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Sample records for tranquilizers

  1. Rapid tranquilization: An audit of Irish mental health nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael; McDonagh, Caitriona; Culhane, Aisling; Noone, Imelda; Higgins, Agnes

    2018-02-12

    Rapid tranquillization is a pharmacological intervention sometimes employed in mental health care for the management of acute behavioural disturbance. It is a form of restrictive practice, which, along with seclusion and restraint, is a conventional and controversial intervention in the therapeutic management of risk in mental health settings. This study surveyed mental health nurses practice in rapid tranquillization. A self-report questionnaire was utilized which addressed aspects such as definitions of rapid tranquillization, presence of rapid tranquillization policy, types of incidents where it is used and postintervention monitoring. The results demonstrate that rapid tranquillization is an intervention used in the management of acute behavioural disturbance in various mental health settings in Ireland. Respondents showed a basic understanding of rapid tranquillization as an intervention; however, some areas reported not having a specific rapid tranquillization policy. There was some evidence of a variation in postrapid tranquillization monitoring of psychiatric/mental health and physical health. Service user debriefing following rapid tranquillization was reported to be common; however, the content of this was not elaborated on. In the light of variations in practice, specific training and the development of rapid tranquillization policies are recommended. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Prevalence, Sources and Uses of Tranquilizers Among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinknecht, Ronald A.; Smith-Scott, Janet

    1977-01-01

    A survey of 344 college students revealed 36.71 percent reported having used minor tranquilizers. Among those who acquired tranquilizers by their own prescription, the vast majority used them from others' prescriptions or black market sources, used them for pleasure. (Author)

  3. The effects of a tranquilizer on body temperature.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1963-10-01

    Four young adult mongrel dogs were exposed twice untranquilized to each of three environmental temperatures: 4.4C, 23.9C, and 37.8C and exposed twice tranquilized with 2.2 mg/Kg propiopromazine hydrochloride. Rectal temperatures were monitored ...

  4. Apollo 11 Mission image - CSM over the Sea of Tranquility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-37-5448 (July 1969) --- The Apollo 11 Command and Service Modules (CSM) (tiny dot near quarter sized crater, center), with astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, aboard. The view overlooking the western Sea of Tranquility was photographed from the Lunar Module (LM). Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, manned the LM and made their historic lunar landing on July 20, 1969. Coordinates of the center of the terrain in the photograph are 18.5 degrees longitude and .5 degrees north latitude.

  5. Restoring effective sleep tranquility (REST): A feasibility and pilot study.

    PubMed

    Eakman, Aaron M; Schmid, Arlene A; Henry, Kimberly L; Rolle, Natalie R; Schelly, Catherine; Pott, Christine E; Burns, Joshua E

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to establish the feasibility of completing a future controlled trial of a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia program for military veterans with sleep disturbance. This was a single-arm feasibility and pilot study. Participants were United States post-9/11 veterans with service-connected injuries, university students, and had self-reported sleep disturbances. Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility was a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia intervention consisting of seven sessions of group therapy and eight 1:1 sessions delivered by occupational therapists. Feasibility and pilot indicators were process, resources, management, and scientific, including pre-post-assessments of sleep difficulties, dysfunctional sleep beliefs, participation, and pain interference. Indicators were supportive of feasibility, including reduced sleep difficulties (for example Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Measure [ t  = 3.29, p  = .02]), reduced nightmares: t  = 2.79, p  = .03; fewer dysfunctional sleep beliefs: t  = 3.63, p  = .01, and greater ability to participate in social roles: t  = -2.86, p  = .03, along with trends towards improved satisfaction with participation and reduced pain interference. The Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility program may reduce sleep difficulties and improve participation in US veterans with service-connected injuries, and evidence indicates a controlled trial would be feasible to deliver.

  6. Restoring effective sleep tranquility (REST): A feasibility and pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Arlene A; Henry, Kimberly L; Rolle, Natalie R; Schelly, Catherine; Pott, Christine E; Burns, Joshua E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this pilot study was to establish the feasibility of completing a future controlled trial of a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia program for military veterans with sleep disturbance. Method This was a single-arm feasibility and pilot study. Participants were United States post-9/11 veterans with service-connected injuries, university students, and had self-reported sleep disturbances. Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility was a multi-component cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia intervention consisting of seven sessions of group therapy and eight 1:1 sessions delivered by occupational therapists. Feasibility and pilot indicators were process, resources, management, and scientific, including pre–post-assessments of sleep difficulties, dysfunctional sleep beliefs, participation, and pain interference. Findings Indicators were supportive of feasibility, including reduced sleep difficulties (for example Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Measure [t = 3.29, p = .02]), reduced nightmares: t = 2.79, p = .03; fewer dysfunctional sleep beliefs: t = 3.63, p = .01, and greater ability to participate in social roles: t = –2.86, p = .03, along with trends towards improved satisfaction with participation and reduced pain interference. Conclusion The Restoring Effective Sleep Tranquility program may reduce sleep difficulties and improve participation in US veterans with service-connected injuries, and evidence indicates a controlled trial would be feasible to deliver. PMID:28626295

  7. Effect of tranquilizers on animal resistance to the adequate stimuli of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovich, Y. B.; Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tranquilizers on vestibulospinal reflexes and motor activity was studied in 900 centrifuged albino mice. Actometric studies have shown that the tranquilizers have a group capacity for increasing animal resistance to the action of adequate stimuli to the vestibular apparatus.

  8. Dispositional, Ecological and Biological Influences on Adolescent Tranquilizer, Ritalin, and Narcotics Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleary, Sasha A.; Heffer, Robert W.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two of the three sources of risk-taking--dispositional and ecological--in adolescence and demographic variables were related to Ritalin, tranquilizer and narcotics misuse. The secondary aim of this study was to distinguish subgroups of Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics…

  9. Nonprescribed use of tranquilizers and use of other drugs among Brazilian students.

    PubMed

    Opaleye, Emérita S; Ferri, Cleusa P; Locatelli, Danilo P; Amato, Tatiana C; Noto, Ana R

    2014-01-01

    To describe patterns of nonprescribed use of tranquilizers by students aged 10 to 18 years and assess the sociodemographic characteristics of these adolescents and their use of other substances. A randomized and stratified sample of 47,979 students from state and private schools of the 27 Brazilian state capitals completed a self-report questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to estimate the associations between tranquilizer use and sociodemographic factors, as well as the use of other psychotropic substances. The lifetime prevalence of nonprescribed use of tranquilizers was 3.9%. Use was most common among girls, wealthier adolescents, and those from private schools. An association was found between use of tranquilizers and lifetime use of alcohol (prevalence ratio [PR] = 3.15; 95% confidence intervals [95%CI] 2.58-3.85), tobacco (PR = 2.61; 95%CI 2.31-2.95), illicit drugs (PR = 3.70; 95%CI 3.19-4.29), and other prescription drugs (PR = 7.03; 95%CI 6.18-7.99). As the number of substances adolescents reported having used increased, so did the nonprescribed use of tranquilizers. Nonprescribed use of tranquilizers by adolescents might indicate the use of other substances, including high-risk combinations such as tranquilizers and alcohol. The risks of this association should be addressed during the early stages of drug prevention programs.

  10. Problems in aviation personnel : influence of a tranquilizer on temperature regulation in man.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1966-05-01

    The effects of a tranquilizing drug of the propaediol group, meprobamate, on thermal balance of men exposed to a cold (50F, 10C), hot (110F, 43.3C), or neutral (80F, 26.7C) environment have been investigated. Results show that a single dose of meprob...

  11. [Ion-dependency of the GABA-potentiating effects of benzodiazepine tranquilizers and harmane].

    PubMed

    Abramets, I I; Komissarov, I V

    1984-06-01

    Experiments on an isolated spinal cord of 8-15-day-old rats have shown that one of the possible mechanisms of the GABA-potentiating action of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer, chlorodiazepoxide, may be a decrease in the intraneuronal concentration of Ca2+. This is evidenced by the enhancement of the GABA-potentiating action of chlorodiazepoxide under Ca2+ deficiency in the medium and in the presence of the blockers of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ ionic channels--Mn2+ and Co2+, and by the reduction of the effect in question under Ca2+ excess in the medium and in the presence of the K+ channels blockers--tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine. The GABA-potentiating action of harmane is likely to be related to the blockade of the voltage-dependent K+ channels and elevation of the intracellular concentration of Ca2+.

  12. [Brief review about compatibility and their pharmacological effects of Chinese material medica as tranquilizer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Wang, Li-wei; Liu, Xin-min

    2007-11-01

    The paper summarized the sedative pharmacological effects of CMM, which were reported in the past 10 years. Those sedative CMMs were found in several type of Chinese medicine, such as tranquilizing the mind, calming the liver to stop the wind, general tonic, blood-activating and stasis-resolving drugs, heat-clearing drugs, exterior-releasing drugs, drugs for resuscitation, diuresis-inducing and dampness-draining drugs, ect. Out of them, the general tonic drugs were used in many occasions. Two Chinese herbs, jujube seed and polygala were used popularly as sedative drugs. And their effects have something to do with heart Meridian and liver Meridian. The Locomotor activity, sleeping test and forcing swimming were used commonly to detect the sedative effects. The sedative mechanisms of those CMM were related with neuro-transmitters such as Dopamine (DA), 5-HT and gamma-GABA, etc.

  13. Apollo 10 oblique view of Apollo Landing Site 2 southwest Sea of Tranquility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    An Apollo 10 oblique view of Apollo Landing Site 2 in the southwestern Sea of Tranquility, and showing some of the area west of the site, looking west. The Site 2 ellipse is at botom center, extending downward (eastward) from the Cat's Paw. At bottom left corner is the crater Moltke AC (Chuck Hole) in the center of the prominent linear feature Hypatia Rille (called U.S. 1). The other rille in the center of the picture and to the right (north) of Hypatia Rille is called Wagon Road. The Largest crater in picture, and nearest to the camera, is Sabine, with Ritter adjoining it on the northwest. The brighter crater near the upper right corner is Dionysius. The smaller crater Schmidt is just above (to the west of) Sabine. The small crater Sabine D is near lower right corner, to the right (north) of Site 2. The coordinates of Site 2 are 23 degrees 42 minutes 23 seconds east longitude and 0 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds north latitude.

  14. Relative Tranquility in Ostomy Patients' Social Life: A Qualitative Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarabi, Nasrin; Navipour, Hassan; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2017-08-01

    Ostomy significantly alters one's elimination pattern and can affect the individual in physiological, psychosocial and spiritual aspects. Over time, the ostomy patient's experience changes and they develop coping strategies to handle the new reality. The aims of this study sought Iranian ostomy patients' main problem, how they deal and the outcome of their efforts to manage that problem in their daily lives. A qualitative content analysis was conducted involving twenty-seven ostomy patients that were chosen by purposeful sampling and referred to the Iranian Ostomy Association from October 2015 to June 2016. The mean age of the participants was 55 years, 15 were males, the major cause of ostomy was colorectal cancer and the colostomy was the most common type of ostomy, and nineteen of them between one and twenty years lived with an ostomy. Most of them were married, had bachelor degree and received adjuvant therapy, and few were employed. Guarantee indecisive to maintain a stable life with an ostomy and the possibility of ostomy disclosure unpredictability show relative tranquility in patients' social life. Because of the ostomy nature, there is not the possibility of full control over life with an ostomy and this issue is causing concerns in their family and social life.

  15. Sales of tranquillizers, hypnotics/sedatives and antidepressants and their relationship with underprivileged area score and mortality and suicide rates.

    PubMed

    Sundquist, J; Ekedahl, A; Johansson, S E

    1996-01-01

    This study analyses the correlation between the Swedish underprivileged area score and sales of tranquillizers, hypnotics/sedatives, neuroleptics and antidepressants, and the correlation between these sales and mortality and suicide rates, with the aim of using sales data to identify areas with poor socioeconomic conditions. Southern Sweden, 33 municipalities in Skåne, 1987 and 1994. Ecological study. Determined and undetermined cases of suicide were taken from the local death register for the years 1987-1993. Suicide rates (determined and undetermined cases) were calculated as the ratio between observed and expected number of suicides. Mortality for people aged 20-64 years was calculated from life tables for the decade 1981-1990. The underprivileged area score was calculated for municipalities using the proportion of persons in the following groups: elderly living alone, under 5 years of age, one-parent families, unskilled, unemployed, living in crowded households, those moving house in the previous year, and ethnic groups. After transformation (square root of arc sine) and standardization, each of the eight variables was weighted by the British general practitioners average weighting and added to give the underprivileged area score. The selection of the eight variables was based on general practitioners' perceptions of the effect of the social characteristics of the populations in their respective residential areas on their workload or pressure on services. The total drug sales figures for tranquillizers, hypnotics/sedatives, neuroleptics and antidepressants are expressed in Defined Daily Doses per 1000 inhabitants per day. The relationship between these variables was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a moderate correlation (0.41-0.68) between the sales expressed as in Defined Daily Doses per 1000 inhabitants per day of tranquillizers and hypnotics/sedatives and underprivileged area score. Furthermore, the sales of tranquillizers and

  16. Psychophysiological differentiation of two types of anxiety and its pharmacological modification by minor tranquillizer and beta-receptor-blocker.

    PubMed

    Albus, M; Stahl, S; Müller-Spahn, F; Engel, R R

    1986-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of beta-blockers and/or minor tranquillizers on autonomic reactions during brief stress, 48 healthy subjects were randomised into 4 groups: A = 4 mg Pindolol, B = 1.5 mg Cloxazolam, C = Placebo, D = 4 mg Pindolol + 1.5 mg Cloxazolam. Subjects underwent four stress situations: Counting, noise, mental arithmetic and ergometry, each lasting 4 min with rest periods of 8 min in between. Electromyogram, finger pulse amplitude, heart rate, pulse wave velocity and electrodermal activity were recorded simultaneously on-line. Analysis of variance showed that the two drugs had significant main effects in different systems: Pindolol reduced heart rate, mainly during mental arithmetic and ergometry, Cloxazolam reduced electrodermal activity, mainly during noise. It can be concluded that different structured situations with a varying amount and type of anxiety induce different autonomic reactions; these reactions can be differentially modified by the drugs applied.

  17. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd chronology and genealogy of mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Depaolo, D. J.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages of two Apollo 11 mare basalts, high-K basalt 10072 and low-K basalt 10062, are reported. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Ar-40-Ar-39 ages are in good agreement and indicate an extensive time interval for filling of the Sea of Tranquility, presumably by thin lava flows, in agreement with similar observations for the Ocean of Storms. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions on Apollo 11 basalts reveal at least two parent sources producing basalts. The Sm-Nd isotopic data demonstrate that low-K and high-Ti basalts from Apollo 11 and 17 derived from distinct reservoirs, while low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalt sources have Sm/Nd similar to the sources of Apollo 11 basalts. Groupings of mare basalt based on Ti content and on isotopic data do not coincide.

  18. Sleep duration and ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality: prospective cohort study on effects of tranquilizers/hypnotics and perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Holtermann, Andreas; Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul

    2013-11-01

    This prospective study aimed to examine if sleep duration is a risk indicator for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality, and how perceived stress during work and leisure time and use of tranquilizers/hypnotics modifies the association. A 30-year follow-up study was carried out in the Copenhagen Male Study comprising 5249 men (40-59 years old). Confounders included lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol, and leisure-time physical activity), clinical and health-related factors (body mass index, blood pressure, diabetes, hypertension, and physical fitness) and social class. Men with a history of cardiovascular disease at baseline were excluded. During follow-up, 587 men (11.9%) died from IHD and 2663 (53.9%) due to all-cause mortality. There were 276 short (<6 hours), 3837 medium (6-7 hours), and 828 long (≥8 hours) sleepers. Men who slept <6 hours had an increased risk of IHD mortality but not all-cause mortality, when referencing medium sleepers. Perceived psychological pressure during work and leisure was not a significant effect modifier for the association between sleep duration and IHD mortality. In contrast, among men using tranquilizers/hypnotics (rarely or regularly), short sleepers had a two-to-three fold increased risk of IHD mortality compared to medium sleepers. Among those never using tranquilizers/hypnotics, no association was observed between sleep duration and IHD mortality. Short sleep duration is a risk factor for IHD mortality among middle-aged and elderly men, particularly those using tranquilizers/hypnotics on a regular or even a rare basis, but not among men not using tranquilizers/hypnotics.

  19. [Effect on tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method on brain blood flow in the patients of insomnia of heart and spleen deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xing-ke; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Lu; Yue, Gong-lei; Li, Tie; Chen, Cheng; Cui, Hai-fu; Wang, Fu-chun

    2010-02-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method on insomnia of heart and spleen deficiency and the effect of brain blood flow. Sixty cases were randomly divided into a tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method group (observation group) and an eight confluence points selected group (control group), 30 cases in each group. The observation group was treated by acupuncture at Sishencong (EX-HN 1), Shenmen (HT 7), and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) with tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method. The control group was treated by acupuncture at Shenmai (BL 62) and Zhaohai (KI 6). Their therapeutic effects and changes of brain blood flow were observed. The total effective rate was 93.3% (28/30) in the observation group which was better than 83.3% (25/30) in the control group (P < 0.05). After treatment, the peak velocity of systolic (Vp) and diastolic blood flow velocity (Vd) of middle cerebral artery, basilar artery and vertebral artery were increased in the both groups (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), with more obvious increase in the observation group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), except the Vd of left vertebral artery. Both the tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method and the eight confluence points selected needling method can improve the clinical signs and symptoms. Meanwhile, the therapeutic effect of acupuncture is related with improvement of brain blood flow. However, the tranquilizing and allaying excitement needling method has better therapeutic effect on insomnia of heart and spleen deficiency.

  20. Prevalence and correlates of co-ingestion of prescription tranquilizers and other psychoactive substances by U.S. high school seniors: Results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Schepis, Ty S; West, Brady T; Teter, Christian J; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-01-01

    Nonmedical tranquilizer use (NMTU) is a concerning and understudied phenomenon in adolescents, despite being the second most prevalent form of nonmedical use in this population. Thus, this work aimed to examine the sociodemographic and substance use correlates of past-year co-ingestion of a prescription tranquilizer and another substance among adolescents. Data were from the Monitoring the Future study, a nationally representative survey of U.S. high school students. Data from 11,444 seniors (12th graders) completing form 1 of the survey were used. The participants represented a population that was 52.7% female, 61.8% White, and had a modal age of 18. Weighted frequencies and Rao-Scott chi-square analyses were computed to describe the target population and examine associations of interest. An estimated 5.3% of the population engaged in past-year NMTU during this time period, with an estimated 72.6% of those users engaged in past-year co-ingestion of a tranquilizer and another substance. Marijuana and alcohol were the most commonly co-ingested substances. Those engaged in co-ingestion were more likely than past-year nonmedical users without co-ingestion to be engaged in other substance or nonmedical use (including past year nonmedical Xanax® (alprazolam) use), have an earlier onset of NMTU, and endorse recreational motives. Adolescent nonmedical tranquilizer users engaged in co-ingestion may be a particularly vulnerable population, with higher rates of other substance use, other nonmedical use and problematic NMTU characteristics than nonmedical users without co-ingestion. Identification of and intervention with adolescent co-ingestion users are important avenues for future research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Most Ancient Spiral Galaxy: A 2.6-Gyr-old Disk with a Tranquil Velocity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tiantian; Richard, Johan; Gupta, Anshu; Federrath, Christoph; Sharma, Soniya; Groves, Brent A.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Cen, Renyue; Birnboim, Yuval; Fisher, David B.

    2017-11-01

    We report an integral-field spectroscopic (IFS) observation of a gravitationally lensed spiral galaxy A1689B11 at redshift z = 2.54. It is the most ancient spiral galaxy discovered to date and the second kinematically confirmed spiral at z≳ 2. Thanks to gravitational lensing, this is also by far the deepest IFS observation with the highest spatial resolution (˜400 pc) on a spiral galaxy at a cosmic time when the Hubble sequence is about to emerge. After correcting for a lensing magnification of 7.2 ± 0.8, this primitive spiral disk has an intrinsic star formation rate of 22 ± 2 M ⊙ yr-1, a stellar mass of {10}9.8+/- 0.3 M ⊙, and a half-light radius of {r}1/2=2.6+/- 0.7 {kpc}, typical of a main-sequence star-forming galaxy at z˜ 2. However, the Hα kinematics show a surprisingly tranquil velocity field with an ordered rotation ({V}{{c}}=200+/- 12 km s-1) and uniformly small velocity dispersions ({V}σ ,{mean}=23 +/- 4 km s-1 and {V}σ ,{outer - {disk}}=15+/- 2 km s-1). The low gas velocity dispersion is similar to local spiral galaxies and is consistent with the classic density wave theory where spiral arms form in dynamically cold and thin disks. We speculate that A1689B11 belongs to a population of rare spiral galaxies at z≳ 2 that mark the formation epoch of thin disks. Future observations with the James Webb Space Telescope will greatly increase the sample of these rare galaxies and unveil the earliest onset of spiral arms.

  2. [Therapeutic effects on cerebral white matter injury of premature infants treated with acupuncture for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind].

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuying; Liu, Zhenhuan; Peng, Guilan; Huang, Xinfa; Li, Yinlan; Hu, Shuxiang

    2018-01-12

    To explore the repair effects of acupuncture for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind (acupuncture technique) on cerebral white matter injury of premature infants. A total of 56 cases of cerebral whiter matter injury of premature infants, the fetal age less than 35 weeks were selected and randomized into an observation group (27 cases) and a control group (29 cases). The routine basic rehabilitation therapy was used in the two groups. Additionally, in the observation group, the acupuncture technique was added, once a day and the treatment for 15 days was as 1 course. Totally, 3 courses of treatment were required. Before and after treatment, the cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were adopted to observe the location and severity of cerebral white matter injury. The Gesell developmental scale was used to assess the nerve motor development. After treatment, the difference was not significant statistically in the severity of cerebral white matter injury in the infants between the two groups ( P >0.05). The FA value of cerebral white matter in the interesting zone was increased as compared with that before treatment in the infants of the two groups (both P <0.05). The result in the observation group was higher than that in the control groups ( P <0.05). After treatment, DQ value of each function zone in Gesell scale was all increased as compared with that before treatment in the two groups (all P <0.05). After treatment, the DQ values of gross motor, fine motor and social adaptability in the observation group were higher than those in the control group (all P <0.05). After treatment, the difference was not significant in DQ value of individual-social and speech behaviors between the two groups (both P >0.05). Acupuncture technique for promoting the governor vessel and tranquilizing the mind promotes the repair of the function in the premature infants with cerebral white matter injury and further benefits

  3. Tranquility and challenge in the natural environment

    Treesearch

    Stephen Kaplan

    1977-01-01

    The issue of clarity is perhaps most urgent and powerful for the adolescent. One interesting route to clarity is through challenge and fascination. People have powerful reactions to certain environmental patterns, although they may not be aware of them if they have not had the opportunity to experience them. Having such an opportunity at a time when issues of identity...

  4. The use of a tranquilizer (chlordiazepoxide) in flight training.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1969-07-01

    Eleven male subjects were given flight training according to a conventional but rigidly standardized private pilot syllabus. On half of the dual flights chloridazepoxide was given; identical-appearing placebo capsules were given on the remaining dual...

  5. [Movement and tranquility in 19th century Aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S

    1993-01-01

    The nineteenth century sees the rise of the bourgeoisie to social and political power. The values of this class increased the attention paid to certain branches of the medical sciences, such as for example hygiene. A set of rules and methods to achieve better health and, at the same time, to come closer to the perfect image of man described by writers of aesthetics, often taking classical Greece as a point of reference, are believed to be found in these branches. In these strategies physical exercise plays a role which is positively valued as much by hygienists as by philosophers, some of whose works are studied in this article.

  6. Glycosyltransferases in secondary plant metabolism: tranquilizers and stimulant controllers.

    PubMed

    Jones, P; Vogt, T

    2001-06-01

    Plants are exposed to a wide range of toxic and bioactive low-molecular-weight molecules from both exogenous and endogenous sources. Glycosylation is one of the primary sedative mechanisms that plants utilise in order to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Recently, a range of glycosyltransferases has been characterized in detail with regard to substrate specificity. The next step in increasing our understanding of the biology of glycosylation will require information regarding the exact role of individual glycosyltransferases in planta, as well as an insight into their potential involvement in metabolon-complexes. Hopefully, this will answer how a large number of glycosyltransferases with broad, rather than narrow, substrate specificity can be constrained in order to avoid interfering with other pathways of primary and secondary metabolism. These and other topics are discussed.

  7. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  8. The Lunar Landing Research Vehicle; Prelude to the Arrival at Tranquility Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelzer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The flight of Apollo 11 was the end of a decade-long race to reach the moon, a race between the US and Soviet Union, but also a race with time, for we as a nation only had the 1960s to reach our objective. Most of us remember that particular day, July 20, 1969, but the further we are from any date the harder it is to recall details. It s easy to forget, for instance, how close together the Apollo flights came to each other as the lunar flight date approached. Apollo 7 circled Earth for almost 11 days testing the systems of the spacecraft in October 1968; Apollo 8 gave us the first glimpse of our entire planet while circling the moon during Christmas of 1968. Apollo 9 lifted off on March 3 of 1969, and Apollo 10 returned to Earth on May 26 of that year. Less than two months later, on 16 July, Apollo 11 lifted off on its mission of landing on the moon. That s five Apollo launches in ten months, three of which went to the moon.

  9. Specialty training and the personal use of benzodiazepines by physicians affect their proneness to prescribe tranquilizers.

    PubMed

    Linden, M; Gothe, H

    1998-03-01

    The decision on how to treat a patient does not depend on clinical matters or illness characteristics alone, but also on patient, physician and setting variables such as personality, training, or reimbursement. No research has yet been carried out to answer the question whether personal experience with medications also influences prescribing behavior. In this study, 124 physicians stratified according to specialty (neuropsychiatrists vs. general practitioners), type of institution (private practice vs. hospital), years of professional experience (young vs. old), and region (rural vs. urban) participated in a structured interview to evaluate their proneness to prescribe benzodiazepines for sleep disorders as well as their personal experience in taking benzodiazepines for their own sleep problems. Both specialty and personal experience were significantly related to proneness to prescribe. Other variables tested (region, institution, age, gender) did not help to explain the variance in benzodiazepine prescribing practice. Thus physician variables and, importantly, their own personal experience in taking the medication significantly influence treatment choice. Rational medical decision making and treatment guidelines must therefore take into account medical knowledge as well as knowledge of personal treatment preferences and professional biases.

  10. STS-128 EVA 3 Node 3 Tranquility Avionics Cable Routing OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-05

    S128-E-007720 (5 Sept. 2009) --- NASA astronaut John “Danny” Olivas (left) and European Space Agency astronaut Christer Fuglesang, both STS-128 mission specialists, participate in the mission's third and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour, one-minute spacewalk, Olivas and Fuglesang deployed the Payload Attachment System (PAS), replaced the Rate Gyro Assembly #2, installed two GPS antennae and did some work to prepare for the installation of Node 3 next year. During connection of one of two sets of avionics cables for Node 3, one of the connectors could not be mated. This cable and connector were wrapped in a protective sleeve and safed. All other cables were mated successfully.

  11. More than clean air and tranquillity: Residential green is independently associated with decreasing mortality.

    PubMed

    Vienneau, Danielle; de Hoogh, Kees; Faeh, David; Kaufmann, Marco; Wunderli, Jean Marc; Röösli, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Green space may improve health by enabling physical activity and recovery from stress or by decreased pollution levels. We investigated the association between residential green (greenness or green space) and mortality in adults using the Swiss National Cohort (SNC) by mutually considering air pollution and transportation noise exposure. To reflect residential green at the address level, two different metrics were derived: normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) for greenness, and high resolution land use classification data to identify green spaces (LU-green). We used stratified Cox proportional hazard models (stratified by sex) to study the association between exposure and all natural cause mortality, respiratory and cardiovascular disease (CVD), including ischemic heart disease, stroke and hypertension related mortality. Models were adjusted for civil status, job position, education, neighbourhood socio-economic position (SEP), geographic region, area type, altitude, air pollution (PM 10 ), and transportation noise. From the nation-wide SNC, 4.2 million adults were included providing 7.8years of follow-up and respectively 363,553, 85,314 and 232,322 natural cause, respiratory and CVD deaths. Hazard ratios (and 95%-confidence intervals) for NDVI [and LU-green] per interquartile range within 500m of residence were highly comparable: 0.94 (0.93-0.95) [0.94 (0.93-0.95)] for natural causes; 0.92 (0.91-0.94) [0.92 (0.90-0.95)] for respiratory; and 0.95 (0.94-0.96) [0.96 (0.95-0.98)] for CVD mortality. Protective effects were stronger in younger individuals and in women and, for most outcomes, in urban (vs. rural) and in the highest (vs. lowest) SEP quartile. Estimates remained virtually unchanged after incremental adjustment for air pollution and transportation noise, and mediation by these environmental factors was found to be small. We found consistent evidence that residential green reduced the risk of mortality independently from other environmental exposures. This suggests the protective effect goes beyond the absence of pollution sources. Environmental public health measures should not only aim at reducing pollutant exposure, but additionally maintain existing and increase residential green in areas where lacking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The brain on silent: mind wandering, mindful awareness, and states of mental tranquility

    PubMed Central

    Vago, David R.; Zeidan, Fadel

    2018-01-01

    Mind wandering and mindfulness are often described as divergent mental states with opposing effects on cognitive performance and mental health. Spontaneous mind wandering is typically associated with self-reflective states that contribute to negative processing of the past, worrying/fantasizing about the future, and disruption of primary task performance. On the other hand, mindful awareness is frequently described as a focus on present sensory input without cognitive elaboration or emotional reactivity, and is associated with improved task performance and decreased stress-related symptomology. Unfortunately, such distinctions fail to acknowledge similarities and interactions between the two states. Instead of an inverse relationship between mindfulness and mind wandering, a more nuanced characterization of mindfulness may involve skillful toggling back and forth between conceptual and nonconceptual processes and networks supporting each state, to meet the contextually specified demands of the situation. In this article, we present a theoretical analysis and plausible neurocognitive framework of the restful mind, in which we attempt to clarify potentially adaptive contributions of both mind wandering and mindful awareness through the lens of the extant neurocognitive literature on intrinsic network activity, meditation, and emerging descriptions of stillness and nonduality. A neurophenomenological approach to probing modality-specific forms of concentration and nonconceptual awareness is presented that may improve our understanding of the resting state. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:27398642

  13. Peace Education, Domestic Tranquility, and Democracy: The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster as Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Kanako

    2014-01-01

    This article is an attempt to develop a theory of peace education through an examination of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. It examines why Japan did not avoid this terrible nuclear disaster. This is an educational issue, because one of the major impacts of Fukushima's catastrophe is that it indicates the failure of peace education. In…

  14. Sicily or the Sea of Tranquility? Mapping and naming the moon.

    PubMed

    Vertesi, Janet

    2004-06-01

    In their race to provide the ultimate guide to the moon, two 17th-century astronomers proposed lunar maps and nomenclatures that they hoped would gain international currency. But the names we use today were those proposed by the Jesuit, a friend of Galileo's persecutors, in a book whose purpose was to refute the Copernican system once and for all. We now believe that Riccioli was wrong about the universe, but why do we still use his nomenclature? The keys to this foundational visual debate in astronomical image-making are the moon maps themselves.

  15. Search for organic compounds in the lunar dust from the Sea of Tranquillity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponnamperuma, C.; Kvenvolden, K.; Chang, S.; Johnson, Richard; Pollock, G.; Philpott, D.; Kaplan, I.; Smith, J.; Schopf, J.W.; Gehrke, C.; Hodgson, G.; Breger, I.A.; Halpern, B.; Duffield, A.; Krauskopf, K.; Barghoorn, E.; Holland, H.; Keil, Klaus

    1970-01-01

    A sample of lunar dust was examined for organic compounds. Carbon detected in concentrations of 157 micrograms per gram had a δ13C per mil (PDB) value of + 20. Treatment with hydrochloric acid yielded hydrocarbons of low molecular weight, suggesting the presence of carbides. The gas chromatogram of the acylated and esterified derivatives of the hydrolyzate was similar to that obtained for the Pueblito de Allende meteorite. There were no detectable amounts of extractable high-molecular-weight alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, isoprenoid hydrocarbons, normal alkanes, fatty acids, amino acids, sugars, or nucleic acid bases. Traces of porphyrins were found, perhaps arising from rocket exhaust materials.

  16. The brain on silent: mind wandering, mindful awareness, and states of mental tranquility.

    PubMed

    Vago, David R; Zeidan, Fadel

    2016-06-01

    Mind wandering and mindfulness are often described as divergent mental states with opposing effects on cognitive performance and mental health. Spontaneous mind wandering is typically associated with self-reflective states that contribute to negative processing of the past, worrying/fantasizing about the future, and disruption of primary task performance. On the other hand, mindful awareness is frequently described as a focus on present sensory input without cognitive elaboration or emotional reactivity, and is associated with improved task performance and decreased stress-related symptomology. Unfortunately, such distinctions fail to acknowledge similarities and interactions between the two states. Instead of an inverse relationship between mindfulness and mind wandering, a more nuanced characterization of mindfulness may involve skillful toggling back and forth between conceptual and nonconceptual processes and networks supporting each state, to meet the contextually specified demands of the situation. In this article, we present a theoretical analysis and plausible neurocognitive framework of the restful mind, in which we attempt to clarify potentially adaptive contributions of both mind wandering and mindful awareness through the lens of the extant neurocognitive literature on intrinsic network activity, meditation, and emerging descriptions of stillness and nonduality. A neurophenomenological approach to probing modality-specific forms of concentration and nonconceptual awareness is presented that may improve our understanding of the resting state. Implications for future research are discussed. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Convulsions induced by centrally administered NMDA in mice: effects of NMDA antagonists, benzodiazepines, minor tranquilizers and anticonvulsants.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J. L.; Pieri, L.; Prud'hon, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. Convulsions were induced reproducibly by intracerebroventricular injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to conscious mice. 2. Competitive (carboxypiperazine-propylphosphonic acid, CPP; 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, AP7) and non-competitive (MK801; phencyclidine, PCP; thienylcyclohexylpiperidine, TCP; dextrorphan; dextromethorphan) NMDA antagonists prevented NMDA-induced convulsions. 3. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists and partial agonists (triazolam, diazepam, clonazepam, Ro 16-6028), classical anticonvulsants (diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and meprobamate were also found to prevent NMDA-induced convulsions. 4. Flumazenil (a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) and the GABA agonists THIP and muscimol (up to subtoxic doses) were without effect. 5. Flumazenil reversed the anticonvulsant action of diazepam, but not that of MK801. 6. Results obtained in this model differ somewhat from those described in a seizure model with systemic administration of NMDA. An explanation for this discrepancy is offered. 7. This model is a simple test for assessing the in vivo activity of NMDA antagonists and also expands the battery of chemically-induced seizure models for characterizing anticonvulsants not acting at NMDA receptors. PMID:2574061

  18. Rock-forming and rare elements in lunar surface material from the Sea of Tranquillity and the Ocean of Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevaleyevskiy, I. D.; Chupakhin, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    Methodological and analytical capabilities associated with spark mass spectrometry and X-ray spectroscopy are presented for the determination of the elemental composition of samples of lunar regolith returned to the earth by Apollo 11 and Apollo 12. Using X-ray spectroscopy, the main constituents of samples of lunar surface material were determined, and using mass spectrometry -- the main admixtures. The principal difference of Apollo 11 samples from Apollo 12 samples was found for elements contained in microconcentrations. This is especially true of rare earth elements.

  19. A new look at lunar soil collected from the sea of tranquility during the Apollo 11 mission.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Carol; Greenberg, Gary; Kiely, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Complementary state-of-the-art optical, scanning electron, and X-ray microscopy techniques have been used to study the morphology of Apollo 11 lunar soil particles (10084-47). The combination of innovative lighting geometries with image processing of a through focal series of images has allowed us to obtain a unique collection of high-resolution light micrographs of these fascinating particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) stereo-pair imaging has been exploited to illustrate some of the unique morphological properties of lunar regolith. In addition, for the first time, X-ray micrographs with submicron resolution have been taken of individual particles using X-ray ultramicroscopy (XuM). This SEM-based technique lends itself readily to the imaging of pores, cracks, and inclusions and allows the internal structure of an entire particle to be viewed. Rotational SEM and XuM movies have also been constructed from a series of images collected at sequential angles through 360°. These offer a new and insightful view of these complex particles providing size, shape, and spatial information on many of their internal features.

  20. A survey of nonmedical use of tranquilizers, stimulants, and pain relievers among college students: patterns of use among users and factors related to abstinence in non-users.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sara A; Taverna, Elise C; Hallock, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    This study examined lifetime non-medical prescription drug use among college students at a small liberal arts college in the Northeast. We assessed the motives, frequency of use, sources, and perceived emotional/physical risks of nonmedical prescription drugs. Specifically, we examined the non-medical use of prescription pain relievers, stimulants, and anti-anxiety medication. We sent an internet-based survey to 1/3 of the student body and 303 students completed the survey. We found that 36.8% of the sample reported using prescription drugs for non-medical purposes. First-year students were less likely to have used the drugs than those in other class years. Of those reporting use, 48% reported non-medical use of pain relievers, 72.8% reported using stimulants, and 39.8% reported using anti-anxiety medication. The most commonly used pain relievers were Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen), OxyContin (oxycodone), and codeine (acetaminophen/codeine). The most commonly used stimulants were Adderall (amphetamine/dextroamphetamine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate), while the most commonly used anti-anxiety medication was Xanax (alprazolam). When non-users were asked what factors influenced their choice not to abuse prescription drugs, 82% cited a lack of interest, 61% responded it was due to a fear of damaging their physical health, and 60.1% responded fear of damaging their mental health. This study supports recent findings that show widespread non-medical use of prescription drugs among college students. Our report brings a more detailed understanding of the patterns of drug usage, and the factors influencing both drug use in those who use them and abstinence in those who choose not to use them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of 105 antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiparasitic agents and tranquilizers by LC-MS/MS based on an acidic QuEChERS-like extraction.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Fan, Kaïli; Minh Tien, Mai; Savoy, Marie-Claude; Tarres, Adrienne; Fuger, Denis; Goyon, Alexandre; Bessaire, Thomas; Mottier, Pascal

    2018-04-01

    A procedure for screening 105 veterinary drugs in foods by liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is presented. Its scope encompasses raw materials of animal origin (milk, meat, fish, egg and fat) but also related processed ingredients and finished products commonly used and manufactured by food business operators. Due to the complexity of the matrices considered and to efficiently deal with losses during extraction and matrix effects during MS source ionisation, each sample was analysed twice, that is 'unspiked' and 'spiked at the screening target concentration' using a QuEChERS-like extraction. The entire procedure was validated according to the European Community Reference Laboratories Residues Guidelines. False-negative and false-positive rates were below 5% for all veterinary drugs whatever the food matrix. Effectiveness of the procedure was further demonstrated through participation to five proficiency tests and its ruggedness demonstrated in quality control operations by a second laboratory.

  2. Stuttering—The Effect of Treatment with D-Amphetamine and a Tranquilizing Agent, Trifluoperazine; A Preliminary Report on an Uncontrolled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fish, Charles H.; Bowling, Evelyn

    1965-01-01

    In an institution for the mentally retarded, an uncontrolled study was made on the effects of d-amphetamine, d-amphetamine followed by trifluoperazine, and of combined d-amphetamine and trifluoperazine on stuttering. Of 28 patients to whom d-amphetamine was given, 14 showed improvement after one month's treatment. Eight more showed improvement when trifluoperazine was given for one month to those who did not improve on d-amphetamine. In many cases, improvement was sustained at least six months after treatment was discontinued. Treatment with d-amphetamine was apparently more effective in patients with functional than with organic retardation. PMID:5836893

  3. 21 CFR 520.600 - Dichlorvos.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... administration of muscle relaxant drugs, phenothiazine derived tranquilizers or central nervous system depressant..., phenothiazine derived tranquilizers, or central nervous system depressants. (4) Do not use in horses which are...

