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Sample records for transient neurological symptoms

  1. Behavioural and psychiatric symptoms in cognitive neurology.

    PubMed

    Robles Bayón, A; Gude Sampedro, F

    2017-03-01

    Behavioural and psychiatric symptoms (BPS) are frequent in neurological patients, contribute to disability, and decrease quality of life. We recorded BPS prevalence and type, as well as any associations with specific diagnoses, brain regions, and treatments, in consecutive outpatients examined in a cognitive neurology clinic.

  2. Transient neurologic event following administration of foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Malvehy, Mario Albert; Asbjornsen, Cindy

    2017-02-01

    This report describes a complication of symptoms consistent with transient ischemic attack following administration of physician-compounded foam sclerotherapy created with room air. After intravenous administration of 8 cc of foam sclerosant prepared with room air and polidocanol using the Tessari method, an otherwise healthy man experienced transient neurologic changes. Immediately following injection of foam, a dense hemiplegia consistent with interruption of the middle cerebral arterial circulation was observed. The patient's symptoms resolved completely over approximately 30 min with interventions including Trendelenburg positioning and supplemental oxygen via nasal cannula. PCP foam sclerotherapy with room air administered in typical concentrations, preparations, and volumes may result in severe neurologic events in otherwise healthy individuals. Continued investigation into the potential role of product, gas, volume and technique to identify optimal approaches may further refine the consistency and safety of foam sclerotherapy.

  3. Network localization of neurological symptoms from focal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Boes, Aaron D; Prasad, Sashank; Liu, Hesheng; Liu, Qi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Caviness, Verne S; Fox, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    A traditional and widely used approach for linking neurological symptoms to specific brain regions involves identifying overlap in lesion location across patients with similar symptoms, termed lesion mapping. This approach is powerful and broadly applicable, but has limitations when symptoms do not localize to a single region or stem from dysfunction in regions connected to the lesion site rather than the site itself. A newer approach sensitive to such network effects involves functional neuroimaging of patients, but this requires specialized brain scans beyond routine clinical data, making it less versatile and difficult to apply when symptoms are rare or transient. In this article we show that the traditional approach to lesion mapping can be expanded to incorporate network effects into symptom localization without the need for specialized neuroimaging of patients. Our approach involves three steps: (i) transferring the three-dimensional volume of a brain lesion onto a reference brain; (ii) assessing the intrinsic functional connectivity of the lesion volume with the rest of the brain using normative connectome data; and (iii) overlapping lesion-associated networks to identify regions common to a clinical syndrome. We first tested our approach in peduncular hallucinosis, a syndrome of visual hallucinations following subcortical lesions long hypothesized to be due to network effects on extrastriate visual cortex. While the lesions themselves were heterogeneously distributed with little overlap in lesion location, 22 of 23 lesions were negatively correlated with extrastriate visual cortex. This network overlap was specific compared to other subcortical lesions (P < 10(-5)) and relative to other cortical regions (P < 0.01). Next, we tested for generalizability of our technique by applying it to three additional lesion syndromes: central post-stroke pain, auditory hallucinosis, and subcortical aphasia. In each syndrome, heterogeneous lesions that themselves had

  4. Challenging neurological symptoms in paediatric palliative care: An approach to symptom evaluation and management in children with neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Lisa Ann; Grégoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Neurological symptoms are very common in children with life-limiting conditions and are challenging in terms of burden of illness. Moreover, neurological symptoms can significantly impact the child’s quality of life and contribute to distress among parents, families, caregivers and health care providers. Knowing how to manage and alleviated these symptoms is essential for providing good palliative care. In the present article, the more common neurological symptoms of agitation/irritability, spasticity and dystonia will be reviewed. The aim of the present brief review is to provide a basic approach to both the identification and treatment of these neurological symptoms. A medication table is provided for quick reference. A brief commentary and guidance for the management of pain are also incorporated, with reference to further literature sources. PMID:25914579

  5. Neurologic symptoms following Pfiesteria exposure: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bever, C T; Grattan, L; Morris, J G

    1998-05-01

    Although the recently identified dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida, may have neurotoxic effects on humans, the precise nature of the neurologic symptoms associated with varying levels of exposure is unknown. Toward this end, we review the neurologic symptoms of three Pfiesteria-exposed laboratory workers reported to data and compare them to the evaluation of an exposed waterman from Maryland. The occupational exposure of a Maryland waterman appears to produce a mild, reversible encephalopathy which predominantly affects functions associated with the frontal and temporal lobes. A comprehensive neurologic examination is recommended for all Pfiesteria piscicida and morphologically related organism-exposed, symptomatic persons.

  6. Functional symptoms in neurology: questions and answers

    PubMed Central

    Reuber, M; Mitchell, A; Howlett, S; Crimlisk, H; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Between 10 and 30% of patients seen by neurologists have symptoms for which there is no current pathophysiological explanation. The objective of this review is to answer questions many neurologists have about disorders characterised by unexplained symptoms (functional disorders) by conducting a multidisciplinary review based on published reports and clinical experience. Current concepts explain functional symptoms as resulting from auto-suggestion, innate coping styles, disorders of volition or attention. Predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating aetiological factors can be identified and contribute to a therapeutic formulation. The sympathetic communication of the diagnosis by the neurologist is important and all patients should be screened for psychiatric or psychological symptoms because up to two thirds have symptomatic psychiatric comorbidity. Treatment programmes are likely to be most successful if there is close collaboration between neurologists, (liaison) psychiatrists, psychologists, and general practitioners. Long term, symptoms persist in over 50% of patients and many patients remain dependent on financial help from the government. Neurologists can acquire the skills needed to engage patients in psychological treatment but would benefit from closer working relationships with liaison psychiatry or psychology. PMID:15716517

  7. Fat embolism syndrome in a patient demonstrating only neurologic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bardana, David; Rudan, John; Cervenko, Frank; Smith, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a recognized complication of both long bone fractures and intramedullary orthopedic procedures. The usual presenting features are respiratory failure, neurologic dysfunction and petechiae. In this report, a 25-year-old woman with FES presented with serious neurologic symptoms and signs in the absence of respiratory dysfunction. The diagnosis is essentially a clinical one, but nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed distinctive lesions that may help future diagnosis of FES. PMID:9793509

  8. Adult phenylketonuria presenting with subacute severe neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Seki, M; Takizawa, T; Suzuki, S; Shimizu, T; Shibata, H; Ishii, T; Hasegawa, T; Suzuki, N

    2015-08-01

    We report a 48-year-old Japanese woman with phenylketonuria (PKU) who presented with severe neurological symptoms more than 30 years after discontinuation of dietary treatment. She was diagnosed with PKU at 6-years-old and was treated with a phenylalanine restricted diet until she was 15 years old. When she was 48-years-old she started having difficulty walking. After several months, she presented with severe disturbance of consciousness and was admitted. She was diagnosed as having neurological complications associated with PKU. We observed temporal changes in her laboratory data, brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan findings. Brain MRI on T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted images revealed high intensity lesions in her bilateral frontal lobes and 123I-IMP SPECT showed marked and diffuse hypoperfusion in the bilateral cerebrum and cerebellum. After the resumption of dietary treatment, serum phenylalanine concentrations immediately decreased to the normal range. However, her neurological symptoms took longer to improve. We also found no clear temporal association between MRI findings and clinical severity. SPECT abnormalities showed marked improvement after treatment. It is well known that PKU patients who discontinue the dietary restriction from their childhood develop minor neurological impairments. However, PKU patients with late-onset severe neurological symptoms are very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding SPECT findings of PKU patients with late-onset severe neurological deterioration.

  9. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  10. Neurological symptoms and natural course of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Anttinen, Anu; Koulu, Leena; Nikoskelainen, Eeva; Portin, Raija; Kurki, Timo; Erkinjuntti, Matti; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Raams, Anja; Green, Michael H L; Lehmann, Alan R; Wing, Jonathan F; Arlett, Colin F; Marttila, Reijo J

    2008-08-01

    We have prospectively followed 16 Finnish xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients for up to 23 years. Seven patients were assigned by complementation analysis to the group XP-A, two patients to the XP-C group and one patient to the XP-G group. Six of the seven XP-A patients had the identical mutation (Arg228Ter) and the seventh patient had a different mutation (G283A). Further patients were assigned to complementation groups on the basis of their consanguinity to an XP patient with a known complementation group. The first sign of the disease in all the cases was severe sunburn with minimal sun exposure in early infancy. However, at the time the diagnosis was made in only two cases. The XP-A patients developed neurological and cognitive dysfunction in childhood. The neurological disease advanced in an orderly fashion through its successive stages, finally affecting the whole nervous system and leading to death before the age of 40 years. Dermatological and ocular damage of the XP-A patients tended to be limited. The two XP-C patients were neurologically and cognitively intact despite mild brain atrophy as seen by neuroimaging. The XP-G patients had sensorineural hearing loss, laryngeal dystonia and peripheral neuropathy. The XP-C patients had severe skin and ocular malignancies that first presented at pre-school age. They also showed immunosuppression in cell-mediated immunity. Neurological disease appears to be associated with the complementation group and the failure of fibroblasts to recover RNA synthesis following UV irradiation, but not necessarily to the severity of the dermatological symptoms, the hypersensitivity of fibroblasts to UVB killing or the susceptibility of keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis.

