutch over the nesting season were similar for all four locations (range, 3.05–3.12) despite wide variation in durations of nesting. Evidence suggests that reduced nutrient availability during nesting contributes to a higher rate of decline in clutch sizes in Alaska than in temperate regions. Pintails that nest early lay large initial clutches, but thereafter clutch sizes decline rapidly and breeding terminates early. This reproductive strategy is adaptive because young that hatch earliest exhibit the highest survival rates; however, the conversion of grassland to cropland on the primary prairie breeding grounds has reduced hatching rates of clutches laid early in the nesting season. Under these conditions, the limited capacity to renest in late spring on their prairie breeding grounds probably has contributed to Pintail population declines.

  9. 12. Detail of clutch and backup gasoline engine for powering ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail of clutch and backup gasoline engine for powering Stoney gates. Clutch mechanism manufactured by Baldridge Machine Company, Detroit, Michigan, ca. 1910. Instrument to the left records volume of flow through headworks. View looking south towards Stoney gates. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. Modeling and analysis of wet friction clutch engagement dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shoaib; Al-Bender, Farid; Ompusunggu, Agusmian P.; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the usage of wet-friction clutches. Presently researchers across the globe are involved in improving the performance and lifetime of clutches through testing and simulation. To understand the clutch vibrational and dynamical behavior, an SAE#2 test setup mathematical model based on extended reset-integrator friction model is developed in this paper. In order to take into account the different phases of fluid lubrication during engagement cycle, the model includes the experimentally determined Stribeck function. In addition the model considers the viscous effect and the delay in the actuation pressure signal. The model is validated with the experiments performed on the SAE#2 test setup in both time and frequency domains. By analyzing the set of experimental results, we confirmed that the amplitude of shudder vibration is independent of the amplitude of applied contact pressure fluctuation.

  11. A novel ultrasonic clutch using near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuo-Tsi

    2004-10-01

    This paper investigates design, fabrication and drive of an ultrasonic clutch with two transducers. For the two transducers, one serving as a driving element of the clutch is connected to a driving shaft via a coupling, and the other serving as a slave element of the clutch is connected to a slave shaft via another coupling. The principle of ultrasonic levitation is first expressed. Then, a series-resonant inverter is used to generate AC voltages at input terminals of each transducer, and a speed measuring system with optic sensors is used to find the relationship between rotational speed of the slave shaft and applied voltage of each transducer. Moreover, contact surfaces of the two transducers are coupled by the frictional force when both the two transducers are not energized, and separated using the ultrasonic levitation when at least one of the two transducers is energized at high voltages at resonance.

  12. Forklift Truck, 4000-Pound-Capacity, Gasoline-Engine-Driven, Solid-Rubber-Tired, Allis-Chalmers Model ACC 45 NSN 3930-01-075-4937 -- Army User Survey,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    to establish more realistic RAM data. 6. Action Taken. a. The undersigned contacted manufacturers regarding problems with the master link on the lift...Carburetor is updraft type and engine is equipped with a mechanical governor LP gas engine also avail able with same specifcations as above TRANSMISSIONS...torque by the converter Two oil-bathed, double-faced direction selec. tor clutches fully-enclosed gear-type pump. heat exchanger in bottom of radiator. 15

  13. Development of a Spoke Type Torque Sensor Using Painting Carbon Nanotube Strain Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Yong; Park, Se Hoon; Choi, Baek Gyu; Kang, In Hyuk; Park, Sang Wook; Shin, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jin Ho; Baek, Woon Kyung; Lim, Kwon Taek; Kim, Young-Ju; Song, Jae-Bok; Kang, Inpil

    2018-03-01

    This study reports a hub-spoke type joint torque sensor involving strain gauges made of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). We developed the novel joint torque sensor for robots by means of MWCNT/epoxy strain sensors (0.8 wt%, gauge factor 2) to overcome the limits of conventional foil strain gauges. Solution mixing process was hired to fabricate a liquid strain sensor that can easily be installed on any complicated surfaces. We painted the MWCNT/epoxy mixing liquid on the hub-spoke type joint torque sensor to form the piezoresistive strain gauges. The painted sensor converted its strain into torque by mean of the installed hub-spoke structure after signal processing. We acquired sufficient torque voltage responses from the painted MWCNT/epoxy strain sensor.

  14. Beyond size–number trade-offs: clutch size as a maternal effect

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, research on life-history traits has viewed the link between clutch size and offspring size as a straightforward linear trade-off; the product of these two components is taken as a measure of maternal reproductive output. Investing more per egg results in fewer but larger eggs and, hence, offspring. This simple size–number trade-off has proved attractive to modellers, but our experimental studies on keelback snakes (Tropidonophis mairii, Colubridae) reveal a more complex relationship between clutch size and offspring size. At constant water availability, the amount of water taken up by a snake egg depends upon the number of adjacent eggs. In turn, water uptake affects hatchling size, and therefore an increase in clutch size directly increases offspring size (and thus fitness under field conditions). This allometric advantage may influence the evolution of reproductive traits such as growth versus reproductive effort, optimal age at female maturation, the body-reserve threshold required to initiate reproduction and nest-site selection (e.g. communal oviposition). The published literature suggests that similar kinds of complex effects of clutch size on offspring viability are widespread in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Our results also challenge conventional experimental methodologies such as split-clutch designs for laboratory incubation studies: by separating an egg from its siblings, we may directly affect offspring size and thus viability. PMID:19324614

  15. Life-history and ecological correlates of geographic variation in egg and clutch mass among passerine species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Bassar, R.D.; Bassar, S.K.; Fontaine, J.J.; Lloyd, P.; Mathewson, Heather A.; Niklison, Alina M.; Chalfoun, A.

    2006-01-01

    Broad geographic patterns in egg and clutch mass are poorly described, and potential causes of variation remain largely unexamined. We describe interspecific variation in avian egg and clutch mass within and among diverse geographic regions and explore hypotheses related to allometry, clutch size, nest predation, adult mortality, and parental care as correlates and possible explanations of variation. We studied 74 species of Passeriformes at four latitudes on three continents: the north temperate United States, tropical Venezuela, subtropical Argentina, and south temperate South Africa. Egg and clutch mass increased with adult body mass in all locations, but differed among locations for the same body mass, demonstrating that egg and clutch mass have evolved to some extent independent of body mass among regions. A major portion of egg mass variation was explained by an inverse relationship with clutch size within and among regions, as predicted by life-history theory. However, clutch size did not explain all geographic differences in egg mass; eggs were smallest in South Africa despite small clutch sizes. These small eggs might be explained by high nest predation rates in South Africa; life-history theory predicts reduced reproductive effort under high risk of offspring mortality. This prediction was supported for clutch mass, which was inversely related to nest predation but not for egg mass. Nevertheless, clutch mass variation was not fully explained by nest predation, possibly reflecting interacting effects of adult mortality. Tests of the possible effects of nest predation on egg mass were compromised by limited power and by counterposing direct and indirect effects. Finally, components of parental investment, defined as effort per offspring, might be expected to positively coevolve. Indeed, egg mass, but not clutch mass, was greater in species that shared incubation by males and females compared with species in which only females incubate eggs. However, egg and

  16. Density effect on great tit (Parus major) clutch size intensifies in a polluted environment.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Lehikoinen, Esa

    2013-12-01

    Long-term data on a great tit (Parus major) population breeding in a metal-polluted zone around a copper-nickel smelter indicate that, against expectations, the clutch size of this species is decreasing even though metal emissions in the area have decreased considerably over the past two decades. Here, we document long-term population-level changes in the clutch size of P. major and explore if changes in population density, population numbers of competing species, timing of breeding, breeding habitat, or female age distribution can explain decreasing clutch sizes. Clutch size of P. major decreased by one egg in the polluted zone during the past 21 years, while there was no significant change in clutch size in the unpolluted reference zone over this time period. Density of P. major nests was similar in both environments but increased threefold during the study period in both areas (from 0.8 to 2.4 nest/ha). In the polluted zone, clutch size has decreased as a response to a considerable increase in population density, while a corresponding density change in the unpolluted zone did not have such an effect. The other factors studied did not explain the clutch size trend. Fledgling numbers in the polluted environment have been relatively low since the beginning of the study period, and they do not show a corresponding decrease to that noted for the clutch size over the same time period. Our study shows that responses of commonly measured life-history parameters to anthropogenic pollution depend on the structure of the breeding population. Interactions between pollution and intrinsic population characters should therefore be taken into account in environmental studies.

  17. 23. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CLUTCH MECHANISM FOR THE MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CLUTCH MECHANISM FOR THE MILL POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. TRANSFER WHEEL WITH A BELT THAT CONNECTS TO THE DRIVE WHEEL OF THE MAIN POWER SHAFT. THE CLUTCH MECHANISM, THE DRIVE WHEEL THAT RECEIVED ITS POWER FROM A BELT CONNECTED TO TRANSFER WHEEL IN THE ELECTRIC MOTOR ROOM (BEHIND CAMERA). - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  18. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  19. A dynamic method for magnetic torque measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. E.; Jou, H. L.

    1994-01-01

    In a magnetic suspension system, accurate force measurement will result in better control performance in the test section, especially when a wider range of operation is required. Although many useful methods were developed to obtain the desired model, however, significant error is inevitable since the magnetic field distribution of the large-gap magnetic suspension system is extremely nonlinear. This paper proposed an easy approach to measure the magnetic torque of a magnetic suspension system using an angular photo encoder. Through the measurement of the velocity change data, the magnetic torque is converted. The proposed idea is described and implemented to obtain the desired data. It is useful to the calculation of a magnetic force in the magnetic suspension system.

  20. Air actuated clutch for four wheel drive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clohessy, K.E.

    1986-12-09

    A control system is described for selectively engaging and disengaging a vehicle wheel and a vehicle drive mechanism comprising; a spindle having inside and outside rotative support surfaces, the spindle adapted to be mounted to a vehicle frame, an axle portion rotatably supported on the inside support surface, and drive means for selectively and rotatively driving the axle portion relative to the spindle; a wheel hub assembly adapted to carry a vehicle wheel, the hub assembly rotatively supported on the outside support surface of the spindle; a sealed expansion chamber defined in part by the spindle, the axle portion, themore » hub assembly and a movable wall carried by the hub assembly, venting means venting the outer side of the movable wall to atmospheric pressure, the clutch ring engaged by the movable wall for movement of the clutch ring with movement of the movable wall as induced by a pressure difference generated within the chamber, and pressurizing means for selectively pressurizing and depressurizing the expansion chamber to thereby selectively shift the clutch ring between the positions of interlocking the axle portion and hub assembly and unlocking the axle portion and hub assembly.« less

  1. Zero-torque spanner wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.

    1980-01-01

    Wrench converts gripping action of hand to rotary motion without imparting reactive moments or forces on part being turned or on operator. Wrench should be useful in undersea operations and other delicate work where reactive forces and torques have to be controlled. In design for valve tightening, tool resembles cross between conventional spanner wrench and pilers. One handle engages valve body; second handle has ratchet pawl that engages toothed coupling ring on perimeter of valve handle. When operator squeezes wrench handles, valve handle rotates with respect to valve body.

  2. Vertical axis wind turbine drive train transient dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, D. B.; Carne, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    Start up of a vertical axis wind turbine causes transient torque oscillations in the drive train with peak torques which may be over two and one half times the rated torque of the turbine. A computer code, based on a lumped parameter model of the drive train, was developed and tested for the low cost 17 meter turbine; the results show excellent agreement with field data. The code was used to predict the effect of a slip clutch on transient torque oscillations. It was demonstrated that a slip clutch located between the motor and brake can reduce peak torques by thirty eight percent.

  3. Embryonic and postnatal telomere length decrease with ovulation order within clutches

    PubMed Central

    Noguera, José C.; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Reichert, Sophie; Monaghan, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) in early life has been found to be predictive of subsequent lifespan. Factors such as parental TL, parental age and environmental conditions during development have been shown to contribute to the observed variation in TL among individuals. One factor that has not hitherto been considered is ovulation order, although it is well established that the last hatched/born offspring in a brood or litter often show relatively poor subsequent performance. We examined the within- and across-clutch effect of ovulation order on TL in embryos of zebra finches experiencing the same controlled incubation conditions (N = 151), and tested whether any such ovulation order effects remained detectable in adults (N = 122). Irrespective of clutch and egg size, TL in early-stage embryos (72 h incubation) markedly decreased with within-clutch ovulation order; the difference in TL of first and last-laid embryos was equivalent to the average within-individual telomere loss over the entire period of nestling and juvenile life. This ovulation-order effect occurred only within but not across clutches, and was still evident in adults. Given that TL in early life predicts lifespan, our results suggest that parental effects on telomere length could contribute to the known poor performance of later-ovulated family members. PMID:27174767

  4. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Weston, Michael A.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L.; Olds, Andrew D.; Connolly, Rod M.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. ‘Topographic’ exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them. PMID:27672510

  5. Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Maslo, Brooke; Schlacher, Thomas A; Weston, Michael A; Huijbers, Chantal M; Anderson, Chris; Gilby, Ben L; Olds, Andrew D; Connolly, Rod M; Schoeman, David S

    2016-01-01

    Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. 'Topographic' exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them.

  6. Paternal care and male mate-attraction effort in the European starling is adjusted to clutch size.

    PubMed

    Komdeur, Jan; Wiersma, Popko; Magrath, Michael

    2002-06-22

    In facultative polygynous birds with biparental care, a trade-off may occur between male parental care and attraction of additional mates. If there is a cost associated with reduced male parental care, the relative benefit of mate attraction may be predicted to decrease as the size of a male's clutch or brood increases. We tested this prediction in monogamous pairs of facultatively polygynous European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). The larger the clutch, the more time the male spent incubating and the less time he spent attracting an additional female (i.e. singing near and carrying green nesting material into adjacent empty nest-boxes). Reduced paternal incubation resulted in lower overall incubation (the female did not compensate) and lower hatching success. Immediately after experimental reduction of clutches, males spent significantly less time incubating and more time singing and carrying greenery, and vice versa for experimentally enlarged clutches. Males with experimentally reduced clutches attracted a second female more often than males with experimentally enlarged clutches. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to provide experimental evidence for an adjustment of paternal care and male mate-attraction effort to clutch size. However, a trade-off between paternal nestling provisioning and mate attraction was not revealed, probably due to the absence of unpaired females by that time in the breeding season. Experiments showed that the relative contribution of the male and female to nestling provisioning was unrelated to brood size.

  7. Quantifying anti-gravity torques for the design of a powered exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ragonesi, Daniel; Agrawal, Sunil K; Sample, Whitney; Rahman, Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Designing an upper extremity exoskeleton for people with arm weakness requires knowledge of the joint torques due to gravity and joint stiffness, as well as, active residual force capabilities of users. The objective of this research paper is to describe the characteristics of the upper limb of children with upper limb impairment. This paper describes the experimental measurements of the torque on the upper limb due to gravity and joint stiffness of three groups of subjects: able-bodied adults, able-bodied children, and children with neuromuscular disabilities. The experiment involves moving the arm to various positions in the sagittal plane and measuring the resultant force at the forearm. This force is then converted to torques at the elbow and shoulder. These data are compared to a two-link lumped mass model based on anthropomorphic data. Results show that the torques based on anthropometry deviate from experimentally measured torques as the arm goes through the range. Subjects with disabilities also maximally pushed and pulled against the force sensor to measure maximum strength as a function of arm orientation. For all subjects, the maximum voluntary applied torque at the shoulder and elbow in the sagittal plane was found to be lower than gravity torques throughout the disabled subjects' range of motion. This experiment informs designers of upper limb orthoses on the contribution of passive human joint torques due to gravity and joint stiffness and the strength capability of targeted users.

  8. Different Temperature and Cooling Patterns at the Blunt and Sharp Egg Poles Reflect the Arrangement of Eggs in an Avian Clutch

    PubMed Central

    Šálek, Miroslav E.; Zárybnická, Markéta

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is an energetically demanding process during which birds apply heat to their eggs to ensure embryonic development. Parent behaviours such as egg turning and exchanging the outer and central eggs in the nest cup affect the amount of heat lost to the environment from individual eggs. Little is known, however, about whether and how egg surface temperature and cooling rates vary among the different areas of an egg and how the arrangement of eggs within the clutch influences heat loss. We performed laboratory (using Japanese quail eggs) and field (with northern lapwing eggs) experiments using infrared imaging to assess the temperature and cooling patterns of heated eggs and clutches. We found that (i) the sharp poles of individual quail eggs warmed to a higher egg surface temperature than did the blunt poles, resulting in faster cooling at the sharp poles compared to the blunt poles; (ii) both quail and lapwing clutches with the sharp poles oriented towards the clutch centre (arranged clutches) maintained higher temperatures over the central part of the clutch than occurred in those clutches where most of the sharp egg poles were oriented towards the exterior (scattered clutches); and (iii) the arranged clutches of both quail and lapwing showed slower cooling rates at both the inner and outer clutch positions than did the respective parts of scattered clutches. Our results demonstrate that egg surface temperature and cooling rates differ between the sharp and blunt poles of the egg and that the orientation of individual eggs within the nest cup can significantly affect cooling of the clutch as a whole. We suggest that birds can arrange their eggs within the nest cup to optimise thermoregulation of the clutch. PMID:25658846

  9. Different temperature and cooling patterns at the blunt and sharp egg poles reflect the arrangement of eggs in an avian clutch.

    PubMed

    Šálek, Miroslav E; Zárybnická, Markéta

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is an energetically demanding process during which birds apply heat to their eggs to ensure embryonic development. Parent behaviours such as egg turning and exchanging the outer and central eggs in the nest cup affect the amount of heat lost to the environment from individual eggs. Little is known, however, about whether and how egg surface temperature and cooling rates vary among the different areas of an egg and how the arrangement of eggs within the clutch influences heat loss. We performed laboratory (using Japanese quail eggs) and field (with northern lapwing eggs) experiments using infrared imaging to assess the temperature and cooling patterns of heated eggs and clutches. We found that (i) the sharp poles of individual quail eggs warmed to a higher egg surface temperature than did the blunt poles, resulting in faster cooling at the sharp poles compared to the blunt poles; (ii) both quail and lapwing clutches with the sharp poles oriented towards the clutch centre (arranged clutches) maintained higher temperatures over the central part of the clutch than occurred in those clutches where most of the sharp egg poles were oriented towards the exterior (scattered clutches); and (iii) the arranged clutches of both quail and lapwing showed slower cooling rates at both the inner and outer clutch positions than did the respective parts of scattered clutches. Our results demonstrate that egg surface temperature and cooling rates differ between the sharp and blunt poles of the egg and that the orientation of individual eggs within the nest cup can significantly affect cooling of the clutch as a whole. We suggest that birds can arrange their eggs within the nest cup to optimise thermoregulation of the clutch.

  10. Computer controllable synchronous shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Davis, R.I.; Patil, P.B.

    1989-08-08

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the torque at the output of the transmission or drive wheels, the speed of the power source, and the hydraulic pressure applied to a clutch and brake. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift, a commanded transmission output torque, and commanded power source speed. A microprocessor processes the inputs and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake at a rate that satisfies the requirements for a short gear ratio change and smooth torque transfer between the friction elements. 6 figs.

  11. Computer controlled synchronous shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roy I.; Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the torque at the output of the transmission or drive wheels, the speed of the power source, and the hydraulic pressure applied to a clutch and brake. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift, a commanded transmission output torque, and commanded power source speed. A microprocessor processes the inputs and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake at a rate that satisfies the requirements for a short gear ratio change and smooth torque transfer between the friction elements.

  12. Clustering of cycloidal wave energy converters

    DOEpatents

    Siegel, Stefan G.

    2016-03-29

    A wave energy conversion system uses a pair of wave energy converters (WECs) on respective active mountings on a floating platform, so that the separation of the WECs from each other or from a central WEC can be actively adjusted according to the wavelength of incident waves. The adjustable separation facilitates operation of the system to cancel reactive forces, which may be generated during wave energy conversion. Modules on which such pairs of WECs are mounted can be assembled with one or more central WECs to form large clusters in which reactive forces and torques can be made to cancel. WECs of different sizes can be employed to facilitate cancelation of reactive forces and torques.

  13. Mismatching between nest volume and clutch volume reduces egg survival and fledgling success in black-tailed gulls

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong-Chil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A longstanding suggestion posits that parents prefer to match nest volume and clutch size (clutch volume), but few studies have tested this in colonial seabirds that nest in the open. Here, we demonstrate the effects of nest–clutch volume matching on egg survival, hatching, and fledgling success in black-tailed gulls Larus crassirostris on Hongdo Island, Korea. We show that the volume mismatch, defined as the difference between nest volume and total egg volume (the sum of all eggs’ volume in the clutch), was positively related to egg and chick mortality caused by predation, but was not significantly related to hatching success incurred by insulation during the incubation period. Although nest volume was negatively related to laying date, we found that the mismatch was positively related to laying date. Our results support the claim that well-matched nest–clutch volume may contribute to survival of eggs and chicks, and ultimately breeding success. PMID:29491934

  14. Evolution of parental incubation behaviour in dinosaurs cannot be inferred from clutch mass in birds.

    PubMed

    Birchard, Geoffrey F; Ruta, Marcello; Deeming, D Charles

    2013-08-23

    A recent study proposed that incubation behaviour (i.e. type of parental care) in theropod dinosaurs can be inferred from an allometric analysis of clutch volume in extant birds. However, the study in question failed to account for factors known to affect egg and clutch size in living bird species. A new scaling analysis of avian clutch mass demonstrates that type of parental care cannot be distinguished by conventional allometry because of the confounding effects of phylogeny and hatchling maturity. Precociality of young but not paternal care in the theropod ancestors of birds is consistent with the available data.

  15. Design of a 7-DOF haptic master using a magneto-rheological devices for robot surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seok-Rae; Choi, Seung-Bok; Hwang, Yong-Hoon; Cha, Seung-Woo

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a 7 degrees-of-freedom (7-DOF) haptic master which is applicable to the robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS). By utilizing a controllable magneto-rheological (MR) fluid, the haptic master can provide force information to the surgeon during surgery. The proposed haptic master consists of three degrees motions of X, Y, Z and four degrees motions of the pitch, yaw, roll and grasping. All of them have force feedback capability. The proposed haptic master can generate the repulsive forces or torques by activating MR clutch and MR brake. Both MR clutch and MR brake are designed and manufactured with consideration of the size and output torque which is usable to the robotic surgery. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is then designed and implemented to achieve torque/force tracking trajectories. It is verified that the proposed haptic master can track well the desired torque and force occurred in the surgical place by controlling the input current applied to MR clutch and brake.

  16. Fundamental study of subharmonic vibration of order 1/2 in automatic transmissions for cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, T.; Nakae, T.; Matsuzaki, K.; Nanba, A.; Takikawa, Y.; Ooi, Y.; Sueoka, A.

    2016-09-01

    A torque converter is an element that transfers torque from the engine to the gear train in the automatic transmission of an automobile. The damper spring of the lock-up clutch in the torque converter is used to effectively absorb the torsional vibration caused by engine combustion. A damper with low stiffness reduces fluctuations in rotational speed but is difficult to use because of space limitations. In order to address this problem, the damper is designed using a piecewise-linear spring with three stiffness stages. However, the damper causes a nonlinear vibration referred to as a subharmonic vibration of order 1/2. In the subharmonic vibration, the frequency is half that of the vibrations from the engine. In order to clarify the mechanism of the subharmonic vibration, in the present study, experiments are conducted using the fundamental experimental apparatus of a single-degree-of-freedom system with two stiffness stages. In the experiments, countermeasures to reduce the subharmonic vibration by varying the conditions of the experiments are also performed. The results of the experiments are evaluated through numerical analysis using the shooting method. The experimental and analytical results were found to be in close agreement.

  17. The convertible flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, B. R.

    The design and testing of a new twin-disk composite flywheel is described. It is the first flywheel to store 2 kW-hr of energy and the first to successfully combine the advantages of composite materials with metal hubs, thus providing a system-ready flywheel with high energy storage and high torque capabilities. The use of flywheels in space for energy storage in satellites and space stations is examined. The convertibility of the present flywheel to provide the next generation Annular Momentum Control Device or Annular Suspension and Pointing System is discussed.

  18. Torque Generation of Enterococcus hirae V-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Hara, Mayu; Rahman, Suhaila; Yamato, Ichiro; Muneyuki, Eiro; Noji, Hiroyuki; Murata, Takeshi; Iino, Ryota

    2014-01-01

    V-ATPase (VoV1) converts the chemical free energy of ATP into an ion-motive force across the cell membrane via mechanical rotation. This energy conversion requires proper interactions between the rotor and stator in VoV1 for tight coupling among chemical reaction, torque generation, and ion transport. We developed an Escherichia coli expression system for Enterococcus hirae VoV1 (EhVoV1) and established a single-molecule rotation assay to measure the torque generated. Recombinant and native EhVoV1 exhibited almost identical dependence of ATP hydrolysis activity on sodium ion and ATP concentrations, indicating their functional equivalence. In a single-molecule rotation assay with a low load probe at high ATP concentration, EhVoV1 only showed the “clear” state without apparent backward steps, whereas EhV1 showed two states, “clear” and “unclear.” Furthermore, EhVoV1 showed slower rotation than EhV1 without the three distinct pauses separated by 120° that were observed in EhV1. When using a large probe, EhVoV1 showed faster rotation than EhV1, and the torque of EhVoV1 estimated from the continuous rotation was nearly double that of EhV1. On the other hand, stepping torque of EhV1 in the clear state was comparable with that of EhVoV1. These results indicate that rotor-stator interactions of the Vo moiety and/or sodium ion transport limit the rotation driven by the V1 moiety, and the rotor-stator interactions in EhVoV1 are stabilized by two peripheral stalks to generate a larger torque than that of isolated EhV1. However, the torque value was substantially lower than that of other rotary ATPases, implying the low energy conversion efficiency of EhVoV1. PMID:25258315

  19. Density-dependent effects on growth, body size, and clutch size in Black Brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedinger, James S.; Lindberg, Mark S.; Person, Brian T.; Eichholz, Michael W.; Herzog, Mark P.; Flint, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    We documented gosling size in late summer, adult body size, and clutch size of known-age Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) females nesting on the Tutakoke River colony between 1986 and 1995. During this period, the colony increased from 1,100 to >5,000 nesting pairs. Gosling mass at 30 days of age declined from 764 ± SE of 13 g and 723 ± 15 g for males and females, respectively, in the 1986 cohort, to 665 ± 18 g and 579 ± 18 g in the 1994 cohort. Gosling size was directly negatively correlated with number of Black Brant broods. We detected no trend in adult body size for individuals from these cohorts; in fact, adults from the 1992 and 1994 cohorts had the largest overall masses. Clutch size increased with age from 3.4 eggs for 2-year-old females to 4.4 eggs for 5-year-old females. Clutch size declined during the study by 0.20 (3-year-old females) to 0.45 (2-year-old females) eggs. Clutch size did not decline between the 1986 and 1990 cohorts for females that were >5 years old. Our results for clutch size and gosling size are similar to those recorded for Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens). Our failure to detect a trend in adult body size, however, differs from the response of other geese to increasing population density. We interpret this difference in effects of density on adult size between Black Brant and other geese as an indication of stronger selection against the smallest individuals in Black Brant relative to other species of geese.

  20. Circulating breeding and pre-breeding prolactin and LH are not associated with clutch size in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Meddle, Simone L; Williams, Tony D

    2014-06-01

    Clutch size is a fundamental predictor of avian fitness, widely-studied from evolutionary and ecological perspectives, but surprisingly little is known about the physiological mechanisms regulating clutch size variation. The only formal mechanistic hypothesis for avian clutch-size determination predicts an anti-gonadal effect of circulating prolactin (PRL) via the inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH), and has become widely-accepted despite little experimental support. Here we investigated the relationship between pre-breeding and breeding plasma PRL and LH and clutch-size in captive-breeding female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using a repeated-measures design, we followed individual females from pre-breeding, through multiple breeding attempts, and attempted to decrease PRL using the D2-receptor agonist, bromocriptine. Clutch size was independent of variation in pre-breeding PRL or LH, although pre-breeding LH was negatively correlated with the time between pairing and the onset of laying. Clutch size was independent of variation in plasma PRL on all days of egg-laying. Bromocriptine treatment had no effect on plasma PRL, but in this breeding attempt clutch size was also independent of plasma PRL. Finally, we found no evidence for an inverse relationship between plasma PRL and LH levels, as predicted if PRL had inhibitory effects via LH. Thus, our data fail to provide any support for the involvement of circulating PRL in clutch size determination. These findings suggest that alternative models for hormonal control of avian clutch size need to be considered, perhaps involving downstream regulation of plasma PRL at the level of the ovary, or other hormones that have not been considered to date. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A study of airborne chrysotile concentrations associated with handling, unpacking, and repacking boxes of automobile clutch discs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, George C T; Madl, Amy K; Ingmundson, Kelsey J; Murbach, Dana M; Fehling, Kurt A; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Finley, Brent L

    2008-06-01

    Although automotive friction products (brakes and manual clutches) historically contained chrysotile asbestos, industrial hygiene surveys and epidemiologic studies of auto mechanics have consistently shown that these workers are not at an increased risk of developing asbestos-related diseases. Airborne asbestos levels during brake repair and brake parts handling have been well-characterized, but the potential exposure to airborne asbestos fibers during the handling of clutch parts has not been examined. In this study, breathing zone samples on the lapel of a volunteer worker (n=100) and area samples at bystander (n=50), remote area (n=25), and ambient (n=9) locations collected during the stacking, unpacking, and repacking of boxes of asbestos-containing clutches, and the subsequent cleanup and clothes handling, were analyzed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, fiber morphology and size distribution was evaluated using X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, and ISO analytical methods. It was observed that the (1) airborne asbestos concentrations increased with the number of boxes unpacked and repacked, (2) repetitive stacking of unopened boxes of clutches resulted in higher asbestos concentrations than unpacking and repacking the boxes of clutches, (3) cleanup and clothes handling tasks yielded very low asbestos concentrations. Fiber size and morphology analyses showed that amphibole fibers were not detected in the clutches and that the vast majority (>95%) of the airborne chrysotile fibers were less than 20 microm in length. Applying the ratio of asbestos fibers:total fibers (including non-asbestos) as determined by TEM to the PCM results, it was found that 30-min average airborne chrysotile concentrations (PCM adjusted) were 0.026+/-0.004 f/cc or 0.100+/-0.017 f/cc for a worker unpacking and repacking 1 or 2 boxes of clutches, respectively. The 30-min PCM adjusted average airborne asbestos

  2. Multiple aspects of plasticity in clutch size vary among populations of a globally distributed songbird.

    PubMed

    Westneat, David F; Bókony, Veronika; Burke, Terry; Chastel, Olivier; Jensen, Henrik; Kvalnes, Thomas; Lendvai, Ádám Z; Liker, András; Mock, Douglas; Schroeder, Julia; Schwagmeyer, P L; Sorci, Gabriele; Stewart, Ian R K

    2014-07-01

    Plasticity in life-history characteristics can influence many ecological and evolutionary phenomena, including how invading organisms cope with novel conditions in new locations or how environmental change affects organisms in native locations. Variation in reaction norm attributes is a critical element to understanding plasticity in life history, yet we know relatively little about the ways in which reaction norms vary within and among populations. We amassed data on clutch size from marked females in eight populations of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) from North America and Europe. We exploited repeated measures of clutch size to assess both the extent of within-individual phenotypic plasticity and among-individual variation and to test alternative hypotheses about the underlying causes of reaction norm shape, particularly the decline in clutch size with date. Across all populations, females of this multibrooded species altered their clutch size with respect to date, attempt order, and the interaction of date and order, producing a reaction norm in multidimensional environmental space. The reaction norm fits that predicted by a model in which optimal clutch size is driven by a decline with date hatched in the ability of offspring to recruit. Our results do not fit those predicted for other proposed causes of a seasonal decline in clutch size. We also found significant differences between populations in response to date and the date by attempt order interaction. We tested the prediction that the relationship with date should be increasingly negative as breeding season becomes shorter but found steeper declines in clutch size with date in populations with longer seasons, contrary to the prediction. Populations also differed in the level of among-individual variation in reaction norm intercept, but we found no evidence of among-individual variation in reaction norm slope. We show that complex reaction norms in life-history characters exhibit within- and among

  3. Egg clutch patterning in Lestes virens (Odonata, Lestidae) with evolutionary emphasis on endophytic oviposition in lestid dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Matushkina, Natalia A; Buy, Denis; Lambret, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Egg deposition within plants is one of the most widely distributed and ancient behaviors in Odonata. The resulting clutch consists of eggs placed in peculiar pattern that can be a characteristic for certain groups of Odonata. Despite their importance for paleontological and evolutionary research, data on egg-clutch positioning are missing or insufficient for most species. Here, patterning of egg clutches in Lestes virens was measured and described in detail for the first time. The female usually produces a linear row of single eggs directed at an angle rightward or leftward to the longitudinal axis of plant substrate. Less often eggs are arranged in egg-sets consisting of up to 4 eggs. Apparently, the female insect follows the rigid behavior stereotypes during oviposition and is unable to easily switch to the alternate stereotypical behavior of single egg deposition or production of multiegg sets. Based on a literature review and original data, egg clutch patterning of European Lestidae is overlaid on preexisting phylogenies. The resulting evolutionary scenario of egg-clutch patterning can be considered in the framework of egg-laying behavior in Lestidae. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Clutch sizes and nests of tailed frogs from the Olympic Peninsula, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bury, R. Bruce; Loafman, P.; Rofkar, D.; Mike, K.

    2001-01-01

    In the summers 1995-1998, we sampled 168 streams (1,714 in of randomly selected 1-m bands) to determine distribution and abundance of stream amphibians in Olympic National Park, Washington. We found six nests (two in one stream) of the tailed frog, compared to only two nests with clutch sizes reported earlier for coastal regions. This represents only one nest per 286 in searched and one nest per 34 streams sampled. Tailed frogs occurred only in 94 (60%) of the streams and, for these waters, we found one nest per 171 in searched or one nest per 20 streams sampled. The numbers of eggs for four masses ((x) over bar = 48.3, range 40-55) were low but one single strand in a fifth nest had 96 eggs. One nest with 185 eggs likely represented communal egg deposition. Current evidence indicates a geographic trend with yearly clutches of relatively few eggs in coastal tailed frogs compared to biennial nesting with larger clutches for inland populations in the Rocky Mountains.

  5. Can selection on nest size from nest predation explain the latitudinal gradient in clutch size?

    PubMed

    Biancucci, Luis; Martin, Thomas E

    2010-09-01

    1. Latitudinal variation in clutch sizes of birds is a well described, but poorly understood pattern. Many hypotheses have been proposed, but few have been experimentally tested, and none have been universally accepted by researchers. 2. The nest size hypothesis posits that higher nest predation in the tropics favours selection for smaller nests and thereby constrains clutch size by shrinking available space for eggs and/or nestlings in the nest. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment in a tropical forest and a comparative study between temperate and tropical field sites. 3. Specifically, we tested if: (i) predation increased with nest size; (ii) tropical birds had smaller nests controlled for body size; and (iii) clutch size was explained by nest size controlled for body size. 4. Experimental swapping of nests of different sizes showed that nest predation increased with nest size in the tropical site. Moreover, nest predation rates were higher in species with larger nests in both sites. However, nest size, corrected for body mass and phylogeny, did not differ between sites and was not related to clutch size between sites. 5. Hence, nest predation can exert selection on nest size as predicted by the hypothesis. Nest size increased with adult body mass, such that adult size might indirectly influence reproductive success through effects on nest size and nest predation risk. Ultimately, however, selection from nest predation on nest size does not explain the smaller clutch sizes typical of the tropics.

  6. Can selection on nest size from nest predation explain the latitudinal gradient in clutch size?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biancucci, L.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    1. Latitudinal variation in clutch sizes of birds is a well described, but poorly understood pattern. Many hypotheses have been proposed, but few have been experimentally tested, and none have been universally accepted by researchers. 2. The nest size hypothesis posits that higher nest predation in the tropics favours selection for smaller nests and thereby constrains clutch size by shrinking available space for eggs and/or nestlings in the nest. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment in a tropical forest and a comparative study between temperate and tropical field sites. 3. Specifically, we tested if: (i) predation increased with nest size; (ii) tropical birds had smaller nests controlled for body size; and (iii) clutch size was explained by nest size controlled for body size. 4. Experimental swapping of nests of different sizes showed that nest predation increased with nest size in the tropical site. Moreover, nest predation rates were higher in species with larger nests in both sites. However, nest size, corrected for body mass and phylogeny, did not differ between sites and was not related to clutch size between sites. 5. Hence, nest predation can exert selection on nest size as predicted by the hypothesis. Nest size increased with adult body mass, such that adult size might indirectly influence reproductive success through effects on nest size and nest predation risk. Ultimately, however, selection from nest predation on nest size does not explain the smaller clutch sizes typical of the tropics.

  7. Clutch pressure estimation for a power-split hybrid transmission using nonlinear robust observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Jianwu; Gao, Ji; Yu, Haisheng; Liu, Dong

    2018-06-01

    For a power-split hybrid transmission, using the brake clutch to realize the transition from electric drive mode to hybrid drive mode is an available strategy. Since the pressure information of the brake clutch is essential for the mode transition control, this research designs a nonlinear robust reduced-order observer to estimate the brake clutch pressure. Model uncertainties or disturbances are considered as additional inputs, thus the observer is designed in order that the error dynamics is input-to-state stable. The nonlinear characteristics of the system are expressed as the lookup tables in the observer. Moreover, the gain matrix of the observer is solved by two optimization procedures under the constraints of the linear matrix inequalities. The proposed observer is validated by offline simulation and online test, the results have shown that the observer achieves significant performance during the mode transition, as the estimation error is within a reasonable range, more importantly, it is asymptotically stable.

  8. A magneto-rheological fluid-based torque sensor for smart torque wrench application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadkhanlou, Farzad; Washington, Gregory N.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the authors have developed a new application where MR fluid is being used as a sensor. An MR-fluid based torque wrench has been developed with a rotary MR fluid-based damper. The desired set torque ranges from 1 to 6 N.m. Having continuously controllable yield strength, the MR fluid-based torque wrench presents a great advantage over the regular available torque wrenches in the market. This design is capable of providing continuous set toque from the lower limit to the upper limit while regular torque wrenches provide discrete set torques only at some limited points. This feature will be especially important in high fidelity systems where tightening torque is very critical and the tolerances are low.

  9. Natural selection and inheritance of breeding time and clutch size in the collared flycatcher.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, B C; Kruuk, L E B; Merilä, J

    2003-02-01

    Many characteristics of organisms in free-living populations appear to be under directional selection, possess additive genetic variance, and yet show no evolutionary response to selection. Avian breeding time and clutch size are often-cited examples of such characters. We report analyses of inheritance of, and selection on, these traits in a long-term study of a wild population of the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis. We used mixed model analysis with REML estimation ("animal models") to make full use of the information in complex multigenerational pedigrees. Heritability of laying date, but not clutch size, was lower than that estimated previously using parent-offspring regressions, although for both traits there was evidence of substantial additive genetic variance (h2 = 0.19 and 0.29, respectively). Laying date and clutch size were negatively genetically correlated (rA = -0.41 +/- 0.09), implying that selection on one of the traits would cause a correlated response in the other, but there was little evidence to suggest that evolution of either trait would be constrained by correlations with other phenotypic characters. Analysis of selection on these traits in females revealed consistent strong directional fecundity selection for earlier breeding at the level of the phenotype (beta = -0.28 +/- 0.03), but little evidence for stabilising selection on breeding time. We found no evidence that clutch size was independently under selection. Analysis of fecundity selection on breeding values for laying date, estimated from an animal model, indicated that selection acts directly on additive genetic variance underlying breeding time (beta = -0.20 +/- 0.04), but not on clutch size (beta = 0.03 +/- 0.05). In contrast, selection on laying date via adult female survival fluctuated in sign between years, and was opposite in sign for selection on phenotypes (negative) and breeding values (positive). Our data thus suggest that any evolutionary response to selection on

  10. Testing of Two-Speed Transmission Configurations for Use in Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Stevens, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Large civil tiltrotors have been identified to replace regional airliners over medium ranges to alleviate next-generation air traffic. Variable rotor speed for these vehicles is required for efficient high-speed operation. Two-speed drive system research has been performed to support these advanced rotorcraft applications. Experimental tests were performed on two promising two-speed transmission configurations. The offset compound gear (OCG) transmission and the dual star/idler (DSI) planetary transmission were tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center variable-speed transmission test facility. Both configurations were inline devices with concentric input and output shafts and designed to provide 1:1 and 2:1 output speed reduction ratios. Both were designed for 200 hp and 15,000 rpm input speed and had a dry shift clutch configuration. Shift tests were performed on the transmissions at input speeds of 5,000, 8,000, 10,000, 12,500, and 15,000 rpm. Both the OCG and DSI configurations successfully perform speed shifts at full rated 15,000 rpm input speed. The transient shifting behavior of the OCG and DSI configurations were very similar. The shift clutch had more of an effect on shifting dynamics than the reduction gearing configuration itself since the same shift clutch was used in both configurations. For both OCG and DSI configurations, low-to-high speed shifts were limited in applied torque levels in order to prevent overloads on the transmission due to transient torque spikes. It is believed that the relative lack of appreciable slippage of the dry shifting clutch at operating conditions and pressure profiles tested was a major cause of the transient torque spikes. For the low-to-high speed shifts, the output speed ramp-up time slightly decreased and the peak out torque slightly increased as the clutch pressure ramp-down rate increased. This was caused by slightly less clutch slippage as the clutch pressure ramp-down rate increased.

  11. A fiber optic sensor for noncontact measurement of shaft speed, torque, and power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor which enables noncontact measurement of the speed, torque and power of a rotating shaft was fabricated and tested. The sensor provides a direct measurement of shaft rotational speed and shaft angular twist, from which torque and power can be determined. Angles of twist between 0.005 and 10 degrees were measured. Sensor resolution is limited by the sampling rate of the analog to digital converter, while accuracy is dependent on the spot size of the focused beam on the shaft. Increasing the sampling rate improves measurement resolution, and decreasing the focused spot size increases accuracy. Digital processing allows for enhancement of an electronically or optically degraded signal.

  12. A fiber optic sensor for noncontact measurement of shaft speed, torque and power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1990-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor which enables noncontact measurement of the speed, torque and power of a rotating shaft was fabricated and tested. The sensor provides a direct measurement of shaft rotational speed and shaft angular twist, from which torque and power can be determined. Angles of twist between 0.005 and 10 degrees were measured. Sensor resolution is limited by the sampling rate of the analog to digital converter, while accuracy is dependent on the spot size of the focused beam on the shaft. Increasing the sampling rate improves measurement resolution, and decreasing the focused spot size increases accuracy. Digital processing allows for enhancement of an electronically or optically degraded signal.

  13. Variable-Speed Simulation of a Dual-Clutch Gearbox Tiltrotor Driveline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSmidt, Hans; Wang, Kon-Well; Smith, Edward C.; Lewicki, David G.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation explores the variable-speed operation and shift response of a prototypical two-speed dual-clutch transmission tiltrotor driveline in forward flight. Here, a Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion System Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed under a NASA funded NRA program is utilized to simulate the drive system dynamics. In this study, a sequential shifting control strategy is analyzed under a steady forward cruise condition. This investigation attempts to build upon previous variable-speed rotorcraft propulsion studies by 1) including a fully nonlinear transient gas-turbine engine model, 2) including clutch stick-slip friction effects, 3) including shaft flexibility, 4) incorporating a basic flight dynamics model to account for interactions with the flight control system. Through exploring the interactions between the various subsystems, this analysis provides important insights into the continuing development of variable-speed rotorcraft propulsion systems.