  4. 21 CFR 520.600 - Dichlorvos.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... administration of muscle relaxant drugs, phenothiazine derived tranquilizers or central nervous system depressant..., phenothiazine derived tranquilizers, or central nervous system depressants. (4) Do not use in horses which are...

  5. 21 CFR 520.600 - Dichlorvos.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... administration of muscle relaxant drugs, phenothiazine derived tranquilizers or central nervous system depressant..., phenothiazine derived tranquilizers, or central nervous system depressants. (4) Do not use in horses which are...

  6. 21 CFR 520.600 - Dichlorvos.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... administration of muscle relaxant drugs, phenothiazine derived tranquilizers or central nervous system depressant..., phenothiazine derived tranquilizers, or central nervous system depressants. (4) Do not use in horses which are...

  7. 21 CFR 520.600 - Dichlorvos.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administration of muscle relaxant drugs, phenothiazine derived tranquilizers or central nervous system depressant..., phenothiazine derived tranquilizers, or central nervous system depressants. (4) Do not use in horses which are...

  8. 9 CFR 381.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer... slaughtered poultry free from protruding pinfeathers and vestigial feathers (hair or down), from which the...

  9. 9 CFR 381.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer... slaughtered poultry free from protruding pinfeathers and vestigial feathers (hair or down), from which the...

  10. 9 CFR 381.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer... slaughtered poultry free from protruding pinfeathers and vestigial feathers (hair or down), from which the...

  11. 9 CFR 381.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer... slaughtered poultry free from protruding pinfeathers and vestigial feathers (hair or down), from which the...

  12. 9 CFR 381.1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer... slaughtered poultry free from protruding pinfeathers and vestigial feathers (hair or down), from which the...

  13. 75 FR 41512 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement/General Management Plan; Ross Lake National Recreation Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... focus of visitor experiences would be linked to solitude, tranquility, natural soundscapes, and scenery... protect and enhance soundscapes and wilderness character, experience, and values. Should a catastrophic...

  14. The Use of Medication in a Residential Institution for Mentally Retarded Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Dennis A.

    1979-01-01

    Overall use of drugs was high, with the largest percentage of clients taking major tranquilizers (21.2 percent), followed closely by those taking anticonvulsants (20.4 percent). The data suggest a decrease over the years in the use of major tranquilizers in residential institutions for the retarded. (Author/DLS)

  15. Meditation

    MedlinePlus

    ... a tranquil mind. During meditation, you focus your attention and eliminate the stream of jumbled thoughts that ... word, thought or phrase to prevent distracting thoughts. Mindfulness meditation. This type of meditation is based on ...

  16. Urinary incontinence products - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... that keeps your clothes from getting wet. Common brands are: Attends Abena Depends Poise Reassure Serenity Tena Tranquility Many different store brands Always change your pad or underwear regularly, even ...

  17. Psychopharmacologic Treatment: A Note on Classroom Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.; Kavale, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Intended for teachers, the article provides an introduction to the four major classes of psychotropic medication (stimulants, tranquilizers, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants) commonly prescribed for children with learning or behavioral disorders. Specific effects on the classroom are addressed. (DB)

  18. 21 CFR 522.1962 - Promazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for tetanus. (B) For use as a tranquilizer and preanesthetic. (iii) Limitations. Not for use in horses... conjunction with local anesthesia, as adjunctive therapy for tetanus, and as an antiemetic prior to worming...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1962 - Promazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for tetanus. (B) For use as a tranquilizer and preanesthetic. (iii) Limitations. Not for use in horses... conjunction with local anesthesia, as adjunctive therapy for tetanus, and as an antiemetic prior to worming...

  20. Organisational Role Climates: Success-Failure Configurations in Educational Leadership (or Are Educational Administrators Doomed to Succeed?)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inbar, Dan E.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an analytical framework based on a threefold classification--unequivocal failure, "satisficing," and unequivocal success--and four basic role climates--apathetic, frustrating, tense, and tranquil--that is applied to the elementary school principalship. (Author/WD)

  1. View of the Cupola

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-19

    S130-E-010329 (18 Feb. 2010) --- Tranquility node?s Cupola of the International Space Station is featured in this image photographed by an STS-130 crew member while space shuttle Endeavour remains docked with the station.

  2. Nyberg with OGS R&R

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-19

    ISS036-E-021797 (18 July 2013) --- NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, performs a remove and replace of the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) Hydrogen (H2) Sensor in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  3. 78 FR 31571 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the “Technology-based Products to Prevent High...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ..., injury, assault, sexual abuse, unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, academic difficulties... among college students will save lives, improve academic success, and decrease other risks to students... as depression or emotional stress; and combining alcohol and medications, such as tranquilizers...

  4. Infertility and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... alcohol, or using recreational drugs like cocaine and marijuana • certain medications like antidepressants, tranquilizers, calcium channel blockers, narcotics, and anti-cancer drugs • chronic medical conditions like kidney disease, liver disease, sickle cell ...

  5. Hopkins works with tanks from the ARFTA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008287 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with tanks from the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  6. ARFTA photos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-19

    ISS029-E-043420 (19 Nov. 2011) --- NASA astronauts Mike Fossum (background), Expedition 29 commander; and Dan Burbank, flight engineer, work with the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  7. Hopkins works with tanks from the ARFTA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-24

    ISS038-E-008289 (24 Nov. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with tanks from the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  8. 9 CFR 301.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... result of treatment or exposure of the livestock to a pesticide, organic or inorganic compound, hormone, hormone-like substance, growth promoter, antibiotic, anthelmintic, tranquilizer, or other therapeutic or...

  9. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These conditions... data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and safety information...

  10. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These conditions... data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and safety information...

  11. Hopins with ARED hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-03

    ISS037-E-006562 (3 Oct. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs routine in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  12. Wiseman with aRED in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006339 (1 June 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  13. Hopins with ARED hardware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-03

    ISS037-E-006563 (3 Oct. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs routine in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  14. Cassidy on ARED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-31

    ISS036-E-038720 (31 Aug. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  15. Nyberg with ARED in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-03

    ISS036-E-005939 (3 June 2013) --- NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, Expedition 36 flight engineer, gets a workout on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  16. Cassidy on ARED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-31

    ISS036-E-038715 (31 Aug. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, Expedition 36 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  17. Kuipers exercises on the ARED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-05

    ISS031-E-157839 (5 June 2012) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 31 flight engineer, exercises using the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  18. Wiseman with aRED in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-01

    ISS040-E-006343 (1 June 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  19. Shkaplerov exercises on the aRED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-05

    ISS030-E-235507 (5 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, exercises using the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  20. ARED Pulley and Rope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-09

    ISS024-E-014009 (9 Sept. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 24 flight engineer, works with the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  1. Gerst with aRED in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-30

    ISS040-E-006102 (31 May 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  2. Ivanishin at the ARED in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-02

    ISS030-E-032246 (2 Jan. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin, Expedition 30 flight engineer, is pictured near the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  3. Gerst with aRED in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-30

    ISS040-E-006099 (30 May 2014) --- European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, Expedition 40 flight engineer, gets a workout on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  4. Temazepam

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach and muscle cramp s, vomiting, sweating, and rarely, seizures.Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the ... Lanoxin); and medications for anxiety, mental illness, or seizures; sedatives; other sleeping pills; and tranquilizers. Your doctor ...

  5. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Teens / Depressants Print en español Depresores del sistema nervioso What They Are: Tranquilizers and other depressants ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  6. FE Furukawa poses for a photo in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-31

    ISS028-E-019583 (31 July 2011) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 28 flight engineer, holds hair clippers attached to a vacuum cleaner in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  7. Biophysical Intervention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Scott

    1987-01-01

    Biophysical interventions as part of an ecological approach to intervention with handicapped children include psychotropic medications (neuroleptics, antidepressants, stimulants, minor tranquilizers and sedatives, lithium); nutritional agents (sugar, vitamins, food allergies); and physical therapies (patterning, optometric training). (DB)

  8. Treatment of the Hyperactive Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunderlich, Ray C.

    1973-01-01

    Described individually are the following forms of medical treatment for the hyperactive child: stimulants, tranquilizers, megavitamins, corticosteroids, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, food elimination, air filtration, allergic desensitization, perceptual motor training, and behavioral counseling. (DB)

  9. Marshburn updates software on the WHC UPA in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-17

    ISS034-E-031133 (17 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, updates software on the Waste and Hygiene Compartment?s Urine Processor Assembly in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  10. Marshburn updates software on the WHC UPA in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-17

    ISS034-E-031130 (17 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, updates software on the Waste and Hygiene Compartment?s Urine Processor Assembly in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  11. The Impact of NATO/Multinational Military Missions on Health Care Management (l’Impact des missions OTAN/militaires internationales sur la gestion des soins de sante)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    audio-visual aids. Rapid correction methods of the pilot’s performance capacity: * psychosomatic self-management; * rational psychotherapy; * music ... therapy ; * central nervous system (CNS) electro-tranquilization; * sauna; * hydrotherapy; * manual therapy; 10-3 * recreational therapy (active rest

  12. Marshburn removing and replacing the WHC piping during routine maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-03

    ISS034-E-031142 (3 Jan. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, removes and replaces the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) piping during routine in-flight maintenance in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  13. Vande Hei exercises on COLBERT/T2 Treadmill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-23

    iss053e040103 (ept. 23, 2017) --- Astronaut Mark Vande Hei, Expedition 53 Flight Engineer, exercises on the COLBERT (Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill) in the Tranquility module.

  14. FE Fossum performs aRED In-Flight Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-28

    ISS028-E-019392 (28 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  15. FE Fossum performs aRED In-Flight Maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-28

    ISS028-E-019399 (28 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance on the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  16. Burbank performs in-flight maintenance on the WRS-2 in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-28

    ISS030-E-051116 (28 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, performs in-flight maintenance on the Water Recovery System 2 (WRS-2) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  17. AR system in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-03

    ISS033-E-009199 (3 Oct. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, conducts the continuing preventive inspection and cleaning of accessible Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) system bacteria filters in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  18. Wiseman on COLBERT in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-31

    ISS040-E-006091 (31 May 2014) --- NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, Expedition 40 flight engineer, equipped with a bungee harness, exercises on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (COLBERT) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  19. Meaning of Pharmacological Treatment for Families of People With Depression.

    PubMed

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Magrini, Daniel Fernando; Souza, Jacqueline de; Zanetti, Ana Carolina Guidorizzi; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Telles Filho, Paulo Celso Prado; Borges, Tatiana Longo

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is related to patient satisfaction with family support. This research aimed to understand the meaning of pharmacotherapy to families of people with major depressive disorder. This qualitative study employed Grounded Theory and Symbolic Interactionism. Seventeen families of people with depression from a Brazilian clinic were included. Data was collected from 2013 to 2014, using open interviews, which were analyzed by open, axial, and selective coding. Medication represented "Tranquility and worry" because it re-established tranquility in family routine, but generated concerns. Thus, families were conflicted and ambivalent about medications, and they interfered with the promotion or impairment of adherence.

  20. Radiation Sickness: An Analysis of Over 1000 Controlled Drug Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, B A

    1962-08-25

    In 1042 irradiated patients drug trials were conducted in attempts to assess the relative value of central sedatives (mainly phenothiazines) as compared with pyridoxine and a relatively inert group of drugs. The phenothiazines used were of the older type (chlorpromazine, prochlorperazine, thiopropazate, fluopromazine, pecazine) as well as of the newer type (trifluoperazine, haloperidol). The relatively inert drugs included cyclazine, amphetamine, diphenylhydramine, and lactose. For nausea, the predominant symptom, pyridoxine, the older phenothiazines, and the newer tranquilizer groups are all significantly superior to the inert drugs. The newer tranquilizers are superior to all others, but there is no statistical difference betweenmore » pyridoxine and the older phenothiazines in the relief of nausea. For vomiting and listlessness, a similar superiority of the newer tranquilizers is shown. In the case of anorexia, however, pyridoxine and the older phenothiazines are superior to the inert group but the newer tranquilizers are relatively less effective. For all drugs used in radiation sickness, anorexia is the most difficult symptom to relieve possibly because its control lies in the appetite center, separate from the vomiting center. Possibly some other factor also enters into its control, such as the loss of taste. Haloperidol and trifluoperazine assessed separately showed no statistical difference in their relative efficacy in any symptom including anorexia. Radiation of the abdomen and pelvis causes more severe radiation sickness, and inert drugs give, in general, less relief of symptoms arising from radiation of this area than of other parts. All the drugs were less efficacious when radiation is given to the abdomen and pelvis, although not at a significantly statistical level. In comparison of the efficacy of each group for irradiation both above and below the diaphragm, the newer tranquilizers appear significantly superior to all others. For nausea arising

  1. 21 CFR 520.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2002...) Conditions of use. (1) The drug is intended for oral administration to dogs as a tranquilizer. It is used as..., car sickness, and severe dermatitis. It is also indicated for use in minor surgery and prior to...

  2. How to Calm Children through Massage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Gilda Rios

    1997-01-01

    Studied the impact of massage three times per week on infants' adjustment to a group care setting. Subjects were infants from at-risk Chilean homes who displayed negative emotional behaviors. Found that massaged infants showed less repetitive crying, more tranquil sleep and muscular relaxation, better social adjustment, and improved feeding…

  3. After Divorce: Personality Factors Related to the Process of Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra Paul

    1982-01-01

    Considered personality variables related to postdivorce adjustment using a sample of 58 females and 31 males. Found persons with the best adjustment scored significantly higher on dominance/assertiveness, self-assurance, intelligence, creativity/imagination, social boldness, liberalism, self-sufficiency, ego strength and tranquility. (Author/JAC)

  4. Drug Use and Abuse: Background Information for Security Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    drugs of abuse, but, in contrast to narcotics, the psychological dependence is more powerful than the physical dependence. By stimulating the pleasure...with one’s life, social isolation, or interpersonal difficulties; traumatic experiences such as childhood physical or sexual abuse; and a family...LSD, PCP, etc.) ............................... 45 vii STIMULANTS (AMPHETAMINES, Etc.) ........................... 50 SEDATIVES, TRANQUILIZERS

  5. Trends in Adolescent Substance Use: The Mokotow Study 1988-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostaszewski, Krzysztof; Pisarska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted every 4 years since 1984, is aimed at monitoring alcohol, tobacco, tranquillizers and illegal drug-use trends among 15-year-olds from Warsaw. The self-report data are taken from a representative sample of students attending schools in three districts of Warsaw (sample size ranged from 1461 to 3918 in the different study…

  6. 21 CFR 520.1422 - Metoserpate hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use. It is used in drinking water for replacement chickens as follows: (1) Amount. 568.5 milligrams per gallon (0.015 percent). (i) Indications for use. As a tranquilizer for flock treatment of chickens prior to handling. (ii) Limitations. To be used one time as a treatment for replacement chickens up to...

  7. The incomplete angler: effects created by visual omission.

    PubMed

    Findlay, John M

    2008-01-01

    The Fisherman, a picture painted by Jean-Louis Forain, demonstrates an interesting interaction between low and high level perceptual processing. The isolation and tranquillity of the fisherman in the picture are enhanced by the absence of his reflection, yet perceivers are rarely aware of the omission.

  8. Nutritional Considerations for Severely Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobsey, Dick

    Children and adults with severe disabilities may have nutritional problems due to the effects of the primary disability (including such syndromes as phenylketonuria, galactosemia, and Hurler's Disease), effects related to medications (including anticonvulsants, tranquilizers, and laxatives), effects of food preferences (restrictive food…

  9. The Medication of Children with Learning and Behavior Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guetzloe, Eleanor; Cline, Ralph

    Reviewed is research on the use of drug therapy with children who have learning and behavior disorders, and reported are results of an opinion survey of 10 teachers of 31 5- to 18-year-old emotionally disturbed children. Briefly described are the primary and side effects of stimulant drugs, tranquilizers and sedatives, anticonvulsants,…

  10. Cuban Women, Sex Role Conflicts and Use of Prescription Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Diana H.; Page, J. Brian

    This paper focuses on Cuban women migrants living in Miami (Florida) and on their adaptation to life in exile, especially their use of minor tranquilizers. Many of these women left Cuba for political and economic reasons. The migration process restructured their social status in many ways. They were not allowed to bring valuables or financial…

  11. Career Education: Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortland-Madison Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Cortland, NY.

    The third of a series of nine career education guides includes four social studies units for grades 4-6. Part one, famous Americans from Plymouth Rock to Tranquility Base, includes goals, objectives, skills to be taught or reviewed, lists of famous Americans in the fields of science and medicine, inventions, sports, religion, politics, literature,…

  12. Dynamics of Higher Education. Court and Campus--Striking a New Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    The unrest of the 1960s brought the fields of law and higher education together in the courts. Although tranquility has returned to campus, the courts show no sign of withdrawing from the field of higher education. This paper is an examination of the role the courts will play in higher education in the decade ahead. Three broad areas of litigation…

  13. Wilmore and Wiseman at the Cupola Hatch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-28

    ISS041-E-046056 (28 Sept. 2014) --- NASA astronauts Barry Wilmore (Captain, U.S. Navy) (left) and Reid Wiseman (Commander, U.S. Navy), both Expedition 41 flight engineers, pose for a photo near the hatch between the Tranquility node and the Cupola of the International Space Station.

  14. Physiological recording from pilots operating an aircraft simulator.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1964-09-01

    The questions to be answered were reduced to the following : (1) to determine whether or not theraputic doses of two common drugs, a tranquilizer and an antihistamine, cause decrements in the operating proficiency of pilots, and (2) do those drugs wh...

  15. Wakata exercises on the COLBERT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-15

    ISS038-E-002210 (14 Nov. 2013) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata, Expedition 38 flight engineer, equipped with a bungee harness, exercises on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (COLBERT) in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  16. Alcohol-Related Problems among Younger Drinkers Who Misuse Prescription Drugs: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermos, J.; Winter, M.; Heeren, T.; Hingson, R.

    2009-01-01

    The authors determined whether lifetime prescription drug misuse (PDM) associated with increased risks for alcohol-related problems among 18- to 34-year-old, NESARC respondents. Among 8222 "ever-drinkers," 15.4% reported ever "misusing sedatives, tranquilizers, painkillers or stimulants ... as prescriptions or from indirect sources." Outcomes were…

  17. The Year of the Pond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Water gardens became popular in China during the Tang Dynasty and goldfish were domesticated more than 1000 years ago. Beyond being beautiful and tranquil, water gardens have the potential for much learning in an educational setting, especially for learning through art. In this article, the author shares how he collaborated with another teacher in…

  18. Abuso de Medicamentos Prescritos y la Juventud: Boletin Informativo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    Prescription drugs, a category of psychotherapeutics that comprises prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives, are among the substances most commonly abused by young people in the United States. Prescription drugs are readily available and can easily be obtained by teenagers who abuse these drugs to experience a…

  19. Prescription Drug Abuse and Youth. Information Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. National Drug Intelligence Center.

    Prescription drugs, a category of psychotherapeutics that comprises prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives, are among the substances most commonly abused by young people in the United States. Prescription drugs are readily available and can easily be obtained by teenagers who abuse these drugs to experience a…

  20. Burbank uses ARED in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012727 (18 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, uses the short bar for the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) equipment to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  1. FE Furukawa exercising with the ARED

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-30

    ISS028-E-019507 (30 July 2011) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa, Expedition 28 flight engineer, uses the short bar for the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) equipment to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  2. Burbank uses ARED in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012724 (18 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, uses the short bar for the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) equipment to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  3. Burbank uses ARED in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012725 (18 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, uses the short bar for the advanced Resistive Exercise Device (aRED) equipment to perform upper body strengthening pull-ups in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  4. Substance Use of Creatively Talented Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 22 writers, 27 artists, and 12 musicians compared their substance use (caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, hallucinogens, cocaine, tranquilizers, stimulants, and narcotics) with that of a control group. In general, no significant intergroup differences were found. Older participants used marijuana less than younger participants.…

  5. KSC-2009-6508

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA, addresses the invited guests at a ceremony transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station, looming in the background, from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Seated, from left, are Bob Cabana, Kennedy Space Center director; Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA; and Secondino Brondolo, head of the Space Infrastructure, Thales Alenia Space Italy. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  6. KSC-2009-6512

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, at left, head of International Space Station, Program Department, European Space Agency, congratulates Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA, upon transfer of the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. KSC-2009-6517

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, right, head of International Space Station, Program Department, European Space Agency, or ESA, has a lot to smile about as he is photographed in front of the node 3 for the International Space Station following a ceremony transferring the ownership of the node from ESA to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  8. KSC-2009-6514

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, from left, Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA; Secondino Brondolo, head of the Space Infrastructure, Thales Alenia Space Italy; and Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA, are photographed in front of node 3 for the International Space Station following a ceremony transferring the ownership of the node from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  9. KSC-2009-6511

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, at left, head of International Space Station, Program Department, European Space Agency, and Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA, sign documents transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  10. KSC-2009-6515

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, European Space Agency, or ESA, is photographed with invited guests of ESA in front of node 3 for the International Space Station following a ceremony transferring the ownership of the node from ESA to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  11. KSC-2009-6509

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA, addresses the invited guests at a ceremony transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station, looming in the background, from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Seated, from left, are Bob Cabana, Kennedy Space Center director, and Secondino Brondolo, head of the Space Infrastructure, Thales Alenia Space Italy. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  12. KSC-2009-6516

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Bernardo Patti, center, head of International Space Station, Program Department, European Space Agency, or ESA, admires the node 3 for the International Space Station, which his agency provided, following a ceremony transferring the ownership of the node from ESA to NASA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  13. Swanson during Day 2 of CDRA IFM

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-09

    ISS039-E-010367 (9 April 2014) --- In the Kibo laboratory aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 39 Flight Engineer Steve Swanson works during in-flight maintenance to mate electrical connectors in Tranquility's Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA). The image was taken during the second day of CDRA in-flight maintenance.

  14. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is used in dogs as a tranquilizer.1... include effectiveness data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and...

  15. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is used in dogs as a tranquilizer.1... include effectiveness data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and...

  16. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is used in dogs as a tranquilizer.1... include effectiveness data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and...

  17. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 000061 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is used in dogs as a tranquilizer.1... include effectiveness data as specified by § 514.111 of this chapter, but may require bioequivalency and...

  18. X-15: the Perspective of History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallion, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The linkages between the Apollo 11 voyage to Tranquility Base and the 199 flights of the X-15 aircraft are discussed. Accomplishments of the X-15 program and a history of aircraft developments that led up to the X-15 are presented.

  19. Finding the numerical compensation in multiple criteria decision-making problems under fuzzy environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mahima; Mohanty, B. K.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have developed a methodology to derive the level of compensation numerically in multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) problems under fuzzy environment. The degree of compensation is dependent on the tranquility and anxiety level experienced by the decision-maker while taking the decision. Higher tranquility leads to the higher realisation of the compensation whereas the increased level of anxiety reduces the amount of compensation in the decision process. This work determines the level of tranquility (or anxiety) using the concept of fuzzy sets and its various level sets. The concepts of indexing of fuzzy numbers, the risk barriers and the tranquility level of the decision-maker are used to derive his/her risk prone or risk averse attitude of decision-maker in each criterion. The aggregation of the risk levels in each criterion gives us the amount of compensation in the entire MCDM problem. Inclusion of the compensation leads us to model the MCDM problem as binary integer programming problem (BIP). The solution to BIP gives us the compensatory decision to MCDM. The proposed methodology is illustrated through a numerical example.

  20. Oasis in Iraq: Universities Flourish in Kurdistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Zvika

    2007-01-01

    The campus of Salahadin University--peaceful, bustling, and collegial-- is a rare sight in Iraq, where sectarian violence has brought the higher education system to the verge of collapse. Home to the country's historically repressed four million to five million ethnic Kurds, it is an oasis of stability and tranquility while much of the rest of…

  1. Ethics in Today's World. Proceedings, Anniversary Conference, Illinois Teacher of Home Economics (30th, Champaign, Illinois, April 11-14, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Hazel Taylor, Ed.

    Presentations and panel discussion papers are provided from a conference on ethics, specifically in regard to home economics education. Presentations include "Education for an Ethical Society: Transforming Moral Education, Insuring Domestic Tranquility" (Jane Martin); "Taking Our Ethical Responsibilities Seriously as Home Economists" (Margaret…

  2. No Place Like Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    To fight rampant consumerism (Martha Stewart Inc.), reduce the divorce rate, prevent cancer and heart disease, and ensure domestic tranquility, educators should bring back home economics. Workers must put more energy into the home front, and we must begin teaching our children how to live well on less. (MLH)

  3. Student Attitudes on Sociomedical Issues: A Follow-Up Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilwein, John H.; Kilwein, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A study compared student attitudes in the first and last years of a pharmaceutical program toward the health care system, environmental protection, abortion, euthanasia, use of tranquilizers, and family vs. career. On some issues there was considerable change by the final year, while attitudes on other issues remained stable. Females showed the…

  4. S70-50761

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-10-12

    S70-50761 (September 1970) --- This map prepared by Mapping Sciences Laboratory, Science & Applications Directorate at the Manned Spacecraft Center, shows the projected Apollo landing sites. Apollo 11 completed a successful lunar landing mission in the Sea of Tranquility in July 1969. Apollo 12 completed a successful lunar landing mission in the Ocean of Storms in November 1969.

  5. Women's Dependency on Prescription Drugs; Hearing Before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    This record of the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control contains testimonies addressing the problems facing drug abusing women. The extensive prescribing of legal drugs such as tranquilizers, sedatives, pain killers, and stimulants is examined. The problems of polydrug abuse and alcohol abuse in combination with other drugs are also…

  6. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018986 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Tarelkin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair. NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, flight engineer, is visible in the background.

  7. Burbank trims Shkaplero's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012660 (18 Dec. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  8. Kuipers trims his hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-30

    ISS030-E-033523 (30 Dec. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, trims his hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Kuipers used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  9. Burbank trims Shkaplerov's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-18

    ISS030-E-161707 (18 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  10. iss028e035074

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-27

    ISS028-E-035074 (27 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims the hair of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Fossum used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  11. Shkaplerov trims Burbank's hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012655 (18 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov, Expedition 30 flight engineer, trims the hair of NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, commander, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Shkaplerov used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  12. View of Expedition 28 Crew Members giving and receiving a haircut in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-31

    ISS028-E-019487 (31 July 2011) --- NASA astronaut Ron Garan, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims astronaut Mike Fossum?s hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Garan used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  13. iss028e035073

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-27

    ISS028-E-035073 (27 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims the hair of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Fossum used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  14. iss028e035071

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-27

    ISS028-E-035071 (27 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims the hair of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Satoshi Furukawa in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Fossum used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  15. iss028e035028

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-27

    ISS028-E-035028 (27 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Mike Fossum, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims astronaut Ron Garan's hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Fossum used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  16. Ivanishin trims his hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-18

    ISS030-E-012662 (18 Dec. 2011) --- Russian cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin, Expedition 30 flight engineer, trims his hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Ivanishin used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  17. Hair cut

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-10

    ISS033-E-018991 (10 Nov. 2012) --- Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, Expedition 33 flight engineer, trims the hair of Russian cosmonaut Evgeny Tarelkin, flight engineer, in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Novitskiy used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  18. Kuipers trims his hair in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-30

    ISS030-E-033548 (30 Dec. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, trims his hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Kuipers used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  19. iss028e035053

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-27

    ISS028-E-035053 (27 Aug. 2011) --- NASA astronaut Ron Garan, Expedition 28 flight engineer, trims astronaut Mike Fossum's hair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Garan used hair clippers fashioned with a vacuum device to garner freshly cut hair.

  20. Substance Use by Fourth-Year Students at 13 U.S. Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conard, Scott; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study investigated drug use by fourth-year medical students in 13 schools and compared drug use patterns with those of an age- and sex-matched cohort. Medical students reported less use of marijuana, cocaine, cigarettes, LSD, barbiturates, and amphetamines, similar use of opiates, and slightly more use of tranquilizers and alcohol. (MSE)

  1. Medical Readings on Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Oliver E.

    Summaries are presented of over 150 articles in the recent medical and psychiatric literature. Topics covered are: effects of drugs, tobacco, alcohol, drugs used in medicine, vapor sniffing, marijuana, barbiturates, tranquilizers, amphetamines, methamphetamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, other hallucinogens, heroin and the opiates, psychiatric…

  2. Evaluating an In-School Drug Prevention Program for At-Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWit, David J.; Steep, Barbara; Silverman, Gloria; Stevens-Lavigne, Andrea; Ellis, Kathy; Smythe, Cindy; Rye, Barbara J.; Braun, Kathy; Wood, Eileen

    2000-01-01

    A drug prevention program involving 167 at-risk students in grades 8-10 at 9 Ontario schools resulted in reduced use of and less supportive attitudes toward alcohol, cannabis, tobacco, and tranquilizers. Program success is attributed to high attendance and retention, community health professionals' participation, comprehensive approach, strong…

  3. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (c) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered either intravenously or intramuscularly to dogs and cats for tranquilization at a dosage level of 0.05-0.5 milligram per pound of body weight and is also administered intravenously to dogs and cats...

  4. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (c) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered either intravenously or intramuscularly to dogs and cats for tranquilization at a dosage level of 0.05-0.5 milligram per pound of body weight and is also administered intravenously to dogs and cats...

  5. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (c) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered either intravenously or intramuscularly to dogs and cats for tranquilization at a dosage level of 0.05-0.5 milligram per pound of body weight and is also administered intravenously to dogs and cats...

  6. Water Processing Assembly Particulate Filter Remove and Replace (R&R)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-12

    ISS036-E-018007 (12 July 2013) --- European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, removes and replaces the particulate filter for the Water Pump Assembly 2 (WPA2) in Tranquility (also called Node 3) on the International Space Station.

  7. Water Processing Assembly Particulate Filter Remove and Replace (R&R)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-07-12

    ISS036-E-018008 (12 July 2013) --- European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 36 flight engineer, removes and replaces the particulate filter for the Water Pump Assembly 2 (WPA2) in Tranquility (also called Node 3) on the International Space Station.

  8. Efficacy of Armodafinil for Maintaining Vigilance Among Navy Air Traffic Controllers Eight to Twelve Hours Post-Dose

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-12

    circle all that apply) a. None b. Sedatives/Tranquilizers c. Aspirin/ Tylenol /any analgesic 31 d. Antihistamines e. Decongestants f. Other (please specify...4. Do you take any over the counter medications (e.g., antacids, Benadryl, Tylenol , etc.) two (2) or more times a month

  9. A Forehead-Mounted Measure of O2 Saturation: The Potential for in Cockpit Hypoxia Early Detection and Warning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-09

    past 24 hours. (circle all that apply) a. None b. Sedatives/Tranquilizers c. Aspirin/ Tylenol /any analgesic d. Antihistamines...e. Decongestants f. Other (please specify) 6. Do you take any over the counter medications (e.g., antacids, Benadryl, Tylenol , etc

  10. Disturbance regimes and the historical range of variation in terrestrial ecosystems [Chapter 389

    Treesearch

    Robert Keane

    2013-01-01

    Picture a tranquil landscape with undulating topography, idyllic streams, scenic glades, and verdant vegetation. Left to its own devices, this landscape would gradually become dominated by late successional communities that would slowly shift in response to climate changes over long time periods. This scene often forms the foundation and reference for most land...

  11. Marshburn removes and replaces the WHC pre-treat tank during in-flight maintenance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-11

    ISS034-E-045742 (11 Feb. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Tom Marshburn, Expedition 34 flight engineer, removes and replaces the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) pretreat tank as part of routine in-flight maintenance in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  12. Handbook of Blackfeet Tribal Law. Blackfeet Heritage Program: Browning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilham, Dan, Sr.

    Based on the Constitution and By-Laws of the Blackfeet Tribe, approved by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior in 1935, the Blackfeet Tribal Council has the authority to make civil and criminal laws and procedures to protect the peace, tranquility, and dignity of all persons residing within the Blackfeet Indian Reservation; to protect the…

  13. Home Truths: Liberal Education for Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graglia, F. Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    This author is best known for her 1998 book "Domestic Tranquility: A Brief Against Feminism," in which she defended a woman's right to choose the role of homemaker, despite feminists' depiction of this role as parasitic and inferior. In this article, Graglia revisits these themes, and explains why she feels that many of the attributes of the…

  14. The Effects of Psychotropic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnardeaux, Jef-Louis

    1984-01-01

    Presents information on psychotropic drugs for individuals who are not specialists in pharmacology. Discusses: alcohol and barbituates; dependence and withdrawal; central nervous system depressors (anaesthetics, narcotic analgesics, sedatives and hypnotic drugs, tranquilizers), central nervous stimulants (amphetamines, cocaine, tobacco, caffeine),…

  15. Development of Computer-Supported Assessment and Treatment Consultation for Emotional Crises (CATCEC) for a Submarine Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    SCHIZOPHRENIC DISORDER Amphetamine Delusional Disorder PARANOID DISORDER Cannabis Delusional Disorder Hallucinogen Delusional Disorder BRIEF REACTIVE...Intoxication Borderline Personality Disorder Cocaine Intoxication Histrionic Personality Disorder Caffeine Intoxication Narcissistic Personality Disorder... Cannabis Intoxication Dependent Personality Disorder ON, Inhalant Intoxication Schizoid Personality Disorder Minor Tranquilizer Intoxication Compulsive

  16. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  17. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  18. Apollo 11 Mission Audio - Day 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Audio from mission control during the launch of Apollo 11, which was the United States' first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  19. Burbank performs the WHC Yearly Maintenance in the Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-01-11

    ISS030-E-032750 (11 Jan. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 flight commander, performs the Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) yearly maintenance in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. The maintenance included removing and replacing the urine hydraulic components which include urine lines, urine valve block and urine pressure sensors, and removing and replacing the Flush Water Tank Pressure Sensor.

  20. Preliminary Examination of lunar Samples from Apollo 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science, 1970

    1970-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the examination of the lunar samples returned from the Apollo 12 mission. Analyses of 34 kilograms of lunar rocks and fines reveal significant differences from the samples from Tranquillity Base, most notably in age, texture, amount of solar wind material, and in mineral and chemical composition. (LC)

  1. And Now, a Message for Today's Students from Ben Franklin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Tedd

    1991-01-01

    Suggests that Benjamin Franklin's autobiography contains many useful messages for today's students. Discusses Franklin's list of virtues that he followed in an attempt at attaining moral perfection. Includes temperance, industry, justice, tranquillity, and humility. Describes the message of Franklin's lesson as one of achieving through effort…

  2. An Exploratory Study of Rape Survivors' Prescription Drug Use as a Means of Coping with Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturza, Marisa L.; Campbell, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined rape survivors' post assault use of prescription drugs, including sedatives, tranquilizers, and antidepressants. In a community-based sample of 102 sexual assault survivors, 44% had used prescription drugs post rape. Consistent with prior research on alcohol as a postassault coping mechanism, the current study found…

  3. Sociocultural Adaptations among Cuban Emigre Women in Miami, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Diana H.

    This paper reports on Cuban women living in Miami (Florida) and their adaptation to life in exile. It includes an examination of health care practices, particularly the practice of self-diagnosis and self-prescription of minor tranquilizers as coping behaviors for dealing with acculturation and culture shock. Data were gathered from questionnaires…

  4. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 522.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... administered either intravenously or intramuscularly to dogs and cats for tranquilization at a dosage level of 0.05-0.5 milligram per pound of body weight and is also administered intravenously to dogs and cats...

  5. Developmental Course of Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs from Adolescence to Adulthood in the United States: National Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Kloska, Deborah D.; Veliz, Philip; Jager, Justin; Schulenberg, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the developmental course of nonmedical use of four separate prescription drug classes (opioids, sedatives, stimulants, and tranquilizers) by examining the general functional growth and related covariates during the transition from adolescence to adulthood in the United States. Design Nationally representative probability samples of high school seniors were followed longitudinally across five waves (waves 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5: modal ages 18, 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26 years respectively). Setting Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires to high school seniors and young adults in the United States. Participants The sample consisted of nearly 72,000 individuals in 30 cohorts (high school senior years of 1977–2006) who participated in at least one wave. Measurements Self-reports of annual nonmedical use of prescription opioids, sedatives, stimulants, and tranquilizers. Findings The annual nonmedical use of prescription opioids, sedatives, stimulants, and tranquilizers was highest at wave 1 over the five waves. There was a consistent descending path (linear and quadratic slopes, p < 001) in annual nonmedical use from baseline across all four prescription drug classes (e.g., opioids linear slope = −.043 and opioids quadratic slope = .034, p <.001). While the annual nonmedical use of stimulants declined over time (linear slope = .063, p <.01; quadratic slope = −.133, p <.001), the same decrease was not observed for the annual nonmedical use of prescription opioids, sedatives or tranquilizers when controlling for sociodemographic and substance use behaviors at baseline. The covariates associated with the general functional growth differed across the four prescription drug classes. Conclusions The nonmedical use of prescription opioids, sedatives, stimulants, and tranquilizers appears to peak during late adolescence, suggesting preventive intervention efforts should be initiated in early adolescence. The developmental course of

  6. The Metabolism of the Volatile Amines

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Barry A.; Goldman, Bernard S.

    1963-01-01

    The effects of certain drugs on metabolism of ammonia by the liver and kidneys in dogs were investigated by a technique in which both hepatic inflow and outflow bloods could be repeatedly sampled in unanesthetized healthy animals. Specific representatives of the classes of the drugs studied included thiopental (barbiturates), morphine (opiates and analgesics), promazine (tranquillizers), and chlorothiazide (oral diuretics). The three drugs commonly used as sedatives were all found to impair the ability of the liver to metabolize ammonia. The diuretic, by contrast, increased the amount of ammonia put into the systemic system by the kidneys. Ethanol appeared to have little or no direct effect on ammonia metabolism. The possibility exists that the occurrence of acute hepatic encephalopathy in patients with severe liver disease may be avoided in many cases if these drugs are administered with proper care. Results also indicated that current concepts of the pharmacological action of sedatives, opiates and tranquillizers may require revision. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:14069611

  7. KSC-2009-3613

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a media event in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to showcase the newest section of the International Space Station, the Tranquility node, astronauts who will deliver the node on the STS-130 mission were available for questions. From left are Pilot Terry Virts and Mission Specialists Stephen Robinson and Kathryn Hire. At right are other guests, Philippe Deloo, ISS Nodes project manager with the European Space Agency, and Rafael Garcia, ISS Nodes and Express Logistics Carrier project manager with NASA's Johnson Space Center. Managers from NASA, the European Space Agency, Thales Alenia Space and Boeing -- the organizations involved in building and processing the module for flight -- were available for a question-and-answer session during the event. Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  8. Effects of music listening on depressed women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y M

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the physiological and psychological effects of music listening on depressed women in Taiwan. Through the use of a pretest-posttest, control group, experimental design, the heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and immediate mood states before and after a music/sound intervention were measured in 30 women. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively and with t tests. A qualitative questionnaire was administered to participants to elicit information related to the subjective experience of music/sound listening. Significant posttest differences were found in experimental group participants' heart rates, respiratory rates, blood pressure, and tranquil mood states. Significant posttest differences also were found in control group participants' heart rates and tranquil mood states. The results support the use of music listening as a body-mind healing modality for depressed women.