  11. [Two horses with neurological symptoms: could this be equine botulism?].

    PubMed

    Roest, H I J; de Bruijn, C M; Picavet, M T J E; Prins, B; Parmentier, D; de Zwart, G M A M; Dijkstra, Y E; van Zijderveld, F G

    2009-10-01

    Symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of equine botulism are discussed by the presentation of two detailed reports of horses with neurological symptoms and the results of laboratory investigations over the period 2003-2008 in the Netherlands. In addition a brief summary of the available literature is presented. Prevailing symptoms of botulism in horses include paralysis of the tongue, salvation, dysphagia and paresis and paralysis of the skeletal muscles, as well as signs of colic. Symptoms and prognosis vary with the amount of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) involved. For early clinical diagnosis of botulism thorough investigation of the facial nerves is important, for instance by the use of the 'Tongue Stress Test'. Laboratory results often remain negative, probably due to the sampling time, the high sensitivity of horses for botulinum neurotoxin or treatment with antitoxins. Most clinical cases in horses are caused by botulinum neurotoxin B (BoNT/B). For therapy to be successful antiserum needs to be administered in the earliest possible stage of the disease and this should be supported by symptomatic therapy. Botulism is a feed-related intoxication caused by either carcasses in the roughage or BoNT/B production after poor conservation of grass silage. This is the main source of botulism in horses due to the popularity of individually packed grass silage as feed for horses. As long as no vaccine is available in the Netherlands quality control of silage and haylage is strictly recommended in order to reduce the risk of botulism in horses.

  12. Increase in ECHOvirus 6 infections associated with neurological symptoms in the Netherlands, June to August 2016

    PubMed Central

    Benschop, Kimberley SM; Geeraedts, Felix; Beuvink, Barbara; Spit, Silke A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Claas, Eric CJ; Pas, Suzan D; Schuurman, Rob; Verweij, Jaco J; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Wolthers, Katja C; Niesters, Hubert GM; Koopmans, Marion; Duizer, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch virus-typing network VIRO-TypeNed reported an increase in ECHOvirus 6 (E-6) infections with neurological symptoms in the Netherlands between June and August 2016. Of the 31 cases detected from January through August 2016, 15 presented with neurological symptoms. Ten of 15 neurological cases were detected in the same province and the identified viruses were genetically related. This report is to alert medical and public health professionals of the circulation of E-6 associated with neurological symptoms. PMID:27719751

  13. The classification of conversion disorder (functional neurologic symptom disorder) in ICD and DSM.

    PubMed

    Levenson, J L; Sharpe, M

    2017-01-01

    The name given to functional neurologic symptoms has evolved over time in the different editions of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), reflecting a gradual move away from an etiologic conception rooted in hysterical conversion to an empiric phenomenologic one, emphasizing the central role of the neurologic examination and testing in demonstrating that the symptoms are incompatible with recognized neurologic disease pathophysiology, or are internally inconsistent.

  14. [Cerebral dysfunction, neurologic symptoms and persistent deliquency. II. Results of the Heidelberg Delinquency Project].

    PubMed

    Kröber, H L; Scheurer, H; Sass, H

    1994-07-01

    In a multidimensional model, the "Heidelberg Delinquency Study" explores biological, biographical, psychological and social factors that may be important to the development and persistence of violent crimes. After a survey of the literature in part I (22) the empirical results in the areas of neurological anamnesis, neurological findings and nonfocal neurological ("soft") signs and their correlations with other variables, e.g. criminal relapses, are reported. In our population of 129 adult offenders we found a high relevance of nonfocal neurological signs. These symptoms were associated with problems in social adjustment and conduct disorder in childhood, cognitive impairment, reduced emotional response, externalizing attributional style and a pattern of rapid delinquent relapses.

  15. Early onset of neurological symptoms in fragile X premutation carriers exposed to neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ripon; Pessah, Isaac N.; Gane, Louise; Ono, Michele; Hagerman, Paul J.; Brunberg, James A.; Tassone, Flora; Bourgeois, James A.; Adams, Patrick E.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Hagerman, Randi

    2014-01-01

    We present four cases of fragile X premutation carriers with early neurological symptoms, including symptoms consistent with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Each patient had significant exposure to one or more environmental neurotoxicants that have documented neurotoxicity (i.e. hexachlorocyclopentadiene or C56, Agent Orange, and 2,4- or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and dichlormate). We hypothesize that premutation carriers are a vulnerable group to neurotoxins because elevated mRNA in the premutation can lead to early cell death and brain disease, leading to neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms consistent with FXTAS. PMID:20466021

  16. Acute neurological symptoms during hypobaric exposure: consider cerebral air embolism.

    PubMed

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; van Hulst, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is well known as a complication of invasive medical procedures and as a risk in diving and submarine escape. In the underwater environment, CAGE is caused by trapped air, which expands and leads to lung vessel rupture when ambient pressure decreases during ascent. Pressure decrease also occurs during hypobaric activities such as flying and, therefore, CAGE may theoretically be a risk in hypobaric exposure. We reviewed the available literature on this subject. Identified were 12 cases of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. Based on these cases, we discuss pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CAGE due to hypobaric exposure. The low and slow pressure decrease during most hypobaric activities (as opposed to diving) account for the low incidence of CAGE during these exposures and suggest that severe air trapping must be present to cause barotrauma. This is also suggested by the large prevalence of air filled cysts in the case reports reviewed. We recommend considering CAGE in all patients presenting with acute central neurological injury during or shortly after pressure decrease such as flying. A CT scan of head and chest should be performed in these patients. Treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy should be initiated as soon as possible in cases of proven or probable CAGE.

  17. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Assogna, Francesca; Fagioli, Sabrina; Cravello, Luca; Meco, Giuseppe; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Imperiale, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pontieri, Francesco E; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with that of control subjects (CS) suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses. Methods One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MIND), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR), criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were also administered to measure depression severity. Results When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP), comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of depression in MDD PD, with no differences in MIND. However, the severity of individual symptom frequency of depression was not different between PD and CS in MDD, MIND, and NODEP groups. Conclusion Although MDD and MIND phenomenology in PD may be very similar to that of CS with non-neurological medical illnesses, neurological symptoms of PD may worsen (or confound) depression severity in patients with no formal/structured DSM-IV-TR, diagnosis of depressive mood disorders. Thus, a thorough assessment of depression in PD should take into consideration the different impacts of neurological manifestations on MDD, MIND, and NODEP. PMID

  18. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking.

  19. Anthropological neurology: symptoms and their meanings according to Joseph Prick (1909-1978).

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, B C; Dekkers, W J M; Keyser, A; van Woerkom, T C A M

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the life and work of the Dutch neurologist Joseph Prick (1909-1978) and his idea of an anthropological neurology. According to Prick, neurological symptoms should not only be explained from an underlying physico-chemical substrate but also be regarded as meaningful. We present an outline of the historical and philosophical context of his ideas with a focus on the theory of the human body by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961) and the concept of anthropology-based medicine developed by Frederik Buytendijk (1887-1974). We give an overview of anthropological neurology as a clinical practice and finally we discuss the value of Prick's approach for clinical neurology today.

  20. [A case of volatile solvent psychosis accompanied with multiple neurological and psychological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Miyashita, H; Saito, T; Sasaki, Y; Ishigaki, H; Ikemoto, M; Nakano, N; Midorikawa, Y; Toki, S; Watanabe, M; Takahata, N

    1996-04-01

    A case of psychosis accompanied with variable symptoms induced by chronic volatile solvent inhalation is reported in this study. The patient was a 27-year-old male who had abused volatile solvents for 15 years, and was sent to the hospital because of a tonic-clonic seizure. Severe psychomotor excitement was observed on the first day and the 7th day after admission. After 10 days of admission, we observed visual transformation and hyperthermia, which suggested acute toxic symptoms due to a volatile solvent. Furthermore, symptoms such as incoherence, delusions of persecution, and catalepsy were also observed in this case. There have been few reports of multiple neurological and mental symptoms appearing in cases of volatile solvent psychosis. Although we sometimes experience cases of solvent abuse with acute mental symptoms and recurrent excitement after sedation, such symptoms are not always observed because of flashback in the strict sense. Therefore, careful early treatment should be employed to prevent 'secondary excitement'.