  14. Clutch morphology and the timing of exposure impact the susceptibility of aquatic insect eggs to esfenvalerate.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Katherine R; Jenkins, Jeffrey J; Jepson, Paul C

    2008-08-01

    We investigated Baetis spp. (mayfly), Hesperoperla pacifica (stonefly), and Brachycentrus americanus (caddisfly) susceptibility at the egg stage to esfenvalerate, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide. Eggs were obtained from the field or from field-collected gravid females at sites near Corvallis (OR, USA) and the Metolius River at Camp Sherman (OR, USA) for static exposures under controlled conditions for temperature and light. Eggs were exposed to esfenvalerate for 48 h at concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 4.0 microg/L. No effect on mortality or posthatch growth was detected in H. pacifica eggs exposed to esfenvalerate concentrations up to 1.0 microg/L. Exposure to 0.07 microg/L of esfenvalerate, however, caused a significant increase in Baetis spp. egg mortality, and exposure of near-eclosion eggs to lower concentrations (0.025 and 0.05 microg/L) resulted in behavioral effects and reduced survivorship in newly hatched Baetis nymphs. Early stage B. americanus eggs were 10-fold more sensitive to esfenvalerate when removed from the gelatinous clutch before exposure, an indication that the gelatin affords protection from toxicant exposure. Exposures of near-hatch B. americanus clutches to esfenvalerate concentrations ranging between 0.035 and 0.2 microg/L, however, resulted in significant clutch death within clutches resulting from behavioral aberrations of first-instar larvae. The results of the present study suggest that aquatic insect egg clutch morphology can be a strong influence on susceptibility of embryos to esfenvalerate exposure.

  15. Optimal Design of Spring Characteristics of Damper for Subharmonic Vibration in Automatic Transmission Powertrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, T.; Ryu, T.; Matsuzaki, K.; Rosbi, S.; Sueoka, A.; Takikawa, Y.; Ooi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In the torque converter, the damper of the lock-up clutch is used to effectively absorb the torsional vibration. The damper is designed using a piecewise-linear spring with three stiffness stages. However, a nonlinear vibration, referred to as a subharmonic vibration of order 1/2, occurred around the switching point in the piecewise-linear restoring torque characteristics because of the nonlinearity. In the present study, we analyze vibration reduction for subharmonic vibration. The model used herein includes the torque converter, the gear train, and the differential gear. The damper is modeled by a nonlinear rotational spring of the piecewise-linear spring. We focus on the optimum design of the spring characteristics of the damper in order to suppress the subharmonic vibration. A piecewise-linear spring with five stiffness stages is proposed, and the effect of the distance between switching points on the subharmonic vibration is investigated. The results of our analysis indicate that the subharmonic vibration can be suppressed by designing a damper with five stiffness stages to have a small spring constant ratio between the neighboring springs. The distances between switching points must be designed to be large enough that the amplitude of the main frequency component of the systems does not reach the neighboring switching point.

  16. Self-oscillation in spin torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsunegi, Sumito; Kubota, Hitoshi

    2014-04-14

    The effect of the field-like torque on the self-oscillation of the magnetization in spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer was studied theoretically. A stable self-oscillation at zero field is excited for negative β while the magnetization dynamics stops for β = 0 or β > 0, where β is the ratio between the spin torque and the field-like torque. The reason why only the negative β induces the self-oscillation was explained from the view point of the energy balance between the spin torque and the damping. The oscillation power and frequency for various β were also studied by numerical simulation.

  17. Effects of meal size, clutch, and metabolism on the energy efficiencies of juvenile Burmese pythons, Python molurus.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christian L; Secor, Stephen M

    2007-12-01

    We explored meal size and clutch (i.e., genetic) effects on the relative proportion of ingested energy that is absorbed by the gut (apparent digestive efficiency), becomes available for metabolism and growth (apparent assimilation efficiency), and is used for growth (production efficiency) for juvenile Burmese pythons (Python molurus). Sibling pythons were fed rodent meals equaling 15%, 25%, and 35% of their body mass and individuals from five different clutches were fed rodent meals equaling 25% of their body mass. For each of 11-12 consecutive feeding trials, python body mass was recorded and feces and urate of each snake was collected, dried, and weighed. Energy contents of meals (mice and rats), feces, urate, and pythons were determined using bomb calorimetry. For siblings fed three different meal sizes, growth rate increased with larger meals, but there was no significant variation among the meal sizes for any of the calculated energy efficiencies. Among the three meal sizes, apparent digestive efficiency, apparent assimilation efficiency, and production efficiency averaged 91.0%, 84.7%, and 40.7%, respectively. In contrast, each of these energy efficiencies varied significantly among the five different clutches. Among these clutches production efficiency was negatively correlated with standard metabolic rate (SMR). Clutches containing individuals with low SMR were therefore able to allocate more of ingested energy into growth.

  18. Intelligent clutch control with incremental encoder to improve wear issues of an intercept pendulum in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalba, C. K.; Diekmann, R.; Epple, S.

    2017-01-01

    A pendulum impact tester is a technical device which is used to perform plasticity characterizations of metallic materials. Results are calculated based on fracture behavior under pendulum impact loadings according to DIN 50115, DIN 51222/EN 10045. The material is held at the two ends and gets struck in the middle. A mechanical Problem occurs when testing materials with a very high impact toughness. These specimen often do not break when hit by the pendulum. To return the pendulum to its initial position, the operator presses a service button. After a delay of approximately 2 seconds a clutch is activated which connects the arm of the pendulum with an electric motor to return it back upright in start position. At the moment of clutch activation, the pendulum can still swing or bounce with any speed in any direction at any different position. Due to the lack of synchronization between pendulum speed and constant engine speed, the clutch suffers heavy wear of friction. This disadvantage results in considerable service and repair costs for the customer. As a solution to this problem this article presents a customized technical device to significantly increase the lifetime of the clutch. It was accomplished by a precisely controlled activation of the clutch at a point of time when pendulum and motor are at synchronized speed and direction using incremental encoders.

  19. Electromagnetic torque tweezers: a versatile approach for measurement of single-molecule twist and torque.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Xander J A; Lipfert, Jan; Jager, Tessa; Daudey, Renier; Beekman, Jaap; Dekker, Nynke H

    2012-07-11

    The well-established single-molecule force-spectroscopy techniques have recently been complemented by methods that can measure torque and twist directly, notably magnetic torque tweezers and the optical torque wrench. A limitation of the current torque measurement schemes is the intrinsic coupling between the force and torque degrees of freedom. Here we present electromagnetic torque tweezers (eMTT) that combine permanent and electromagnets to enable independent control of the force and torsional trap stiffness for sensitive measurements of single molecule torque and twist. Using the eMTT, we demonstrate sensitive torque measurements on tethered DNA molecules from simple tracking of the beads' (x,y)-position, obviating the need for any angular tracking algorithms or markers. Employing the eMTT for high-resolution torque measurements, we experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted torque overshoot at the DNA buckling transition in high salt conditions. We envision that the flexibility and control afforded by the eMTT will enable a range of new torque and twist measurement schemes from single-molecules to living cells.

  20. Development and Test of an Eddy-Current Clutch-Propulsion System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1973-10-01

    This report covers the Phase 1 effort which is to develop and to test an/AC-propulsion system for personal rapid- transit vehicles. This propulsion system incorporates an AC-induction motor in conjunction with an eddy-current clutch and brake. Also i...

  1. Constant Switching Frequency DTC for Matrix Converter Fed Speed Sensorless Induction Motor Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Tabish Nazir; Singh, Bhim; Bhat, Abdul Hamid

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents a constant switching frequency scheme for speed sensorless Direct Torque Control (DTC) of Matrix Converter fed Induction Motor Drive. The use of matrix converter facilitates improved power quality on input as well as motor side, along with Input Power Factor control, besides eliminating the need for heavy passive elements. Moreover, DTC through Space Vector Modulation helps in achieving a fast control over the torque and flux of the motor, with added benefit of constant switching frequency. A constant switching frequency aids in maintaining desired power quality of AC mains current even at low motor speeds, and simplifies input filter design of the matrix converter, as compared to conventional hysteresis based DTC. Further, stator voltage estimation from sensed input voltage, and subsequent stator (and rotor) flux estimation is done. For speed sensorless operation, a Model Reference Adaptive System is used, which emulates the speed dependent rotor flux equations of the induction motor. The error between conventionally estimated rotor flux (reference model) and the rotor flux estimated through the adaptive observer is processed through PI controller to generate the rotor speed estimate.

  2. Studies on Automobile Clutch Release Bearing Characteristics with Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoliang; Chen, Xiaoyang

    Automobile clutch release bearings are important automotive driveline components. For the clutch release bearing, early fatigue failure diagnosis is significant, but the early fatigue failure response signal is not obvious, because failure signals are susceptible to noise on the transmission path and to working environment factors such as interference. With an improvement in vehicle design, clutch release bearing fatigue life indicators have increasingly become an important requirement. Contact fatigue is the main failure mode of release rolling bearing components. Acoustic emission techniques in contact fatigue failure detection have unique advantages, which include highly sensitive nondestructive testing methods. In the acoustic emission technique to detect a bearing, signals are collected from multiple sensors. Each signal contains partial fault information, and there is overlap between the signals' fault information. Therefore, the sensor signals receive simultaneous source information integration is complete fragment rolling bearing fault acoustic emission signal, which is the key issue of accurate fault diagnosis. Release bearing comprises the following components: the outer ring, inner ring, rolling ball, cage. When a failure occurs (such as cracking, pitting), the other components will impact damaged point to produce acoustic emission signal. Release bearings mainly emit an acoustic emission waveform with a Rayleigh wave propagation. Elastic waves emitted from the sound source, and it is through the part surface bearing scattering. Dynamic simulation of rolling bearing failure will contribute to a more in-depth understanding of the characteristics of rolling bearing failure, because monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling bearings provide a theoretical basis and foundation.

  3. Variation in annual clutch phenology of desert tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Averill-Murray, Roy C.; Agha, Mickey; Ennen, Joshua R.; Austin, Meaghan

    2017-01-01

    The phenology of egg production and oviposition in organisms affects survival and development of neonates and thus, both offspring and maternal fitness. In addition, in organisms with environmental sex determination, clutch phenology can affect hatchling sex ratios with attendant effects on population demography. The rapid rate of contemporary climate change might disrupt reproductive phenologies that evolved to match environmental conditions. To better understand the response of clutch phenology to annual and long-term changes in climate, we studied a population of Sonoran Desert Tortoises (Gopherus morafkai) in Arizona in 1993 and 1997–2005, specifically quantifying three phenophases, including (1) the estimated time of appearance of shelled eggs in females, (2) the estimated time that eggs were last visible in X-radiographs, and (3) the duration of the interval between the first two events. The mean date for appearance of shelled eggs was 6 June, and the mean date they were last visible was 26 June. After controlling for individual female effects, these dates were different among years. The total number of days that eggs were visible across all females within a year differed among years, but the mean duration of time that clutches were visible, after controlling for individual female effects, was similar among years. Three of 18 females exhibited interannual egg retention on 5 occasions from 52 clutches. Although G. morafkai ovulates only one clutch per year, they might oviposit up to two because of interannual egg retention. Most females produced shelled eggs through heat-unit accumulation achieving 8.3 degree days within a 14-d moving average. The ability to vary the timing of egg formation and oviposition might buffer G. morafkai from some of the effects of predicted increases in temperatures, but species-specific information on developmental temperatures and nesting behavior are needed to determine whether or not the species will be able to produce viable

  4. Effects of water conditions on clutch size, egg volume, and hatchling mass of mallards and gadwalls in the Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pietz, Pamela J.; Krapu, Gary L.; Buhl, Deborah A.; Brandt, David A.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between local water conditions (measured as the percent of total area of basins that was covered by water) and clutch size, egg volume, and hatchling mass of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and Gadwalls (A. strepera) on four study sites in the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota and Minnesota, 1988-1994. We also examined the relationship between pond density and clutch size of Mallards and Gadwalls, using data collected at another North Dakota site, 1966-1981. For Mallards, we found no relationships to be significant. For Gadwalls, clutch size increased with percent basin area wet and pond density; hatchling mass marginally increased with percent basin area wet. These species differences may reflect, in part, that Mallards acquire lipid reserves used to produce early clutches before they reach the breeding grounds, whereas Gadwalls acquire lipid reserves locally; thus Gadwall clutches are more likely to be influenced by local food resources.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity in clutch size regulation among populations of a potential invasive fruit fly from environments that vary in host heterogeneity and isolation.

    PubMed

    Aluja, M; Birke, A; Díaz-Fleischer, F; Rull, J

    2018-05-21

    Phenotypic plasticity is thought to evolve in response to environmental unpredictability and can shield genotypes from selection. However, selection can also act on plastic traits. Egg-laying behaviour, including clutch size regulation, is a plastic behavioural trait among tephritid fruit flies. We compared plasticity in clutch size regulation among females of Anastrepha ludens populations stemming from environments that differed in the degree of predictability in egg-laying opportunities. Clutch size regulation in response to hosts of different sizes was compared among flies from (a) a wild, highly isolated population, (b) a wild population that switches seasonally from a small wild host fruit that varies greatly in abundance to an abundant large-sized commercial host, and (c) a laboratory population. Flies from all three populations adjusted clutch number and size according to host size. However, flies from the heterogeneous wild environment were more plastic in adjusting clutch size than flies from agricultural settings that also laid fewer eggs; yet both populations were more plastic in adjusting clutch size in line with host size when compared with laboratory females. When wild and orchard females encountered the largest host, clutch size was extremely variable and egg regulation did not follow the same trend. Heterogeneity in host availability in space and time appears to be as important as seasonal variation in host size in maintaining plastic clutch size regulation behaviour. In stable environments, there was a clear reduction in the plasticity of these traits.

  6. An Efficient Power Regeneration and Drive Method of an Induction Motor by Means of an Optimal Torque Derived by Variational Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Kaoru; Ogata, Kenji; Kato, Toshiji

    When the motor speed is reduced by using a regenerative brake, the mechanical energy of rotation is converted to the electrical energy. When the regenerative torque is large, the corresponding current increases so that the copper loss also becomes large. On the other hand, the damping effect of rotation increases according to the time elapse when the regenerative torque is small. In order to use the limited energy effectively, an optimal regenerative torque should be discussed in order to regenerate electrical energy as much as possible. This paper proposes a design methodology of a regenerative torque for an induction motor to maximize the regenerative electric energy by means of the variational method. Similarly, an optimal torque for acceleration is derived in order to minimize the energy to drive. Finally, an efficient motor drive system with the proposed optimal torque and the power storage system stabilizing the DC link voltage will be proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed methods are illustrated by both simulations and experiments.

  7. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zero percent speed specified in the engine dynamometer schedules (appendix I (f)(1), (f)(2), or (f)(3... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... reference speed and reference torque are zero percent values. For each idle segment that is ten seconds or...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... zero percent speed specified in the engine dynamometer schedules (appendix I (f)(1), (f)(2), or (f)(3... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... reference speed and reference torque are zero percent values. For each idle segment that is ten seconds or...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... zero percent speed specified in the engine dynamometer schedules (appendix I (f)(1), (f)(2), or (f)(3... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... reference speed and reference torque are zero percent values. For each idle segment that is ten seconds or...

  11. Development of a nearshore oscillating surge wave energy converter with variable geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, N. M.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y. H.

    This paper presents an analysis of a novel wave energy converter concept that combines an oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) with control surfaces. The control surfaces allow for a variable device geometry that enables the hydrodynamic properties to be adapted with respect to structural loading, absorption range and power-take-off capability. The device geometry is adjusted on a sea state-to-sea state time scale and combined with wave-to-wave manipulation of the power take-off (PTO) to provide greater control over the capture efficiency, capacity factor, and design loads. This work begins with a sensitivity study of the hydrodynamic coefficients with respect tomore » device width, support structure thickness, and geometry. A linear frequency domain analysis is used to evaluate device performance in terms of absorbed power, foundation loads, and PTO torque. Previous OSWEC studies included nonlinear hydrodynamics, in response a nonlinear model that includes a quadratic viscous damping torque that was linearized via the Lorentz linearization. Inclusion of the quadratic viscous torque led to construction of an optimization problem that incorporated motion and PTO constraints. Results from this study found that, when transitioning from moderate-to-large sea states the novel OSWEC was capable of reducing structural loads while providing a near constant power output.« less

  12. Accuracy of dental torque wrenches.

    PubMed

    Wood, James S; Marlow, Nicole M; Cayouette, Monica J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the actual torque of 2 manual wrench systems to their stated (target) torque. New spring- (Nobel Biocare USA, LLC) and friction-style (Zimmer Dental, Inc.) manual dental torque wrenches, as well as spring torque wrenches that had undergone sterilization and clinical use, were tested. A calibrated torque gauge was used to compare actual torque to target torque values of 15 and 35 N/cm. Data were statistically analyzed via mixed-effects regression model with Bonferroni correction. At a target torque of 15 N/cm, the mean torque of new spring wrenches (13.97 N/cm; SE, 0.07 N/cm) was significantly different from that of used spring wrenches (14.94 N/cm; SE, 0.06 N/cm; P < 0.0001). However, the mean torques of new spring and new friction wrenches (14.10 N/cm; SE, 0.07 N/cm; P = 0.21) were not significantly different. For torque measurements calibrated at 35 N/cm, the mean torque of new spring wrenches (35.29 N/cm; SE, 0.10 N/cm) was significantly different (P < 0.0001) from the means of new friction wrenches (36.20 N/cm; SE, 0.08 N/cm) and used spring wrenches (36.45 N/cm; SE, 0.08 N/cm). Discrepancies in torque could impact the clinical success of screw-retained dental implants. It is recommended that torque wrenches be checked regularly to ensure that they are performing to target values.

  13. Twin-enhanced magnetic torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobza, Anthony; García-Cervera, Carlos J.; Müllner, Peter

    2018-07-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys experience magnetic-field-induced torque due to magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy. In a homogeneous magnetic field, torque results in bending of long samples. This study investigates the torque on a single crystal of Ni-Mn-Ga magnetic shape memory alloy constrained with respect to bending in an external magnetic field. The dependence of the torque on external magnetic field magnitude, strain, and twin boundary structure was studied experimentally and with computer simulations. With increasing magnetic field, the torque increased until it reached a maximum near 700 mT. Above 200 mT, the torque was not symmetric about the equilibrium orientation for a sample with one twin boundary. The torque on two specimen with equal strain but different twin boundary structures varied systematically with the spatial arrangement of crystallographic twins. Numerical simulations show that twin boundaries suppress the formation of 180° domains if the direction of easy magnetization between two twin boundaries is parallel to a free surface and the magnetic field is perpendicular to that surface. For a particular twin microstructure, the torque decreases with increasing strain by a factor of six due to the mutual compensation of magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropy. When free rotation is suppressed such as in transducers of magneto-mechanical actuators, magnetic-field-induced torque creates strong bending forces, which may cause friction and failure under cyclic loading.

  14. Efficient micromagnetic modelling of spin-transfer torque and spin-orbit torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Suess, Dieter

    2018-05-01

    While the spin-diffusion model is considered one of the most complete and accurate tools for the description of spin transport and spin torque, its solution in the context of dynamical micromagnetic simulations is numerically expensive. We propose a procedure to retrieve the free parameters of a simple macro-spin like spin-torque model through the spin-diffusion model. In case of spin-transfer torque the simplified model complies with the model of Slonczewski. A similar model can be established for the description of spin-orbit torque. In both cases the spin-diffusion model enables the retrieval of free model parameters from the geometry and the material parameters of the system. Since these parameters usually have to be determined phenomenologically through experiments, the proposed method combines the strength of the diffusion model to resolve material parameters and geometry with the high performance of simple torque models.

  15. van der Waals torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul; Schatz, George

    2014-03-01

    The theory of generalized van der Waals forces by Lifshtz when applied to optically anisotropic media predicts the existence of a torque. In this work we present a theoretical calculation of the van der Waals torque for two systems. First we consider two isotropic parallel plates where the anisotropy is induced using an external magnetic field. The anisotropy will in turn induce a torque. As a case study we consider III-IV semiconductors such as InSb that can support magneto plasmons. The calculations of the torque are done in the Voigt configuration, that occurs when the magnetic field is parallel to the surface of the slabs. The change in the dielectric function as the magnetic field increases has the effect of decreasing the van der Waals force and increasing the torque. Thus, the external magnetic field is used to tune both the force and torque. The second example we present is the use of the torque in the non retarded regime to align arrays of nano particle slabs. The torque is calculated within Barash and Ginzburg formalism in the nonretarded limit, and is quantified by the introduction of a Hamaker torque constant. Calculations are conducted between anisotropic slabs of materials including BaTiO3 and arrays of Ag nano particles. Depending on the shape and arrangement of the Ag nano particles the effective dielectric function of the array can be tuned as to make it more or less anisotropic. We show how this torque can be used in self assembly of arrays of nano particles. ref. R. Esquivel-Sirvent, G. C. Schatz, Phys. Chem C, 117, 5492 (2013). partial support from DGAPA-UNAM.

  16. Performance testing of a high frequency link converter for Space Station power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sul, S. K.; Alan, I.; Lipo, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    The testing of a brassboard version of a 20-kHz high-frequency ac voltage link prototype converter dynamics for Space Station application is presented. The converter is based on a three-phase six-pulse bridge concept. The testing includes details of the operation of the converter when it is driving an induction machine source/load. By adapting a field orientation controller (FOC) to the converter, four-quadrant operation of the induction machine from the converter has been achieved. Circuit modifications carried out to improve the performance of the converter are described. The performance of two 400-Hz induction machines powered by the converter with simple V/f regulation mode is reported. The testing and performance results for the converter utilizing the FOC, which provides the capability for rapid torque changes, speed reversal, and four-quadrant operation, are reported.

  17. A phylogenetic analysis of egg size, clutch size, spawning mode, adult body size, and latitude in reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasimatis, Katja; Riginos, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical treatments of egg size in fishes suggest that constraints on reproductive output should create trade-offs between the size and number of eggs produced per spawn. For marine reef fishes, the observation of distinct reproductive care strategies (demersal guarding, egg scattering, and pelagic spawning) has additionally prompted speculation that these strategies reflect alternative fitness optima with selection on egg size differing by reproductive mode and perhaps latitude. Here, we aggregate data from 278 reef fish species and test whether clutch size, reproductive care, adult body size, and latitudinal bands (i.e., tropical, subtropical, and temperate) predict egg size, using a statistically unified framework that accounts for phylogenetic correlations among traits. We find no inverse relationship between species egg size and clutch size, but rather that egg size differs by reproductive mode (mean volume for demersal eggs = 1.22 mm3, scattered eggs = 0.18 mm3, pelagic eggs = 0.52 mm3) and that clutch size is strongly correlated with adult body size. Larger eggs were found in temperate species compared with tropical species in both demersal guarders and pelagic spawners, but this difference was not strong when accounting for phylogenetic correlations, suggesting that differences in species composition underlies regional differences in egg size. In summary, demersal guarders are generally small fishes with small clutch sizes that produce large eggs. Pelagic spawners and egg scatterers are variable in adult and clutch size. Although pelagic spawned eggs are variable in size, those of scatterers are consistently small.

  18. Torque Compensator for Mirror Mountings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    Device nulls flexural distributions of pivotal torques. Magnetic compensator for flexing pivot torque consists of opposing fixed and movable magnet bars. Magnetic torque varies nonlinearly as function of angle of tilt of movable bar. Positions of fixed magnets changed to improve magnetic torque linearity.

  19. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - I. Static migration torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Gressel, Oliver; Lyra, Wladimir

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by models suggesting that the inner planet forming regions of protoplanetary discs are predominantly lacking in viscosity-inducing turbulence, and are possibly threaded by Hall-effect generated large-scale horizontal magnetic fields, we examine the dynamics of the corotation region of a low-mass planet in such an environment. The corotation torque in an inviscid, isothermal, dead zone ought to saturate, with the libration region becoming both symmetrical and of a uniform vortensity, leading to fast inward migration driven by the Lindblad torques alone. However, in such a low viscosity situation, the material on librating streamlines essentially preserves its vortensity. If there is relative radial motion between the disc gas and the planet, the librating streamlines will no longer be symmetrical. Hence, if the gas is torqued by a large-scale magnetic field so that it undergoes a net inflow or outflow past the planet, driving evolution of the vortensity and inducing asymmetry of the corotation region, the corotation torque can grow, leading to a positive torque. In this paper, we treat this effect by applying a symmetry argument to the previously studied case of a migrating planet in an inviscid disc. Our results show that the corotation torque due to a laminar Hall-induced magnetic field in a dead zone behaves quite differently from that studied previously for a viscous disc. Furthermore, the magnetic field induced corotation torque and the dynamical corotation torque in a low viscosity disc can be regarded as one unified effect.

  20. A method to accurately estimate the muscular torques of human wearing exoskeletons by torque sensors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2015-04-09

    In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user's muscular effort is important to recognize the user's motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users' muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user's limb accurately from the measured torque. The user's limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user's muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions.

  1. A Method to Accurately Estimate the Muscular Torques of Human Wearing Exoskeletons by Torque Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Beomsoo; Jeon, Doyoung

    2015-01-01

    In exoskeletal robots, the quantification of the user’s muscular effort is important to recognize the user’s motion intentions and evaluate motor abilities. In this paper, we attempt to estimate users’ muscular efforts accurately using joint torque sensor which contains the measurements of dynamic effect of human body such as the inertial, Coriolis, and gravitational torques as well as torque by active muscular effort. It is important to extract the dynamic effects of the user’s limb accurately from the measured torque. The user’s limb dynamics are formulated and a convenient method of identifying user-specific parameters is suggested for estimating the user’s muscular torque in robotic exoskeletons. Experiments were carried out on a wheelchair-integrated lower limb exoskeleton, EXOwheel, which was equipped with torque sensors in the hip and knee joints. The proposed methods were evaluated by 10 healthy participants during body weight-supported gait training. The experimental results show that the torque sensors are to estimate the muscular torque accurately in cases of relaxed and activated muscle conditions. PMID:25860074

  2. Noncontact Measurement Of Shaft Speed, Torque, And Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, George C.

    1993-01-01

    Noncontact fiber-optic sensor and associated electronic equipment measure twist and speed of rotation of shaft. Measurements determine torque and power. Response of sensor remains linear even at cryogenic temperatures. Reflective strips on rotating shaft reflect two series of light pulses back into optical system. Bidirectional coupler in each of two optical fiber paths separates reflected light from incident light, sending it to photodiode for output to analog-to-digital converter and computer. Sensor requires no slip rings or telemetry to transfer signals from shaft. Well suited for providing data on performances of turbopumps for such cryogenic fluids as liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen.

  3. Circulating carotenoid concentrations are positively correlated with later clutch initiation in Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens).

    PubMed

    Heiss, Rebecca S; Cohen, Alan A; Bowman, Reed; Boughton, Raoul K; Bridge, Eli; McGraw, Kevin J; Schoech, Stephan J

    2011-02-01

    Antioxidants play key roles in preventing free radical damage to various molecules, cells, and tissues, but it is not well understood how variation in antioxidant levels may relate to the reproductive success or health of wild animals. We explored the relationship between circulating antioxidant concentrations and both body condition and timing of reproduction in male and female Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a cooperatively breeding passerine bird. We examined whether levels of uric acid, vitamin E, and carotenoids (all potentially important antioxidants) were linked to body condition and timing of reproduction, two measures that are directly related to reproductive success. Antioxidant concentrations were not correlated with body condition, but they were related to timing of first clutch initiation, though not always in the predicted direction. Elevated circulating levels of carotenoids were associated with delayed clutch initiation in female breeders. Relatively higher vitamin E levels in control birds were associated with earlier clutch initiation, whereas male breeders that received long-term food supplementation had elevated levels of vitamin E and delayed reproduction. Several potential explanations for the link between elevated levels of antioxidants and delayed clutch initiation are discussed. Separate explanations for each sex include, but are not limited to, oxidative stress as a result of territory defense efforts in males, different dietary regimes due to supplementation, and mobilized plasma antioxidants in females that were coping with a stressor. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Infanticide and within-clutch competition select for reproductive synchrony in a cooperative bird.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina

    2016-08-01

    Reproduction among members of social animal groups is often highly synchronized, but neither the selective advantages nor the proximate causes of synchrony are fully understood. Here I investigate the evolution of hatching synchrony in the Greater Ani (Crotophaga major), a communally nesting bird in which several unrelated females contribute eggs to a large, shared clutch. Hatching synchrony is variable, ranging from complete synchrony to moderate asynchrony, and is determined by the onset of incubation of the communal clutch. Data from a 10-year field study indicate that individual reproductive success is highest in synchronous groups, and that nestlings that hatch in the middle of the hatching sequence are most likely to survive. Nestling mortality is high in asynchronous clutches because early-hatching nestlings are more likely to be killed by adult group members, whereas late-hatching nestlings are more likely to starve due competition with their older nest-mates. Therefore, the timing of hatching appears to be under stabilizing selection from infanticide and resource competition acting in concert. These results provide empirical support for models predicting that synchrony may evolve as an adaptive counter-strategy to infanticide, and they highlight the importance of competition in shaping the timing of reproduction in social groups. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Current Best Practices for Preventing Asbestos Exposure Among Brake and Clutch Repair Workers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Covers concerns about asbestos exposure for mechanics, how to tell if asbestos brake or clutch components contain asbestos, work practices to follow, protecting yourself for home mechanics, disposal of waste that contains asbestos.

  6. Direct Torque Control of a Small Wind Turbine with a Sliding-Mode Speed Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sri Lal Senanayaka, Jagath; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper. the method of direct torque control in the presence of a sliding-mode speed controller is proposed for a small wind turbine being used in water heating applications. This concept and control system design can be expanded to grid connected or off-grid applications. Direct torque control of electrical machines has shown several advantages including very fast dynamics torque control over field-oriented control. Moreover. the torque and flux controllers in the direct torque control algorithms are based on hvsteretic controllers which are nonlinear. In the presence of a sliding-mode speed control. a nonlinear control system can be constructed which is matched for AC/DC conversion of the converter that gives fast responses with low overshoots. The main control objectives of the proposed small wind turbine can be maximum power point tracking and soft-stall power control. This small wind turbine consists of permanent magnet synchronous generator and external wind speed. and rotor speed measurements are not required for the system. However. a sensor is needed to detect the rated wind speed overpass events to activate proper speed references for the wind turbine. Based on the low-cost design requirement of small wind turbines. an available wind speed sensor can be modified. or a new sensor can be designed to get the required measurement. The simulation results will be provided to illustrate the excellent performance of the closed-loop control system in entire wind speed range (4-25 m/s).

  7. Cyclic variation in seasonal recruitment and the evolution of the seasonal decline in Ural owl clutch size.

    PubMed Central

    Brommer, Jon E; Pietiäinen, Hannu; Kokko, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    Plastic life-history traits can be viewed as adaptive responses to environmental conditions, described by a reaction norm. In birds, the decline in clutch size with advancing laying date has been viewed as a reaction norm in response to the parent's own (somatic or local environmental) condition and the seasonal decline in its offspring's reproductive value. Theory predicts that differences in the seasonal recruitment are mirrored in the seasonal decrease in clutch size. We tested this prediction in the Ural owl. The owl's main prey, voles, show a cycle of low, increase and peak phases. Recruitment probability had a humped distribution in both increase and peak phases. Average recruitment probability was two to three times higher in the increase phase and declined faster in the latter part of the season when compared with the peak phase. Clutch size decreased twice as steep in the peak (0.1 eggs day-1) as in the increase phase (0.05 eggs day-1). This result appears to refute theoretical predictions of seasonal clutch size declines. However, a re-examination of current theory shows that the predictions of modelling are less robust to details of seasonal condition accumulation in birds than originally thought. The observed pattern can be predicted, assuming specifically shaped seasonal increases in condition across individuals. PMID:11916482

  8. Influence of Joint Angle on EMG-Torque Model During Constant-Posture, Torque-Varying Contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Clancy, Edward A

    2015-11-01

    Relating the electromyogram (EMG) to joint torque is useful in various application areas, including prosthesis control, ergonomics and clinical biomechanics. Limited study has related EMG to torque across varied joint angles, particularly when subjects performed force-varying contractions or when optimized modeling methods were utilized. We related the biceps-triceps surface EMG of 22 subjects to elbow torque at six joint angles (spanning 60° to 135°) during constant-posture, torque-varying contractions. Three nonlinear EMG σ -torque models, advanced EMG amplitude (EMG σ ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) and the duration of data used to train models were investigated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the six distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.01±1.2% MVC(F90) resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so achieved a statistically equivalent error of 4.06±1.2% MVC(F90). Results demonstrated that advanced EMG σ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation as do longer model training durations.

  9. Propeller torque load and propeller shaft torque response correlation during ice-propeller interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polić, Dražen; Ehlers, Sören; Æsøy, Vilmar

    2017-03-01

    Ships use propulsion machinery systems to create directional thrust. Sailing in ice-covered waters involves the breaking of ice pieces and their submergence as the ship hull advances. Sometimes, submerged ice pieces interact with the propeller and cause irregular fluctuations of the torque load. As a result, the propeller and engine dynamics become imbalanced, and energy propagates through the propulsion machinery system until equilibrium is reached. In such imbalanced situations, the measured propeller shaft torque response is not equal to the propeller torque. Therefore, in this work, the overall system response is simulated under the ice-related torque load using the Bond graph model. The energy difference between the propeller and propeller shaft is estimated and related to their corresponding mechanical energy. Additionally, the mechanical energy is distributed among modes. Based on the distribution, kinetic and potential energy are important for the correlation between propeller torque and propeller shaft response.

  10. Improved direct torque control of an induction generator used in a wind conversion system connected to the grid.

    PubMed

    Abdelli, Radia; Rekioua, Djamila; Rekioua, Toufik; Tounzi, Abdelmounaïm

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a modulated hysteresis direct torque control (MHDTC) applied to an induction generator (IG) used in wind energy conversion systems (WECs) connected to the electrical grid through a back-to-back converter. The principle of this strategy consists in superposing to the torque reference a triangular signal, as in the PWM strategy, with the desired switching frequency. This new modulated reference is compared to the estimated torque by using a hysteresis controller as in the classical direct torque control (DTC). The aim of this new approach is to lead to a constant frequency and low THD in grid current with a unit power factor and a minimum voltage variation despite the wind variation. To highlight the effectiveness of the proposed method, a comparison was made with classical DTC and field oriented control method (FOC). The obtained simulation results, with a variable wind profile, show an adequate dynamic of the conversion system using the proposed method compared to the classical approaches. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for maximum...

  12. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for maximum...

  13. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for maximum...

  14. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for maximum...

  15. 14 CFR 27.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 27.361 Section 27.361... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 27.361 Engine torque. (a) For turbine engines, the limit torque may not be less than the highest of— (1) The mean torque for maximum...

  16. Pressurized fluid torque driver control and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  17. Is there a weekend bias in clutch-initiation dates from citizen science? Implications for studies of avian breeding phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Caren B.

    2014-09-01

    Accurate phenology data, such as the timing of migration and reproduction, is important for understanding how climate change influences birds. Given contradictory findings among localized studies regarding mismatches in timing of reproduction and peak food supply, broader-scale information is needed to understand how whole species respond to environmental change. Citizen science—participation of the public in genuine research—increases the geographic scale of research. Recent studies, however, showed weekend bias in reported first-arrival dates for migratory songbirds in databases created by citizen-science projects. I investigated whether weekend bias existed for clutch-initiation dates for common species in US citizen-science projects. Participants visited nests on Saturdays more frequently than other days. When participants visited nests during the laying stage, biased timing of visits did not translate into bias in estimated clutch-initiation dates, based on back-dating with the assumption of one egg laid per day. Participants, however, only visited nests during the laying stage for 25 % of attempts of cup-nesting species and 58 % of attempts in nest boxes. In some years, in lieu of visit data, participants provided their own estimates of clutch-initiation dates and were asked "did you visit the nest during the laying period?" Those participants who answered the question provided estimates of clutch-initiation dates with no day-of-week bias, irrespective of their answer. Those who did not answer the question were more likely to estimate clutch initiation on a Saturday. Data from citizen-science projects are useful in phenological studies when temporal biases can be checked and corrected through protocols and/or analytical methods.

  18. Is there a weekend bias in clutch-initiation dates from citizen science? Implications for studies of avian breeding phenology.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caren B

    2014-09-01

    Accurate phenology data, such as the timing of migration and reproduction, is important for understanding how climate change influences birds. Given contradictory findings among localized studies regarding mismatches in timing of reproduction and peak food supply, broader-scale information is needed to understand how whole species respond to environmental change. Citizen science-participation of the public in genuine research-increases the geographic scale of research. Recent studies, however, showed weekend bias in reported first-arrival dates for migratory songbirds in databases created by citizen-science projects. I investigated whether weekend bias existed for clutch-initiation dates for common species in US citizen-science projects. Participants visited nests on Saturdays more frequently than other days. When participants visited nests during the laying stage, biased timing of visits did not translate into bias in estimated clutch-initiation dates, based on back-dating with the assumption of one egg laid per day. Participants, however, only visited nests during the laying stage for 25% of attempts of cup-nesting species and 58% of attempts in nest boxes. In some years, in lieu of visit data, participants provided their own estimates of clutch-initiation dates and were asked "did you visit the nest during the laying period?" Those participants who answered the question provided estimates of clutch-initiation dates with no day-of-week bias, irrespective of their answer. Those who did not answer the question were more likely to estimate clutch initiation on a Saturday. Data from citizen-science projects are useful in phenological studies when temporal biases can be checked and corrected through protocols and/or analytical methods.

  19. Torque, Cognitive Ability, and Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csapo, Marg

    1985-01-01

    West African Hausan Children (N=110) aged 5-6 were administered a torque test and relationshps between the torque task and visual spatial tasks were analyzed. Findings supported the assumption that educational experience related to circling accounts for decrease in torque, or that the educational experiences have potential influence on cortical…

  20. Investigation of Motorcycle Steering Torque Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossalter, V.; Lot, R.; Massaro, M.; Peretto, M.

    2011-10-01

    When driving along a circular path, the rider controls a motorcycle mainly by the steering torque. This work addresses an in-depth analysis of the steady state cornering and in particular the decomposition of the motorcycle steering torque in its main components, such as road-tyre forces, gyroscopic torques, centrifugal and gravity effects. A detailed and experimentally validated multibody model of the motorcycle is used herein to analyze the steering torque components at different speeds and lateral accelerations. First the road tests are compared with the numerical results for three different vehicles and then a numerical investigation is carried out to decompose the steering torque. Finally, the effect of longitudinal acceleration and deceleration on steering torque components is presented.

  1. Charge-induced spin torque in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurebayashi, Daichi; Nomura, Kentaro

    In this work, we present phenomenological and microscopic derivations of spin torques in magnetically doped Weyl semimetals. As a result, we obtain the analytical expression of the spin torque generated, without a flowing current, when the chemical potential is modulated. We also find that this spin torque is a direct consequence of the chiral anomaly. Therefore, observing this spin torque in magnetic Weyl semimetals might be an experimental evidence of the chiral anomaly. This spin torque has also a great advantage in application. In contrast to conventional current-induced spin torques such as the spin-transfer torques, this spin torque does not accompany a constant current flow. Thus, devices using this operating principle is free from the Joule heating and possibly have higher efficiency than devices using conventional current-induced spin torques. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15H05854 and JP26400308.

  2. System for computer controlled shifting of an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determine from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  3. Closed loop computer control for an automatic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Patil, Prabhakar B.

    1989-01-01

    In an automotive vehicle having an automatic transmission that driveably connects a power source to the driving wheels, a method to control the application of hydraulic pressure to a clutch, whose engagement produces an upshift and whose disengagement produces a downshift, the speed of the power source, and the output torque of the transmission. The transmission output shaft torque and the power source speed are the controlled variables. The commanded power source torque and commanded hydraulic pressure supplied to the clutch are the control variables. A mathematical model is formulated that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the powertrain before, during and after a gear shift. The model represents the operating characteristics of each component and the structural arrangement of the components within the transmission being controlled. Next, a close loop feedback control is developed to determine the proper control law or compensation strategy to achieve an acceptably smooth gear ratio change, one in which the output torque disturbance is kept to a minimum and the duration of the shift is minimized. Then a computer algorithm simulating the shift dynamics employing the mathematical model is used to study the effects of changes in the values of the parameters established from a closed loop control of the clutch hydraulic and the power source torque on the shift quality. This computer simulation is used also to establish possible shift control strategies. The shift strategies determined from the prior step are reduced to an algorithm executed by a computer to control the operation of the power source and the transmission.

  4. Advantages and disadvantages of new torque-controlled endodontic motors and low-torque NiTi rotary instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G

    2001-12-01

    The main problem with the NiTi rotary instrumentation technique is instrument failure. During shaping procedures, rotary instruments might lock and/or screw into canals and, consequently, be subjected to high levels of stress. This may frequently lead to instrument separation or deformation. If a high-torque motor is used, the applied forces are usually very high and the instrument-fracture limit is often exceeded, thus increasing the risk of intracanal failure. A possible solution of this problem is to use a low-torque endodontic motor, which operates below the maximum permissible torque limit of each and every rotary instrument. During clinical instrumentation of root canals, if a torque-controlled motor is loaded right up to the instrument-specific torque, the motor stops momentarily and/or starts rotating counter-clockwise (auto-reverse function) to disengage the locked instrument. These safety mechanisms were developed to reduce the risk of instrument fracture. The author fully discusses the rationale for selecting lower torque values in everyday endodontic practice, and provides clinicians with useful information on the advantages and disadvantages of new endodontic motors with torque control.

  5. The multivariate egg: quantifying within- and among-clutch correlations between maternally derived yolk immunoglobulins and yolk androgens using multivariate mixed models.

    PubMed

    Postma, Erik; Siitari, Heli; Schwabl, Hubert; Richner, Heinz; Tschirren, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Egg components are important mediators of prenatal maternal effects in birds and other oviparous species. Because different egg components can have opposite effects on offspring phenotype, selection is expected to favour their mutual adjustment, resulting in a significant covariation between egg components within and/or among clutches. Here we tested for such correlations between maternally derived yolk immunoglobulins and yolk androgens in great tit (Parus major) eggs using a multivariate mixed-model approach. We found no association between yolk immunoglobulins and yolk androgens within clutches, indicating that within clutches the two egg components are deposited independently. Across clutches, however, there was a significant negative relationship between yolk immunoglobulins and yolk androgens, suggesting that selection has co-adjusted their deposition. Furthermore, an experimental manipulation of ectoparasite load affected patterns of covariance among egg components. Yolk immunoglobulins are known to play an important role in nestling immune defence shortly after hatching, whereas yolk androgens, although having growth-enhancing effects under many environmental conditions, can be immunosuppressive. We therefore speculate that variation in the risk of parasitism may play an important role in shaping optimal egg composition and may lead to the observed pattern of yolk immunoglobulin and yolk androgen deposition across clutches. More generally, our case study exemplifies how multivariate mixed-model methodology presents a flexible tool to not only quantify, but also test patterns of (co)variation across different organisational levels and environments, allowing for powerful hypothesis testing in ecophysiology.