  9. Pharmacological study and fractionation of Paspalum scrobiculatum extract.

    PubMed

    BHIDE, N K

    1962-02-01

    The dried ethanol extract of the husk of the grain of Paspalum scrobiculatum produced tranquillization and tremors in various species of animals. It potentiated the effect of hexobarbitone in mice, produced hypothermia in mice and rats and enhanced leptazol toxicity in rats. Amphetamine group-toxicity in mice increased after injecting the extract or an emulsion containing a similar quantity of olive oil. Vomiting in pigeons and decrease of morphine rage in cats were noted. Diminution of carotid occlusion reflex and hypotension were observed in anaesthetized dogs. Tremors and sleep were experienced by a human volunteer after taking the extract orally. Stability of the extract under different conditions was studied in dogs. Fractions of the extract, resolved by solvent separation and column chromatography, were tested in dogs for tranquillization and tremors.

  10. Ulcers in restrained rats: Study of protective substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buche, L.; Gallaire, D.

    1980-01-01

    The genesis of ulcers in restrained rats is discussed through an investigation of the relationship between the protective effects of nervous system effectual substances examined vis-a-vis ulcers in restrained rats and their elective or secondary pharmacologic effects. The substances used were capable of either peripheral parasympatholytic, sympatholytic, ganglioplegic, spasmolytic effects or central, hypnotic, tranquilizing, neuroleptic, analgesic effects. The regular and considerable protection observed with parasympatholytics (atropine sulfate, benzylonium bromide, dihexyverine, J.L. 1344) and a ganglioplegic (pentamethonium) is a function of their anticholinergic properties. It is of less importance with dibenamine, a sympatholytic action on the adrenergic receptors. Among the central depressive substances tested (hypnotics, tranquilizers, neuroleptics, analgesic), phenobarbital at a nonhypnotic dose, and dextromoramide at a nonanalgesic dose, show antiulcerous effects, which are found with chlorpromazine only at cataleptogenic doses.

  11. Evaluation of United States Strategy In Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-03

    degree of tranquility and repose which it has never en - joyed even under the palmiest days of Spanish oc- cupation." William Walker was driven out of...fear and focus on Cuban/Soviet en - couragement of insurgencies miss the even greater threat that the Soviet objective for the area will bring. This... Belize , British Virgin Islands, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Montserrat

  12. Brief review of published alprazolam clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Straw, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    1 The clinical efficacy of alprazolam has been evaluated in both anxiety states and depressive disorders. In anxiety neurosis, studies have been conducted vs placebo and/or other benzodiazepine tranquilizers. Reports, to date, with regard to panic/phobia disorders have been limited to open-label studies and a single report from a placebo-controlled study. In depression, both open-label and double-blind studies (vs tricyclic antidepressants) have been published. PMID:2859879

  13. OGS Hydrogen Sensor ORU R&R

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-18

    ISS030-E-236919 (18 April 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, works with the Oxygen Generator System (OGS) rack in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank unpowered the OGS, purged the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) with the Hydrogen Sensor ORU Purge Adapter (HOPA) for return to Earth, and replaced the hydrogen sensor with a new spare, then cleaned the rack Avionics Air Assembly (AAA).

  14. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences, Number 83.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-14

    quality in the surrounding area and the health of the employees who worked at the breeding center. A flow diagram shows the acceptable processes for...use of this 44 tranquilizer, and the successes realized in investigations of its metabolism and pharmacokinetics . The authors undertook to study such...described (this journal, Vol 63, 1977, p 496, by these authors). A synchronization reaction was observed in the cochlear nuclei—with respect to the rapid

  15. [On "the essence of acupuncture is treating spirit as priority"].

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Wu, Zhixiong

    2016-06-12

    From the content of spirit and treating spirit in traditional culture and Taoist culture, the implication of treating spirit in the Internal Classic is discussed, which is by long-time exercises, the body and mental status could achieve a high level of tranquility and calmness, not the mutual spirit focus of patients and physicians during acupuncture. It is emphasized that treating spirit is a long-time basic training for acupuncturist before acupuncture.

  16. Vertical view of Apollo 16 landing site located Descartes area lunar nearside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A vertical view of the Apollo 16 landing site located in the Descartes area lunar nearside. The overlay indicates the location of the proposed touchdown point for the Apollo 16 Lunar Module. Descartes is located west of the Sea of Nectar and southwest of the Sea of Tranquility. This photograph was taken with a 500mm lens camera from lunar orbit by the Apollo 14 crew.

  17. Highlights from the Worldwide Survey of Nonmedical Drug Use and Alcohol Use Among Military Personnel: 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-14

    Prepared with assistance of: Yukiko Gamnes and Edward Farley W9 KEY WORDS (Continue on revere.r side it necessary and identify by block number) Drug use... side if neresestry aund idennty by block ntimber) his survey report provides a comprehensive, detailed and accurate estimallte or the preval ence of drug...34 Other Uppers ............. Preludin, Ritalin , Sandrex Tranquilizers ............ Valium, Librium, Miltown Barbiturates ............. Seconal (reds

  18. CDRA Valve RR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    ISS037-E-021985 (28 Oct. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Tranquility node, NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins (right) and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, both Expedition 37 flight engineers, perform routine in-flight maintenance within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly. This device removes carbon dioxide from the station?s atmosphere and is part of the station?s Environmental Control and Life Support System that provides clean water and air to the crew.

  19. CDRA Valve RR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-10-28

    ISS037-E-021962 (28 Oct. 2013) --- NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs routine in-flight maintenance within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly in the International Space Station?s Tranquility node. This device removes carbon dioxide from the station?s atmosphere and is part of the station?s Environmental Control and Life Support System that provides clean water and air to the crew.

  20. Artist's concept of Apollo 10 Lunar Module descending for look at moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A North American Rockwell artist's concept depicting the Apollo 10 Lunar Module descending to 50,000 ft for a close look at a lunar landing site. The Command and Service modules remain in lunar orbit. The landing area is Site 2 on the east central part of the moon in southwestern Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis). The site is about 62 miles east of the rim of the crater Sabine and 118 miles west-southwest of the crater Maskelyne.

  1. KSC-2009-6507

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA, addresses the invited guests at a ceremony transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station, looming in the background, from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Seated, from left, are Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA; William Dowdell, deputy for Operations, International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing, Kennedy; and Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  2. KSC-2009-6510

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Secondino Brondolo, head of the Space Infrastructure, Thales Alenia Space Italy, addresses the invited guests at a ceremony transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Seated, from left, are Bob Cabana, Kennedy Space Center director; Michael Suffredini, program manager, International Space Station, NASA; William Dowdell, deputy for Operations, International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing, Kennedy; and Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  3. KSC-2009-6505

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Kennedy Director Bob Cabana addresses the invited guests at a ceremony transferring the ownership of node 3 for the International Space Station, looming in the background, from the European Space Agency, or ESA, to NASA. Seated, from left, are William Dowdell, deputy for Operations, International Space Station and Spacecraft Processing, Kennedy; Bernardo Patti, head of International Space Station, Program Department, ESA; and Secondino Brondolo, head of the Space Infrastructure, Thales Alenia Space Italy. Node 3 is named "Tranquility" after the Sea of Tranquility, the lunar landing site of Apollo 11. The payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. The module was built for ESA by Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work station with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Just under 10 feet in diameter, the module will accommodate two crew members and portable workstations that can control station and robotic activities. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted to launch Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  4. Prevalence and Correlates of Prescription Drug Misuse Among a Racially Diverse Sample of Young Sexual Minority Men

    PubMed Central

    Mustanski, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Sexual minority men (SMM) are at greater risk than heterosexual men for misusing prescription psychotropic medications. However, community prevalence estimates of prescription drug misuse among young SMM are lacking. The current study described lifetime and past-6-month stimulant, painkiller, and depressant/tranquilizer misuse in a large, racially diverse sample of 967 SMM aged 16–29 in Chicago, Illinois, and investigated demographic and other substance use associations. Methods: Data came from the baseline visit of the RADAR longitudinal cohort study. Associations were examined using bivariate and multivariable logistic regression. Results: A quarter of the sample reported ever misusing any prescription drug, and 14.2% reported recent misuse. Lifetime class-specific misuse was 16.9% for stimulants, 11.0% for painkillers, and 11.4% for depressants/tranquilizers; recent misuse was 8.0%, 5.7%, and 6.2%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, Non-Hispanic black participants had lower odds of lifetime stimulant and depressant/tranquilizer misuse and recent stimulant misuse than non-Hispanic white participants, and bisexual participants had greater odds of lifetime and recent painkiller and depressant/tranquilizer misuse than gay participants. Generally, using other substances was associated with greater odds of prescription drug misuse. Having ever been prescribed a psychotropic medication was associated with higher odds of lifetime painkiller misuse after controlling for covariates. Conclusion: These results provide critical information on a growing public health problem among young SMM. Future research should explore why differential rates of misuse exist across subgroups. New interventions emphasizing the risk of prescription drugs, discouraging drug sharing, and bolstering refusal and coping skills should be developed and evaluated. PMID:29360421

  5. Exp.55_US_EVA_49_03_2018_088_1430_633697

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-30

    SPACE STATION CREW WALKS IN SPACE TO UPGRADE SYSTEMS Veteran NASA astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold ventured outside the International Space Station March 29 clad in U.S. spacesuits to install wireless communications antennas on the Tranquility module, replace a camera system on the port truss and remove suspect hoses from a cooling system. The excursion was the 209th in space station history for assembly, maintenance and upgrades, the seventh in Feustel’s career and the third for Arnold.

  6. MCA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-12

    ISS037-E-001078 (12 Sept. 2013) --- European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano, Expedition 37 flight engineer, performs in-flight maintenance behind a rack in Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Parmitano replaced a mass spectrometer inside the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). The MCA measures the levels of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen and water vapor inside the space station’s atmosphere.

  7. Measurements of temperature and pressure fluctuations in the T prime 2 cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A.; Dor, J. B.; Breil, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cold wire measurement of temperature fluctuations were made in a DERAT T'2 induction powered cryogenic wind tunnel for 2 types of liquid nitrogen injectors. Thermal turbulence measured in the tranquilization chamber depends to a great extent on the injector used; for fine spray of nitrogen drops, this level of turbulence seemed completely acceptable. Fluctuations in static pressure taken from the walls of the vein by Kulite sensors showed that there was no increase in aerodynamic noise during cryogenic gusts.

  8. Adults' drug use: relationship to perceived drug use of parents, friends while growing up, and present friends.

    PubMed

    Apsler, R; Blackman, C

    1979-01-01

    Results from a random household survey of the Boston Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area show a consistent and relatively strong association of adults' use of coffee, tobacco, alcohol, tranquilizers, and marijuana with their perceptions of present friends' use. Associations with parents' and past adolescent friends' use are much weaker. The results support efforts to explain illicit drug use with general theories of behavior acquisition and cast doubt on the utility of deviance theories.

  9. Burbank performs Part 1 of the WRS-1 Repair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-08

    ISS030-E-128752 (8 March 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, performs part one of the Water Recovery System-1 (WRS-1) repair in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank removed and replaced the failed Catalytic Reactor (CR), and installed a temporary filter kit between the new CR and the Microbial Check Valve (MCV) to support a system flush of the new Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU).

  10. Electroencephalographic changes in albino rats subjected to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercier, J.; Assouline, G.; Fondarai, J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty one albino Wistar rats were subjected to stress for 7 hours. There was a significant difference in the slopes of regression lines for 7 nonulcerous rats and those for 14 ulcerous rats. Nonulcerous rats subjected to stress showed greater EEG curve synchronization than did ulcerous rats. If curve synchronization can be equated to a relaxed state, it may therefore be possible to explain the protective action of hypnotics, tranquilizers and analgesics on ulcers.

  11. Trekking at high altitudes. How safe is it for your patients?

    PubMed

    Houston, C S

    1990-07-01

    Even healthy persons may experience some form of altitude illness when they hike or ski in high mountains. Therefore, it is imperative that those with compromised cardiac or pulmonary function take extra precautions by allowing time for ascent, by recognizing and accepting their limitations, and by descending promptly at the first sign of trouble. Certain medications, such as anticoagulants and strong tranquilizers, are probably best discontinued at higher elevations. In all caes, preventive and treatment measures should be available.

  12. Men and Women in Ships: Preconceptions of the Crews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    the other hand, mentioned job experience; they saw travel as the main benefit to be gained with "life at sea" (i.e., solitude, tranquility, scenery...change of pace) as a secondary benefit . 33 Table 13 Responses to Problem Resolution Items (E-1--E-6) Response Percentagea Item Men Women Who are you...the addition of women would benefit the ship and crew. Men in supply concurred, despite their unexpected conservative scores on traditionalism (factor

  13. KSC-2009-3614

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – During a media event at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to showcase the newest section of the International Space Station, the Tranquility node, STS-130 Commander George Zamka speaks to the media and guests. Tranquility will be delivered to the station during space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission, targeted for launch in February 2010. Others present at right of Zamka are Russ Romanella, director of the ISS and Payload Processing Directorate, STS-130 Pilot Terry Virts and Mission Specialists Stephen Robinson and Kathryn Hire, Philippe Deloo, ISS Nodes project manager with the European Space Agency, and Rafael Garcia, ISS Nodes and Express Logistics Carrier project manager with NASA's Johnson Space Center. Managers from NASA, the European Space Agency, Thales Alenia Space and Boeing -- the organizations involved in building and processing the module for flight -- were available for a question-and-answer session during the event. Tranquility will be delivered to the station during space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission, targeted for launch in February 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  14. KSC-2009-6806

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-14

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the interior of the International Space Station's Node 3, named Tranquility, is seen for the last time on Earth before its hatch is shut. Hatch closure follows the completion of preparations for the node's transport to the pad and is a significant milestone in launch processing activities. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission, Tranquility is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the space station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency. Space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission is targeted for launch in early February 2010. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  15. Evaluation of use of tiletamine/zolazepam for anesthesia of bullfrogs and leopard frogs.

    PubMed

    Letcher, J; Durante, R

    1995-07-01

    Use of tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride (1:1 fixed ratio combination) as an anesthetic agent in 2 anuran species was studied. A dosage of 5 mg/kg of body weight, administered IM, resulted in variable weak tranquilization. Intramuscular administration at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg induced variable states of tranquilization or anesthesia in leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and bullfrogs (R catesbeiana). The dosages of 50 mg/kg induced anesthesia with greater consistency than lower dosages in bullfrogs, but resulted in mortalities. The same dosage was uniformly fatal in leopard frogs. Neither gross nor histologic lesions were identified in the frogs that died. Depth and duration of anesthesia was dosage related. At the 20 and 50 mg/kg dosages, leopard frogs attained a greater depth of anesthesia and remained anesthetized for a significantly greater duration than did bullfrogs; however, at the 5 and 10 mg/kg dosages, bullfrogs developed greater tranquilization for longer periods than did leopard frogs. Results of this study revealed profound intraspecies variation in depth and duration of effect of tiletamine/zolazepam; therefore, the drug does not appear to be a suitable injectable anesthetic in anurans.

  16. Effect of sweet orange aroma on experimental anxiety in humans.

    PubMed

    Goes, Tiago Costa; Antunes, Fabrício Dias; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Teixeira-Silva, Flavia

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential anxiolytic effect of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) aroma in healthy volunteers submitted to an anxiogenic situation. Forty (40) male volunteers were allocated to five different groups for the inhalation of sweet orange essential oil (test aroma: 2.5, 5, or 10 drops), tea tree essential oil (control aroma: 2.5 drops), or water (nonaromatic control: 2.5 drops). Immediately after inhalation, each volunteer was submitted to a model of anxiety, the video-monitored version of the Stroop Color-Word Test (SCWT). Psychologic parameters (state-anxiety, subjective tension, tranquilization, and sedation) and physiologic parameters (heart rate and gastrocnemius electromyogram) were evaluated before the inhalation period and before, during, and after the SCWT. Unlike the control groups, the individuals exposed to the test aroma (2.5 and 10 drops) presented a lack of significant alterations (p>0.05) in state-anxiety, subjective tension and tranquillity levels throughout the anxiogenic situation, revealing an anxiolytic activity of sweet orange essential oil. Physiologic alterations along the test were not prevented in any treatment group, as has previously been observed for diazepam. Although more studies are needed to find out the clinical relevance of aromatherapy for anxiety disorders, the present results indicate an acute anxiolytic activity of sweet orange aroma, giving some scientific support to its use as a tranquilizer by aromatherapists.

  17. [Consumption of alcohol and other drugs by the active population in Spain].

    PubMed

    Benavides, Fernando G; Ruiz-Forès, Núria; Delclós, Jordi; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia

    2013-01-01

    To describe consumption patterns of alcohol and other drugs in the active population in Spain by gender. Based on 15,082 active persons selected from the Domiciliary Survey of Alcohol and Drugs (Encuesta Domiciliaria de Alcohol y Drogas [EDADES]) 2007, we estimated prevalences for high-risk alcohol consumption (>50 g/day in males, >30 g/day in females), daily intake of tranquilizers, cannabis consumption in the last 30 days, and consumption of any other illegal drug in the last 12 months, by employment status, economic sector and occupational categories. Odds ratios (OR) and their confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by logistic regression models. The following prevalences were found: high-risk alcohol consumption, 3.4%; daily use of tranquilizers, 2.3%; cannabis consumption in the last 30 days, 7.9%; and consumption of any illegal drug in the last 12 months, 11.9%. Except for tranquilizer use, prevalences were higher in men than in women. Consumption of tranquilizers (OR = 1.68; 95%CI: 1.04-2.73), cannabis and other illegal drugs were all higher in unemployed men than in employed men, while only tranquilizer consumption was higher in unemployed women (OR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.23-2.34). High-risk alcohol consumption was greater among men engaged in the catering, primary production and construction sectors in comparison to manufacturing industries: OR = 1.63 (95% CI: 1.11-2.38), OR = 1.52 (95% CI: 1.04-2.20), and OR = 1.50 (95% CI: 1.10-2.04), respectively. For women, those in catering showed higher consumptions of cannabis (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.28-4.27) and of other illegal drugs (OR = 2.85; 95% CI: 1.71-4.76); the latter were also higher in commerce, transport and administration sectors than in manufacturing industries. These findings could serve as a useful reference for companies wanting to carry out preventive programs, and also for future studies assessing the impact of preventive measures. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights

  18. Medical marijuana laws and adolescent use of marijuana and other substances: Alcohol, cigarettes, prescription drugs, and other illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Cerdá, Magdalena; Sarvet, Aaron L; Wall, Melanie; Feng, Tianshu; Keyes, Katherine M; Galea, Sandro; Hasin, Deborah S

    2018-02-01

    Historical shifts have taken place in the last twenty years in marijuana policy. The impact of medical marijuana laws (MML) on use of substances other than marijuana is not well understood. We examined the relationship between state MML and use of marijuana, cigarettes, illicit drugs, nonmedical use of prescription opioids, amphetamines, and tranquilizers, as well as binge drinking. Pre-post MML difference-in-difference analyses were performed on a nationally representative sample of adolescents in 48 contiguous U.S. states. Participants were 1,179,372U.S. 8th, 10th, and 12th graders in the national Monitoring the Future annual surveys conducted in 1991-2015. Measurements were any self-reported past-30-day use of marijuana, cigarettes, non-medical use of opioids, amphetamines and tranquilizers, other illicit substances, and any past-two-week binge drinking (5+ drinks per occasion). Among 8th graders, the prevalence of marijuana, binge drinking, cigarette use, non-medical use of opioids, amphetamines and tranquilizers, and any non-marijuana illicit drug use decreased after MML enactment (0.2-2.4% decrease; p-values:<0.0001-0.0293). Among 10th graders, the prevalence of substance use did not change after MML enactment (p-values: 0.177-0.938). Among 12th graders, non-medical prescription opioid and cigarette use increased after MML enactment (0.9-2.7% increase; p-values: <0.0001-0.0026). MML enactment is associated with decreases in marijuana and other drugs in early adolescence in those states. Mechanisms that explain the increase in non-medical prescription opioid and cigarette use among 12th graders following MML enactment deserve further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effect of a Single Bout of Surfing on Exercise-Induced Affect.

    PubMed

    Pittsinger, Ryan; Kress, Jeff; Crussemeyer, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced affect (EIA) has been well documented and is often composed of positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue. Research on EIA has focused on mainstream sports such as running, walking, or cycling; however, no research has evaluated the influence of action sports participation in activities such surfing on EIA. The current study examined the effect of a single 30-min surfing bout on EIA in 107 adult volunteers. An additional purpose was if change in affect was similar based on surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. To assess EIA, each participant completed the Physical Activity Affect Scale (PAAS) prior to and immediately following the 30-min surf session. Dependent t -tests were used to examine differences between pre- and post-test EIA. For the secondary purpose, a change score (PAAS posttest-PAAS pretest) was computed for each subscale. One-way ANOVAs were performed to determine differences among comparisons of surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and the change score for each of the 4 subscales. EIA was significantly altered by surfing, with significant improvements in positive affect and tranquility, and significant reductions in negative affect and fatigue. There were no significant differences among surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and positive affect, negative affect or tranquility. However, there were significant differences between fatigue and surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. The results indicate that a single 30-min surfing bout may provide positive benefits for the participant. Implications for future surfing research and EIA are discussed.

  20. The Effect of a Single Bout of Surfing on Exercise-Induced Affect

    PubMed Central

    PITTSINGER, RYAN; KRESS, JEFF; CRUSSEMEYER, JILL

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced affect (EIA) has been well documented and is often composed of positive affect, negative affect, tranquility, and fatigue. Research on EIA has focused on mainstream sports such as running, walking, or cycling; however, no research has evaluated the influence of action sports participation in activities such surfing on EIA. The current study examined the effect of a single 30-min surfing bout on EIA in 107 adult volunteers. An additional purpose was if change in affect was similar based on surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. To assess EIA, each participant completed the Physical Activity Affect Scale (PAAS) prior to and immediately following the 30-min surf session. Dependent t-tests were used to examine differences between pre- and post-test EIA. For the secondary purpose, a change score (PAAS posttest-PAAS pretest) was computed for each subscale. One-way ANOVAs were performed to determine differences among comparisons of surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and the change score for each of the 4 subscales. EIA was significantly altered by surfing, with significant improvements in positive affect and tranquility, and significant reductions in negative affect and fatigue. There were no significant differences among surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level, and positive affect, negative affect or tranquility. However, there were significant differences between fatigue and surfing history, surfing frequency, and surfing skill level. The results indicate that a single 30-min surfing bout may provide positive benefits for the participant. Implications for future surfing research and EIA are discussed. PMID:29170700

  1. Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications Among Medical Students in Greece: Prevalence of and Motivation for Use.

    PubMed

    Papazisis, Georgios; Tsakiridis, Ioannis; Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Apostolidou, Eirini; Spachos, Dimitrios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios

    2018-01-02

    Non-medical use of prescription medications has risen to unprecedented levels over the past decade worldwide; however, studies assessing misuse across medical students are sparse. The purpose of this study was to1) estimate the lifetime and the past-year prevalence of non-medical use of prescription medications among medical students in Greece 2) identify the motivation for use. 591 medical students completed an anonymous, self-administered, web-based survey assessing lifetime and past-year prevalence of non-medical use of four classes of prescription drugs (opioid painkillers, tranquillizers, sleeping and stimulant medications). According to the motivation to use the responders were classified into three subtypes (selftreatment, recreational, and mixed). The prevalence of lifetime use was 10.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes and 9% of the respondents reported lifetime misuse of multiple categories of prescription drugs. The past-year prevalence was approximately 7.7% for at least one of the four prescription drug classes, while the majority misused the drugs "1-2 times per year". Senior students used tranquilizers more than junior students. Self-treatment and mixed subtypes of tranquillizers misuse was more prevalent among women than men while the self-treatment subtype was the most prevalent subtype in all the four drug classes. This is the first study investigating non-medical use of prescription medications among Greek medical students and indicates a high prevalence of misuse of some categories of prescription drugs, mostly for self-treatment purposes.

  2. Close-up view of astronauts foot and footprint in lunar soil

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-40-5880 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's boot and bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin A. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM)" Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  3. 'Positive and 'negative' aspects of the 'altered states of consciousness' induced by autogenic training, Zen and yoga.

    PubMed

    Ikemi, Y; Ishikawa, H; Goyeche, J R; Sasaki, Y

    1978-01-01

    As practices of altered states of consciousness (ASC) have become more widely used among psychotherapists who have become aware of the limitations of psychoanalytic, educational and behavioral approaches, negative aspects ('Makyo') of ASC have drawn their special attention. For the purpose of controlling or preventing these side-effects, (1) the problem of indication is most important, (2) and evaluation of the patient's personality is indispensable, (3) preparatory education about ASC methods and (4) guidance by experienced leaders are most helpful, (5) appropriate use of tranquilizers and (6) the mere presence of a supportive therapist at the place of practice can also be helpful.

  4. Experience with pericyazine in profoundly and severely retarded children.

    PubMed

    Tischler, B; Patriasz, K; Beresford, J; Bunting, R

    1972-01-22

    The effectiveness of pericyazine in severe behavioural disorders was evaluated in 15 profoundly and severely retarded children. Pericyazine provided significant improvement in such parameters as co-operation, temper, purposeless activities, hyperactivity, communication and mood. It proved to be statistically superior to the minor tranquillizers in improving co-operation and helpfulness, temper, mood, the understanding of commands and table manners, and in reducing self-abusiveness and abusiveness to staff. The safety of this agent was confirmed and photosensitivity was not found to be associated with its use.

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Brief Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    LIEBERMAN, PAUL B.; VON REHN, SUSAN; DICKIE, ELLEN; ELLIOTT, BINETTE; EGERTER, ELISE

    1992-01-01

    Correlational data in this study suggest that a strong therapeutic alliance is associated with improvement during brief hospitalization. Two measures of alliance were used: patient-staff agreement on treatment goals and patient expectations of benefit from treatment. Greater patient-staff agreement at admission was associated with symptomatic improvement, independent of medication use; less use of immature defense mechanisms at discharge; and reduced risk of precipitous discharge. For a given level of symptoms, greater agreement was associated with lower doses of antipsychotics but higher doses of minor tranquilizers and antidepressants. Perception of the ward was associated with patients’ expectation of benefit. PMID:22700056

  6. iss047e133469

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-25

    ISS047e133469 (05/25/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Tim Peak (left) and NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams (right) prepare the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) for expansion. The pair were outfitting the area known as the vestibule, which is the space between the hatch on BEAM and hatch on Tranquility. NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams and the NASA and Bigelow Aerospace teams working at Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center spent more than seven hours on operations to fill the BEAM with air to cause it to expand.

  7. KSC-as11-40-5927

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS - Man's first landing on the Moon was accomplished at 4:17 p.m. today as Lunar Module "Eagle" touched down gently on the Sea of Tranquility on the east side of the Moon. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module Pilot, removes scientific experiment packages from a stowage area in the Lunar Module's descent stage. Left behind on the lunar surface by Aldrin and Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, were a Passive Seismic Experiments Package and a Laser-Ranging Retro-Reflector.

  8. Apollo 11 Launch HD SILENT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-08

    On July 16, 1969, the huge, 363-feet tall Saturn V rocket launches on the Apollo 11 mission from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, at 9:32 a.m. EDT. Onboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 was the United States' first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  9. APOLLO SEPARATION - ART CONCEPTS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-14

    S69-30520 (April 1969) --- A North American Rockwell Corporation artist's concept depicting the Apollo 10 Lunar Module descending to 50,000 feet for a close look at a lunar landing site. The Command and Service Modules remain in lunar orbit. The landing area is Site 2 on the east central part of the moon in southwestern Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis). The site is about 62 miles east of the rim of the crater Sabine and 118 miles west-southwest of the crater Maskelyne. Apollo 11 is scheduled to be the first lunar landing mission.

  10. Photograph of moon after transearth insertion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-24

    AS10-27-3956 (24 May 1969) --- This photograph of the moon was taken after trans-Earth insertion when the Apollo 10 spacecraft was high above the lunar equator near 27 degrees east longitude. North is about 20 degrees left of the top of the photograph. Apollo Landing Site 3 is on the lighted side of the terminator in a dark area just north of the equator. Apollo Landing Site 2 is near the lower left margin of the Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis), which is the large, dark area near the center of the photograph.

  11. Skin care in the aging female: myths and truths

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2012-01-01

    I recently had the opportunity to visit a very relaxing and beautiful day spa during the middle-of-the-day break from the sessions at a Keystone meeting. I was having a very tranquil and restorative day, when I went in for my final treatment — a facial. The very chipper and cheerful esthetician began examining my skin and applying various creams, when I then heard her say something that nearly ruined my experience: she claimed that the topical treatment she was about to apply would, in her words, “cleanse my liver.” PMID:22293186

  12. Valium without dependence? Individual GABAA receptor subtype contribution toward benzodiazepine addiction, tolerance, and therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianze; Wallace, Dominique Marie; Ponteri, Benjamin; Tuli, Mahir

    2018-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are one of the most prescribed medications as first-line treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and epilepsy around the world. Over the past two decades, advances in the neuropharmacological understanding of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors revealed distinct contributions from each subtype and produced effects. Recent findings have highlighted the importance of α 1 containing GABA A receptors in the mechanisms of addiction and tolerance in benzodiazepine treatments. This has shown promise in the development of tranquilizers with minimal side effects such as cognitive impairment, dependence, and tolerance. A valium-like drug without its side effects, as repeatedly demonstrated in animals, is achievable.

  13. Endeavour SRMS / OBSS during Survey OPS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-09

    S130-E-005338 (8 Feb. 2010) --- Backdropped by the South China Sea and the Gulf of Tonkin, the Tranquility node in space shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay, vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and a shadow-covered docking mechanism are featured in this image photographed by the STS-130 crew from an aft flight deck window. Hainan Island can be seen between the South China Sea (bottom) and Gulf of Tonkin (top). The Leizhou Peninsula of the Chinese mainland is on the upper right.

  14. KSC-2009-4199

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-16

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians keep watch as the control moment gyroscope is lifted past the Node 3 Tranquility module to an EXPRESS Logistics Carrier. The carrier is part of the STS-129 payload on space shuttle Atlantis, which will deliver to the International Space Station two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly and a spare latching end effector for the station's robotic arm. STS-129 is targeted to launch Nov. 12 . Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  15. Basis of behavioral influence of chlorpromazine.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emley, G. S.; Hutchinson, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys, studied during response-independent, periodic presentation of electric shock, engaged in biting attack behavior after shock and anticipatory manual and locomotor behavior prior to shock. For all subjects, administration of chlorpromazine caused a dose-dependent decrease in biting attack reactions and a simultaneous increase in anticipatory manual responses. Administration of d-Amphetamine increased while morphine decreased both responses. The results suggest that the tranquilizer, chlorpromazine, produces a shift in an organism's response tendency from post-event aggressivity toward pre-event anticipatory responding.

  16. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065714 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  17. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065720 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  18. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065733 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  19. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065722 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  20. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065734 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  1. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065736 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  2. Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065735 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Nicholas Patrick, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Patrick and Robert Behnken (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  3. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065710 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  4. Behnken and Patrick during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065725 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronauts Robert Behnken (right) and Nicholas Patrick, both STS-130 mission specialists, participate in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Patrick connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  5. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007858 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  6. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065731 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  7. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065750 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  8. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065758 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  9. Behnken during EVA 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    S130-E-007862 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission’s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  10. Behnken during EVA-2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-14

    ISS022-E-065751 (14 Feb. 2010) --- NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission?s second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Nicholas Patrick (out of frame), mission specialist, connected two ammonia coolant loops, installed thermal covers around the ammonia hoses, outfitted the Earth-facing port on the Tranquility node for the relocation of its Cupola, and installed handrails and a vent valve on the new module.

  11. Node 1 CPA docking mechanism installation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-26

    ISS043E256577 (05/26/2015) --- Expedition 43 commander and NASA astronaut Terry Virts is seen here closing the hatch to the Leonardo Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM.) The PMM was moved on May 27, 2015 from the Unity node to the Tranquility node. This freed up a docking port on the Earth-facing side of Unity for visiting cargo vehicles and was the latest activity in the ongoing upgrades to the station to prepare for future U.S. commercial crew vehicles.

  12. jsc2017m000677_SpeedyTime2–Advanced_ Resistive_Exercise_ Device

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-20

    SpeedyTime #2 – Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Astronauts on the International Space Station have to exercise for two hours every day, but they can show off the hardware in a lot less time than that. In this “SpeedyTime” segment Expedition 52 flight engineer Peggy Whitson gives us a rapid-fire display of exercises that can be done with just one piece of equipment, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device in the Tranquility module. _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/

  13. Apollo 11 crewmen released from quarantine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-08-07

    S69-41359 (10 Aug. 1969) --- Astronauts Michael Collins (left) and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., are greeted by Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, director, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), and others upon their release from quarantine. The Apollo 11 crew left the Crew Reception Area (CRA) of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) at 9 p.m., Aug. 10, 1969. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Aldrin, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  14. Close-up view of astronauts footprint in lunar soil

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-40-5878 (20 July 1969) --- A close-up view of an astronaut's bootprint in the lunar soil, photographed with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  15. Action Cam Footage from U.S. Spacewalk 41

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-09

    This footage was taken by NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson during a spacewalk on the International Space Station on Thursday, March 30. She was joined on the spacewalk by NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough. The two spacewalkers reconnected cables and electrical connections on PMA-3 at its new home on top of the Harmony module. They also installed the second of the two upgraded computer relay boxes on the station’s truss and installed shields and covers on PMA-3 and the now-vacant common berthing mechanism port on Tranquility.

  16. Oblique view of the lunar surface taken from Apollo 8 spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-24

    AS08-17-2814 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- This oblique view of the lunar surface taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft looking westward across the Sea of Fertility into the Sea of Tranquility shows the terrain the astronauts will see as the approach Apollo Landing Site East 2. The landing site is at the horizon about one-third of the distance from the left to the right photograph margin. The prominent crater in the highlands near the center of the picture is Secchi, about 25 kilometers (15 statute miles) in diameter.

  17. Exp.55_US_EVA_49_02_2018_088_1230_633620

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-30

    SPACE STATION CREW WALKS IN SPACE TO UPGRADE SYSTEMS----------------------Veteran NASA astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold ventured outside the International Space Station March 29 clad in U.S. spacesuits to install wireless communications antennas on the Tranquility module, replace a camera system on the port truss and remove suspect hoses from a cooling system. The excursion was the 209th in space station history for assembly, maintenance and upgrades, the seventh in Feustel’s career and the third for Arnold.

  18. EXP.55_US_EVA_49_04_2018_088_1630_633783

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-04-02

    SPACE STATION CREW WALKS IN SPACE TO UPGRADE SYSTEMS-----------------------Veteran NASA astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold ventured outside the International Space Station March 29 clad in U.S. spacesuits to install wireless communications antennas on the Tranquility module, replace a camera system on the port truss and remove suspect hoses from a cooling system. The excursion was the 209th in space station history for assembly, maintenance and upgrades, the seventh in Feustel’s career and the third for Arnold.

  19. Exp.55_US_EVA_49_01_2018_088_1029_633551

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-30

    SPACE STATION CREW WALKS IN SPACE TO UPGRADE SYSTEMS----------------Veteran NASA astronauts Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold ventured outside the International Space Station March 29 clad in U.S. spacesuits to install wireless communications antennas on the Tranquility module, replace a camera system on the port truss and remove suspect hoses from a cooling system. The excursion was the 209th in space station history for assembly, maintenance and upgrades, the seventh in Feustel’s career and the third for Arnold.

  20. [Preliminary approach to the mental component in dermatologic patients].

    PubMed

    Di Prima, T M; De Pasquale, R; Gilotta, S M; Cravotta, A

    1989-04-01

    The aim of this study was to approach on a psychical point of view 27 patients suffering from chronic idiopathic urticaria (14), pruritus sine materia (6), alopecia areata (3), pathomimia (4), in order to examine the possibility that psychic disorders could act as triggering or aggravating the dermatological affection. Psychical assessment was evaluated by colloquy and by the administration of some psychodiagnostic tests: EPI, MMPI, Zung. The role of psychogenic factors in skin diseases is emphasized and the results obtained from the use of antidepressant and minor tranquilizer drugs are discussed.

  1. KSC-2009-6141

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-3 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-130 Commander George Zamka dressed in clean-room attire, known as a "bunny suit," gets the feel of the cockpit of space shuttle Endeavour. The crew is at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which provides hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The STS-130 flight will carry the Tranquility pressurized module with a built-in cupola to the International Space Station aboard Endeavour. Launch is targeted for Feb. 4, 2010. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  2. [Pathomorphosis of anxiety disorder in patients with intestinal dysbiosis].

    PubMed

    Uspenskiĭ, Iu P; Balukova, E V

    2009-01-01

    It is known, that anxiety is one of the most wide-spread mental disorders in-between psychiatric state and it takes part in pathogenesis a lot of somatic diseases as well. At the same time the host bowel microbiota participates in metabolic control of vital human functions such as mood and behavioural reactions. This title connection reveals some new therapeutic opportunity in treatment of psychiatric disorders that based on using with probiotics. In case non-clinically significant anxiety it is claimed to use probiotic (Enterol) however in case clinically significant anxiety it is claimed to use non-benzodiazepine tranquilizer (Stresam).

  3. [A case of transient auditory agnosia and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Jin; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Kanzaki, Sho

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of transient functional auditory agnosia and schizophrenia and discuss their relationship. A 30-year-old woman with schizophrenia reporting bilateral hearing loss was found in history taking to be able to hear but could neither understand speech nor discriminate among environmental sounds. Audiometry clarified normal but low speech discrimination. Otoacoustic emission and auditory brainstem response were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) elsewhere evidenced no abnormal findings. We assumed that taking care of her grandparents who had been discharged from the hospital had unduly stressed her, and her condition improved shortly after she stopped caring for them, returned home and started taking a minor tranquilizer.

  4. Lunar Landing Site 2 - Comparisons with Size of Various Metropolitan Areas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-07

    S69-38670 (July 1969) --- A photographic illustration comparing the size of Apollo Landing Site 2 with that of the metropolitan Los Angeles, California area. Site 2 is one of three Apollo 11 lunar landing sites. This will be the landing site if Apollo 11 is launched on July 16, 1969, as scheduled. Site 2 is located at 23 degrees 42 minutes 28 seconds east longitude and 0 degrees 42 minutes 50 seconds north latitude in southwestern Mare Tranquillitatis (Sea of Tranquility). (The white overlay is printed over a lunar surface photograph taken from Apollo 10 during its lunar orbit mission and is numbered AS10-31-4537.)

  5. SCPS-TP, TCP, and Rate-Based Protocol Evaluation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Diepchi T.; Lawas-Grodek, Frances J.; Dimond, Robert P.; Ivancic, William D.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed at Glenn Research Center to compare the performance of the Space Communications Protocol Standard Transport Protocol (SCPS TP, otherwise known as "TCP Tranquility") relative to other variants of TCP and to determine the implementation maturity level of these protocols, particularly for higher speeds. The testing was performed over reasonably high data rates of up to 100 Mbps with delays that are characteristic of near-planetary environments. The tests were run for a fixed packet size, but for variously errored environments. This report documents the testing performed to date.

  6. Risk factors for tumors of the brain and cranial meninges in Seventh-Day Adventists.

    PubMed

    Mills, P K; Preston-Martin, S; Annegers, J F; Beeson, W L; Phillips, R L; Fraser, G E

    1989-01-01

    We studied the occurrence of tumors of the brain and cranial meninges in a cohort of 34,000 California Seventh-Day Adventists who completed a detailed life-style questionnaire in 1976 and who were followed for cancer incidence until the end of 1982. During the period of follow-up, 31 tumors were diagnosed in the cohort (21 gliomas, 10 meningiomas). Increased risk for glioma was associated with rural residence, history of a positive tuberculosis skin test and consumption of pork products; increased meningioma risk was associated with a positive reaction to a tuberculosis skin test, previous stroke, use of tranquillizers and a vegetarian life-style in childhood.