  1. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  2. Severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Only a high-energy force can cause thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation injuries, and such injuries should always be suspected in patients with polytrauma. The injury is usually accompanied by neurological symptoms. There are only a few cases of severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms in the literature, and until now, no case of severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and without costal fractures has been reported. Case presentation A 30-year-old Han Chinese man had T6 to T7 vertebral fracture and anterolateral dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures. The three-dimensional reconstruction by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated the injuries in detail. A patient with thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms inclines to further dislocation of the spine and secondary neurological injury; therefore, laminectomy, reduction and internal fixations with rods and screws were done. The outcome was good. Severe spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms should be evaluated in detail, especially with three-dimensional reconstruction by computed tomography. Although treatment is individualized, reduction and internal fixation are advised for the patient if the condition is suitable for operation. Conclusions Severe thoracic spinal fracture-dislocation without neurological symptoms and costal fractures is frighteningly rare; an operation should be done if the patient's condition permits. PMID:25316002

  3. Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in two sibs with mild psycho-neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, G; son Blomquist, H K

    1977-02-01

    Non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH) has been diagnosed in two sibs. At the age 2:5 years and 1:3 years respectively only moderate psycho-motor retardation and muscular hypotonia were seen in the elderly child while no psycho-neurological symptoms were seen in the younger sib. Neither of the children had convulsions. This observation is in contrast to earlier published cases of this disorder. A summary of earlier published cases of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia is presented.

  4. Medically unexplained neurologic symptoms: a primer for physicians who make the initial encounter.

    PubMed

    Evens, Ashley; Vendetta, Lindsay; Krebs, Kaitlin; Herath, Priyantha

    2015-10-01

    Medically unexplained symptoms are ubiquitous in clinical practice. Medical use costs of medically unexplained symptoms are projected at approximately $256 billion per year. When initially seen, these symptoms are often baffling, not only to the patients but also to the physicians who encounter them. Because of this, properly diagnosing them is seen generally as difficult at best, leading to massive overuse of unnecessary testing. Subsequently, their management can be cumbersome. All this burdens the patients with unnecessary costs, financially and emotionally. This primer discusses historical perspectives of these and the changing nomenclature, and outlines how to think about these complex symptoms and neurologic findings that will enable a positive diagnosis rather than a diagnosis of exclusion. We also offer useful heuristic principles of their management so that physician-patient relationships can be better maintained and the quality of life of these patients can be improved by way of some simple, economic approaches.

  5. Syndrome of Headache Accompanied with Transient Neurologic Deficits and Cerebrospinal Fluid Lymphocytosis

    PubMed Central

    ÇOBAN, Arzu; SHUGAIV, Erkingül; TÜZÜN, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of headache accompanied with transient neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL), is a rare, benign and self limiting syndrome. In the 2nd Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, HaNDL syndrome was defined in secondary headache group as “Headache attributed to non-vascular intracranial disorder”. The etiology of HaNDL is still unknown. In recent years, some authors have shown that ion channel autoimmunity might at least partially contribute to HaNDL pathogenesis. In this paper, the definition of HaNDL syndrome, clinical picture and epidemiology of HaNDL syndrome, etiopathogenesis, differential diagnosis and treatment will be reviewed with the recent literature.

  6. Correlates of transient versus persistent psychotic symptoms among dependent methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    McKetin, Rebecca; Gardner, Jonathon; Baker, Amanda L; Dawe, Sharon; Ali, Robert; Voce, Alexandra; Leach, Liana S; Lubman, Dan I

    2016-04-30

    This study examined correlates of transient versus persistent psychotic symptoms among people dependent on methamphetamine. A longitudinal prospective cohort study of dependent methamphetamine users who did not meet DSM-IV criteria for lifetime schizophrenia or mania. Four non-contiguous one-month observation periods were used to identify participants who had a) no psychotic symptoms, (n=110); (b) psychotic symptoms only when using methamphetamine (transient psychotic symptoms, n=85); and, (c) psychotic symptoms both when using methamphetamine and when abstaining from methamphetamine (persistent psychotic symptoms, n=37). Psychotic symptoms were defined as a score of 4 or greater on any of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale items of suspiciousness, hallucinations or unusual thought content. Relative no psychotic symptoms, both transient and persistent psychotic symptoms were associated with childhood conduct disorder and comorbid anxiety disorders. Earlier onset methamphetamine use and being male were more specifically related to transient psychotic symptoms, while a family history of a primary psychotic disorder and comorbid major depression were specifically related to persistent psychotic symptoms. We conclude that there are overlapping but also distinct clinical correlates of transient versus persistent psychotic symptoms, suggesting potentially heterogeneous etiological pathways underpinning the psychotic phenomena seen amongst people who use methamphetamine.

  7. Nonverbal Medical Symptom Validity Test performance of elderly healthy adults and clinical neurology patients.

    PubMed

    Henry, Matthias; Merten, Thomas; Wolf, Simone Andrea; Harth, Sandy

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to provide independent data on the specificity of the Nonverbal Medical Symptom Validity Test (NV-MSVT; Green, 2008 ), a new test that combines conventional decision making based on cutoffs with profile analyses in order to identify invalid test performance and to reduce false positive classifications. The results of 65 bona fide neurological patients (with 21 of them meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition, DSM-IV, core criteria for dementia) were compared to 50 healthy volunteers. One patient was wrongly classified as malingering, resulting in a specificity of 98.5% for neurological patients and 100% for controls. A total of 13 patients with dementia (62%), 6 patients without dementia (14%), and 1 healthy participant exhibited a dementia profile in the NV-MSVT. While these results confirm the high specificity of the NV-MSVT for the classification insufficient effort, its sensitivity has to be verified by independent research data.

  8. The outcome of neurology outpatients with medically unexplained symptoms: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Carson, A; Best, S; Postma, K; Stone, J; Warlow, C; Sharpe, M

    2003-01-01

    Background: In a previous cross sectional study of 300 consecutive new attenders at neurology outpatient clinics, 90 were detected with symptoms that were rated as "not at all" or only "somewhat" explained by organic disease. Objective: To report a follow up study of this cohort. Methods: Patients were reinterviewed by telephone eight months after their initial assessment. They were asked to rate their overall improvement on a clinical global improvement scale, and their health status on the medical outcome short form 36 item scale (SF-36). The PRIME MD interview was administered to determine psychiatric diagnoses. Neurological and primary care records were reviewed for any changes in diagnostic opinion during the follow up period. Results: Of the 90 eligible patients, 66 (73%) participated in follow up. Among these, five (8%) rated themselves as "much worse," four (6%) as "somewhat worse," 27 (40%) as "just the same," 15 (23%) as "somewhat better," and 15 (23%) as "much better." There were no cases in which an organic cause for the presenting complaint was uncovered during the follow up period. Poorer physical function at baseline was the only predictor of poorer outcome at follow up. Conclusions: Over half the patients who presented to neurologists with symptoms that were rated as largely or completely medically unexplained had not improved eight months later. In no case was a disease explanation for the original presenting symptoms subsequently identified. PMID:12810775

  9. Transgenic Monkey Model of the Polyglutamine Diseases Recapitulating Progressive Neurological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Minakawa, Eiko N.; Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Takayama, Osamu; Popiel, H. Akiko; Puentes, Sandra; Owari, Kensuke; Nakatani, Terumi; Nogami, Naotake; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yonekawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hikaru; Aizawa, Shu; Nagano, Seiichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Kohsaka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, are becoming prevalent as a consequence of elongation of the human lifespan. Although various rodent models have been developed to study and overcome these diseases, they have limitations in their translational research utility owing to differences from humans in brain structure and function and in drug metabolism. Here, we generated a transgenic marmoset model of the polyQ diseases, showing progressive neurological symptoms including motor impairment. Seven transgenic marmosets were produced by lentiviral introduction of the human ataxin 3 gene with 120 CAG repeats encoding an expanded polyQ stretch. Although all offspring showed no neurological symptoms at birth, three marmosets with higher transgene expression developed neurological symptoms of varying degrees at 3–4 months after birth, followed by gradual decreases in body weight gain, spontaneous activity, and grip strength, indicating time-dependent disease progression. Pathological examinations revealed neurodegeneration and intranuclear polyQ protein inclusions accompanied by gliosis, which recapitulate the neuropathological features of polyQ disease patients. Consistent with neuronal loss in the cerebellum, brain MRI analyses in one living symptomatic marmoset detected enlargement of the fourth ventricle, which suggests cerebellar atrophy. Notably, successful germline transgene transmission was confirmed in the second-generation offspring derived from the symptomatic transgenic marmoset gamete. Because the accumulation of abnormal proteins is a shared pathomechanism among various neurodegenerative diseases, we suggest that this new marmoset model will contribute toward elucidating the pathomechanisms of and developing clinically applicable therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28374014