  6. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Naing, Veronica; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2009-06-23

    Biomechanical energy harvesting-generating electricity from people during daily activities-is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm), and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%). Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 +/- 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 +/- 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices.

  7. Method for controlling a motor vehicle powertrain

    DOEpatents

    Burba, Joseph C.; Landman, Ronald G.; Patil, Prabhakar B.; Reitz, Graydon A.

    1990-01-01

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the position of the gear selector lever operated manually by the vehicle operator, the speed of the power source, the state of the ignition key, and the rate of release of an accelerator pedal. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift and a torque command and various constant torque signals. A microprocessor processes the input and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake to produce the forward drive, reverse and regenerative operation of the transmission.

  8. Method for controlling a motor vehicle powertrain

    DOEpatents

    Burba, J.C.; Landman, R.G.; Patil, P.B.; Reitz, G.A.

    1990-05-22

    A multiple forward speed automatic transmission produces its lowest forward speed ratio when a hydraulic clutch and hydraulic brake are disengaged and a one-way clutch connects a ring gear to the transmission casing. Second forward speed ratio results when the hydraulic clutch is engaged to connect the ring gear to the planetary carrier of a second gear set. Reverse drive and regenerative operation result when an hydraulic brake fixes the planetary and the direction of power flow is reversed. Various sensors produce signals representing the position of the gear selector lever operated manually by the vehicle operator, the speed of the power source, the state of the ignition key, and the rate of release of an accelerator pedal. A control algorithm produces input data representing a commanded upshift, a commanded downshift and a torque command and various constant torque signals. A microprocessor processes the input and produces a response to them in accordance with the execution of a control algorithm. Output or response signals cause selective engagement and disengagement of the clutch and brake to produce the forward drive, reverse and regenerative operation of the transmission. 7 figs.

  9. EDITORIAL: Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2011-09-01

    This cluster, consisting of five invited articles on spin-transfer torque, offers the very first review covering both magnetization reversal and domain-wall displacement induced by a spin-polarized current. Since the first theoretical proposal on spin-transfer torque—reported by Berger and Slonczewski independently—spin-transfer torque has been experimentally demonstrated in both vertical magnetoresistive nano-pillars and lateral ferromagnetic nano-wires. In the former structures, an electrical current flowing vertically in the nano-pillar exerts spin torque onto the thinner ferromagnetic layer and reverses its magnetization, i.e., current-induced magnetization switching. In the latter structures, an electrical current flowing laterally in the nano-wire exerts torque onto a domain wall and moves its position by rotating local magnetic moments within the wall, i.e., domain wall displacement. Even though both phenomena are induced by spin-transfer torque, each phenomenon has been investigated separately. In order to understand the physical meaning of spin torque in a broader context, this cluster overviews both cases from theoretical modellings to experimental demonstrations. The earlier articles in this cluster focus on current-induced magnetization switching. The magnetization dynamics during the reversal has been calculated by Kim et al using the conventional Landau--Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, adding a spin-torque term. This model can explain the dynamics in both spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions in a nano-pillar form. This phenomenon has been experimentally measured in these junctions consisting of conventional ferromagnets. In the following experimental part, the nano-pillar junctions with perpendicularly magnetized FePt and half-metallic Heusler alloys are discussed from the viewpoint of efficient magnetization reversal due to a high degree of spin polarization of the current induced by the intrinsic nature of these alloys. Such switching can

  10. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  11. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  12. Development of an ankle torque measurement device for measuring ankle torque during walking.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Genichi; Tomita, Yutaka; Mizuno, Shiho; Maeda, Hirofumi; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Orand, Abbas; Takeda, Kotaro; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To develop a device for measuring the torque of an ankle joint during walking in order to quantify the characteristics of spasticity of the ankle and to verify the functionality of the device by testing it on the gait of an able-bodied individual and an equinovarus patient. [Subjects and Methods] An adjustable posterior strut (APS) ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) was used in which two torque sensors were mounted on the aluminum strut for measuring the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions. Two switches were also mounted at the heel and toe in order to detect the gait phase. An able-bodied individual and a left hemiplegic patient with equinovarus participated. They wore the device and walked on a treadmill to investigate the device's functionality. [Results] Linear relationships between the torques and the corresponding output of the torque sensors were observed. Upon the analyses of gait of an able-body subject and a hemiplegic patient, we observed toque matrices in both AP and ML directions during the gait of the both subjects. [Conclusion] We developed a device capable of measuring the torque in the AP and ML directions of ankle joints during gait.

  13. Miniaturized force/torque sensor for in vivo measurements of tissue characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hessinger, M; Pilic, T; Werthschutzky, R; Pott, P P

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a surgical instrument to measure interaction forces/torques with organic tissue during operation. The focus is on the design progress of the sensor element, consisting of a spoke wheel deformation element with a diameter of 12 mm and eight inhomogeneous doped piezoresistive silicon strain gauges on an integrated full-bridge assembly with an edge length of 500 μm. The silicon chips are contacted to flex-circuits via flip chip and bonded on the substrate with a single component adhesive. A signal processing board with an 18 bit serial A/D converter is integrated into the sensor. The design concept of the handheld surgical sensor device consists of an instrument coupling, the six-axis sensor, a wireless communication interface and battery. The nominal force of the sensing element is 10 N and the nominal torque is 1 N-m in all spatial directions. A first characterization of the force sensor results in a maximal systematic error of 4.92 % and random error of 1.13 %.

  14. Multi-speed multi-phase resolver converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean (Inventor); Howard, David (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A multiphase converter circuit generates a plurality of sinusoidal outputs of displaced phase and given speed value from the output of an angular resolver system attachable to a motor excited by these multi-phase outputs, the resolver system having a lower speed value than that of the motor. The angular resolver system provides in parallel format sequential digital numbers indicative of the amount of rotation of the shaft of an angular position sensor associated with the angular resolver system. These numbers are used to excite simultaneously identical addresses of a plurality of addressable memory systems, each memory system having stored therein at sequential addresses sequential values of a sinusoidal wavetrain of a given number of sinusoids. The stored wavetrain values represent sinusoids displaced from each other in phase according to the number of output phases desired. A digital-to-analog converter associated with each memory system converts each accessed word to a corresponding analog value to generate attendant to rotation of the angular resolver a sinusoidal wave of proper phase at each of the plurality of outputs. By properly orienting the angular resolver system with respect to the rotor of the motor, essentially ripple-free torque is supplied to the rotor. The angular resolver system may employ an analog resolver feeding an integrated circuit resolver-to-digital converter to produce the requisite digital values serving as addresses. Alternative versions employing incremental or absolute encoders are also described.

  15. Multi-speed multi-phase resolver converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A multiphase converter circuit generates a plurality of sinusoidal outputs of displaced phase and given speed value from the output of an angular resolver system attachable to a motor excited by these multi-phase outputs, the resolver system having a lower speed value than that of the motor. The angular resolver system provides in parallel format sequential digital numbers indicative of the amount of rotation of the shaft of an angular position sensor associated with the angular resolver system. These numbers are used to excite simultaneously identical addresses of a plurality of addressable memory systems, each memory system having stored therein at sequential addresses sequential values of a sinusoidal wavetrain of a given number of sinusoids. The stored wavetrain values represent sinusoids displaced from each other in phase according to the number of output phases desired. A digital-to-analog converter associated with each memory system converts each accessed word to a corresponding analog value to generate attendant to rotation of the angular resolver a sinusoidal wave of proper phase at each of the plurality of outputs. By properly orienting the angular resolver system with respect to the rotor of the motor, essentially ripple-free torque is supplied to the rotor. The angular resolver system may employ an analog resolver feeding an integrated circuit resolver-to-digital converter to produce the requisite digital values serving as addresses. Alternative versions employing incremental or absolute encoders are also described.

  16. Fabricated torque shaft

    DOEpatents

    Mashey, Thomas Charles

    2002-01-01

    A fabricated torque shaft is provided that features a bolt-together design to allow vane schedule revisions with minimal hardware cost. The bolt-together design further facilitates on-site vane schedule revisions with parts that are comparatively small. The fabricated torque shaft also accommodates stage schedules that are different one from another in non-linear inter-relationships as well as non-linear schedules for a particular stage of vanes.

  17. R dump converter without DC link capacitor for an 8/6 SRM: experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Pasumalaithevan; Umamaheswari, Bhaskaran

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of 8/6 switched reluctance motor (SRM) when excited with sinusoidal voltage. The conventional R dump converter provides DC excitation with the help of capacitor. In this paper the converter used is the modified R dump converter without DC link capacitor providing AC or sinusoidal excitation. Torque ripple and speed ripple are investigated based on hysteresis current control. Constant and sinusoidal current references are considered for comparison in both DC and AC excitation. Extensive theoretical and experimental investigations are made to bring out the merits and demerits of AC versus DC excitation. It is shown that the constructionally simple SRM can be favorably controlled with simple R dump converter with direct AC excitation without need for DC link capacitor. A 4-phase 8/6 0.5 kW SRM is used for experimentation.

  18. Passive and active floating torque during swimming.

    PubMed

    Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Stallman, Robert Keig; Stray-Gundersen, James

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of passive underwater torque on active body angle with the horizontal during front crawl swimming and to assess the effect of body size on passive torque and active body angle. Additionally, the effects of passive torque, body angle and hydrostatic lift on maximal sprinting performance were addressed. Ten boys [aged 11.7 (0.8) years] and 12 male adult [aged 21.4 (3.7) years] swimmers volunteered to participate. Their body angle with the horizontal was measured at maximal velocity, and at two submaximal velocities using an underwater video camera system. Passive torque and hydrostatic lift were measured during an underwater weighing procedure, and the center of mass and center of volume were determined. The results showed that passive torque correlated significantly with the body angle at a velocity 63% of v(max) ( alpha(63) r=-0.57), and that size-normalized passive torque correlated significantly with the alpha(63) and alpha(77) (77% of v(max)) with r=-0.59 and r=-0.54 respectively. Hydrostatic lift correlated with alpha(63) with r=-0.45. The negative correlation coefficients are suggested to be due to the adults having learned to overcome passive torque when swimming at submaximal velocities by correcting their body angle. It is concluded that at higher velocities the passive torque and hydrostatic lift do not influence body angle during swimming. At a velocity of 63% of v(max), hydrostatic lift and passive torque influences body angle. Passive torque and size-normalized passive torque increases with body size. When corrected for body size, hydrostatic lift and passive torque did not influence the maximal sprinting velocity.

  19. Improved Force-And-Torque Sensor Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved sensor assembly measures forces and torques of interaction between supporting and supported object. Measures all three components of force and all three components of torque. Force measurements uncoupled from torque measurements. Price for improved measurement capability, complexity and flexibility, excessive in some applications.

  20. Calibration of the optical torque wrench.

    PubMed

    Pedaci, Francesco; Huang, Zhuangxiong; van Oene, Maarten; Dekker, Nynke H

    2012-02-13

    The optical torque wrench is a laser trapping technique that expands the capability of standard optical tweezers to torque manipulation and measurement, using the laser linear polarization to orient tailored microscopic birefringent particles. The ability to measure torque of the order of kBT (∼4 pN nm) is especially important in the study of biophysical systems at the molecular and cellular level. Quantitative torque measurements rely on an accurate calibration of the instrument. Here we describe and implement a set of calibration approaches for the optical torque wrench, including methods that have direct analogs in linear optical tweezers as well as introducing others that are specifically developed for the angular variables. We compare the different methods, analyze their differences, and make recommendations regarding their implementations.

  1. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources.

  2. Development of a Portable Torque Wrench Tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Gou, C.; Su, D.

    2018-03-01

    A portable torque wrench tester (PTWT) with calibration range from 0.5 Nm to 60 Nm has been developed and evaluated for periodic or on-site calibration of setting type torque wrenches, indicating type torque wrenches and hand torque screwdrivers. The PTWT is easy to carry with weight about 10 kg, simple and efficient operation and energy saving with an automatic loading and calibrating system. The relative expanded uncertainty of torque realized by the PTWT was estimated to be 0.8%, with the coverage factor k=2. A comparison experiment has been done between the PTWT and a reference torque standard at our laboratory. The consistency between these two devices under the claimed uncertainties was verified.

  3. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  4. Torque limit of PM motors for field-weakening region operation

    DOEpatents

    Royak, Semyon [Beachwood, OH; Harbaugh, Mark M [Richfield, OH

    2012-02-14

    The invention includes a motor controller and technique for controlling a permanent magnet motor. In accordance with one aspect of the present technique, a permanent magnet motor is controlled by receiving a torque command, determining a physical torque limit based on a stator frequency, determining a theoretical torque limit based on a maximum available voltage and motor inductance ratio, and limiting the torque command to the smaller of the physical torque limit and the theoretical torque limit. Receiving the torque command may include normalizing the torque command to obtain a normalized torque command, determining the physical torque limit may include determining a normalized physical torque limit, determining a theoretical torque limit may include determining a normalized theoretical torque limit, and limiting the torque command may include limiting the normalized torque command to the smaller of the normalized physical torque limit and the normalized theoretical torque limit.

  5. None of the Rotor Residues of F1-ATPase Are Essential for Torque Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chiwata, Ryohei; Kohori, Ayako; Kawakami, Tomonari; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Furuike, Shou; Adachi, Kengo; Sutoh, Kazuo; Yoshida, Masasuke; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    F1-ATPase is a powerful rotary molecular motor that can rotate an object several hundred times as large as the motor itself against the viscous friction of water. Forced reverse rotation has been shown to lead to ATP synthesis, implying that the mechanical work against the motor’s high torque can be converted into the chemical energy of ATP. The minimal composition of the motor protein is α3β3γ subunits, where the central rotor subunit γ turns inside a stator cylinder made of alternately arranged α3β3 subunits using the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The rotor consists of an axle, a coiled coil of the amino- and carboxyl-terminal α-helices of γ, which deeply penetrates the stator cylinder, and a globular protrusion that juts out from the stator. Previous work has shown that, for a thermophilic F1, significant portions of the axle can be truncated and the motor still rotates a submicron sized bead duplex, indicating generation of up to half the wild-type (WT) torque. Here, we inquire if any specific interactions between the stator and the rest of the rotor are needed for the generation of a sizable torque. We truncated the protruding portion of the rotor and replaced part of the remaining axle residues such that every residue of the rotor has been deleted or replaced in this or previous truncation mutants. This protrusionless construct showed an unloaded rotary speed about a quarter of the WT, and generated one-third to one-half of the WT torque. No residue-specific interactions are needed for this much performance. F1 is so designed that the basic rotor-stator interactions for torque generation and control of catalysis rely solely upon the shape and size of the rotor at very low resolution. Additional tailored interactions augment the torque to allow ATP synthesis under physiological conditions. PMID:24853745

  6. Torque limited drive for manual valves

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Philip G.; Underwood, Daniel E.

    1989-06-06

    The present invention is directed to a torque-limiting handwheel device for preventing manual valves from being damaged due to the application of excessive torque during the opening or closing operation of the valves. Torque can only be applied when ridges in the handwheel assembly engage in channels machined in the face of the baseplate. The amount of torque required for disengagement of the ridges from the channels is determined by the force exerted by various Bellville springs and the inclination of the side faces of the channels.

  7. Torque limited drive for manual valves

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Philip G.; Underwood, Daniel E.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a torque-limiting handwheel device for preventing manual valves from being damaged due to the application of excessive torque during the opening or closing operation of the valves. Torque can only be applied when ridges in the handwheel assembly engage in channels machined in the face of the baseplate. The amount of torque required for disengagement of the ridges from the channels is determined by the force exerted by various Bellville springs and the inclination of the side faces of the channels.

  8. Multiple mating and clutch size in invertebrate brooders versus pregnant vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Tatarenkov, Andrey; Liu, Jin-Xian

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the genetic literature on polygamy rates and sire numbers per clutch in invertebrate animals that brood their offspring and then compare findings with analogous data previously compiled for vertebrate species displaying viviparity or other pregnancy-like syndromes. As deduced from molecular parentage analyses of several thousand broods from more than 100 “pregnant” species, invertebrate brooders had significantly higher mean incidences of multiple mating than pregnant vertebrates, a finding generally consistent with the postulate that clutch size constrains successful mate numbers in species with extended parental care. However, we uncovered no significant correlation in invertebrates between brood size and genetically deduced rates of multiple mating by the incubating sex. Instead, in embryo-gestating animals otherwise as different as mammals and mollusks, polygamy rates and histograms of successful mates per brooder proved to be strikingly similar. Most previous studies have sought to understand why gestating parents have so many mates and such high incidences of successful multiple mating; an alternative perspective based on logistical constraints turns the issue on its head by asking why mate numbers and polygamy rates are much lower than they theoretically could be, given the parentage-resolving power of molecular markers and the huge sizes of many invertebrate broods. PMID:21709247

  9. Spin Transfer torques in Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed; Waintal, Xavier; Manchon, Aurelien; Spsms, Cea, Grenoble France Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Spin Transfer Torque (STT) has attracted tremendously growing interest in the past two decades. Consisting on the transfer of spin angular momentum of a spin polarized current to local magnetic moments, the STT gives rise to a complex dynamics of the magnetization. Depending on the the structure, the STT shows a dominated In plane component for spin valves, whereas both components coexist for magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJ). For latter case the symmetry of the structure is considered to be decisive in identifying the nature and behavior of the torque. In the present study we are interested in magnetic structures where we substitute either one or both of the magnetic layers by antiferromagnets (AF). We use Non-equilibrium Green's function formalism applied on a tight-binding model to investigate the nature of the spin torque. We notice the presence of two types of torque exerted on (AF), a torque which tends to rotate the order parameter and another one that competes with the exchange interaction. We conclude by comparison with previous works.

  10. Split torque transmission load sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Rashidi, M.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Split torque transmissions are attractive alternatives to conventional planetary designs for helicopter transmissions. The split torque designs can offer lighter weight and fewer parts but have not been used extensively for lack of experience, especially with obtaining proper load sharing. Two split torque designs that use different load sharing methods have been studied. Precise indexing and alignment of the geartrain to produce acceptable load sharing has been demonstrated. An elastomeric torque splitter that has large torsional compliance and damping produces even better load sharing while reducing dynamic transmission error and noise. However, the elastomeric torque splitter as now configured is not capable over the full range of operating conditions of a fielded system. A thrust balancing load sharing device was evaluated. Friction forces that oppose the motion of the balance mechanism are significant. A static analysis suggests increasing the helix angle of the input pinion of the thrust balancing design. Also, dynamic analysis of this design predicts good load sharing and significant torsional response to accumulative pitch errors of the gears.

  11. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1) The...

  12. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1) The...

  13. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1) The...

  14. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1) The...

  15. 14 CFR 29.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 29.361 Section 29.361... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Flight Loads § 29.361 Engine torque. The limit engine torque may not be less than the following: (a) For turbine engines, the highest of— (1) The...

  16. Force, Torque and Stiffness: Interactions in Perceptual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Hollis, Ralph L.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether force and torque cues interact in haptic discrimination of force, torque and stiffness, and if so, how. The statistical relation between force and torque was manipulated across four experimental conditions: Either one type of cue varied while the other was constant, or both varied so as to be positively correlated, negatively correlated, or uncorrelated. Experiment 1 showed that the subjects’ ability to discriminate force was improved by positively correlated torque but impaired with uncorrelated torque, as compared to the constant torque condition. Corresponding effects were found in Experiment 2 for the influence of force on torque discrimination. These findings indicate that force and torque are integrated in perception, rather than being processed as separate dimensions. A further experiment demonstrated facilitation of stiffness discrimination by correlated force and torque, whether the correlation was positive or negative. The findings suggest new means of augmenting haptic feedback to facilitate perception of the properties of soft objects. PMID:21359137

  17. In-line rotating capacitive torque sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-09-10

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for measuring torques developed along a rotating mechanical assembly comprising a rotating inner portion and a stationary outer portion. The rotating portion has an electrically-conductive flexing section fitted between two coaxial shafts in a configuration which varies radially in accordance with applied torque. The stationary portion comprises a plurality of conductive plates forming a surface concentric with and having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the rotating portion. The capacitance between the outer, nonrotating and inner, rotating portion varies with changes in the radial configuration of the rotating portion. Signal output varies approximately linearly with torque for small torques, nonlinearly for larger torques. The sensor is preferably surrounded by a conductive shell to minimize electrical interference from external sources. 18 figures.

  18. The Spin Torque Lego - from spin torque nano-devices to advanced computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT), predicted in 1996, and first observed around 2000, brought spintronic devices to the realm of active elements. A whole class of new devices, based on the combined effects of STT for writing and Giant Magneto-Resistance or Tunnel Magneto-Resistance for reading has emerged. The second generation of MRAMs, based on spin torque writing : the STT-RAM, is under industrial development and should be out on the market in three years. But spin torque devices are not limited to binary memories. We will rapidly present how the spin torque effect also allows to implement non-linear nano-oscillators, spin-wave emitters, controlled stochastic devices and microwave nano-detectors. What is extremely interesting is that all these functionalities can be obtained using the same materials, the exact same stack, simply by changing the device geometry and its bias conditions. So these different devices can be seen as Lego bricks, each brick with its own functionality. During this talk, I will show how spin torque can be engineered to build new bricks, such as the Spintronic Memristor, an artificial magnetic nano-synapse. I will then give hints on how to assemble these bricks in order to build novel types of computing architectures, with a special focus on neuromorphic circuits. Financial support by the European Research Council Starting Grant NanoBrain (ERC 2010 Stg 259068) is acknowledged.

  19. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  20. History dependence of the EMG-torque relationship.

    PubMed

    Paquin, James; Power, Geoffrey A

    2018-05-28

    The influence of active lengthening (residual force enhancement: RFE) and shortening (force depression: FD) on the electromyography (EMG)-torque relationship was investigated by matching torque and activation at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Sixteen males performed lengthening and shortening contractions of the dorsiflexors over 25° into an isometric steady-state. There was 5% greater torque, with no change in agonist EMG during the RFE condition as compared to the isometric condition. Sub-maximally, in the force enhanced state, there was less agonist EMG during the torque clamp at all intensities relative to isometric, and greater torque during the activation clamps relative to isometric was observed across all intensities except 20% MVC. During the FD state compared to isometric, there was less torque produced during MVC (∼15%) with no change in agonist EMG. Sub-maximally, in the FD state, there was greater agonist EMG during the torque clamp and less torque during the activation clamp relative to the isometric condition across all intensities. The EMG-torque relationship was bilinear for all contraction types but was shifted to the left and right for FD and RFE, respectively as compared with isometric, indicating altered neuromuscular activation strategies in the history-dependent states of RFE and FD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. EMG-Torque Dynamics Change With Contraction Bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Mahsa A; Jalaleddini, Kian; Kearney, Robert E

    2018-04-01

    An accurate model for ElectroMyoGram (EMG)-torque dynamics has many uses. One of its applications which has gained high attention among researchers is its use, in estimating the muscle contraction level for the efficient control of prosthesis. In this paper, the dynamic relationship between the surface EMG and torque during isometric contractions at the human ankle was studied using system identification techniques. Subjects voluntarily modulated their ankle torque in dorsiflexion direction, by activating their tibialis anterior muscle, while tracking a pseudo-random binary sequence in a torque matching task. The effects of contraction bandwidth, described by torque spectrum, on EMG-torque dynamics were evaluated by varying the visual command switching time. Nonparametric impulse response functions (IRF) were estimated between the processed surface EMG and torque. It was demonstrated that: 1) at low contraction bandwidths, the identified IRFs had unphysiological anticipatory (i.e., non-causal) components, whose amplitude decreased as the contraction bandwidth increased. We hypothesized that this non-causal behavior arose, because the EMG input contained a component due to feedback from the output torque, i.e., it was recorded from within a closed-loop. Vision was not the feedback source since the non-causal behavior persisted when visual feedback was removed. Repeating the identification using a nonparametric closed-loop identification algorithm yielded causal IRFs at all bandwidths, supporting this hypothesis. 2) EMG-torque dynamics became faster and the bandwidth of system increased as contraction modulation rate increased. Thus, accurate prediction of torque from EMG signals must take into account the contraction bandwidth sensitivity of this system.

  2. R Dump Converter without DC Link Capacitor for an 8/6 SRM: Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Pasumalaithevan; Umamaheswari, Bhaskaran

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the performance of 8/6 switched reluctance motor (SRM) when excited with sinusoidal voltage. The conventional R dump converter provides DC excitation with the help of capacitor. In this paper the converter used is the modified R dump converter without DC link capacitor providing AC or sinusoidal excitation. Torque ripple and speed ripple are investigated based on hysteresis current control. Constant and sinusoidal current references are considered for comparison in both DC and AC excitation. Extensive theoretical and experimental investigations are made to bring out the merits and demerits of AC versus DC excitation. It is shown that the constructionally simple SRM can be favorably controlled with simple R dump converter with direct AC excitation without need for DC link capacitor. A 4-phase 8/6 0.5 kW SRM is used for experimentation. PMID:25642452

  3. Modelling grain alignment by radiative torques and hydrogen formation torques in reflection nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Reflection nebulae - dense cores - illuminated by surrounding stars offer a unique opportunity to directly test our quantitative model of grain alignment based on radiative torques (RATs) and to explore new effects arising from additional torques. In this paper, we first perform detailed modelling of grain alignment by RATs for the IC 63 reflection nebula illuminated both by a nearby γ Cas star and the diffuse interstellar radiation field. We calculate linear polarization pλ of background stars by radiatively aligned grains and explore the variation of fractional polarization (pλ/AV) with visual extinction AV across the cloud. Our results show that the variation of pV/AV versus AV from the dayside of IC 63 to its centre can be represented by a power law (p_V/A_V∝ A_V^{η }) with different slopes depending on AV. We find a shallow slope η ˜ -0.1 for AV < 3 and a very steep slope η ˜ -2 for AV > 4. We then consider the effects of additional torques due to H2 formation and model grain alignment by joint action of RATs and H2 torques. We find that pV/AV tends to increase with an increasing magnitude of H2 torques. In particular, the theoretical predictions obtained for pV/AV and peak wavelength λmax in this case show an improved agreement with the observational data. Our results reinforce the predictive power of the RAT alignment mechanism in a broad range of environmental conditions and show the effect of pinwheel torques in environments with efficient H2 formation. Physical parameters involved in H2 formation may be constrained using detailed modelling of grain alignment combined with observational data. In addition, we discuss implications of our modelling for interpreting latest observational data by Planck and other ground-based instruments.

  4. Development of a biomechanical energy harvester

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Naing, Veronica; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2009-01-01

    Background Biomechanical energy harvesting–generating electricity from people during daily activities–is a promising alternative to batteries for powering increasingly sophisticated portable devices. We recently developed a wearable knee-mounted energy harvesting device that generated electricity during human walking. In this methods-focused paper, we explain the physiological principles that guided our design process and present a detailed description of our device design with an emphasis on new analyses. Methods Effectively harvesting energy from walking requires a small lightweight device that efficiently converts intermittent, bi-directional, low speed and high torque mechanical power to electricity, and selectively engages power generation to assist muscles in performing negative mechanical work. To achieve this, our device used a one-way clutch to transmit only knee extension motions, a spur gear transmission to amplify the angular speed, a brushless DC rotary magnetic generator to convert the mechanical power into electrical power, a control system to determine when to open and close the power generation circuit based on measurements of knee angle, and a customized orthopaedic knee brace to distribute the device reaction torque over a large leg surface area. Results The device selectively engaged power generation towards the end of swing extension, assisting knee flexor muscles by producing substantial flexion torque (6.4 Nm), and efficiently converted the input mechanical power into electricity (54.6%). Consequently, six subjects walking at 1.5 m/s generated 4.8 ± 0.8 W of electrical power with only a 5.0 ± 21 W increase in metabolic cost. Conclusion Biomechanical energy harvesting is capable of generating substantial amounts of electrical power from walking with little additional user effort making future versions of this technology particularly promising for charging portable medical devices. PMID:19549313

  5. Ironless armature torque motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Four iron-less armature torque motors, four Hall device position sensor assemblies, and two test fixtures were fabricated. The design approach utilized samarium cobalt permanent magnets, a large airgap, and a three-phase winding in a stationary ironless armature. Hall devices were employed to sense rotor position. An ironless armature torque motor having an outer diameter of 4.25 inches was developed to produce a torque constant of 65 ounce-inches per ampere with a resistance of 20.5 ohms. The total weight, including structural elements, was 1.58 pounds. Test results indicated that all specifications were met except for generated voltage waveform. It is recommended that investigations be made concerning the generated voltage waveform to determine if it may be improved.

  6. Viscous Torques on a Levitating Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busse, F.; Wang, T.

    1982-01-01

    New analytical expressions for viscous torque generated by orthogonal sound waves agree well with experiment. It is possible to calculate torque on an object levitated in a fluid. Levitation has applications in containerless materials processing, coating, and fabrication of small precision parts. Sound waves cause fluid particles to move in elliptical paths and induce azimuthal circulation in boundary layer, giving rise to time-averaged torque.

  7. Torque and Learning and Behavior Problems in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zendel, Ivan H.; Pihl, R. O.

    1980-01-01

    Findings indicate minimal differences, on diagnostic tests, between children who exhibited torque and those who did not. Torque is defined as the circling of any X in a clockwise direction. Torque is not associated with learning problems in school. Diagnostic utility of torque should be carefully considered. (Author)

  8. Electromagnetic Torque in Tokamaks with Toroidal Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Nikolas Christopher

    Toroidal rotation and rotation shear strongly influences stability and confinement in tokamaks. Breaking of the toroidal symmetry by fields orders of magnitude smaller than the axisymmetric field can, however, produce electromagnetic torques that significantly affect the plasma rotation, stability and confinement. These electromagnetic torques are the study of this thesis. There are two typical types of electromagnetic torques in tokamaks: 1) "resonant torques" for which a plasma current defined by a single toroidal and single poloidal harmonic interact with external currents and 2) "nonresonant torques" for which the global plasma response to nonaxisymmetric fields is phase shifted by kinetic effects that drive the rotation towards a neoclassical offset. This work describes the diagnostics and analysis necessary to evaluate the torque by measuring the rate of momentum transfer per unit area in the vacuum region between the plasma and external currents using localized magnetic sensors to measure the Maxwell stress. These measurements provide model independent quantification of both the resonant and nonresonant electromagnetic torques, enabling direct verification of theoretical models. Measured values of the nonresonant torque are shown to agree well with the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code calculation of torque from cross field transport in nonaxisymmetric equilibria. A combined neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory, valid across a wide range of kinetic regimes, is fully implemented for the first time in general aspect ratio and shaped plasmas. The code captures pitch angle resonances, reproducing previously inaccessible collisionality limits in the model. The complete treatment of the model enables benchmarking to the hybrid kinetic MHD stability codes MARS-K and MISK, confirming the energy-torque equivalency principle in perturbed equilibria. Experimental validations of PENT results confirm the torque applied by nonaxisymmetric

  9. Balancing Power Absorption and Structural Loading for an Asymmetric Heave Wave-Energy Converter in Regular Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M.; Madhi, Farshad; Yeung, Ronald W.

    2016-06-24

    The aim of this paper is to maximize the power-to-load ratio of the Berkeley Wedge: a one-degree-of-freedom, asymmetrical, energy-capturing, floating breakwater of high performance that is relatively free of viscosity effects. Linear hydrodynamic theory was used to calculate bounds on the expected time-averaged power (TAP) and corresponding surge restraining force, pitch restraining torque, and power take-off (PTO) control force when assuming that the heave motion of the wave energy converter remains sinusoidal. This particular device was documented to be an almost-perfect absorber if one-degree-of-freedom motion is maintained. The success of such or similar future wave energy converter technologies would requiremore » the development of control strategies that can adapt device performance to maximize energy generation in operational conditions while mitigating hydrodynamic loads in extreme waves to reduce the structural mass and overall cost. This paper formulates the optimal control problem to incorporate metrics that provide a measure of the surge restraining force, pitch restraining torque, and PTO control force. The optimizer must now handle an objective function with competing terms in an attempt to maximize power capture while minimizing structural and actuator loads. A penalty weight is placed on the surge restraining force, pitch restraining torque, and PTO actuation force, thereby allowing the control focus to be placed either on power absorption or load mitigation. Thus, in achieving these goals, a per-unit gain in TAP would not lead to a greater per-unit demand in structural strength, hence yielding a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. Demonstrative results in the form of TAP, reactive TAP, and the amplitudes of the surge restraining force, pitch restraining torque, and PTO control force are shown for the Berkeley Wedge example.« less

  10. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification. Verify torque-measurement systems by performing the verifications described in §§ 1066.270 and... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Torque transducer verification. 1066...

  11. Power tong torque control

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, D.A.; James, R.N.

    1987-10-20

    Torque controlled powered pipe tongs, are described the apparatus comprises: (a) a power tong powered by a fluid motor; (b) a fluid power source connected to the motor; (c) a force conducting element attached to the power tong, situated to oppose reaction torque from the tongs when torque is applied to pipe; (d) force sensing means operatively associated with the force conducting element situated to sense at least part of the force experienced by the force conducting element, arranged to produce a pressure signal proportional to force sensed; and (e) a fluid by-pass valve, adjustably biased toward a closed position,more » responsive to the signal to tend to move toward an open position, the by-pass valve connected between the fluid power source and the motor.« less

  12. Knudsen torque on heated micro beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qi; Liang, Tengfei; Ye, Wenjing

    Thermally induced mechanical loading has been shown to have significant effects on micro/nano objects immersed in a gas with a non-uniform temperature field. While the majority of existing studies and related applications focus on forces, we investigate the torque, and thus the rotational motion, produced by such a mechanism. Using the asymptotic analysis in the near continuum regime, the Knudsen torque acting on an asymmetrically located uniformly heated microbeam in a cold enclosure is investigated. The existence of a non-zero net torque is demonstrated. In addition, it has been found that by manipulating the system configuration, the rotational direction ofmore » the torque can be changed. Two types of rotational motion of the microbeam have been identified: the pendulum motion of a rectangular beam, and the unidirectional rotation of a cylindrical beam. A rotational frequency of 4 rpm can be achieved for the cylindrical beam with a diameter of 3μm at Kn = 0.005. Illustrated by the simulations using the direct simulation of Monte Carlo, the Knudsen torque can be much increased in the transition regime, demonstrating the potential of Knudsen torque serving as a rotation engine for micro/nano objects.« less

  13. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  14. Torque equilibrium attitudes for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1993-01-01

    All spacecraft orbiting in a low earth orbit (LEO) experience external torques due to environmental effects. Examples of these torques include those induced by aerodynamic, gravity-gradient, and solar forces. It is the gravity-gradient and aerodynamic torques that produce the greatest disturbances to the attitude of a spacecraft in LEO, and large asymmetric spacecraft, such as the space station, are affected to a greater degree because the magnitude of the torques will, in general, be larger in proportion to the moments of inertia. If left unchecked, these torques would cause the attitude of the space station to oscillate in a complex manner and the resulting motion would destroy the micro-gravity environment as well as prohibit the orbiter from docking. The application of control torques will maintain the proper attitude, but the controllers have limited momentum capacity. When any controller reaches its limit, propellant must then be used while the device is reset to a zero or negatively-biased momentum state. Consequently, the rate at which momentum is accumulated is a significant factor in the amount of propellant used and the frequency of resupply necessary to operate the station. A torque profile in which the area curve for a positive torque is not equal to the area under the curve for a negative torque is 'biased,' and the consequent momentum build-up about that axis is defined as secular momentum because it continues to grow with time. Conversely, when the areas are equal, the momentum is cyclic and bounded. A Torque Equilibrium Attitude (TEA) is thus defined as an attitude at which the external torques 'balance' each other as much as possible, and which will result in lower momentum growth in the controllers. Ideally, the positive and negative external moments experienced by a spacecraft at the TEA would exactly cancel each other out and small cyclic control torques would be required only for precise attitude control. Over time, the only momentum build

  15. Loss of knee extensor torque complexity during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions occurs exclusively above the critical torque.

    PubMed

    Pethick, Jamie; Winter, Samantha L; Burnley, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The complexity of knee extensor torque time series decreases during fatiguing isometric muscle contractions. We hypothesized that because of peripheral fatigue, this loss of torque complexity would occur exclusively during contractions above the critical torque (CT). Nine healthy participants performed isometric knee extension exercise (6 s of contraction, 4 s of rest) on six occasions for 30 min or to task failure, whichever occurred sooner. Four trials were performed above CT (trials S1-S4, S1 being the lowest intensity), and two were performed below CT (at 50% and 90% of CT). Global, central, and peripheral fatigue were quantified using maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with femoral nerve stimulation. The complexity of torque output was determined using approximate entropy (ApEn) and the detrended fluctuation analysis-α scaling exponent (DFA-α). The MVC torque was reduced in trials below CT [by 19 ± 4% (means ± SE) in 90%CT], but complexity did not decrease [ApEn for 90%CT: from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.75 ± 0.06, 95% paired-samples confidence intervals (CIs), 95% CI = -0.23, 0.10; DFA-α from 1.36 ± 0.01 to 1.32 ± 0.03, 95% CI -0.12, 0.04]. Above CT, substantial reductions in MVC torque occurred (of 49 ± 8% in S1), and torque complexity was reduced (ApEn for S1: from 0.67 ± 0.06 to 0.14 ± 0.01, 95% CI = -0.72, -0.33; DFA-α from 1.38 ± 0.03 to 1.58 ± 0.01, 95% CI 0.12, 0.29). Thus, in these experiments, the fatigue-induced loss of torque complexity occurred exclusively during contractions performed above the CT. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Computerized Torque Control for Large dc Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, Richard M.; Carroll, Michael J.; Geiger, Ronald V.

    1987-01-01

    Speed and torque ranges in generator mode extended. System of shunt resistors, electronic switches, and pulse-width modulation controls torque exerted by large, three-phase, electronically commutated dc motor. Particularly useful for motor operating in generator mode because it extends operating range to low torque and high speed.

  17. [Biomechanical testing of the new torque-segmented arch (TSA)].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, A; Sander, F G

    1995-07-01

    New torque-segmented arch wires are presented which consist of a superelastic anterior component with 30 degrees or 45 degrees torque and which are connected to 2 steel lateral components by means of a crimped connector. When using such torque-segmented arch wires, the crimped connector rests mesially to the canine bracket and the lateral components exhibit a torque of 0 degree. The use of the torque-segmented arch wires requires the practitioner to adjust the anterior tooth segment, to bend in first order bends in the steel lateral portion as well as to bend in a sweep to avoid an anterior tooth extrusion, and, if desired, to bend in third order bends to influence premolars and molars. In some cases the simultaneous application of palatal arches can become necessary, because each torque transfer results in a transversal enlargement in the molar area. Compared to conventional steel wires with dimensions of 0.016 x 0.022 in which an anterior tooth torque is bent, the torque segmented arch wires exhibit considerably fewer side effects, but there is a larger distally rotating moment for the molars. 1. When applying torque-segmented arch wires, the extrusive force transferred to the anterior teeth is considerably smaller. 2. The protrusive force acting on the anterior teeth is also considerably smaller, which results in a reduced demand being placed on the anchorage of the molars. 3. The torque transfer to the incisors rests in a quite moderate range, even in the case of a 50 degrees torque. For this reason, the practitioner can expect diminished or no resorptions at all compared to the aforementioned steel wires. 4. The Martensite plateau of the torque-segmented arch wires exhibit constant moments in large areas so that such arch wires can be used in almost every anterior tooth position. 5. The segmented wires presented here can be applied not only in the case of the standard edgewise technique but also in each case of the straight-wire technique. 6. These new arch

  18. Special-Purpose High-Torque Permanent-Magnet Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, George B., III

    1995-01-01

    Permanent-magnet brushless motors that must provide high commanded torques and satisfy unusual heat-removal requirement are developed. Intended for use as thrust-vector-control actuators in large rocket engines. Techniques and concepts used to design improved motors for special terrestrial applications. Conceptual motor design calls for use of rotor containing latest high-energy-product rare-earth permanent magnets so that motor produces required torque while drawing smallest possible currents from power supply. Torque generated by electromagnetic interaction between stator and permanent magnets in rotor when associated electronic circuits applied appropriately temporally and spatially phased currents to stator windings. Phase relationships needed to produce commanded torque computed in response to torque command and to electronically sensed angular position of rotor relative to stator.

  19. Heat-driven spin torques in antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białek, Marcin; Bréchet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Heat-driven magnetization damping, which is a linear function of a temperature gradient, is predicted in antiferromagnets by considering the sublattice dynamics subjected to a heat-driven spin torque. This points to the possibility of achieving spin torque oscillator behavior. The model is based on the magnetic Seebeck effect acting on sublattices which are exchange coupled. The heat-driven spin torque is estimated and the feasibility of detecting this effect is discussed.

  20. Turbine Windage Torque Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    chamber, with a 0-60,000 RPM, 300 HP dynamometer, was selected as the test facility. A rotary transformer ( brushless ) torque sensor, using air /oil... brushless ) of 100 and 500 in-lb torque ranges were selected from Lebow Associates, Inc. of Troy, Michigan. Special air / oil mist lubrication for the...period August 1979 - October 1980 I Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. _ DTIC AERO PROPULSION LABORATORY AIR FORCE WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL

  1. Torque-Summing Brushless Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidya, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Torque channels function cooperatively but electrically independent for reliability. Brushless, electronically-commutated dc motor sums electromagnetic torques on four channels and applies them to single shaft. Motor operates with any combination of channels and continues if one or more of channels fail electrically. Motor employs single stator and rotor and mechanically simple; however, each of channels electrically isolated from other so that failure of one does not adversely affect others.

  2. Accuracy of mechanical torque-limiting devices for dental implants.

    PubMed

    L'Homme-Langlois, Emilie; Yilmaz, Burak; Chien, Hua-Hong; McGlumphy, Edwin

    2015-10-01

    A common complication in implant dentistry is unintentional implant screw loosening. The critical factor in the prevention of screw loosening is the delivery of the appropriate target torque value. Mechanical torque-limiting devices (MTLDs) are the most frequently recommended devices by the implant manufacturers to deliver the target torque value to the screw. Two types of MTLDs are available: friction-style and spring-style. Limited information is available regarding the influence of device type on the accuracy of MTLDs. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the accuracy of spring-style and friction-style MTLDs. Five MTLDs from 6 different dental implant manufacturers (Astra Tech/Dentsply, Zimmer Dental, Biohorizons, Biomet 3i, Straumann [ITI], and Nobel Biocare) (n=5 per manufacturer) were selected to determine their accuracy in delivering target torque values preset by their manufacturers. All torque-limiting devices were new and there were 3 manufacturers for the friction-style and 3 manufacturers for the spring-style. The procedure of target torque measurement was performed 10 times for each device and a digital torque gauge (Chatillon Model DFS2-R-ND; Ametek) was used to record the measurements. Statistical analysis used nonparametric tests to determine the accuracy of the MTLDs in delivering target torque values and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to assess pairwise comparisons. Median absolute difference between delivered torque values and target torque values of friction-style and spring-style MTLDs were not significantly different (P>.05). Accuracy of Astra Tech and Zimmer Dental friction-style torque-limiting devices were significantly different than Biohorizons torque-limiting devices (P<.05). There is no difference between the accuracy of new friction-style MTLDs and new spring-style MTLDs. All MTLDs fell within ±10% of the target torque value. Astra Tech and Zimmer Dental friction-style torque-limiting devices were significantly

  3. Clutch and egg allometry of the turtle Mauremys leprosa (Chelonia: Geoemydidae) from a polluted peri-urban river in west-central Morocco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimi, Mohamed; Znari, Mohammed; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Feddadi, Youssef; Baamrane, Moulay Abdeljalil Ait

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationships of clutch size (CS) and egg size to female body size (straight-line carapace length, CL) in a population of the turtle Mauremys leprosa from a polluted segment of oued (river) Tensift in arid west-central Morocco. Twenty-eight adult females were collected in May–July, 2009 and all were gravid. Each was weighed, measured, humanely euthanized and then dissected. Oviductal shelled eggs were removed, weighed (egg mass, EM) and measured for length (EL) and width (EW). Clutch mass (CM) was the sum of EM for a clutch. Pelvic aperture width (PAW) was measured at the widest point between the ilia bones through which eggs must pass at oviposition. The smallest gravid female had a CL of 124.0 mm. Mean CS was relatively large (9.7±2.0 eggs, range: 3–13) and may reflect high productivity associated with polluted (eutrophic) waters. Regression analyses were conducted using log-transformed data. CM increased isometrically with maternal body size. CS, EW and EM were all significantly hypoallometric in their relationship with CL. EL did not change significantly with increases in CL. EW increased at a hypoallometric rate with increasing CL but was unconstrained by PAW since the widest egg was smaller than the narrowest PAW measurement when excluding the three smallest females. Smaller females may have EW constrained by PAW. As females increase in size they increase both clutch size and egg width in contradiction to predictions of optimal egg size theory.