  7. WHC Dose pump R&R

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-02

    ISS033-E-009153 (2 Oct. 2012) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, Expedition 33 flight engineer, performs a removal and replacement of the DKiV water pump and the E-K pre-treat tank with its hose in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. E-K contains five liters of pre-treat solution, i.e., a mix of H2SO4 (sulfuric acid), CrO3 (chromium oxide, for oxidation and purple color) and H2O (water). The pre-treat liquid is mixed with water in the DKiV dispenser and used for toilet flushing.

  8. View of near full Moon photographed by Apollo 13 during transearth journey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This view of a near full Moon was photographed from the Apollo 13 spacecraft during its transearth journey homeward. Though the explosion of the oxygen tank in the Service Module forced the cancellation of the scheduled lunar landing, Apollo 13 made a pass around the Moon prior to returning to Earth. Some of the conspicuous lunar features include the Sea of Crisis, the Sea of Fertility, the Sea of Tranquility, the Sea of Serenity, The Sea of Nector, the Sea of Vapors, the Border Sea, Smyth's Sea, the crater Langenus, and the crater Tsiolkovsky.

  9. View of near full Moon photographed by Apollo 13 during transearth journey

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-14

    AS13-60-8703 (11-17 April 1970) --- This outstanding view of a near full moon was photographed from the Apollo 13 spacecraft during its trans-Earth journey homeward. Though the explosion of the oxygen tank in the Service Module (SM) forced the cancellation of the scheduled lunar landing, Apollo 13 made a pass around the moon prior to returning to Earth. Some of the conspicuous lunar features include the Sea of Crisis, the Sea of Fertility, the Sea of Tranquility, the Sea of Serenity, the Sea of Nectar, the Sea of Vapors, the Border Sea, Smyth's Sea, the crater Langrenus, and the crater Tsiolkovsky.

  10. Observations and analysis of lunar radio emission at 3.09 mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulich, B. L.; Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.; Calvert, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of data on lunar radio emission at 3.09 mm wavelength is presented. The data were obtained during a single lunation in a manner that facilitates their comparison with a calculated model. Specific regions of the moon (Copernicus, Sea of Serenity, Sea of Tranquillity, Ocean of Storms, and an highland region near the mean center) were studied with enough angular resolution to distinguish between different types of terrain. The data were absolutely calibrated and yield a new measurement of the lunation average brightness temperature of the center of the moon.

  11. Analysis of responses of cold pressor tests on pilots and executives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaroop, R.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical analyses were performed to study the relationship between cold pressor test responses and certain medical attributes of a group of 81 pilots and a group of 466 executives. The important results of this study were as follows: There was a significant relationship between a subject's cold pressor test response and his profession (that is, pilot or executive). The executives' diastolic cold pressor test responses were significantly related to their medical conditions, and their families' medical conditions. Significant relationships were observed between executives' diastolic and systolic cold pressor test responses and their history of tranquilizer and cardiac drug use.

  12. Effects of Bright Light Therapy on Sleep, Cognition, Brain Function, and Neurochemistry in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-30

    34poppers").      Cannabis:   marijuana , hashish ("hash"), THC, "pot", "grass", "weed", "reefer".        Tranquilizers:  Quaalude, Seconal ("reds"), Valium...How many times in the past year have you used marijuana ? _______________ Have you ever used marijuana at other times in your life? YES NO...If YES, at what age did you begin smoking marijuana ? ______________ On approximately how many occasions have you used marijuana ? __________ Do

  13. Risk factors for high levels of prescription drug misuse and illicit drug use among substance-using young men who have sex with men (YMSM).

    PubMed

    Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Wong, Carolyn F; Corliss, Heather L; Lankenau, Stephen E

    2015-05-01

    Limited research has focused on prescription drug misuse among young men who have sex with men (YMSM), or investigated risk factors contributing to misuse. This study aims to investigate the relationship between multiple psychosocial risk factors (i.e., childhood abuse, discrimination, mental health distress) and prescription drug misuse among YMSM who are current substance users. YMSM (N=191) who reported prescription drug misuse in the past 6 months were recruited in Philadelphia between 2012 and 2013 to complete an anonymous survey assessing demographic information, substance use, and psychosocial factors. High levels of childhood physical abuse and perceived stress were associated with higher opioid misuse, while high levels of depression were associated with lower misuse of opioids. Those with higher levels of perceived stress were more likely to report higher tranquilizer misuse, while those with more experiences of social homophobia/racism and higher levels of depression and somatization reported higher stimulant misuse. Regarding demographic correlates, older participants were more likely than younger participants to report higher opioid misuse, while racial minorities were less likely than White participants to report higher misuse of tranquilizers, stimulants, and illicit drug use. Bisexual/heterosexual/other identified participants were more likely than gay identified participants to report higher misuse of all three classes of prescription drugs. Associations of risk factors with substance use among YMSM are complex and offer opportunities for additional research. Our findings show that prevention efforts must address substance use among YMSM in sync with psychosocial stressors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Physical reworking by near-bottom flow alters the metazoan meiofauna of Fieberling Guyot (northeast Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Levin, Lisa A.; Gooday, Andrew J.; Pfannkuche, Olaf; Lambshead, P. John D.

    1999-12-01

    Although much of the deep sea is physically tranquil, some regions experience near-bottom flows that rework the surficial sediment. During periods of physical reworking, animals in the reworked layer risk being suspended, which can have both positive and negative effects. Reworking can also change the sediment in ecologically important ways, so the fauna of reworked sites should differ from that of quiescent locations. We combined data from two reworked, bathyal sites on the summit of Fieberling Guyot (32°27.631'N, 127°49.489'W; 32°27.581'N, 127°47.839'W) and compared the results with those of more tranquil sites. We tested for differences in the following parameters, which seemed likely to be sensitive to the direct or indirect effects of reworking: (1) the vertical distribution of the meiofauna in the sea bed, (2) the relative abundance of surface-living harpacticoids, (3) the proportion of the fauna consisting of interstitial harpacticoids, (4) the ratio of harpacticoids to nematodes. We found that the vertical distributions of harpacticoid copepods, ostracods, and kinorhynchs were deeper on Fieberling. In addition, the relative abundance of surface-living harpacticoids was less, the proportion of interstitial harpacticoids was greater, and the ratio of harpacticoids to nematodes was greater on Fieberling. These differences between Fieberling and the comparison sites suggest that physical reworking affects deep-sea meiofauna and indicate the nature of some of the effects.

  15. Learning the ABCs (of Project Management)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frandsen, Allan

    2003-01-01

    To lead a project effectively, one has to establish and maintain the flexibility to take appropriate actions when needed. Overconstrained situations should be avoided. To get on top of matters and stay there, a manager needs to anticipate what it will take to successfully complete the job. Physical and financial resources, personnel, and management structure are all important considerations. Carving out the necessary turf up front can make a world of difference to the project's outcome. After the "what," "where," and "when" of a project are nailed down, the next question is "how" to do the job. When I first interviewed for the job of Science Payload Manager on the Advanced Composition (ACE) Explorer mission, Dr. Edward Stone (ACE Principal Investigator) asked, "Al, give me an idea of your management style." It was a question I had not considered before. I thought about it for a few seconds and then answered, "Well, the first descriptive term that comes to mind is the word "tranquility". That seemed to startle him. So I added, "I guess what I mean is, that if the situation is tranquil and the project is running smoothly, then I've anticipated all the problems and taken necessary actions to head them off." He then asked: "Have you ever reached this state?" "No," I admitted, "but I strive for it." That seemed to satisfy him because I got the job.

  16. [Transitions in drug abuse in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Gómez, Augusto

    2009-01-01

    Transitions in drug abuse (going from one substance to another and from one form of administration to another) has been scarcely studied in Latin America. In this project 96 people in treatment, aged 14 to 50, were interviewed in seven Colombian cities. Five kinds of transition were identified: general, cumulative, substitutive, reverse and negative, occurring at nine different points; 113 transitional patterns (combinations of two substances) were found, 23 common to men and women, 10 exclusive to women and 80 exclusive to men. Contrary to all expectations, 21 cases of heroin users appeared in this sample, mainly among upper- and middle-class users, more in men than in women, and in very young people: 11 out of 21 were under 20 years of age. The 10 main transitions only involve four substances: marihuana, cocaine, inhalants and tranquillizers, and are most common amongst those under age 23. The youngest use marihuana, cocaine, tranquillizers, glues, ecstasy, poppers and heroin; the eldest prefer cocaine, basuco and marihuana. Mixtures, changes of substance and changes of from of administration are always associated with a search for more powerful effects. Many youngsters believe that marihuana is either harmless or beneficial, because it can cure cancer caused by smoking tobacco. Heroin is considered the most dangerous drug because of its bad effects on all levels. The main limitations of this study were: the small number of participants, the even smaller number of women, and the fact that only people in treatment were interviewed.

  17. The effect of exercise on affective and self-efficacy responses in older and younger women.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the self-efficacy and affective responses to an acute exercise bout in sedentary older and younger women to determine whether aging has an effect on affective states. Twenty-five sedentary younger (mean age = 19.9 yrs) and 25 older (mean age = 55.7 yrs) women completed an acute bout of exercise. Affective responses were measured before, during, and immediately following exercise. Self-efficacy responses were measured before and immediately following exercise. Positive engagement, revitalization, tranquility, Felt Arousal and Feeling Scale responses, and self-efficacy were all higher immediately following compared with before or during exercise for both groups of women. In addition, older women experienced higher overall positive engagement and lower physical exhaustion compared with younger women as well as higher tranquility and Feeling Scale responses immediately following exercise. This investigation found that an acute bout of moderate-intensity exercise produced more positive and fewer negative affective states in both younger and older women.

  18. Analyses related to the development of DSM-5 criteria for substance use related disorders: 1. Toward amphetamine, cocaine and prescription drug use disorder continua using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tulshi D; Compton, Wilson M; Chou, S Patricia; Smith, Sharon; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Pickering, Roger P; Grant, Bridget F

    2012-04-01

    Prior research has demonstrated the dimensionality of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis use disorders criteria. The purpose of this study was to examine the unidimensionality of DSM-IV cocaine, amphetamine and prescription drug abuse and dependence criteria and to determine the impact of elimination of the legal problems criterion on the information value of the aggregate criteria. Factor analyses and Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to explore the unidimensionality and psychometric properties of the illicit drug use criteria using a large representative sample of the U.S. population. All illicit drug abuse and dependence criteria formed unidimensional latent traits. For amphetamines, cocaine, sedatives, tranquilizers and opioids, IRT models fit better for models without legal problems criterion than models with legal problems criterion and there were no differences in the information value of the IRT models with and without the legal problems criterion, supporting the elimination of that criterion. Consistent with findings for alcohol, nicotine and cannabis, amphetamine, cocaine, sedative, tranquilizer and opioid abuse and dependence criteria reflect underlying unitary dimensions of severity. The legal problems criterion associated with each of these substance use disorders can be eliminated with no loss in informational value and an advantage of parsimony. Taken together, these findings support the changes to substance use disorder diagnoses recommended by the American Psychiatric Association's DSM-5 Substance and Related Disorders Workgroup. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Classification and evaluation of the pharmacodynamics of psychotropic drugs by single-lead pharmaco-EEG, EEG mapping and tomography (LORETA).

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Anderer, P; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G M; Arnold, O; Pascual-Marqui, R D

    2002-01-01

    Utilizing computer-assisted quantitative analyses of human scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) in combination with certain statistical procedures (quantitative pharmaco-EEG) and mapping techniques (pharmaco-EEG mapping), it is possible to classify psychotropic substances and objectively evaluate their bioavailability at the target organ: the human brain. Specifically, one may determine at an early stage of drug development whether a drug is effective on the central nervous system (CNS) compared with placebo, what its clinical efficacy will be like, at which dosage it acts, when it acts and the equipotent dosages of different galenic formulations. Pharmaco-EEG profiles and maps of neuroleptics, antidepressants, tranquilizers, hypnotics, psychostimulants and nootropics/cognition-enhancing drugs will be described in this paper. Methodological problems, as well as the relationships between acute and chronic drug effects, alterations in normal subjects and patients, CNS effects, therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data will be discussed. In recent times, imaging of drug effects on the regional brain electrical activity of healthy subjects by means of EEG tomography such as low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) has been used for identifying brain areas predominantly involved in psychopharmacological action. This will be demonstrated for the representative drugs of the four main psychopharmacological classes, such as 3 mg haloperidol for neuroleptics, 20 mg citalopram for antidepressants, 2 mg lorazepam for tranquilizers and 20 mg methylphenidate for psychostimulants. LORETA demonstrates that these psychopharmacological classes affect brain structures differently.

  20. How Is Developing the Sense of Belonging in Iranian Adolescent Girls? A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Mahsa; Shahriari, Mohsen; Salehi, Mehrdad; Kohan, Shahnaz

    2018-05-20

    Communicating with adolescents is associated with many challenges for parents and healthcare providers. This qualitative study was conducted for exploring the sense of belonging in Iranian adolescent girls. In this study, deep semi-structured interviews were carried out with 27 adolescent girls, 10 experts, and 10 parents. Purposeful sampling was used and continued until data saturation. The data were coded and categorised through a conventional content analysis method by MAXQDA 10. Three main categories were obtained from the analysis of the participants' descriptions: "family; a haven of tranquillity", "dominated by peers", and "concerns about differences in gender socialization". According to our results, most of the girls achieved calmness through being emotionally accepted by their families. But this sense of belonging and tranquillity was shaken by their peers' showing off, in a way that adolescent girls were always struggling to gain acceptance among their peers. Also for fear of being rejected by their peers' group, they sometimes began to make friends with the opposite sex. Meanwhile, traditional attitudes towards gender roles and adolescent girls' feelings about their lower social participation as compared to that of boys had also led to their concern about differences in gender socialization and a lower sense of community belonging among some adolescent girls. Adequate parental education and the proper management of girls' interactions with the family and society can play an important role in the development of a sense of belonging among adolescent girls.

  1. Compressibility, isothermal titration calorimetry and dynamic light scattering analysis of the aggregation of the amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in water/ethanol mixed solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif; Siddiq, Mohammad; Barbosa, Silvia; Castro, Emilio; Egea, José A.; Antelo, Luis T.; Taboada, Pablo; Mosquera, Víctor

    2007-07-01

    Thioridazine hydrochloride is a drug used in treatment of mental illness that shows side effects. Therefore, it is interesting to study the change of the physico-chemical properties of the drug in different environments to understand the mechanism of action of the drug. Thioridazine can be considered as a hydrotrope if we considered that the term comprise hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that form aggregates by a stacking mechanism as it is the case of all the phenothiazine tranquillizing drugs. The association properties of the amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride were investigated by density, ultrasound, isothermal titration calorimetry and dynamic light scattering (DLS), yielding values of the critical concentration, adiabatic apparent compressibilities and hydrodynamic radius. The DLS data were analyzed according to the treatment of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory to study the stability of the system. The aim of the study is to obtain information about the physico-chemical characterization of the drug in aqueous solution and the effect of ethanol on the aggregate stability of this amphiphilic drug. The phenothiazine tranquillizing drugs have interesting association characteristics that derive from their rigid, tricyclic hydrophobic groups.

  2. Victimization and perpetration of intimate partner violence and substance use disorders in a nationally representative sample.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Tracie O; Henriksen, Christine A; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Sareen, Jitender

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between perpetration and victimization of physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) in the past year and substance use disorders (SUDs) in the past year, including alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, cocaine, cannabis, and nicotine stratified according to sex. Data were from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. A series of adjusted logistic regression models were conducted. Among men and women, all types of SUDs were associated with increased odds of IPV perpetration (odds ranging from 1.4 to 8.5 adjusting for sociodemographic variables). IPV victimization increased the odds of having all types of SUDs for male and female victims, with the exception of sedatives/tranquilizer abuse/dependence among women (odds ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 adjusting for sociodemographic variables). Substances that had the most robust relationship with perpetration and victimization of IPV included alcohol and cannabis, after adjusting for sociodemographic variables, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and mutual violence.

  3. [Social issues in the doctor's clinic].

    PubMed

    Vos, H

    2017-01-01

    Doctors are confronted with issues that arise in society. These social issues can affect patients' health. Solving these problems requires more than just prescribing a pill, as illustrated by the cases of three patients. The first patient is a 42-year-old male with cardiac symptoms, chronic lower back pain and an excessive use of tranquillizers. The welfare worker intervened and his demand for health care and use of tranquillizers diminished. The second patient is a 53-year-old female with symptoms of chronic back pain, migraine and depression. A labour dispute concerning her health eventually led to a referral to a project named 'social hospital', but actual assistance never took place due to the patient's alleged lack of time to participate. The third case concerns an 86-year-old female with postherpetic neuralgia who also suffered from loneliness. The patient's named welfare worker tried to get in touch with her, but the patient kept her at a distance. These three cases illustrate that it is very important to get to know the social network in a community in order to refer patients with social issues to the right person or place. Furthermore, prevention and early intervention strategies should be applied where possible. Doctors and local governments must act together in order to succeed in solving patient ill health as a result of social issues.

  4. [Needs satisfaction deficit among cocaine and/or marijuana users asking for treatment].

    PubMed

    García-Aurrecoechea, Raúl; Díaz-Guerrero, Rogelio; Medina-Mora, María Elena

    2007-01-01

    As part of a pioneer investigation line on the field of addiction and mental health centred on the operationalization of clinical implications of the motivational theory of Maslow (1954/1970) and feedback treatment and prevention strategies of drug use and its associated disturbances, it is tested the psycho-pathogenesis construct of this theory by means of a cross sectional design of four independent samples, on which it is explored the satisfaction degree of 16 deficitary needs on intentional samples of adolescents and young adults: Three samples of actual users of marihuana (n = 47), cocaine (n = 47) and both substances (n = 50), that were gotten between treatment solicitors and a sample of students and workers non illicit drug users (n = 150). The comparative and predictive statistical analysis provide validity to the psycho-pathogenesis construct of the theory of motivation of Maslow, and its stand out: 1)The potential utility for the treatment of the development of techniques and instruments oriented to cover the deficit of satisfaction of the needs of health, tranquillity, order, emotional security, family justice, love, friendship, respect, tenderness, power, domination, success and money and; 2) The importance for the prevention of the actual consumption of drugs as cocaine or marihuana of the development of strategies focused to keep satisfied the needs of health, tranquillity, affection, respect and success.

  5. KSC-2010-1325

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission take time out from their training to pose for a group portrait with space shuttle Endeavour as backdrop. From left are Mission Specialists Stephen Robinson and Nicholas Patrick, Commander George Zamka, Mission Specialist Kathryn Hire, Pilot Terry Virts and Mission Specialist Robert Behnken. The crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's upcoming mission are at Kennedy for training related to their launch dress rehearsal, the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload on STS-130 is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. Endeavour's launch is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  6. KSC-2010-1335

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission take time out from their emergency exit training at Launch Pad 39A to pose for a group portrait in the White Room. Standing, from left, are Pilot Terry Virts and Mission Specialists Kathryn Hire and Robert Behnken. Kneeling, from left, are Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson, Commander George Zamka and Mission Specialist Nicholas Patrick. The crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's upcoming mission are at Kennedy for training related to their launch dress rehearsal, the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload on STS-130 is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. Endeavour's launch is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. KSC-2010-1307

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-19

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission pause from their M113 training for a group portrait. From left are Commander George Zamka; Pilot Terry Virts; and Mission Specialists Robert Behnken, Kathryn Hire, Stephen Robinson and Nicholas Patrick. An M113 is kept at the foot of the launch pad in case an emergency egress from the vicinity of the pad is needed. The crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission are at Kennedy for training related to their launch dress rehearsal, the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload on STS-130 is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. Endeavour's launch is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  8. KSC-2010-1311

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-19

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission pose for a group portrait following the completion of their M113 training. From top left are Mission Specialists Stephen Robinson and Nicholas Patrick. From bottom left are Mission Specialist Robert Behnken; Pilot Terry Virts; Mission Specialist Kathryn Hire; and Commander George Zamka. An M113 is kept at the foot of the launch pad in case an emergency egress from the vicinity of the pad is needed. The crew members of Endeavour's STS-130 mission are at Kennedy for training related to their launch dress rehearsal, the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload on STS-130 is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. Endeavour's launch is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  9. KSC-2010-1287

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-18

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The crew of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission poses for a group portrait following their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. From left are Mission Specialists Robert Behnken, Nicholas Patrick, Stephen Robinson and Kathryn Hire; Pilot Terry Virts; and Commander George Zamka. The crew is at Kennedy to participate in training and a dress rehearsal for their upcoming launch, known as the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency. Launch of STS-130 is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  10. KSC-2010-1334

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's STS-130 mission pose for a group portrait following a question-and-answer session with the media. From left are Commander George Zamka; Pilot Terry Virts; and Mission Specialists Kathryn Hire, Stephen Robinson, Nicholas Patrick and Robert Behnken. The crew members of space shuttle Endeavour's upcoming mission are at Kennedy for training related to their launch dress rehearsal, the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The primary payload on STS-130 is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. Endeavour's launch is targeted for Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  11. Substance use and misuse in burn patients: Testing the classical hypotheses of the interaction between post-traumatic symptomatology and substance use.

    PubMed

    Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco Jose; Giannoni-Pastor, Anna; Fidel-Kinori, Sara Guila; Argüello, José María

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to test whether the three classical hypotheses of the interaction between post-traumatic symptomatology and substance use (high risk of trauma exposure, susceptibility for post-traumatic symptomatology, and self-medication of symptoms), may be useful in the understanding of substance use among burn patients. Substance use data (nicotine, alcohol, cannabis, amphetamines, cocaine, opiates, and tranquilizers) and psychopathology measures among burn patients admitted to a burn unit and enrolled in a longitudinal observational study were analyzed. Lifetime substance use information (n = 246) was incorporated to analyses aiming to test the high risk hypothesis. Only patients assessed for psychopathology in a 6-month follow-up (n = 183) were included in prospective analyses testing the susceptibility and self-medication hypotheses. Regarding the high risk hypothesis, results show a higher proportion of heroin and tranquilizer users compared to the general population. Furthermore, in line with the susceptibility hypothesis, higher levels of symptomatology were found in lifetime alcohol, tobacco, and drug users during recovery. The self-medication hypothesis could be tested partially due to the hospital stay "cleaning" effect, but severity of symptoms was linked to the amount of caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis use after discharge. It was found that the 3 classical hypotheses could be used to understand the link between traumatic experiences and substance use explaining different patterns of burn patient's risk for trauma exposure and emergence of symptomatology.

  12. Prostaglandin control of renal circulation in the unanesthetized dog and baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. A.; Vatner, S. F.; Heyndrickx, G. R.; Boettcher, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of indomethacin and meclofenamate, inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis, were evaluated in the regulation of renal blood flow in conscious and anesthetized dogs and in tranquilized baboons, instrumented with arterial pressure catheters and renal blood flow probes. Indomethacin, 10 mg/kg, did not alter renal blood flow or resistance significantly in the conscious dog. In the anesthetized dog, however, indomethacin caused a reduction in renal blood flow and an elevation of renal vascular resistance. Meclofenamate, 4 mg/kg, reduced renal flow and increased renal vascular resistance in conscious dogs. In conscious dogs and tranquilized primates, indomethacin and meclofenamate reduced the reactive hyperemia in the renal bed. Methoxamine and angiotensin II infused in graded doses induced significantly greater renal vasoconstriction in conscious dogs in the presence of indomethacin. Thus, in the conscious animal, prostaglandins appear to play only a minor part in the control of renal circulation at rest, but they are of greater importance in mediating the renal responses to reactive hyperemia and to vasoconstriction.

  13. Involuntary movements in the elderly. Parkinson's disease and other causes.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Q

    1986-03-01

    Dyskinesia is usually lifelong and progressive; therefore, physicians generally see the disorder in elderly patients. Medical treatment must be carefully selected on the basis of the cause of the dyskinesia. Parkinsonian dyskinesia is well controlled by drug therapy. However, patients can become less responsive to a drug after years of use and may experience unwelcome side effects. Cerebellar tremor is extremely disabling because it worsens with activity, but no satisfactory therapy is available. Senile, essential, and familial tremors are also intensified by action, but they can often be suppressed with a mild tranquilizer or a beta blocker. Drug treatment of blepharospasm and spastic dysphonia has been disappointing: Facial or laryngeal surgery is sometimes required. Tardive dyskinesia is caused by neuroleptic drugs, so the only therapy for the disorder is withdrawal of the offending drug.

  14. Telecast of Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin by the Lunar Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    S69-39562 (20 July 1969) --- Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), commander; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (right), lunar module pilot, are seen standing near their Lunar Module (LM) in this black and white reproduction taken from a telecast by the Apollo 11 lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). This picture was made from a televised image received at the Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking station at Goldstone, California. United States President Richard M. Nixon had just spoken to the two astronauts by radio. Aldrin, a Colonel in the United States Air Force, is saluting the Commander-in-Chief. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  15. President Nixon - Welcome - Apollo XI Astronauts - USS Hornet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-21365 (24 July 1969) --- United States President Richard M. Nixon was in the central Pacific recovery area to welcome the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Already confined to the Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) are (left to right) Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet. The three crewmen will remain in the MQF until they arrive at the Manned Spacecraft Center's (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  16. Surrogacy in modern obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Celia; Edozien, Leroy C

    2014-10-01

    Surrogacy is rising in profile and prevalence, which means that perinatal care providers face an increasing likelihood of encountering a case in their clinical practice. Rapidly expanding scientific knowledge (for example, fetal programming) and technological advances (for example, prenatal screening and diagnosis) pose challenges in the management of the surrogate mother; in particular, they could exacerbate conflict between the interests of the baby, the surrogate mother, and the intending parent(s). Navigating these often-tranquil-but-sometimes-stormy waters is facilitated if perinatal care providers are aware of the relevant ethical, legal, and service delivery issues. This paper describes the ethical and legal context of surrogacy, and outlines key clinical practice issues in management of the surrogate mother. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. KSC-2014-3247

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts and their families examine the mission plaques mounted on the wall in the lobby of the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility houses the firing rooms from which the Apollo countdowns were conducted. Kennedy Director Robert Cabana, at left, led the tour which followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  18. Astronaut Edwin Aldrin poses for photograph beside deployed U.S. flag

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-40-5875 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the "Eagle", to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  19. KSC-2009-2828

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-24

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  20. KSC-2009-2826

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-24

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  1. KSC-2009-2827

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-24

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  2. KSC-2009-2825

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-24

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker prepares to pack a component of the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  3. KSC-2009-2824

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-24

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker prepares to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  4. Station Module Move in 4K Video Resolution

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-09

    Robotics flight controllers in Mission Control Houston and Canada detached the large Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), used as a supply depot on the orbital laboratory, from the Earth-facing port of the Unity module and robotically relocated it to the forward port of the Tranquility module. This move cleared the Unity port for its conversion into the spare berthing location for U.S. cargo spacecraft; the Earth-facing port on Harmony is the primary docking location. Harmony’s space-facing port currently is the spare berthing location for cargo vehicles, so this move frees that location to be used in conjunction with Harmony’s forward port as the arrival locations for commercial crew spacecraft.

  5. Frequent non-storm washover of barrier islands, Pacific coast of Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Lopez, G.I.; Correa, I.D.

    2000-01-01

    Barrier islands of the Pacific coast of Colombia repeatedly experience severe washover even when breaking waves in the eastern Pacific are low and onshore winds are calm. On the barrier island of El Choncho, recent non-storm washover events have breached a new inlet, caused rapid beach retreat, destroyed a shoreline protection structure, and flooded a small village of indigenous people so frequently that it had to be relocated. Barrier washover may be augmented by lowered land elevations associated with earthquake-induced subsidence or long-term beach retreat, but temporally it is most closely associated with a 20 to 30 cm regional increase in sea level caused by El Nino. The contradiction of a tranquil tropical island scene simultaneously disturbed by hostile turbulent washover may be unique at present, but it exemplifies how coastal plains throughout the world would be affected if sea level were to rise rapidly as a result of global warming.

  6. Treatment of tension-type headache: from old myths to modern concepts.

    PubMed

    Barbanti, P; Egeo, G; Aurilia, C; Fofi, L

    2014-05-01

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the second most common human disease, accounting for intense disability, high costs and numerous workdays lost. Tension-type headache is less simple and easy-to-treat than commonly thought. Antidepressants, despite their poor tolerability, are still the first-choice drugs for preventing TTH. The most widely studied non-pharmacological approach to TTH, cognitive-behavioral techniques, effectively relieve pain only in selected patients. The most frequently used and recommended treatments for acute TTH, NSAIDs and paracetamol have scarce efficacy as documented by their low therapeutic gain over placebo in the 2-h pain-free response. Their effectiveness may be increased by a more proper use and by the adjunction of caffeine, antiemetics, myorelaxants or tranquillizers but the risk of medication-overuse headache must be considered. Hence, the need for more effective and tailored treatments in TTH remains.

  7. High Prevalence of Substance Use among Men who have Sex with Men in Buenos Aires, Argentina: Implications for HIV Risk Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Balán, Iván C.; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Dolezal, Curtis; Marone, Rubén; Pando, María A.; Barreda, Victoria; Ávila, María M

    2012-01-01

    Five hundred gay and other men who have sex with men (G&MSM) from Buenos Aires, Argentina completed an assessment regarding substance use and sexual behavior. During the past two months, 78% of participants consumed alcohol and 61% drugs. Over 20% of participants reporting alcohol, marijuana, cocaine sulfate, or tranquilizer use, did so daily. Heavy alcohol use was more likely among participants with greater mood reactivity (AOR = 1.64) and less likely among those who identified as gay (AOR=0.38). Weekly drug use was less likely among older (AOR=0.98), and gay-identified participants (AOR=0.50), but more likely among participants with greater mood reactivity (AOR=1.49). Drug use was correlated with unprotected anal and vaginal intercourse with men, women, and transvestites among non-gay identified participants (r= 0.22). Findings highlight the need to reduce substance use and sexual risk behavior in this population. PMID:23196860

  8. MARRIAGE PROBLEMS—Dealing with Them in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ruskin, Isidore W.

    1959-01-01

    Marriages and divorces in Los Angeles County almost equal each other. Marriage per se is not the cause of neurosis. When two neurotic persons marry, the resulting neurotic interaction too often ends in conflict, broken homes and a new generation of neurotic children. Psychotherapy must be related to the diagnosis of family psychopathology, should include all the involved members and should be directed toward the realistic goal of integrating them into family living. Of 100 cases taken from the author's experience, 64 involved married couples and the majority of these had serious interspouse conflicts. In 37 cases both spouses were treated and substantial psychotherapy was given to one or both of the partners. It included one or more modalities varying from electroshock therapy, tranquilizers, and such psychotherapy as supportive, dynamic interpretive, individual, spouses together, group and hypnotherapy. Thirteen achieved clinical recovery, nine improved, twelve were still in therapy. In three cases therapy failed. PMID:13629353

  9. Recovery - Apollo 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-21698 (24 July 1969) --- The three Apollo 11 crew men await pickup by a helicopter from the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The fourth man in the life raft is a United States Navy underwater demolition team swimmer. All four men are wearing biological isolation garments. Apollo 11, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, onboard, splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  10. A humanbecoming qualitative descriptive study on quality of life with older adults.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina

    2014-04-01

    Quality of life is a universal living experience and is significant for older adults living in long-term residential care facilities. The purposes of this research study were to: explicate the experience of quality of life for older adults, contribute to the understanding of quality of life for older adults and to nursing's extant body of knowledge by enhancing humanbecoming. Humanbecoming was selected as the theoretical perspective for the qualitative descriptive exploratory method study with 10 volunteers living in the same long-term residential care facility in Singapore. Findings showed that: quality of life is fortifying tranquillity amid potential turbulence with the gratifying engagements of diverse affiliations, as envisioning possibilities arise with discordant constraints. The findings of this study have made a significant contribution to the phenomenon - quality of life both in terms of older adults living in nursing homes and from a Singaporean context.

  11. Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    S69-39961 (16 July 1969) --- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 (Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT), July 16, 1969. Onboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States' first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Liftoff - Apollo XI - Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    S69-39962 (16 July 1969) --- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 (Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module 5/Saturn 506) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT), July 16, 1969. Aboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States' first lunar landing mission. This view of the liftoff was taken by a camera mounted on the mobile launch tower. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  13. Liftoff of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    S69-39959 (16 July 1969) --- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 11 (Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module 5/ Saturn 506) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT), July 16, 1969. Aboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 is the United States' first lunar landing mission. This view of the liftoff was taken by a camera mounted on the mobile launch tower. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descend in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  14. Rogue waves for a system of coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Chan, H N; Malomed, B A; Chow, K W; Ding, E

    2016-01-01

    Rogue waves (RWs) are unexpectedly strong excitations emerging from an otherwise tranquil background. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a ubiquitous model with wide applications to fluid mechanics, optics, plasmas, etc., exhibits RWs only in the regime of modulation instability (MI) of the background. For a system of multiple waveguides, the governing coupled NLSEs can produce regimes of MI and RWs, even if each component has dispersion and cubic nonlinearity of opposite signs. A similar effect is demonstrated here for a system of coupled derivative NLSEs (DNLSEs) where the special feature is the nonlinear self-steepening of narrow pulses. More precisely, these additional regimes of MI and RWs for coupled DNLSEs depend on the mismatch in group velocities between the components, and the parameters for cubic nonlinearity and self-steepening. RWs considered in this paper differ from those of the NLSEs in terms of the amplification ratio and criteria of existence. Applications to optics and plasma physics are discussed.

  15. [Economic Dimension of Surrogacy Maternity (″Rooms For Rent″)].

    PubMed

    López Guzmán, José

    2017-01-01

    Maternity by subrogation has an important economic dimension that, in the last years, has been even more potentiated. It is a multimillion-dollar industry that, on the other hand, takes advantage of women with low economic resources. Faced with this, there is an important criticism, carried out by different groups, that refer to this sector with such questionable terms as ″uterine rental industry″, ″baby farms″, ″children's factories″, etc. These criticisms are being strongly counteracted by maternity centers by subrogation. To this they dedicate enormous budgets with strategies that, based on great doses of sentimentality, manage to transmit a positive image of the process. The objective is to provide tranquility to users and to society in general. To this end they distort the ethical and legal implications of the process; in particular, deny the exploitation of women and the instrumentalization of the children that, necessarily, implies this technique.

  16. Traditions and Alcohol Use: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe González; Coe, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    An integrative mixed-methods analysis examined traditional beliefs as associated with beliefs about self-care during pregnancy and with alcohol abstinence among young adult women from two rural U.S.–Mexico border communities. Quantitative (measured scale) variables and qualitative thematic variables generated from open-ended responses served as within-time predictors of these health-related outcomes. A weaker belief that life is better in big cities was associated with stronger self-care beliefs during pregnancy. Also, a weaker belief that small towns offer tranquil environments was associated with total abstinence from alcohol. Regarding the Hispanic Paradox, these results suggest that a critical appreciation of cultural traditions can be protective, as this avoids stereotypical or idyllic views of urban or rural lifeways, and promotes self-protective beliefs and behaviors. PMID:17967095

  17. Fragrances in oolong tea that enhance the response of GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sheikh Julfikar; Aoshima, Hitoshi; Koda, Hirofumi; Kiso, Yoshinobu

    2004-09-01

    We electrophysiologically investigated the effect of some fragrant compounds in oolong tea on the response of ionotropic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABAA receptors) which were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Of the tested fragrances in oolong tea, cis-jasmone, jasmine lactone, linalool oxide and methyl jasmonate significantly potentiated the response. Among these, cis-jasmone and methyl jasmonate potently potentiated the response, having a respective dissociation constant of the compound (Kp) and maximum potentiation (Vm) of 0.49 mM and 322% for cis-jasmone, and 0.84 mM and 450% for methyl jasmonate. Inhalation of 0.1% cis-jasmone or methyl jasmonate significantly increased the sleeping time of mice induced by pentobarbital, suggesting that these fragrant compounds were absorbed by the brain and thereby potentiated the GABAA receptor response. Both of these compounds may therefore have a tranquillizing effect on the brain.

  18. Drug use and accidental falls in an intermediate care facility.

    PubMed

    Sobel, K G; McCart, G M

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between nonenvironment-caused falls and drug use was evaluated in an intermediate care facility over a 14-month period. The medical problems and selected drug use of 45 patients who had fallen were retrospectively compared with those of a matched control population of 30 patients who had not fallen during this same period. Antihypertensives, diuretics, tranquilizers, sedative/hypnotics, antidepressants, and antianginal agents were reviewed for all patients. The use of diuretics, specifically furosemide, and sedative/hypnotics was significantly greater in the population who had fallen. Observations of dizziness, confusion, insomnia, and ataxia were recorded more frequently in that group, as well. Closer monitoring of medications, especially in specific drug classes, may help prevent accidental falls in this type of institution.

  19. PMA3 Relocate ops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-07

    ISS020-E-028611 (7 Aug. 2009) --- European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne (foreground) and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk, both Expedition 20 flight engineers, work the controls of the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Centerline Berthing Camera System (CBCS) in the International Space Station’s Destiny laboratory to relocate the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 (PMA-3) from the Unity node nadir port to Unity’s port side. This relocation is required to allow reconfigurations on the side of the Unity node port bulkhead by the crew in a pressurized environment where PMA-3 is now located. Once these reconfigurations are completed, PMA-3 will be relocated back to Unity’s nadir port, after which the Tranquility node will be brought up and berthed to Unity’s port side on mission STS-130/20A.

  20. Psychotropic drugs in opioid addicts on methadone treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferris, G N

    1976-07-01

    Psychotropic drug treatment of persons on methadone maintenance is discussed. Patients with clear target symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, or psychosis responded just as non-opioid addicts would to the major psychotropic agents. The minor tranquilizers are felt to be of doubtful value, and subject to abuse. Sleep disturbances cannot be treated by the usual means, as the drugs needed again are abused. However, chlorpromazine shows some promise here. Methods of drug delivery and goals of treatment must be adapted to the realities of this patient-group's characteristics, particularly anti-social traits, poor motivation and unreliability. Psychotropic drugs are unlikely to be of aid in multiple drug abusers, personality and character disorders, and opioid withdrawal. Four case histories are presented.

  1. Apollo XI Command Module (CM) - Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) - U.S.S. Hornet

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-40758 (24 July 1969) --- The Apollo 11 spacecraft Command Module (CM) and the Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) are photographed aboard the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic first lunar landing mission. The three crewmen are already in the MQF. Apollo 11 with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. aboard splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet. While astronauts Armstrong, commander, and Aldrin, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  2. [Münchhausen syndrome by proxy between two adults].

    PubMed

    Krebs, M O; Bouden, A; Lôo, H; Olié, J P

    1996-04-06

    Münchhausen syndrome by proxy has been well described in the case of a women producing or pretending symptoms in one of her children, leading that child to have numerous medical interventions. The case of two adults has been seldom described and the differences in the psychopathological features of the two situations are not well known. We report our observation of a Münchhausen syndrome in a married couple where the wife injected tranquilizers to her husband, inducing repeated episodes of coma. Complex interactions between the pathological personalities of the husband and wife were present. Prominent features of the wife's personality included a narcissistic deficiency, poor defenses and signs of depression. Practioners should be aware of this peculiar pathology to avoid delayed diagnosis and its dramatic consequences. Appropriate medical, psychiatric, as well as legal measures must be taken.