  10. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BIDAKI, Reza; ZAREPUR, Ehsan; AKRAMI, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse’s trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  11. Organophosphate intermediate syndrome with neurological complications of extrapyramidal symptoms in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) are ubiquitous in the world as domestic and industrial agricultural insecticides. Intentional poisoning as suicides attempts are clinical phenomena seen in emergency departments and clinics in agricultural areas. Intermediate syndrome with the neurological complication of extra pyramidal symptoms following acute OP ingestion may occur in pediatric and adult cases. While death is the most serious consequence of toxic OP doses, low levels of exposure and nonfatal doses may disrupt the neurobehavioral development of fetuses and children in addition to bring linked to testicular cancer and male and female infertility. These are disturbing. Chronic and acute toxicity from OPs are barriers to the health of our present and future generations. Symptoms and treatment of acute and chronic OP exposure are briefly referenced with inclusion of the intermediate syndrome. Suggestions for local and systemic reduction of the acute and long term consequences of OP ingestion are opined. PMID:25002781

  12. Decompression illness with hypovolemic shock and neurological failure symptoms after two risky dives: a case report.

    PubMed

    Klapa, Sebastian; Meyne, Johannes; Kähler, Wataru; Tillmans, Frauke; Werr, Henning; Binder, Andreas; Koch, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Hypovolemia is known to be a predisposing factor of decompression illness (DCI) while diving. The typical clinically impressive neurological symptoms of DCI may distract from other symptoms such as an incipient hypovolemic shock. We report the case of a 61-year-old male Caucasian, who presented with an increasing central and peripheral neural failure syndrome and massive hypovolemia after two risky dives. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest and Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the head revealed multiple cerebral and pulmonary thromboembolisms. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Furthermore, the patient displayed hypotension as well as prerenal acute kidney injury with elevated levels of creatinine and reduced renal clearance, indicating a hypovolemic shock. Early hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy reduced the neurological deficits. After volume expansion of 11 liters of electrolyte solution (1000 mL/h) the cardiopulmonary and renal function normalized. Hypovolemia increases the risk of DCI during diving and that of hypovolemic shock. Early HBO therapy and fluid replacement is crucial for a favorable outcome.

  13. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  14. Intracerebral adenosine infusion improves neurological outcome after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Hisashi; Mori, Atsushi; Shimada, Jun; Mitsumoto, Yasuhide; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2002-04-01

    Second Institute of New Drug Research, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima, Japan In order to elucidate the role of adenosine in brain ischemia, the possible protective effects of adenosine on ischemic brain injury were investigated in a rat model of brain ischemia both in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous adenosine dose-dependently rescued cortical neuronal cells from injury after glucose deprivation in vitro. Adenosine (1 mM) also significantly reduced hypoglycemia/hypoxia-induced glutamate release from the hippocampal slice. In a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), extracellular adenosine concentration was increased immediately after occlusion, and then returned to the baseline by 30 min after reperfusion. Adenosine infusion through a microdialysis probe into the ipsilateral striatum (1 mM adenosine, 2 microl min(-1), total 4.5 h from the occlusion to 3 h after reperfusion) showed a significant improvement in the neurological outcome, and about 25% reduction of infarct volume, although the effect did not reach statistical significance, compared with the vehicle-treated group at 20 h after 90 min of MCAO. These results demonstrated the neuroprotective effect of adenosine against ischemic brain injury both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the possible therapeutic application of adenosine regulating agents, which inhibit adenosine uptake or metabolism to enhance or maintain extracellular endogenous adenosine levels, for stroke treatment.

  15. Transient and persistent symptoms in patients with lacunar infarction: results from a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui; Tong, Dao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The transient symptoms with lacunar infarction (TSI) and persistent symptoms with lacunar infarction (PSI) are the most common forms of symptomatic lacunar infarction (LI). The aim of this study was to compare the differences in TSI and PSI of symptomatic LI. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in the neurologic outpatients of the tertiary teaching hospital in Northern China between February 2011 and February 2012. The TSI and PSI in participants aged 35 years or over were assessed. Patients were followed up and their outcomes were compared. Results Of the 453 symptomatic outpatients, 251 patients with LI were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. Approximately 77.3% (194/251) of the patients with LI at this time had TSI. and the remaining 23.7% had PSI. After the adjusted odds ratios, only middle age (risk ratio [RR], 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.157–1.189), lower National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (RR, 20.6; 95% CI, 6.705–13.31), smaller lacunae on brain images (RR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.960–4.245), and LI frequently in the anterior circulation territory (RR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.079–0.721) were independently associated with TSI. During a mean follow-up of 6 months, survival rate was significantly higher among patients with TSI than among those with PSI (log rank, 6.9; P=0.010); estimated unadjusted incidence of vascular subsequent events (30.9% vs 54.4%, P=0.001) was significantly lower in TSI than in PSI. Conclusion The TSI has a higher prevalence and is associated with a lower risk of vascular subsequent events and death than PSI. The implications of these findings for TSI and PSI may require different interventions. PMID:26648735

  16. Congenital agenesis of internal carotid artery with ipsilateral Horner presenting as focal neurological symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Wassim; Ahdab, Rechdi; Hosseini, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) agenesis is a rare developmental anomaly and is most frequently asymptomatic, but it may also present as cerebrovascular accidents. The association with Horner’s syndrome is exceptional. We present three cases of agenesis of ICA associated with Horner’s syndrome and hypochromia iridum presenting as focal neurological symptoms. A system of collaterals develops as a consequence of agenesis of the ICA, making the majority of cases asymptomatic. Three types of collateral circulations have been described. These collaterals increase the risk of aneurysm formation and the occurrence of life-threatening subarachnoid hemorrhages. The association of congenital Horner’s syndrome and hypochromia iridum without anhidrosis is highly suggestive of sympathetic pathway injury early in life. Such signs should prompt further diagnostic evaluation to demonstrate the presence of the agenesis of the carotid canal. Early diagnosis is essential to rule out potentially life-threatening associated vascular anomalies. PMID:21339912

  17. Congenital agenesis of internal carotid artery with ipsilateral Horner presenting as focal neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Wassim; Ahdab, Rechdi; Hosseini, Hassan

    2011-01-26

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) agenesis is a rare developmental anomaly and is most frequently asymptomatic, but it may also present as cerebrovascular accidents. The association with Horner's syndrome is exceptional. We present three cases of agenesis of ICA associated with Horner's syndrome and hypochromia iridum presenting as focal neurological symptoms. A system of collaterals develops as a consequence of agenesis of the ICA, making the majority of cases asymptomatic. Three types of collateral circulations have been described. These collaterals increase the risk of aneurysm formation and the occurrence of life-threatening subarachnoid hemorrhages. The association of congenital Horner's syndrome and hypochromia iridum without anhidrosis is highly suggestive of sympathetic pathway injury early in life. Such signs should prompt further diagnostic evaluation to demonstrate the presence of the agenesis of the carotid canal. Early diagnosis is essential to rule out potentially life-threatening associated vascular anomalies.