  4. A self-calibrating multicomponent force/torque measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Rafael R.; Schleichert, Jan; Rahneberg, Ilko; Hilbrunner, Falko; Fröhlich, Thomas

    2018-07-01

    A multicomponent self-calibrating force and torque sensor is presented. In this system, the principle of a Kibble balance is adapted for the traceable force and torque measurement in three orthogonal directions. The system has two operating modes: the velocity mode and the force/torque sensing mode. In the velocity mode, the calibration of the sensor is performed, while in the force/torque sensing mode, forces and torques are measured by using the principle of the electromagnetic force compensation. Details about the system are provided, with the main components of the sensor and a description of the operational procedure. A prototype of the system is currently being implemented for measuring forces and torques in a range of  ±2 N and  ±0.1 N · m respectively. A maximal relative expanded measurement uncertainty (k  =  2) of 1 · 10‑4 is expected for the force and torque measurements.

  5. Displaceable Spur Gear Torque Controlled Driver and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a laterally displaceable gear support member to carry an output spur gear. A biasing assembly biases the output spur gear into engagement with a pinion to which is applied an input torque greater than a desired output torque limit for a threaded fastener such as a nut or screw. A coiled output linkage connects the output spur gear with a fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. A gauged selector mechanism is provided to laterally displace multiple driven members for fasteners arranged in differing configurations. The torque limit is selectably adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  6. Displaceable spur gear torque controlled driver and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a laterally displaceable gear support member to carry an output spur gear. A biasing assembly biases the output spur gear into engagement with a pinion to which is applied an input torque greater than a desired output torque limit for a threaded fastener such as a nut or screw. A coiled output linkage connects the output spur gear with a fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. A gauged selector mechanism is provided to laterally displace multiple driver members for fasteners arranged in differing configurations. The torque limit is selectably adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  7. Multigenerational response to artificial selection for biased clutch sex ratios in Tigriopus californicus populations.

    PubMed

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Anholt, B R

    2014-09-01

    Polygenic sex determination (PSD) is relatively rare and theoretically evolutionary unstable, yet has been reported across a range of taxa. Evidence for multilocus PSD is provided by (i) large between-family variance in sex ratio, (ii) paternal and maternal effects on family sex ratio and (iii) response to selection for family sex ratio. This study tests the polygenic hypothesis of sex determination in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus using the criterion of response to selection. We report the first multigenerational quantitative evidence that clutch sex ratio responds to artificial selection in both directions (selection for male- and female-biased families) and in multiple populations of T. californicus. In the five of six lines that showed a response to selection, realized heritability estimated by multigenerational analysis ranged from 0.24 to 0.58. Divergence of clutch sex ratio between selection lines is rapid, with response to selection detectable within the first four generations of selection. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  8. Torque shudder protection device and method

    DOEpatents

    King, Robert D.; De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.; Szczesny, Paul M.

    1997-01-01

    A torque shudder protection device for an induction machine includes a flux command generator for supplying a steady state flux command and a torque shudder detector for supplying a status including a negative status to indicate a lack of torque shudder and a positive status to indicate a presence of torque shudder. A flux adapter uses the steady state flux command and the status to supply a present flux command identical to the steady state flux command for a negative status and different from the steady state flux command for a positive status. A limiter can receive the present flux command, prevent the present flux command from exceeding a predetermined maximum flux command magnitude, and supply the present flux command to a field oriented controller. After determining a critical electrical excitation frequency at which a torque shudder occurs for the induction machine, a flux adjuster can monitor the electrical excitation frequency of the induction machine and adjust a flux command to prevent the monitored electrical excitation frequency from reaching the critical electrical excitation frequency.

  9. Torque shudder protection device and method

    DOEpatents

    King, R.D.; Doncker, R.W.A.A. De.; Szczesny, P.M.

    1997-03-11

    A torque shudder protection device for an induction machine includes a flux command generator for supplying a steady state flux command and a torque shudder detector for supplying a status including a negative status to indicate a lack of torque shudder and a positive status to indicate a presence of torque shudder. A flux adapter uses the steady state flux command and the status to supply a present flux command identical to the steady state flux command for a negative status and different from the steady state flux command for a positive status. A limiter can receive the present flux command, prevent the present flux command from exceeding a predetermined maximum flux command magnitude, and supply the present flux command to a field oriented controller. After determining a critical electrical excitation frequency at which a torque shudder occurs for the induction machine, a flux adjuster can monitor the electrical excitation frequency of the induction machine and adjust a flux command to prevent the monitored electrical excitation frequency from reaching the critical electrical excitation frequency. 5 figs.

  10. Forearm Torque and Lifting Strength: Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Peter; Fredrikson, Per; Nilsson, Anders; Andersson, Jonny K; Kärrholm, Johan

    2018-02-10

    To establish reference values for new methods designed to quantitatively measure forearm torque and lifting strength and to compare these values with grip strength. A total of 499 volunteers, 262 males and 237 females, aged 15 to 85 (mean, 44) years, were tested for lifting strength and forearm torque with the Kern and Baseline dynamometers. These individuals were also tested for grip strength with a Jamar dynamometer. Standardized procedures were used and information about sex, height, weight, hand dominance, and whether their work involved high or low manual strain was collected. Men had approximately 70% higher forearm torque and lifting strength compared with females. Male subjects aged 26 to 35 years and female subjects aged 36 to 45 years showed highest strength values. In patients with dominant right side, 61% to 78% had a higher or equal strength on this side in the different tests performed. In patients with dominant left side, the corresponding proportions varied between 41% and 65%. There was a high correlation between grip strength and forearm torque and lifting strength. Sex, body height, body weight, and age showed a significant correlation to the strength measurements. In a multiple regression model sex, age (entered as linear and squared) could explain 51% to 63% of the total variances of forearm torque strength and 30% to 36% of lifting strength. Reference values for lifting strength and forearm torque to be used in clinical practice were acquired. Grip strength has a high correlation to forearm torque and lifting strength. Sex, age, and height can be used to predict forearm torque and lifting strength. Prediction equations using these variables were generated. Normative data of forearm torque and lifting strength might improve the quality of assessment of wrist and forearm disorders as well as their treatments. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Accuracy of torque-limiting devices: A comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Haydar; Gumus, Hasan Onder; Tursun, Funda; Kocaagaoglu, Hasan Huseyin; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    To prevent the loosening of implant screws, clinicians should be aware of the output torque values needed to achieve the desired preload. Accurate torque-control devices are crucial in this regard; however, little information is currently available comparing the accuracy of mechanical with that of electronic torque-control devices. The purpose of this in vitro study was to identify and compare the accuracy of different types of torque-control devices. Devices from 5 different dental implant manufacturers were evaluated, including 2 spring-type (Straumann, Implance) mechanical devices (MTLD), 2 friction-type (Biohorizons, Dyna) MTLDs, and 1 (Megagen) electronic torque-control device (ETLD). For each manufacturer, 5 devices were tested 5 times with a digital torque tester, and the average for each device was calculated and recorded. The percentage of absolute deviations from the target torque values (PERDEV) were calculated and compared by using 1-way ANOVA. A 1-sample t test was used to evaluate the ability of each device to achieve its target torque value within a 95% confidence interval for the true population mean of measured values (α=.05 for all statistical analyses). One-way ANOVAs revealed statistically significant differences among torque-control devices (P<.001). ETLD showed higher PERDEVs (28.33 ±9.53) than MTLDs (P<.05), whereas PERDEVS of friction-type (7.56 ±3.64) and spring-type (10.85 ±4.11) MTLDs did not differ significantly. In addition, devices produced by Megagen had a significantly higher (P<.05) PERDEV (28.33 ±9.53) other devices, whereas no differences were found in devices manufactured by Biohorizons (7.31 ±5.34), Dyna (7.82 ±1.08), Implance (8.43 ±4.77), and Straumann (13.26 ±0.79). However, 1-sample t tests showed none of the torque-control devices evaluated in this study were capable of achieving their target torque values (P<.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, MTLDs were shown to be significantly more accurate

  12. Neutron star dynamics under time dependent external torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, M. A.; Gügercinoğlu, E.

    2017-12-01

    The two component model of neutron star dynamics describing the behaviour of the observed crust coupled to the superfluid interior has so far been applied to radio pulsars for which the external torques are constant on dynamical timescales. We recently solved this problem under arbitrary time dependent external torques. Our solutions pertain to internal torques that are linear in the rotation rates, as well as to the extremely non-linear internal torques of the vortex creep model. Two-component models with linear or nonlinear internal torques can now be applied to magnetars and to neutron stars in binary systems, with strong variability and timing noise. Time dependent external torques can be obtained from the observed spin-down (or spin-up) time series, \\dot Ω ≤ft( t \\right).

  13. Calculation of the magnetic field in the active zone of a hysteresis clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ermilov, M. A.; Glukhov, O. M.

    1977-01-01

    The initial distribution of magnetic induction in the armature stationary was calculated relative to the polar system of a hysteresis clutch. Using several assumptions, the problem is reduced to calculating the static magnetic field in the ferromagnetic plate with finite and continuous magnetic permeability placed in the air gap between two identical, parallel semiconductors with rack fixed relative to the tooth or slot position.

  14. The near-term hybrid vehicle program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Performance specifications were determined for a hybrid vehicle designed to achieve the greatest reduction in fuel consumption. Based on the results of systems level studies, a baseline vehicle was constructed with the following basic paramaters: a heat engine power peak of 53 kW (VW gasoline engine); a traction motor power peak of 30 kW (Siemens 1GV1, separately excited); a heat engine fraction of 0.64; a vehicle curb weight of 2080 kg; a lead acid battery (35 kg weight); and a battery weight fraction of 0.17. The heat engine and the traction motor are coupled together with their combined output driving a 3 speed automatic transmission with lockup torque converter. The heat engine is equipped withe a clutch which allows it to be decoupled from the system.

  15. Enhanced precision of ankle torque measure with an open-unit dynamometer mounted with a 3D force-torque sensor.

    PubMed

    Toumi, A; Leteneur, S; Gillet, C; Debril, J-F; Decoufour, N; Barbier, F; Jakobi, J M; Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie

    2015-11-01

    Many studies have focused on maximum torque exerted by ankle joint muscles during plantar flexion. While strength parameters are typically measured with isokinetic or isolated ankle dynamometers, these devices often present substantial limitations for the measurement of torque because they account for force in only 1 dimension (1D), and the device often constrains the body in a position that augments torque through counter movements. The purposes of this study were to determine the contribution of body position to ankle plantar-flexion torque and to assess the use of 1D and 3D torque sensors. A custom designed 'Booted, Open-Unit, Three dimension, Transportable, Ergometer' (B.O.T.T.E.) was used to quantify plantar flexion in two conditions: (1) when the participant was restrained within the unit (locked-unit) and (2) when the participant's position was independent of the ankle dynamometer (open-unit). Ten young males performed maximal voluntary isometric plantar-flexion contractions using the B.O.T.T.E. in open and locked-unit mechanical configurations. The B.O.T.T.E. was reliable with ICC higher than 0.90, and CV lower than 7 %. The plantar-flexion maximal resultant torque was significantly higher in the locked-unit compared with open-unit configuration (P < 0.001; +61 to +157 %) due to the addition of forces from the body being constrained within the testing device. A 1D compared with 3D torque sensor significantly underestimated the proper capacity of plantar-flexion torque production (P < 0.001; -37 to -60 %). Assessment of plantar-flexion torque should be performed with an open-unit dynamometer mounted with a 3D sensor that is exclusive of accessory muscles but inclusive of all ankle joint movements.

  16. Automated manual transmission clutch controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Jr., Richard G.; Rausen, David J.

    1999-11-30

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  17. Torque Sensor Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso; Young, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A proposed torque sensor would be capable of operating over the temperature range from 1 to 400 K, whereas a typical commercially available torque sensor is limited to the narrower temperature range of 244 to 338 K. The design of this sensor would exploit the wide temperature range and other desirable attributes of differential transducers based on tunnel-diode oscillators as described in "Multiplexing Transducers Based on Tunnel-Diode Oscillators". The proposed torque sensor would include three flexural springs that would couple torque between a hollow outer drive shaft and a solid inner drive shaft. The torque would be deduced from the torsional relative deflection of the two shafts, which would be sensed via changes in capacitances of two capacitors defined by two electrodes attached to the inner shaft and a common middle electrode attached to the outer shaft.

  18. Torque Splitting by a Concentric Face Gear Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filler, Robert R.; Heath, Gregory F.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Lewicki, David G.

    2002-01-01

    Tests of a 167 Kilowatt (224 Horsepower) split torque face gearbox were performed by the Boeing Company in Mesa, Arizona, while working under a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program (TRP). This paper provides a summary of these cooperative tests, which were jointly funded by Boeing and DARPA. Design, manufacture and testing of the scaled-power TRP proof-of-concept (POC) split torque gearbox followed preliminary evaluations of the concept performed early in the program. The split torque tests were run using 200 N-m (1767 in-lbs) torque input to each side of the transmission. During tests, two input pinions were slow rolled while in mesh with the two face gears. Two idler gears were also used in the configuration to recombine torque near the output. Resistance was applied at the output face gear to create the required loading conditions in the gear teeth. A system of weights, pulleys and cables were used in the test rig to provide both the input and output loading. Strain gages applied in the tooth root fillets provided strain indication used to determine torque splitting conditions at the input pinions. The final two pinion-two idler tests indicated 52% to 48% average torque split capabilities for the two pinions. During the same tests, a 57% to 43% average distribution of the torque being recombined to the upper face gear from the lower face gear was measured between the two idlers. The POC split torque tests demonstrated that face gears can be applied effectively in split torque rotorcraft transmissions, yielding good potential for significant weight, cost and reliability improvements over existing equipment using spiral bevel gearing.

  19. Methodology for Determining Limit Torques for Threaded Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hissam, Andy

    2011-01-01

    In aerospace design, where minimizing weight is always a priority, achieving the full capacity from fasteners is essential. To do so, the initial bolt preload must be maximized. The benefits of high preload are well documented and include improved fatigue resistance, a stiffer joint, and resistance to loosening. But many factors like elastic interactions and embedment tend to lower the initial preload placed on the bolt. These factors provide additional motivation to maximize the initial preload. But, to maximize bolt preload, you must determine what torque to apply. Determining this torque is greatly complicated by the large preload scatter generally seen with torque control. This paper presents a detailed methodology for generating limit torques for threaded fasteners. This methodology accounts for the large scatter in preload found with torque control, and therefore, addresses the statistical nature of the problem. It also addresses prevailing torque, a feature common in aerospace fasteners. Although prevailing torque provides a desired locking feature, it can also increase preload scatter. In addition, it can limit the amount of preload that can be generated due to the torsion it creates in the bolt. This paper discusses the complications of prevailing torque and how best to handle it. A wide range of torque-tension bolt testing was conducted in support of this research. The results from this research will benefit the design engineer as well as analyst involved in the design of bolted joints, leading to better, more optimized structural designs.

  20. Detecting Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhujing; Li, Tongcang

    2017-09-01

    The linear momentum and angular momentum of virtual photons of quantum vacuum fluctuations can induce the Casimir force and the Casimir torque, respectively. While the Casimir force has been measured extensively, the Casimir torque has not been observed experimentally though it was predicted over 40 years ago. Here we propose to detect the Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod near a birefringent plate in vacuum. The axis of the nanorod tends to align with the polarization direction of the linearly polarized optical tweezer. When its axis is not parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal, it will experience a Casimir torque that shifts its orientation slightly. We calculate the Casimir torque and Casimir force acting on a levitated nanorod near a birefringent crystal. We also investigate the effects of thermal noise and photon recoils on the torque and force detection. We prove that a levitated nanorod in vacuum will be capable of detecting the Casimir torque under realistic conditions, and will be an important tool in precision measurements.

  1. Measurement of torque during mandibular distraction.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Fernando D; Lukas, Saylan; Forsthoffer, Dina

    2008-05-01

    In a prospective study, 26 patients aged 9 days to 12 years old underwent mandibular distraction. There were 18 bilateral and 8 unilateral distractions performed. Five patients had previous distraction. Torque measurements were performed during the distraction process. A modest linear increase in torque was noted during the distraction process. Older patients required more torque to achieve the same distraction length as younger patients. The results of this study suggest that distraction forces are relatively modest, which may allow for greater freedom of distractor design.

  2. Balancing Power Absorption and Fatigue Loads in Irregular Waves for an Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Wright, Alan D.

    The aim of this paper is to describe how to control the power-to-load ratio of a novel wave energy converter (WEC) in irregular waves. The novel WEC that is being developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory combines an oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) with control surfaces as part of the structure; however, this work only considers one fixed geometric configuration. This work extends the optimal control problem so as to not solely maximize the time-averaged power, but to also consider the power-take-off (PTO) torque and foundation forces that arise because of WEC motion. The objective function of themore » controller will include competing terms that force the controller to balance power capture with structural loading. Separate penalty weights were placed on the surge-foundation force and PTO torque magnitude, which allows the controller to be tuned to emphasize either power absorption or load shedding. Results of this study found that, with proper selection of penalty weights, gains in time-averaged power would exceed the gains in structural loading while minimizing the reactive power requirement.« less

  3. Eccentric knee flexor torque following anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

    PubMed

    Osternig, L R; James, C R; Bercades, D T

    1996-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare eccentric knee flexor torque and muscle activation in the limbs of normal (NOR) subjects and in subjects who had undergone unilateral ACI, autograft surgical reconstruction (INJ) and to assess the effect of movement speed on EMG/ torque ratios and eccentric-concentric actions. Fourteen subjects (7 NOR and 7 INJ) were tested for knee eccentric flexor torque and EMG activity at four isokinetic speeds (15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees and 60 degrees.s-1). Results revealed that post-surgical limbs (ACL) produced significantly less (P < 0.05) eccentric torque and flexor EMG activity at 60 degrees.s-1 than uninjured (UNI) contralateral limbs. Eccentric torque rose significantly as speed increased from 45 degrees to 60 degrees.s-1 for surgical group uninjured limbs and NOR group left and right limbs. Eccentric flexor torque increased with speed for both groups and approximated equality with concentric extensor torque at 60 degrees.s-1 for INJ group ACL and UNI limbs. Concentric flexor muscle EMG/torque ratios were 30-191% greater than eccentric muscle actions across groups and speeds. The results suggest that ACL dysfunction may result in reduced eccentric flexor torque at rapid movement speeds, that eccentric flexor torque increases with movement speed and may have the capacity to counter forceful extensor concentric torque, and that eccentric muscle actions produce less muscle activation per unit force than concentric actions which may reflect reduced energy cost.

  4. Extraneous torque and compensation control on the electric load simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Zongxia; Li, Chenggong; Ren, Zhiting

    2003-09-01

    In this paper a novel motor-drive load simulator based on compensation control strategy is proposed and designed. Through analyzing the torque control system consisting of DC torque motor, PWM module and torque sensor, it is shown that performance of the motor-drive load simulator is possible to be as good as that of the electro-hydraulic load simulator in the range of small torque. In the course of loading, the rotation of the actuator would cause a strong disturbance torque through the motor back-EMF, which produces extraneous torque similar as in electro-hydraulic load simulator. This paper analyzes the cause of extraneous torque inside the torque motor in detail and presents an appropriate compensation control with which the extraneous torque can be compensated and the good performance of the torque control system can be obtained. The results of simulation indicate that the compensation is very effective and the track performance is according with the request.

  5. Temperature dependence of spin-orbit torques in Cu-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yan; Wu, Jun; Li, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuelei; Manchon, Aurelien; Xiao, John Q.; Zhang, Xixiang

    2017-03-01

    We investigated current driven spin-orbit torques in C u40A u60/N i80F e20/Ti layered structures with in-plane magnetization. We have demonstrated a reliable and convenient method to separate dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque by using the second harmonic technique. It is found that the dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque depend on temperature very differently. Dampinglike torque increases with temperature, while fieldlike torque decreases with temperature, which are different from results obtained previously in other material systems. We observed a nearly linear dependence between the spin Hall angle and longitudinal resistivity, suggesting that skew scattering may be the dominant mechanism of spin-orbit torques.

  6. Atmospheric Gravitational Torque Variations Based on Various Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Rowlands, David; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advancements in the study of the Earth's variable rate of rotation and the motion of its rotation axis have given impetus to the analysis of the torques between the atmosphere, oceans and solid Earth. The output from global general circulation models of the atmosphere (pressure, surface stress) is being used as input to the torque computations. Gravitational torque between the atmosphere, oceans and solid Earth is an important component of the torque budget. Computation of the gravitational torque involves the adoption of a gravitational model from a wide variety available. The purpose of this investigation is to ascertain to what extent this choice might influence the results of gravitational torque computations.

  7. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    SciTech Connect

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.

    We present that most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show howmore » ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.« less

  8. Perspective: Interface generation of spin-orbit torques

    DOE PAGES

    Sklenar, Joseph; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; ...

    2016-11-14

    We present that most of the modern spintronics developments rely on the manipulation of magnetization states via electric currents, which started with the discovery of spin transfer torque effects 20 years ago. By now, it has been realized that spin-orbit coupling provides a particularly efficient pathway for generating spin torques from charge currents. At the same time, spin-orbit effects can be enhanced at interfaces, which opens up novel device concepts. Here, we discuss two examples of such interfacial spin-orbit torques, namely, systems with inherently two-dimensional materials and metallic bilayers with strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling at their interfaces. We show howmore » ferromagnetic resonance excited by spin-orbit torques can provide information about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, this article provides a brief overview of recent developments with respect to interfacial spin-orbit torques and an outlook of still open questions.« less

  9. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  10. Torquing preload in a lubricated bolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. L.

    1978-01-01

    The tension preload obtained by torquing a 7/8 in. diam UNC high strength bolt was determined for lubricated and dry conditions. Consistent preload with a variation of + or - 3% was obtained when the bolt head area was lubricated prior to each torque application. Preload tensions nearly 70% greater than the value predicted with the commonly used formula occurred with the lubricated bolt. A reduction to 39% of the initial preload was observed during 50 torque applications without relubrication. Little evidence of wear was noted after 203 cycles of tightening.

  11. Neutron star dynamics under time-dependent external torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gügercinoǧlu, Erbil; Alpar, M. Ali

    2017-11-01

    The two-component model describes neutron star dynamics incorporating the response of the superfluid interior. Conventional solutions and applications involve constant external torques, as appropriate for radio pulsars on dynamical time-scales. We present the general solution of two-component dynamics under arbitrary time-dependent external torques, with internal torques that are linear in the rotation rates, or with the extremely non-linear internal torques due to vortex creep. The two-component model incorporating the response of linear or non-linear internal torques can now be applied not only to radio pulsars but also to magnetars and to neutron stars in binary systems, with strong observed variability and noise in the spin-down or spin-up rates. Our results allow the extraction of the time-dependent external torques from the observed spin-down (or spin-up) time series, \\dot{Ω }(t). Applications are discussed.

  12. A reactive torque control law for gyroscopically controlled space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method of control is developed based on the reactive torques as seen by the individual CMG gimbals. The application of a torque to the gimbal of a CMG rotates the momentum vector and applies a torque to the spacecraft according to well-known laws. The response (rotation) of the vehicle produces a reverse or reaction torque opposing the torque producing the gimbal movement. The reactive torque and the pseudoinverse control schemes are contrasted in order to point out the simplicity of the first method. Simulation was performed only to the extent necessary to prove that reactive torque stabilization and control is feasible.

  13. Does polyandry really pay off? The effects of multiple mating and number of fathers on morphological traits and survival in clutches of nesting green turtles at Tortuguero.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Núñez, Alonzo; Jensen, Michael P; Abreu-Grobois, F Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Despite the long debate of whether or not multiple mating benefits the offspring, studies still show contradictory results. Multiple mating takes time and energy. Thus, if females fertilize their eggs with a single mating, why to mate more than once? We investigated and inferred paternal identity and number of sires in 12 clutches (240 hatchlings) of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nests at Tortuguero, Costa Rica. Paternal alleles were inferred through comparison of maternal and hatchling genotypes, and indicated multiple paternity in at least 11 of the clutches (92%). The inferred average number of fathers was three (ranging from 1 to 5). Moreover, regression analyses were used to investigate for correlation of inferred clutch paternity with morphological traits of hatchlings fitness (emergence success, length, weight and crawling speed), the size of the mother, and an environmental variable (incubation temperature). We suggest and propose two different comparative approaches for evaluating morphological traits and clutch paternity, in order to infer greater offspring survival. First, clutches coded by the exact number of fathers and second by the exact paternal contribution (fathers who gives greater proportion of the offspring per nest). We found significant differences (P < 0.05) in clutches coded by the exact number of fathers for all morphological traits. A general tendency of higher values in offspring sired by two to three fathers was observed for the length and weight traits. However, emergence success and crawling speed showed different trends which unable us to reach any further conclusion. The second approach analysing the paternal contribution showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) for any of the traits. We conclude that multiple paternity does not provide any extra benefit in the morphological fitness traits or the survival of the offspring, when analysed following the proposed comparative statistical methods.

  14. The convertible engine: A dual-mode propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.

    1988-01-01

    A variable inlet guide vane (VIGV) convertible engine that could be used to power future high-speed rotorcraft was tested on an outdoor stand. The engine ran stably and smoothly in the turbofan, turboshaft, and dual (combined fan and shaft) power modes. In the turbofan mode with the VIGV open, fuel consumption was comparable to that of a conventional turbofan engine. In the turboshaft mode with the VIGV closed, fuel consumption was higher than that of present turboshaft engines because power was wasted in churning fan-tip air flow. In dynamic performance tests with a specially built digital engine control and using a waterbrake dynamometer for shaft load, the engine responded effectively to large steps in thrust command and shaft torque. Previous mission analyses of a conceptual X-wing rotorcraft capable of 400-knot cruise speed were revised to account for more fan-tip churning power loss that was originally estimated. The calculations confirm that using convertible engines rather than separate life and cruise engines would result in a smaller, lighter craft with lower fuel use and direct operating cost.

  15. Torque control for electric motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  16. Expanding torque possibilities: A skeletally anchored torqued cantilever for uprighting "kissing molars".

    PubMed

    Barros, Sérgio Estelita; Janson, Guilherme; Chiqueto, Kelly; Ferreira, Eduardo; Rösing, Cassiano

    2018-04-01

    Several uprighting mechanics and devices have been used for repositioning tipped molars. "Kissing molars" (KMs) are an uncommon tooth impaction involving 2 severely tipped mandibular molars with their occlusal surfaces positioned crown to crown, with the roots pointing in opposite directions. Orthodontic uprighting of KMs has not been a usual treatment protocol, and it can be a challenging task due to the severe tipping and double impaction, requiring efficient and well-controlled uprighting mechanics. An innovative skeletally anchored cantilever, which uses the torque principle for uprighting tipped molars, is suggested. This torqued cantilever is easy to manufacture, install, and activate; it is a well-known torque that is effective for producing root movement. A successful treatment of symptomatic KMs, involving the first and second molars, was achieved with this cantilever. Thus, clinicians should consider the suggested uprighting mechanics and orthodontic device as a more conservative alternative to extraction of KMs, depending on the patient's age, involved teeth in KMs, tipping severity, and impaction positions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bevel gear driver and method having torque limit selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention comprises a torque drive mechanism utilizing axially translatable, mutually engageable transmission members having mating crown gears, driven and driving members with a three-element drive train being biased together by resilient means or by a fluid actuator system, the apparatus being operable to transmit a precisely controlled degree of torque to a driven member. The apparatus is applicable for use in hand tools and as a replacement for impact torque drivers, torque wrenches, motorized screw drivers, or the like, wherein the applied torque must be precisely controlled or limited. The bevel torque drive includes a drive gear which is axially displaceable and rotatable within cylindrical driver housing, a rotatable intermediate gear, and an output gear. Key rotationally secures displaceable gear with respect to input shaft but permits axial movement therebetween. A thrust bearing is preferably connected to the lower end of shaft for support to reduce play and friction between shaft and a transmission joint disc during rotation of the gear train. Coaxially mounted coiled spring is footed against displaceable gear for biasing the displaceable gear toward and into engagement with the intermediate gear for driving intermediate gear and output gear. Torque control is achieved by the use of straight or spiral beveled gears which are of configurations adapted to withdraw from mutual engagement upon the torque exceeding a predetermined limit. The novel, advantageous features of the invention include the configuration of the mating, crown gear sets and the axially translatable, slidable drive gear. The mechanism is capable of transmitting a high degree of torque within a narrow, compact transmission housing. The compact size and narrow, elongated configuration of the housing is particularly applicable for use in hand tools and in multiple torque driver mechanisms in which it is necessary to drive multiple fasteners which are located in close proximity. Prior

  18. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed apparatus produces constant tension in superconducting electrical cable, or some other strand, under conditions of intermittent demand, as the cable is unreeled from a reel or reeled thereon. The apparatus comprises a pivotally supported swing frame on which the reel is rotatably supported, a rotary motor, a drive train connected between the motor and the reel and including an electrically controllable variable torque slip clutch, a servo transducer connected to the swing frame for producing servo input signals corresponding to the position thereof, a servo control system connected between the transducer and the clutch for regulating the torque transmitted by the clutch to maintain the swing frame in a predetermined position, at least one air cylinder connected to the swing frame for counteracting the tension in the cable, and pressure regulating means for supplying a constant air pressure to the cylinder to establish the constant tension in the cable, the servo system and the clutch being effective to produce torque on the reel in an amount sufficient to provide tension in the cable corresponding to the constant force exerted by the air cylinder. The drive train also preferably includes a fail-safe brake operable to its released position by electrical power in common with the servo system, for preventing rotation of the reel if there is a power failure. A shock absorber and biasing springs may also be connected to the swing frame, such springs biasing the frame toward its predetermined position. The tension in the cable may be measured by force measuring devices engageable with the bearings for the reel shaft, such bearings being supported for slight lateral movement. The reel shaft is driven by a Shmidt coupler which accommodates such movement.

  19. Active motion assisted by correlated stochastic torques.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hänggi, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The stochastic dynamics of an active particle undergoing a constant speed and additionally driven by an overall fluctuating torque is investigated. The random torque forces are expressed by a stochastic differential equation for the angular dynamics of the particle determining the orientation of motion. In addition to a constant torque, the particle is supplemented by random torques, which are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τ(c). These nonvanishing correlations cause a persistence of the particles' trajectories and a change of the effective spatial diffusion coefficient. We discuss the mean square displacement as a function of the correlation time and the noise intensity and detect a nonmonotonic dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to both correlation time and noise strength. A maximal diffusion behavior is obtained if the correlated angular noise straightens the curved trajectories, interrupted by small pirouettes, whereby the correlated noise amplifies a straightening of the curved trajectories caused by the constant torque.

  20. Torque Measurement at the Single Molecule Level

    PubMed Central

    Forth, Scott; Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Inman, James; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for exerting and measuring forces on single molecules have revolutionized the study of the physics of biology. However, it is often the case that biological processes involve rotation or torque generation, and these parameters have been more difficult to access experimentally. Recent advances in the single molecule field have led to the development of techniques which add the capability of torque measurement. By combining force, displacement, torque, and rotational data, a more comprehensive description of the mechanics of a biomolecule can be achieved. In this review, we highlight a number of biological processes for which torque plays a key mechanical role. We describe the various techniques that have been developed to directly probe the torque experienced by a single molecule, and detail a variety of measurements made to date using these new technologies. We conclude by discussing a number of open questions and propose systems of study which would be well suited for analysis with torsional measurement techniques. PMID:23541162

  1. Torque measurement at the single-molecule level.

    PubMed

    Forth, Scott; Sheinin, Maxim Y; Inman, James; Wang, Michelle D

    2013-01-01

    Methods for exerting and measuring forces on single molecules have revolutionized the study of the physics of biology. However, it is often the case that biological processes involve rotation or torque generation, and these parameters have been more difficult to access experimentally. Recent advances in the single-molecule field have led to the development of techniques that add the capability of torque measurement. By combining force, displacement, torque, and rotational data, a more comprehensive description of the mechanics of a biomolecule can be achieved. In this review, we highlight a number of biological processes for which torque plays a key mechanical role. We describe the various techniques that have been developed to directly probe the torque experienced by a single molecule, and detail a variety of measurements made to date using these new technologies. We conclude by discussing a number of open questions and propose systems of study that would be well suited for analysis with torsional measurement techniques.

  2. Accuracy of electronic implant torque controllers following time in clinical service.

    PubMed

    Mitrani, R; Nicholls, J I; Phillips, K M; Ma, T

    2001-01-01

    Tightening of the screws in implant-supported restorations has been reported to be problematic, in that if the applied torque is too low, screw loosening occurs. If the torque is too high, then screw fracture can take place. Thus, accuracy of the torque driver is of the utmost importance. This study evaluated 4 new electronic torque drivers (controls) and 10 test electronic torque drivers, which had been in clinical service for a minimum of 5 years. Torque values of the test drivers were measured and were compared with the control values using a 1-way analysis of variance. Torque delivery accuracy was measured using a technique that simulated the clinical situation. In vivo, the torque driver turns the screw until the selected tightening torque is reached. In this laboratory experiment, an implant, along with an attached abutment and abutment gold screw, was held firmly in a Tohnichi torque gauge. Calibration accuracy for the Tohnichi is +/- 3% of the scale value. During torque measurement, the gold screw turned a minimum of 180 degrees before contact was made between the screw and abutment. Three torque values (10, 20, and 32 N-cm) were evaluated, at both high- and low-speed settings. The recorded torque measurements indicated that the 10 test electronic torque drivers maintained a torque delivery accuracy equivalent to the 4 new (unused) units. Judging from the torque output values obtained from the 10 test units, the clinical use of the electronic torque driver suggests that accuracy did not change significantly over the 5-year period of clinical service.

  3. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Seung; Go, Dongwook; Manchon, Aurélien; Haney, Paul M.; Stiles, M. D.; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-04-01

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  4. Magnetic Torque in Single Crystal Ni-Mn-Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobza, Anthony; Müllner, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys deform in an external magnetic field in two distinct ways: by axial straining—known as magnetic-field-induced strain—and by bending when exposed to torque. Here, we examine the magnetic torque that a magnetic field exerts on a long Ni-Mn-Ga rod. A single crystal specimen of Ni-Mn-Ga was constrained with respect to bending and subjected to an external magnetic field. The torque required to rotate the specimen in the field was measured as a function of the orientation of the sample with the external magnetic field, strain, and the magnitude of the external magnetic field. The torque was analyzed based on the changes in the free energy with the angle between the field and the sample. The contributions of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy to the Zeeman energy determine the net torque. The torque is large when magneotcrystalline and shape anisotropies act synergistically and small when these anisotropies act antagonistically.

  5. Intrinsic domain wall flexing from current-induced spin torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth; Flatté, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport in domain walls [1] is a major component in the development of spintronic devices [2]. We model spin torque in N'eel walls [3] using a piecewise linear transfer-matrix method [4] to calculate spin torque on interior wall segments. For a π wall with a total positive torque (current left-to-right), we find the largest positive and negative spin torques left of the central region, 4-5 orders of magnitude larger than the center. The wall's rightward push comes from the back of the wall; all other significant regions pull to the left. Adding a second wall (both walls with positive total torque) changes the first wall little, but produces spin torques in the second wall with large canceling torques on the left, and the push rightward from a smaller torque on the right. The gradient of torque across the wall generates an intrinsic domain wall flexing (distinct from extrinsic wall flexing from pinning centers [5]). Work supported by an ARO MURI.[4pt] [1] M. Yamanouchi et al., Nature 428, 539 (2004).[0pt] [2] S. Parkin et al., Science 320, 190 (2008)[0pt] [3] G. Vignale and M. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 098302 (2002)[0pt] [4] E. Golovatski and M. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. B, 84, 115210 (2011)[0pt] [5] A. Balk et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 077205 (2011).

  6. Balancing Power Absorption and Fatigue Loads in Irregular Waves for an Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Wright, Alan D.

    The aim of this paper is to describe how to control the power-to-load ratio of a novel wave energy converter (WEC) in irregular waves. The novel WEC that is being developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory combines an oscillating surge wave energy converter (OSWEC) with control surfaces as part of the structure; however, this work only considers one fixed geometric configuration. This work extends the optimal control problem so as to not solely maximize the time-averaged power, but to also consider the power-take-off (PTO) torque and foundation forces that arise because of WEC motion. The objective function of themore » controller will include competing terms that force the controller to balance power capture with structural loading. Separate penalty weights were placed on the surge-foundation force and PTO torque magnitude, which allows the controller to be tuned to emphasize either power absorption or load shedding. Results of this study found that, with proper selection of penalty weights, gains in time-averaged power would exceed the gains in structural loading while minimizing the reactive power requirement.« less

  7. Effect of insertion torque on bone screw pullout strength.

    PubMed

    Lawson, K J; Brems, J

    2001-05-01

    The effect of insertion torque on the holding strength of 4.5-mm ASIF/AO cortical bone screws was studied in vitro. Screw holding strength was determined using an Instron materials testing machine (Bristol, United Kingdom) on 55 lamb femora and 30 human tibiocortical bone sections. Holding strength was defined as tensile stress at pullout with rapid loading to construct failure. Different insertion torques were tested, normalizing to the thickness of cortical bone specimen engaged. These represented low, intermediate, high, and thread-damaging insertion torque. All screws inserted with thread-damaging torque and single cortex engaging screws inserted to high torque tightening moments showed diminished holding strength. This loss of strength amounted to 40%-50% less than screws inserted with less torque.

  8. Measurement of clinicians' ability to hand torque dental implant components.

    PubMed

    Kanawati, Ali; Richards, Mark W; Becker, Jeffery J; Monaco, Natalie E

    2009-01-01

    There is a varying degree of hand torque abilities using finger drivers among clinicians. Calibrating one's own abilities requires complicated instruments not readily available. This study evaluated a simple-to-use method that allows dental practitioners to have a quantifiable clinical assessment of relative torque ability using finger drivers to torque down dental implant components. A typodont that includes dental implants was mounted in a mannequin placed in a patient-reclined position. The subjects were asked to torque as tightly as they could a new healing abutment to an implant secured firmly in resin within the typodont. All participants wore moistened gloves when using a finger driver. The healing abutment was countertorqued using a certified precalibrated precision torque measurement device. The reading on the torque driver was recorded when the healing abutment disengaged. An average of torque values of dentists and dental students was calculated. Fifty subjects had an average maximum torque ability of 24 Ncm (male dentists: 28 Ncm; students: 22 Ncm; male students: 24 Ncm; female students: 19 Ncm). Maximum torque values for all participants ranged from 11 Ncm to 38 Ncm. There was no significant difference between groups. This study showed a varying degree of hand torquing abilities using a finger driver. Clinicians should regularly calibrate their ability to torque implant components to more predictably perform implant dentistry. Dental implant manufacturers should more precisely instruct clinicians as to maximum torque, as opposed to "finger tighten only".

  9. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master load-cell...

  10. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master load-cell...

  11. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master load-cell...

  12. 40 CFR 90.306 - Dynamometer torque cell calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dynamometer torque cell calibration... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.306 Dynamometer torque cell calibration. (a)(1) Any lever arm used...-cell or transfer standard may be used to verify the torque measurement system. (1) The master load-cell...

  13. Accuracy and precision of as-received implant torque wrenches.

    PubMed

    Britton-Vidal, Eduardo; Baker, Philip; Mettenburg, Donald; Pannu, Darshanjit S; Looney, Stephen W; Londono, Jimmy; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2014-10-01

    Previous implant torque evaluation did not determine if the target value fell within a confidence interval for the population mean of the test groups, disallowing determination of whether a specific type of wrench met a standardized goal value. The purpose of this study was to measure both the accuracy and precision of 2 different configurations (spring style and peak break) of as-received implant torque wrenches and compare the measured values to manufacturer-stated values. Ten wrenches from 4 manufacturers, representing a variety of torque-limiting mechanisms and specificity of use (with either a specific brand or universally with any brand of implant product). Drivers were placed into the wrench, and tightening torque was applied to reach predetermined values using a NIST-calibrated digital torque wrench. Five replications of measurement were made for each wrench and averaged to provide a single value from that instrument. The target torque value for each wrench brand was compared to the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean of measured values to see if it fell within the measured range. Only 1 wrench brand (Nobel Biocare) demonstrated the target torque value falling within the 95% confidence interval for the true population mean. For others, the targeted torque value fell above the 95% confidence interval (Straumann and Imtec) or below (Salvin Torq). Neither type of torque-limiting mechanism nor designation of a wrench to be used as a dedicated brand-only product or to be used as a universal product on many brands affected the ability of a wrench to deliver torque values where the true population mean included the target torque level. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Research on the Control Strategy for Grid-side Converter of PWM Doubly Fed Induction Wind Power Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifang; Wang, Zhijie; Li, Renfu; Jiang, Xiuchen; Sheng, Gehao; Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Sanming

    2017-05-01

    When the grid voltage drop, over current of transient rotor and over voltage may damage the power electronic devices. The attenuation of electromagnetic torque will lead to speed up. This paper proposes an improved feed-forward control strategy and its application in the PWM converter. When the PWM converter on voltage drops, bus voltage will be more stable. So over current problems of the DFIG rotor side can be reduced, and it also can improve voltage regulation speed of the DC bus voltage and reduce the oscillation amplitude. Furthermore, the stability of doubly fed wind generator system can be improved. The simulation results verify the validity of the modified control strategy.

  15. Manipulation of Spin-Torque Generation Using Ultrathin Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hongyu; Haku, Satoshi; Kanno, Yusuke; Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Maki, Hideyuki; Shi, Ji; Ando, Kazuya

    2018-06-01

    The generation and the manipulation of current-induced spin-orbit torques are of essential interest in spintronics. However, in spite of the vital progress in spin orbitronics, electric control of the spin-torque generation still remains elusive and challenging. We report on electric control of the spin-torque generation using ionic-liquid gating of ultrathin Au. We show that by simply depositing a SiO2 capping layer on an ultrathin-Au /Ni81Fe19 bilayer, the spin-torque generation efficiency is drastically enhanced by a maximum of 7 times. This enhancement is verified to be originated from the rough ultrathin-Au /Ni81Fe19 interface induced by the SiO2 deposition, which results in the enhancement of the interface spin-orbit scattering. We further show that the spin-torque generation efficiency from the ultrathin Au film can be reversibly manipulated by a factor of 2 using the ionic gating with an external electric field within a small range of 1 V. These results pave a way towards the efficient control of the spin-torque generation in spintronic applications.