  3. View of the orange soil which Apollo 17 crewmen found at Station 4 during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    AS17-137-20989 (12 Dec. 1972) --- A close-up view of the much-publicized orange soil which the Apollo 17 crewmen found at Station 4 (Shorty Crater) during the second Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The orange soil was first spotted by scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt. While astronauts Schmitt and Eugene A. Cernan descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Challenger" to explore the lunar surface, astronaut Ronald E. Evans remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. The orange soil was never seen by the crewmen of the other lunar landing missions - Apollo 11 (Sea of Tranquility); Apollo 12 (Ocean of Storms); Apollo 14 (Fra Mauro); Apollo 15 (Hadley-Apennines); and Apollo 16 (Descartes).

  4. Teacher drug use: a response to occupational stress.

    PubMed

    Watts, W D; Short, A P

    1990-01-01

    Work-related stress is predicted to be correlated with wanting to leave the teaching profession and drug use. A stratified random sample of 500 Texas teachers was surveyed (56.5% responded), regarding working conditions, collegial and supervisory relationships, job satisfaction, rigidity of attitudes and drug use. Two-thirds of teachers may want to quit the profession, while 36.4 percent are likely to quit. Teachers report higher rates than a national sample of lifetime alcohol, amphetamine, and tranquilizer use and higher rates of alcohol use in the last year and last month. Selected measures of stress are correlated with drug use, particularly amphetamine use, over the lifetime, last year, and last month.

  5. Delayed postpartum fetotomy in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, Willem

    2013-03-01

    A 37-yr-old Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) started parturition after 640 days of pregnancy but no fetal parts entered the birth canal. Despite veterinary intervention, the calf was not delivered. After 13 mo calving resumed and a full-term dead calf advanced into and lodged within the vagina. With standing xylazine tranquilization, the dam received a vagino-vestibulotomy to permit total fetotomy of the calf, which presented with bilateral carpal arthrogryposis. Severe infection of the caudal vaginal vestibulum complicated wound healing, and over the following year two corrective surgeries were performed, which resolved the fistula 3 mo after the second debridement. The elephant not only survived the procedures but also resumed normal estrous cycles, as demonstrated by blood progesterone concentration monitoring.

  6. Surgical sterilization of free-ranging wolves.

    PubMed

    Spence, C E; Kenyon, J E; Smith, D R; Hayes, R D; Baer, A M

    1999-02-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether surgical sterilization of both males and females in wolf pairs alters basic wolf social and territorial behaviors. Wolves were located from the air by snow-tracking methods and were tranquilizer-darted from a helicopter. Surgeries were performed either in a tent at the capture site or in a heated building in a nearby village. Six vasectomies and seven uterine horn ligations were performed in January and February of 1996 and 1997. Two females died: one likely related to the capture procedure, the other of a peritonitis unrelated to the surgery. One wolf had a litter. None of the wolves have shown changes in behavioral patterns. Surgical sterilization can be effective, but other, less invasive, fertility control techniques should be investigated.

  7. Scientific basis for the selection of absorbent underpads that remain securely attached to underlying bed or chair.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of pressure ulcers in patients is very high in certain high-risk groups. These special high-risk groups include elderly patients, patients with spinal cord injuries, or any individual with an impaired ability to reposition. Prevention of pressure ulcers is by far the best treatment of this condition, warranting certain interventions and preventive measures. One major risk factor to be minimized is the exposure of skin to moisture. Underpads are often used to protect the skin of patients who are incontinent. These products effectively absorb moisture and present a quick-drying surface to the skin. The construction of an underpad should accomplish three goals. First, its backing should have a low coefficient of friction to prevent frictional skin injuries. Second, an inner absorbent core should rapidly contain moisture and disseminate it throughout the entire pad. Third, the core and coverstock should successfully work together to retain moisture and prevent wet-back or fluid return. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of three commercially available underpads in reducing the development of pressure sores in patients at high risk. In this study we selected three underpads that could be securely attached to either the underlying bed or the chair. The three performance parameters examined were absorbent capacity, wetback prevention, and holding security of the underpads. Measurements of these performance parameters can be easily replicated in other laboratories. The results of these studies provide a scientific basis for selecting and purchasing an underpad to prevent pressure ulcers in patients. In this comprehensive evaluation, we assess an absorbent underpad with polyethylene flaps and two absorbent underpads with adhesive. The absorbent capacity results showed Tranquility SlimLine Peach Sheet to be the most absorbent. The wet-back results showed Tranquility SlimLine Peach Sheet to be the only underpad with no wet-back, with no

  8. Apollo 14 - Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14, the sixth United States manned flight to the Moon and fourth Apollo mission with an objective of landing men on the Moon, is scheduled for launch Jan. 31 at 3:23 p.m. EST from Kennedy Space Center, Fla. The Apollo 14 lunar module is to land in the hilly upland region north of the Fra Mauro crater for a stay of about 33 hours, during which the landing crew will leave the spacecraft twice to set up scientific experiments on the lunar surface and to continue geological explorations. The two earlier Apollo lunar landings were Apollo 11 at Tranquility Base and Apollo 12 at Surveyor 3 crater in the Ocean of Storms.

  9. Apollo 13 - Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Apollo 13, the third U.S. manned lunar landing mission, will be launched April 11 from Kennedy Space Center, Fla., to explore a hilly upland region of the Moon and bring back rocks perhaps five billion years old. The Apollo 13 lunar module will stay on the Moon more than 33 hours and the landing crew will leave the spacecraft twice to emplace scientific experiments on the lunar surface and to continue geological investigations. The Apollo 13 landing site is in the Fra Mauro uplands; the two National Aeronautics and Space Administration previous landings were in mare or 'sea' areas, Apollo 11 in the Sea of Tranquility and Apollo 12 in the Ocean of Storms.

  10. Amotivational syndrome: The real management problem of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, W. N.; King, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Impaired insight is a prominent feature of the schizophrenic syndrome, and failure to take major tranquillizers by the oral route has resulted in many relapses. The introduction of the long-acting phenothiazine fluphenazine enanthate (Moditen Enanthate) has greatly facilitated the control of the florid symptoms of this disorder by transferring most of the responsibility for phenothiazine administration from the patients to the clinic or family physician. The educational maturing process, to enable these patients to cope with the challenges of adult life and the reality of their condition, can be handled more effectively through a therapeutic team approach, operating within the framework of a structured program, than by the traditional psychiatrist/patient relationship alone. PMID:4338368

  11. Liability concerns in contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Segal, S J

    1999-12-01

    The history of liability claims in the US against contraceptive products is among the issues that discourage manufacturers from investing in discovery and development in this field. Other factors are the high cost of new drug development, elevated insurance rates for contraceptives, and the desire to avoid controversy that can disturb corporate tranquility. General features of the American legal system influence the large number and cost of product liability claims in the US compared to Europe. These differences pertain to issues such as the role of judges, how lawyers receive their compensation, and the use of expert scientific testimony. The history of litigation in the US against pharmaceutical products and devices pertaining to women's health suggests that interventions that involve the reproductive system are held to different standards or elicit different emotional responses than other pharmaceutical products or devices.

  12. [Belching (eructation)].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei; Lee, Joon Seong

    2014-07-01

    Belching is a normal physiological function that may occur when ingested air accumulated in the stomach is expelled or when food containing air and gas produced in the gastrointestinal tract is expelled. Excessive belching can cause patients to complain of abdominal discomfort, disturbed daily life activities, decreased quality of life and may be related to various gastrointestinal disorders such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, aerophagia and rumination syndrome. Belching disorders can be classified into aerophagia and unspecified belching disorder according to the Rome III criteria. Since the introduction of multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring, efforts are being made to elucidate the types and pathogenic mechanisms of belching disorders. Treatment modalities such as behavioral therapy, speech therapy, baclofen, tranquilizers and proton pump inhibitors can be attempted, but further investigations on the effective treatment of belching disorders are warranted.

  13. [Psychopharmacology in aviation and astronautics].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, P V; Glod, G D

    1977-01-01

    Flights aboard modern vehicles are associated with high nervous-emotional and physical stresses. This may induce depletion of reserve capabilities, development of fatigue and, consequently, reduction of work capacity of crewmembers. The paper discusses approaches and results of the use of drugs by pilots and cosmonauts in order to alleviate their fatigue and emotional stress. It gives indications and contraindications for the adminstration of stimulants and tranquilizers. On the basis of a comprehensive analysis of the literature data and their own findings, the authors draw the conclusion that the use of stimulants and anxiolytics may increase the level of reliability and performance of air- and spacecraft pilots during programmed and, particularly, contigent situations of the flight.

  14. Exterior view of the ISS taken during a session of EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-12

    ISS028-E-016225 (12 July 2011) --- Components of the International Space Station, though moving along at 17,500 miles per hour, appear to hover above the Pacific Ocean just off the California coast. Ten cosmonauts and astronauts were working together when this photo was taken -- four of them as STS-135 visitors from the docked space shuttle Atlantis and six as members of the Expedition 28 crew. The Cupola, near center of frame, is attached to Node 3 or Tranquility. A Russian Soyuz and a Russian Progress spacecraft are parked at the station, left side of frame. While much of the coast is obscured by clouds, just inland from left to right, one can see the agriculture of the San Joaquin Valley, the southern Sierra Nevada, the Los Angeles Basin (center), the Mojave Desert, coastal mountains of southern California, the Salton Sea, the Imperial Valley, and the mouth of the Colorado River on the extreme right edge.

  15. (/sup 3/H)Batrachotoxinin A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels: a rapid and quantitative assay for local anesthetic activity in a variety of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, E.T.; Lewandowski, G.A.; Daly, J.W.

    1985-03-01

    (/sup 3/H)Batrachotoxinin A benzoate ((/sup 3/H)BTX-B) binds with high affinity to sites on voltage-dependent sodium channels in a vesicular preparation from guinea pig cerebral cortex. In this preparation, local anesthetics competitively antagonize the binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B. The potencies of some 40 classical local anesthetics and a variety of catecholamine, histamine, serotonin, adenosine, GABA, glycine, acetylcholine, and calcium antagonists, tranquilizers, antidepressants, barbiturates, anticonvulsants, steroids, vasodilators, antiinflammatories, anticoagulants, analgesics, and other agents have been determined. An excellent correlation with the known local anesthetic activity of many of these agents indicate that antagonism of binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding provides a rapid,more » quantitative, and facile method for the screening and investigation of local anesthetic activity.« less

  16. [Ethology of panic disorders].

    PubMed

    Cyrulnik, B

    1996-12-01

    Animal's world is perfectly coded. According to genetical equipment, there are in natural sphere, signals whose bio-physical structure releases panics behaviours. But the mere fact that an organism is developing from birth to death makes it sensitive to different informations. Imprinting allows to young to incorporate another live-being or a sphere, category it. From now, if we change this sphere, it's a trouble of relation of world which panics the young. Surpopulation regarded in an animal world as an impossibility to classify its world, impairs animal's behaviours and released accidental panics. Overgenerational appears soon in animals, a long time before words. But when human language appears, it modifies memory's nature and allows therefore troubles released by a representation. The tranquilizing mechanism often consists of changing fear in anxiety, easier to manage.

  17. [Pharmacokinetics and the clinical effect of bemitil after a single administration].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Bobkov, Iu G; Neznamov, G G; Serebriakova, T V

    1986-01-01

    It was found on studying a novel psychotropic drug bemitil that after its single administration kinetic curves significantly differed depending on a clinical effect of the test dose in patients with asthenic states. At predomination of the psychoactivating component of action one could note a larger area under the concentration-time relationship curve and a shorter period of half-excretion than in patients with the tranquilizing action. The obtained data on the difference in the drug test dose effect depending on the drug pharmacokinetics should be taken into consideration at determination of bemitil course therapy duration in patients with neuroses and neurosis-like states with predominance of asthenic disturbances in the clinical picture.

  18. Preisocalamendiol, Shyobunol and Related Oxygenated Sesquiterpenes from Bolivian Schinus molle Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    St-Gelais, Alexis; Mathieu, Michel; Levasseur, Virginie; Ovando, Jesús Flores; Escamilla, Ruben; Marceau, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Five batches of Bolivian Schinus molle essential oils were obtained from pilot and industrial-scale hydrodiffusions. They were analyzed by gas chromatography to find 80 known compounds and two unknown molecules. In particular, preisocalamendiol (5.6-11.0 %) was found to be an important constituent of these oils, along with shyobunol (0.6-3.2 %) and several other related oxygenated sesquiterpenes. These compounds, usually found in Acorus calamus, had not been reported altogether in S. molle essential oils previously. These findings, in light of the GABAA positive modulating effect of shyobunone and preisocalamendiol, along with some traditional uses of S. molle, suggest that further investigation of the tranquilizing properties of these Bolivian oils would be of interest.

  19. Blood concentrations of clobazam and norclobazam in a lethal case involving clobazam, meprobamate and clorazepate.

    PubMed

    Pok, Phak-Rop Pos; Mauras, Michel; De Saint Léger, Marie-Noëlle; Kuhlmann, Erika; Charpenel-Durat, Catherine; Navarette, Claudie; Duval, Marie-Laure; De Meo, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Clobazam is a benzodiazepine with anti-anxiety and anticonvulsant properties marketed in several countries. Norclobazam, a metabolite of clobazam, has similar pharmacological activity but weaker sedative and tranquilizing effect. The two drugs were detected by GC-MS and determined by HPLC-DAD in the samples from a postmortem case. The femoral blood concentrations of clobazam and norclobazam were 0.72 and 36 μg/mL, respectively. The concentration of the active norclobazam was very high. The sum of both clobazam and norclobazam blood concentration (36.72 μg/mL) was clearly toxic, but was not necessarily fatal. Other associated drugs concentrations were within their therapeutic ranges. Interactions due to drug association were discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Space Station Upgrades Continue on This Week @NASA – March 31, 2017

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-31

    Work continues aboard the International Space Station on upgrades to prepare it for future operational activities. Ground controllers, using the station’s robotic arm, moved the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 (PMA-3) from the Tranquility module to the station’s Harmony module March 26. PMA-3 will be outfitted with one of two International Docking Adapters to accommodate U.S. commercial spacecraft carrying astronauts on future missions. Four days after the PMA-3 move, NASA’s Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson conducted the second in a series of three planned spacewalks to complete work related to the upgrades. The third spacewalk is planned in April. Also, James Webb Space Telescope Completes Acoustic and Vibration Tests, MAVEN Data Helps Measure Loss of Mars’ Atmosphere, Getting Excited About STEM, and New NASA App for Amazon Fire TV!

  1. Intermittent dynamics in complex systems driven to depletion.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan V; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2018-03-19

    When complex systems are driven to depletion by some external factor, their non-stationary dynamics can present an intermittent behaviour between relative tranquility and burst of activity whose consequences are often catastrophic. To understand and ultimately be able to predict such dynamics, we propose an underlying mechanism based on sharp thresholds of a local generalized energy density that naturally leads to negative feedback. We find a transition from a continuous regime to an intermittent one, in which avalanches can be predicted despite the stochastic nature of the process. This model may have applications in many natural and social complex systems where a rapid depletion of resources or generalized energy drives the dynamics. In particular, we show how this model accurately describes the time evolution and avalanches present in a real social system.

  2. Does Medical Cannabis Use Increase or Decrease the Use of Opioid Analgesics and Other Prescription Drugs?

    PubMed

    Bachhuber, Marcus A; Arnsten, Julia H; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Sohler, Nancy

    2018-04-17

    : In observational and retrospective studies, people who use cannabis are more likely than people who do not use cannabis to also use other drugs. People who take medical cannabis are also more likely to report medical and non-medical use of opioid analgesics, stimulants, and tranquilizers. Given that people who take medical cannabis and those who do not are likely to have different underlying morbidity, it is possible that medical cannabis use reduces prescription drug use yet prescription drug use remains relatively high. Studies comparing people who take medical cannabis with people who do not take it cannot draw conclusions about the effect of medical cannabis on drug use. To fully understand the effect of medical cannabis on the use of other drugs, prospective longitudinal studies randomizing individuals to cannabis versus other treatments are urgently needed.

  3. SpeedyTime_3_Treadmill_2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-31

    When you live in a place where your heart doesn’t even have to work against the pull of gravity, you need help with exercise: the astronauts on the International Space Station have a suite of exercise equipment at their disposal, including a treadmill. In this “SpeedyTime” segment Expedition 52 flight engineer Jack Fischer runs through the workout they get on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (COLBERT) in the station’s Tranquility module. HD Link: https://archive.org/details/jsc2017m000676_SpeedyTime_3_Treadmill_2 _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/

  4. Escalating role of piezosurgery in dental therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Esha; Masamatti, Sujata Surendra; Kumar, Ashish

    2014-10-01

    Dentistry, an art in science and tranquilizer in medicine, has seen a lot of changing concepts over a decade and one such novel innovation is piezosurgery. Piezosurgery is a true revolution in bone surgery as it fulfils both biological and technical criteria. It has a variety of applications ranging from minor surgical procedures to complex implantology, plastic and reconstructive surgeries. Piezosurgery uses a low frequency modulated ultrasonic insert which produces microvibrations in the range of 60-200micro meter/sec and leads to safe and precise bony incision without damaging underlying vital structures like nerves, mucosa and vessels. It overcomes technical difficulties such as visibility by producing bloodless field during surgery and removes debris simultaneously through internal irrigation mechanism. The soft tissues remain safe and biological factors like release of certain cytokines promote bone healing and enhance patients recovery. This critical review outweighs piezosurgery over traditional tools and emphasizes on its clinical and biological aspects contributing to beneficial dental health.

  5. Inhibition of radioemesis by disruption of catecholamines in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Luthra, Y.K.; Mattsson, J.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.

    1981-03-01

    Dogs were treated 30 min to 1 h before x irradiation with ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine or 6-hydroxydopamine. A third group of dogs was given a known antiradioemetic drug, haloperidol to verify the sensitivity of the procedure. Irradiated but untreated controls were also used. Light methoxyflurane anesthesia was used for restraint during the exposure. Exposure dose was 800 rad kerma delivered at 50 rad/min to a 10 x 10-cm area covering the abdominal area from xiphoid to pubis. Haloperidol and 6-hydroxydopamine significantly reduced the number of emetic episodes and delayed the onset time to the first episode, ..cap alpha..-Methyl-p-tyrosine caused no significantmore » changes. The effectiveness of 6-hydroxydopamine indicates that catecholaminergic neurons are involved in radioemesis, whereas haloperidol and phenothiazine-derivative tranquilizers inhibit radiomesis by blocking catecholamine receptor neurons.« less

  6. Physicians' attitudes toward the legalization of marijuana use.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, L S; Yager, J; Leake, B

    1989-01-01

    We asked 303 practicing physicians in general internal medicine, family medicine, gastroenterology, or psychiatry to indicate whether possessing or using marijuana should be considered a felony, a misdemeanor, warrant the issuance of a citation, or be legalized. The position physicians advocated was unrelated to their specialty, experience diagnosing or treating substance abuse problems, their attitudes toward the efficacy of the treatment of drug abuse, or any other work role or habit we measured. Legalization or citation as compared with harsher penalties, however, was more likely favored by physicians who were younger, less religious, politically more liberal, and those less likely to perceive a serious drug problem in society. Legalization was also more likely favored by physicians who themselves had used marijuana, cocaine, and amphetamines but was unrelated to the use of alcohol, cigarettes, or tranquilizers. Although physician opinion should be sought as society deals with the drug problem, this study suggests how physicians' characteristics may influence the opinions that are rendered. PMID:2750164

  7. Physicians' attitudes toward the legalization of marijuana use.

    PubMed

    Linn, L S; Yager, J; Leake, B

    1989-06-01

    We asked 303 practicing physicians in general internal medicine, family medicine, gastroenterology, or psychiatry to indicate whether possessing or using marijuana should be considered a felony, a misdemeanor, warrant the issuance of a citation, or be legalized. The position physicians advocated was unrelated to their specialty, experience diagnosing or treating substance abuse problems, their attitudes toward the efficacy of the treatment of drug abuse, or any other work role or habit we measured. Legalization or citation as compared with harsher penalties, however, was more likely favored by physicians who were younger, less religious, politically more liberal, and those less likely to perceive a serious drug problem in society. Legalization was also more likely favored by physicians who themselves had used marijuana, cocaine, and amphetamines but was unrelated to the use of alcohol, cigarettes, or tranquilizers. Although physician opinion should be sought as society deals with the drug problem, this study suggests how physicians' characteristics may influence the opinions that are rendered.

  8. Health-related economic costs of the Three-Mile Island accident.

    PubMed

    Hu, T W; Slaysman, K S

    1984-01-01

    On March 1979, a nuclear power station at Three-Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, had a major breakdown. During the two-week period of the accident, about 150,000 residents were evacuated for reasons associated with safety and health. Many residents during and after the accident, regardless of whether they left or stayed, made mental and physical adjustments due to this accident. This paper is to estimate the economic costs incurred by individuals or communities as a result of a change in physical or mental health status and/or a change in health care services due to the TMI accident. The findings indicate that stress symptoms caused by the accident did affect the health-related behaviors of area residents. Of the costs examined, the economic costs of work days lost and physician visits are the largest cost items. There were some increases in consumption of alcohol, cigarettes, and tranquilizers immediately following the accident.

  9. Relations between big five traits and fundamental motives.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R; Weber, Dale A

    2004-12-01

    Relations were examined between configurations of Big Five Traits (Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism, Openness to Experience) and 16 fundamental motives (Social Contact, Curiosity, Honor, Power, Order, Idealism, Independence, Status, Vengeance, Romance, Family, Activity, Saving, Acceptance, Eating, Tranquility) in 138 university students (93 women, 45 men; M age= 20.3 yr., SD=4.5). Big Five traits were measured with the NEO-PI-R and motives were measured with the Reiss Profile of Fundamental Goals and Motivation Sensitivities. The traits were significantly related with all the motives (adjusted R2=.06 to .43) except Physical Activity. Four motives were related with only one trait and nine configurations of two or more traits were correlated with the remaining 11 motives. Total motive scores across all participants, an index of the strength of overall motivation, were positively correlated with Extraversion and Neuroticism and negatively with Agreeableness.

  10. Not all collectivisms are equal: opposing preferences for ideal affect between East Asians and Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Matthew B; Falk, Carl F; Heine, Steven J; Villa, Covadonga; Silberstein, Orly

    2012-12-01

    Previous research has revealed differences in how people value and pursue positive affect in individualistic and collectivistic cultural contexts. Whereas Euro-Americans place greater value on high activation positive affect (HAP; e.g., excitement, enthusiasm, elation) than do Asian Americans and Hong Kong Chinese, the opposite is true for low activation positive affect (LAP; e.g., calmness, serenity, tranquility). Although the form of collectivism present in East Asia dictates that individuals control and subdue their emotional expressions so as to maintain harmonious relationships, the opposite norm emerges in Mexico and other Latin American countries, in that the cultural script of simpatía promotes harmony through the open and vibrant expression of positive emotion. Across two studies, we found that Mexicans display a pattern of HAP/LAP preference different from those from East Asian collectivistic cultures, endorsing HAP over LAP. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Structures, biological activities, and industrial applications of the polysaccharides from Hericium erinaceus (Lion's Mane) mushroom: A review.

    PubMed

    He, Xirui; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jiacheng; Chang, Yu; Ning, Ning; Guo, Hao; Huang, Linhong; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhao, Zefeng

    2017-04-01

    Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Pers., also known as Yamabushitake, Houtou and Lion's Mane, is capable of fortifying the spleen and nourishing the stomach, tranquilizing the mind, and fighting cancer. Over the past decade, it has been demonstrated that H. erinaceus polysaccharides possess various promising bioactivities, including antitumor and immunomodulation, anti-gastric ulcer, neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, anti-oxidation and hepatoprotection, anti-hyperlipidemia, anti-hyperglycemia, anti-fatigue and anti-aging. The purpose of the present review is to provide systematically reorganized information on extraction and purification, structure characteristics, biological activities, and industrial applications of H. erinaceus polysaccharides to support their therapeutic potentials and sanitarian functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An Examination of Exercise-Induced Feeling States and Their Association With Future Participation in Physical Activity Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Jennifer; Guérin, Eva; Speranzini, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    Although exercise-induced feeling states may play a role in driving future behavior, their role in relation to older adults' participation in physical activity (PA) has seldom been considered. The objectives of this study were to describe changes in older adults' feeling states during exercise, and examine if levels of and changes in feeling states predicted their future participation in PA. Self-reported data on feeling states were collected from 82 older adults immediately before, during, and after a moderate-intensity exercise session, and on participation in PA 1 month later. Data were analyzed using latent growth modeling. Feelings of revitalization, positive engagement, and tranquility decreased during exercise, whereas feelings of physical exhaustion increased. Feelings of revitalization immediately before the exercise session predicted future participation in PA; changes in feeling states did not. This study does not provide empirical evidence that older adults' exercise-induced feeling states predict their future participation in PA.

  13. [Effect of caffeine and phenamin on caudate inhibition of aggressive reactions in cats].

    PubMed

    Belozertsev, Iu A

    1975-01-01

    In chronic experiments conducted on cats it was shown that caffeine (10--30 mg/kg) failed to change agressive reactions developing in stimulation of the meso- or diencephalic structures. Phenamine (1--3 mg/kg) facilitated the appearance of emotional manifestations and lowered the threshold of the agressive response. Subliminal stimulation of the caudate nucleus in control experiments caused motor tranquilization and depressed the agressive behaviour to a lesser degree when practised against the background of the caffeine action. At the same time, phenamine abolished the influence not only of the threshold, but also of the subliminal stimulation of the caudate nucleus on the spontaneous motor activity and the rage behaviour.

  14. Anxiolytic effects of repeated treatment with an essential oil from Lippia alba and (R)-(-)-carvone in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Hatano, V Y; Torricelli, A S; Giassi, A C C; Coslope, L A; Viana, M B

    2012-03-01

    Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown (Verbenaceae) is widely used in different regions of Central and South America as a tranquilizer. The plant's anxiolytic properties, however, merit investigation. The present study evaluated the effects of repeated daily (14 days) intraperitoneal (ip) treatment with an essential oil (EO) from a chemotype of L. alba (LA, chemotype II, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg; N = 6-8) and (R)-(-)-carvone (25 mg/kg; N = 8-12), the main constituent of this chemotype, on male Wistar rats (weighing 250 g at the beginning of the experiments) submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM). The ETM allows the measurement of two defensive responses: inhibitory avoidance and one-way escape. In terms of psychopathology, these responses have been related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Treatment with the EO impaired ETM avoidance latencies, without altering escape, in a way similar to the reference drug diazepam (P < 0.05) (avoidance 2: control = 84.6 ± 35.2; EO 12.5 mg/kg = 11.8 ± 3.8; EO 25 mg/kg = 14.6 ± 2.7; diazepam = 7 ± 2.1). (R)-(-)-carvone also significantly altered this same response (P < 0.05; avoidance 1: control = 91.9 ± 31.5; carvone = 11.6 ± 1.8; diazepam = 8.1 ± 3.3). These results were not due to motor changes since no significant effects were detected in an open field. These observations suggest that LA exerts anxiolytic-like effects on a specific subset of defensive behaviors that have been implicated in generalized anxiety disorder, and suggest that carvone is one of the constituents of LA responsible for its action as a tranquilizer.

  15. Anxiolytic effects of repeated treatment with an essential oil from Lippia alba and (R)-(-)-carvone in the elevated T-maze

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, V.Y.; Torricelli, A.S.; Giassi, A.C.C.; Coslope, L.A.; Viana, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown (Verbenaceae) is widely used in different regions of Central and South America as a tranquilizer. The plant's anxiolytic properties, however, merit investigation. The present study evaluated the effects of repeated daily (14 days) intraperitoneal (ip) treatment with an essential oil (EO) from a chemotype of L. alba (LA, chemotype II, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg; N = 6-8) and (R)-(-)-carvone (25 mg/kg; N = 8-12), the main constituent of this chemotype, on male Wistar rats (weighing 250 g at the beginning of the experiments) submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM). The ETM allows the measurement of two defensive responses: inhibitory avoidance and one-way escape. In terms of psychopathology, these responses have been related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Treatment with the EO impaired ETM avoidance latencies, without altering escape, in a way similar to the reference drug diazepam (P < 0.05) (avoidance 2: control = 84.6 ± 35.2; EO 12.5 mg/kg = 11.8 ± 3.8; EO 25 mg/kg = 14.6 ± 2.7; diazepam = 7 ± 2.1). (R)-(-)-carvone also significantly altered this same response (P < 0.05; avoidance 1: control = 91.9 ± 31.5; carvone = 11.6 ± 1.8; diazepam = 8.1 ± 3.3). These results were not due to motor changes since no significant effects were detected in an open field. These observations suggest that LA exerts anxiolytic-like effects on a specific subset of defensive behaviors that have been implicated in generalized anxiety disorder, and suggest that carvone is one of the constituents of LA responsible for its action as a tranquilizer. PMID:22358424

  16. Epidemiology of psychotropic medication use: comparison of sales, prescriptions and survey data in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Tómasson, Kristinn; Tómasson, Helgi; Zoëga, Tómas; Sigfússon, Eggert; Helgason, Tómas

    2007-01-01

    Public health issues, medical and socio-demographics, related to use of psychotropic medications and to increasing sale of antidepressants and hypnotics need to be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of antidepressants, tranquillizers and sedatives nationally and its connection with health and demographic factors, by comparing: 1) sales data and 2) prescription data for outpatients with 3) self-reported use of a random sample of the population aged 18-75 years. In 2001, the sales of psychopharmaca was 168.8 daily defined doses (DDD)/1000/day, thereof 46.6% were antidepressants mainly for outpatients; one-third of hypnotics and tranquillizers were used for inpatients; 134.2 DDD/1000/day were filled by outpatients. Almost 20% of the respondents in the survey had used one or more of these drugs for some time during the preceding 12 months. Treatment adherence for antidepressants was 56%, lower for women than men. The probability of psychotropic drug use for mental complaints is 52% when controlled for other covariates. Any observed gender difference in the community survey is related to differences in the covariates, e.g. women are more likely to seek a doctor than men. The age effect on self-reported use in the community survey is related to hypnotics. The use of psychotropic medicaments is primarily driven by mental health complaints, but not by gender or age, except the use of hypnotics, which increases with age. The difference between self-reported use and prescriptions filled may reflect compliance problems in psychiatric treatment.

  17. Effects of Alprazolam, Zolpidem and Zopiclone, and of chronic inflammation on peripheral experimental algesia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zdrîncă, Mihaela; Muţiu, Gabriela; Bogdan, Maria; Dobjanschi, Luciana; Antonescu, Angela; Moş, Ioana; Mureşan, Mariana; Zdrîncă, M; Antonescu, Andreea

    2011-01-01

    In the literature, there are some data which indicate that benzodiazepines and other chemical compounds with the same mechanism of action (Diazepam, Chlordiazepoxide, Lorazepam, Zopiclone, etc.) also have other effects. We investigated the effects of experimental chronic inflammation under the administration of some tranquilizers and hypnotics on peripheral algesia induced in rats by "writhing test". Chronic inflammation was induced by "cotton wool granuloma" technique. The "writhing test" consisted in intraperitoneal injection of an irritant agent (acetic acid 0.0025%, 0.4 mL). The animal reacts with a characteristic stretching behavior called writhing. A writhe is indicated by stretching of the abdomen with simultaneous stretching of at least one hind limb. Then, the animals were placed individually into glass beakers and 5 minutes were allowed to elapse. The rats were then observed for a period of 10 minutes and the number of writhes is recorded for each animal. Three drugs were administered by gastric probe: Alprazolam 1 mg/kg, Zolpidem 10 mg/kg and Zopiclone 10 mg/kg. Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine derivative used as a tranquilizer. Zolpidem is an imidazopyridine with marked sedative-hypnotic effect and it has the same mechanism of action like benzodiazepines. Zopiclone is a cyclopyrrolone with sedative-hypnotic effect used as hypnotic and acts like benzodiazepines. After that, the animals were sacrificed and the weight of cotton wool granuloma was determined. In the same time, the histopatological aspect of granulomatous inflammation was studied. It was found that experimental proliferative inflammation under the action of these drugs was accompanied by a peripheral analgesic activity in "writhing test". The mechanisms of these effects are not fully elucidated. Some explanations are: they act as agonists or antagonists on algesia and inflammation mediators and they have a stimulating effect on peripheral ω3-benzodiazepine receptors ("peripheral

  18. Motivations for prescription drug misuse among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Corliss, Heather L; Lankenau, Stephen E

    2015-08-01

    Prescription drug misuse (i.e. opioids, tranquilizers and stimulants) has become the fastest growing area of substance abuse among young adults. Limited studies focus on prescription drug misuse among young men who have sex with men (YMSM, aged 18-29 years). Furthermore, little is known about YMSM's motivations for misuse. The purpose of this study was to explore personal motivations for prescription drug misuse among YMSM, including the possible connection between misuse and sexual behaviors. As part of a larger mixed methods study of 191 YMSM recruited in Philadelphia during 2012-2013, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 25 of these participants to gather additional contextual information about their prescription drug misuse. We conducted thematic analysis of qualitative data. While our results corroborated previous literature on motives for misuse of prescription drugs, our data yielded some distinct motivations specific among YMSM. These motives included social/recreational motives, facilitating sex with other men (including motives such as use of opioids for less painful anal receptive sex), and psychological motives such as depression, stress management, coping with everyday hardships (opioids and tranquilizers) or feeling more energized (stimulants). Prescription drugs were commonly misused within the broader contexts of participants' polysubstance use, adding to the significance of this problem. Our findings offer insights into YMSM's motivations for prescription drug misuse, and point to the importance of recognizing and addressing them. While substance use is likely related to various psychosocial issues impacting YMSM, it also may lead to significant health consequences. Results support the need to include prescription drugs and polysubstance use in harm reduction messages and treatment approaches aimed at substance using YMSM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to test blood and urine samples for the toxicological investigation of drug-facilitated crimes.

    PubMed

    Deveaux, Marc; Chèze, Marjorie; Pépin, Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    The authors present an overview of the drug-facilitated crime (DFC) phenomenon, especially in France. Recently, there has been an increase in reports of incidents (mainly sexual assaults and robbery) as well as in scientific publications and congress presentations on the topic. From enquiries conducted nationally, a list of drugs reportedly associated with DFC was established and includes benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs (zolpidem, zopiclone), minor tranquilizers and neuroleptics, barbiturates, narcotics, hallucinogens, and anaesthetics. Some of these molecules are specific to France in DFC cases. A study using healthy volunteers who had taken benzodiazepines (lorazepam, bromazepam, flunitrazepam, clonazepam), zolpidem and zopiclone, showed that the only way to increase the duration of detection of these drugs is to use liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to test blood and urine samples. The very high sensitivity of this method appears to be an essential condition to document the cases, because the drugs tested were still detectable in urine at least 6 days after the ingestion of one therapeutic dose. Limits of detection were always lower than 0.5 ng/mL in urine. The actual list of molecules and metabolites the authors screened for in urine and blood by LC-MS/MS, in every DFC, is given in detail: 25 benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs, 11 minor tranquilizers and neuroleptics, 2 barbiturates, 12 narcotics, 4 hallucinogens, and 1 anaesthetic. However, the distinction between continual therapeutic use of a psychotropic drug or illegal narcotic and a single ingestion has to be documented by sequential analysis of hair, again with LC-MS/MS.

  20. Motivations for prescription drug misuse among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Corliss, Heather L.; Lankenau, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prescription drug misuse (i.e. opioids, tranquilizers and stimulants) has become the fastest growing area of substance abuse among young adults. Limited studies focus on prescription drug misuse among young men who have sex with men (YMSM, aged 18–29 years). Furthermore, little is known about YMSM’s motivations for misuse. The purpose of this study was to explore personal motivations for prescription drug misuse among YMSM, including the possible connection between misuse and sexual behaviors. Methods As part of a larger mixed methods study of 191 YMSM recruited in Philadelphia during 2012–2013, we conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 25 of these participants to gather additional contextual information about their prescription drug misuse. We conducted thematic analysis of qualitative data. Results While our results corroborated previous literature on motives for misuse of prescription drugs, our data yielded some distinct motivations specific among YMSM. These motives included social/recreational motives, facilitating sex with other men (including motives such as use of opioids for less painful anal receptive sex), and psychological motives such as depression, stress management, coping with everyday hardships (opioids and tranquilizers) or feeling more energized (stimulants). Prescription drugs were commonly misused within the broader contexts of participants' polysubstance use, adding to the significance of this problem. Conclusions Our findings offer insights into YMSM’s motivations for prescription drug misuse, and point to the importance of recognizing and addressing them. While substance use is likely related to various psychosocial issues impacting YMSM, it also may lead to significant health consequences. Results support the need to include prescription drugs and polysubstance use in harm reduction messages and treatment approaches aimed at substance using YMSM. PMID:25936445

  1. Associations between adverse childhood experiences, student-teacher relationships, and non-medical use of prescription medications among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Forster, Myriam; Gower, Amy L; Borowsky, Iris W; McMorris, Barbara J

    2017-05-01

    Few studies have investigated associations between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and nonmedical use of prescription medication (NMUPM) in population-based samples of adolescents, and even fewer have examined whether promotive factors might buffer these effects. The present study assesses the direct effects of ACE and positive student-teacher relationships on NUMPD and whether positive student-teacher relationships moderate this association. Data were from the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey (MSS), an in-school survey administered every three years to students throughout Minnesota. The analytic sample (n=104,332) was comprised of 8th, 9th, and 11th graders. Approximately 3% of students acknowledged past year NMUPM, the majority of whom reported at least one ACE. The most frequently used prescription drug was Ritalin/ADHD medications (1.71%) followed by opiate-based painkillers (1.67%), tranquilizers (0.92%), and stimulants (0.75%). Students who reported any use tended to use more than one medication. For every additional ACE, there was a 56%, 51%, 47%, and 52% increase in the odds of past year stimulant use, ADHD medication, pain reliever, and tranquilizer use, respectively. The estimated rate of the number of prescription drugs used increased by 62% for every additional ACE. Positive student- teacher relationships buffered the association between ACE and NMUPD, especially at higher levels of ACEs. Our findings have important implications for prevention work. Training educators to recognize trauma symptomology and cultivating strong student-teacher relationships are important considerations for future school-based substance use prevention initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Do Young Heroin Users in Madrid, Barcelona and Seville have Sufficient Knowledge of the Risk Factors for Unintentional Opioid Overdose?