  18. Autistic Traits, ADHD Symptoms, Neurological Soft Signs and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manouilenko, Irina; Pagani, Marco; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Brolin, Fredrik; Hatherly, Robert; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to co-occurring symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, neurological soft signs and motor problems have not yet been disclosed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study thirteen adults with ASD and ten matched neurotypical controls underwent PET. The scores of rating…

  19. Course of neurological soft signs in first-episode schizophrenia: Relationship with negative symptoms and cognitive performances

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Geng, Fu-lei; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Wang, Ya; Ho, Karen K. Y.; Hung, Karen S. Y.; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.; Cheung, Eric F. C.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective study examined the course of neurological soft signs (NSS) in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and its relationship with negative symptoms and cognitive functions. One hundred and forty-five patients with first-episode schizophrenia were recruited, 29 were classified as having prominent negative symptoms. NSS and neuropsychological measures were administered to all patients and 62 healthy controls at baseline. Patients were then followed-up prospectively at six-month intervals for up to a year. Patients with prominent negative symptoms exhibited significantly more motor coordination signs and total NSS than patients without prominent negative symptoms. Patients with prominent negative symptoms performed worse than patients without negative symptoms in working memory functions but not other fronto-parietal or fronto-temporal functions. Linear growth model for binary data showed that the prominent negative symptoms were stable over time. Despite general improvement in NSS and neuropsychological functions, the prominent negative symptoms group still exhibited poorer motor coordination and higher levels of NSS, as well as poorer working memory than patients without prominent negative symptoms. Two distinct subtypes of first-episode patients could be distinguished by NSS and prominent negative symptoms. PMID:26053141

  20. Arachnoid cyst producing recurrent neurological disturbances.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Fieger, H G

    1978-08-01

    A patient with an arachnoid cyst of the posteriro fossa experienced repeated episodes of transient right upper extremity numbness and weakness. Review of the literature indicates that arachnoid cysts of the posterior fossa and spinal canal as well as extradural spinal cysts may present with symptoms of transient neurological deficit which often suggest the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  1. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates Neurological Symptoms in the G93A-SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Choi, Juli; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis of voluntary skeletal muscles and eventually death, usually within 2~3 years of symptom onset. The pathophysiology mechanism underlying ALS is not yet clearly understood. Moreover the available medication for treating ALS, riluzole, only modestly improves neurological symptoms and increases survival by a few months. Therefore, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether rosmarinic acid has a therapeutic potential to alleviate neurological deterioration in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS. Treatment of G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice with rosmarinic acid from 7 weeks of age at the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly extended survival, and relieved motor function deficits. Specifically, disease onset and symptom progression were delayed by more than one month. These symptomatic improvements were correlated with decreased oxidative stress and reduced neuronal loss in the ventral horns of G93A-SOD1 mice. These results support that rosmarinic acid is a potentially useful supplement for relieving ALS symptoms. PMID:26713081

  2. Adolescence spinal epidural abscess with neurological symptoms: case report, a lesson to be re-learnt.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Gavidel, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    Epidural abscess of the spinal column is a rare condition that can be fatal if left untreated. It promptly progresses and can cause neurologic paralysis, urinary retention or cauda equina syndrome. Compromised immune system that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, AIDS, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, or cancer is a predisposing factor. It mostly occurs in adults. Here we would like to report a case of spontaneous pyogenic lumbar epidural abscess with neurological deficit diagnosed in a 15 year old boy. We treated this case successfully with surgical microscopic decompression and drainage.

  3. Epidemiological studies of neurological signs and symptoms and blood pressure in populations near the industrial methylmercury contamination at Minamata, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide

    2016-07-03

    Severe methylmercury exposure occurred in Minamata, Japan. Only a limited number of epidemiological studies related to that exposure have been carried out. The evidence that methylmercury is cardiotoxic is very limited, and these studies provide only minimal support for that hypothesis. We therefore analyzed the data both from an investigation in Minamata and neighboring communities in 1971 and an investigation in 1974 in another area simultaneously. We included a total of 3,751 participants. We examined the association of residential area with neurological signs or blood pressure using logistic regression or multiple linear regression models, adjusting for sex and age. We found that the prevalence of neurological signs and symptoms was elevated in the Minamata area (high-exposure), followed by the Goshonoura area (medium-exposure). Moreover, blood pressure was elevated in residents of the Minamata area.

  4. Can Post mTBI Neurological Soft Signs Predict Postconcussive and PTSD Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    reported post-concussive symptoms or functional incapacity at Day 30 or Day 90 (Appendix B: Correlation between average NSS level at Day 4 and RPG...BC-PSI, and MPAI-4 at Day 90). Early depressive mood was highly predictive of later post-concussive symptoms and functional incapacity (Appendix C

  5. Neurological symptoms in patients whose cerebrospinal fluid is culture- and/or polymerase chain reaction-positive for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Socan, M; Ravnik, I; Bencina, D; Dovc, P; Zakotnik, B; Jazbec, J

    2001-01-15

    We describe 13 patients with neurological signs and symptoms associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. M. pneumoniae was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 9 patients: 5 with meningoencephalitis, 2 with meningitis, and 1 with cerebrovascular infarction. One patient had headache and difficulties with concentration and thinking for 1 month after the acute infection. M. pneumoniae was detected, by means of PCR, in the CSF of 4 patients with negative culture results. Two had epileptic seizures, 1 had blurred vision as a consequence of edema of the optic disk, and 1 had peripheral nerve neuropathy.

  6. Neurological sequelae and long-term behavioural assessment of rats with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Modo, M; Stroemer, R P; Tang, E; Veizovic, T; Sowniski, P; Hodges, H

    2000-12-15

    Animal models of stroke, notably transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), are used to assess the efficacy of pharmacological and transplant treatments. Long-term studies (>1 month) of the functional effects of treatments in animal models are required to predict treatments likely to improve dysfunctions associated with stroke damage. These pre-clinical studies require (1) optimum post-operative care to ensure long-term survival, (2) methods for assignment of rats to groups with equivalent impairments to reduce variability and enhance detection of treatment effects, and (3) behavioural tests that detect long-term stable deficits. For long-term functional assessment, a battery of behavioural tests sensitive to a range of deficits observed after MCAo was developed. The bilateral asymmetry test evaluated the time course of sensory neglect. Deficits of motor integration were examined in the footfault test, and motor bias was assessed by pharmacological stimulation of rotation. The water maze was used to detect long-term deficits in spatial information processing. Long-term differences between control and MCAo animals in this battery of tests indicate that the protocol provides an efficient assessment suitable for evaluating treatment outcomes in pre-clinical studies of stroke, and that the post-operative care procedure and method of assignment to groups were effective.

  7. An adolescent with pseudomigraine, transient headache, neurological deficits, and lymphocytic pleocytosis (HaNDL Syndrome): case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Filina, Tatiana; Feja, Kristina N; Tolan, Robert W

    2013-06-01

    We report a 16-year-old adolescent with 2 episodes of focal neurological deficits, pseudomigrainous headache, and lymphocytic pleocytosis due to the syndrome of transient headache and neurological deficits with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis (HaNDL), also known as pseudomigraine with CSF pleocytosis. Review of the literature identifies 13 additional cases of HaNDL in the pediatric population. These cases are reviewed and evidence for possible etiopathogenesis is discussed. This syndrome may mimic much more common conditions such as complicated or hemiplegic migraine, aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or stroke. However, HaNDL differs from complicated or hemiplegic migraine and stroke since CSF pleocytosis is uniformly present. There are many infectious conditions that can present with neurological deficits, headache, and CSF pleocytosis, but the transient nature of the deficits and lack of a consistently identifiable infectious etiology despite extensive evaluations typify HaNDL. This clinical syndrome is underrecognized and underreported. HaNDL remains a diagnosis of exclusion.

  8. Findings at brain MRI in children with dengue fever and neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Garg, Bhavya

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a flavivirus of the genus arbovirus with four serotypes, from DEN 1 to DEN 4. There has been an increase in incidence of dengue infection in children in the tropics and subtropics. Dengue has a variable clinical presentation, with many patients being asymptomatic. Its clinical manifestations in children vary from fever and arthralgia to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. We describe MRI findings in children with neurological involvement including dengue encephalopathy, acute hypoxic injury and dengue encephalitis. Dengue encephalopathy is usually secondary to multisystem derangement such as shock, hepatitis, coagulopathy and concurrent bacterial infection and is relatively common. Dengue encephalitis from direct neuronal invasion is rare. Nonspecific changes are seen on brain MRI in dengue infection. Clinical and laboratory findings as well as outcome do not necessarily correspond with brain MRI findings.

  9. CT findings of a thoracic vertebral hemangioma presenting with acute neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sinan; Kurt, Aydın; Okutan, Ozerk; Keskin, Suat

    2011-01-01

    Vertebral body hemangiomas are benign lesions and account for 4% of all spinal tumors. The most common histological type is cavernous hemangioma. These tumors generally locate in the vertebral body as a solitary lesion. Multiple lesions are seen in approximately 25-30% of vertebral hemangiomas. Mostly they are asymptomatic and incidentally found with radiological studies. Symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas are rare and represent < 1% of all hemangiomas; however, if untreated, they may cause local or radicular pain and neurological deficits ranging from myeloradiculopathy to paralysis. In this case we aim to present preoperative and postoperative Computed Tomography findings of a cavernous hemangioma that caused sudden motor deficit and was localised to the thoracic vertebra corpus and posterior elements.