  16. Relationships of maternal body size and morphology with egg and clutch size in the diamondback terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin (Testudines: Emydidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Maximilian M.; Guzy, Jacquelyn C.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Gibbons, J. Whitfield; Dorcas, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Because resources are finite, female animals face trade-offs between the size and number of offspring they are able to produce during a single reproductive event. Optimal egg size (OES) theory predicts that any increase in resources allocated to reproduction should increase clutch size with minimal effects on egg size. Variations of OES predict that egg size should be optimized, although not necessarily constant across a population, because optimality is contingent on maternal phenotypes, such as body size and morphology, and recent environmental conditions. We examined the relationships among body size variables (pelvic aperture width, caudal gap height, and plastron length), clutch size, and egg width of diamondback terrapins from separate but proximate populations at Kiawah Island and Edisto Island, South Carolina. We found that terrapins do not meet some of the predictions of OES theory. Both populations exhibited greater variation in egg size among clutches than within, suggesting an absence of optimization except as it may relate to phenotype/habitat matching. We found that egg size appeared to be constrained by more than just pelvic aperture width in Kiawah terrapins but not in the Edisto population. Terrapins at Edisto appeared to exhibit osteokinesis in the caudal region of their shells, which may aid in the oviposition of large eggs.

  17. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  18. Advanced Direct-Drive Generator for Improved Availability of Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Power Generation Systems Phase II 10hp 30rpm Radial-Flux Magnetically Geared Generator Test Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ouyang, Wen; Tchida, Colin

    2017-05-02

    Static torque, no load, constant speed, and sinusoidal oscillation test data for a 10hp, 300rpm magnetically-geared generator prototype using either an adjustable load bank for a fixed resistance or an output power converter.

  19. PREFACE: The Science of Making Torque from Wind 2014 (TORQUE 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Bak, Christian; Bechmann, Andreas; Bingöl, Ferhat; Dellwik, Ebba; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Giebel, Gregor; Hansen, Martin O. L.; Jensen, Dorte Juul; Larsen, Gunner; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Natarajan, Anand; Rathmann, Ole; Sathe, Ameya; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Nørkær Sørensen, Niels

    2014-06-01

    The 186 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the fifth Science of Making Torque from Wind conference, which is organized by the European Academy of Wind Energy (EAWE, www.eawe.eu). The conference, also called Torque 2014, is held at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) 17-20 June 2014. The EAWE conference series started in 2004 in Delft, the Netherlands. In 2007 it was held in Copenhagen, in 2010 in Heraklion, Greece, and then in 2012 in Oldenburg, Germany. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown approximately by 25% annually over the last couple of decades and covers now 2-3% of the global electrical power consumption. In order to make a significant impact on one of the large challenges of our time, namely global warming, the growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research and education in wind turbine aerodynamics and wind resources, the two topics which are the main subjects of this conference. Similar to the growth in electrical power production by wind is the growth in scientific papers about wind energy. Over the last decade the number of papers has also grown by about 25% annually, and many research based companies all over the world are founded. Hence, the wind energy research community is rapidly expanding and the Torque conference series offers a good opportunity to meet and exchange ideas. We hope that the Torque 2014 will heighten the quality of the wind energy research, while the participants will enjoy each others company in Copenhagen. Many people have been involved in producing the Torque 2014 proceedings. The work by more than two hundred reviewers ensuring the quality of the papers is greatly appreciated. The timely evaluation and coordination of the reviews would not have been possible without the work of sixteen ''section editors'' all from DTU Wind Energy: Christian Bak, Andreas Bechmann, Ferhat Bingöl, Ebba Dellwik, Nikolay Dimitrov, Gregor Giebel, Martin

  20. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin F.

    1998-01-01

    Brosche and Seiler recently suggested that direct lunar and solar tidal torques on the oceanic tides play a significant role in the earth's short-period angular momentum balance ("short-period" here meaning daily and sub-daily). We reexamine that suggestion here, concentrating on axial torques and hence on variations in rotation rate. Only those spherical harmonic components of the ocean tide having the same degree and order as the tidal potential induce nonzero torques. Prograde components (those moving in the same direction as the tide-generating body) produce the familiar secular braking of the earth's rotation. Retrograde components, however, produce rapid variations in UTI at twice the tidal frequency. There also exist interaction torques between tidal constituents, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides. They generate UTI variations at frequencies equal to the sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. We give estimates of the torques and angular momentum variations for each of the important regimes, secular to quarter-diurnal. For the M(sub 2) potential acting on the M(sub 2) ocean tide, we find an associated angular momentum variation of amplitude 3 x 10(exp 19) N m. This is 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the angular momentum variations associated with tidal currents. We conclude that these torques do not play a significant role in the short-period angular momentum balance.

  1. Cerebellar ataxia: abnormal control of interaction torques across multiple joints.

    PubMed

    Bastian, A J; Martin, T A; Keating, J G; Thach, W T

    1996-07-01

    1. We studied seven subjects with cerebellar lesions and seven control subjects as they made reaching movements in the sagittal plane to a target directly in front of them. Reaches were made under three different conditions: 1) "slow-accurate," 2) "fast-accurate," and 3) "fast as possible." All subjects were videotaped moving in a sagittal plane with markers on the index finger, wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Marker positions were digitized and then used to calculate joint angles. For each of the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints, inverse dynamics equations based on a three-segment limb model were used to estimate the net torque (sum of components) and each of the component torques. The component torques consisted of the torque due to gravity, the dynamic interaction torques induced passively by the movement of the adjacent joint, and the torque produced by the muscles and passive tissue elements (sometimes called "residual" torque). 2. A kinematic analysis of the movement trajectory and the change in joint angles showed that the reaches of subjects with cerebellar lesions were abnormal compared with reaches of control subjects. In both the slow-accurate and fast-accurate conditions the cerebellar subjects made abnormally curved wrist paths; the curvature was greater in the slow-accurate condition. During the slow-accurate condition, cerebellar subjects showed target undershoot and tended to move one joint at a time (decomposition). During the fast-accurate reaches, the cerebellar subjects showed target overshoot. Additionally, in the fast-accurate condition, cerebellar subjects moved the joints at abnormal rates relative to one another, but the movements were less decomposed. Only three subjects were tested in the fast as possible condition; this condition was analyzed only to determine maximal reaching speeds of subjects with cerebellar lesions. Cerebellar subjects moved more slowly than controls in all three conditions. 3. A kinetic analysis of torques generated at

  2. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 25.361 Section 25.361...

  3. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 25.361 Section 25.361...

  4. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 25.361 Section 25.361...

  5. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 25.361 Section 25.361...

  6. 14 CFR 25.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1) A limit engine torque.... (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts and supporting structure must be designed to... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 25.361 Section 25.361...

  7. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310. ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...

  8. 40 CFR 1066.240 - Torque transducer verification and calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Dynamometer Specifications § 1066.240 Torque transducer verification and calibration. Calibrate torque-measurement systems as described in 40 CFR 1065.310. ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Torque transducer verification and...

  9. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... rational analysis, a factor of 1.6 must be used. (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine torque. 23.361 Section 23.361...

  10. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... rational analysis, a factor of 1.6 must be used. (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine torque. 23.361 Section 23.361...

  11. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... rational analysis, a factor of 1.6 must be used. (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine torque. 23.361 Section 23.361...

  12. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... rational analysis, a factor of 1.6 must be used. (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine torque. 23.361 Section 23.361...

  13. 14 CFR 23.361 - Engine torque.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Engine torque. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for the effects of— (1... rational analysis, a factor of 1.6 must be used. (b) For turbine engine installations, the engine mounts... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine torque. 23.361 Section 23.361...

  14. Displacement of Implant Abutments Following Initial and Repeated Torqueing.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Gilbert, Andy B; Seidt, Jeremy D; McGlumphy, Edwin A; Clelland, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    To measure and compare the three-dimensional (3D) position of nine different abutments manufactured by different manufacturers after repeated torqueing on an internal-hexagon implant. Nine tapered implants were placed into an acrylic resin block. Five specimens each of nine different abutments (n = 45) were placed into one of nine implants. The abutments were handtightened and then torqued to the manufacturer-recommended torque of 30 Ncm. After 10 minutes, 30 Ncm of torque was reapplied. Another 10 minutes elapsed before testing was completed. Images were recorded in 12-second intervals. The spatial relationship of the abutments to the resin block was determined using 3D digital image correlation. Commercial image correlation software was used to analyze the displacements. Mean displacements for the abutments were calculated in three dimensions and overall for both torque applications. Statistical comparisons were done with a t test and a step-down Bonferroni correction. The overall 3D displacement of the Atlantis Titanium abutment after the second applied torque was significantly greater than that of two of the eight other abutments. Displacement in all three dimensions for the Atlantis Titanium abutment changed direction between the first and second torque applications. All abutments moved further in the same direction except for the Atlantis Titanium abutment, which moved back toward its original hand-tightened position horizontally after the second torque application. Re-torqueing of abutments after a 10-minute interval leads to minor displacement of varying degrees between the abutment and a tapered implant. A potential effect of embedment relaxation and/or manufacturing errors should be taken into consideration when selecting an abutment for a cement-retained crown on a tapered implant. Accordingly, clinicians may benefit from adjusting cement-retained implant crowns after re-torqueing the abutments to prevent potential occlusal and interproximal contact

  15. Effect of long-term steam autoclaving on changes in torque delivery of spring- and friction-type torque wrenches.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; L'Homme-Langlois, Emilie; Beck, Frank M; McGlumphy, Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Two types of mechanical torque-limiting devices (MTLD) are available: friction-style and spring-style. Limited information is available regarding the accuracy of different types of MTLDs after sterilization. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the accuracy of MTLDs after sterilization. Three new friction-style and 3 new spring-style MTLDs (Astra Tech/Dentsply, Zimmer Dental, Biohorizons, Biomet 3i, Straumann [ITI] and Nobel Biocare; n=5 per manufacturer; 30 total) were selected to evaluate their accuracy in delivering the target torque values preset by their manufacturers before and after sterilization. Target torque measurements were made with a digital torque gauge (model DFS2-R-ND; Chatillon) 10 times for each device. All MTLDs were sterilized following the manufacturers' recommendations. The sterilization procedure was repeated 100 times, and the accuracy of all MTLDs was retested. Absolute torque differences were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance with instrument as the repeated factor. MTLD type (friction or spring) and MTLD status (new or autoclaved) were the independent variables. Post hoc testing was done using the Tukey method for balanced data. No significant difference was found between the spring-style and friction-style MTLDs or within the spring-style and friction-style MTLDs before and after sterilization (P>.05). After 100 cycles of steam autoclaving, the accuracy of spring-style and friction-style MTLDs was similar. All MTLDs fell within ±10% of the target torque value before and after sterilization. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Reynolds, Reid G.; Liu, Frank X.; Lebsock, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum that the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical strategies for distributing a prescribed torque or momentum among the n wheels are presented, with special emphasis on configurations of four, five, and six wheels.

  17. Spin-Orbit Torques and Anisotropic Magnetization Damping in Skyrmion Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil; Brataas, Arne

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the non-relativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  18. Performance Investigation of A Mix Wind Turbine Using A Clutch Mechanism At Low Wind Speed Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamanun, M. J.; Misaran, M. S.; Rahman, M.; Muzammil, W. K.

    2017-07-01

    Wind energy is one of the methods that generates energy from sustainable resources. This technology has gained prominence in this era because it produces no harmful product to the society. There is two fundamental type of wind turbine are generally used this day which is Horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). The VAWT technology is more preferable compare to HAWT because it gives better efficiency and cost effectiveness as a whole. However, VAWT is known to have distinct disadvantage compared to HAWT; self-start ability and efficiency at low wind speed condition. Different solution has been proposed to solve these issues which includes custom design blades, variable angle of attack mechanism and mix wind turbine. A new type of clutch device was successfully developed in UMS to be used in a mix Savonius-Darrieus wind turbine configuration. The clutch system which barely audible when in operation compared to a ratchet clutch system interconnects the Savonius and Darrieus rotor; allowing the turbine to self-start at low wind speed condition as opposed to a standalone Darrieus turbine. The Savonius height were varied at three different size in order to understand the effect of the Savonius rotor to the mix wind turbine performance. The experimental result shows that the fabricated Savonius rotor show that the height of the Savonius rotor affecting the RPM for the turbine. The swept area (SA), aspect ratio (AR) and tip speed ratio (TSR) also calculated in this paper. The highest RPM recorded in this study is 90 RPM for Savonius rotor 0.22-meter height at 2.75 m/s. The Savonius rotor 0.22-meter also give the highest TSR for each range of speed from 0.75 m/s, 1.75 m/s and 2.75 m/s where it gives 1.03 TSR, 0.76 TSR, and 0.55 TSR.

  19. Torque during canal instrumentation using rotary nickel-titanium files.

    PubMed

    Sattapan, B; Palamara, J E; Messer, H H

    2000-03-01

    Nickel-titanium engine-driven rotary instruments are used increasingly in endodontic practice. One frequently mentioned problem is fracture of an instrument in the root canal. Very few studies have been conducted on torsional characteristics of these instruments, and none has been done under dynamic conditions. The purposes of this study were to measure the torque generated and the apical force applied during instrumentation with a commercial engine-driven nickel-titanium file system, and to relate torque generated during simulated clinical use to torsional failure of the instruments. Ten extracted human teeth (five with small-sized and five with medium-sized straight root canals) were instrumented with Quantec Series 2000 files, and the torque and apical force generated were measured. The applied apical force was generally low, not exceeding 150 g in either small or medium canals. The torque depended on the tip size and taper of each instrument, and on canal size. Instruments with 0.05 and 0.06 taper generated the highest torque, which was greater in small than in medium canals. The torque at failure was significantly (p < 0.001) higher than torque during instrumentation, but with considerable variation in the extent of the difference.

  20. Towards Scalable Strain Gauge-Based Joint Torque Sensors

    PubMed Central

    D’Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Caldwell, Darwin G.; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    During recent decades, strain gauge-based joint torque sensors have been commonly used to provide high-fidelity torque measurements in robotics. Although measurement of joint torque/force is often required in engineering research and development, the gluing and wiring of strain gauges used as torque sensors pose difficulties during integration within the restricted space available in small joints. The problem is compounded by the need for a scalable geometric design to measure joint torque. In this communication, we describe a novel design of a strain gauge-based mono-axial torque sensor referred to as square-cut torque sensor (SCTS), the significant features of which are high degree of linearity, symmetry, and high scalability in terms of both size and measuring range. Most importantly, SCTS provides easy access for gluing and wiring of the strain gauges on sensor surface despite the limited available space. We demonstrated that the SCTS was better in terms of symmetry (clockwise and counterclockwise rotation) and more linear. These capabilities have been shown through finite element modeling (ANSYS) confirmed by observed data obtained by load testing experiments. The high performance of SCTS was confirmed by studies involving changes in size, material and/or wings width and thickness. Finally, we demonstrated that the SCTS can be successfully implementation inside the hip joints of miniaturized hydraulically actuated quadruped robot-MiniHyQ. This communication is based on work presented at the 18th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots (CLAWAR). PMID:28820446

  1. Towards Scalable Strain Gauge-Based Joint Torque Sensors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hamza; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Cannella, Ferdinando; Caldwell, Darwin G; Cuschieri, Alfred; Semini, Claudio

    2017-08-18

    During recent decades, strain gauge-based joint torque sensors have been commonly used to provide high-fidelity torque measurements in robotics. Although measurement of joint torque/force is often required in engineering research and development, the gluing and wiring of strain gauges used as torque sensors pose difficulties during integration within the restricted space available in small joints. The problem is compounded by the need for a scalable geometric design to measure joint torque. In this communication, we describe a novel design of a strain gauge-based mono-axial torque sensor referred to as square-cut torque sensor (SCTS) , the significant features of which are high degree of linearity, symmetry, and high scalability in terms of both size and measuring range. Most importantly, SCTS provides easy access for gluing and wiring of the strain gauges on sensor surface despite the limited available space. We demonstrated that the SCTS was better in terms of symmetry (clockwise and counterclockwise rotation) and more linear. These capabilities have been shown through finite element modeling (ANSYS) confirmed by observed data obtained by load testing experiments. The high performance of SCTS was confirmed by studies involving changes in size, material and/or wings width and thickness. Finally, we demonstrated that the SCTS can be successfully implementation inside the hip joints of miniaturized hydraulically actuated quadruped robot- MiniHyQ . This communication is based on work presented at the 18th International Conference on Climbing and Walking Robots (CLAWAR).

  2. Spin-orbit torques and anisotropic magnetization damping in skyrmion crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, Kjetil M. D.; Brataas, Arne

    2014-02-01

    The length scale of the magnetization gradients in chiral magnets is determined by the relativistic Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Thus, even conventional spin-transfer torques are controlled by the relativistic spin-orbit coupling in these systems, and additional relativistic corrections to the current-induced torques and magnetization damping become important for a complete understanding of the current-driven magnetization dynamics. We theoretically study the effects of reactive and dissipative homogeneous spin-orbit torques and anisotropic damping on the current-driven skyrmion dynamics in cubic chiral magnets. Our results demonstrate that spin-orbit torques play a significant role in the current-induced skyrmion velocity. The dissipative spin-orbit torque generates a relativistic Magnus force on the skyrmions, whereas the reactive spin-orbit torque yields a correction to both the drift velocity along the current direction and the transverse velocity associated with the Magnus force. The spin-orbit torque corrections to the velocity scale linearly with the skyrmion size, which is inversely proportional to the spin-orbit coupling. Consequently, the reactive spin-orbit torque correction can be the same order of magnitude as the nonrelativistic contribution. More importantly, the dissipative spin-orbit torque can be the dominant force that causes a deflected motion of the skyrmions if the torque exhibits a linear or quadratic relationship with the spin-orbit coupling. In addition, we demonstrate that the skyrmion velocity is determined by anisotropic magnetization damping parameters governed by the skyrmion size.

  3. Research methodology simplification for teaching purposes illustrated by clutch automatic control device testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojs, J.

    2016-09-01

    The paper proves that simplified, shorter examination of an object, feasible in laboratory classes, can produce results similar to those reached in scientific investigation of the device using extensive equipment. A thorough investigation of an object, an automatic clutch device in this case, enabled identifying the magnitudes that most significantly affect its operation. The knowledge of these most sensitive magnitudes allows focusing in the teaching process on simplified measurement of only selected magnitudes and verifying the given object in the positive or negative.

  4. Spin currents and spin-orbit torques in ferromagnetic trilayers.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Heon C; Amin, Vivek P; Oh, Young-Wan; Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Geun-Hee; Kim, Kab-Jin; Stiles, M D; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2018-06-01

    Magnetic torques generated through spin-orbit coupling 1-8 promise energy-efficient spintronic devices. For applications, it is important that these torques switch films with perpendicular magnetizations without an external magnetic field 9-14 . One suggested approach 15 to enable such switching uses magnetic trilayers in which the torque on the top magnetic layer can be manipulated by changing the magnetization of the bottom layer. Spin currents generated in the bottom magnetic layer or its interfaces transit the spacer layer and exert a torque on the top magnetization. Here we demonstrate field-free switching in such structures and show that its dependence on the bottom-layer magnetization is not consistent with the anticipated bulk effects 15 . We describe a mechanism for spin-current generation 16,17 at the interface between the bottom layer and the spacer layer, which gives torques that are consistent with the measured magnetization dependence. This other-layer-generated spin-orbit torque is relevant to energy-efficient control of spintronic devices.

  5. Torque-onset determination: Unintended consequences of the threshold method.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Raffy; Jenkins, Glenn; O'Brien, Thomas D; Hansen, Steve; Falk, Bareket

    2016-12-01

    Compared with visual torque-onset-detection (TOD), threshold-based TOD produces onset bias, which increases with lower torques or rates of torque development (RTD). To compare the effects of differential TOD-bias on common contractile parameters in two torque-disparate groups. Fifteen boys and 12 men performed maximal, explosive, isometric knee-extensions. Torque and EMG were recorded for each contraction. Best contractions were selected by peak torque (MVC) and peak RTD. Visual-TOD-based torque-time traces, electromechanical delays (EMD), and times to peak RTD (tRTD) were compared with corresponding data derived from fixed 4-Nm- and relative 5%MVC-thresholds. The 5%MVC TOD-biases were similar for boys and men, but the corresponding 4-Nm-based biases were markedly different (40.3±14.1 vs. 18.4±7.1ms, respectively; p<0.001). Boys-men EMD differences were most affected, increasing from 5.0ms (visual) to 26.9ms (4Nm; p<0.01). Men's visually-based torque kinetics tended to be faster than the boys' (NS), but the 4-Nm-based kinetics erroneously depicted the boys as being much faster to any given %MVC (p<0.001). When comparing contractile properties of dissimilar groups, e.g., children vs. adults, threshold-based TOD methods can misrepresent reality and lead to erroneous conclusions. Relative-thresholds (e.g., 5% MVC) still introduce error, but group-comparisons are not confounded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Design of a lightweight, tethered, torque-controlled knee exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Witte, Kirby Ann; Fatschel, Andreas M; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-01

    Lower-limb exoskeletons show promise for improving gait rehabilitation for those with chronic gait abnormalities due to injury, stroke or other illness. We designed and built a tethered knee exoskeleton with a strong lightweight frame and comfortable, four-point contact with the leg. The device is structurally compliant in select directions, instrumented to measure joint angle and applied torque, and is lightweight (0.76 kg). The exoskeleton is actuated by two off-board motors. Closed loop torque control is achieved using classical proportional feedback control with damping injection in conjunction with iterative learning. We tested torque measurement accuracy and found root mean squared (RMS) error of 0.8 Nm with a max load of 62.2 Nm. Bandwidth was measured to be phase limited at 45 Hz when tested on a rigid test stand and 23 Hz when tested on a person's leg. During bandwidth tests peak extension torques were measured up to 50 Nm. Torque tracking was tested during walking on a treadmill at 1.25 m/s with peak flexion torques of 30 Nm. RMS torque tracking error averaged over a hundred steps was 0.91 Nm. We intend to use this knee exoskeleton to investigate robotic assistance strategies to improve gait rehabilitation and enhance human athletic ability.

  7. Magnetic torque on a rotating superconducting sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The London theory of superconductivity is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in a uniform applied magnetic field. The London theory is combined with classical electrodynamics for a calculation of the direct effect of excess charge on a rotating superconducting sphere. Classical electrodynamics, with the assumption of a perfect Meissner effect, is used to calculate the torque on a superconducting sphere rotating in an arbitrary magnetic induction; this macroscopic approach yields results which are correct to first order. Using the same approach, the torque due to a current loop encircling the rotating sphere is calculated.

  8. Diffusion of torqued active particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Mario; Lauga, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by swimming microorganisms whose trajectories are affected by the presence of an external torque, we calculate the diffusivity of an active particle subject to an external torque and in a fluctuating environment. The analytical results are compared with Brownian dynamics simulations showing excellent agreement between theory and numerical experiments. This work was funded in part by the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia of Mexico (Conacyt postdoctoral fellowship to M. S.) and the US National Science Foundation (Grant CBET-0746285 to E.L.).

  9. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-04-01

    We examine the migration of low mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by midplane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  10. Low-mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - II. Flow-locked and runaway migration, and a torque prescription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2018-07-01

    We examine the migration of low-mass planets in laminar protoplanetary discs, threaded by large-scale magnetic fields in the dead zone that drive radial gas flows. As shown in Paper I, a dynamical corotation torque arises due to the flow-induced asymmetric distortion of the corotation region and the evolving vortensity contrast between the librating horseshoe material and background disc flow. Using simulations of laminar torqued discs containing migrating planets, we demonstrate the existence of the four distinct migration regimes predicted in Paper I. In two regimes, the migration is approximately locked to the inward or outward radial gas flow, and in the other regimes the planet undergoes outward runaway migration that eventually settles to fast steady migration. In addition, we demonstrate torque and migration reversals induced by mid-plane magnetic stresses, with a bifurcation dependent on the disc surface density. We develop a model for fast migration, and show why the outward runaway saturates to a steady speed, and examine phenomenologically its termination due to changing local disc conditions. We also develop an analytical model for the corotation torque at late times that includes viscosity, for application to discs that sustain modest turbulence. Finally, we use the simulation results to develop torque prescriptions for inclusion in population synthesis models of planet formation.

  11. The Monitoring System of the Operating State of the Gear Wheels of the Torque Multiplier of the Desalination Plant Steam Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilin, A. I.; Neverov, V. V.; Danilin, S. A.; Shimanov, A. A.; Tsapkova, A. B.

    2018-01-01

    The article describes a noncontact operational control method based on the processing of a microwave signal reflected from the controlled teeth of the wheel. In this paper describes the influence of wear patterns on the characteristic information parameters of the analyzed signals. The block diagram in section 3 shows the experimental system for monitoring the operating state of the gear wheels of the steam compressor torque multiplier. The design of the primary converter is briefly described.

  12. Eddy Current Sensing of Torque in Rotating Shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varonis, Orestes J.; Ida, Nathan

    2013-12-01

    The noncontact torque sensing in machine shafts is addressed based on the stress induced in a press-fitted magnetoelastic sleeve on the shaft and eddy current sensing of the changes of electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability due to the presence of stress. The eddy current probe uses dual drive, dual sensing coils whose purpose is increased sensitivity to torque and decreased sensitivity to variations in distance between probe and shaft (liftoff). A mechanism of keeping the distance constant is also employed. Both the probe and the magnetoelastic sleeve are evaluated for performance using a standard eddy current instrument. An eddy current instrument is also used to drive the coils and analyze the torque data. The method and sensor described are general and adaptable to a variety of applications. The sensor is suitable for static and rotating shafts, is independent of shaft diameter and operational over a large range of torques. The torque sensor uses a differential eddy current measurement resulting in cancellation of common mode effects including temperature and vibrations.

  13. Cogging Torque Reduction Techniques for Spoke-type IPMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, F. S.; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.; Jusoh, L. I.

    2017-08-01

    A spoke-type interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) is extending its tentacles in industrial arena due to good flux-weakening capability and high power density. In many of the application, high strength of permanent magnet causes the undesirable effects of high cogging torque that can aggravate performance of the motor. High cogging torque is significantly produced by IPMSM due to the similar length and the effectiveness of the magnetic air-gap. The address of this study is to analyze and compare the cogging torque effect and performance of four common techniques for cogging torque reduction such as skewing, notching, pole pairing and rotor pole pairing. With the aid of 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) by JMAG software, a 6S-4P Spoke-type IPMSM with various rotor-PM configurations has been designed. As a result, the cogging torque effect reduced up to 69.5% for skewing technique, followed by 31.96%, 29.6%, and 17.53% by pole pairing, axial pole pairing and notching techniques respectively.

  14. Spin-transfer torque in spin filter tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Pauyac, Christian; Kalitsov, Alan; Manchon, Aurelien; Chshiev, Mairbek

    2014-12-01

    Spin-transfer torque in a class of magnetic tunnel junctions with noncollinear magnetizations, referred to as spin filter tunnel junctions, is studied within the tight-binding model using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique within Keldysh formalism. These junctions consist of one ferromagnet (FM) adjacent to a magnetic insulator (MI) or two FM separated by a MI. We find that the presence of the magnetic insulator dramatically enhances the magnitude of the spin-torque components compared to conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. The fieldlike torque is driven by the spin-dependent reflection at the MI/FM interface, which results in a small reduction of its amplitude when an insulating spacer (S) is inserted to decouple MI and FM layers. Meanwhile, the dampinglike torque is dominated by the tunneling electrons that experience the lowest barrier height. We propose a device of the form FM/(S)/MI/(S)/FM that takes advantage of these characteristics and allows for tuning the spin-torque magnitudes over a wide range just by rotation of the magnetization of the insulating layer.

  15. Maximum Torque and Momentum Envelopes for Reaction Wheel Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R. G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft reaction wheel maneuvers are limited by the maximum torque and/or angular momentum which the wheels can provide. For an n-wheel configuration, the torque or momentum envelope can be obtained by projecting the n-dimensional hypercube, representing the domain boundary of individual wheel torques or momenta, into three dimensional space via the 3xn matrix of wheel axes. In this paper, the properties of the projected hypercube are discussed, and algorithms are proposed for determining this maximal torque or momentum envelope for general wheel configurations. Practical implementation strategies for specific wheel configurations are also considered.

  16. Modeling of toroidal torques exerted by internal kink instability in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yu, D. L.; Wang, S.; Xia, G. L.; Dong, G. Q.; Bai, X.

    2017-08-01

    Toroidal modeling efforts are initiated to systematically compute and compare various toroidal torques, exerted by an unstable internal kink in a tokamak plasma, using the MARS-F/K/Q suite of codes. The torques considered here include the resonant electromagnetic torque due to the Maxwell stress (the EM or JXB torque), the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque, and the torque associated with the Reynolds stress. Numerical results show that the relative magnitude of the net resonant electromagnetic and the Reynolds stress torques increases with the equilibrium flow speed of the plasma, whilst the net NTV torque follows the opposite trend. The global flow shear sensitively affects the Reynolds stress torque, but not the electromagnetic and the NTV torques. Detailed examinations reveal dominant contributions to the Maxwell and Reynolds stress torques, in terms of the poloidal harmonic numbers of various perturbation fields, as well as their relative toroidal phasing.

  17. Tool for Coupling a Torque Wrench to a Round Cable Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C.; Dean, Richard J.; Burge, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    A tool makes it possible to couple a torque wrench to an externally knurled, internally threaded, round cable connector. The purpose served by the tool is to facilitate the tightening of multiple such connectors (or the repeated tightening of the same connector) to repeatable torques. The design of a prior cable-connector/ torque-wrench coupling tool provided for application of the torque-wrench jaws to a location laterally offset from the axis of rotation of the cable connector, making it necessary to correct the torque reading for the offset. Unlike the design of the prior tool, the design of the present tool provides for application of the torque-wrench jaws to a location on the axis of rotation, obviating correction of the torque reading for offset. The present tool (see figure) consists of a split collet containing a slot that provides clearance for inserting and bending the cable, a collet-locking sleeve, a collet-locking nut, and a torque-wrench adaptor that is press-fit onto the collet. Once the collet is positioned on the cable connector, the collet-locking nut is turned to force the collet-locking sleeve over the collet, compressing the collet through engagement of tapered surfaces on the outside of the collet and the inside of the locking sleeve. Because the collet is split and therefore somewhat flexible, this compression forces the collet inward to grip the connector securely. The torque wrench is then applied to the torque-wrench adaptor in the usual manner for torquing a nut or a bolt.

  18. Radiation Forces and Torques without Stress (Tensors)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2011-01-01

    To understand radiation forces and torques or to calculate them does not require invoking photon or electromagnetic field momentum transfer or stress tensors. According to continuum electromagnetic theory, forces and torques exerted by radiation are a consequence of electric and magnetic fields acting on charges and currents that the fields induce…

  19. How joint torques affect hamstring injury risk in sprinting swing-stance transition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuliang; Wei, Shutao; Zhong, Yunjian; Fu, Weijie; Li, Li; Liu, Yu

    2015-02-01

    The potential mechanisms of hamstring strain injuries in athletes are not well understood. The study, therefore, was aimed at understanding hamstring mechanics by studying loading conditions during maximum-effort overground sprinting. Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction force data were collected from eight elite male sprinters sprinting at their maximum effort. Maximal isometric torques of the hip and knee were also collected. Data from the sprinting gait cycle were analyzed via an intersegmental dynamics approach, and the different joint torque components were calculated. During the initial stance phase, the ground reaction force passed anteriorly to the knee and hip, producing an extension torque at the knee and a flexion torque at the hip joint. Thus, the active muscle torque functioned to produce flexion torque at the knee and extension torque at the hip. The maximal muscle torque at the knee joint was 1.4 times the maximal isometric knee flexion torque. During the late swing phase, the muscle torque counterbalanced the motion-dependent torque and acted to flex the knee joint and extend the hip joint. The loading conditions on the hamstring muscles were similar to those of the initial stance phase. During both the initial stance and late swing phases, the large passive torques at both the knee and hip joints acted to lengthen the hamstring muscles. The active muscle torques generated mainly by the hamstrings functioned to counteract those passive effects. As a result, during sprinting or high-speed locomotion, the hamstring muscles may be more susceptible to high risk of strain injury during these two phases.

  20. Comprehensive Modeling and Analysis of Rotorcraft Variable Speed Propulsion System With Coupled Engine/Transmission/Rotor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSmidt, Hans A.; Smith, Edward C.; Bill, Robert C.; Wang, Kon-Well

    2013-01-01

    This project develops comprehensive modeling and simulation tools for analysis of variable rotor speed helicopter propulsion system dynamics. The Comprehensive Variable-Speed Rotorcraft Propulsion Modeling (CVSRPM) tool developed in this research is used to investigate coupled rotor/engine/fuel control/gearbox/shaft/clutch/flight control system dynamic interactions for several variable rotor speed mission scenarios. In this investigation, a prototypical two-speed Dual-Clutch Transmission (DCT) is proposed and designed to achieve 50 percent rotor speed variation. The comprehensive modeling tool developed in this study is utilized to analyze the two-speed shift response of both a conventional single rotor helicopter and a tiltrotor drive system. In the tiltrotor system, both a Parallel Shift Control (PSC) strategy and a Sequential Shift Control (SSC) strategy for constant and variable forward speed mission profiles are analyzed. Under the PSC strategy, selecting clutch shift-rate results in a design tradeoff between transient engine surge margins and clutch frictional power dissipation. In the case of SSC, clutch power dissipation is drastically reduced in exchange for the necessity to disengage one engine at a time which requires a multi-DCT drive system topology. In addition to comprehensive simulations, several sections are dedicated to detailed analysis of driveline subsystem components under variable speed operation. In particular an aeroelastic simulation of a stiff in-plane rotor using nonlinear quasi-steady blade element theory was conducted to investigate variable speed rotor dynamics. It was found that 2/rev and 4/rev flap and lag vibrations were significant during resonance crossings with 4/rev lagwise loads being directly transferred into drive-system torque disturbances. To capture the clutch engagement dynamics, a nonlinear stick-slip clutch torque model is developed. Also, a transient gas-turbine engine model based on first principles mean

  1. Morphological diversity and evolution of egg and clutch structure in amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Altig, Ronald; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this synthesis summarizes the morphology of the jelly layers surrounding an amphibian ovum. We propose a standard terminology and discuss the evolution of jelly layers. The second part reviews the morphological diversity and arrangement of deposited eggs?the ovipositional mode; we recognize 5 morphological classes including 14 modes. We discuss some of the oviductal, ovipositional, and postovipositional events that contribute to these morphologies. We have incorporated data from taxa from throughout the world but recognize that other types will be discovered that may modify understanding of these modes. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary context of the diversity of clutch structure and present a first estimate of its evolution.

  2. Torque Limits for Fasteners in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yi

    2002-01-01

    The two major classes of laminate joints are bonded and bolted. Often the two classes are combined as bonded-bolted joints. Several characteristics of fiber reinforced composite materials render them more susceptible to joint problems than conventional metals. These characteristics include weakness in in-plane shear, transverse tension/compression, interlaminar shear, and bearing strength relative to the strength and stiffness in the fiber direction. Studies on bolted joints of composite materials have been focused on joining assembly subject to in-plane loads. Modes of failure under these loading conditions are net-tension failure, cleavage tension failure, shear-out failure, bearing failure, etc. Although the studies of torque load can be found in literature, they mainly discussed the effect of the torque load on in-plane strength. Existing methods for calculating torque limit for a mechanical fastener do not consider connecting members. The concern that a composite member could be crushed by a preload inspired the initiation of this study. The purpose is to develop a fundamental knowledge base on how to determine a torque limit when a composite member is taken into account. Two simplified analytical models were used: a stress failure analysis model based on maximum stress criterion, and a strain failure analysis model based on maximum strain criterion.

  3. Driving magnetization dynamics with interfacial spin-orbit torques (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Axel F.; Zhang, Wei; Sklenar, Joseph; Jungfleisch, Matthias Benjamin; Jiang, Wanjun; Hsu, Bo; Xiao, Jiao; Pearson, John E.; Fradin, Frank Y.; Liu, Yaohua; Ketterson, John B.; Yang, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Bulk spin Hall effects are well know to provide spin orbit torques, which can be used to drive magnetization dynamics [1]. But one of the reoccurring questions is to what extend spin orbit torques may also originate at the interface between materials with strong spin orbit coupling and the ferromagnets. Using spin torque driven ferromagnetic resonance we show for two systems, where interfacial torques dominate, that they can be large enough to be practically useful. First, we show spin transfer torque driven magnetization dynamics based on Rashba-Edelstein effects at the Bi/Ag interface [2]. Second, we will show that combining permalloy with monolayer MoS2 gives rise to sizable spin-orbit torques. Given the monolayer nature of MoS2 it is clear that bilk spin Hall effects are negligible and therefore the spin transfer torques are completely interfacial in nature. Interestingly the spin orbit torques with MoS2 show a distinct dependence on the orientation of the magnetization in the permalloy, and become strongly enhanced, when the magnetization is pointing perpendicular to the interfacial plane. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Science and Engineering Division. [1] A. Hoffmann, IEEE Trans. Mag. 49, 5172 (2013). [2] W. Zhang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 17C727 (2015). [3] M. B. Jungfleisch et al., arXiv:1508.01410.

  4. Variable Torque Prescription: State of Art.

    PubMed Central

    Lacarbonara, Mariano; Accivile, Ettore; Abed, Maria R.; Dinoi, Maria Teresa; Monaco, Annalisa; Marzo, Giuseppe; Capogreco, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The variable prescription is widely described under the clinical aspect: the clinics is the result of the evolution of the state-of-the-art, aspect that is less considered in the daily literature. The state-of-the-art is the key to understand not only how we reach where we are but also to learn how to manage propely the torque, focusing on the technical and biomechanical purpos-es that led to the change of the torque values over time. The aim of this study is to update the clinicians on the aspects that affect the torque under the biomechanical sight, helping them to understand how to managing it, following the “timeline changes” in the different techniques so that the Variable Prescription Orthodontic (VPO) would be a suitable tool in every clinical case. PMID:25674173

  5. In-line rotating torque sensor with on-board amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A rotating torque sensor apparatus and method for measuring small torques comprising a shaft, a platform having a circuit board and a first moment arm attached to the shaft, a rotatable wheel coaxial with the shaft and having a second moment arm spaced apart from the first moment arm with a load cell therebetween for generating an electric signal as the torque is applied to the shaft and transferred through the moment arms to the load cell. The electrical signal is conducted from the load cell to the circuit board for filtering and amplification before being extracted from the torque assembly through a slip ring.

  6. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  7. Extreme intra-clutch egg size dimorphism is not coupled with corresponding differences in antioxidant capacity and stable isotopes between eggs.

    PubMed

    Poisbleau, Maud; Beaulieu, Michaël; Dehnhard, Nina; Demongin, Laurent; Lepoint, Gilles; Sturaro, Nicolas; Eens, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    Oviparous females need to allocate resources optimally to their eggs in order to maximize their fitness. Among these resources, dietary antioxidants, acquired by females and transferred to the eggs during egg formation, can greatly affect the development and survival of the embryo and chick. In crested penguins, incubation starts after the second and last egg is laid and, as opposed to many other bird species, this egg hatches first, thereby enhancing the survival of the chick. Here, we assessed whether antioxidant and isotopic composition could underlie these differences between eggs within clutches of southern rockhopper penguins (Eudyptes chrysocome chrysocome). The second-laid egg had higher total antioxidant capacity than the first-laid egg, although this was not due to higher antioxidant concentration but to its higher mass. This suggests that resources are allocated by females at a constant rate in both eggs within clutches. Accordingly, we found a strong correlation for isotopic compositions between eggs suggesting that resources were allocated similarly to each egg within the clutch. Overall, we found little evidence for a significant role of antioxidant and isotopic compositions to explain differences in terms of embryo/chick development between eggs in crested penguins. However, since our results suggest a constant rate of antioxidant transfer from females to eggs, limiting the mass of the first-laid egg might represent a strategy for females to spare antioxidant defences and preserve self-maintenance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adaptive torque estimation of robot joint with harmonic drive transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhiguo; Li, Yuankai; Liu, Guangjun

    2017-11-01

    Robot joint torque estimation using input and output position measurements is a promising technique, but the result may be affected by the load variation of the joint. In this paper, a torque estimation method with adaptive robustness and optimality adjustment according to load variation is proposed for robot joint with harmonic drive transmission. Based on a harmonic drive model and a redundant adaptive robust Kalman filter (RARKF), the proposed approach can adapt torque estimation filtering optimality and robustness to the load variation by self-tuning the filtering gain and self-switching the filtering mode between optimal and robust. The redundant factor of RARKF is designed as a function of the motor current for tolerating the modeling error and load-dependent filtering mode switching. The proposed joint torque estimation method has been experimentally studied in comparison with a commercial torque sensor and two representative filtering methods. The results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed torque estimation technique.

  9. Effect of capping layer on spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chi; Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Yang, Hyunsoo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2018-04-01

    In order to enhance the magnitude of spin-orbit torque (SOT), considerable experimental works have been devoted to studying the thickness dependence of the different layers in multilayers consisting of heavy metal (HM), ferromagnet (FM), and capping layers. Here, we present a theoretical model based on the spin-drift-diffusion formalism to investigate the effect of the capping layer properties such as its thickness on the SOT observed in experiments. It is found that the spin Hall-induced SOT can be significantly enhanced by incorporating a capping layer with an opposite spin Hall angle to that of the HM layer. The spin Hall torque can be maximized by tuning the capping layer thickness. However, in the absence of the spin Hall effect (SHE) in the capping layer, the torque decreases monotonically with the capping layer thickness. Conversely, the spin Hall torque is found to decrease monotonically with the FM layer thickness, irrespective of the presence or absence of the SHE in the capping layer. All these trends are in correspondence with experimental observations. Finally, our model suggests that capping layers with a long spin diffusion length and high resistivity would also enhance the spin Hall torque.

  10. Reconstruction of Twist Torque in Main Parachute Risers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of twist torque in the Main Parachute Risers of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) has been successfully used to validate CPAS Model Memo conservative twist torque equations. Reconstruction of basic, one degree of freedom drop tests was used to create a functional process for the evaluation of more complex, rigid body simulation. The roll, pitch, and yaw of the body, the fly-out angles of the parachutes, and the relative location of the parachutes to the body are inputs to the torque simulation. The data collected by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was used to calculate the true torque. The simulation then used photogrammetric and IMU data as inputs into the Model Memo equations. The results were then compared to the true torque results to validate the Model Memo equations. The Model Memo parameters were based off of steel risers and the parameters will need to be re-evaluated for different materials. Photogrammetric data was found to be more accurate than the inertial data in accounting for the relative rotation between payload and cluster. The Model Memo equations were generally a good match and when not matching were generally conservative.

  11. Hydrodynamic Torques and Rotations of Superparamagnetic Bead Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Christopher; Etheridge, J.; Wijesinghe, H. S.; Pierce, C. J.; Prikockis, M. V.; Sooryakumar, R.