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Gregorio; Brugal, M. Teresa; de la Fuente, Luis; Ballesta, Rosario; Bravo, María J.; Silva, Teresa C.; Rodríguez-Martos, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    To identify the self-perceived reasons for unintentional opioid overdose of young heroin users in three Spanish cities and their agreement with objective risk factors for overdose. Computer-Assisted Personal Interviews (CAPI) were held with 991 street-recruited current heroin users aged 18–30. The general reasons for overdose and the reasons for the last overdose suffered were explored with open-ended (OEQs) and pre-coded questions (PCQs). Limited knowledge of overdose risk factors was defined as mention of fewer than two objective risk factors for unintentional overdose in the OEQ. Univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression methods were used. 77.8% (Seville), 64.9% (Madrid) and 57.2% (Barcelona) of participants have limited knowledge of overdose risk factors. Residence in Seville and not having attended courses or meetings on overdoses were significantly associated with limited knowledge, after adjusting for other factors. The most frequently identified general reasons in OEQ or PCQ were using heroin in large amounts (66.8%), together with tranquilizers (62.0%), adulterated (60.7%), or purer than usual (57.6%). Most reasons were selected more frequently in PCQ than in OEQ, especially rapid injection of the entire dose and using heroin shortly after using tranquilizers or alcohol, by injection, or after a period of abstinence. The results were similar for overdoses suffered by participants. Most young heroin users do not have sufficient knowledge of overdose risk factors, especially the use of heroin by injection, after a period of abstinence, or together with alcohol or methadone. Specific informational or educational programs adapted to the local context are critically needed. PMID:16739049

  3. Preclinical evidence of the anxiolytic and sedative-like activities of Tagetes erecta L. reinforces its ethnobotanical approach.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ortega, Gimena; Angeles-López, Guadalupe Esther; Argueta-Villamar, Arturo; González-Trujano, María Eva

    2017-09-01

    Morelos State is one of the regions of Mexico where several plant species are used in traditional medicine. Species from Tagetes genus (Asteraceae) are reported as useful in infusion to treat stomachache and intestinal diseases, but also as tranquilizers. In this study, medicinal uses of T. erecta including its depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS) were explored by interviewing healers and merchants of local markets of Morelos State, and by investigation of the phytochemical and pharmacological tranquilizing properties. Specific anxiolytic and/or sedative-like responses of different doses of T. erecta (10, 30 and 100 or 300mg/kg, i.p.) were investigated using experimental models in mice such as: open-field, exploration cylinder, hole-board, and the barbituric-induced hypnosis potentiation. The possible anxiolytic mechanism of action was assessed in the presence of WAY100635 (0.32mg/kg, i.p.) and flumazenil (10mg/kg, i.p.), antagonists of 5-HT 1A and GABA/BDZs receptors, respectively. Individual flavonoids reported in this species were also evaluated in these experimental models. As a result of this study, healers and merchants from ten local regions of Morelos State recommended T. erecta flowers as an infusion or as a tincture for several culture-bound syndromes associated with CNS, among others. Anxiolytic and sedative-like activities of the T. erecta aqueous and organic polar extracts were corroborated in these models associated to a participation of rutin, kaempferol, quercetin, kaempferitrin, and β-sitosterol constituents; where 5-HT 1A , but not BDZs, receptors were involved as anxiolytic mechanism of action. These data support the anxiolytic and sedative-like properties of T. erecta in traditional medicine by involving mainly serotonergic neurotransmission because of the presence in part of flavonoids and the terpenoid β-sitosterol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of first use of inhalants within sequencing pattern of first use of drugs among Brazilian university students

    PubMed Central

    Castaldelli-Maia, João Maurício; Martins, Silvia S.; de Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Nicastri, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of first use of inhalants within a first drug sequencing pattern. In a representative sample of university students from 27 Brazilian capitals (n=12,711), we analyzed the patterns of transition from/to first use of inhalants to/from the first use of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, ecstasy, amphetamines, prescription opioids, and tranquilizers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze data. Drugs that were not specified as the pair of drugs tested in each model were included as time-varying covariates in all models. In this sample, first use of inhalants was preceded only by the first use of alcohol and tobacco. However, first use of inhalants preceded first use of cannabis, amphetamines, cocaine, and tranquilizers. First use of inhalants preceded the first use of prescription opioids, and vice versa. This study highlights the need to intervene early with youths who are at risk of or just beginning to use inhalants, since this class of drugs seems to be the first illegal drug in Brazil to be experimented by respondents in our sample. There is also a call for attention to individuals who have already first used inhalants because of their higher chance to experiment with other drugs such as cannabis, cocaine, and prescription drugs. All these findings show an in-transition culture of drug use, which should be tracked through the time, since some classical models (i.e., gateway model) might be outdated and might also not fit within different settings. PMID:25150538

  5. EEG topography and tomography (LORETA) in the classification and evaluation of the pharmacodynamics of psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Saletu, Bernd; Anderer, Peter; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M

    2006-04-01

    By multi-lead computer-assisted quantitative analyses of human scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (QEEG) in combination with certain statistical procedures (quantitative pharmaco-EEG) and mapping techniques (pharmaco-EEG mapping or topography), it is possible to classify psychotropic substances and objectively evaluate their bioavailability at the target organ, the human brain. Specifically, one may determine at an early stage of drug development whether a drug is effective on the central nervous system (CNS) compared with placebo, what its clinical efficacy will be like, at which dosage it acts, when it acts and the equipotent dosages of different galenic formulations. Pharmaco-EEG maps of neuroleptics, antidepressants, tranquilizers, hypnotics, psychostimulants and nootropics/cognition-enhancing drugs will be described. Methodological problems, as well as the relationships between acute and chronic drug effects, alterations in normal subjects and patients, CNS effects and therapeutic efficacy will be discussed. Imaging of drug effects on the regional brain electrical activity of healthy subjects by means of EEG tomography such as low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) has been used for identifying brain areas predominantly involved in psychopharmacological action. This will be shown for the representative drugs of the four main psychopharmacological classes, such as 3 mg haloperidol for neuroleptics, 20 mg citalopram for antidepressants, 2 mg lorazepam for tranquilizers and 20 mg methylphenidate for psychostimulants. LORETA demonstrates that these psychopharmacological classes affect brain structures differently. By considering these differences between psychotropic drugs and placebo in normal subjects, as well as between mental disorder patients and normal controls, it may be possible to choose the optimum drug for a specific patient according to a key-lock principle, since the drug should normalize the deviant brain function. Thus, pharmaco

  6. Double trouble: Exploring the association between waterpipe tobacco smoking and the nonmedical use of psychoactive prescription drugs among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zahlan, Leona; Ghandour, Lilian; Yassin, Nasser; Afifi, Rima; Martins, Silvia S

    2014-12-01

    In youth, both waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) and nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) are globally growing concerns. This study assesses for the first time the lifetime and past-year associations between WTS and four classes of psychoactive prescription drugs. Cross-sectional data (2011) on 986 high school students attending public and private high schools in Beirut (Lebanon) was analyzed. Schools were selected using proportionate random cluster sampling from a comprehensive list of schools provided by the Ministry of Education. Almost half (46%) had tried WTS compared to 25% who had ever tried cigarettes. Lifetime prevalence estimates of NMUPD were: pain relievers (8.2%), sedatives/tranquilizers (5.6%), stimulants (3.5%), antidepressants (2.5%), and sleeping pills (2.3%). WTS was associated with increased odds of sedatives/tranquilizer use (OR = 3.22, 95% CI: 1.25, 8.25), pain reliever use (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 2.02, 9.17), and sleeping medication use (OR = 8.31, 95% CI: 2.37, 29.20), controlling for sex, age, school type, and other substance use. For cigarettes, the associations were consistently either weaker or non-existent, except with stimulant use (OR = 5.29, 95% CI: 1.55, 18.05). While public health professionals have watched with caution the global prevalence of youth cigarette use-worldwide, an insidious alternative form of tobacco use has grown. Further research is needed to understand the unique risk factors and motives associated with WTS and how these relate to NMUPD in order to inform the development of effective intervention programs and policies that support youth positive health decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [A Case of Dengue Fever and Subsequent Long-lasting Depression Accompanied by Alopecia in a Japanese Traveler Returning from Bali, Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Hitani, Akihiro; Yamaya, Waka; To, Masako; Kano, Ichino; Honda-Hosono, Natsue; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Haruki, Kosuke

    2015-03-01

    Recovery from dengue fever is generally rapid and uneventful. However, recuperation is often prolonged and may be accompanied by noticeable depression. We present herein on a traveler to Indonesia who developed long-lasting depression after the classic symptoms of dengue fever such as fever, arthralgia, and macropapular rash had resolved. A previously healthy 42-year old japanese woman presented to the Travel Clinic of Seirei Yokohama Hospital with complaints of 4 days of fever, joint aches, bone pain, and a macropapular rash on her torso. She had returned from Bali 5 days previously. During her 1-week stay, one day was spent in rural, mountainous areas where she was exposed to several mosquito bites. The 1st serum sample collected 4 days after the disease onset gave positive result in the rapid dengue IgM antibody test and the rapid dengue NS1 antigen immunechromatographic test. The DENV-1 genome was detected with RT-PCR. Her 13-year old son, who had accompanied her, was also diagnosed as having dengue fever and he recovered without event. The Above-mentioned symptoms resolved within one week. However, the patient suffered from prolonged depression. She also noticed loss of hair 3 months after the disease onset Administration of a Serotonin-Noradrenalin Reuptake Inhibitor and a minor tranquillizer required to allow her requied to lead a normal life. Although she gradually felt better, it took approximately 2 years until she had recovered completely without taking any antidepressant and minor tranquillizer. It is a well-known fact in endemic countries that dengue fever could have an significant impact on the patients' mental well-being. However, it appears that physicians in non-endemic countries are not fully aware of the prolonged depression, which can occur subsequent to the acute illness. Follow-up consultations of returing travelers who have recoverd from dengu fever should be arranged to monitor their mental and emotional states closely.

  8. The high prevalence of substance use disorders among recent MDMA users compared with other drug users: implications for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Parrott, Andy C.; Ringwalt, Christopher L.; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Mannelli, Paolo; Blazer, Dan G.

    2009-01-01

    Aim In light of the resurgence in MDMA use and its association with polysubstance use, we investigated the 12-month prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among adult MDMA users to determine whether they are at risk of other drug-related problems that would call for targeted interventions. Methods Data were drawn from the 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Past-year adult drug users were grouped into three mutually exclusive categories: 1) recent MDMA users, who had used the drug within the past year; 2) former MDMA users, who had a history of using this drug but had not done so within the past year; and 3) other drug users, who had never used MDMA. Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate the association between respondents’ SUDs and MDMA use while adjusting for their socioeconomic status, mental health, age of first use, and history of polydrug use. Results Approximately 14% of adults reported drug use in the past year, and 24% of those past-year drug users reported a history of MDMA use. Recent MDMA users exhibited the highest prevalence of disorders related to alcohol (41%), marijuana (30%), cocaine (10%), pain reliever/opioid (8%), and tranquilizer (3%) use. Adjusted logistic regression analyses revealed that, relative to other drug users, those who had recently used MDMA were twice as likely to meet criteria for marijuana and pain reliever/opioid use disorders. They were also about twice as likely as former MDMA users to meet criteria for marijuana, cocaine, and tranquilizer use disorders. Conclusions Seven out of ten recent MDMA users report experiencing an SUD in the past year. Adults who have recently used MDMA should be screened for possible SUDs to ensure early detection and treatment. PMID:19361931

  9. PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON THE BEHAVIOURAL EFFECTS OF THE METHANOL EXTRACT OF LEONOTIS NEPETIFOLIA LINN STEM IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Ayanwuyi, Lydia O.; Kwanashie, Helen O.; Hussaini, Isa M.; Yaro, Abdullahi H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Leonotis nepetifolia Linn (Lamiaceae) is used in traditional medicine for its calming (tranquilizing) effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is any scientific justification for this use. To achieve this purpose, we investigated the behavioural effects of the methanol extract of Leonotis nepetifolia stem (37.5, 75 and 150 mg/kg) in mice. Methods: Acute toxicity studies were carried out on the methanol stem extract of Leonotis nepetifolia to determine the LD50. The behavioural tests employed were diazepam-induced sleep onset and duration, hole board assay for exploratory activity, mouse beam walk assay for motor coordination, and the staircase test for the detection of anxiolytic compounds. Preliminary phytochemical screening was also carried out on the extract. Results: The intraperitoneal LD50 value was found to be 3.8 g/kg. The results showed that the extract significantly prolonged the duration of diazepam-induced sleep at the highest dose (150 mg/kg). There was no observable effect on exploratory activity and motor coordination at the doses tested (37.5, 75 and 150 mg/kg). The extract, however, at 150 mg/kg elicited a significant decrease in the number of rearings in the staircase test, an effect also observed in the group of mice injected with an anxiolytic dose of diazepam. The preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, saponins, glycosides and triterpenoids. Conclusion: The results obtained suggest that the crude methanol extract of Leonotis nepetifolia stem possesses some biologically active constituents with potential anxiolytic activity and thus may justify its traditional use as a tranquilizer. PMID:28852715

  10. Sources of Prescription Medication Misuse Among Young Adults in the United States: The Role of Educational Status.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Teter, Christian J; Boyd, Carol J; Wilens, Timothy E; Schepis, Ty S

    This study examined prescription drug misuse (PDM), sources of PDM, and substance use disorder (SUD) symptoms as a function of educational status among US young adults based on a large nationally representative sample. Data from the 2009-2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health came from a sample of 106,845 young adults aged 18-25 years. Respondents were categorized by educational status and PDM, sources of PDM, other substance use, and SUD symptoms, with analyses performed separately for prescription opioids, stimulants, and sedatives/tranquilizers. Prescription opioid (past-year: 11.9%) and sedative/tranquilizer (past-year: 5.8%) misuse were most prevalent among young adults not attending college, especially among high school dropouts. In contrast, full-time college students and college graduates had the highest rates of prescription stimulant misuse (past-year: 4.3% and 3.9%, respectively). Obtaining prescription medications from friends/relatives for free was the most common source of PDM, especially among college students/graduates. Prescription drug misusers who obtained medications from theft/fake prescriptions, purchases, or multiple sources were more likely to report past-year SUDs and had the most severe overall risk profile of concurrent substance use and SUD. More than 70% of past-month prescription drug misusers who reported multiple sources for PDM had at least 1 past-year SUD. Sources of PDM vary by educational status among US young adults, and the college environment is associated with sharing prescription medications. Clinicians can help assess an individual's risk for SUD by determining whether the individual engaged in PDM and the source of prescription medication the individual is misusing. © Copyright 2018 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. KSC-2010-1077

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour is reflected in the icy water standing inside the perimeter fence of Launch Pad 39A. The ambient air temperature during Endeavour's 3.4-mile trip from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pad ranged from 30 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. First motion for the move, known as rollout, was at 4:13 a.m. EST Jan. 6. Endeavour was secure or "hard down" on the pad at 10:37 a.m. Rollout is a significant milestone in launch processing activities. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency. Endeavour's STS-130 launch is targeted for 4:39 a.m. EST Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  13. KSC-2010-1078

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-01-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour arrives at Launch Pad 39A during uncustomary conditions -- ice floating in the standing water inside the perimeter fence. The ambient air temperature during Endeavour's 3.4-mile trip from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the pad ranged from 30 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit. First motion for the move, known as rollout, was at 4:13 a.m. EST Jan. 6. Endeavour was secure or "hard down" on the pad at 10:37 a.m. Rollout is a significant milestone in launch processing activities. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission is the International Space Station's Node 3, Tranquility, a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency. Endeavour's STS-130 launch is targeted for 4:39 a.m. EST Feb. 7. For information on the STS-130 mission and crew, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  14. Tobacco use among 10th grade students in Istanbul and related variables.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge; Bozkurt, Muge

    2014-04-01

    Aim of this study was to determine prevalence of cigarette smoking and hookah use among 10th grade students in Istanbul, Turkey, and to compare sociodemographic, psychological and behavioral variables according to frequency of tobacco use. Cross-sectional online self-report survey conducted in 45 schools from the 15 districts in Istanbul/Turkey. The questionnaire included sections about demographic data, family characteristics, school life, psychological symptoms and use of substances including tobacco, hookah, alcohol, marijuana, volatiles, heroin, cocaine, non-prescribed legal tranquillizers (benzodiazepines, alprazolam etc.) and illegal tranquillizers (flunitrazepam). The analyses were conducted based on the 4957 subjects. Trial at least once in life is observed as 45.4% for hookah use and as 24.4% for cigarette use. Risk of hookah and cigarette use was significantly higher in male students than in female students. Frequency of tobacco use is related with various sociodemographic, psychological and behavioral variables. Our data also shows that using tobacco and alcohol increases the risk of all the other substances use and these effects are interrelated. The data suggest that there is a link between tobacco use and substance use, psychological, behavioral and social factors. There is also a strong association between tobacco use and suicidal behavior as well as self-mutilative, impulsive, hyperactive, delinquent, aggressive and behavioral problems. The illumination of these relationships may be relevant in prevention and management of tobacco use as well as important problems, such as substance use, impulsivity, hyperactivity, delinquent, aggressive self-mutilative and suicidal behavior among 10th grade students in Istanbul. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-Term Functional Side-Effects of Stimulants and Sedatives in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Matsagas, Kennedy; Lim, David B.; Horwitz, Marc; Rizza, Cristina L.; Mueller, Laurence D.; Villeponteau, Bryant; Rose, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Small invertebrate animals, such as nematodes and fruit flies, are increasingly being used to test candidate drugs both for specific therapeutic purposes and for long-term health effects. Some of the protocols used in these experiments feature such experimental design features as lifelong virginity and very low densities. By contrast, the ability of both fruit flies and nematodes to resist stress is frequently correlated with their longevity and other functional measures, suggesting that low-stress assays are not necessarily the only useful protocol for testing the long-term effects of drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report an alternative protocol for fruit fly drug-testing that maximizes reproductive opportunities and other types of interaction, with moderately high population densities. We validate this protocol using two types of experimental tests: 1. We show that this protocol detects previously well-established genetic differences between outbred fruit fly populations. 2. We show that this protocol is able to distinguish among the long-term effects of similar types of drugs within two broad categories, stimulants and tranquilizers. Conclusions Large-scale fly drug testing can be conducted using mixed-sex high-density cage assays. We find that the commonly-used stimulants caffeine and theobromine differ dramatically in their chronic functional effects, theobromine being more benign. Likewise, we find that two generic pharmaceutical tranquilizers, lithium carbonate and valproic acid, differ dramatically in their chronic effects, lithium being more benign. However, these findings do not necessarily apply to human subjects, and we thus do not recommend the use of any one substance over any other. PMID:19668379

  16. Cycles of insanity and creativity within contemplative neural systems.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Stephen L

    2016-09-01

    Random connection weight disturbances within an assembly of artificial neural networks (ANN) drive a progression of activation patterns that are tantamount to the memories and ideas nucleating within the brain's cortex. The numerical evaluation of these pattern-based notions by another, more placid system of ANNs governs the magnitude of weight disturbances administered to the former assembly, that perturbative intensity in turn controlling the novelty of the resulting ideational stream as well as the retention of newly formed concepts. In search of solution patterns to posed problems, such collaborating neural systems autonomously cycle between two extremes in mean synaptic perturbation level. The higher limit, characterized by chaos and inattentiveness to exogenous input patterns, is the regime in which ideas first form and incubate. The lower bound, marked by relative synaptic tranquility, is favorable to the reactivation and reinforcement of concepts first seeded during heightened perturbation. When considering this synthetic neural architecture as a cognitive model, the proposed source of such synaptic fluctuations is volume neurotransmitter release within cortex where both ideational and critic nets are commingled. As a result of their overlap, not only are the generative cortical networks suffused with neurotransmitters, but also those functioning in a critic role, leading to altered 'opinions' about the perturbation-driven stream of consciousness that then govern the injection of neurotransmitters into cortex. The likely effect of such chemical feedback is that the brain constantly cycles between states of idea generating chaos and perception stabilizing tranquility in much the same way that creative artificial neural systems do. Postulating that ideas are potentially useful or interesting false memories born within such turmoil, creativity appears to take place through a cyclic process consisting of alternating phases of (1) cognitive incapacitation

  17. Therapeutic Body Wraps in Swiss public adult acute inpatient wards. A retrospective descriptive cohort study.

    PubMed

    Opsommer, E; Dubois, J; Bangerter, G; Panchaud, R; Martin, D; Skuza, K

    2016-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Various expert opinions reported relational benefits and tranquilizing effects of therapeutic body wraps (TBW) in adults experiencing high anxiety in the context of psychosis. Yet, this tranquilizing effect was never investigated in larger samples and in the context of modern psychopharmacology. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to establish descriptive statistics of this mind-body therapy in French-speaking Switzerland where TBWs are routinely used in two public psychiatric hospitals. It brings knowledge on patients nowadays treated with TBW. Moreover, it opens a new area of investigation on the potential of this nursing technique, which may contribute to reduce anxiolytic medication in severely ill patients. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: This study sheds light on a clinical practice in mental health nursing and upon nurses' specific contribution to psychiatric clinic. It investigates a potential for TBWs to reduce the use of anxiolytic medications by patients who agreed to have TBW as part of their treatment. It may help to inform the mental health nursing practice. Introduction Many patients suffering from serious mental illness experience severe anxiety and those with psychosis often report the feeling of their bodies falling apart. While it is believed that these patients benefit from therapeutic body wraps (TBWs), the use of this adjunct therapy has rarely been studied in adult patients. Aims The aim of this study was to obtain descriptive statistics on the clinical, social-demographic and institutional reality of TBW therapy in Swiss public adult inpatient wards. Methods Retrospective data related to a cohort of 172 adult inpatients were retrieved from records of two public hospitals. Correlations between TBW and the prescriptions of lorazepam were explored. Results TBWs were primarily used for patients diagnosed with either schizophrenia, schizotypal, delusional and other non

  18. Effects of the aqueous extract of Pimpinella anisum L. seeds on exploratory activity and emotional behavior in rats using the open field and elevated plus maze tests.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Rodrigues, Domingos Sávio; Rodrigues, Daniela; Pontes, Victoria Bottino

    2015-06-20

    Pimpinella anisum L. is considered one of the first plants used for medicinal purposes. Pharmacological actions of the plant on the central nervous system have been proven but previous analyses have focused on anticonvulsant and neuroprotective actions. In traditional medicine worldwide, the use of Pimpinella is commonly recommended as a tranquilizer, although no scientific information supporting this use is available. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the central actions of the plant to observe behavioral responses, with an emphasis on the emotional component. To investigate the effects of the aqueous extract of Pimpinella seeds on exploratory activity and emotional behavior in rats using the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Seeds of Pimpinella were extracted with distilled water, concentrated and freeze-dried yielding the aqueous extract(AE). Rats were divided into four groups: control(water 5 mL/kg, p.o.) and AE 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg, p.o. Individual observations were performed in an open field and the parameters locomotor activity, rearing, grooming and defecation were recorded. In elevated plus maze test, rats were divided into four groups: control(water 5 mL/kg, p.o.) and AE 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 g/kg, p.o. The parameters arm entries, total time spent in open and closed arms; and total number of arrivals at the end of an open or closed arm were recorded for each rat. Among the parameters assessed with the open field test, only rearing was reduced in the AE 0.5 g/kg group. When AE 1.0 g/kg was administered, only the initiation of exploratory activity was delayed, without impairing the animals' general activity. The highest dose of AE (2.0 g/kg) induced a reduction in the animals' habituation during the open field test within the same session, as evidenced by the maintenance of high levels of peripheral locomotion and rearing throughout the test. On the elevated plus maze test, no alterations were observed in the responses of the animals relative to

  19. Psychotropic Drug Use in São Paulo, Brazil – An Epidemiological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Maria Ines; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter; Peluffo, Marcela Poctich; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Feijo, Marcelo M.; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Coutinho, Evandro S. F.; Mari, Jair de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of one month psychotropic drug use in São Paulo, Brazil, and to assess the gap treatment between the presence of mental disorders and psychotropic drug users. Method A probabilistic sample of non-institutionalized individuals from the general population of São Paulo (n = 2336; turnout: 84.5%) who were 15 years or older were interviewed by a trained research staff, applying the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 (CIDI WHO) (depression, anxiety-phobia, OCD\\PTSD, alcoholism sections), and an inventory investigating psychotropic drug use during the 12-month and one-month periods immediately preceding the interview. Logistic models were fitted to investigate associations between psychotropic drug use as well as socio-demographic and clinical variables. Results The one month prevalence of psychotropic drug use in São Paulo was 5.89%, the most commonly used drugs were antidepressants (3.15%) and tranquilizers (2.67%). A higher consumption of psychotropic drugs (overall, antidepressants and tranquilizers) was observed among women (OR:2.42), older individuals (OR:1.04), individuals with higher levels of formal education (1.06), and individuals with a family (OR:2.29) or personal history of mental illness (OR:3.27). The main psychotropic drug prescribers were psychiatrists (41%), followed by general practitioners (30%); 60% of psychotropic drugs were obtained through a government-run dispensing program. Most individuals who obtained a positive diagnosis on the CIDI 2.1 during the previous month were not using psychotropic medication (85%). Among individuals with a diagnosis of moderate to severe depression, 67.5% were not on any pharmacological treatment. Conclusion There is a change in the type of psychotropic more often used in São Paulo, from benzodiazepines to antidepressants, this event is observed in different cultures. The prevalence of use is similar to other developing countries. Most of the patients presenting

  20. Psychotropic Drug Use in São Paulo, Brazil--An Epidemiological Survey.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Maria Ines; Andreoli, Sergio Baxter; Peluffo, Marcela Poctich; Ribeiro, Wagner Silva; Feijo, Marcelo M; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Coutinho, Evandro S F; Mari, Jair de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of one month psychotropic drug use in São Paulo, Brazil, and to assess the gap treatment between the presence of mental disorders and psychotropic drug users. A probabilistic sample of non-institutionalized individuals from the general population of São Paulo (n = 2336; turnout: 84.5%) who were 15 years or older were interviewed by a trained research staff, applying the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1 (CIDI WHO) (depression, anxiety-phobia, OCD\\PTSD, alcoholism sections), and an inventory investigating psychotropic drug use during the 12-month and one-month periods immediately preceding the interview. Logistic models were fitted to investigate associations between psychotropic drug use as well as socio-demographic and clinical variables. The one month prevalence of psychotropic drug use in São Paulo was 5.89%, the most commonly used drugs were antidepressants (3.15%) and tranquilizers (2.67%). A higher consumption of psychotropic drugs (overall, antidepressants and tranquilizers) was observed among women (OR:2.42), older individuals (OR:1.04), individuals with higher levels of formal education (1.06), and individuals with a family (OR:2.29) or personal history of mental illness (OR:3.27). The main psychotropic drug prescribers were psychiatrists (41%), followed by general practitioners (30%); 60% of psychotropic drugs were obtained through a government-run dispensing program. Most individuals who obtained a positive diagnosis on the CIDI 2.1 during the previous month were not using psychotropic medication (85%). Among individuals with a diagnosis of moderate to severe depression, 67.5% were not on any pharmacological treatment. There is a change in the type of psychotropic more often used in São Paulo, from benzodiazepines to antidepressants, this event is observed in different cultures. The prevalence of use is similar to other developing countries. Most of the patients presenting a psychiatric illness in the month

  1. Value priorities and their relations with quality of life in the Baby Boomer generation of Lithuanian nurses: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Jakusovaite, Irayda

    2007-11-08

    The understanding of the values of nurses is especially important, since nurses constitute 80% of workforce in the healthcare system in Lithuania. In addition to that, nursing is one of the major constituents of healthcare. The aim of this study was to determine what values predominate in the cohort of Baby Boomer nurses, and to evaluate the relation of these values with quality of life using M. Rokeach's terminal and instrumental values scale. M.Rokeach distinguished terminal values (such as world peace, wisdom, and happiness), which are preferred end-states of existence, and instrumental values (such as responsibility and cooperation), which are preferred modes of conduct. We performed a representative anonymous questionnaire-based inquiry of nurses working in regional hospitals of Lithuania. The nurses who participated in the study were distributed into four work cohorts: the Veterans, the Baby Boomers, the Generation Xers, and the Generation Nexters. The majority of the nurses belonged to the Baby Boomers and the Generation Xers cohorts. Since in Lithuania, like in the whole Europe, the representatives of the Baby Boomers generation are predominating among working people, we selected this cohort (N = 387) for the analysis. The survey data was processed using the SPSS statistical software package The main values in life were family security, tranquility, and a sense of accomplishment. However, such values as true friendship, equality, and pleasurable and leisured life were seen as rather insignificant. The most important instrumental values were honesty, skillfulness, and responsibility. Our study showed a statistically significant (albeit weak) correlation between the QOL and terminal values such as the sense of accomplishment, tranquility, equality, and pleasure, as well as the instrumental value - obedience. We detected a statistically significant relationship between good QOL and satisfaction with oneself, relationships with the surrounding people, and

  2. Value priorities and their relations with quality of life in the Baby Boomer generation of Lithuanian nurses: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Jakusovaite, Irayda

    2007-01-01

    Background The understanding of the values of nurses is especially important, since nurses constitute 80% of workforce in the healthcare system in Lithuania. In addition to that, nursing is one of the major constituents of healthcare. The aim of this study was to determine what values predominate in the cohort of Baby Boomer nurses, and to evaluate the relation of these values with quality of life using M. Rokeach's terminal and instrumental values scale. M.Rokeach distinguished terminal values (such as world peace, wisdom, and happiness), which are preferred end-states of existence, and instrumental values (such as responsibility and cooperation), which are preferred modes of conduct. Methods We performed a representative anonymous questionnaire-based inquiry of nurses working in regional hospitals of Lithuania. The nurses who participated in the study were distributed into four work cohorts: the Veterans, the Baby Boomers, the Generation Xers, and the Generation Nexters. The majority of the nurses belonged to the Baby Boomers and the Generation Xers cohorts. Since in Lithuania, like in the whole Europe, the representatives of the Baby Boomers generation are predominating among working people, we selected this cohort (N = 387) for the analysis. The survey data was processed using the SPSS statistical software package Results The main values in life were family security, tranquility, and a sense of accomplishment. However, such values as true friendship, equality, and pleasurable and leisured life were seen as rather insignificant. The most important instrumental values were honesty, skillfulness, and responsibility. Our study showed a statistically significant (albeit weak) correlation between the QOL and terminal values such as the sense of accomplishment, tranquility, equality, and pleasure, as well as the instrumental value – obedience. We detected a statistically significant relationship between good QOL and satisfaction with oneself, relationships with the

  3. [Optimal acupoint combination of transcutaneous electrical stimulation in artificial abortion operation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Xie, Wenxia; Wang, Zedong; Zeng, Linchai; Liu, Pei; Li, Chunli

    2017-02-12

    To observe the clinical effects on analgesia, tranquilization and prevention of abortion syndrome of artificial abortion operation treated with transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) with different acupoint combination and explore the optimal acupoint combination of TEAS in artificial abortion operation. Two hundred patients intended to artificial operation were randomized into No.1 group[Sanyinjiao (SP 6) + Zusanli (ST 36)], No.2 group[Sanyinjiao (SP 6) + Diji (SP 8)], No.3 group[Sanyinjiao (SP 6) + Taichong (LR 3)], No.4 group (cervical blockage anesthesia with lidocaine) and No.5 group (blank group, without any analgesia measure applied), 40 cases in each one. In the No.1, No.2 and No.3 groups, Sanyinjiao (SP 6) was the main acupoint, combined with Zusanli (ST 36), Dijin (SP 8) and Taichong (LR 3) respectively. TEAS was given 30 min before the operation till the end of operation. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and oxygen saturation during operation, as well as bleeding amount were observed in the five groups. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score was observed during and 30 min after operation, and Ramsay score was observed during operation. Cervical relaxation degree and the incidence of artificial abortion syndrome were recorded. For VAS score during and 30 min after operation and Ramsay score during operation, the differences were significant statistically in the No. 1, No.2, No.3 and No.4 groups as compared with the No.5 group ( P <0.01, P <0.05). The results in the No.2 group were better than those in the No.1, No.3 and No.4 groups (all P <0.05). For cervical relaxationdegree, the result in the No.2 group was better than that in each of the rest groups ( P <0.01, P <0.05). For artificial abortion syndrome, the incidences in the No.2 and No.3 groups were lower than those in the No.4 and No.5 groups (all P <0.05). For bleeding amount and hemodynamic changes, the differences were not significant statistically among the five groups (all P >0

  4. Emotion, cognitive load and learning outcomes during simulation training.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene; Teteris, Elise; Baxter, Heather; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Simulation training has emerged as an effective way to complement clinical training of medical students. Yet outcomes from simulation training must be considered suboptimal when 25-30% of students fail to recognise a cardiac murmur on which they were trained 1 hour previously. There are several possible explanations for failure to improve following simulation training, which include the impact of heightened emotions on learning and cognitive overload caused by interactivity with high-fidelity simulators. This study was conducted to assess emotion during simulation training and to explore the relationships between emotion and cognitive load, and diagnostic performance. We trained 84 Year 1 medical students on a scenario of chest pain caused by symptomatic aortic stenosis. After training, students were asked to rate their emotional state and cognitive load. We then provided training on a dyspnoea scenario before asking participants to diagnose the murmur in which they had been trained (aortic stenosis) and a novel murmur (mitral regurgitation). We used factor analysis to identify the principal components of emotion, and then studied the associations between these components of emotion and cognitive load and diagnostic performance. We identified two principal components of emotion, which we felt represented invigoration and tranquillity. Both of these were associated with cognitive load with adjusted regression coefficients of 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-0.99; p = 0.001) and - 0.44 (95% CI - 0.77 to - 0.10; p = 0.009), respectively. We found a significant negative association between cognitive load and the odds of subsequently identifying the trained murmur (odds ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.67; p = 0.004). We found that increased invigoration and reduced tranquillity during simulation training were associated with increased cognitive load, and that the likelihood of correctly identifying a trained murmur declined with increasing cognitive load. Further

  5. Case report: a case of intractable Meniere's disease treated with autogenic training.

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-01-25

    Psychological stress plays an important role in the onset and course of Meniere's disease. Surgical therapy and intratympanic gentamicin treatment are options for cases that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. Psychotherapy, however, including autogenic training (AT), which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of AT in a subject suffering from intractable Meniere's disease. A 51-year-old male patient has suffered from fluctuating right sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo since 1994. In May 2002, he was first admitted to our hospital due to a severe vertigo attack accompanied by right sensorineural hearing loss. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the right side was observed. Since April 2004, he has experienced vertigo spells with right-sided tinnitus a few times per month that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. After four months, tympanic tube insertion was preformed in the right tympanic membrane. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone was ineffective. He refused Meniett therapy and intratympanic gentamicin injection. In addition to his vertigo spells, he suffered from insomnia, tinnitus, and anxiety. Tranquilizers such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants such as serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) failed to stop the vertigo and only slightly improved his insomnia. In December 2006, the patient began psychological counseling with a psychotherapist. After brief psychological counseling along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), he began AT. He diligently and regularly continued his AT training in his home according to a written timetable. His insomnia, tinnitus, and vertigo spells disappeared within a few weeks after only four psychotherapy sessions. In order to master the six standard formulas of AT, he underwent two more sessions. Thereafter, he underwent follow-up for 9 months with no additional treatment. He is now free from drugs, including

  6. Case report: a case of intractable Meniere's disease treated with autogenic training

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Nakai, Kimiko; Kunihiro, Takanobu; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Background Psychological stress plays an important role in the onset and course of Meniere's disease. Surgical therapy and intratympanic gentamicin treatment are options for cases that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. Psychotherapy, however, including autogenic training (AT), which can be used for general relaxation, is not widely accepted. This paper describes the successful administration of AT in a subject suffering from intractable Meniere's disease. Case presentation A 51-year-old male patient has suffered from fluctuating right sensorineural hearing loss with vertigo since 1994. In May 2002, he was first admitted to our hospital due to a severe vertigo attack accompanied by right sensorineural hearing loss. Spontaneous nystagmus toward the right side was observed. Since April 2004, he has experienced vertigo spells with right-sided tinnitus a few times per month that are intractable to conventional medical therapy. After four months, tympanic tube insertion was preformed in the right tympanic membrane. Intratympanic injection of dexamethasone was ineffective. He refused Meniett therapy and intratympanic gentamicin injection. In addition to his vertigo spells, he suffered from insomnia, tinnitus, and anxiety. Tranquilizers such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants such as serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) failed to stop the vertigo and only slightly improved his insomnia. In December 2006, the patient began psychological counseling with a psychotherapist. After brief psychological counseling along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), he began AT. He diligently and regularly continued his AT training in his home according to a written timetable. His insomnia, tinnitus, and vertigo spells disappeared within a few weeks after only four psychotherapy sessions. In order to master the six standard formulas of AT, he underwent two more sessions. Thereafter, he underwent follow-up for 9 months with no additional treatment. He is now

  7. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of 40 legal and illegal psychoactive drugs in breast and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    López-García, Ester; Mastroianni, Nicola; Postigo, Cristina; Valcárcel, Yolanda; González-Alonso, Silvia; Barceló, Damia; López de Alda, Miren

    2018-04-15

    This work presents a fast, sensitive and reliable multi-residue methodology based on fat and protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of common legal and illegal psychoactive drugs, and major metabolites, in breast milk. One-fourth of the 40 target analytes is investigated for the first time in this biological matrix. The method was validated in breast milk and also in various types of bovine milk, as tranquilizers are occasionally administered to food-producing animals. Absolute recoveries were satisfactory for 75% of the target analytes. The use of isotopically labeled compounds assisted in correcting analyte losses due to ionization suppression matrix effects (higher in whole milk than in the other investigated milk matrices) and ensured the reliability of the results. Average method limits of quantification ranged between 0.4 and 6.8 ng/mL. Application of the developed method showed the presence of caffeine in breast milk samples (12-179 ng/mL). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Personal Factors on Sound Perception and Overall Experience in Urban Green Areas. A Case Study of a Cycling Path Highly Exposed to Road Traffic Noise.

    PubMed

    Aletta, Francesco; Van Renterghem, Timothy; Botteldooren, Dick

    2018-05-30

    In contemporary urban design, green public areas play a vital role. They have great societal value, but if exposed to undue environmental noise their restorative potential might be compromised. On the other hand, research has shown that the presence of greenery can moderate noise annoyance in areas with high sound levels, while personal factors are expected to play an important role too. A cycling path bordered by vegetation, but highly exposed to road traffic noise, was here considered as a case study. A sound perception survey was submitted to participants on site and they were subsequently sorted into groups according to their noise sensitivity, visual attention and attitude towards greenery. The aim of this study was testing whether these three personal factors could affect their noise perception and overall experience of the place. Results showed that people highly sensitive to noise and more sceptical towards greenery's potential as an environmental moderator reported worse soundscape quality, while visually attentive people reported better quality. These three personal factors were found to be statistically independent. This study shows that several person-related factors impact the assessment of the sound environment in green areas. Although the majority of the respondents benefit from the presence of visual green, policy-makers and planners should be aware that for a significant subset of the population, it should be accompanied by a tranquil soundscape to be fully appreciated.

  9. Sleep Disturbances as a Risk Factor for Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Dae Lim; Nam, Hyunwoo; Thomas, Robert J.; Yun, Chang-Ho

    2018-01-01

    Sleep, a vital process of human being, is carefully orchestrated by the brain and consists of cyclic transitions between rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. Autonomic tranquility during NREM sleep is characterized by vagal dominance and stable breathing, providing an opportunity for the cardiovascular-neural axis to restore homeostasis, in response to use, distress or fatigue inflicted during wakefulness. Abrupt irregular swings in sympathovagal balance during REM sleep act as phasic loads on the resting cardiovascular system. Any causes of sleep curtailment or fragmentation such as sleep restriction, sleep apnea, insomnia, periodic limb movements during sleep, and shift work, not only impair cardiovascular restoration but also impose a stress on the cardiovascular system. Sleep disturbances have been reported to play a role in the development of stroke and other cardiovascular disorders. This review aims to provide updated information on the role of abnormal sleep in the development of stroke, to discuss the implications of recent research findings, and to help both stroke clinicians and researchers understand the importance of identification and management of sleep pathology for stroke prevention and care. PMID:29402071

  10. The relationship between aircraft noise exposure and day-use visitor survey responses in backcountry areas of national parks.

    PubMed

    Rapoza, Amanda; Sudderth, Erika; Lewis, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and the quality of national park visitor experience, more than 4600 visitor surveys were collected at seven backcountry sites in four U.S. national parks simultaneously with calibrated sound level measurements. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate parameters describing the relationship among visitor responses, aircraft noise dose metrics, and mediator variables. For the regression models, survey responses were converted to three dichotomous variables, representing visitors who did or did not experience slightly or more, moderately or more, or very or more annoyance or interference with natural quiet from aircraft noise. Models with the most predictive power included noise dose metrics of sound exposure level, percent time aircraft were audible, and percentage energy due to helicopters and fixed-wing propeller aircraft. These models also included mediator variables: visitor ratings of the "importance of calmness, peace and tranquility," visitor group composition (adults or both adults and children), first visit to the site, previously taken an air tour, and participation in bird-watching or interpretive talks. The results complement and extend previous research conducted in frontcountry areas and will inform evaluations of air tour noise effects on visitors to national parks and remote wilderness sites.