  10. Neurologic symptoms as the only manifestation of B12 deficiency in a young patient with normal hematocrit, MCV, peripheral blood smear and homocysteine levels

    PubMed Central

    Voukelatou, Panagiota; Vrettos, Ioannis; Kalliakmanis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    B12 deficiency is associated with several neurological manifestations. It is well documented that neurologic symptoms due to B12 deficiency may sometimes present in the absence of anemia. However, in most cases there are several indicating factors like megaloblastic changes in complete blood count, hypersegmentated neutrophils or macroovalocytes in peripheral blood smear and abnormal homocysteine levels. In this report, we describe a case of a 32-year-old man with neurological symptomatology as the only manifestation of B12 deficiency with normal hematocrit, mean cell volume, peripheral blood smear and homocysteine levels. All the above emphasize the point that patients with neurologic symptoms must be screened for B12 deficiency even in the absence of any laboratory evidence. PMID:28031855

  11. Clinical course of children with a depressive spectrum disorder and transient manic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Radha B; Fristad, Mary A

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess rates of conversion to bipolar spectrum disorder (BPSD) and risk factors associated with conversion in children with depressive spectrum disorders (DSD) and transient manic symptoms (TMS) over 18 months. TMS are manic-like symptoms of insufficient duration or number to warrant a diagnosis of BPSD. Methods Participants were 165 children (mean = 9.9 years, SD = 1.3) with mood disorders from the Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP) treatment study; 37 with DSD+TMS, 13 with DSD, and 115 with BPSD. All were assessed with standardized instruments on four occasions over 18-months, with half receiving MF-PEP after their baseline assessment and half receiving MF-PEP after a one-year wait-list condition. Results At baseline, the Children’s Global Assessment Scale scores did not differ significantly between the DSD+TMS, DSD, and BPSD groups. Conversion rates to BPSD were significantly higher for the DSD+TMS group (48.0%) compared to the DSD group (12.5%). Conversion was significantly more frequent for participants in the one-year wait-list control group (60%) compared to the immediate treatment group (16%). Clinical presentation, family environment, and family history did not differ significantly between the small subset of DSD+TMS participants who did convert to BPSD at follow-up and those who did not convert. Baseline functional impairment was greater for the converted group than the non-converted group. Conclusions Transient manic symptoms are a risk factor for eventual conversion to BPSD; psychoeducational psychotherapy may be protective. As this exploratory study had a small sample size and did not correct for multiple comparisons, additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed. PMID:20712750

  12. [Development of the locomotive and neurologic symptoms in the offspring of schizophrenics during the first few years of life].

    PubMed

    Goriunova, A V

    1990-01-01

    The author provides the neurological characteristics and the follow-up data on the development of locomotion in 36 children aged 3 months to 3 years born to schizophrenic patients. Three variants of motor development were distinguished: the first one--early and proper development; the second one--short-term retardation at some stages, namely before the age of 1 year and 4 months, with intermittent episodes in the development and a proper or little changed formula of the postural and motor development; the third one--appreciable retardation and perversion of the motor developmental formula, insufficiency of the extrapyramidal and cortical components of the motor act, preserved even after 3 years of age. Among the discovered neurological symptoms, disorders in the system of gaze innervation, vocal and motor disorders, motor stereotypies, disturbances of the extrapyramidal and cortical component of the motor act, the hydrocephalic syndrome can be attributed to more specific ones as regards the schizotypic dysontogenesis. They were distinguished for using in further follow-up of the children.

  13. Temporal deterioration of neurological symptoms and increase of serum acetylcholine receptor antibody levels after thymectomy: a case report of a cat with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    NAGATA, Nao; MIYOSHI, Takuma; OTAKE, Yuzo; SUZUKI, Hitomi; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YAMAGAMI, Tetsushi; IRIE, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Neurological signs and serum acetylcholine receptor antibody (AChR-Ab) levels before and after thymectomy were monitored in a 6-year-old male cat with acquired Myasthenia Gravis (MG) as a paraneoplastic syndrome of thymoma. Soon after surgery, the neurological symptoms relapsed, and the cholinesterase inhibitor was administered to control them. The AChR-Ab levels increased postoperatively until 90 days after surgery. This is the first report on long term measurements of serum AChR-Ab levels in a cat with MG. Although thymectomy is valuable for the removal of thymoma, it may not resolve MG symptoms, neurological signs and serum AChR-Ab levels, without medication early after surgery. Also, this case report indicates that the AChR-Ab level might be a guide to detect a deterioration of MG symptoms. PMID:27593682

  14. Complex neurological symptoms in bilateral thalamic stroke due to Percheron artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Paola; Manganotti, Paolo; Moretti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant where a single thalamic perforating artery arises from the proximal posterior cerebral artery (P1 segment) between the basilar artery and the posterior communicating artery and supplies the rostral mesencephalon and both paramedian territories of the thalami. Almost one-third of human brains present this variant. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron mostly results in a bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which usually manifests with altered consciousness (including coma), vertical gaze paresis, and cognitive disturbance. The presentation is similar to the “top of the basilar syndrome”, and early recognition should be prompted. We describe the case of a young female with this vessel variant who experienced a bilateral thalamic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarcts and a truncated artery of Percheron. Occlusion of the vessel was presumably due to embolism from a patent foramen ovale. Thrombolysis was performed, with incomplete symptom remission, cognitive impairment, and persistence of speech disorders. Early recognition and treatment of posterior circulation strokes is mandatory, and further investigation for underlying stroke etiologies is needed. PMID:28053539

  15. Hibiscus sabdariffa increases hydroxocobalamin oral bioavailability and clinical efficacy in vitamin B12 deficiency with neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Souirti, Zouhayr; Loukili, Mouna; Soudy, Imar D; Rtibi, Kaies; Özel, Aslihan; Limas-Nzouzi, Nicolas; El Ouezzani, Seloua; Eto, Bruno

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bioavailability and clinical benefits of oral new formulation (HB12 ) of hydroxocobalamin (Hdrx) with Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS). First, in an observational study, a cohort of 30 vitamin B12 -deficient patients (vit B12 < 200 pg/mL) with neurological symptoms received oral fixed dose of Hdrx containing 15 mg Hdrx daily for 10 days followed by 15 mg monthly. Clinical benefits were evaluated on haematological and biochemical parameters, and neurological improvement at days 10 and 90 compared to day 0. To understand the mechanism, intestinal mucosa from mice were mounted in vitro in Ussing chambers to measure Hdrx Fluxes. In the clinical study, serum vitamin B12 level increased from 55.1 ± 36.9 to 1330 ± 335.5 pg/mL at day 10 and 431.0 ± 24.27 pg/mL at day 90, without overt adverse effects. In mice ileum, (i) intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 . The apparent permeability of Hdrx was Papp = 34.9 ± 4.6 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of 3 mg/mL (HB12 B) compared to the control Papp = 6.2 ± 0.7 × 10(-6) cm/s. (ii) Total transepithelial electrical conductance (Gt ) increased in dose-dependent manner with HB12 , Gt = 161.5 ± 10.8 mS/cm² with HB12 B (Hdrx 1 mg + HS 3 mg) compared to the control Hdrx, Gt = 28.7 ± 4.0 mS/cm². In conclusion, the clinical study suggests that injections are not required when Hdrx is given orally. Intestinal bioavailability of Hdrx increased in vitro when it was used concomitantly with HS.

  16. A case-matched study of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with brain metastases: comparing treatment results for those with versus without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koiso, Takao; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Watanabe, Shinya; Sato, Yasunori; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Barfod, Bierta E

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to reappraise whether post-stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) results for brain metastases differ between patients with and without neurological symptoms. This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using our prospectively accumulated database including 2825 consecutive BM patients undergoing gamma knife SRS alone during the 15-year period since July 1998. The 2825 patients were divided into two groups; neurologically asymptomatic [group A, 1374 patients (48.6 %)] and neurologically symptomatic [group B, 1451 (51.4 %)]. Because there was considerable bias in pre-SRS clinical factors between groups A and B, a case-matched study was conducted. Ultimately, 1644 patients (822 in each group) were selected. The standard Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine post-SRS survival. Competing risk analysis was applied to estimate cumulative incidences of neurological death, neurological deterioration, local recurrence, re-SRS for new lesions and SRS-induced complications. Post-SRS median survival times (MSTs) did not differ between the two groups; 7.8 months in group A versus 7.4 months in group B patients (HR 1.064, 95 % CI 0.963-1.177, p = 0.22). However, cumulative incidences of neurological death (HR 1.637, 95 % CI 1.174-2.281, p = 0.0036) and neurological deterioration (HR 1.425, 95 % CI 1.073-1.894, p = 0.014) were significantly lower in the group A than in the group B patients. Neurologically asymptomatic patients undergoing SRS for BM had better results than symptomatic patients in terms of both maintenance of good neurological state and prolonged neurological survival. Thus, we conclude that screening computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging is highly beneficial for managing cancer patients.

  17. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA. III. NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS AND PIN-PRICK MEASURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: III. Neurological Symptoms and Pin-prick Measures

    Yanhong Li, M.D.,Yajuan.Xia, M.D., Kegong Wu, M.D., Inner Mongolia Center For Endemic Disease Control and Research, Ling Ling He, B.S., Zhi...