    Chains of micro-magnetic particles are often rotated with external magnetic fields for many lab-on-a-chip technologies such as transporting beads or mixing fluids. These applications benefit from faster responses of the actuated particles. In a rotating magnetic field, the magnetization of superparamagnetic beads, created from embedded magnetic nano-particles within a polymer matrix, is largely characterized by induced dipoles mip along the direction of the field. In addition there is often a weak dipole mop that orients out-of-phase with the external rotating field. On a two-bead dimer, the simplest chain of beads, mop contributes a torque Γm in addition to the torque from mip. For dimers with beads unbound to each other, mop rotates individual beads which generate an additional hydrodynamic torque on the dimer. Whereas, mop directly torques bound dimers. Our results show that Γm significantly alters the average frequency-dependent dimer rotation rate for both bound and unbound monomers and, when mop exceeds a critical value, increases the maximum dimer rotation frequency. Models that include magnetic and hydrodynamics torques provide good agreement with the experimental findings over a range of field frequencies.

  12. Estimation of muscle torque in various combat sports.

    PubMed

    Pędzich, Wioletta; Mastalerz, Andrzej; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to compare muscle torque of elite combat groups. Twelve taekwondo WTF athletes, twelve taekwondo ITF athletes and nine boxers participated in the study. Measurements of muscle torques were done under static conditions on a special stand which belonged to the Department of Biomechanics. The sum of muscle torque of lower right and left extremities of relative values was significantly higher for taekwondo WTF athletes than for boxers (16%, p < 0.001 for right and 10%, p < 0.05 for left extremities) and taekwondo ITF (10%, p < 0.05 for right and 8% for left extremities). Taekwondo ITF athletes attained significantly higher absolute muscle torque values than boxers for elbow flexors (20%, p < 0.05 for right and 11% for left extremities) and extensors (14% for right and 18%, p < 0.05 for left extremities) and shoulder flexors (10% for right and 12%, p < 0.05 for left extremities) and extensors (11% for right and 1% for left extremities). Taekwondo WTF and taekwondo ITF athletes obtained significantly different relative values of muscle torque of the hip flexors (16%, p < 0.05) and extensors (11%, p < 0.05) of the right extremities.

  13. Parthenogenesis in unfertilized eggs of Coturnix chinensis, the Chinese painted quail, and the effect of egg clutch position on embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Parker, H M; McDaniel, C D

    2009-04-01

    Parthenogenesis, embryonic development of an unfertilized egg, was studied for many years in turkeys. In fact, as many as 49% of unfertilized Beltsville Small White turkey eggs develop embryos. However, no research exists on parthenogenesis in quail. The Chinese painted quail is a close relative of the more common Japanese quail and, unlike turkeys or chickens, the small Chinese painted quail reaches sexual maturity rapidly, making it a great candidate for further research on parthenogenesis. Obviously, a better understanding of avian parthenogenesis should increase our knowledge of avian fertilization and early embryonic development. Therefore, we determined if unfertilized Chinese painted quail hens produce embryos. Second, we explored the possibility that position of the egg within the clutch influences parthenogenesis. When initial secondary sexual plumage was apparent at 4 wk of age, male chicks were separated from females to prevent fertilization. Hens were placed in individual cages near sexual maturity, at approximately 6 wk of age. Individual eggs were collected daily and labeled with hen number and date. Eggs were stored for 0 to 3 d at 20 degrees C before incubation at 37.5 degrees C. After 10 d of incubation, approximately 4,000 eggs from 300 laying hens were examined for embryonic development under a magnifying lamp. On average, 4.8% of the unfertilized eggs contained an abortive form of embryonic development consisting of undifferentiated cells and unorganized membranes. Approximately 27% of the laying hens produced at least 1 egg with parthenogenic development. However, about 10% (30) of these hens exhibited a predisposition for parthenogenesis by producing 2 or more unfertilized eggs with embryonic development. Twenty percent of the eggs from 2 hens produced embryonic development. Additionally, the first egg laid in a clutch was most likely to produce embryonic development, with a steady decline in the percentage of eggs with embryonic development

  14. Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Harnist, Iga; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Perrins, Christopher M; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; Pascoal da Silva, Luis; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Tryjanowski, Piotr; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wieslaw; Møller, Anders Pape

    2016-08-01

    The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pertinently, caterpillars are an important food source for the nestlings of many bird species, and their abundance is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature and date of bud burst. Higher temperatures and advanced date of bud burst in urban areas could advance peak caterpillar abundance and thus affect breeding phenology of birds. In order to test whether laying date advance and clutch sizes decrease with the intensity of urbanization, we analyzed the timing of breeding and clutch size in relation to intensity of urbanization as a measure of human impact in 199 nest box plots across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East (i.e., the Western Palearctic) for four species of hole-nesters: blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Meanwhile, we estimated the intensity of urbanization as the density of buildings surrounding study plots measured on orthophotographs. For the four study species, the intensity of urbanization was not correlated with laying date. Clutch size in blue and great tits does not seem affected by the intensity of urbanization, while in collared and pied flycatchers it decreased with increasing intensity of urbanization. This is the first large-scale study showing a species-specific major correlation between intensity of urbanization and the ecology of breeding. The underlying mechanisms for the relationships between life history and

  15. How Joint Torques Affect Hamstring Injury Risk in Sprinting Swing–Stance Transition

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YULIANG; WEI, SHUTAO; ZHONG, YUNJIAN; FU, WEIJIE; LI, LI; LIU, YU

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose The potential mechanisms of hamstring strain injuries in athletes are not well understood. The study, therefore, was aimed at understanding hamstring mechanics by studying loading conditions during maximum-effort overground sprinting. Methods Three-dimensional kinematics and ground reaction force data were collected from eight elite male sprinters sprinting at their maximum effort. Maximal isometric torques of the hip and knee were also collected. Data from the sprinting gait cycle were analyzed via an intersegmental dynamics approach, and the different joint torque components were calculated. Results During the initial stance phase, the ground reaction force passed anteriorly to the knee and hip, producing an extension torque at the knee and a flexion torque at the hip joint. Thus, the active muscle torque functioned to produce flexion torque at the knee and extension torque at the hip. The maximal muscle torque at the knee joint was 1.4 times the maximal isometric knee flexion torque. During the late swing phase, the muscle torque counterbalanced the motion-dependent torque and acted to flex the knee joint and extend the hip joint. The loading conditions on the hamstring muscles were similar to those of the initial stance phase. Conclusions During both the initial stance and late swing phases, the large passive torques at both the knee and hip joints acted to lengthen the hamstring muscles. The active muscle torques generated mainly by the hamstrings functioned to counteract those passive effects. As a result, during sprinting or high-speed locomotion, the hamstring muscles may be more susceptible to high risk of strain injury during these two phases. PMID:24911288

  16. High torque DC motor fabrication and test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makus, P.

    1976-01-01

    The testing of a standard iron and standard alnico permanent magnet two-phase, brushless dc spin motor for potential application to the space telescope has been concluded. The purpose of this study was to determine spin motor power losses, magnetic drag, efficiency and torque speed characteristics of a high torque dc motor. The motor was designed and built to fit an existing reaction wheel as a test vehicle and to use existing brass-board commutation and torque command electronics. The results of the tests are included in this report.

  17. Isometric hip-rotator torque production at varying degrees of hip flexion.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sam; Hoffman, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Hip torque production is associated with certain knee injuries. The hip rotators change function depending on hip angle. To compare hip-rotator torque production between 3 angles of hip flexion, limbs, and sexes. Descriptive. University sports medicine research laboratory. 15 men and 15 women, 19-39 y. Three 6-s maximal isometric contractions of the hip external and internal rotators at 10 degrees, 40 degrees, and 90 degrees of hip flexion on both legs. Average torque normalized to body mass. Internal-rotation torque was greatest at 90 degrees of hip flexion, followed by 40 degrees of hip flexion and finally 10 degrees of hip flexion. External-rotation torque was not different based on hip flexion. The nondominant leg's external rotators were stronger than the dominant leg's, but the reverse was true for internal rotators. Finally, the men had more overall rotator torque. Hip-rotation torque production varies between flexion angle, leg, and sex. Clinicians treating lower extremity problems need to be aware of these differences.

  18. Electrode position markedly affects knee torque in tetanic, stimulated contractions.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Potenza, Paolo; Gastaldi, Laura; Botter, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how much the distance between stimulation electrodes affects the knee extension torque in tetanic, electrically elicited contractions. Current pulses of progressively larger amplitude, from 0 mA to maximally tolerated intensities, were delivered at 20 pps to the vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis muscles of ten, healthy male subjects. Four inter-electrode distances were tested: 32.5% (L1), 45.0% (L2), 57.5% (L3) and 70% (L4) of the distance between the patella apex and the anterior superior iliac spine. The maximal knee extension torque and the current leading to the maximal torque were measured and compared between electrode configurations. The maximal current tolerated by each participant ranged from 60 to 100 mA and did not depend on the inter-electrode distance. The maximal knee extension torque elicited did not differ between L3 and L4 (P = 0.15) but, for both conditions, knee torque was significantly greater than for L1 and L2 (P < 0.024). On average, the extension torque elicited for L3 and L4 was two to three times greater than that obtained for L1 and L2. The current leading to maximal torque was not as sensitive to inter-electrode distance. Except for L1 current intensity did not change with electrode configuration (P > 0.16). Key results presented here revealed that for a given stimulation intensity, knee extension torque increased dramatically with the distance between electrodes. The distance between electrodes seems therefore to critically affect knee torque, with potential implication for optimising exercise protocols based on electrical stimulation.

  19. Towards measuring quantum electrodynamic torque with a levitated nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhujing; Bang, Jaehoon; Ahn, Jonghoon; Hoang, Thai M.; Li, Tongcang

    2017-04-01

    According to quantum electrodynamics, quantum fluctuations of electromagnetic fields give rise to a zero-point energy that never vanishes, even in the absence of electromagnetic sources. The interaction energy will not only lead to the well-known Casimir force but will also contribute to the Casimir torque for anisotropic materials. We propose to use an optically levitated nanorod in vacuum and a birefringent substrate to experimentally investigate the QED torque. We have previously observed the libration of an optically levitated non-spherical nanoparticle in vacuum and found it to be an ultrasensitive torque sensor. A nanorod with a long axis of 300nm and a diameter of 60nm levitated in vacuum at 10 (- 8) torr will have a remarkable torque detection sensitivity on the order of 10 (- 28) Nm/ √Hz, which will be sufficient to detect the Casimir torque. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No.1555035-PHY.

  20. Heat Control via Torque Control in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Richard; Colligan, Kevin; Knapp, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In a proposed advance in friction stir welding, the torque exerted on the workpiece by the friction stir pin would be measured and controlled in an effort to measure and control the total heat input to the workpiece. The total heat input to the workpiece is an important parameter of any welding process (fusion or friction stir welding). In fusion welding, measurement and control of heat input is a difficult problem. However, in friction stir welding, the basic principle of operation affords the potential of a straightforward solution: Neglecting thermal losses through the pin and the spindle that supports it, the rate of heat input to the workpiece is the product of the torque and the speed of rotation of the friction stir weld pin and, hence, of the spindle. Therefore, if one acquires and suitably processes data on torque and rotation and controls the torque, the rotation, or both, one should be able to control the heat input into the workpiece. In conventional practice in friction stir welding, one uses feedback control of the spindle motor to maintain a constant speed of rotation. According to the proposal, one would not maintain a constant speed of rotation: Instead, one would use feedback control to maintain a constant torque and would measure the speed of rotation while allowing it to vary. The torque exerted on the workpiece would be estimated as the product of (1) the torque-multiplication ratio of the spindle belt and/or gear drive, (2) the force measured by a load cell mechanically coupled to the spindle motor, and (3) the moment arm of the load cell. Hence, the output of the load cell would be used as a feedback signal for controlling the torque (see figure).

  1. Validity of trunk extensor and flexor torque measurements using isokinetic dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Guilhem, Gaël; Giroux, Caroline; Couturier, Antoine; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity and test-retest reliability of trunk muscle strength testing performed with a latest-generation isokinetic dynamometer. Eccentric, isometric, and concentric peak torque of the trunk flexor and extensor muscles was measured in 15 healthy subjects. Muscle cross sectional area (CSA) and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity were respectively correlated to peak torque and submaximal isometric torque for erector spinae and rectus abdominis muscles. Reliability of peak torque measurements was determined during test and retest sessions. Significant correlations were consistently observed between muscle CSA and peak torque for all contraction types (r=0.74-0.85; P<0.001) and between EMG activity and submaximal isometric torque (r ⩾ 0.99; P<0.05), for both extensor and flexor muscles. Intraclass correlation coefficients were comprised between 0.87 and 0.95, and standard errors of measurement were lower than 9% for all contraction modes. The mean difference in peak torque between test and retest ranged from -3.7% to 3.7% with no significant mean directional bias. Overall, our findings establish the validity of torque measurements using the tested trunk module. Also considering the excellent test-retest reliability of peak torque measurements, we conclude that this latest-generation isokinetic dynamometer could be used with confidence to evaluate trunk muscle function for clinical or athletic purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Eggshell porosity covaries with egg size among female House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon) but is unrelated to incubation onset and egg-laying order within clutches.

    PubMed

    Bowers, E K; White, A; Lang, A; Podgorski, L; Thompson, C F; Sakaluk, S K; Jaeckle, W B; Harper, R G

    2015-06-01

    In birds, the duration of egg incubation (the time from incubation onset to hatching) can affect multiple components of nest success, but what affects incubation duration? Previous studies suggest that incubation duration is affected by both parental behavior and components of the egg, which have yet to be determined. One egg component that may be related to incubation behavior and the time until hatching is eggshell porosity, which affects the exchange of metabolic gasses and water vapor across the shell and, thus, the speed of embryonic development and incubation duration. We tested whether eggshell porosity was associated with the timing of incubation onset by female House Wrens ( Troglodytes aedon Vieillot, 1809), and whether porosity varied within clutches in a manner that might be associated with incubation periods and hatching patterns (i.e., synchronous vs. asynchronous hatching). Eggshell porosity was unrelated to the onset of maternal incubation and did not differ between early and later-laid eggs within clutches, but differed significantly among females and covaried with egg size. We conclude that producing all eggshells of similar porosity within clutches, while adjusting incubation onset once most or all eggs are laid, provide facultative maternal control over variation in hatching patterns.

  3. Torque expression of 0.018 and 0.022 inch conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore; Katsaros, Christos; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the moments generated with low- and high-torque brackets. Four different bracket prescription-slot combinations of the same bracket type (Mini Diamond® Twin) were evaluated: high-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch and low-torque 0.018 and 0.022 inch. These brackets were bonded on identical maxillary acrylic resin models with levelled and aligned teeth and each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system (OMSS). Ten specimens of 0.017 × 0.025 inch and ten 0.019 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires (ORMCO) were evaluated in the low- and high-torque 0.018 inch and 0.022 inch brackets, respectively. The wires were ligated with elastomerics into the brackets and each measurement was repeated once after religation. Two-way analysis of variance and t-test were conducted to compare the generated moments between wires at low- and high-torque brackets separately. The maximum moment generated by the 0.017 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwire in the 0.018 inch brackets at +15 degrees ranged from 14.33 and 12.95 Nmm for the high- and low-torque brackets, respectively. The measured torque in the 0.022 inch brackets with the 0.019 × 0.025 inch stainless steel archwire was 9.32 and 6.48 Nmm, respectively. The recorded differences of maximum moments between the high- and low-torque series were statistically significant. High-torque brackets produced higher moments compared with low-torque brackets. Additionally, in both high- and low-torque configurations, the thicker 0.019 × 0.025 inch steel archwire in the 0.022 inch slot system generated lower moments in comparison with the 0.017 × 0.025 inch steel archwire in the 0.018 inch slot system.

  4. Technical Errors May Affect Accuracy of Torque Limiter in Locking Plate Osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Savin, David D; Lee, Simon; Bohnenkamp, Frank C; Pastor, Andrew; Garapati, Rajeev; Goldberg, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    In locking plate osteosynthesis, proper surgical technique is crucial in reducing potential pitfalls, and use of a torque limiter makes it possible to control insertion torque. We conducted a study of the ways in which different techniques can alter the accuracy of torque limiters. We tested 22 torque limiters (1.5 Nm) for accuracy using hand and power tools under different rotational scenarios: hand power at low and high velocity and drill power at low and high velocity. We recorded the maximum torque reached after each torque-limiting event. Use of torque limiters under hand power at low velocity and high velocity resulted in significantly (P < .0001) different mean (SD) measurements: 1.49 (0.15) Nm and 3.73 (0.79) Nm. Use under drill power at controlled low velocity and at high velocity also resulted in significantly (P < .0001) different mean (SD) measurements: 1.47 (0.14) Nm and 5.37 (0.90) Nm. Maximum single measurement obtained was 9.0 Nm using drill power at high velocity. Locking screw insertion with improper technique may result in higher than expected torque and subsequent complications. For torque limiters, the most reliable technique involves hand power at slow velocity or drill power with careful control of insertion speed until 1 torque-limiting event occurs.

  5. Spin transfer torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves: From clean to disordered regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed; Manchon, Aurelien; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Current-driven spin torques in metallic spin valves composed of antiferromagnets are theoretically studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function method implemented on a tight-binding model. We focus our attention on G-type and L-type antiferromagnets in both clean and disordered regimes. In such structures, spin torques can either rotate the magnetic order parameter coherently (coherent torque) or compete with the internal antiferromagnetic exchange (exchange torque). We show that, depending on the symmetry of the spin valve, the coherent and exchange torques can either be in the plane, ∝n×(q×n) or out of the plane ∝n×q, where q and n are the directions of the order parameter of the polarizer and the free antiferromagnetic layers, respectively. Although disorder conserves the symmetry of the torques, it strongly reduces the torque magnitude, pointing out the need for momentum conservation to ensure strong spin torque in antiferromagnetic spin valves.

  6. Electronic measurement of variable torques in precision work technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maehr, M.

    1978-01-01

    Approaches for the determination of torques on the basis of length measurements are discussed. Attention is given to torque determinations in which the deformation of a shaft is measured, an electric measurement of the torsion angle, and an approach proposed by Buschmann (1970). Methods for a torque determination conducted with the aid of force measurements make use of piezoelectric approaches. The components used by these methods include a quartz crystal and a charge amplifier.

  7. Design of digital load torque observer in hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yukun; Zhang, Haoming; Wang, Yinghai

    2008-12-01

    In hybrid electric vehicle, engine begain to work only when motor was in high speed in order to decrease tail gas emission. However, permanent magnet motor was sensitive to its load, adding engine to the system always made its speed drop sharply, which caused engine to work in low efficiency again and produced much more environment pollution. Dynamic load torque model of permanent magnet synchronous motor is established on the basic of motor mechanical equation and permanent magnet synchronous motor vector control theory, Full- digital load torque observer and compensation control system is made based on TMS320F2407A. Experiment results prove load torque observer and compensation control system can detect and compensate torque disturbing effectively, which can solve load torque disturbing and decrease gas pollution of hybrid electric vehicle.

  8. Displaying Force and Torque of A Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Dotson, R. S.; Primus, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    Display combines bar charts, vector diagrams, and numerical values to inform operator of forces and torques exerted by end effector of manipulator. On voice or keyboard command, eight-channel strip-chart recorder traces force and torque components and claw position of raw measurements from eight strain gage sensors in end effector. Especially helpful when operator's view of end effector is obscured.

  9. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  10. Evaluation Method for Fieldlike-Torque Efficiency by Modulation of the Resonance Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsoo; Kim, Dongseuk; Chun, Byong Sun; Moon, Kyoung-Woong; Hwang, Chanyong

    2018-05-01

    The spin Hall effect has attracted a lot of interest in spintronics because it offers the possibility of a faster switching route with an electric current than with a spin-transfer-torque device. Recently, fieldlike spin-orbit torque has been shown to play an important role in the magnetization switching mechanism. However, there is no simple method for observing the fieldlike spin-orbit torque efficiency. We suggest a method for measuring fieldlike spin-orbit torque using a linear change in the resonance field in spectra of direct-current (dc)-tuned spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The fieldlike spin-orbit torque efficiency can be obtained in both a macrospin simulation and in experiments by simply subtracting the Oersted field from the shifted amount of resonance field. This method analyzes the effect of fieldlike torque using dc in a normal metal; therefore, only the dc resistivity and the dimensions of each layer are considered in estimating the fieldlike spin-torque efficiency. The evaluation of fieldlike-torque efficiency of a newly emerging material by modulation of the resonance field provides a shortcut in the development of an alternative magnetization switching device.

  11. Hex ball torque test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, B. A.; Foster, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    A series of torque tests were performed on four flight-type hex ball universal joints in order to characterize and determine the actual load-carrying capability of this device. The universal joint is a part of manual actuation rods for scientific instruments within the Hubble Space Telescope. It was found that the hex ball will bind slightly during the initial load application. This binding did not affect the function of the universal joint, and the units would wear-in after a few additional loading cycles. The torsional yield load was approximately 50 ft-lb, and was consistent among the four test specimens. Also, the torque required to cause complete failure exceeded 80 ft-lb. It is concluded that the hex ball universal joint is suitable for its intended applications.

  12. Increase of economy of torque flow pump with high specific speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusak, A. G.; Krishtop, I. V.; German, V. F.; Baga, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    Torque flow pumps are widely spread types of energy machines, which are used in majority of modern branches of industry for pumping of dirty media. The main task of researchers of torque flow pumps is increase of such pumps effectiveness for higher feed. Hydraulic losses for torque flow pumps are caused by working process of such pumps and are inevitable. Decrease of losses can be obtained by means of optimization of hydraulic flow part geometry. Modern approach to design of pump outlet introduces new constructive solutions which can increase economy of torque flow pumps. The aim of this research is increase of economy of torque flow pumps by means of application of spatial outlet and investigation of its geometry on pump characteristics. Analytical and numerical methods of liquid flow research for hydraulic flow part of torque flow pump were used in this paper. Moreover, influence of hydraulic flow part geometry of different designs of “Turo” type torque flow pumps outlets on pump characteristics was investigated. Numerical research enabled to study process of energy transfer of torque flow pump and evaluate influence of geometrical dimensions of spatial spiral outlet on its characteristics. Besides numerical research confirmed introduced regularity of peripheral velocity distribution in outlet. Velocity moment distribution in outlet was obtained during implementation of numerical research. Implemented bench tests of torque flow pump prototypes enabled to obtain real characteristics of pump and confirm effectiveness of spatial geometry of outlet application for such pump.

  13. Spin Transfer Torque in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Chen, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Graphene is an idea channel material for spin transport due to its long spin diffusion length. To develop graphene based spin logic, it is important to demonstrate spin transfer torque in graphene. Here, we report the experimental measurement of spin transfer torque in graphene nonlocal spin valve devices. Assisted by a small external in-plane magnetic field, the magnetization reversal of the receiving magnet is induced by pure spin diffusion currents from the injector magnet. The magnetization switching is reversible between parallel and antiparallel configurations by controlling the polarity of the applied charged currents. Current induced heating and Oersted field from the nonlocal charge flow have also been excluded in this study. Next, we further enhance the spin angular momentum absorption at the interface of the receiving magnet and graphene channel by removing the tunneling barrier in the receiving magnet. The device with a tunneling barrier only at the injector magnet shows a comparable nonlocal spin valve signal but lower electrical noise. Moreover, in the same preset condition, the critical charge current density for spin torque in the single tunneling barrier device shows a substantial reduction if compared to the double tunneling barrier device.

  14. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    SciTech Connect

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A.; King, Robert D.; Sanza, Peter C.

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation.

  15. Comparison of design and torque measurements of various manual wrenches.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jörg; Petermöller, Simone; Scheer, Martin; Happe, Arndt; Faber, Franz-Josef; Zoeller, Joachim E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate torque application and determination of the applied torque during surgical and prosthetic treatment is important to reduce complications. A study was performed to determine and compare the accuracy of manual wrenches, which are available in different designs with a large range of preset torques. Thirteen different wrench systems with a variety of preset torques ranging from 10 to 75 Ncm were evaluated. Three different designs were available, with a spring-in-coil or toggle design as an active mechanism or a beam as a passive mechanism, to select the preset torque. To provide a clinically relevant analysis, a total of 1,170 torque measurements in the range of 10 to 45 Ncm were made in vitro using an electronic torque measurement device. The absolute deviations in Ncm and percent deviations across all wrenches were small, with a mean of -0.24 ± 2.15 Ncm and -0.84% ± 11.72% as a shortfall relative to the preset value. The greatest overage was 8.2 Ncm (82.5%), and the greatest shortfall was 8.47 Ncm (46%). However, extreme values were rare, with 95th-percentile values of -1.5% (lower value) and -0.16% (upper value). A comparison with respect to wrench design revealed significantly higher deviations for coil and toggle-style wrenches than for beam wrenches. Beam wrenches were associated with a lower risk of rare extreme values thanks to their passive mechanism of achieving the selected preset torque, which minimizes the risk of harming screw connections.

  16. Quantifying the Precision of Single-Molecule Torque and Twist Measurements Using Allan Variance.

    PubMed

    van Oene, Maarten M; Ha, Seungkyu; Jager, Tessa; Lee, Mina; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2018-04-24

    Single-molecule manipulation techniques have provided unprecedented insights into the structure, function, interactions, and mechanical properties of biological macromolecules. Recently, the single-molecule toolbox has been expanded by techniques that enable measurements of rotation and torque, such as the optical torque wrench (OTW) and several different implementations of magnetic (torque) tweezers. Although systematic analyses of the position and force precision of single-molecule techniques have attracted considerable attention, their angle and torque precision have been treated in much less detail. Here, we propose Allan deviation as a tool to systematically quantitate angle and torque precision in single-molecule measurements. We apply the Allan variance method to experimental data from our implementations of (electro)magnetic torque tweezers and an OTW and find that both approaches can achieve a torque precision better than 1 pN · nm. The OTW, capable of measuring torque on (sub)millisecond timescales, provides the best torque precision for measurement times ≲10 s, after which drift becomes a limiting factor. For longer measurement times, magnetic torque tweezers with their superior stability provide the best torque precision. Use of the Allan deviation enables critical assessments of the torque precision as a function of measurement time across different measurement modalities and provides a tool to optimize measurement protocols for a given instrument and application. Copyright © 2018 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computing the motor torque of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasish; Lauga, Eric

    2018-06-13

    The rotary motor of bacteria is a natural nano-technological marvel that enables cell locomotion by powering the rotation of semi-rigid helical flagellar filaments in fluid environments. It is well known that the motor operates essentially at constant torque in counter-clockwise direction but past work have reported a large range of values of this torque. Focusing on Escherichia coli cells that are swimming and cells that are stuck on a glass surface for which all geometrical and environmental parameters are known (N. C. Darnton et al., J. Bacteriol., 2007, 189, 1756-1764), we use two validated numerical methods to compute the value of the motor torque consistent with experiments. Specifically, we use (and compare) a numerical method based on the boundary integral representation of Stokes flow and also develop a hybrid method combining boundary element and slender body theory to model the cell body and flagellar filament, respectively. Using measured rotation speed of the motor, our computations predict a value of the motor torque in the range 440 pN nm to 829 pN nm, depending critically on the distance between the flagellar filaments and the nearby surface.

  18. Results and Analysis from Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matty, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    A space suit's mobility is critical to an astronaut's ability to perform work efficiently. As mobility increases, the astronaut can perform tasks for longer durations with less fatigue. Mobility can be broken down into two parts: range of motion (ROM) and torque. These two measurements describe how the suit moves and how much force it takes to move. Two methods were chosen to define mobility requirements for the Constellation Space Suit Element (CSSE). One method focuses on range of motion and the second method centers on joint torque. A joint torque test was conducted to determine a baseline for current advanced space suit joint torques. This test utilized the following space suits: Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), I-Suit, D-Suit, Enhanced Mobility (EM)- ACES, and Mark III (MK-III). Data was collected data from 16 different joint movements of each suit. The results were then reviewed and CSSE joint torque requirement values were selected. The focus of this paper is to discuss trends observed during data analysis.

  19. Evaluation of a high-torque backlash-free roller actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Rohn, Douglas A.; Anderson, William

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a test program that evaluated the stiffness, accuracy, torque ripple, frictional losses, and torque holding capability of a 16:1 ratio, 430 N-m (320 ft-lb) planetary roller drive for a potential space vehicle actuator application. The drive's planet roller supporting structure and bearings were found to be the largest contributors to overall drive compliance, accounting for more than half of the total. In comparison, the traction roller contacts themselves contributed only 9 percent of the drive's compliance based on an experimentally verified stiffness model. The drive exhibited no backlash although 8 arc sec of hysteresis deflection were recorded due to microcreep within the contact under torque load. Because of these load-dependent displacements, some form of feedback control would be required for arc second positioning applications. Torque ripple tests showed the drive to be extremely smooth, actually providing some damping of input torsional oscillations. The drive also demonstrated the ability to hold static torque with drifts of 7 arc sec or less over a 24 hr period at 35 percent of full load.

  20. Local nature of impurity induced spin-orbit torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Sergey; Kalitsov, Alan; Chshiev, Mairbec; Mryasov, Oleg

    Spin-orbit torques are of a great interest due to their potential applications for spin electronics. Generally, it originates from strong spin orbit coupling of heavy 4d/5d elements and its mechanism is usually attributed either to the Spin Hall effect or Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We have developed a quantum-mechanical approach based on the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism and tight binding Hamiltonian model to study spin-orbit torques and extended our theory for the case of extrinsic spin-orbit coupling induced by impurities. For the sake of simplicity, we consider a magnetic material on a two dimensional lattice with a single non-magnetic impurity. However, our model can be easily extended for three dimensional layered heterostructures. Based on our calculations, we present the detailed analysis of the origin of local spin-orbit torques and persistent charge currents around the impurity, that give rise to spin-orbit torques even in equilibrium and explain the existence of anisotropy.

  1. Investigation of torque generated by Test Blanket Module mock-up in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Lanctot, M.; Degrassie, J. S.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N.; Solomon, W. M.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at DIII-D have investigated the scaling of Test Blanket Module (TBM) torque with plasma pressure and collisionality by performing dimensionless parameter scans. In each configuration, neutral beam torque modulation and TBM torque modulation were sequentially applied to allow experimental characterization of the TBM generated torque and the underlying transport. Calculations of the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque with PENT code of these plasmas find that TBM torque is strongly edge localized while the tentative experimental analysis indicates a more radially broad TBM torque profile. Both the experimental and PENT results will be elaborated and experimental TBM torque scaling with pressure and collisionality presented. Experimental validation of existing plasma response and NTV torque models is an important step toward understanding the impact of magnetic field ripple on plasma rotation, and for predicting the required compensation fields. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Power-to-load balancing for asymmetric heave wave energy converters with nonideal power take-off

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M.; Madhi, Farshad; Yeung, Ronald W.

    The aim of this study is to maximize the power-to-load ratio for asymmetric heave wave energy converters. Linear hydrodynamic theory was used to calculate bounds of the expected time-averaged power (TAP) and corresponding surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and power take-off (PTO) control force with the assumption of sinusoidal displacement. This paper formulates an optimal control problem to handle an objective function with competing terms in an attempt to maximize power capture while minimizing structural and actuator loads in regular and irregular waves. Penalty weights are placed on the surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and PTO actuation force, thereby allowing the controlmore » focus to concentrate on either power absorption or load mitigation. The penalty weights are used to control peak structural and actuator loads that were found to curb the additional losses in power absorption associated with a nonideal PTO. Thus, in achieving these goals, a per-unit gain in TAP would not lead to a greater per-unit demand in structural strength, hence yielding a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. Demonstrative results for 'The Berkeley Wedge' in the form of output TAP, reactive TAP needed to drive WEC motion, and the amplitudes of the surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and PTO control force are shown.« less

  3. Power-to-load balancing for asymmetric heave wave energy converters with nonideal power take-off

    DOE PAGES

    Tom, Nathan M.; Madhi, Farshad; Yeung, Ronald W.

    2017-12-11

    The aim of this study is to maximize the power-to-load ratio for asymmetric heave wave energy converters. Linear hydrodynamic theory was used to calculate bounds of the expected time-averaged power (TAP) and corresponding surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and power take-off (PTO) control force with the assumption of sinusoidal displacement. This paper formulates an optimal control problem to handle an objective function with competing terms in an attempt to maximize power capture while minimizing structural and actuator loads in regular and irregular waves. Penalty weights are placed on the surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and PTO actuation force, thereby allowing the controlmore » focus to concentrate on either power absorption or load mitigation. The penalty weights are used to control peak structural and actuator loads that were found to curb the additional losses in power absorption associated with a nonideal PTO. Thus, in achieving these goals, a per-unit gain in TAP would not lead to a greater per-unit demand in structural strength, hence yielding a favorable benefit-to-cost ratio. Demonstrative results for 'The Berkeley Wedge' in the form of output TAP, reactive TAP needed to drive WEC motion, and the amplitudes of the surge-restraining force, pitch-restraining torque, and PTO control force are shown.« less

  4. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    SciTech Connect

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.; King, R.D.; Sanza, P.C.

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation. 1 figure.

  5. Closed-loop torque feedback for a universal field-oriented controller

    DOEpatents

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.; King, R.D.; Sanza, P.C.; Haefner, K.B.

    1992-11-24

    A torque feedback system is employed in a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller to tune a torque-producing current command and a slip frequency command in order to achieve robust torque control of an induction machine even in the event of current regulator errors and during transitions between pulse width modulated (PWM) and square wave modes of operation. 1 figure.

  6. Preparation Torque Limit for Composites Joined with Mechanical Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Frank P.; Yi, Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Current design guidelines for determining torque ranges for composites are based on tests and analysis from isotropic materials. Properties of composites are not taken into account. No design criteria based upon a systematic analytical and test analyses is available. This paper is to study the maximum torque load a composite component could carry prior to any failure. Specifically, the torque-tension tests are conducted. NDT techniques including acoustic emission, thermography and photomicroscopy are also utilized to characterize the damage modes.

  7. Muscle activation and the isokinetic torque-velocity relationship of the human triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Harridge, S D; White, M J

    1993-01-01

    The influence of muscle activation and the time allowed for torque generation on the angle-specific torque-velocity relationship of the triceps surae was studied during plantar flexion using supramaximal electrical stimulation and a release technique on six male subjects [mean (SD) age 25 (4) years]. Torque-velocity data were obtained under different levels of constant muscle activation by varying the stimulus frequency and the time allowed for isometric torque generation prior to release and isokinetic shortening. To eliminate the effects of the frequency response on absolute torque the isokinetic data were normalized to the maximum isometric torque values at 0.44 rad. There were no significant differences in the normalized torques generated at any angular velocity using stimulus frequencies of 20, 50 or 80 Hz. When the muscle was stimulated at 50 Hz the torques obtained after a 400 ms and 1 s pre-release isometric contraction did not differ significantly. However, with no pre-release contraction significantly less torque was generated at all angular velocities beyond 1.05 rad.s-1 when compared with either the 200, 400 ms or 1 s condition. With a 200 ms pre-release contraction significantly less torque was generated at angular velocities beyond 1.05 rad.s-1 when compared with the 400 ms or 1 s conditions. It would seem that the major factor governing the shape of the torque-velocity curve at a constant level of muscle activation is the time allowed for torque generation.

  8. Pelvic rotation torque during fast-pitch softball hitting under three ball height conditions.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kojima, Takeji

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relevance of hip joint angles to the production of the pelvic rotation torque in fast-pitch softball hitting and to examine the effect of ball height on this production. Thirteen advanced female softball players hit stationary balls at three different heights: high, middle, and low. The pelvic rotation torque, defined as the torque acting on the pelvis through the hip joints about the pelvic superior-inferior axis, was determined from the kinematic and force plate data using inverse dynamics. Irrespective of the ball heights, the rear hip extension, rear hip external rotation, front hip adduction, and front hip flexion torques contributed to the production of pelvic rotation torque. Although the contributions of the adduction and external rotation torques at each hip joint were significantly different among the ball heights, the contributions of the front and rear hip joint torques were similar among the three ball heights owing to cancelation of the two torque components. The timings of the peaks of the hip joint torque components were significantly different, suggesting that softball hitters may need to adjust the timings of the torque exertions fairly precisely to rotate the upper body effectively.

  9. Fatigue affects peak joint torque angle in hamstrings but not in quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Bellin, Giuseppe; Beato, Marco; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Primary aim of this study was to investigate peak joint torque angle (i.e. the angle of peak torque) changes recorded during an isokinetic test before and after a fatiguing soccer match simulation. Secondarily we want to investigate functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratio changes due to fatigue. Before and after a standardised soccer match simulation, twenty-two healthy male amateur soccer players performed maximal isokinetic strength tests both for hamstrings and for quadriceps muscles at 1.05 rad · s(‒1), 3.14 rad · s(‒1) and 5.24 rad · s(‒1). Peak joint torque angle, peak torque and both functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratios were examined. Both dominant and non-dominant limbs were tested. Peak joint torque angle significantly increased only in knee flexors. Both eccentric and concentric contractions resulted in such increment, which occurred in both limbs. No changes were found in quadriceps peak joint torque angle. Participants experienced a significant decrease in torque both in hamstrings and in quadriceps. Functional Hecc:Qconc ratio was lower only in dominant limb at higher velocities, while Hconc:Qconc did not change. This study showed after specific fatiguing task changes in hamstrings only torque/angle relationship. Hamstrings injury risk could depend on altered torque when knee is close to extension, coupled with a greater peak torque decrement compared to quadriceps. These results suggest the use eccentric based training to prevent hamstrings shift towards shorter length.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of friction torque from radial ball bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geonea, Ionut; Dumitru, Nicolae; Dumitru, Ilie

    2017-10-01

    In this paper it is presented a numerical simulation and an experimental study of total friction torque from radial ball bearings. For this purpose it is conceived a virtual CAD model of the experimental test bench for bearing friction torque measurement. The virtual model it is used for numerical simulation in Adams software, that allows dynamic study of multi-body systems and in particularly with facility Adams Machinery of dynamic behavior of machine parts. It is manufactured an experimental prototype of the test bench for radial ball bearings friction torque measurement. In order to measure the friction torque of the tested bearings it is used an equal resistance elastic beam element, with strain gauge transducer to measure bending deformations. The actuation electric motor of the bench has the shaft mounted on two bearings and the motor housing is fixed to the free side of the elastic beam, which is bended by a force proportional with the total friction torque. The beam elastic element with strain gauge transducer is calibrated in order to measure the force occurred. Experimental determination of the friction torque is made for several progressive radial loads. It is established the correlation from the friction torque and bearing radial load. The bench allows testing of several types and dimensions of radial bearings, in order to establish the bearing durability and of total friction torque.

  11. New Cogging Torque Reduction Methods for Permanent Magnet Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, F. S.; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.; Jusoh, L. I.

    2017-08-01

    Permanent magnet type motors (PMs) especially permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) are expanding its limbs in industrial application system and widely used in various applications. The key features of this machine include high power and torque density, extending speed range, high efficiency, better dynamic performance and good flux-weakening capability. Nevertheless, high in cogging torque, which may cause noise and vibration, is one of the threat of the machine performance. Therefore, with the aid of 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) and simulation using JMAG Designer, this paper proposed new method for cogging torque reduction. Based on the simulation, methods of combining the skewing with radial pole pairing method and skewing with axial pole pairing method reduces the cogging torque effect up to 71.86% and 65.69% simultaneously.

  12. Atypical Brain Torque in Boys With Developmental Stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Jeffrey Ryan; Zadina, Janet N.; Corey, David M.; Cohen, Jeremy D.; Lemen, Lisa C.; Foundas, Anne L.

    2017-01-01

    The counterclockwise brain torque, defined as a larger right prefrontal and left parietal-occipital lobe, is a consistent brain asymmetry. Reduced or reversed lobar asymmetries are markers of atypical cerebral laterality and have been found in adults who stutter. It was hypothesized that atypical brain torque would be more common in children who stutter. MRI-based morphology measures were completed in boys who stutter (n=14) and controls (n=14), ages 8–13. The controls had the expected brain torque configurations whereas the boys who stutter were atypical. These results support the hypothesis that developmental stuttering is associated with atypical prefrontal and parietal-occipital lobe asymmetries. PMID:22799762

  13. Steam sterilization effect on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices.

    PubMed

    Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Fayyaz, Ali; Mahshid, Minoo; Saboury, Aboulfazl; Ansari, Ghassem

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of steam sterilization on the accuracy (within 10%) of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices (F-S MTLDs) to achieve their target torque values. Fifteen new F-S MTLDs were selected from Astra Tech (25 Ncm, Hader SA, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland), BioHorizons (30 Ncm, Dynatorq ITL, Irvine, California, USA), Dr. Idhe (15-60 Ncm, Dr. Idhe Dental, Eching/Munich, Germany). Every peak torque measurement was tested ten times before steam sterilization using Tohnichi torque gauge (6Tohnichi-BTG (-S), Japan). Steam sterilization was performed using a 100 cycle autoclave. Preparation steps were carried out for the devices before each autoclave sterilization cycle. Peak torque measurements were repeated after every sterilization cycle. Mean difference between the measured and the targeted torque values were evaluated before and after aging. Repeated-measures of ANOVA were used to compare the differences of accuracy between subjects. Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for pairwise comparison. Autoclaving resulted in an increase in the error values (the difference between peak torque and target torque values) in all the three groups studied (P < 0.05), with only Astra Tech devices showing >10% (maximum 12%) difference from their torque values in 5% of the measurements. Steam sterilization effect differs between target torque and measured peak values with an increase trend. The peak torque values showed a significant decrease for BioHorizons, while a significant increase was noted for Astra Tech and no significant change in Dr. Idhe group after sterilization. Within the limitation of this study the torque output of each individual device deviated in varying degrees from target torque values. However, the majority of the new frictional-style devices tested in this study, delivered fairly consistent torque output within 10% of their preset target values after sterilization. Astra Tech devices were the only one showing more

  14. Self-consistent perturbed equilibrium with neoclassical toroidal torque in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas C.

    2017-03-01

    Toroidal torque is one of the most important consequences of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks. The well-known neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) is due to the second-order toroidal force from anisotropic pressure tensor in the presence of these asymmetries. This work shows that the first-order toroidal force originating from the same anisotropic pressure tensor, despite having no flux surface average, can significantly modify the local perturbed force balance and thus must be included in perturbed equilibrium self-consistent with NTV. The force operator with an anisotropic pressure tensor is not self-adjoint when the NTV torque is finite and thus is solved directly formore » each component. This approach yields a modified, non-self-adjoint Euler-Lagrange equation that can be solved using a variety of common drift-kinetic models in generalized tokamak geometry. The resulting energy and torque integral provides a unique way to construct a torque response matrix, which contains all the information of self-consistent NTV torque profiles obtainable by applying non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma. This torque response matrix can then be used to systematically optimize non-axisymmetric field distributions for desired NTV profiles. Published by AIP Publishing.« less

  15. A theoretical model of speed-dependent steering torque for rolling tyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yintao; Oertel, Christian; Liu, Yahui; Li, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the tyre steering torque is highly dependent on the tyre rolling speed. In limited cases, i.e. parking manoeuvre, the steering torque approaches the maximum. With the increasing tyre speed, the steering torque decreased rapidly. Accurate modelling of the speed-dependent behaviour for the tyre steering torque is a key factor to calibrate the electric power steering (EPS) system and tune the handling performance of vehicles. However, no satisfactory theoretical model can be found in the existing literature to explain this phenomenon. This paper proposes a new theoretical framework to model this important tyre behaviour, which includes three key factors: (1) tyre three-dimensional transient rolling kinematics with turn-slip; (2) dynamical force and moment generation; and (3) the mixed Lagrange-Euler method for contact deformation solving. A nonlinear finite-element code has been developed to implement the proposed approach. It can be found that the main mechanism for the speed-dependent steering torque is due to turn-slip-related kinematics. This paper provides a theory to explain the complex mechanism of the tyre steering torque generation, which helps to understand the speed-dependent tyre steering torque, tyre road feeling and EPS calibration.