  11. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders.

  12. Profile of male Brazilian injecting drug users who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Aline Dayrell; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; Bastos, Francisco I; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida

    2006-04-01

    This study aims to characterize the profile of male injecting drug users who have sex with other men (MSM IDUs) recruited through a cross-sectional multi-city survey (AjUDE-Brasil II Project) in six Brazilian cities, in 2000-2001. MSM IDUs were compared to other male IDUs using bivariate and multivariate procedures (logistic regression and answer tree analysis with the CHAID algorithm). Among the 709 male IDUs, 187 (26.4%) reported ever having had sex with other men, while only 37 reported sex with other men in the previous six months. MSM IDUs were more likely to be unemployed (OR = 2.3), to have injected tranquilizers (OR = 3.6), and to be HIV-seropositive (OR = 2.1), compared to other male IDUs. Male same-sex relations in this subgroup appear to be associated with strategies to finance drug consuming habits, including sex for drugs with occasional female partners or obtaining injection paraphernalia from occasional sex partners. Further studies should focus on this especially vulnerable subgroup of IDUs, due to the bidirectional and complex interrelationships between their drug injecting habits and sexual risk behaviors.

  13. Apollo 11 Lunar Message For Mankind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Millions of people on Earth watched via television as a message for all mankind was delivered to the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquility) region of the Moon during the historic Apollo 11 mission, where it still remains today. This commemorative plaque, attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle, is engraved with the following words: 'Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July, 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all of mankind.' It bears the signatures of the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot along with the signature of the U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, 'Columbia', piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  14. Short-term overeating results in incomplete energy intake compensation regardless of energy density or macronutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Apolzan, John W; Bray, George A; Hamilton, Marc T; Zderic, Theodore W; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M; Shepard, Desti; Martin, Corby K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of overeating (140% of energy requirements) a high-fat low-energy density diet (HF/LED, 1.05 kcal/g), high-fat high-energy density diet (HF/HED, 1.60 kcal/g), and high-carbohydrate (HC) LED (1.05 kcal/g) for 2-days on subsequent 4-day energy intake (EI), activity levels, appetite, and mood. Using a randomized cross-over design, energy expenditure and EI were standardized during overeating. In 20 adults with a mean ± SD BMI of 30.7 ± 4.6 kg/m(2) , EI was not suppressed until the second day after overeating and accounted for ∼30% of the excess EI. Reductions in EI did not differ among the three diets or across days. Overeating had no effect on subsequent energy expenditure but steps/day decreased after the HC/LED and HF/HED. Sleep time was increased after the HF/HED compared to both LEDs. After overeating a HF/HED vs. HF/LED, carbohydrate cravings, hunger, prospective food consumption, and sadness increased and satisfaction, relaxation, and tranquility decreased. Diet type, time, or their interaction had no impact on compensation over 4 days. No adaptive thermogenesis was observed. The HF/HED vs. HF/LED had detrimental effects on food cravings, appetite, and mood. These results suggest short-term overeating is associated with incomplete compensation. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  15. Short-term overeating results in incomplete energy intake compensation regardless of energy density or macronutrient composition

    PubMed Central

    Apolzan, John W.; Bray, George A.; Hamilton, Marc T.; Zderic, Theodore W.; Han, Hongmei; Champagne, Catherine M.; Shepard, Desti; Martin, Corby K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of overeating (140% of energy requirements) a high-fat low-energy density diet (HF/LED, 1.05kcal/g), high-fat high-energy density diet (HF/HED, 1.60kcal/g), and high-carbohydrate (HC) LED (1.05kcal/g) for 2-days on subsequent 4-day energy intake (EI), activity levels, appetite, and mood. Design and Methods Using a randomized cross-over design, energy expenditure and EI were standardized during overeating. Results In 20 adults with a mean±SD BMI of 30.7±4.6kg/m2, EI was not suppressed until the second day after overeating and accounted for ~30% of the excess EI. Reductions in EI did not differ among the 3 diets or across days. Overeating had no effect on subsequent energy expenditure but steps/day decreased after the HC/LED and HF/HED. Sleep time was increased after the HF/HED compared to both LEDs. After overeating a HF/HED vs. HF/LED, carbohydrate cravings, hunger, prospective food consumption, and sadness increased and satisfaction, relaxation, and tranquility decreased. Conclusions Diet type, time, or their interaction had no impact on compensation over 4 days. No adaptive thermogenesis was observed. The HF/HED vs. HF/LED had detrimental effects on food cravings, appetite, and mood. These results suggest short-term overeating is associated with incomplete compensation. PMID:23913807

  16. [Poisoning with selected mushrooms with neurotropic and hallucinogenic effect].

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Beata; Ferenc, Tomasz; Kusowska, Joanna; Ciećwierz, Julita; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Picking mushrooms, especially in summer and autumn, is still very popular in Poland. Despite raising awareness of poisonous mushrooms in the Polish society, year after year hospitals treat many patients diagnosed with poisoning with the most common toxic species of mushroom found in our country. Furthermore, growing interest in hallucinogenic mushrooms among young people has become a serious medical problem of our time. Websites make it incredibly easy for people to obtain information on the morphology and appearance of mushrooms with psychoactive properties, which leads inexperienced pickers to misidentification, resulting frequently in a fatal outcome. The article explores the subject of poisoning with the most common mushrooms with neurotropic effects, these are: Amanita muscaria, Amanita pantherina, Inocybe rubescens, Clitocybe dealbata, Clitocybe rivulosa and Psilocybe semilanceata. Toxins found in these species show symptoms that affect the central nervous system, parasympathetic system as well as the gastro-intestinal system. The effects of poisoning in the mushroom species mentioned above are mild in general, liver and kidney damage occur rarely, but the symptoms depend on both the dosage of the consumed toxins and individual susceptibility. In most cases the treatment is of symptomatic nature. There is no specific treatment. Medical procedures mainly involve induced gastrolavage--stomach pumping (providing that the patient is conscious), prescription of active carbon as well as replacement of lost body fluids and electrolytes. If the muscarinic symptoms prevail it is generally advised to dose atropine. Patients showing the signs of hyperactivity receive tranquilizers or narcoleptics to eliminate psychotic symptoms.

  17. History of Music Therapy and Its Contemporary Applications in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Montinari, Maria Rosa; Giardina, Simona; Minelli, Pierluca; Minelli, Sergio

    2018-02-01

    Contrary to what is commonly believed, music therapy is an old cure, the use of which is lost in the mists of time. Music always has been perceived to have particular healing powers, and the entire history of civilization contains aspects that link music to physical and mental healing. It seems that the adoption of music for therapeutic purposes harks back to a distant past, probably since the Paleolithic period: it was believed that listening to music could affect the behavior of human beings. In later centuries, the concept of "musical organ-tropism" was born and developed, because according to the type of music, one may affect the cardiovascular, respiratory, and neuroendocrine systems. Studies have shown that music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure, and breathing. Indeed, the following findings arise from the literature: heart and respiratory rates are higher in response to exciting music than in the case of tranquilizing music. In addition, music produces activity changes in brain structures (amygdala, hypothalamus, insular and orbitofrontal cortex) known to modulate heart function. This article provides a careful overview of music therapy history from prehistory to the present and a review of the latest applications of music therapy in cardiovascular diseases.

  18. The Chesapeake Bay bolide impact: a new view of coastal plain evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie

    1998-01-01

    A spectacular geological event took place on the Atlantic margin of North America about 35 million years ago in the late part of the Eocene Epoch. Sea level was unusually high everywhere on Earth, and the ancient shoreline of the Virginia region was somewhere in the vicinity of where Richmond is today (fig. 1). Tropical rain forests covered the slopes of the Appalachians. To the east of a narrow coastal plain, a broad, lime (calcium carbonate)- covered continental shelf lay beneath the ocean. Suddenly, with an intense flash of light, that tranquil scene was transformed into a hellish cauldron of mass destruction. From the far reaches of space, a bolide (comet or asteroid), 3-5 kilometers in diameter, swooped through the Earth's atmosphere and blasted an enormous crater into the continental shelf. The crater is now approximately 200 km southeast of Washington, D.C., and is buried 300-500 meters beneath the southern part of Chesapeake Bay and the peninsulas of southeastern Virginia (fig. 1). The entire bolide event, from initial impact to the termination of breccia deposition, lasted only a few hours or days. The crater was then buried by additional sedimentary beds, which accumulated during the following 35 million years.

  19. Semantic word impressions expressed by hue.

    PubMed

    Shinomori, Keizo; Komatsu, Honami

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the possibility of whether impressions of semantic words showing complex concepts could be stably expressed by hues. Using a paired comparison method, we asked ten subjects to select from a pair of hues the one that more suitably matched a word impression. We employed nine Japanese semantic words and used twelve hues from vivid tones in the practical color coordinate system. As examples of the results, for the word "vigorous" the most frequently selected color was yellow and the least selected was blue to purple; for "tranquil" the most selected was yellow to green and the least selected was red. Principal component analysis of the selection data indicated that the cumulative contribution rate of the first two components was 94.6%, and in the two-dimensional space of the components, all hues were distributed as a hue-circle shape. In addition, comparison with additional data of color impressions measured by a semantic differential method suggested that most semantic word impressions can be stably expressed by hue, but the impression of some words, such as "magnificent" cannot. These results suggest that semantic word impression can be expressed reasonably well by color, and that hues are treated as impressions from the hue circle, not from color categories.

  20. [A cross-sectional study on suicide attempts in urban middle school students in Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-qun; Guo, Lan-ting

    2003-03-01

    To study the prevalence and associated factors of suicide attempt in middle school students. Five middle schools in Chengdu were randomly sampled in the study. A total of 1393 students between the ages of 11 and 18 finished a self-administered questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List (ASLEC) and Egma Minnen av Bardodosnauppforstran (EMBU). Everyone who had suicide attempts was interviewed. Data were analysed by SPSS 8.0 (statistical package for the social science) program on computer. Thirty-six (2.6%) of the 1 393 students has the history of attempted suicide and the ratio of boys and girls was 1:2. Among the suicide attempters, 33.3% had recurrent events. The most common reason of suicide attempts in middle school stage was family conflicts (34.4%) with most common event as taking overdose tranquilizers or poisoning (50.0%). Risk factors of suicide attempt seemed to include hallucination, cigarette smoking, being bullied by peers, wanting to change sex, parents' remarriage, being female, father's refusal, being neglected in childhood and experiencing more events in the previous year. Protecting factor was found to have been family warmness. Suicide attempts were not uncommonly seen in middle school students. Clinicians and teaching staff should identify the risk factors and carry out intervention as early as possible.

  1. [Drug abuse in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Garrido-González, Iria; Bugarín-González, Rosendo; Machín-Fernández, Antonio Javier

    2016-01-01

    To determine the patterns of substance abuse of students attending the Lugo School of Nursing. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study in the classroom carried out by survey research in April 2015. 61.5% of students participated (185), 83.2% of whom were females. The first addictive substance consumed by participants was tobacco (at 15 years old). In the last month cigarettes were consumed by 36.2% of students, while alcohol was consumed by 89.9% (58.4% of the total got drunk). 2.2% were consuming tranquilizers/hypnotics in the same time period. The most widely used illegal drug was cannabis (17.8%) and then cocaine (2.2%). There is a significant correlation between illegal drug consumption and being male, smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol, living alone or with friends (not family), have poor academic performance and public drinking (botellón). There were no association between illegal drugs and sports or reading. Polydrug use was also studied: a 16.2% declared to have consumed alcohol and cannabis simultaneously, and a 4.9% alcohol and cocaine. Consumption patterns are similar compared to the general population in that age group, with some of them being higher. Therefore, it is necessary to take measures in order to prevent substance abuse at the university level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Astronauts onboard included Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. This is a reproduction of the television image that was transmitted to the world on July 20th, as Armstrong egressed the ladder to the lunar surface. The black bar running through the center of the photograph is an anomaly in the TV Ground Data System at Goldstone Tracking Station.

  3. An introduction to Kundalini yoga meditation techniques that are specific for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, David S

    2004-02-01

    The ancient system of Kundalini yoga includes a vast array of meditation techniques and many were discovered to be specific for treating the psychiatric disorders as we know them today. One such technique was found to be specific for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the fourth most common psychiatric disorder, and the tenth most disabling disorder worldwide. Two published clinical trials are described here for treating OCD using a specific Kundalini yoga protocol. This OCD protocol also includes techniques that are useful for a wide range of anxiety disorders, as well as a technique specific for learning to manage fear, one for tranquilizing an angry mind, one for meeting mental challenges, and one for turning negative thoughts into positive thoughts. Part of that protocol is included here and published in detail elsewhere. In addition, a number of other disorder-specific meditation techniques are included here to help bring these tools to the attention of the medical and scientific community. These techniques are specific for phobias, addictive and substance abuse disorders, major depressive disorders, dyslexia, grief, insomnia and other sleep disorders.

  4. KSC-2014-3218

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Rick Armstrong addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Rick is Neil Armstrong's son. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  5. KSC-2014-3200

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, visiting Apollo astronauts have a group portrait taken in front of the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are Mike Collins, Buzz Aldrin and Jim Lovell. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System rocket. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  6. KSC-2014-3213

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. KSC-2014-3226

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts tour the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left, are Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, Mark Geyer, Orion Program manager, and Scott Wilson, manager, production operations for the Orion Program. Also at the renaming ceremony were Apollo astronauts Michael Collins and Jim Lovell. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they've ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  8. KSC-2014-3205

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins participates in a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  9. KSC-2014-3250

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts and their families receive a briefing in one of the remodeled firing rooms in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility's firing rooms were used to conduct the Saturn V countdowns during the Apollo Program. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Second from left is Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin and former astronaut Jim Lovell, a member of the Apollo 8 and Apollo 13 crews, standing next to him, at center. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  10. KSC-2014-3252

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins signs a banner displaying the new name of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The banner signing followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  11. KSC-2014-3196

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts visiting Launch Pad 39B with their families and friends take a moment to enjoy the view. From left are Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, Center Director Bob Cabana, Apollo 11 command module pilot Mike Collins, and Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin's son Andy Aldrin. The group is at Kennedy for a ceremony renaming the Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The pad is being modified to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft which will lift off atop the Space Launch System rocket. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Neil Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  12. KSC-2014-3224

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of the Armstrong family pose for a portrait with an Apollo-era spacesuit following its unveiling in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are Armstrong's son Mark, his grandson Bryce, his son Rick and his granddaughter Lily. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  13. KSC-2014-3208

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana, left, and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden participate a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  14. KSC-2014-3243

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronaut Michael Collins tours the astronaut crew quarters in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, accompanied by family members and friends. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Besides housing the crew quarters, the building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  15. KSC-2014-3232

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts tour the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Viewing the Orion crew module stacked on top of the service module from left, are Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana, Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they've ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  16. KSC-2014-3212

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. The LM was a two part spacecraft. Its lower or descent stage had the landing gear, engines, and fuel needed for the landing. When the LM blasted off the Moon, the descent stage served as the launching pad for its companion ascent stage, which was also home for the two astronauts on the surface of the Moon. The LM was full of gear with which to communicate, navigate, and rendezvous. It also had its own propulsion system, and an engine to lift it off the Moon and send it on a course toward the orbiting CM. This photograph shows a close up of the LM on the Lunar surface.

  18. KSC-2014-3217

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crowd turns out for a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  19. KSC-2014-3249

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts and their families receive a briefing in one of the remodeled firing rooms in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility's firing rooms were used to conduct the Saturn V countdowns during the Apollo Program. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Second from left is Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin and former astronaut Jim Lovell, a member of the Apollo 8 and Apollo 13 crews, standing next to him, at center. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. KSC-2014-3231

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo astronauts tour the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Viewing the Orion crew module stacked on top of the service module from left, are Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, and Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they've ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  1. KSC-2014-3202

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the family of Neil Armstrong poses for a group portrait in front of the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building. From left are Armstrong's son Mark, his former wife Janet, his granddaughter Lily, his son Rick and his grandson Bryce. Armstrong, an Apollo 11 astronaut, was the first person to set foot on the moon and for whom the facility is newly named. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System rocket. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  2. KSC-2014-3251

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, left, signs a banner displaying the new name of the Operations and Checkout Building, as Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin prepares to sign. The banner signing followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  3. KSC-2014-3244

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts and their families tour the Vehicle Assembly Building, the facility in which Apollo's Saturn V rockets were processed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Leading the way through the transfer aisle, from left, are Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, Neil's former wife Janet, Neil's granddaughter Lily, and Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  4. KSC-2014-3206

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  5. KSC-2014-3204

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin participates in a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  6. KSC-2014-3245

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana, at right, escorts Apollo astronauts and their families through the transfer aisle of the 525-foot-tall Vehicle Assembly Building, the facility in which Apollo's Saturn V rockets were processed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The visit followed a ceremony renaming Kennedy's refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. In front of the group, from left, are Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, Armstrong's son Mark, Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, Armstrong's former wife Janet, and Cabana. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  7. KSC-2014-3242

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts Jim Lovell, left, and Buzz Aldrin tour the astronaut crew quarters in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Besides housing the crew quarters, the building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  8. KSC-2014-3219

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, media representatives turn out for a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay, in which the ceremony was held, is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon, while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. The LM was a two part spacecraft. Its lower or descent stage had the landing gear, engines, and fuel needed for the landing. When the LM blasted off the Moon, the descent stage served as the launching pad for its companion ascent stage, which was also home for the two astronauts on the surface of the Moon. The LM was full of gear with which to communicate, navigate, and rendezvous. It also had its own propulsion system, and an engine to lift it off the Moon and send it on a course toward the orbiting CM. In this photograph Aldrin is seen near the leg of the LM.

  10. KSC-2014-3209

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo astronauts participate in a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are Jim Lovell, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  11. KSC-2014-3223

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins gets a close look at an Apollo-era spacesuit following its unveiling in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  12. KSC-2014-3239

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins checks out some equipment during a tour of the astronaut crew quarters in the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tour followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Besides housing the crew quarters, the building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  13. KSC-2014-3227

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts tour the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Leading the way at left is Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana, Scott Wilson, manager, production operations for the Orion Program, and Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins. At right is Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin, and Mark Geyer, Orion Program manager. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they've ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  14. KSC-2014-3225

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of the Armstrong family pose beside a plaque following its unveiling in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are Armstrong's son Mark, his former wife Janet, his son Rick, his grandson Bryce, and his granddaughter Lily. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  15. KSC-2014-3254

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A banner displaying the new name of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida is signed by Apollo astronauts and their families. The banner signing followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. The Orion spacecraft is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. Orion's first flight will be Exploration Fight Test-1, planned for December 2014. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  16. KSC-2014-3199

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts have a group portrait taken in front of the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building, newly named for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Apollo astronauts Mike Collins, Buzz Aldrin and Jim Lovell, and Center Director Robert Cabana. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft, which will lift off atop the Space Launch System rocket. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  17. KSC-2014-3253

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Family members of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong sign a banner displaying the new name of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The banner signing followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are Armstrong's son Rick, his grandson Bryce and his granddaughter Lily. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kevin O'Connell

  18. KSC-2014-3211

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  19. KSC-2014-3221

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana, left, and NASA Administrator Charles Bolden unveil a plaque on display in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  20. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. The LM was a two part spacecraft. Its lower or descent stage had the landing gear, engines, and fuel needed for the landing. When the LM blasted off the Moon, the descent stage served as the launching pad for its companion ascent stage, which was also home for the two astronauts on the surface of the Moon. The LM was full of gear with which to communicate, navigate, and rendezvous. It also had its own propulsion system, and an engine to lift it off the Moon and send it on a course toward the orbiting CM. Aldrin is pictured here next to the LM on the lunar surface.

  1. KSC-2014-3246

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Robert Cabana, a former space shuttle astronaut, at front right, finds a moment to talk to Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell during a tour for Apollo astronauts and their families of the Vehicle Assembly Building, the facility in which Apollo's Saturn V rockets were processed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The visit followed a ceremony renaming Kennedy's refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  2. KSC-2014-3210

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell addresses the audience at a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Lovell served on the crews of Apollo 8 and Apollo 13. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  3. KSC-2014-3248

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Apollo astronauts and their families tour one of the remodeled firing rooms in the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The facility's firing rooms were used to conduct the Saturn V countdowns during the Apollo Program. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, at left, accompanied the astronauts on the tour which followed a ceremony renaming the refurbished Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. Former astronaut Jim Lovell, a member of the Apollo 8 and Apollo 13 crews, is at center. The ceremony was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility on July 20, 1969, aboard the lunar module Eagle. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  4. KSC-2014-3220

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    KSC-2014-3220 – CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana unveils an Apollo-era spacesuit on display in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  5. KSC-2014-3222

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Center Director Robert Cabana reads the inscription on a plaque to invited guests following its unveiling in the lobby of the newly named Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden is at his right. The facility has been renamed for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. The building's high bay is being used to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft and is the same spaceport facility where the Apollo 11 command/service module and lunar module were prepped for the first lunar landing mission in 1969. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The unveiling was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Apollo 11 astronauts landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module, Eagle, on July 20, 1969, as the command module, Columbia, orbited overhead. For more: http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission/ Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  6. Effects of current physical activity on affective response to exercise: Physical and social-cognitive mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Renee E.; Kwan, Bethany M.; Bryan, Angela D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Affective responses during exercise are often important determinants of exercise initiation and maintenance. Current physical activity may be one individual difference that is associated with the degree to which individuals have positive (or negative) affective experiences during exercise. The objective of this investigation was to explore physical and cognitive explanations of the relationship between current activity status (more versus less active) and affective response during a 30-minute bout of moderate-intensity exercise. Method Participants reported their current level of physical activity, exercise self-efficacy, and affect during a 30-minute bout of moderate-intensity exercise. Results More active individuals experienced higher levels of positive affect and tranquility and lower levels of negative affect and fatigue during exercise. Multivariate models for each affective state indicated separate processes through which physical activity may be associated with changes in affect during exercise. Conclusions These models indicate that affect experienced during physical activity is related to current activity level and these relationships can be partially explained by the physical and cognitive factors explored in this study. Recommendations for future research to elucidate whether positive affective response to physical activity improves as a function of becoming more active over time are discussed. PMID:23088712

  7. The Variety of Ecstasy/MDMA Users: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Parrott, Andy C.; Ringwalt, Christopher L.; Yang, Chongming; Blazer, Dan G.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the potential heterogeneity of ecstasy or MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine) users. Data came from the 2001–2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Latent class analysis (LCA) and multinomial logistic regression procedures were used to identify subtypes of ecstasy users. Approximately 1.6% (n=562) of adult participants (N=43,093) reported lifetime ecstasy use. LCA identified three subtypes of ecstasy users. Class 1 exhibited pervasive use of most drug classes (ecstasy–polydrug users, 37%). Class 2 reported a high rate of use of marijuana and cocaine and a moderate use of amphetamines (ecstasy–marijuana–stimulant users, 29%). Class 3 was characterized by a high rate of use of marijuana and a low use of primarily prescription-type drugs (ecstasy– marijuana users, 34%). Subtypes were distinguished by family income, history of substance abuse treatment, and familial substance abuse. Class 1 exhibited the highest prevalence of disorders related to the use of marijuana (77%), tobacco (66%), amphetamines (36%), opioids (35%), sedatives (31%), and tranquilizers (30%). The recent resurgence in ecstasy use among adults underscores the need to monitor trends in its use. PMID:19874166

  8. KSC-2009-3794

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-16

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module is being prepared for the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery. The module will carry among its science and storage racks the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or C.O.L.B.E.R.T. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  9. KSC-2009-3795

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-16

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – This decal will be placed on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or C.O.L.B.E.R.T., that will be carried to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-128 mission. The treadmill is in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and will be placed in the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module with science and storage racks. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  10. KSC-2009-3796

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-06-16

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The C.O.L.B.E.R.T decal is placed on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill. The treadmill shares space in the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The module is part of the payload for the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  11. [Parkinson therapy 1985].

    PubMed

    Kaeser, H E

    1986-06-14

    The problems of long term treatment with antiparkinson drugs are numerous, involving increased involuntary movements, painful dystonic cramps, decrease or loss of therapeutic benefit, wearing-off, episodes of akinesia (on-off) and long periods of "freezing". Important side effects are also mental changes with heavy dreams, hallucinations, nocturnal confusional states and paranoid psychosis. As most of these side effects are dose-related, they are postponed and lessened by small daily doses of L-dopa and decarboxylase inhibitor. Frequent small doses may decrease the wearing-off effect but may cause unpredictable episodes of on-off. The addition of or partial replacement by bromocriptine may decrease fluctuations and dyskinesias in many patients. To reduce the side effects such as nausea, orthostatic hypotension and mental disturbances, daily doses of 15-30 mg should be built up very slowly. Painful dystonias are related to the off period and respond well to baclofen. For the treatment of severe psychic disturbances tranquilizers with little or no extrapyramidal side effects, such as clomethiazole, benzodiazepine derivatives and (if necessary) thioridazine, are recommended. Bromocriptine may also be useful in occasional cases which do not, or no longer, respond to L-dopa.

  12. The pattern of intravenous drug use and associated criminal activity in patients on a methadone treatment waiting list.

    PubMed

    Adamson, S J; Sellman, J D

    1998-06-01

    Sixty-four patients on the Christchurch Methadone Treatment Programme waiting list were questioned on their drug-use behaviour, criminal activity and sources of income, both legal and illegal, for the preceding 7 days. Opioids used included morphine sulphate tablets, methadone and opium poppies, while other drugs used included tranquillizers, cannabis and alcohol. A significant minority were prescribed opioids. The mean cost of drugs used in 7 days across all subjects was 882 dollars. The mean financial gain from criminal sources for the same period was 1079 dollars and was derived from drug-related crime, property crime and prostitution. Few gender differences were found relating to criminal activity or drug use. The majority of the sample were on unemployment benefits of varying types while a minority were in paid employment. Those in paid employment did not earn significantly less from criminal activity, nor did they spend significantly less on drug use than did those not in paid employment. An important implication of these findings is that untreated opioid users are a substantial financial burden to the community, strongly supporting the argument for greater treatment provision.

  13. n/a

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Astronauts onboard included Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle'', carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew set up experiments, collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth, planted the U.S Flag, and left a message for all mankind. In this photograph, Armstrong is removing scientific equipment from a storage bay of the LM. The brilliant sunlight emphasizes the U. S. Flag to the left. The object near the flag is the Solar Wind Composition Experiment deployed by Aldrin earlier.

  14. Co-occurrence between mental distress and poly-drug use: a ten year prospective study of patients from substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Burdzovic Andreas, Jasmina; Lauritzen, Grethe; Nordfjaern, Trond

    2015-09-01

    Longitudinal research investigating psychiatric trajectories among patients with poly-drug use patterns remains relatively scant, even though this specific population is at elevated risk for multiple negative outcomes. The present study examined temporal associations between poly-drug use (i.e. heroin, cannabis, tranquilizers, and amphetamines) and mental distress over a 10-year period. A clinical cohort of 481 patients was recruited from substance use treatment facilities in Norway, and prospectively interviewed 1, 2, 7 and 10years after the initial data collection at treatment admission. At each assessment participants completed a questionnaire addressing their substance use and mental distress. Longitudinal growth models were used to examine whether, and if so, how, levels of drug use were associated with the level and rate of change in mental distress over time. Results from the longitudinal growth models showed a co-occurrence between active poly-drug use and mental distress, such that there was a dose-response effect where mental distress increased both in magnitude and over time with the number of drugs used. Reduction in mental distress during the 10-year study period was evident only in the no-drug use condition. Use of multiple drugs and mental distress appear strongly co-related over time. Pre-treatment assessment should carefully identify individuals manifesting poly-drug use and mental disorders. Treatment and follow-up services should be tailored to their specific needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Childhood sibling relationships as a predictor of major depression in adulthood: a 30-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Robert J; Vaillant, George E; Orav, E John

    2007-06-01

    The authors examined the quality of sibling relationships in childhood as a predictor of major depression in adulthood. Study subjects were 229 men selected for mental and physical health and followed from ages 20 through 50 and beyond as part of a study of adult psychosocial development. Data were obtained from interviews with participants and their parents at intake and from follow-up interviews and self-report questionnaires completed by participants at regular intervals. These data were used to rate the quality of relationships with siblings, the quality of parenting received in childhood, and family history of depression as well as the occurrence, by age 50, of major depression, alcoholism, and use of mood-altering drugs (tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and stimulants). Poorer relationships with siblings prior to age 20 and a family history of depression independently predicted both the occurrence of major depression and the frequency of use of mood-altering drugs by age 50, even after adjustment for the quality of childhood relationships with parents. Poor relationships with parents in childhood did not predict the occurrence of depression by age 50 when family history of depression and the quality of relationships with siblings were taken into account. Quality of sibling relationships and family history of depression did not predict later alcohol abuse or dependence. Poor sibling relationships in childhood may be an important and specific predictor of major depression in adulthood. Further study of links between childhood sibling relationships and adult depression is warranted.

  16. KSC-2014-3190

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-21

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA officials and Apollo astronauts visiting Launch Pad 39B with their families and friends preserve the moment with a group portrait. The group was at Kennedy for a ceremony renaming the Operations and Checkout Building for Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first person to set foot on the moon. From left are NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, Apollo astronaut Jim Lovell, Neil's son Mark Armstrong, Neil's granddaughter Lily Armstrong, Neil's son Rick Armstrong, Neil's grandson Bryce Armstrong, Neil's former wife Janet Armstrong, Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, and Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins. The pad is being modified to support the agency's new Orion spacecraft which will lift off atop the Space Launch System rocket. Orion is designed to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, serving as the exploration vehicle that will carry astronauts to deep space and sustain the crew during travel to destinations such as an asteroid or Mars. The visit of the former astronauts was part of NASA's 45th anniversary celebration of the Apollo 11 moon landing. As the world watched, Neil Armstrong and Neil Aldrin landed in the moon's Sea of Tranquility aboard the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Meanwhile, crewmate Michael Collins orbited above in the command module Columbia. For more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/july/nasa-honors-historic-first-moon-landing-eyes-first-mars-mission. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  17. Incorporating spirituality in psychosocial group intervention for women undergoing in vitro fertilization: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Chan, Celia H Y; Chan, Cecilia L W; Ng, Ernest H Y; Ho, P C; Chan, Timothy H Y; Lee, G L; Hui, W H C

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a group intervention, the Integrative Body-Mind-Spirit (I-BMS) intervention, which aims at improving the psychosocial and spiritual well-being of Chinese women undergoing their first IVF treatment cycle. The I-BMS intervention facilitates the search of meaning of life in the context of family and childbearing, as well as the letting go of high IVF expectations. A randomized controlled study of 339 women undergoing first IVF treatment cycle in a local Hong Kong hospital was conducted (intervention: n= 172; no-intervention control: n= 167). Assessments of anxiety, perceived importance of childbearing, and spiritual well-being were made at randomization (T(0) ), on the day starting ovarian stimulations (T(1)), and on the day undertaking embryo transfer (T(2)). Comparing T(0) and T(2), interaction analyses showed women who had received the intervention reported lower levels of physical distress, anxiety, and disorientation. They reported being more tranquil and satisfied with their marriage, and saw childbearing as less important compared to women in the control group. These findings suggest that I-BMS intervention was successful at improving the psychosocial and spiritual well-being of women undergoing their first IVF treatment cycle. This study highlights the importance of providing integrative fertility treatment that incorporates psychosocial and spiritual dimensions. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  18. [Peculiarities of therapy of neurotic disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Toirov, E S; Imamov, A Kh

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of neurotic disorders (ND) in 168 patients with rheumatoid arthritis revealed them in 65.6% of the cases including 22.6% weak, 31.7% moderate and 14.9% severe ones. Asthenovegetative disorders were most frequently detected (61.3%). They associated with emotional, hypochondriac, hysterical, and obsessional disorders in 24.4, 14.3, 9.5, and 4.8% of the patients respectively. ND were treated depending on their type and severity. Mild ND were managed by combined therapy including general tonics, physiotherapeutic procedures, and remedial gymnastics. Patients with moderate ND were given sedative medicines (novopassit, sedavit, glycine, peony tincture). Severe ND were managed using antidepressants and tranquilizers. Duration of therapy was 10-21 days depending on its form. The treatment eliminated all symptoms of ND in 66 (54.1%) and reduced them in 44 (36.1%) of the patients. The outcome of psychotherapy was regarded as unsatisfactory in 11.5%, satisfactory in 26.2%, and positive in 62.3% of the patients. These values in a control group of 46 patients without HD were 10.8, 37.0, and 52.2% respectively.

  19. East meets West: applying Eastern spirituality in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cecilia L W; Ng, S M; Ho, Rainbow T H; Chow, Amy Y M

    2006-07-01

    The paper discusses the application of the Eastern body-mind-spirit approach in healthcare practice. Traumas, sufferings and losses may induce immense distress in patients and their families, as well as apathy and exhaustion in healthcare workers. Over-specialization and compartmentalization of services may provide a convenient shelter for healthcare workers to be detached and to simply focus on a narrowly defined scope of intervention. However, the existential problems are still there. Based upon eastern philosophies and holistic health practices, we propose the body-mind-spirit approach in healthcare settings. This is a review paper summarizing the application of the approach on various clinical populations. The approach has been trialled with promising results in a number of health conditions and psychosocial predicaments. Spirituality is not restricted to any religious practices, nor is it narrowed to the pursuit of knowledge at a high level of abstraction. The interconnectedness of the body, mind and spirit presupposes that the practice of spirituality is multidimensional and multi-levelled. Using the body-mind-spirit framework flexibly we can engage more clients while facilitating the important process of exploration and change. The key components include getting in touch with the inner self, coming back to our senses, connecting our body and mind and rebalancing our relationship with the natural and social environment. The ultimate goal is to move out of meaninglessness and to reach a state of mature spirituality of tranquillity and transcendence. The practice of spirituality can be easily applied to daily life.

  20. Breeding synchrony in colonial birds: from local stress to global harmony.

    PubMed

    Jovani, Roger; Grimm, Volker

    2008-07-07

    Why and how birds in colonies often breed in striking synchrony is an unsolved question. In colonies, conspecific birds often destroy eggs and kill chicks, either intentionally or not. We propose that social tranquillity at the time of laying can be achieved if a bird's stress level is partly determined by the agitation of its neighbours. Moreover, we propose that this local process, together with environmental cues, can synchronize breeding between neighbours and through a whole colony. We tested our hypotheses using a generic individual-based model where the breeding predisposition of females was updated daily depending on an increase in the photoperiod (positively) and the stress level of neighbours: negatively if they were agitated, and positively otherwise. A female laid her eggs when her stress level fell to a critical value. Even giving only a low relevance to the neighbour's stress level was enough to synchronize the laying date of neighbours and also of a huge colony. Moreover, females bred in a safer environment, which is known from field studies to increase fitness. Our study highlights the power of local adaptive (individual) behaviour to create global (colony) patterns. We argue that collective patterns such as breeding synchrony in colonial birds could have simple adaptive individual-level explanations.

  1. Risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; da Costa, Bruno R

    2011-09-01

    To review the literature to identify and synthesize the evidence on risk factors for patient falls in geriatric rehabilitation hospital settings. Eligible studies were systematically searched on 16 databases from inception to December 2010. The search strategies used a combination of terms for rehabilitation hospital patients, falls, risk factors and older adults. Cross-sectional, cohort, case-control studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published in English that investigated risks for falls among patients ≥65 years of age in rehabilitation hospital settings were included. Studies that investigated fall risk assessment tools, but did not investigate risk factors themselves or did not report a measure of risk (e.g. odds ratio, relative risk) were excluded. A total of 2,824 references were identified; only eight articles concerning six studies met the inclusion criteria. In these, 1,924 geriatric rehabilitation patients were followed. The average age of the patients ranged from 77 to 83 years, the percentage of women ranged from 56% to 81%, and the percentage of fallers ranged from 15% to 54%. Two were case-control studies, two were RCTs and four were prospective cohort studies. Several intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for falls were identified. Carpet flooring, vertigo, being an amputee, confusion, cognitive impairment, stroke, sleep disturbance, anticonvulsants, tranquilizers and antihypertensive medications, age between 71 and 80, previous falls, and need for transfer assistance are risk factors for geriatric patient falls in rehabilitation hospital settings.

  2. Use of licit and illicit drugs at the University of Alfenas.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, João Evangelista; Alves, Adriana Luiza; Ferreira, Luciano Resende; Fiorini, Celso Maia; Durães, Sandro Willian; Santos, Ricardo Luiz Diniz; Nascimento, Luiz Carlos do; Geraldini, Andréa Mantelo Vicente; Ortiz, Cássia de Fátima

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the study of drug consumption carried out within the population of undergraduate students from 2 colleges of Alfenas, in the state of Minas Gerais state. Both licit and illicit drugs were studied, including alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, heroin, crack, inhalants, glue, tranquilizers, stimulants, and others. The research included a wide bibliographical search and the application of a questionnaire to approximately 23% of the students (total of 6500 students). A total of 1500 students participated in this investigation. The results demonstrated that there was a significant consumption of both licit and illicit drugs. The pattern of drug consumption in the research sample was similar to other investigations conducted in Brazil and in other countries. It was observed that 55% of the university students use drugs. However, the most surprising finding was that most of the students (88%) answered "yes" to the inquiry, "Have you already tried any type of drug, including alcohol and cigarettes?" The students revealed that they had taken drugs even prior to the admission to the university. The results suggest clearly that the university environment does not necessarily represent the starting point for student drug consumption.

  3. EEG mapping and low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) in diagnosis and therapy of psychiatric disorders: evidence for a key-lock principle.

    PubMed

    Saletu, Bernd; Anderer, Peter; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D

    2005-04-01

    Different psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia with predominantly positive and negative symptomatology, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, multi-infarct dementia, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type and alcohol dependence, show EEG maps that differ statistically both from each other and from normal controls. Representative drugs of the main psychopharmacological classes, such as sedative and non-sedative neuroleptics and antidepressants, tranquilizers, hypnotics, psychostimulants and cognition-enhancing drugs, induce significant and typical changes to normal human brain function, which in many variables are opposite to the above-mentioned differences between psychiatric patients and normal controls. Thus, by considering these differences between psychotropic drugs and placebo in normal subjects, as well as between mental disorder patients and normal controls, it may be possible to choose the optimum drug for a specific patient according to a key-lock principle, since the drug should normalize the deviant brain function. This is supported by 3-dimensional low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA), which identifies regions within the brain that are affected by psychiatric disorders and psychopharmacological substances.

  4. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    This is a close-up view of an astronaut’s footprint in the lunar soil, photographed by a 70 mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The first manned lunar mission, the Apollo 11 launched aboard a Saturn V launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A, Armstrong, mission commander; Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module Pilot; and Michael Collins, Command Module pilot. The LM landed on the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969 in the region known as Mare Tranquilitatis (the Sea of Tranquility). Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface. As he stepped off the LM, Armstrong proclaimed, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. He was followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, describing the lunar surface as Magnificent desolation. Astronaut Collins piloted the Command Module in a parking orbit around the Moon. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. von Braun.