  18. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4–87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5–69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5–78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5–57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  19. Neurological impairment in rats after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion: a comparative study under various treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Zausinger, S; Hungerhuber, E; Baethmann, A; Reulen, H; Schmid-Elsaesser, R

    2000-04-28

    The assessment of the functional outcome - in addition to the conventional endpoints as histomorphometry of the ischemic brain damage - for the evaluation of cerebroprotective therapies is increasingly recommended, although there is little consensus on appropriate procedures. We evaluated a battery of sensorimotor tasks in rats after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to select those with the highest potential to discriminate between various degrees of neuronal damage. A total of 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 90 min of MCAO and assigned to one of four treatment arms: (1) sham-operated controls, (2) vehicle-treated controls, (3) moderately effective neuroprotection by 2x100 mg/kg alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), (4) highly effective neuroprotection by mild hypothermia (33 degrees C). Functional deficits were daily quantified using the beam balance task (1.5 cm, 2.5 cm diameter rectangular and 2.5 cm diameter cylindrical beam), the prehensile traction task, the rotarod, and a six-point neuro-score. Infarction of cerebral cortex and basal ganglia was assessed one week after ischemia. Treatment with PBN significantly reduced cortical infarction (-31%), while treatment with hypothermia resulted in a significantly smaller infarct volume of cortex (-94%) and basal ganglia (-27%). Beam balance, prehensile traction and rotarod failed to demonstrate any difference in motor performance. The six-point neuro-score showed a significant correlation with cortical infarction from day 2 and with total infarct volume from day 3. The smaller the reduction of infarct volume, the later the corresponding difference in neuro-score became apparent. Functional outcome after MCAO in rats can be assessed by a relatively simple measurement of neurological deficit. The slope of functional recovery is closely related with the degree of the morphological, particularly cortical damage. If expected treatment effects are small, an observation period of at least 3

  20. Effect of methionine supplement on physical responses and neurological symptoms in broiler chicks fed grass pea (Lathyrus sativus)-based starter ration.

    PubMed

    Fikre, Asnake; Yami, Alemu; Kuo, Yu-Haey; Ahmed, Seid; Gheysen, Godelieve; Lambein, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Starter feeding experiments of broiler chicks with raw grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) supplemented with different levels of DL-methionine were undertaken for 4 weeks to assess the toxicity of grass pea-based feed and to correlate it with neurological symptoms. Four hundred fifty day-old broiler chicks were divided into two groups and were given formulations containing 35% (ration I) or 98.5% (ration II) grass pea, respectively. Each ration included controls and treatments with added methionine of four different concentrations. Feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion efficiency (FCE) were much higher in ration I than in ration II and these parameters significantly improved by addition of methionine in both rations. Significant increase of neurological signs with higher grass pea intake and significant reduction of acute neurological signs with addition of methionine were observed. Tolerance for grass pea was enhanced with increasing methionine in the diet and with age. Despite a similarity in the initial intake, a significant (p0.05) increase in the final feed intake by the chicks with methionine addition was found in both rations. These results suggest that methionine can improve a grass pea-based diet for broiler chicks and especially can protect young chicks from neurological symptoms.

  1. Transient neurological deficit due to a misplacement of central venous catheter despite ultrasound guidance and ultrasound assistance.

    PubMed

    Idialisoa, Rado; Jouffroy, Romain; Saint Martin, Laure Castres; Lamhaut, Lionel; Baud, Frédéric; Philippe, Pascal; Carli, Pierre; Vivien, Benoît

    2015-10-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are frequently used in intensive care units (ICU), with a low incidence of complications, most of them being of mechanical origin and occurring during the insertion of the catheter. To avoid such complications, "ultrasound guidance" and "ultrasound assistance" are recommended. Nevertheless, even with trained and experienced physicians, mechanical complications of IJV access such as carotid punctures are still reported. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman, admitted into the ICU for CVC insertion due to impossibility of peripheral venous access. About 12 hours after the procedure, the patient presented a neurological deficit. The cervical and thoracic CT scan showed a transfixing path of the catheter from the left IJV into the left common carotid artery, with distal extremity of the catheter localized in the ascending aorta. The catheter was removed, and thereafter the neurological deficit immediately and definitely disappeared. Onset of a neurological deficit after CVC insertion into the IJV, regardless the time of occurrence after the procedure, should suggest complication due to the CVC insertion, even if procedure was uneventful and chest radiography confirmed the apparent accurate position of CVC.

  2. Presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time in patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Julia Warner; Wehner, Susan; Reeves, Mathew J

    2011-11-01

    Delayed arrival to the emergency department (ED) precludes most stroke patients from receiving thrombolytic treatment. Our objective in this study was to examine the association between presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time (ie, time between onset of symptoms to arrival at the ED) in a statewide stroke registry. Demographics, clinical data, and presenting symptoms were collected for patients with acute stroke or symptomatic transient ischemic attack (TIA) admitted to 15 Michigan hospitals (n = 1922). Polytomous logistic regression models were developed to test the association between presenting symptoms and onset-to-arrival time (classified as <2 hours, 2-6 hours, or >6 hours/unknown). Onset-to-arrival time was <2 hours in 19% of the patients, 2-6 hours in 22%, and >6 hours/unknown in 59%. Unilateral symptoms (reported by 40%) and speech difficulties (reported by 22%) were associated with increased likelihood of arriving within 2 hours (unilateral: adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9; speech: aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.2-2.2). Difficulty with walking, balance, or dizziness (12%), confusion (9%), loss of consciousness (6.7%) and falls (3.4%) were associated with lower likelihood of arriving within 2 hours (walking: aOR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.4-1.0; confusion: aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.8; consciousness: aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9; falls: aOR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9). Presenting symptoms were strongly associated with time of arrival; patients with unilateral symptoms and speech difficulties were more likely to seek care early. Future studies should consider including more specific patient-level data to identify psychosocial and behavioral aspects of recognition and action to stroke symptoms.

  3. Childhood trauma are not associated with the intensity of transient cocaine induced psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Karsinti, Emily; Jarroir, Marine; Zerdazi, El-Hadi; Bloch, Vanessa; Dupuy, Gaël; Belforte, Beatriz; Coeuru, Philippe; Plat, Arnaud; Deschenau, Alice; Cottencin, Olivier; Gay, Aurelia; Lack, Philippe; Pelissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure; Bellivier, Frank; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Brousse, George; Vorspan, Florence

    2015-08-30

    A personal history of childhood trauma has been associated with the severity of psychotic symptoms in several disorders. We evaluated retrospectively cocaine-induced psychotic symptoms with the SAPS-CIP and childhood trauma with the CTQ in a clinical sample of 144 cocaine users. The SAPS-CIP score was not statistically associated with the presence or number or intensity of trauma, but was associated with rapid routes of administration (intravenous and smoked) and with frequent cocaine use.

  4. Transient global amnesia: a study with Tc-99m ECD SPECT shortly after symptom onset and after recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Cho, Sang Soo; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Transient global amnesia (TGA) is characterized by sudden loss of memory of recent events, transient inability to retain new information, and retrograde amnesia. We investigated the changes of regional cerebral blood flow in patients with TGA shortly after symptom onset and after recovery using Tc-99m-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (Tc-99m ECD SPECT) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. METHODS Six right-handed patients with TGA were studied using Tc-99m ECD SPECT shortly after symptom onset and after recovery. As a control group, six healthy individuals were also studied. Images were analyzed using SPM8 using voxel-based analysis to estimate the differences between TGA patients and controls. RESULTS There was significant hypoperfusion in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and bilateral cerebellum. In the follow-up SPECT scan, hypoperfusion in hippocampus and thalamus were restored, while hypoperfusion was noted in the temporoparietal region. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that the underlying mechanism of TGA may be temporary ischemia in the hippocampus and thalamus. There was significant restoration of perfusion in the hippocampus and thalamus after recovery from TGA. PMID:27535207

  5. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids.

  6. Accidental choke-cherry poisoning: early symptoms and neurological sequelae of an unusual case of cyanide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Pentore, R; Venneri, A; Nichelli, P

    1996-06-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old woman who was accidentally poisoned when she ingested choke cherries whose pulp contained cyanide, and describe the acute clinical picture, the neurological sequelae and the neuroradiological findings. After recovery from coma, the patient showed signs of a parkinsonian syndrome, retrobulbar neuritis and sensory-motor neuropathy. MRI showed abnormal signal intensities involving the basal ganglia. Since no memory deficits were observed, we argue that the parkinsonian syndrome was caused by cyanide intoxication rather than by subcortical damage due to hypoxia.