  16. Large Torque Variations in Two Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; Finger, Mark H.; Swank, Jean; Markwardt, Craig B.; Hurley, Kevin; vanderKlis, Michiel

    2002-01-01

    We have monitored the pulse frequencies of the two soft gamma repeaters SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 through the beginning of year 2001 using primarily Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observations. In both sources, we observe large changes in the spin-down torque up to a factor of approximately 4, which persist for several months. Using long-baseline phase-connected timing solutions as well as the overall frequency histories, we construct torque noise power spectra for each SGR (Soft Gamma Repeater). The power spectrum of each source is very red (power-law slope is approximately -3.5). The torque noise power levels are consistent with some accreting systems on timescales of approximately 1 yr, yet the full power spectrum is much steeper in frequency than any known accreting source. To the best of our knowledge, torque noise power spectra with a comparably steep frequency dependence have been seen only in young, glitching radio pulsars (e.g., Vela). The observed changes in spin-down rate do not correlate with burst activity; therefore, the physical mechanisms behind each phenomenon are also likely unrelated. Within the context of the magnetar model, seismic activity can not account for both the bursts and the long-term torque changes unless the seismically active regions are decoupled from one another.

  17. Rotational and peak torque stiffness of rugby shoes.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Moez S; Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Montrasio, Umberto Alfieri; Molloy, Andy; La Barbera, Luigi; Villa, Tomaso; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Sports people always strive to avoid injury. Sports shoe designs in many sports have been shown to affect traction and injury rates. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the differing stiffness and torque in rugby boots that are designed for the same effect. Five different types of rugby shoes commonly worn by scrum forwards were laboratory tested for rotational stiffness and peak torque on a natural playing surface generating force patterns that would be consistent with a rugby scrum. The overall internal rotation peak torque was 57.75±6.26 Nm while that of external rotation was 56.55±4.36 Nm. The Peak internal and external rotational stiffness were 0.696±0.1 and 0.708±0.06 Nm/deg respectively. Our results, when compared to rotational stiffness and peak torques of football shoes published in the literature, show that shoes worn by rugby players exert higher rotational and peak torque stiffness compared to football shoes when tested on the same natural surfaces. There was significant difference between the tested rugby shoes brands. In our opinion, to maximize potential performance and lower the potential of non-contact injury, care should be taken in choosing boots with stiffness appropriate to the players main playing role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonlocal Gilbert damping tensor within the torque-torque correlation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonig, Danny; Kvashnin, Yaroslav; Eriksson, Olle; Pereiro, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    An essential property of magnetic devices is the relaxation rate in magnetic switching, which depends strongly on the damping in the magnetization dynamics. It was recently measured that damping depends on the magnetic texture and, consequently, is a nonlocal quantity. The damping enters the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation as the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter α , which does not, in a straightforward formulation, account for nonlocality. Efforts were spent recently to obtain Gilbert damping from first principles for magnons of wave vector q . However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report about real-space nonlocal Gilbert damping αi j. Here, a torque-torque correlation model based on a tight-binding approach is applied to the bulk elemental itinerant magnets and it predicts significant off-site Gilbert damping contributions, which could be also negative. Supported by atomistic magnetization dynamics simulations, we reveal the importance of the nonlocal Gilbert damping in atomistic magnetization dynamics. This study gives a deeper understanding of the dynamics of the magnetic moments and dissipation processes in real magnetic materials. Ways of manipulating nonlocal damping are explored, either by temperature, materials doping, or strain.

  19. Magnetic moment of inertia within the torque-torque correlation model.

    PubMed

    Thonig, Danny; Eriksson, Olle; Pereiro, Manuel

    2017-04-19

    An essential property of magnetic devices is the relaxation rate in magnetic switching which strongly depends on the energy dissipation. This is described by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and the well known damping parameter, which has been shown to be reproduced from quantum mechanical calculations. Recently the importance of inertia phenomena have been discussed for magnetisation dynamics. This magnetic counterpart to the well-known inertia of Newtonian mechanics, represents a research field that so far has received only limited attention. We present and elaborate here on a theoretical model for calculating the magnetic moment of inertia based on the torque-torque correlation model. Particularly, the method has been applied to bulk itinerant magnets and we show that numerical values are comparable with recent experimental measurements. The theoretical analysis shows that even though the moment of inertia and damping are produced by the spin-orbit coupling, and the expression for them have common features, they are caused by very different electronic structure mechanisms. We propose ways to utilise this in order to tune the inertia experimentally, and to find materials with significant inertia dynamics.

  20. Minimization of torque ripple in ferrite-assisted synchronous reluctance motors by using asymmetric stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Meimei; Liu, Guohai; Zhao, Wenxiang; Aamir, Nazir

    2018-05-01

    Torque ripple is one of the important issues for ferrite assisted synchronous reluctance motors (FASRMs). In this paper, an asymmetrical stator is proposed for the FASRM to reduce its torque ripple. In the proposed FASRM, an asymmetrical stator is designed by appropriately choosing the angle of the slot-opening shift. Meanwhile, its analytical torque expressions are derived. The results show that the proposed FASRM has an effective reduction in the cogging torque, reluctance torque ripple and total torque ripple. Moreover, it is easy to implement while the average torque is not sacrificed.

  1. Spin torque and Nernst effects in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya ferromagnets

    DOE PAGES

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Zyuzin, Vladimir

    2016-04-11

    Here, we predict that a temperature gradient can induce a magnon-mediated intrinsic torque in systems with a nontrivial magnon Berry curvature. With the help of a microscopic linear response theory of nonequilibrium magnon-mediated torques and spin currents we identify the interband and intraband components that manifest in ferromagnets with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions and magnetic textures. To illustrate and assess the importance of such effects, we apply the linear response theory to the magnon-mediated spin Nernst and torque responses in a kagome lattice ferromagnet.

  2. Torque characteristics of a 122-centimeter butterfly valve with a hydro/pneumatic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Lundy, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    Actuating torque data from field testing of a 122-centimeter (48 in.) butterfly valve with a hydro/pneumatic actuator is presented. The hydraulic cylinder functions as either a forward or a reverse brake. Its resistance torque increases when the valve speeds up and decreases when the valve slows down. A reduction of flow resistance in the hydraulic flow path from one end of the hydraulic cylinder to the other will effectively reduce the hydraulic resistance torque and hence increase the actuating torque. The sum of hydrodynamic and friction torques (combined resistance torque) of a butterfly valve is a function of valve opening time. An increase in the pneumatic actuating pressure will result in a decrease in both the combined resistance torque and the actuator opening torque; however, it does shorten the valve opening time. As the pneumatic pressure increases, the valve opening time for a given configuration approaches an asymptotical value.

  3. MUSCLE WEAKNESS, FATIGUE, AND TORQUE VARIABILITY: EFFECTS OF AGE AND MOBILITY STATUS

    PubMed Central

    KENT-BRAUN, JANE A.; CALLAHAN, DAMIEN M.; FAY, JESSICA L.; FOULIS, STEPHEN A.; BUONACCORSI, JOHN P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whereas deficits in muscle function, particularly power production, develop in old age and are risk factors for mobility impairment, a complete understanding of muscle fatigue during dynamic contractions is lacking. We tested hypotheses related to torque-producing capacity, fatigue resistance, and variability of torque production during repeated maximal contractions in healthy older, mobility-impaired older, and young women. Methods Knee extensor fatigue (decline in torque) was measured during 4 min of dynamic contractions. Torque variability was characterized using a novel 4-component logistic regression model. Results Young women produced more torque at baseline and during the protocol than older women (P < 0.001). Although fatigue did not differ between groups (P = 0.53), torque variability differed by group (P = 0.022) and was greater in older impaired compared with young women (P = 0.010). Conclusions These results suggest that increased torque variability may combine with baseline muscle weakness to limit function, particularly in older adults with mobility impairments. PMID:23674266

  4. Two-Speed Gearbox Dynamic Simulation Predictions and Test Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; DeSmidt, Hans; Smith, Edward C.; Bauman, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic simulations and experimental validation tests were performed on a two-stage, two-speed gearbox as part of the drive system research activities of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Rotary Wing Project. The gearbox was driven by two electromagnetic motors and had two electromagnetic, multi-disk clutches to control output speed. A dynamic model of the system was created which included a direct current electric motor with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) speed control, a two-speed gearbox with dual electromagnetically actuated clutches, and an eddy current dynamometer. A six degree-of-freedom model of the gearbox accounted for the system torsional dynamics and included gear, clutch, shaft, and load inertias as well as shaft flexibilities and a dry clutch stick-slip friction model. Experimental validation tests were performed on the gearbox in the NASA Glenn gear noise test facility. Gearbox output speed and torque as well as drive motor speed and current were compared to those from the analytical predictions. The experiments correlate very well with the predictions, thus validating the dynamic simulation methodologies.

  5. Heat engine and electric motor torque distribution strategy for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Boberg, Evan S.; Gebby, Brian P.

    1999-09-28

    A method is provided for controlling a power train system for a hybrid electric vehicle. The method includes a torque distribution strategy for controlling the engine and the electric motor. The engine and motor commands are determined based upon the accelerator position, the battery state of charge and the amount of engine and motor torque available. The amount of torque requested for the engine is restricted by a limited rate of rise in order to reduce the emissions from the engine. The limited engine torque is supplemented by motor torque in order to meet a torque request determined based upon the accelerator position.

  6. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  7. Influence of reverse torque values in abutments with or without internal hexagon indexes.

    PubMed

    Cerutti-Kopplin, Daiane; Rodrigues Neto, Dimas João; Lins do Valle, Accácio; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical stability of the implant-abutment connection is of fundamental importance for successful implant-supported restorations. Therefore, understanding removal torque values is essential. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reverse torque values of indexed and nonindexed abutments of the Morse Taper system. Twelve Morse taper implants with their respective abutments were divided into 2 groups (n=6): group NI, nonindexed abutments; and group IN, indexed abutments. Each abutment received a sequence of 2 consecutive torques for insertion (15 Ncm) at an interval of 10 minutes, and 1 reverse torque, all measured with a digital torque wrench. The Student t test with a 5% significance level was used to evaluate the data. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in reverse torque values between nonindexed and indexed abutments (P=.57). When comparing insertion torque and reverse torque values between the groups, group NI presented a mean torque loosening percentage of 8% (P=.013), whereas group IN presented a loosening of 15.33% (P<.001). The use of indexed abutments for the Morse taper system presented similar biomechanical stability when compared with nonindexed abutments, both with a significant reduction in reverse torque values. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Instantaneous flywheel torque of IC engine grey-box identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milašinović, A.; Knežević, D.; Milovanović, Z.; Škundrić, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical model developed for the identification of excitation torque acting on the IC engine flywheel is presented. The excitation torque gained through internal combustion of the fuel in the IC engine is transmitted from the flywheel to the transmission. The torque is not constant but variable and is a function of the crank angle. The verification of the mathematical model was done on a 4-cylinder 4-stroke diesel engine for which the in-cylinder pressure was measured in one cylinder and the instantaneous angular speed of the crankshaft at its free end. The research was conducted on a hydraulic engine brake. Inertial forces of all rotational parts, from flywheel to the turbine wheel of the engine brake, are acting on the flywheel due to the nonuniform motion of the flywheel. It is known from the theory of turbomachinery that the torque on the hydraulic brake is a quadratic function of angular speed. Due to that and the variable angular speed of the turbine wheel of the engine brake, the torque during one engine cycle is also variable. The motivation for this research was the idea (intention) to determine the instantaneous torque acting on the flywheel as a function of the crank angle with a mathematical model without any measuring and based on this to determine the quality of work of specific cylinders of the multi-cylinder engine. The crankshaft was considered elastic and also its torsional vibrations were taken into account.

  9. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Nirody, Jasmine A; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-08-11

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify roles for two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, whereas steric forces comprise the actual "power stroke." Specifically, we propose that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline "hinge" residue in a stator α-helix are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental properties of the flagellar motor, including torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the effects of key mutations in the stator.

  10. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk-planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential (r s), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk (γ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ, up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  11. Space Suit Joint Torque Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valish, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009 and early 2010, a test was performed to quantify the torque required to manipulate joints in several existing operational and prototype space suits in an effort to develop joint torque requirements appropriate for a new Constellation Program space suit system. The same test method was levied on the Constellation space suit contractors to verify that their suit design meets the requirements. However, because the original test was set up and conducted by a single test operator there was some question as to whether this method was repeatable enough to be considered a standard verification method for Constellation or other future space suits. In order to validate the method itself, a representative subset of the previous test was repeated, using the same information that would be available to space suit contractors, but set up and conducted by someone not familiar with the previous test. The resultant data was compared using graphical and statistical analysis and a variance in torque values for some of the tested joints was apparent. Potential variables that could have affected the data were identified and re-testing was conducted in an attempt to eliminate these variables. The results of the retest will be used to determine if further testing and modification is necessary before the method can be validated.

  12. Evaluation of a high-torque backlash-free roller actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1988-01-01

    The results are presented of a test program that evaluated the stiffness, accuracy, torque ripple, frictional losses, and torque holding capability of a 16:1 ratio, 430 N-m (320 ft-lb) planetary roller drive for a potential space vehicle actuator application. The drive's planet roller supporting structure and bearings were found to be the largest contributors to overall drive compliance, accounting for more than half the total. In comparison, the traction roller contacts themselves contributed only 9 percent of the drive's compliance based on an experimentally verified stiffnesss model. Torque ripple tests showed the drive to be extremely smooth, actually providing some damping of input torsional oscillations. The drive also demonstrated the ability to hold static torque with drifts of 7 arc sec or less over a 24-hour period at 35 percent of full load.

  13. Shear mode ER transfer function for robotic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. P.; Stanway, R.; Bullough, W. A.

    2005-06-01

    Electro-rheological (ER) fluids are becoming popular in modern industrial applications. The advantage of employing ER devices is due to the ease of energizing the ER fluids at fast speeds of response. One innovation in ER applications could be in the positioning control of the robotic arm using an ER clutch. In order to actuate the manipulator, the ER output torque response is required. However, the behaviour of this ER torque response at different input conditions is not clearly understood. Therefore, in this paper, a sample study of the ER output torque is conducted. The ER output torque responses at different input parameters are studied carefully for the establishment of an appropriate ER transfer function in shear mode. This transfer function will serve as an important feature in future ER-actuated robot arm's control process.

  14. Resonance measurement of nonlocal spin torque in a three-terminal magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lin; Wang, Chen; Cui, Yong-Tao; Liu, Luqiao; Swander, A; Sun, J Z; Buhrman, R A; Ralph, D C

    2012-04-06

    A pure spin current generated within a nonlocal spin valve can exert a spin-transfer torque on a nanomagnet. This nonlocal torque enables new design schemes for magnetic memory devices that do not require the application of large voltages across tunnel barriers that can suffer electrical breakdown. Here we report a quantitative measurement of this nonlocal spin torque using spin-torque-driven ferromagnetic resonance. Our measurement agrees well with the prediction of an effective circuit model for spin transport. Based on this model, we suggest strategies for optimizing the strength of nonlocal torque. © 2012 American Physical Society

  15. Cogging Torque Minimization in Transverse Flux Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz

    2017-02-16

    This paper presents the design considerations in cogging torque minimization in two types of transverse flux machines. The machines have a double stator-single rotor configuration with flux concentrating ferrite magnets. One of the machines has pole windings across each leg of an E-Core stator. Another machine has quasi-U-shaped stator cores and a ring winding. The flux in the stator back iron is transverse in both machines. Different methods of cogging torque minimization are investigated. Key methods of cogging torque minimization are identified and used as design variables for optimization using a design of experiments (DOE) based on the Taguchi method.more » A three-level DOE is performed to reach an optimum solution with minimum simulations. Finite element analysis is used to study the different effects. Two prototypes are being fabricated for experimental verification.« less

  16. Intended and Achieved Torque of Implant Abutment's Screw using Manual Wrenches in Simulated Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Hanan N

    2016-11-01

    To measure the difference between the intended torque and the achieved torque by the operator using the spring-style mechanical torque-limiting device (MTLD). Inexperienced and experienced clinicians used one spring-type MTLD to torque two abutment screws of each anterior and posterior implants, which were attached to two digital torque meters through a jaw model. The jaw model was part of a preclinical bench manikin attached to a dental chair. The intended torque value was 35 N cm (recommended by manufacturer) and the technique of torquing was observed for all the participants (instantaneous and repeated). The mean torque value was calculated for each subject for the anterior and posterior implants independently; t-test was used to compare between the intended and achieved torque values and to compare between the experienced and inexperienced clinicians (p ≤ 0.05). Thirty-seven clinicians participated, with an overall mean torque value of 34.30 N cm. The mean torque value of the achieved torque (34.30 ± 4.13 N cm) was statistically significantly less than the intended torque (p = 0.041). The male clinicians produced more statistically significantly accurate torque value (34.54 ± 3.78 N cm) than the female clinicians (p = 0.034), and the experienced clinicians produced more accurate torque values (34.9 ± 5.13 N cm) than the inexperienced clinicians (p = 0.048). Within the limitation of this study, the use of MTLDs did not always produce consistent torque values and the technique by which the operators use the MTLD might affect the torque value.

  17. Design and Control of a Closed-Loop Brushless Torque Activator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    AD-A270 760 Technical Report 1244 Design and Control of a Closed-Loop Brushless Torque Activator Michael Dean Levi MIT Artificial Intelligence... Brushless N00014-86-K-0685 Torque Actuator 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael Dean Levin 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORESS(ES) B. PERFORMING...200 words) This’report explores the design and control issues associated with a brushless actuator capable of achieving extremely high torque

  18. Spin-orbit torques in high-resistivity-W/CoFeB/MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yutaro; Zhang, Chaoliang; Okada, Atsushi; Sato, Hideo; Fukami, Shunsuke; Ohno, Hideo

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic heterostructures consisting of high-resistivity (238 ± 5 µΩ cm)-W/CoFeB/MgO are prepared by sputtering and their spin-orbit torques are evaluated as a function of W thickness through an extended harmonic measurement. W thickness dependence of the spin-orbit torque with the Slonczewski-like symmetry is well described by the drift-diffusion model with an efficiency parameter, the so-called effective spin Hall angle, of -0.62 ± 0.03. In contrast, the field-like spin-orbit torque is one order of magnitude smaller than the Slonczewski-like torque and shows no appreciable dependence on the W thickness, suggesting a different origin from the Slonczewski-like torque. The results indicate that high-resistivity W is promising for low-current and reliable spin-orbit torque-controlled devices.

  19. Development of the Second-Generation Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter with Variable Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Thresher, Robert W

    This study investigates the effect of design changes on the hydrodynamics of a novel oscillating surge wave energy converter being developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The design utilizes controllable geometry features to shed structural loads while maintaining a rated power over a greater number of sea states. The second-generation design will seek to provide a more refined control of performance because the first-generation design demonstrated performance reductions considered too large for smooth power output. Performance is evaluated using frequency domain analysis with consideration of a nonideal power-take-off system, with respect to power absorption, foundation loads, and power-take-off torque.

  20. Spin-Orbit Torques in ferrimagnetic GdFeCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roschewsky, Niklas; Lambert, Charles-Henri; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    Recently spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnets received a lot of attention due to intrinsic high frequency dynamics as well as robustness against perturbations from external magnetic fields. Here, we report on spin-orbit torque (SOT) switching in ferrimagnetic Gdx (Fe90Co10)100-x films on both sides of the magnetic compensation point. In addition to current driven switching experiments we performed harmonic Hall measurements of the effective SOT fields. We find that both the Slonczewski torque as well as the field-like torque diverge at the magnetization compensation point. However, the effective spin Hall angle ξ = (2 | e | / ℏ) MStFM (Heff / | jHM |) is found to be roughly constant across the investigated composition range. This provides important insight into the the angular momentum transfer process in ferrimagnets. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231 within the NEMM program (KC2204).

  1. Optimal Spacecraft Attitude Control Using Aerodynamic Torques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    His design resembles a badminton shuttlecock and “uses passive aerodynamic drag torques to stabilize pitch and yaw” and active magnetic torque...Ravindran’s and Hughes’ ‘arrow-like’ design. Psiaki notes that “this arrow concept has been modified to become a badminton shuttlecock-type design...panels were placed to the rear of the center-of-mass, similar to a badminton shuttlecock, to provide passive stability about the pitch and yaw axes

  2. Peak Torque and Rate of Torque Development Influence on Repeated Maximal Exercise Performance: Contractile and Neural Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Baptiste; Rouffet, David M.; Saboul, Damien; Rota, Samuel; Clémençon, Michel; Hautier, Christophe A.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid force production is critical to improve performance and prevent injuries. However, changes in rate of force/torque development caused by the repetition of maximal contractions have received little attention. The aim of this study was to determine the relative influence of rate of torque development (RTD) and peak torque (Tpeak) on the overall performance (i.e. mean torque, Tmean) decrease during repeated maximal contractions and to investigate the contribution of contractile and neural mechanisms to the alteration of the various mechanical variables. Eleven well-trained men performed 20 sets of 6-s isokinetic maximal knee extensions at 240°·s-1, beginning every 30 seconds. RTD, Tpeak and Tmean as well as the Rate of EMG Rise (RER), peak EMG (EMGpeak) and mean EMG (EMGmean) of the vastus lateralis were monitored for each contraction. A wavelet transform was also performed on raw EMG signal for instant mean frequency (ifmean) calculation. A neuromuscular testing procedure was carried out before and immediately after the fatiguing protocol including evoked RTD (eRTD) and maximal evoked torque (eTpeak) induced by high frequency doublet (100 Hz). Tmean decrease was correlated to RTD and Tpeak decrease (R²=0.62; p<0.001; respectively β=0.62 and β=0.19). RER, eRTD and initial ifmean (0-225 ms) decreased after 20 sets (respectively -21.1±14.1, -25±13%, and ~20%). RTD decrease was correlated to RER decrease (R²=0.36; p<0.05). The eTpeak decreased significantly after 20 sets (24±5%; p<0.05) contrary to EMGpeak (-3.2±19.5 %; p=0.71). Our results show that reductions of RTD explained part of the alterations of the overall performance during repeated moderate velocity maximal exercise. The reductions of RTD were associated to an impairment of the ability of the central nervous system to maximally activate the muscle in the first milliseconds of the contraction. PMID:25901576

  3. Peak torque and rate of torque development influence on repeated maximal exercise performance: contractile and neural contributions.

    PubMed

    Morel, Baptiste; Rouffet, David M; Saboul, Damien; Rota, Samuel; Clémençon, Michel; Hautier, Christophe A

    2015-01-01

    Rapid force production is critical to improve performance and prevent injuries. However, changes in rate of force/torque development caused by the repetition of maximal contractions have received little attention. The aim of this study was to determine the relative influence of rate of torque development (RTD) and peak torque (T(peak)) on the overall performance (i.e. mean torque, T(mean)) decrease during repeated maximal contractions and to investigate the contribution of contractile and neural mechanisms to the alteration of the various mechanical variables. Eleven well-trained men performed 20 sets of 6-s isokinetic maximal knee extensions at 240° · s(-1), beginning every 30 seconds. RTD, T(peak) and T(mean) as well as the Rate of EMG Rise (RER), peak EMG (EMG(peak)) and mean EMG (EMG(mean)) of the vastus lateralis were monitored for each contraction. A wavelet transform was also performed on raw EMG signal for instant mean frequency (if(mean)) calculation. A neuromuscular testing procedure was carried out before and immediately after the fatiguing protocol including evoked RTD (eRTD) and maximal evoked torque (eT(peak)) induced by high frequency doublet (100 Hz). T(mean) decrease was correlated to RTD and T(peak) decrease (R(²) = 0.62; p<0.001; respectively β=0.62 and β=0.19). RER, eRTD and initial if(mean) (0-225 ms) decreased after 20 sets (respectively -21.1 ± 14.1, -25 ± 13%, and ~20%). RTD decrease was correlated to RER decrease (R(²) = 0.36; p<0.05). The eT(peak) decreased significantly after 20 sets (24 ± 5%; p<0.05) contrary to EMG(peak) (-3.2 ± 19.5 %; p=0.71). Our results show that reductions of RTD explained part of the alterations of the overall performance during repeated moderate velocity maximal exercise. The reductions of RTD were associated to an impairment of the ability of the central nervous system to maximally activate the muscle in the first milliseconds of the contraction.

  4. Torques on a nearly rigid body in a relativistic gravitational field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of post-Newtonian potentials on the rotation of a nearly rigid body is shown to consist of a precession and a torque. The frequency of the precession can be exactly represented by means of suitable differential operators. The relativistic torques in the quadrupole approximation depend on the instantaneous orientation of the principal axes of one body with respect to the position like the classical torque and velocity of the other. For a relatively low mass body, such as a gyroscope, these velocity-dependent torques have no observable consequences.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of macro and micro designed screw-type implants: an insertion torque and removal torque study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Ramesh; Jimbo, Ryo; Thomsen, Christian; Carlsson, Lennart; Wennerberg, Ann

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the combined effect of macro and pitch shortened threads on primary and secondary stability during healing, but before dynamic loading. Two sets of turned implants with different macro geometry were prepared. The test group possessed pitch shortened threads in between the large threads and the control group did not have thread alterations. The two implant groups were placed in both femur and tibiae of 10 lop-eared rabbits, and at the time of implant insertion, insertion torques were recorded. After 4 weeks, all implants were subjected to removal torque tests. The insertion torque values for the control and test groups for the tibia were 15.7 and 20.6 Ncm, respectively, and for the femur, 11.8, and 12.8 Ncm respectively. The removal torque values for the control and test groups in the tibia were 7.9 and 9.1 Ncm, respectively, and for the femur, 7.9 and 7.7 Ncm respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the control and test groups. Under limited dynamic load, the addition of pitch shortened threads did not significantly improve either the primary or the secondary stability of the implants in bone. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Torque Measurement of 3-DOF Haptic Master Operated by Controllable Electrorheological Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok; Lee, Yang-Sub

    2015-02-01

    This work presents a torque measurement method of 3-degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) haptic master featuring controllable electrorheological (ER) fluid. In order to reflect the sense of an organ for a surgeon, the ER haptic master which can generate the repulsive torque of an organ is utilized as a remote controller for a surgery robot. Since accurate representation of organ feeling is essential for the success of the robot-assisted surgery, it is indispensable to develop a proper torque measurement method of 3-DOF ER haptic master. After describing the structural configuration of the haptic master, the torque models of ER spherical joint are mathematically derived based on the Bingham model of ER fluid. A new type of haptic device which has pitching, rolling, and yawing motions is then designed and manufactured using a spherical joint mechanism. Subsequently, the field-dependent parameters of the Bingham model are identified and generating repulsive torque according to applied electric field is measured. In addition, in order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed torque model, a comparative work between simulated and measured torques is undertaken.

  7. Direct mechanical torque sensor for model wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyung Suk; Meneveau, Charles

    2010-10-01

    A torque sensor is developed to measure the mechanical power extracted by model wind turbines. The torque is measured by mounting the model generator (a small dc motor) through ball bearings to the hub and by preventing its rotation by the deflection of a strain-gauge-instrumented plate. By multiplying the measured torque and rotor angular velocity, a direct measurement of the fluid mechanical power extracted from the flow is obtained. Such a measurement is more advantageous compared to measuring the electrical power generated by the model generator (dc motor), since the electrical power is largely affected by internal frictional, electric and magnetic losses. Calibration experiments are performed, and during testing, the torque sensor is mounted on a model wind turbine in a 3 rows × 3 columns array of wind turbines in a wind tunnel experiment. The resulting electrical and mechanical powers are quantified and compared over a range of applied loads, for three different incoming wind velocities. Also, the power coefficients are obtained as a function of the tip speed ratio. Significant differences between the electrical and mechanical powers are observed, which highlights the importance of using the direct mechanical power measurement for fluid dynamically meaningful results. A direct calibration with the measured current is also explored. The new torque sensor is expected to contribute to more accurate model wind tunnel tests which should provide added flexibility in model studies of the power that can be harvested from wind turbines and wind-turbine farms.

  8. Knudsen torque: A rotational mechanism driven by thermal force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Liang, Tengfei; Ye, Wenjing

    2014-09-01

    Thermally induced mechanical loading has been shown to have significant effects on micro- and nano-objects immersed in a gas with a nonuniform temperature field. While the majority of existing studies and related applications focus on forces, we investigate the torque, and thus the rotational motion, produced by such a mechanism. Our study has found that a torque can be induced if the configuration of the system is asymmetric. In addition, both the magnitude and the direction of the torque depend highly on the system configuration, indicating the possibility of manipulating the rotational motion via geometrical design. Based on this feature, two types of rotational micromotor that are of practical importance, namely pendulum motor and unidirectional motor, are designed. The magnitude of the torque at Kn =0.5 can reach to around 2nN×μm for a rectangular microbeam with a length of 100μm.

  9. Production Experiences with the Cray-Enabled TORQUE Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Ezell, Matthew A; Maxwell, Don E; Beer, David

    High performance computing resources utilize batch systems to manage the user workload. Cray systems are uniquely different from typical clusters due to Cray s Application Level Placement Scheduler (ALPS). ALPS manages binary transfer, job launch and monitoring, and error handling. Batch systems require special support to integrate with ALPS using an XML protocol called BASIL. Previous versions of Adaptive Computing s TORQUE and Moab batch suite integrated with ALPS from within Moab, using PERL scripts to interface with BASIL. This would occasionally lead to problems when all the components would become unsynchronized. Version 4.1 of the TORQUE Resource Manager introducedmore » new features that allow it to directly integrate with ALPS using BASIL. This paper describes production experiences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the new TORQUE software versions, as well as ongoing and future work to improve TORQUE.« less

  10. Torque fluctuations caused by upstream mean flow and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. D.; Hancock, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    A series of studies are in progress investigating the effects of turbine-array-wake interactions for a range of atmospheric boundary layer states by means of the EnFlo meteorological wind tunnel. The small, three-blade model wind turbines drive 4-quadrant motor-generators. Only a single turbine in neutral flow is considered here. The motor-generator current can be measured with adequate sensitivity by means of a current sensor allowing the mean and fluctuating torque to be inferred. Spectra of torque fluctuations and streamwise velocity fluctuations ahead of the rotor, between 0.1 and 2 diameters, show that only the large-scale turbulent motions contribute significantly to the torque fluctuations. Time-lagged cross-correlation between upstream velocity and torque fluctuations are largest over the inner part of the blade. They also show the turbulence to be frozen in behaviour over the 2 diameters upstream of the turbine.

  11. Hip joint torques during the golf swing of young and senior healthy males.

    PubMed

    Foxworth, Judy L; Millar, Audrey L; Long, Benjamin L; Way, Michael; Vellucci, Matthew W; Vogler, Joshua D

    2013-09-01

    Descriptive, laboratory study. To compare the 3-D hip torques during a golf swing between young and senior healthy male amateur golfers. The secondary purpose was to compare the 3-D hip joint torques between the trail leg and lead leg. The generation of hip torques from the hip musculature is an important aspect of the golf swing. Golf is a very popular activity, and estimates of hip torques during the golf swing have not been reported. Twenty healthy male golfers were divided into a young group (mean ± SD age, 25.1 ± 3.1 years) and a senior group (age, 56.9 ± 4.7 years). All subjects completed 10 golf swings using their personal driver. A motion capture system and force plates were used to obtain kinematic and kinetic data. Inverse dynamic analyses were used to calculate 3-D hip joint torques of the trail and lead limbs. Two-way analyses of covariance (group by leg), with club-head velocity as a covariate, were used to compare peak hip torques between groups and limbs. Trail-limb hip external rotator torque was significantly greater in the younger group compared to the senior group, and greater in the trail leg versus the lead leg. When adjusting for club-head velocity, young and senior healthy male amateur golfers generated comparable hip torques during a golf swing, with the exception of the trail-limb hip external rotator torque. The largest hip torque found was the trail-limb hip extensor torque.

  12. Tool for Torquing Circular Electrical-Connector Collars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaulke, Kathryn; Werneth, Russell; Grunsfeld, John; O'Neill, Patrick; Snyder, Russ

    2006-01-01

    An improved tool has been devised for applying torque to lock and unlock knurled collars on circular electrical connectors. The tool was originally designed for, and used by, astronauts working in outer space on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The tool is readily adaptable to terrestrial use in installing and removing the same or similar circular electrical connectors as well as a wide variety of other cylindrical objects, the tightening and loosening of which entail considerable amounts of torque.

  13. Torque loss of different abutment sizes before and after cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Moris, Izabela Cristina; Faria, Adriana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 3.8- and 4.8-mm abutments submitted to simulations of masticatory cycles to examine whether abutment diameter and cemented vs screw-retained crowns affect torque loss of the abutments and crowns. Forty implant/abutment sets were divided into the following groups (n = 10 in each group): (1) G4.8S included 4.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; (2) G4.8C included 4.8-mm abutment with cemented crown; (3) G3.8S included 3.8-mm abutment with screw-retained crown; and (4) G3.8C included 3.8-mm abutment with cemented crown. All abutments were tightened with torque values of 20 Ncm, and 10 Ncm for screw-retained crowns. Torque loss was measured before and after cycling loading (300,000 cycles). Torque loss of screw-retained crowns significantly increased after cycling in abutments of groups G3.8S (P ≤ .05) and G4.8S (P = .001). No difference was noted between the abutments before cycling (P = .735), but G3.8S abutments presented greater torque loss than the other groups after cycling (P = .008). Significant differences were noted in the abutment torque loss before and after cycling loading only for the G3.8C group (P ≤ .05). The abutment diameter affects torque loss of screw-retained crowns and leads to failure during the test; mechanical cycling increases torque loss of abutment screw and screw-retained crowns.

  14. A torque, tension and stress corrosion evaluation of high strength A286 bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The problems associated with overtorque applied to the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) Igniter Adapter high strength 200 KSI (1379 Mpa) A286 CRES bolts and the threaded holes of the 7075-T73 aluminum alloy BSM cases are addressed. The evaluation included torque, tensile, and stress corrosion tests incorporating the A286 CRES bolts and the 7075-T73 aluminum alloy BSM cases. The tensile test data includes ultimate tensile load (UTL), Johnson's 2/3 yield load (J2/3YL), proportional limit load (PLL), and total bolt stretch. Torque tension data includes torque, torque induced load, and positive and negative break-away torque. Stress corrosion test data reflect the overtorque and the resulting torque induced loads sustained by the A286 CRES bolts torqued into a 7075-T73 aluminum alloy forged dome with threaded holes. After 60 days of salt fog exposure, the positive and the negative break-away torques, the subsequent mechanical property tensile test results, and the BSM dome threaded hole axial tensile pullout loads are reported.

  15. A flight simulator control system using electric torque motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, R. O.; Wagner, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Control systems are required in flight simulators to provide representative stick and rudder pedal characteristics. A system has been developed that uses electric dc torque motors instead of the more common hydraulic actuators. The torque motor system overcomes certain disadvantages of hydraulic systems, such as high cost, high power consumption, noise, oil leaks, and safety problems. A description of the torque motor system is presented, including both electrical and mechanical design as well as performance characteristics. The system develops forces sufficiently high for most simulations, and is physically small and light enough to be used in most motion-base cockpits.

  16. Acceleration and torque feedback for robotic control - Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclnroy, John E.; Saridis, George N.

    1990-01-01

    Gross motion control of robotic manipulators typically requires significant on-line computations to compensate for nonlinear dynamics due to gravity, Coriolis, centripetal, and friction nonlinearities. One controller proposed by Luo and Saridis avoids these computations by feeding back joint acceleration and torque. This study implements the controller on a Puma 600 robotic manipulator. Joint acceleration measurement is obtained by measuring linear accelerations of each joint, and deriving a computationally efficient transformation from the linear measurements to the angular accelerations. Torque feedback is obtained by using the previous torque sent to the joints. The implementation has stability problems on the Puma 600 due to the extremely high gains inherent in the feedback structure. Since these high gains excite frequency modes in the Puma 600, the algorithm is modified to decrease the gain inherent in the feedback structure. The resulting compensator is stable and insensitive to high frequency unmodeled dynamics. Moreover, a second compensator is proposed which uses acceleration and torque feedback, but still allows nonlinear terms to be fed forward. Thus, by feeding the increment in the easily calculated gravity terms forward, improved responses are obtained. Both proposed compensators are implemented, and the real time results are compared to those obtained with the computed torque algorithm.

  17. Design and characteristics of MRF-based actuators for torque transmission under influence of high shear rates up to 34,000s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güth, Dirk; Erbis, Vadim; Schamoni, Markus; Maas, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    High rotational speeds for brakes and clutches based on magnetorheological fluids represent a remaining challenge for the industrial or automotive application. Beside particle centrifugation effects and rotational speed-depending no-load losses, the torque characteristic is an important property that needs to considered in the design process of actuators. Due to missing experimental data for these operating conditions, in this paper the shear rate and flux depending yield stress behavior of magnetorheological uids is experimentally investigated for high rotational speeds or respectively high shear rates. Therefore a brake actuator with variable shear gap heights up to 4 mm is designed, realized and used for the experimental investigation, which are performed for a maximum shear rate of ƴ= 34; 000 s-1 under large magnetic elds. The measurement results point out a strong dependency between shear rate, magnetic ux density and resulting yield stress. For low shear gap heights, a significant reduction in the yield stress up to 10 % can be determined. Additionally the development of Taylor vortices is determined, which will not only occur in viscous case without an applied magnetic field. The measurement results are important for a reliable actuator design which should be used in application with high rotational speeds.

  18. Nonambipolar Transport and Torque in Perturbed Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Wang, Z. R.; Berkery, J. W.; Kim, K.; Menard, J. E.

    2013-10-01

    A new Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) code has been developed to calculate the neoclassical toroidal torque from radial current composed of both passing and trapped particles in perturbed equilibria. This presentation outlines the physics approach used in the development of the PENT code, with emphasis on the effects of retaining general aspect-ratio geometric effects. First, nonambipolar transport coefficients and corresponding neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque in perturbed equilibria are re-derived from the first order gyro-drift-kinetic equation in the ``combined-NTV'' PENT formalism. The equivalence of NTV torque and change in potential energy due to kinetic effects [J-K. Park, Phys. Plas., 2011] is then used to showcase computational challenges shared between PENT and stability codes MISK and MARS-K. Extensive comparisons to a reduced model, which makes numerous large aspect ratio approximations, are used throughout to emphasize geometry dependent physics such as pitch angle resonances. These applications make extensive use of the PENT code's native interfacing with the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC), and the combination of these codes is a key step towards an iterative solver for self-consistent perturbed equilibrium torque. Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DOE Office of Science Graduate Fellowship administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science & Education under contract #DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  19. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  20. Nonlinear gearshifts control of dual-clutch transmissions during inertia phase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Tian, Lu; Gao, Bingzhao; Chen, Hong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a model-based nonlinear gearshift controller is designed by the backstepping method to improve the shift quality of vehicles with a dual-clutch transmission (DCT). Considering easy-implementation, the controller is rearranged into a concise structure which contains a feedforward control and a feedback control. Then, robustness of the closed-loop error system is discussed in the framework of the input to state stability (ISS) theory, where model uncertainties are considered as the additive disturbance inputs. Furthermore, due to the application of the backstepping method, the closed-loop error system is ordered as a linear system. Using the linear system theory, a guideline for selecting the controller parameters is deduced which could reduce the workload of parameters tuning. Finally, simulation results and Hardware in the Loop (HiL) simulation are presented to validate the effectiveness of the designed controller. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct torque control method applied to the WECS based on the PMSG and controlled with backstepping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errami, Youssef; Obbadi, Abdellatif; Sahnoun, Smail; Ouassaid, Mohammed; Maaroufi, Mohamed

    2018-05-01

    This paper proposes a Direct Torque Control (DTC) method for Wind Power System (WPS) based Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG) and Backstepping approach. In this work, generator side and grid-side converter with filter are used as the interface between the wind turbine and grid. Backstepping approach demonstrates great performance in complicated nonlinear systems control such as WPS. So, the control method combines the DTC to achieve Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) and Backstepping approach to sustain the DC-bus voltage and to regulate the grid-side power factor. In addition, control strategy is developed in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem for the WPS. Simulation results using MATLAB/Simulink validate the effectiveness of the proposed controllers.

  2. The overuse of the implant motor: effect on the output torque in overloading condition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Du-Hyeong; Cho, Sung-Am; Lee, Cheong-Hee; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2015-06-01

    The overloading of the motor affects its performance. The output torque of the implant motor under overloading condition has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability and the tendency of the output torque when an implant motor is consecutively used. Three implant motors were evaluated: SurgicXT/X-SG20L (NSK), INTRAsurg300/CL3-09 (KaVo), and XIP10/CRB26LX (Saeshin). The output torque was measured using an electronic torque gauge fixed with jigs. For the 40 and 50 Ncm torque settings, 300 measurements were taken at 30 rpm. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and one-way ANOVA were used to compare the torque values within each group and between the groups. As repeating measures, the output torque values decreased gradually compared with the baseline. In within-group analysis, the different torque value from the first measurement appeared earliest in NSK motor, followed in order by Saeshin and KaVo motors. NSK motor showed a different torque decrease between 40 and 50 Ncm settings (p < .05). Intergroup analysis revealed Saeshin motor to have the least deviation from the baseline, followed by KaVo motor. NSK motor had the most inconsistent torque at the 6, 8, 9, and 10 repeat counts (p < .05). The actual torque decreases when the surgical motor is continuously used. The NSK motor showed more significant decreases in torque than KaVo and Saeshin motors in overloading condition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Self-current induced spin-orbit torque in FeMn/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Yumeng; Yao, Kui; Xu, Baoxi; Wu, Yihong

    2016-05-01

    Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of spin-orbit torque in ferromagnetic metal/heavy metal bilayers and exploitation of it for magnetization switching using an in-plane current. As the spin-orbit torque is inversely proportional to the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, sizable effect has only been realized in bilayers with an ultrathin ferromagnetic layer. Here we demonstrate that, by stacking ultrathin Pt and FeMn alternately, both ferromagnetic properties and current induced spin-orbit torque can be achieved in FeMn/Pt multilayers without any constraint on its total thickness. The critical behavior of these multilayers follows closely three-dimensional Heisenberg model with a finite Curie temperature distribution. The spin torque effective field is about 4 times larger than that of NiFe/Pt bilayer with a same equivalent NiFe thickness. The self-current generated spin torque is able to switch the magnetization reversibly without the need for an external field or a thick heavy metal layer. The removal of both thickness constraint and necessity of using an adjacent heavy metal layer opens new possibilities for exploiting spin-orbit torque for practical applications.