  5. The Effect of Massage Therapy on Children's Learning Process: A Review.

    PubMed

    Emtiazy, Majid; Abrishamkar, Mahboobeh

    2016-05-01

    Massage therapy is the scientific manipulation of the soft tissues of the body for normalizing those tissues and consists of manual techniques that include applying fixed or movable pressure, holding, and/or causing movement of or to the body. There are more than 1500 massage training centers or schools in the United States. Several studies evaluated the effect of massage on elevating child health and to treat various disorders. In this review, keywords related to the subject were searched in ScienceDirect, Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Cochrane library. The data were classified, analyzed, and interpreted. Studies showed massage in pupils could increase blood circulation in the body, make breathing better, better growth, increased concentration and IQ, improved immune system, reduction in stress, pain, anger, and aggressiveness as well as allowing restful sleep. All these together would elevate their learning ability. In addition, massage therapy is studied on a variety of disorders such as blood pressure, rheumatoid arthritis, autism, cystic fibrosis, back pain, nervous pain, muscle and joints pain and headache. To promote health in pupils, it I proposed to introduce the concept of "classmates massage during break" program. Such groups massage therapy, next to its health benefits, would contribute to their peace, tranquility, and teamwork. A similar program is running in Australia as well as few other countries under the codename "massage in schools program (MISP)". This program has had a tangible effect on children's capabilities.

  6. A thermodynamic study of the amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in water/ethanol solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif; Barbosa, Silvia; Taboada, Pablo; Castro, Emilio; Siddiq, Mohammad; Mosquera, Víctor

    2006-09-01

    The thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions of the tricyclic antidepressant amphiphilic phenothiazine drug thioridazine hydrochloride in the temperature range 20-50 °C and in the presence of ethanol have been measured. The phenothiazine tranquillizing drugs have interesting association characteristics that derive from their rigid, tricyclic hydrophobic groups. Thioridazine hydrochloride is a drug used in treatment of mental illness that shows side effects. Therefore, it is interesting to study the change of its physico-chemical properties with temperature and with the surrounding environment to understand the action mechanism of the drug. Densities, conductivities, and surface tension were measured to obtain surface and bulk solution properties. Critical concentrations, cc, at different temperatures and in the presence of ethanol, and partition coefficients, K, have been calculated, the latter using an indirect method based in the pseudophase model with the help of apparent molar volume data. This method has the advantage that allows calculating the distribution coefficients at solubilizate concentrations below the saturation. Conductivity data show two critical concentrations. The second critical concentration is not clear by density data. The effect of the alcohol is to decrease the first critical concentration due to a decrease in headgroup repulsion. The molar apparent volumes at infinite dilution and in the aggregate in water and in presence of ethanol have been also obtained.

  7. Prescription drug misuse and risk behaviors among young injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristen M; Fibbi, Meghan; Langer, Debra; Silva, Karol; Lankenau, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse among young adults, especially opioids, is a substantial public health problem in the United States. Although risks associated with injection of illicit drugs are well established, injection and sexual risks associated with misuse of prescription drugs are under-studied. Forty young injection drug users aged 16 to 25 who reported injection of a prescription drug were recruited in 2008-09 in Los Angeles and New York City. Descriptive quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to illustrate risky injection and sexual behaviors reported in this sample. Over half of participants engaged in risky injection behavior, three-quarters engaged in risky sexual behavior, nearly half reported both risky behaviors, and five did not report either risk behavior while misusing a prescription drug. Prescription opioids, tranquilizers, and stimulants were misused in the context of risky sexual behaviors while only opioids were misused in the context of injection risk behaviors. Access to clean syringes, attitudes and beliefs regarding hepatitis C, and risk reduction through partner selection were identified as key themes that contextualized risk behaviors. Although these findings help identify areas to target educational campaigns, such as prevention of sexually transmitted infections, risk behaviors specifically associated with prescription drug misuse warrant further study.

  8. STS-69 launch view across water and trees (landscape)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The tranquil beauty of a wildlife refuge serves as a lush backdrop to the drama of a Space Shuttle surging skyward atop a pillar of flame. The Shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 11:09:00.052 a.m. EDT, Sept. 7, 1995. Only a small portion of the 140,000 acres occupied by the Kennedy Space Center has been developed to support space operations; most of the land is pristine and untouched by man, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a wildlife refuge. On board Endeavour are a crew of five and a payload complement that includes two deployable free-flyers, the Wake Shield Facility-2 and the Spartan-201. David M. Walker is the mission commander; Kenneth D. Cockrell is the pilot; James S. Voss is the payload commander; and the two mission specialists are Michael L. Gernhardt and James H. Newman. The 11-day flight also is scheduled to include an extravehicular activity by Gernhardt and Newman.

  9. STS-69 launch view thru trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The tranquil beauty of a wildlife refuge serves as a lush backdrop to the drama of a Space Shuttle surging skyward atop a pillar of flame. The Shuttle Endeavour lifted off from Launch Pad 39A at 11:09:00.052 a.m. EDT, Sept. 7, 1995. Only a small portion of the 140,000 acres occupied by the Kennedy Space Center has been developed to support space operations; most of the land is pristine and untouched by man, and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a wildlife refuge. On board Endeavour are a crew of five and a payload complement that includes two deployable free-flyers, the Wake Shield Facility-2 and the Spartan-201. David M. Walker is the mission commander; Kenneth D. Cockrell is the pilot; James S. Voss is the payload commander; and the two mission specialists are Michael L. Gernhardt and James H. Newman. The 11-day flight also is scheduled to include an extravehicular activity by Gernhardt and Newman.

  10. Scintigraphic evaluation of digital circulation during the developmental and acute phases of equine laminitis

    SciTech Connect

    Trout, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Using nuclear isotopic imaging, digital circulation was sequentially evaluated at 24-hour intervals in 11 control horses and in 9 horses affected with acute laminitis, created by administration of a high-starch ration. Following intra-arterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin into the brachiocephalic trunk, a gamma camera and dedicated nuclear medicine computer were used to acquire static images of the right front foot. Dynamic vascular-phase and static interstitial-phase images were also obtained after jugular vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid. These procedures were performed on standing horses, using either minimal or no tranquilization. The images were quantitatively analyzed formore » parameters indicative of circulation to the foot as a whole and to specific regions of interest within the foot. There was no evidence of reduced total blood flow to the lamellae during either the developmental or acute phases of laminitis. Although total flow tended to increase throughout the peripheral/external regions of the foot, statistically significant elevations were consistently present only within the lamellae. Changes indicative of decreased total blood flow were noted in the central/internal regions of the foot. These alterations usually occurred coincident with or after the onset of clinical lameness.« less

  11. Abraham's discovery of the 'bad mother'. A contribution to the history of the theory of depression.

    PubMed

    May, U

    2001-04-01

    The author shows how, after Freud struggled in vain from the 1890s to develop a theory of depression, Abraham succeeded for the first time in finding an approach to the understanding of depression a few years before the publication of Freud's 'Mourning and melancholia'. It is contained in his study of the painter Giovanni Segantini (1911), which also includes a description, imbued with a new atmospheric quality, of the mother-son relationship that centres on the concept of the 'bad mother'. The author points out that Abraham's 'good/bad' dimension is effectively absent from Freud's published work up to 1911 and is also at variance with his view of the relationship between son and mother. In later contributions, too, Abraham maintained that unconscious hate directed at the mother, who is experienced as 'bad' but longed for as 'good', was a central factor in the aetiology of depression, a view he had to defend vis-à-vis Freud. The author contends that in the Segantini paper Abraham was describing an inner world similar to that evinced by the work of Melanie Klein and significantly different from Freud's. It is characterised by hate, revenge, death wishes and guilt feelings on the one hand and tranquillity and inner peace on the other.

  12. Marketing Masked Depression: Physicians, Pharmaceutical Firms, and the Redefinition of Mood Disorders in the 1960s and 1970s.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lucie; Gaudillière, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the redefinition of depression that took place in the early 1970s. Well before the introduction of the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, this rather rare and severe psychiatric disorder hitherto treated in asylums was transformed into a widespread mild mood disorder to be handled by general practitioners. Basing itself on the archives of the Swiss firm Ciba-Geigy, the article investigates the role of the pharmaceutical industry in organizing this shift, with particular attention paid to research and scientific marketing. By analyzing the interplay between the firm, elite psychiatrists specializing in the study of depression, and general practitioners, the article argues that the collective construction of the market for first-generation antidepressants triggered two realignments: first, it bracketed etiological issues with multiple classifications in favor of a unified symptom-oriented approach to diagnosis and treatment; second, it radically weakened the differentiation between antidepressants, neuroleptics, and tranquilizers. The specific construction of masked depression shows how, in the German-speaking context, issues of ambulatory care such as recognition, classification, and treatment of atypical or mild forms of depression were reshaped to meet commercial as well as professional needs.

  13. Effects of phenazepam on the behavior of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice in the open field test after naloxone pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Seredenin, S B; Nadorova, A V; Kolik, L G; Yarkova, M A

    2013-07-01

    We studied the effects of phenazepam (0.075 mg/kg) after pretreatment (5 minutes before) with naloxone (10 mg/kg) on open-field behavior of C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice. In ex vivo experiments, we studied the effects of naloxone (1 and 10 mg/kg) on receptor binding of [(3)H]-flunitrazepam by membranes of brain fraction (P1+P2) of C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice. It was shown that naloxone increased motor activity in the open field in BALB/c mice and decreased this parameter in C57Bl/6 mice. During combined treatment, naloxone potentiated the activating effects of phenazepam on the open-field behavior of BALB/c mice and slightly increased the sedative effect of this drug in C57Bl/6 mice. Naloxone stimulated reception of [(3)H]-flunitrazepam in BALB/c mice and slightly increased radioligand binding in C57Bl/6 mice. These data attest to enhanced reception in benzodiazepine site of GABAA-receptor under conditions of opioid receptor blockade, the presence of anxiolytic or sedative (depending on the phenotype of the response to emotional stress) effect of naloxone, and co-directed effects of naloxone and benzodiazepine tranquilizer on open-field behavior of C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice.

  14. Human capital, resources, and healthy childbearing for Mexican women in a new destination immigrant community.

    PubMed

    Bernosky de Flores, Catherine H

    2010-10-01

    To describe a healthy mother, a healthy pregnancy, a healthy baby, and the resources essential for achieving these goals from the perspective of Mexican women in a new destination immigrant community in the United States. Traditional care and health behaviors are often cited to explain the favorable birth outcomes of Mexican-born women in the United States. Little is known about the approaches Mexican women use to have healthy babies in new destination communities. Eleven Mexican women of childbearing age in the early years of their settlement participated in semifocused ethnographic interviews. Healthy mothers have good nutrition and abstain from substance use. Healthy pregnancies are worry-free and tranquil, and healthy behaviors are supported by networks of people with good morals who motivate women and provide sound advice. Information needs include vitamin supplementation before and after pregnancy and family planning. English skills and having the courage to go out and meet people are vital for healthy childbearing. Informed prenatal care programs preserve diet and low substance use behaviors, reduce stress, and provide networking opportunities and information about family planning, prenatal care services, nutrition, and folic acid supplementation.

  15. Breaking the Taboo: Illicit Drug Use among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hogendorf, Anna M.; Fendler, Wojciech; Sieroslawski, Janusz; Bobeff, Katarzyna; Wegrewicz, Krzysztof; Malewska, Kamila I.; Przudzik, Maciej W.; Szmigiero-Kawko, Malgorzata; Sztangierska, Beata; Mysliwiec, Malgorzata; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence of illicit drug use in a group of Polish adolescents with type 1 diabetes (DM1) in comparison with a national cohort of their healthy peers. Methods. Two hundred and nine adolescents with DM1, aged 15–18 years, were studied in 2013 with an anonymous questionnaire prepared for the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD). The control group was a representative sample of 12114 students at the same age who took part in ESPAD in 2011. Metabolic control was regarded as good if self-reported HbA1c was <8% or poor if HbA1c was ≥8%. Results. Lifetime prevalence of illicit drug use was lower among adolescents with DM1 than in the control group [58 (28%) versus 5524 (46%), p = 10−5]. Cannabis preparations were the most frequently used substances [38 (18.3%) versus 3976 (33.1%), p = 10−5], followed by tranquilizers, sedatives, and amphetamine. Lifetime and last 12-month use of cannabis were associated with poorer glycemic control (HbA1c ≥ 8%), p < 0.01 and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions. Adolescents with DM1 report using illicit drugs to a lesser extent than their healthy peers. The use of cannabis is associated with a poorer metabolic control in teens with DM1. PMID:26858959

  16. Breaking the Taboo: Illicit Drug Use among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Anna M; Fendler, Wojciech; Sieroslawski, Janusz; Bobeff, Katarzyna; Wegrewicz, Krzysztof; Malewska, Kamila I; Przudzik, Maciej W; Szmigiero-Kawko, Malgorzata; Sztangierska, Beata; Mysliwiec, Malgorzata; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence of illicit drug use in a group of Polish adolescents with type 1 diabetes (DM1) in comparison with a national cohort of their healthy peers. Two hundred and nine adolescents with DM1, aged 15-18 years, were studied in 2013 with an anonymous questionnaire prepared for the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD). The control group was a representative sample of 12114 students at the same age who took part in ESPAD in 2011. Metabolic control was regarded as good if self-reported HbA1c was <8% or poor if HbA1c was ≥8%. Lifetime prevalence of illicit drug use was lower among adolescents with DM1 than in the control group [58 (28%) versus 5524 (46%), p = 10(-5)]. Cannabis preparations were the most frequently used substances [38 (18.3%) versus 3976 (33.1%), p = 10(-5)], followed by tranquilizers, sedatives, and amphetamine. Lifetime and last 12-month use of cannabis were associated with poorer glycemic control (HbA1c ≥ 8%), p < 0.01 and 0.02, respectively. Adolescents with DM1 report using illicit drugs to a lesser extent than their healthy peers. The use of cannabis is associated with a poorer metabolic control in teens with DM1.

  17. Nicaragua: an example of commitments and strengths despite problems of poverty.

    PubMed

    Ross, Carl A

    2007-01-01

    Nicaragua is located in the middle of the Central American isthmus between the countries of Honduras and Costa Rica. It is the largest Central American country and is equivalent in size to the state of Georgia. Nicaragua is cited by Pan American Health Organization as one of the poorest third-world countries. One factor that continues to contribute to Nicaragua's chronic poverty state is the demographics of the country. Nearly half of all Nicaraguans are under 15 years of age, and more than a quarter are between the ages of 15 and 29 years. Only a quarter of the population is over 30 years of age. Beyond the hardship and poverty, there is a country rich in beauty. Nicaragua has a beautiful countryside with lush green mountains, black sand beaches of the Pacific Ocean, and the natural wonder of active volcanoes. It is easy to become engulfed by the tranquility of these surroundings and to steer away from the harsh conditions of the country. It is, however, a temporary escape from reality, for it was the hardships and unfavorable circumstances of this country that are never forgotten and which persist until today. This article focuses on a variety of interventions used to assist Nicaragua with their health care and state of well-being.

  18. Levels and potential health risks of mercury in prescription, non-prescription medicines and dietary supplements in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Artur; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-10-01

    Determination of mercury is important in the case of pharmaceuticals for which the European Union regulations have not defined the maximum permissible concentration of this metal. The aim of the study was to determine the levels of mercury in the following groups of drugs (n = 119): analgesics, diuretics, cardiacs, antihypertensives, anti-influenza, antibiotics, anti-allergics, tranquilizers, antibacterials and in dietary supplements (n = 33) available on the Polish market. Mercury was analyzed using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry CV-AFS. Its content in the samples varied in the range of 0.9-476.1 ng g(-1). Higher mercury concentrations were reported for prescription drugs (Rx): 0.9-476.1 ng g(-1) (median: 7.4 ng g(-1)), lower--for non-prescription medicines (OTC): 1.2-45.8 ng g(-1) (median: 6.0 ng g(-1)). In the analyzed dietary supplements the concentrations were: 0.9-16.7 ng g(-1) (median: 5.9 ng g(-1)). On the basis of the information contained in the leaflet accompanying the medicine, a daily dose of mercury taken into the body with an analyzed medicament was estimated and the health risk posed by using such medicines was assessed. The study indicates that it is justified to carry out measurements of mercury in pharmaceuticals due to its high, potentially harmful. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. KSC-96PC1289

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Vividly framed by a tranquil Florida landscape, the Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off from Launch Pad 39B at 2:55:47 p.m. EST, Nov. 19, 1996. Leading the veteran crew of Mission STS-80 is Commander Kenneth D. Cockrell; Kent V. Rominger is the pilot and the three mission specialists are Tamara E. Jernigan, Story Musgrave and Thomas D. Jones. At age 61, Musgrave becomes the oldest person ever to fly in space; he also ties astronaut John Young’s record for most number of spaceflights by a human being, and in embarking on his sixth Shuttle flight Musgrave has logged the most flights ever aboard NASA’s reusable space vehicle. The two primary payloads for STS-80 are the Wake Shield Facility-3 (WSF-3) and the Orbiting and Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer-Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (ORFEUS-SPAS II). Two spacewalks also will be performed during the nearly 16-day mission. Mission STS-80 closes out the Shuttle flight schedule for 1996; it marks the 21st flight for Columbia and the 80th in Shuttle program history.

  20. Apollo 11 voice transcript pertaining to the geology of the landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, N.G.; Ulrich, G.E.

    1974-01-01

    On July 20, 1969, America's Eagle touched down in southwestern Mare Tranquillitatis beginning man's firsthand exploration of the moon. This document is an edited record of the conversations between astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Jr., at Tranquility Base, and Bruce McCandless at Mission Control in Houston during the approximately 22 hours spent on the lunar surface. It includes additional commentary during their return to Earth. It is a condensation hopefully of all the verbal data having geological significance. All discussions and observations documenting the lunar landscape, its geologic characteristics, the rocks and soils collected, and the photographic record are retained along with supplementary remarks essential to the continuity of events during the mission. We have deleted the words of mechanical housekeeping and engineering data, attempting not to lose the personal and philosophical aspects of this intensely human experience. The sources of this verbal transcript are the complete audio tapes recorded during the mission and the Technical Air-to-Ground Voice Transcription published by NASA. The voice record is listed chronologically given in days, hours, minutes, and seconds. These are the Ground Elapsed Times (GET) after launch from Kennedy Space Center which was 9:32 a.m. EDT on July 16, 1969. Figure 1 shows the vicinity of the landing site that was described, sampled, and photographed by the Apollo 11 crewmen.

  1. Mental Health and Substance Use Factors Associated with Unwanted Sexual Contact among U.S. Active Duty Service Women

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Javanbakht, Marjan; Cochran, Susan; Hamilton, Alison B.; Shoptaw, Steven; Gorbach, Pamina M.

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. military women are exposed to unwanted sexual contact during military service, which can have important implications for mental health. Using data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors, we employed multiple logistic regression methods to examine whether unwanted sexual contact was associated with stress, screening positive for mental disorders, or substance use, among active duty service women. The sample included 7,415 female military personnel, of whom 13.4% reported unwanted sexual contact (including any touching of genitals) since entering the military. After adjusting for potentially confounding variables, factors independently associated with unwanted sexual contact included military-related stress (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.44), family/personal life-related stress (AOR = 1.78), and gender-related stress (AOR = 1.98) in the past 12 months. In addition, screening positive for depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychological distress, and suicidal ideation or attempt were associated with unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.57–2.11). For drug/alcohol use, only misuse of tranquilizers/muscle relaxers (past 12 months) was associated with report of unwanted sexual contact (AOR = 1.35). Given the prevalence of unwanted sexual contact and corresponding adverse health outcomes in this sample of active duty women, strategies to create military structural/cultural changes and reduce gender-related stress and sexism are needed. PMID:25976935

  2. Commercial valerian interactions with [3H]Flunitrazepam and [3H]MK-801 binding to rat synaptic membranes.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, José G; Rassi, Nicole; Maldonado, Patricia M; González-Cabrera, Silvia; Ramos, Igmeris

    2006-09-01

    Valeriana officinalis extracts are used in folkloric medicine for their sedative, hypnotic and tranquilizer effects. Using [3H]flunitrazepam binding as an indicator, the interactions of commercial Valerian extracts with GABA(A) receptors were examined. There was considerable fluctuation among the different extracts, some mildly enhanced [3H]flunitrazepam binding, others had no effect and others had inhibitory effects, independent of standardization by valerenic acid. Central depression can also be accomplished by a reduction of excitatory transmission. Valerian extracts had modest inhibitory effects on [3H]MK-801 binding, an indicator of NMDA-Valerian interactions. Spectral analyses (UV region) did not show marked differences among the different extracts. The inhibitory effects of one of the extracts on [3H]flunitrazepam binding was somewhat stable, while on [3H]MK-801 binding the inhibitory effects were lost within months. These results suggest that particular care should be taken in analysing and interpreting results from commercial Valerian preparations. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Valeriana officinalis Extracts Ameliorate Neuronal Damage by Suppressing Lipid Peroxidation in the Gerbil Hippocampus Following Transient Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Young; Jung, Hyo Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kwak, Youn-Gil; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Yoon, Yeo Sung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As a medicinal plant, the roots of Valeriana officinalis have been used as a sedative and tranquilizer. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effects of valerian root extracts (VE) on the hippocampal CA1 region of gerbils after 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia. Gerbils were administered VE orally once a day for 3 weeks, subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and continued on VE for 3 weeks. The administration of 100 mg/kg VE (VE100 group) significantly reduced the ischemia-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity 1 day after ischemia/reperfusion. Four days after ischemia/reperfusion, animals treated with VE showed abundant cresyl violet-positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region when compared to the vehicle or 25 mg/kg VE-treated groups. In addition, the VE treatment markedly decreased microglial activation in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia. Compared to the other groups, the VE100 group showed the lowest level of lipid peroxidation during the first 24 h after ischemia/reperfusion. In summary, the findings in this study suggest that pretreatment with VE has protective effects against ischemic injury in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons by decreasing microglial activation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:25785762

  4. Valeriana officinalis Extracts Ameliorate Neuronal Damage by Suppressing Lipid Peroxidation in the Gerbil Hippocampus Following Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Jung, Hyo Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kwak, Youn-Gil; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2015-06-01

    As a medicinal plant, the roots of Valeriana officinalis have been used as a sedative and tranquilizer. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective effects of valerian root extracts (VE) on the hippocampal CA1 region of gerbils after 5 min of transient cerebral ischemia. Gerbils were administered VE orally once a day for 3 weeks, subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury, and continued on VE for 3 weeks. The administration of 100 mg/kg VE (VE100 group) significantly reduced the ischemia-induced spontaneous motor hyperactivity 1 day after ischemia/reperfusion. Four days after ischemia/reperfusion, animals treated with VE showed abundant cresyl violet-positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region when compared to the vehicle or 25 mg/kg VE-treated groups. In addition, the VE treatment markedly decreased microglial activation in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia. Compared to the other groups, the VE100 group showed the lowest level of lipid peroxidation during the first 24 h after ischemia/reperfusion. In summary, the findings in this study suggest that pretreatment with VE has protective effects against ischemic injury in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons by decreasing microglial activation and lipid peroxidation.

  5. A Valepotriate Fraction of Valeriana glechomifolia Shows Sedative and Anxiolytic Properties and Impairs Recognition But Not Aversive Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Maurmann, Natasha; Reolon, Gustavo Kellermann; Rech, Sandra Beatriz; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Roesler, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Plants of the genus Valeriana (Valerianaceae) are used in traditional medicine as a mild sedative, antispasmodic and tranquilizer in many countries. This study was undertaken to explore the neurobehavioral effects of systemic administration of a valepotriate extract fraction of known quantitative composition of Valeriana glechomifolia (endemic of southern Brazil) in mice. Adult animals were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of valepotriate fraction (VF) in the concentrations of 1, 3 or 10 mg kg−1, or with vehicle in the pre-training period before each behavioral test. During the exploration of an open field, mice treated with 10 mg kg−1 of VF showed reduced locomotion and exploratory behavior. Although overall habituation sessions for locomotion and exploratory behavior among vehicle control and doses of VF were not affected, comparison between open-field and habituation sessions within each treatment showed that VF administration at 1 and 10 mg kg−1 impaired habituation. In the elevated plus-maze test, mice treated with VF (10 mg kg−1) showed a significant increase in the percentage of time spent in the open arms without significant effects in the number of total arm entries. VF at 3 mg kg−1 produced an impairment of novel-object recognition memory. In contrast, VF did not affect fear-related memory assessed in an inhibitory avoidance task. The results indicate that VF can have sedative effects and affect behavioral parameters related to recognition memory. PMID:20047889

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins,Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon, while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. The LM was a two part spacecraft. Its lower or descent stage had the landing gear, engines, and fuel needed for the landing. When the LM blasted off the Moon, the descent stage served as the launching pad for its companion ascent stage, which was also home for the two astronauts on the surface of the Moon. The LM was full of gear with which to communicate, navigate, and rendezvous. It also had its own propulsion system, and an engine to lift it off the Moon and send it on a course toward the orbiting CM. In this photograph, the shadow of one of the Apollo 11 astronauts can be seen (lower left) as the other snaps a shot of the LM on its landing site.

  7. Illicit drug use by persons with disabilities: insights from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, S F; Chilcoat, H D; Stapleton, J M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to evaluate the association of drug use with disability in a representative sample of the US household population. METHODS: The use of illicit drugs and alcohol reported by respondents in the 1991 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse who identified themselves as "disabled, unable to work" was compared with respondents without disabilities. RESULTS: Among younger adults (18-24 years), persons with disabilities were more likely than those without disabilities to report that they had used heroin (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 6.89; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.35, 35.1) or crack cocaine (OR = 6.38; 95% CI = 1.05, 38.6). Among older adults (35 years and older), persons with disabilities were more likely to report the use of sedatives (OR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.21, 4.94) or tranquilizers (OR = 2.18: 95% CI = 1.08; 4.42) not medically prescribed. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that use of illicit drugs is a potentially serious problem among persons with disabilities and requires both research and clinical attention. PMID:8916529

  8. [Drug consumption and occupational violence in working women of Monterrey, N. L., Mexico].

    PubMed

    Alonso Castillo, Maria Magdalena; Caufield, Catherine; Gómez Meza, Marco Vinicio

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore drug consumption and occupational violence in a sample of 669 adult women, working and living in 13 basic geostatistical areas of Monterrey, Nuevo León, México, using a descriptive correlational design with a qualitative approach. Results indicated that 37.1% of women consumed alcohol, 29.1% tobacco, 0.4% marihuana, 0.1% inhalants, and, among medical drugs, 5% consumed tranquilizers, and 1% other substances (barbiturates, antidepressive agents, Tylenol/codeine). The c2 test found no significant difference between sociodemographic and occupational factors and drug consumption (p<.05), except for the work form (c2=18.08, gl=4, p=.001). However, violence rate showed a positive association with drug consumption (p<.05). This study found 126 cases of violence, 34 of which narrated their experience. Drug consumption and violence perception was identified in 2 categories: Conceptualization of Occupational Violence and Relationship between Violence and Drug Consumption.

  9. Israel under threat of biological warfare--the reactions of our patients during the 1998 Persian Gulf crisis.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, S; Vinker, S; Monnickendam, S; Cohen, O; Disegni, M; Kitai, E

    2000-05-01

    During February 1998, there was heightened tension in the Persian Gulf area. Iraq's ruler, Saddam Hussein, threatened Israeli citizens with the use of biological weapons. This study observed the use of health care services by patients visiting our clinics during this period. During the period of February 17, 1998, through March 1, 1998, 12 family physicians classified all clinic visits as "related" or "unrelated" to the crisis. The participating clinics were situated in (A) high-risk and (B) low-risk areas, according to their location as related to missile hits during the 1991 Gulf War. A total of 1,841 visits were recorded during the crisis period (February 17-23). There were 934 visits in Area A and 907 in Area B. Overall, 194 visits related to the crisis were recorded, of which 155 were in Area A. The rate of crisis-related visits was higher in Area A (16.6% versus 3.4%). There were more visits for authorizations for special masks (8.2% versus .8%), requests for information (3.9% versus 1.3%), and tranquilizers (2.1% versus .5%). In the period subsequent to the agreement reached on February 24, crisis-related visits declined sharply in both areas. During the crisis, there was an increase in visits related to the threat of biological warfare. The phenomenon was more pronounced in areas that had sustained missile hits during the 1991 Gulf War.

  10. People Control Their Addictions: No matter how much the "chronic" brain disease model of addiction indicates otherwise, we know that people can quit addictions - with special reference to harm reduction and mindfulness.

    PubMed

    Peele, Stanton

    2016-12-01

    The world, led by the United States, is hell bent on establishing the absence of choice in addiction, as expressed by the defining statement that addiction is a " chronic relapsing brain disease" (my emphasis). The figure most associated with this model, the director of the American National Institute on Drug Abuse, Nora Volkow, claims that addiction vitiates free will through its effects on the brain. In reality, while by no means a simple task, people regularly quit their substance addictions, often by moderating their consumption, usually through mindfulness-mediated processes (Peele, 2007). Ironically, the brain disease model's ascendance in the U.S. corresponds with epidemic rises in opiate addiction, both painkillers (Brady et al., 2016) and heroin (CDC, n.d.), as well as heroin, painkiller, and tranquilizer poisoning deaths (Rudd et al., 2016). More to the point, the conceptual and treatment goal of eliminating choice in addiction and recovery is not only futile, but iatrogenic. Indeed, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's epidemiological surveys, while finding natural recovery for both drug and alcohol disorders to be typical, has found a decline in natural recovery rates (Dawson et al., 2005) and a sharp increase in AUDs (Grant et al., 2015).

  11. Addressing holistic health and work empowerment through a body-mind-spirit intervention program among helping professionals in continuous education: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Sing, Cheuk Yan; Wong, Venus P Y

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a body-mind-spirit (BMS) intervention program in improving the holistic well-being and work empowerment among helping professionals in continuous education. Forty-four helping professionals, who were in their first-year part-time postgraduate study, participated in the present study. All participants attended a 3-day BMS intervention program which emphasized a holistic approach to health and well-being. Ratings on their levels of physical distress, daily functioning, affect, spirituality, and psychological empowerment at work were compared before and immediately after the intervention. Participants reported significantly lower levels of negative affect and physical distress, and were less spiritually disoriented after the intervention. Enhanced levels of daily functioning, positive affect, spiritual resilience, and tranquility were also reported. Results also suggested that participants were empowered at work, and specifically felt more able to make an impact on work outcomes. The 3-day BMS intervention program produced a positive and measurable effect on participants' holistic well-being and empowerment at work. Educators in related fields could incorporate holistic practices into the curriculum to better prepare the future practitioners, leading to better outcomes both to the professionals themselves and their clients or patients.

  12. Networks of volatility spillovers among stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumöhl, Eduard; Kočenda, Evžen; Lyócsa, Štefan; Výrost, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    In our network analysis of 40 developed, emerging and frontier stock markets during the 2006-2014 period, we describe and model volatility spillovers during both the global financial crisis and tranquil periods. The resulting market interconnectedness is depicted by fitting a spatial model incorporating several exogenous characteristics. We document the presence of significant temporal proximity effects between markets and somewhat weaker temporal effects with regard to the US equity market - volatility spillovers decrease when markets are characterized by greater temporal proximity. Volatility spillovers also present a high degree of interconnectedness, which is measured by high spatial autocorrelation. This finding is confirmed by spatial regression models showing that indirect effects are much stronger than direct effects; i.e., market-related changes in 'neighboring' markets (within a network) affect volatility spillovers more than changes in the given market alone, suggesting that spatial effects simply cannot be ignored when modeling stock market relationships. Our results also link spillovers of escalating magnitude with increasing market size, market liquidity and economic openness.

  13. sts-130patch-design-finalthreads

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-18

    STS130-S-001 (September 2009) --- The STS-130 patch was designed by the crew to reflect both the objectives of the mission and its place in the history of human spaceflight. The main goal of the mission is to deliver Node 3 and the Cupola to the International Space Station (ISS). Node 3, named ?Tranquility,? will contain life support systems enabling continued human presence in orbit aboard the ISS. The shape of the patch represents the Cupola, which is the windowed robotics viewing station, from which astronauts will have the opportunity not only to monitor a variety of ISS operations, but also to study our home planet. The image of Earth depicted in the patch is the first photograph of Earth taken from the moon by Lunar Orbiter I on Aug. 23, 1966. As both a past and a future destination for explorers from planet Earth, the moon is thus represented symbolically in the STS-130 patch. The space shuttle Endeavour is pictured approaching the ISS, symbolizing the space shuttle's role as the prime construction vehicle for the ISS. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA

  14. The acute mania of King George III: A computational linguistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rentoumi, Vassiliki; Peters, Timothy; Conlin, Jonathan; Garrard, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We used a computational linguistic approach, exploiting machine learning techniques, to examine the letters written by King George III during mentally healthy and apparently mentally ill periods of his life. The aims of the study were: first, to establish the existence of alterations in the King's written language at the onset of his first manic episode; and secondly to identify salient sources of variation contributing to the changes. Effects on language were sought in two control conditions (politically stressful vs. politically tranquil periods and seasonal variation). We found clear differences in the letter corpus, across a range of different features, in association with the onset of mental derangement, which were driven by a combination of linguistic and information theory features that appeared to be specific to the contrast between acute mania and mental stability. The paucity of existing data relevant to changes in written language in the presence of acute mania suggests that lexical, syntactic and stylometric descriptions of written discourse produced by a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of acute mania will be necessary to support the diagnosis independently and to look for other periods of mental illness of the course of the King's life, and in other historically significant figures with similarly large archives of handwritten documents.

  15. Prior medical conditions and medication use and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Connecticut United States women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Leaderer, Brian; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Boyle, Peter; Morton, Lindsay McOmber; Zhang, Bing; Zou, Kaiyong; Flynn, Stuart; Tallini, Giovanni; Owens, Patricia H; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2004-05-01

    To further investigate the role of prior medical conditions and medication use in the etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we analyzed the data from a population-based case-control study of NHL in Connecticut women. A total of 601 histologically confirmed incident cases of NHL and 717 population-based controls were included in this study. In-person interviews were administered using standardized, structured questionnaires to collect information on medical conditions and medication use. An increased risk was found among women who had a history of autoimmune disorders (such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, and multiple sclerosis), anemia, eczema, or psoriasis. An increased risk was also observed among women who had used steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tranquilizers. A reduced risk was found for women who had scarlet fever or who had used estrogen replacement therapy, aspirin, medications for non-insulin dependent diabetes, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or beta-adrenergic blocking agents. Risk associated with past medical history appeared to vary based on NHL subtypes, but the results were based on small number of exposed subjects. A relationship between certain prior medical conditions and medication use and risk of NHL was observed in this study. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings.

  16. [Acute accidental poisoning in children: aspects of their epidemiology, aetiology, and outcome at the Charles de Gaulle Paediatric Hospital in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Kouéta, Fla; Dao, Lassina; Yé, Diarra; Fayama, Zéinabou; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2009-01-01

    Accidents are a daily concern in the paediatric ward because of their frequency, diversity and severity. Acute accidental poisoning (AAP) accounts for an important portion of these. To help improvement management of AAP, we conducted a retrospective study covering a period of 2 years from January 2005 to December 2006 at Charles de Gaulle Paediatric University Hospital in Ouagadougou. Of 9390 admissions during the study period, 123 children, or 1.3%, were admitted for poisoning. A cumulative average of 11 were admitted monthly, with a peak of 16 patients in April 2005 and 2006, together. AAP was most common among children aged 1 to 4 years. Their mean age was 3 years and ranged from 6 days to 12 years. Boys outnumbered girls, with a sex ratio of 1.2. Mothers of more than half (61%) of the children poisoned worked in the home. Household products accounted for 44.7% of AAPs, followed by drug (22.7%) and food (22%) poisoning. Kerosene and other petroleum products topped the list of household products, with 54.5%. Tranquilizers (46.4%) and dairy products (37%) dominated the drug and food poisoning categories. Immediate outcome was fatal in 3% of cases, and three quarters of these deaths occurred during drug poisoning of children aged 1 to 4 years. The mean hospital stay was 2 days, and ranged from 0 to 9 days. Health officials, the media, and community outreach must all help to increase awareness about the dangers of poisoning and of preventive measures.

  17. Wave trapping by dual porous barriers near a wall in the presence of bottom undulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Manisha; Sahoo, T.

    2017-09-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  18. [Addictive behavior in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Adès, J; Lejoyeux, M

    1994-06-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse are the two main addictions in the elderly subject. Prevalence of alcohol dependency is 14% in those over 65 years of age and 17% in elderly psychiatric patients. The distribution of alcoholism between the sexes becomes equal with age. After 65 years of age, the sex-ratio is 1 female to 1.3 male subjects. The elderly alcoholic population consists of both subjects having become alcoholics at a young age and those in whom alcoholic behaviour appeared at a late age. In one third of elderly alcoholics such dependency appeared after 60 years of age. The main risk factors for alcoholism in the elderly subject are lonliness, death of the spouse and the presence of an invalid or bedridden spouse. In the elderly, tolerance to and dependence on alcohol are rare and appear late. Somatic complications are particularly severe (cirrhosis, liver cancer, gastritis, acute pancreatitis and myocardial involvement). Psychiatric complications include anxiety, depression and especially suicide. Alcoholism is the third most frequent cause of organic cerebral dementia, following Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Drug dependency is very often linked to alcoholism and consists of tranquillizers and less often of antalgics.

  19. Anaesthesia with medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane with and without midazolam, in eight captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol.

    PubMed

    Adami, C; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Morath, U; Bergadano, A

    2013-08-01

    In 8 captive adult chimpanzees of various ages premedicated with oral zuclopenthixol anaesthesia was induced intramuscularly with a combination of medetomidine and ketamine (40 or 50 µg/kg and 5 mg/kg, IM, respectively), with and without midazolam (0.05 mg/kg), and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. At the end of the procedure, sedation was reversed with atipamezole (0.25 mg/kg, IM) and sarmazenil (0.005 mg/kg, IM) when midazolam had been administered. Oral zuclopenthixol resulted in tranquillization of the whole group and only one animal required a second dart injection to achieve adequately deep anaesthesia. Effective and reliable anaesthesia was achieved in all apes; the depth of hypnosis was stable and sudden arousal did not occur. Physiological parameters remained within normal ranges in the majority of the animals; however, manageable anaesthesia-related complications, namely apnoea after darting, hypotension, hypoventilation, hypoxemia and prolonged recovery, occurred in 6 out of 8 animals. The use of monitoring devices was essential to guarantee adequate management of these complications.

  20. Are the noise levels acceptable in a built environment like Hong Kong?

    PubMed Central

    To, Wai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming; Chung, Wai Leung

    2015-01-01

    Governments all over the world have enacted environmental noise directives and noise control ordinances/acts to protect tranquility in residential areas. However, there is a lack of literature on the evaluation of whether the Acceptable Noise Levels (ANLs) stipulated in the directive/ordinance/act are actually achievable. The study aimed at measuring outdoor environmental noise levels in Hong Kong and identifying whether the measured noise levels are lower than the stipulated ANLs at 20 categories of residential areas. Data were gathered from a territory-wide noise survey. Outdoor noise measurements were conducted at 203 residential premises in urban areas, low-density residential areas, rural areas, and other areas. In total, 366 daytime hourly Leq outdoor noise levels, 362 nighttime hourly Leq outdoor noise levels, and 20 sets of daily, that is, 24 Leq,1-h outdoor noise levels were recorded. The mean daytime Leq,1-h values ranged 54.4-70.8 dBA, while the mean nighttime Leq,1-h values ranged 52.6-67.9 dBA. When the measured noise levels were compared with the stipulated ANLs, only three out of the 20 categories of areas had outdoor noise levels below ANLs during daytime. All other areas (and all areas during nighttime) were found to have outdoor noise levels at or above ANLs. PMID:26572703