  4. Self-current induced spin-orbit torque in FeMn/Pt multilayers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanjun; Yang, Yumeng; Yao, Kui; Xu, Baoxi; Wu, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of spin-orbit torque in ferromagnetic metal/heavy metal bilayers and exploitation of it for magnetization switching using an in-plane current. As the spin-orbit torque is inversely proportional to the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, sizable effect has only been realized in bilayers with an ultrathin ferromagnetic layer. Here we demonstrate that, by stacking ultrathin Pt and FeMn alternately, both ferromagnetic properties and current induced spin-orbit torque can be achieved in FeMn/Pt multilayers without any constraint on its total thickness. The critical behavior of these multilayers follows closely three-dimensional Heisenberg model with a finite Curie temperature distribution. The spin torque effective field is about 4 times larger than that of NiFe/Pt bilayer with a same equivalent NiFe thickness. The self-current generated spin torque is able to switch the magnetization reversibly without the need for an external field or a thick heavy metal layer. The removal of both thickness constraint and necessity of using an adjacent heavy metal layer opens new possibilities for exploiting spin-orbit torque for practical applications. PMID:27185656

  5. RFID Torque Sensing Tag System for Fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides an RFID-based torque sensor that can be used to quickly monitor off the shelf fasteners including fasteners that are used in expensive satellites or other uses where fastener failure can be very costly. In one embodiment, an antenna, RFID ring and spring comprise a sensor tag that can be interrogated with an interrogation signal produced by an interrogator device. When sufficient torque is applied to the fastener, an RFID circuit is connected, and produces a radio frequency (RF) signal that can be read by the interrogator. In one embodiment, the RFID circuit does not transmit when the spring member is not compressed, thereby indicating insufficient tensioning of the fastener. The present invention offers the ability to remotely, quickly, and inexpensively verify that any number of fasteners are torqued properly upon initial installation. Where applicable, the present invention allows low cost monitoring over the life of the fastener.

  6. Dynamics of a split torque helicopter transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidi, Majid; Krantz, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    A high reduction ratio split torque gear train has been proposed as an alternative to a planetary configuration for the final stage of a helicopter transmission. A split torque design allows a high ratio of power-to-weight for the transmission. The design studied in this work includes a pivoting beam that acts to balance thrust loads produced by the helical gear meshes in each of two parallel power paths. When the thrust loads are balanced, the torque is split evenly. A mathematical model was developed to study the dynamics of the system. The effects of time varying gear mesh stiffness, static transmission errors, and flexible bearing supports are included in the model. The model was demonstrated with a test case. Results show that although the gearbox has a symmetric configuration, the simulated dynamic behavior of the first and second compound gears are not the same. Also, results show that shaft location and mesh stiffness tuning are significant design parameters that influence the motions of the system.

  7. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397 Section 23.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface...

  8. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397 Section 23.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface...

  9. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397 Section 23.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface...

  10. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397 Section 23.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface...

  11. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397 Section 23.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface...

  12. How orthodontic records can influence torque choice decisions?

    PubMed Central

    Mavreas, Dimitrios; Kuppens, Enya; Buyl, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the addition of records can influence intra- and inter-rated agreement on torque choices made to treat a group of patients with various malocclusions. Methods: Forty-eight patients were presented to five orthodontic specialists in three different occasions. During the first session, the participants were shown only the models and intraoral photos of the patients; extraoral photos were added during the second session, and cephalometric X-rays were further supplemented during the third session. Mean weighted kappa coefficients were calculated to measure agreement. Results: The inter-observer agreement was low with the mean coefficients measured:κ1 = 0.34 (SD ± 0.09), κ2 = 0.57 (SD ± 0.12), and κ3 = 0.54 (SD ± 0.28) for the three attempts, respectively. The mean kappa coefficients for the intra-rater agreement were also low ranging from 0.18 to 0.66 and the mean coefficients were 0.27 (SD ± 0.11) between first and second, and 0.53 (SD ± 0.11) between second and third attempt, respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that the addition of extraoral photographs, and subsequently cephalograms to plaster models and intraoral photos, does affect intra-, and inter-rater agreement on torque selection. It seems that the addition of extraoral photos plays a more important role in torque selection decisions than lateral cephalograms. Different clinicians do not have a uniform opinion on the size of torque required to treat cases. Further research is required to define rules on torque choices. PMID:26409048

  13. Measuring Micro-Friction Torque in MEMS Gas Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xudong; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    An in situ measurement of micro-friction torque in MEMS gas bearings, which has been a challenging research topic for years, is realized by a system designed in this paper. In the system, a high accuracy micro-force sensor and an electronically-driven table are designed, fabricated and utilized. With appropriate installation of the sensor and bearings on the table, the engine rotor can be driven to rotate with the sensor using a silicon lever beam. One end of the beam is fixed to the shaft of the gas bearing, while the other end is free and in contact with the sensor probe tip. When the sensor begins to rotate with the table, the beam is pushed by the sensor probe to rotate in the same direction. For the beam, the friction torque from the gas bearing is balanced by the torque induced by pushing force from the sensor probe. Thus, the friction torque can be calculated as a product of the pushing force measured by the sensor and the lever arm, which is defined as the distance from the sensor probe tip to the centerline of the bearing. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this system, with a sensitivity of 1.285 mV/μN·m in a range of 0 to 11.76 μN·m when the lever arm is 20 mm long. The measuring range can be modified by varying the length of the lever arm. Thus, this system has wide potential applications in measuring the micro-friction torque of gas bearings in rotating MEMS machines. PMID:27213377

  14. Explosive sport training and torque kinetics in children.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Raffy; Mitchell, Cameron J; Cohen, Rotem; Gabriel, David; Klentrou, Panagiota; Falk, Bareket

    2013-07-01

    A high rate of force development (RFD) is often more important than maximal force in daily and sports activities. In children, resistance training has been shown to increase maximal force. It is unclear whether, or to what extent, can children improve RFD and force kinetics. For this study, we compared strength and force kinetics of boy gymnasts with those of untrained boys and untrained men. Eight boy gymnasts (age, 9.5 ± 1.2 y), 20 untrained boys (age, 10.1 ± 1.3 y), and 20 untrained men (age, 22.9 ± 4.4 y) performed maximal, explosive, isometric elbow flexions (EF) and knee flexions (KF). Peak torque (maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)), elapsed times to 10%-100% MVC, peak rate of torque development (RTDpk), and other kinetics parameters were determined. When gymnasts were compared with untrained boys, size-normalized EF MVC was 11%-20% higher, RTDpk was 32% higher, and times to 30% and 80% MVC were 16% and 55% shorter, respectively (p < 0.05). No corresponding differences were observed in KF. Furthermore, although the normalized EF MVC was 28% lower in gymnasts than in men (p < 0.001), their torque kinetics parameters were similar. These findings highlight the specificity of gymnastics training, which markedly elevated the torque kinetics of young, prepubertal boys to adult levels, but only moderately affected peak torque. It is suggested that neurologic adaptations, such as enhanced firing and activation rates or increased type II motor-unit recruitment, as well as changes in musculotendinous stiffness, could explain these findings.

  15. Compensation of an attitude disturbance torque caused by magnetic substances in LEO satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Wang, Jihe; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    This research considers an attitude disturbance torque caused by ferromagnetic substances in a LEO satellite. In most LEO satellite missions, a gravity gradient torque, solar pressure torque, aerodynamic torque, and magnetic dipole moment torque are considered for their attitude control systems, however, the effect of the ferromagnetic substances causing a disturbance torque in the geomagnetic field is not considered in previous satellite missions. The ferromagnetic substances such as iron cores of MTQs and a magnetic hysteresis damper for a passive attitude control system are used in various small satellites. These substances cause a disturbance torque which is almost the same magnitude of the dipole magnetic disturbance and the dominant disturbance in the worst cases. This research proposes a method to estimate and compensate for the effect of the ferromagnetic substances using an extended Kalman filter. From simulation results, the research concludes that the proposed method is useful and attractive for precise attitude control for LEO satellite missions.

  16. Development of the Second-Generation Oscillating Surge Wave Energy Converter with Variable Geometry: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Nathan M; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Thresher, Robert W

    This study investigates the effect of design changes on the hydrodynamics of a novel oscillating surge wave energy converter being developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The design utilizes controllable geometry features to shed structural loads while maintaining a rated power over a greater number of sea states. The second-generation design will seek to provide a more refined control of performance because the first-generation design demonstrated performance reductions considered too large for smooth power output. Performance is evaluated using frequency domain analysis with consideration of a nonideal power-take-off system, with respect to power absorption, foundation loads, and power-take-off torque.

  17. Two-Finger Tightness: What Is It? Measuring Torque and Reproducibility in a Simulated Model.

    PubMed

    Acker, William B; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Shih, Albert J; Irwin, Todd A; Holmes, James R

    2016-05-01

    Residents in training are often directed to insert screws using "two-finger tightness" to impart adequate torque but minimize the chance of a screw stripping in bone. This study seeks to quantify and describe two-finger tightness and to assess the variability of its application by residents in training. Cortical bone was simulated using a polyurethane foam block (30-pcf density) that was prepared with predrilled holes for tightening 3.5 × 14-mm long cortical screws and mounted to a custom-built apparatus on a load cell to capture torque data. Thirty-three residents in training, ranging from the first through fifth years of residency, along with 8 staff members, were directed to tighten 6 screws to two-finger tightness in the test block, and peak torque values were recorded. The participants were blinded to their torque values. Stripping torque (2.73 ± 0.56 N·m) was determined from 36 trials and served as a threshold for failed screw placement. The average torques varied substantially with regard to absolute torque values, thus poorly defining two-finger tightness. Junior residents less consistently reproduced torque compared with other groups (0.29 and 0.32, respectively). These data quantify absolute values of two-finger tightness but demonstrate considerable variability in absolute torque values, percentage of stripping torque, and ability to consistently reproduce given torque levels. Increased years in training are weakly correlated with reproducibility, but experience does not seem to affect absolute torque levels. These results question the usefulness of two-finger tightness as a teaching tool and highlight the need for improvement in resident motor skill training and development within a teaching curriculum. Torque measuring devices may be a useful simulation tools for this purpose.

  18. Six component robotic force-torque sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grahn, Allen R.; Hutchings, Brad L.; Johnston, David R.; Parsons, David C.; Wyatt, Roland F.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a two-phase contract studying the feasibility of a miniaturized six component force-torque sensor and development of a working laboratory system were described. The principle of operation is based upon using ultrasonic pulse-echo ranging to determine the position of ultrasonic reflectors attached to a metal or ceramic cover plate. Because of the small size of the sensor, this technology may have application in robotics, to sense forces and torques at the finger tip of a robotic end effector. Descriptions are included of laboratory experiments evaluating materials and techniques for sensor fabrication and of the development of support electronics for data acquisition, computer interface, and operator display.

  19. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  20. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  1. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  2. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  3. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  4. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  5. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  6. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  7. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397 Section 29.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  8. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397 Section 27.397 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this...

  9. Atmospheric Torques on the Solid Earth and Oceans Based on the GEOS-1 General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Au, Andrew Y.

    1998-01-01

    The GEOS-1 general circulation model has been used to compute atmospheric torques on the oceans and solid Earth for the period 1980-1995. The time series for the various torque components have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform techniques. It was determined that the wind stress torque over land is more powerful than the wind stress torque over water by 55%, 42%, and 80% for the x, y, and z components respectively. This is mainly the result of power in the high frequency range. The pressure torques due to polar flattening, equatorial ellipticity, marine geoid, and continental orography were computed. The orographic or "mountain torque" components are more powerful than their wind stress counterparts (land plus ocean) by 231% (x), 191% (y), and 77% (z). The marine pressure torques due to geoidal undulations are much smaller than the orographic ones, as expected. They are only 3% (x), 4% (y), and 5% (z) of the corresponding mountain torques. The geoidal pressure torques are approximately equal in magnitude to those produced by the equatorial ellipticity of the Earth. The pressure torque due to polar flattening makes the largest contributions to the atmospheric torque budget. It has no zonal component, only equatorial ones. Most of the power of the latter, between 68% and 69%, is found in modes with periods under 15 days. The single most powerful mode has a period of 361 days. The gravitational torque ranks second in power only to the polar flattening pressure torque. Unlike the former, it does produce a zonal component, albeit much smaller (1%) than the equatorial ones. The gravitational and pressure torques have opposite signs, therefore, the gravitational torque nullifies 42% of the total pressure torque. Zonally, however, the gravitational torque amounts to only 6% of the total pressure torque. The power budget for the total atmospheric torque yields 7595 and 7120 Hadleys for the equatorial components and 966 Hadleys for the zonal. The x-component exhibits

  10. Atmospheric Torques on the Solid Earth and Oceans Based on the GEOS-1 General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio

    1999-01-01

    The GEOS-1 general circulation model has been used to compute atmospheric torques on the oceans and solid Earth for the period 1980-1995. The time series for the various torque components have been analyzed by means of Fourier transform techniques. It was determined that the wind stress torque over land is more powerful than the wind stress torque over water by 55\\%, 42\\%, and 80\\t for the x, y, and z components respectively. This is mainly the result of power in the high frequency range. The pressure torques due to polar flattening, equatorial ellipticity, marine geoid, and continental orography were computed. The orographic or "mountain torque" components are more powerful than their wind stress counterparts (land plus ocean) by 231\\% (x), 191\\% (y), and 77\\% (z). The marine pressure torques due to geoidal undulations are much smaller than the orographic ones, as expected. They are only 3\\% (x), 4\\% (y), and 5\\% (z) of the corresponding mountain torques. The geoidal pressure torques are approximately equal in magnitude to those produced by the equatorial ellipticity of the Earth. The pressure torque due to polar flattening makes the largest contributions to the atmospheric'torque budget. It has no zonal component, only equatorial ones. Most of the power of the latter, between 68\\% and 69 %, is found in modes with periods under 15 days. The single most powerful mode has a period of 361 days. The gravitational torque ranks second in power only to the polar flattening pressure torque. Unlike the former, it does produce a zonal component, albeit much smaller (1\\ ) than the equatorial ones. The gravitational and pressure torques have opposite signs, therefore, the gravitational torque nullifies 42\\% of the total pressure torque. Zonally, however, the gravitational torque amounts to only 6\\% of the total pressure torque. The power budget for the total atmospheric torque yields 7595 and 7120 Hadleys for the equatorial components and 966 Hadleys for the

  11. Somatotype Variables Related to Muscle Torque and Power in Judoists

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Joanna; Buśko, Krzysztof; Pastuszak, Anna; Boguszewska, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between somatotype, muscle torque and power output in judoists. Thirteen judoists (age 18.4±3.1 years, body height 178.6±8.2 cm, body mass 82.3±15.9 kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Somatotype was determined using the Heath-Carter method. Maximal muscle torques of elbow, shoulder, knee, hip and trunk flexors as well as extensors were measured under static conditions. Power outputs were measured in 5 maximal cycle ergometer exercise bouts, 10 s each, at increasing external loads equal to 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5% of body weight. The Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated between all parameters. The mean somatotype of judoists was: 3.5-5.9-1.8 (values for endomorphy, mesomorphy and ectomorphy, respectively). The values (mean±SD) of sum of muscle torque of ten muscle groups (TOTAL) was 3702.2±862.9 N x m. The power output ranged from 393.2±79.4 to 1077.2±275.4 W. The values of sum of muscle torque of right and left upper extremities (SUE), sum of muscle torque of right and left lower extremities (SLE), sum of muscle torque of the trunk (ST) and TOTAL were significantly correlated with the mesomorphic component (0.68, 0.80, 0.71 and 0.78, respectively). The ectomorphic component correlated significantly with values of SUE, SLE, ST and TOTAL (−0.69, −0.81, −0.71 and −0.79, respectively). Power output was also strongly correlated with both mesomorphy (positively) and ectomorphy (negatively). The results indicated that the values of mesomorphic and ectomorphic somatotype components influence muscle torque and power output, thus body build could be an important factor affecting results in judo. PMID:23487284

  12. Somatotype variables related to muscle torque and power in judoists.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Joanna; Buśko, Krzysztof; Pastuszak, Anna; Boguszewska, Katarzyna

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between somatotype, muscle torque and power output in judoists. Thirteen judoists (age 18.4±3.1 years, body height 178.6±8.2 cm, body mass 82.3±15.9 kg) volunteered to participate in this study. Somatotype was determined using the Heath-Carter method. Maximal muscle torques of elbow, shoulder, knee, hip and trunk flexors as well as extensors were measured under static conditions. Power outputs were measured in 5 maximal cycle ergometer exercise bouts, 10 s each, at increasing external loads equal to 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 and 12.5% of body weight. The Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between all parameters. The mean somatotype of judoists was: 3.5-5.9-1.8 (values for endomorphy, mesomorphy and ectomorphy, respectively). The values (mean±SD) of sum of muscle torque of ten muscle groups (TOTAL) was 3702.2±862.9 N x m. The power output ranged from 393.2±79.4 to 1077.2±275.4 W. The values of sum of muscle torque of right and left upper extremities (SUE), sum of muscle torque of right and left lower extremities (SLE), sum of muscle torque of the trunk (ST) and TOTAL were significantly correlated with the mesomorphic component (0.68, 0.80, 0.71 and 0.78, respectively). The ectomorphic component correlated significantly with values of SUE, SLE, ST and TOTAL (-0.69, -0.81, -0.71 and -0.79, respectively). Power output was also strongly correlated with both mesomorphy (positively) and ectomorphy (negatively). The results indicated that the values of mesomorphic and ectomorphic somatotype components influence muscle torque and power output, thus body build could be an important factor affecting results in judo.

  13. Universal adaptive torque control for PM motors for field-weakening region operation

    DOEpatents

    Royak, Semyon [Beachwood, OH; Harbaugh, Mark M [Richfield, OH; Breitzmann, Robert J [South Russel, OH; Nondahl, Thomas A [Wauwatosa, WI; Schmidt, Peter B [Franklin, WI; Liu, Jingbo [Milwaukee, WI

    2011-03-29

    The invention includes a motor controller and method for controlling a permanent magnet motor. In accordance with one aspect of the present technique, a permanent magnet motor is controlled by, among other things, receiving a torque command, determining a normalized torque command by normalizing the torque command to a characteristic current of the motor, determining a normalized maximum available voltage, determining an inductance ratio of the motor, and determining a direct-axis current based upon the normalized torque command, the normalized maximum available voltage, and the inductance ratio of the motor.

  14. On the monoaxial stabilization of a rigid body under vanishing restoring torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Aleksandrova, E. B.; Tikhonov, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of monoaxial stabilization of a rigid body is studied. It is assumed that a linear time-invariant dissipative torque and a time-varying restoring torque vanishing as time increases act on the body. Both the case of linear restoring torque and that of essentially nonlinear one are considered. With the aid of the decomposition method, conditions are obtained under which we can guarantee the asymptotic stability of an equilibrium position of the body despite the vanishing of the restoring torque. A numerical simulation is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  15. Alignment of Irregular Grains by Mechanical Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Cho, Jungyeon; Lazarian, A.

    2018-01-01

    We study the alignment of irregular dust grains by mechanical torques due to the drift of grains through the ambient gas. We first calculate mechanical alignment torques (MATs) resulting from specular reflection of gas atoms for seven irregular shapes: one shape of mirror symmetry, three highly irregular shapes (HIS), and three weakly irregular shapes (WIS). We find that the grain with mirror symmetry experiences negligible MATs due to its mirror-symmetry geometry. Three HIS can produce strong MATs, which exhibit some generic properties as radiative torques (RATs), while three WIS produce less efficient MATs. We then study grain alignment by MATs for the different angles between the drift velocity and the ambient magnetic field, for paramagnetic and superparamagnetic grains assuming efficient internal relaxation. We find that for HIS grains, MATs can align subsonically drifting grains in the same way as RATs, with low-J and high-J attractors. For supersonic drift, MATs can align grains with low-J and high-J attractors, analogous to RAT alignment by anisotropic radiation. We also show that the joint action of MATs and magnetic torques in grains with iron inclusions can lead to perfect MAT alignment. Our results point out the potential importance of MAT alignment for HIS grains predicted by the analytical model of Lazarian & Hoang, although more theoretical and observational studies are required due to uncertainty in the shape of interstellar grains. We outline astrophysical environments where MAT alignment is potentially important.

  16. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

  17. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-07-20

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

  18. Anatomical and neuromuscular variables strongly predict maximum knee extension torque in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Trezise, J; Collier, N; Blazevich, A J

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the relative influence of anatomical and neuromuscular variables on maximal isometric and concentric knee extensor torque and provided a comparative dataset for healthy young males. Quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and fascicle length (l f) and angle (θ f) from the four quadriceps components; agonist (EMG:M) and antagonist muscle activity, and percent voluntary activation (%VA); patellar tendon moment arm distance (MA) and maximal voluntary isometric and concentric (60° s(-1)) torques, were measured in 56 men. Linear regression models predicting maximum torque were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc), and Pearson's correlation coefficients assessed relationships between variables. The best-fit models explained up to 72 % of the variance in maximal voluntary knee extension torque. The combination of 'CSA + θ f + EMG:M + %VA' best predicted maximum isometric torque (R (2) = 72 %, AICc weight = 0.38) and 'CSA + θ f + MA' (R (2) = 65 %, AICc weight = 0.21) best predicted maximum concentric torque. Proximal quadriceps CSA was included in all models rather than the traditionally used mid-muscle CSA. Fascicle angle appeared consistently in all models despite its weak correlation with maximum torque in isolation, emphasising the importance of examining interactions among variables. While muscle activity was important for torque prediction in both contraction modes, MA only strongly influenced maximal concentric torque. These models identify the main sources of inter-individual differences strongly influencing maximal knee extension torque production in healthy men. The comparative dataset allows the identification of potential variables to target (i.e. weaknesses) in individuals.

  19. Computations of Torque-Balanced Coaxial Rotor Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Chan, William M.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics has been studied for counter-rotating coaxial rotors in hover. The effects of torque balancing on the performance of coaxial-rotor systems have been investigated. The three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved on overset grids using high-order accurate schemes, dual-time stepping, and a hybrid turbulence model. Computational results for an experimental model are compared to available data. The results for a coaxial quadcopter vehicle with and without torque balancing are discussed. Understanding interactions in coaxial-rotor flows would help improve the design of next-generation autonomous drones.

  20. Relationship between locking-bolt torque and load pre-tension in the Ilizarov frame.

    PubMed

    Osei, N A; Bradley, B M; Culpan, P; Mitchell, J B; Barry, M; Tanner, K E

    2006-10-01

    The wire-bolt interface in an Ilizarov frame has been mechanically tested. The optimal torque to be applied to the frame locking-bolts during physiological loading has been defined. The set-up configuration was as is used clinically except a copper tube was used to simulate bone. The force-displacement curves of the Ilizarov wires are not altered by locking-bolt torque. The force in the bone model at which pre-tension is lost increases as the locking-bolts are tightened to 14 Nm torque, but decreases if torque exceeds 14 Nm. Thus, 14 Nm is the optimal locking-bolt torque in frame. The relationship between pre-tension versus load for different locking-bolt torques arises because at low and high clamping torques poor wire holding and plastic deformation respectively occur. Wire damage was seen under light and electron microscopy. Clinically, over or under-tightening locking-bolts will cause loss of pre-tension, reduction in frame stiffness and excessive movement at the fracture site, which may be associated with delayed union.

  1. Current control of PMSM based on maximum torque control reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, Takumi

    2017-07-01

    This study presents a new method of current controls of PMSMs (Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors) based on a maximum torque control reference frame, which is suitable for high-performance controls of the PMSMs. As the issues of environment and energy increase seriously, PMSMs, one of the AC motors, are becoming popular because of their high-efficiency and high-torque density in various applications, such as electric vehicles, trains, industrial machines, and home appliances. To use the PMSMs efficiently, a proper current control of the PMSMs is necessary. In general, a rotational coordinate system synchronizing with the rotor is used for the current control of PMSMs. In the rotating reference frame, the current control is easier because the currents on the rotating reference frame can be expressed as a direct current in the controller. On the other hand, the torque characteristics of PMSMs are non-linear and complex; the PMSMs are efficient and high-density though. Therefore, a complicated control system is required to involve the relation between the torque and the current, even though the rotating reference frame is adopted. The maximum torque control reference frame provides a simpler way to control efficiently the currents taking the torque characteristics of the PMSMs into consideration.

  2. Speed And Power Control Of An Engine By Modulation Of The Load Torque

    DOEpatents

    Ziph, Benjamin; Strodtman, Scott; Rose, Thomas K

    1999-01-26

    A system and method of speed and power control for an engine in which speed and power of the engine is controlled by modulation of the load torque. The load torque is manipulated in order to cause engine speed, and hence power to be changed. To accomplish such control, the load torque undergoes a temporary excursion in the opposite direction of the desired speed and power change. The engine and the driven equipment will accelerate or decelerate accordingly as the load torque is decreased or increased, relative to the essentially fixed or constant engine torque. As the engine accelerates or decelerates, its power increases or decreases in proportion.

  3. Role of external torque in the formation of ion thermal internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-04-01

    We present an analytic study of the impact of external torque on the formation of ion internal transport barriers (ITBs). A simple analytic relation representing the effect of low external torque on transport bifurcations is derived based on a two field transport model of pressure and toroidal momentum density. It is found that the application of an external torque can either facilitate or hamper bifurcation in heat flux driven plasmas depending on its sign relative to the direction of intrinsic torque. The ratio between radially integrated momentum (i.e., external torque) density to power input is shown to be a key macroscopic control parameter governing the characteristics of bifurcation.

  4. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  5. Large Torque Variations in Two Soft Gamma Repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; Finger, Mark H.; Swank, Jean; Markwardt, Craig B.; Hurley, Kevin; vanderKlis, Michiel; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have monitored the pulse frequencies of the two soft gamma repeaters SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14 through the beginning of year 2001 using primarily Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Proportional Counter Array observations. In both sources, we observe large changes in the spin-down torque up to a factor of approximately 4, which persist for several months. Using long baseline phase-connected timing solutions as well as the overall frequency histories, we construct torque noise power spectra for each SGR. The power spectrum of each source is very red (power-law slope approximately -3.5). These power spectra are consistent in normalization with some accreting systems, yet much steeper in slope than any known accreting source. To the best of our knowledge, torque noise power spectra with a comparably steep frequency dependence have only been seen in young, glitching radio pulsars (e.g. Vela). The observed changes in spin-down rate do not correlate with burst activity, therefore, the physical mechanisms behind each phenomenon are also likely unrelated. Within the context of the magnetar model, seismic activity cannot account for both the bursts and the long-term torque changes unless the seismically active regions are decoupled from one another.

  6. Ultrasonic resonant piezoelectric actuator with intrinsic torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Pott, Peter P; Matich, Sebastian; Schlaak, Helmut F

    2012-11-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic actuators are widely used in small-scale actuation systems, in which a closed-loop position control is usually utilized. To save an additional torque sensor, the intrinsic measurement capabilities of the piezoelectric material can be employed. To prove feasibility, a motor setup with clearly separated actuation for the friction and driving forces is chosen. The motor concept is based on resonant ultrasonic vibrations. To assess the effects of the direct piezoelectric effect, a capacitance bridge-type circuit has been selected. Signal processing is done by a measurement card with an integrated field-programmable gate array. The motor is used to drive a winch, and different torques are applied by means of weights to be lifted. Assessing the bridge voltage, a good proportionality to the applied torque of 1.47 mV/mN·m is shown. A hysteresis of 1% has been determined. The chosen motor concept is useful for intrinsic torque measurement. However, it provides drawbacks in terms of limited mechanical performance, wear, and thermal losses because of the soft piezoelectric material. Future work will comprise the application of the method to commercially available piezoelectric actuators as well as the implementation of the measurement circuit in an embedded system.

  7. Evaluation of fracture torque resistance of orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    Dalla Rosa, Fernando; Burmann, Paola Fp; Ruschel, Henrique C; Vargas, Ivana A; Kramer, Paulo F

    2016-12-01

    This study sought to assess the fracture torque resistance of mini-implants used for orthodontic anchorage. Five commercially available brands of mini-implants were used (SIN®, CONEXÃO®, NEODENT®, MORELLI®, andFORESTADENT®). Ten mini-implants of each diameter of each brand were tested, for a total 100 specimens. The mini-implants were subject to a static torsion test as described in ASTMstandard F543. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Tukey multiple comparisons procedure was used to assess results. Overall, mean fracture strength ranged from 15.7 to 70.4 N·cm. Mini-implants with larger diameter exhibited higher peak torque values at fracture and higher yield strength, regardless of brand. In addition, significant differences across brands were observed when implants were stratified by diameter. In conclusion, larger mini-implant diameter is associated with increased fracture torque resistance. Additional information on peak torque values at fracture of different commercial brands of mini-implants may increase the success rate of this orthodontic anchorage modality. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  8. The effect of the use of a counter-torque device on the abutment-implant complex.

    PubMed

    Lang, L A; May, K B; Wang, R F

    1999-04-01

    Little is known about the condition of the abutment-screw joint before loading, after the development of the preload. This study examined the tightening force transmitted to the implant with and without the use of a counter-torque device during the tightening of the abutment screw. Forty Brânemark implants and 10 CeraOne, Estheticone, Procera, and AurAdapt abutments formed the experimental populations. Samples in each group were further divided into 2 groups, 1 group was tightened with a torque controller without the use of a counter-torque device, whereas the other used the counter-torque device. Samples were positioned in a special holder within the grips of a Tohnichi BTG-6 torque gauge for measuring transmitted forces. There were significant differences (P =. 0001) in the tightening forces transmitted to the implant with and without the use of a counter-torque device when tightening the abutment screws. An average of 91% of the recommended preload tightening torque was transmitted to the implant-bone interface in the absence of a counter-torque device. In all abutment systems, less than 10% of the recommended preload tightening torque was transmitted to the implant when the counter-torque device was used.

  9. Effect of Different Torque Settings on Crack Formation in Root Dentin.

    PubMed

    Dane, Asım; Capar, Ismail Davut; Arslan, Hakan; Akçay, Merve; Uysal, Banu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the incidence of cracks in root canal dentin using the ProTaper Universal system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) at low- and high-torque settings. Sixty-nine mandibular premolar teeth that had been extracted for different reasons were selected. The teeth were divided into 3 groups: an unprepared control group, a low-torque settings group (SX = 3, S1 = 2, S2 = 1, F1 = 1.5, F2 = 2, F3 = 2, F4 = 2 N/cm), and a high-torque settings group (SX = 4, S1 = 4, S2 = 1.5, F1 = 2, F2 = 3, F3 = 3, F4 = 3 N/cm). After a root canal procedure, all the teeth were horizontally sectioned at 2, 4, 6, and 8 mm from the apex. Then, under a stereomicroscope, all the slices were examined to determine the presence of cracks. A chi-square test was used for data analysis. The significance level was set at P = .05. There were no cracks in the unprepared control group. Vertical root fractures were not observed in any of the groups. There were significantly fewer cracks (17.4% of the sections) in the low-torque group than in the high-torque group (29.4% of the sections) (P < .05). In this in vitro study, the instrumentation of root canals with the ProTaper Universal instrument caused more crack formation in root canal dentin at high-torque than at low-torque settings. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of Electrically-Evoked Knee Torque from Mechanomyography Using Support Vector Regression.

    PubMed

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Hasnan, Nazirah; Olatunji, Sunday Olusanya; Davis, Glen M

    2016-07-19

    The difficulty of real-time muscle force or joint torque estimation during neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in physical therapy and exercise science has motivated recent research interest in torque estimation from other muscle characteristics. This study investigated the accuracy of a computational intelligence technique for estimating NMES-evoked knee extension torque based on the Mechanomyographic signals (MMG) of contracting muscles that were recorded from eight healthy males. Simulation of the knee torque was modelled via Support Vector Regression (SVR) due to its good generalization ability in related fields. Inputs to the proposed model were MMG amplitude characteristics, the level of electrical stimulation or contraction intensity, and knee angle. Gaussian kernel function, as well as its optimal parameters were identified with the best performance measure and were applied as the SVR kernel function to build an effective knee torque estimation model. To train and test the model, the data were partitioned into training (70%) and testing (30%) subsets, respectively. The SVR estimation accuracy, based on the coefficient of determination (R²) between the actual and the estimated torque values was up to 94% and 89% during the training and testing cases, with root mean square errors (RMSE) of 9.48 and 12.95, respectively. The knee torque estimations obtained using SVR modelling agreed well with the experimental data from an isokinetic dynamometer. These findings support the realization of a closed-loop NMES system for functional tasks using MMG as the feedback signal source and an SVR algorithm for joint torque estimation.

  11. Quantification of pronator quadratus contribution to isometric pronation torque of the forearm.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Mark O; Schwab, Timothy D; Travlos, Andrew; Oxland, Thomas R; Goetz, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    The contribution of the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle in generation of pronation torque has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate pronation torque in healthy volunteers before and after temporary paralysis of the PQ with lidocaine, under electromyographic guidance. A custom apparatus was designed to allow isometric testing of pronation torque at 5 positions of rotation: 90 degrees of supination, 45 degrees of supination, neutral, 45 degrees of pronation, and 80 degrees of pronation. After validation of the apparatus, 17 (9 male, 8 female) right-hand-dominant volunteers were recruited. They were tested at all 5 positions in random order and then had their PQ muscles paralyzed with lidocaine. Repeat testing was performed in the same random order 30 minutes after injection. Three unblinded subjects underwent testing after injection of saline instead of lidocaine to determine effect of fluid volume alone on PQ function. The validation trial demonstrated reproducibility of the testing apparatus. After paralysis of PQ with lidocaine, pronation torque decreased by an average 21% (range, 16.7% to 23.2%) at all positions compared with preinjection testing. All were statistically significant except at 80 degrees of pronation. The subjects who underwent injection of saline showed no evidence of decrease in pronation torque. This study demonstrated a significant decrease in pronation torque with controlled elimination of PQ function. Open reduction and internal fixation of distal radius fractures damages the PQ and may result in a pronation torque deficit. Pronation torque measurement may help in postoperative outcome analysis of surgical procedures using the volar approach to the distal radius.

  12. Thermomagnetic torques in polyatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Wood, C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The application of the Scott effect to the dynamics of galactic and stellar rotation is investigated. Efforts were also made to improve the sensitivity and stability of torque measurements and understand the microscopic mechanism that causes the Scott effect.

  13. Manual Torque Data Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mundt, Mark Osroe; Martinez, Matthew Ronald; Varela, Jeanette Judith

    At the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX, Production Technicians (PTs) build and disassemble nuclear weapon systems. The weapons are held in an integrated work stand for stability and to increase the safety environment for the workers and for the materials being processed. There are many occasions in which a knob must be turned to tighten an assembly part. This can help to secure or manipulate pieces of the system. As there are so many knobs to turn, the instructions given to the PTs are to twist the knob to a hand-tight setting, without the aid of a torque wrench. Theremore » are inherent risks in this procedure as the knobs can be tightened too loosely such that the apparatus falls apart or too tightly such that the force can crush or pinch components in the system that contain energetic materials. We want to study these operations at Pantex. Our goal is to collect torque data to assess the safety and reliability of humantooling interfaces.« less

  14. Age-related reduction of trunk muscle torque and prevalence of trunk sarcopenia in community-dwelling elderly: Validity of a portable trunk muscle torque measurement instrument and its application to a large sample cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Shizuka; Chiba, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yuji; Nawata, Atsushi; Tsuda, Eiichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-01

    Trunk muscle weakness and imbalance are risk factors for postural instability, low back pain, and poor postoperative outcomes. The association between trunk muscle strength and aging is poorly understood, and establishing normal reference values is difficult. We aimed to establish the validity of a novel portable trunk muscle torque measurement instrument (PTMI). We then estimated reference data for healthy young adults and elucidated age-related weakness in trunk muscle strength. Twenty-four university students were enrolled to validate values for PTMI, and 816 volunteers from the general population who were recruited to the Iwaki Health Promotion Project were included to estimate reference data for trunk muscle strength. Trunk flexion and extension torque were measured with PTMI and KinCom, and interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were estimated to evaluate the reliability of PTMI values. Furthermore, from the young adult reference, the age-related reduction in trunk muscle torque and the prevalence of sarcopenia among age-sex groups were estimated. The ICC in flexion and extension torque were 0.807 (p<0.001) and 0.789 (p<0.001), respectively. The prevalence of sarcopenia increased with age, and the prevalence due to flexion torque was double that of extension torque. Flexion torque decreased significantly after 60 years of age, and extension torque decreased after 70 years of age. In males over age 80, trunk muscle torque decreased to 49.1% in flexion and 63.5% in extension. In females over age 80, trunk muscle torque decreased to 60.7% in flexion and 68.4% in extension. The validity of PTMI was confirmed by correlation with KinCom. PTMI produced reference data for healthy young adults, and demonstrated age-related reduction in trunk muscle torque. Trunk sarcopenia progressed with aging, and the loss of flexion torque began earlier than extension torque. At age 80, trunk muscle torque had decreased 60% compared with healthy young adults. PMID:29471310

  15. Age-related reduction of trunk muscle torque and prevalence of trunk sarcopenia in community-dwelling elderly: Validity of a portable trunk muscle torque measurement instrument and its application to a large sample cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Eiji; Sasaki, Shizuka; Chiba, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yuji; Nawata, Atsushi; Tsuda, Eiichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-01

    Trunk muscle weakness and imbalance are risk factors for postural instability, low back pain, and poor postoperative outcomes. The association between trunk muscle strength and aging is poorly understood, and establishing normal reference values is difficult. We aimed to establish the validity of a novel portable trunk muscle torque measurement instrument (PTMI). We then estimated reference data for healthy young adults and elucidated age-related weakness in trunk muscle strength. Twenty-four university students were enrolled to validate values for PTMI, and 816 volunteers from the general population who were recruited to the Iwaki Health Promotion Project were included to estimate reference data for trunk muscle strength. Trunk flexion and extension torque were measured with PTMI and KinCom, and interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were estimated to evaluate the reliability of PTMI values. Furthermore, from the young adult reference, the age-related reduction in trunk muscle torque and the prevalence of sarcopenia among age-sex groups were estimated. The ICC in flexion and extension torque were 0.807 (p<0.001) and 0.789 (p<0.001), respectively. The prevalence of sarcopenia increased with age, and the prevalence due to flexion torque was double that of extension torque. Flexion torque decreased significantly after 60 years of age, and extension torque decreased after 70 years of age. In males over age 80, trunk muscle torque decreased to 49.1% in flexion and 63.5% in extension. In females over age 80, trunk muscle torque decreased to 60.7% in flexion and 68.4% in extension. The validity of PTMI was confirmed by correlation with KinCom. PTMI produced reference data for healthy young adults, and demonstrated age-related reduction in trunk muscle torque. Trunk sarcopenia progressed with aging, and the loss of flexion torque began earlier than extension torque. At age 80, trunk muscle torque had decreased 60% compared with healthy young adults.

  16. Torques Induced by Scattered Pebble-flow in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Pessah, Martin E.

    2018-03-01

    Fast inward migration of planetary cores is a common problem in the current planet formation paradigm. Even though dust is ubiquitous in protoplanetary disks, its dynamical role in the migration history of planetary embryos has not been assessed. In this Letter, we show that the scattered pebble-flow induced by a low-mass planetary embryo leads to an asymmetric dust-density distribution that is able to exert a net torque. By analyzing a large suite of multifluid hydrodynamical simulations addressing the interaction between the disk and a low-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, and neglecting dust feedback onto the gas, we identify two different regimes, gas- and gravity-dominated, where the scattered pebble-flow results in almost all cases in positive torques. We collect our measurements in a first torque map for dusty disks, which will enable the incorporation of the effect of dust dynamics on migration into population synthesis models. Depending on the dust drift speed, the dust-to-gas mass ratio/distribution, and the embryo mass, the dust-induced torque has the potential to halt inward migration or even induce fast outward migration of planetary cores. We thus anticipate that dust-driven migration could play a dominant role during the formation history of planets. Because dust torques scale with disk metallicity, we propose that dust-driven outward migration may enhance the occurrence of distant giant planets in higher-metallicity systems.

  17. Effect of screw torque level on cortical bone pullout strength.

    PubMed

    Cleek, Tammy M; Reynolds, Karen J; Hearn, Trevor C

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of this study were 2-fold: (1) to perform detailed analysis of cortical screw tightening stiffness during automated insertion, and (2) to determine the effect of 3 torque levels on the holding strength of the bone surrounding the screw threads as assessed by screw pullout. Ten pairs of ovine tibiae were used with 3 test sites spaced 20 mm apart centered along the shaft. One side of each pair was used for measuring ultimate failure torque (Tmax). These Tmax and bone-density values were used to predict Tmax at contralateral tibia sites. Screws were inserted and tightened to 50%, 70%, and 90% of predicted Tmax at the contralateral sites to encompass the average clinical level of torque (86% Tmax). Pullout tests were performed and maximum force values were normalized by cortical thickness. Torque to failure tests indicated tightening to 86% Tmax occurs after yield and leads to an average 51% loss in stiffness. Normalized pullout strength for screws tightened to 50% Tmax, 70% Tmax, and 90% Tmax were 2525 +/- 244, 2707 +/- 280, and 2344 +/- 346 N, respectively, with a significant difference between 70% Tmax and 90% Tmax groups (P < 0.05). Within the limitations of our study involving the testing of 1 type of screw purchase in ovine tibiae, results demonstrate that clinical levels of lag screw tightening (86% Tmax) are past the yield point of bone. Tightening to these high torque levels can cause damage leading to compromised holding strength. Further research is still required to establish the appropriate level of torque required for achieving optimal fracture fixation and healing.

  18. Advances in the analysis and design of constant-torque springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.; Yura, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    In order to improve the design procedure of constant-torque springs used in aerospace applications, several new analysis techniques have been developed. These techniques make it possible to accurately construct a torque-rotation curve for any general constant-torque spring configuration. These new techniques allow for friction in the system to be included in the analysis, an area of analysis that has heretofore been unexplored. The new analysis techniques also include solutions for the deflected shape of the spring as well as solutions for drum and roller support reaction forces. A design procedure incorporating these new capabilities is presented.

  19. Antidamping spin-orbit torques in epitaxial-Py(100)/β-Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Dhananjay; Behera, Nilamani; Kumar, Akash; Dürrenfeld, Philipp; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, D. K.; Åkerman, Johan; Muduli, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    We perform spin torque ferromagnetic resonance measurements on the Si(100)/TiN(100)/epi-Py(100)/β-Ta system. We demonstrate current induced modulation of the Gilbert damping constant, which is about 30% for a current density of 6.25 × 109 A/m2. We show that the observed modulation of the Gilbert damping constant cannot be explained by spin transfer torques arising from the spin Hall effect of the β-Ta layer. An additional mechanism such as antidamping spin-orbit torque resulting from the interface or the crystalline structure of Py thin films needs to be considered.

  20. Peculiarities of Clutch Forming Rails and Wheel Block Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiler, V. V.; Galiev, I. I.; Shiler, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    The clutch of the wheel and rail is significantly influenced by the design features of the standard wheel pair, which are manifested in the presence of "parasitic" slipping of the wheels along the rails during its movement. The purpose of the presented work is to evaluate new design solutions for wheel sets. The research was carried out using methods of comparative simulation modelling and physical prototyping. A new design of the wheel pair (block wheel pair) is proposed, which features an independent rotation of all surfaces of the wheels in contact with the rails. The block construction of the wheel pair forms open mechanical contours with the track gauge, which completely eliminates the "parasitic" slippage. As a result, in the process of implementing traction or braking forces, the coupling coefficient of the block construction of the wheel pair is significantly higher than that of existing structures. In addition, in the run-out mode, the resistance to movement of the block wheel pair is half as much. All this will allow one to significantly reduce the energy consumption for traction of trains, wear of track elements and crew, and to increase the speed and safety of train traffic.