  7. Study of demographic, clinical, laboratory and electromyographic symptoms in Myasthenia Gravis patients referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram hospital in 2015.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Y; Haghi-Ashtiani, B; Zamani, B; Akhundi, F H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Myasthenia Gravis is an autoimmune disorder, which is clinically a neuromuscular illness that shows itself as muscular weakness and fatigue. The diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis depends on clinical evaluation, electrophysiological assessment, and autoantibody detection in serum. Known antibodies could be found in about 90% of the patients, which had a causative relation with disease symptoms. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was a survey on demographic features, clinical, laboratorial, and electromyographic signs of patients with Myasthenia Gravis referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram hospital. Materials and methods. This study was a descriptive cross-sectional one that used an easy sampling method: 54 patients with Myasthenia Gravis who were referred to the neurology clinic of Rasoul Akram were elected in 2015. The patients' information was recorded in the checklists based on the variables and the data were analyzed by using SPSS software version 21. The results. The demographic and the clinical symptoms data of 54 known Myasthenia Gravis patients, whose diagnosis was made according to the clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and autoantibody detection, were analyzed in this paper. There were 31 females (57.4%) and 23 males (42.6%) with an average age of 47.3 years. The average age of diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis in these patients was 42.8 years. Among the patients, 19 (35.2%) had a hospitalization history because of their disease. Due to laboratory findings, 10 patients (18.5%) had Musk antibody, 34 patients (62.9%) had acetylcholine receptor antibodies and 10 patients (18.5%) had none of these two antibodies. Moreover, in electromyographic findings, 38 patients (70.37%) had positive findings and 16 patients (29.6%) had normal findings. Discussion and Conclusion. Due to the chronic nature of this disease, and its rising trend, educating the people for the early detection of the disease, was necessary as soon as possible so

  8. Focal luxury perfusion with an early-filling vein in relation to neurological symptoms evoked by heat.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, S; Takahashi, M; Ogasahara, S; Nakamura, Y; Hazama, T; Mitomo, M; Tarui, S

    1985-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with a 1-year history of transient attacks of left total hemiparesis was admitted to hospital with a complaint of increasing frequency of attacks. Minimal or moderate left hemiparesis was elicited by elevation of environmental temperature when taking a hot bath or a hot shower. Right carotid angiography revealed an early-filling vein near the right central sulcus. An increase of focal luxury perfusion by elevation of body temperature seemed to cause relative ischaemia in this paracentral gyrus.

  9. Aging potentiates the acute and chronic neurological symptoms of pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency in the rodent.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, S R; Savage, L M

    2001-03-15

    The present study aimed to assess the role of advanced age in the development and manifestation of thiamine deficiency using an animal model of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Interactions between pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) and age were examined relative to working memory impairment and neuropathology in Fischer 344 rats. Young (2-3 months) and aged (22-23 months) F344 rats were assigned to one of two treatment conditions: PTD or pair-fed control (PF). Rats in the former group were further divided into three groups according to duration of PTD treatment. Working memory was assessed with an operant matching-to-position (MTP) task; after testing, animals were sacrificed and both gross and immunocytochemical measures of brain pathology were obtained. Aged rats exhibited acute neurological disturbances during the PTD treatment regime earlier than did young rats, and also developed more extensive neuropathology with a shorter duration of PTD. Aged rats displayed increased brain shrinkage (smaller frontal cortical and callosal thickness) as well as enhanced astrocytic activity in the thalamus and a decrease in ChAT-positive cell numbers in the medial septum; the latter two measures of neuropathology were potentiated by PTD. In both young and aged rats, and to a greater degree in the latter group, PTD reduced thalamic volume. Behaviorally, aged rats displayed impaired choice accuracy on the delayed MTP task. Regardless of age, rats with lesions centered on the internal medullary lamina of the thalamus also displayed impaired choice accuracy. Moreover, increased PTD treatment duration led to increased response times on the delayed MTP task. These results suggest that aging does indeed potentiate the neuropathology associated with experimental thiamine deficiency, supporting an age coupling hypothesis of alcohol-related neurological disorders.

  10. Validation of the RRE-90 Scale to Predict Stroke Risk after Transient Symptoms with Infarction: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hui; Zhao, Lu; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Tan, Song; Xu, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The risk of stroke after a transient ischemic attack (TIA) for patients with a positive diffusion-weighted image (DWI), i.e., transient symptoms with infarction (TSI), is much higher than for those with a negative DWI. The aim of this study was to validate the predictive value of a web-based recurrence risk estimator (RRE; http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/RRE/) of TSI. Methods Data from the prospective hospital-based TIA database of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University were analyzed. The RRE and ABCD2 scores were calculated within 7 days of symptom onset. The predictive outcome was ischemic stroke occurrence at 90 days. The receiver-operating characteristics curves were plotted, and the predictive value of the two models was assessed by computing the C statistics. Results A total of 221 eligible patients were prospectively enrolled, of whom 46 (20.81%) experienced a stroke within 90 days. The 90-day stroke risk in high-risk TSI patients (RRE ≥4) was 3.406-fold greater than in those at low risk (P <0.001). The C statistic of RRE (0.681; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.592–0.771) was statistically higher than that of ABCD2 score (0.546; 95% CI, 0.454–0.638; Z = 2.115; P = 0.0344) at 90 days. Conclusion The RRE score had a higher predictive value than the ABCD2 score for assessing the 90-day risk of stroke after TSI. PMID:26394400

  11. Neurological Findings & Symptoms Associated with Acute Combat-Related Concussion: Impact of Migraine and Other Co-morbidities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Features Unilateral: 26 (68%)              Aura:  2  (5%) Throbbing: 32 (84%)              Dizziness / Vertigo : 10 (26%) Photophobia:  28 (74%)       Nausea...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Causes of Concussion Concussion ‐ 4 Symptom Categories • Physical (10) – Headache – Fatigue  – Dizziness

  12. Test of 259 serums from patients with arthritis or neurological symptoms confirmed existence of Lyme disease in Hainan province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Xiong; Hou, Xuexia; Geng, Zhen; Chen, Hai; Hao, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Indirect Fluorescent-Antibody Test (IFA), Western Blot (WB) and Nested-PCR were applied to identify the Borrelia burgdorferi in human serum samples in Hainan province. A total of 259 serum samples were collected from Sanya Peoples’ Hospital, Hainan province. These samples were examined for the presence of B. burgdorferi serologically and etiologically by the two tier tests (IFA and WB) and Nested-PCR. 43 in total of 259 serum samples were tested positive by IFA assay, the positive rate was 16.6%. Among 43 IFA-positive samples, 6 were identified positive by WB. Nested-PCR were also used to test B. burgdorferi DNA in 259 serum samples at the same time, 27 samples were tested positive with positive rate of 10.42%. It is the first time to confirm that there are Lyme patients in Hainan province of China. The study suggested that Lyme disease should be commonly considered by clinicians with the patients who had correlated symptoms with lyme disease in Hainan. PMID:26309619

  13. [Neurologic manifestations of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Béard, T; Ben Ismail, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty out of 287 patients (10.4%) admitted to hospital for infective endocarditis between December 1970 and January 1990 had neurological complications. Twenty-three patients had native valve infectious endocarditis and 7 had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The clinical features were characterized by the frequency of aortic valve involvement (23 out of 30) and other complications, especially cardiac failure (16 cases) and peripheral vascular manifestations (7 cases). The commonest organism was the staphylococcus (53% of identified organisms) but the number of negative blood cultures was high (50% of cases). The neurological complication was often the presenting symptom of the endocarditis (19 cases) but it occurred after bacteriological cure in 4 cases. The complications observed were cerebral ischemia (16 cases), cerebral haemorrhage (11 cases), coma (2 cases), and one peripheral neuropathy causing a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. These complications presented with hemiplegia in 17 cases, a meningeal syndrome in 8 cases, a convulsion in 1 case, a Von Wallenberg syndrome in 1 case, and a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome in 1 case. Twelve patients had a transient or permanent neurological coma. Cerebral CT scan showed ischemic lesions in 7 cases and haemorrhagic lesions in 10 cases. Carotid angiography demonstrated mycotic aneurysms in 6 patients. Twelve patients died: the cause of death was neurological coma (7 cases), low cardiac output (4 cases) and haemorrhagic shock (1 case). Four patients underwent neurosurgery: 3 for clipping a mycotic aneurysm and 1 for drainage of an intracerebral haematoma. Poor prognostic factors were: coma, cardiac failure, cardiac valve prosthesis and, above all, the extent and multiplicity of the neurological lesions. The authors propose the following measures to improve the prognosis: early surgery in cases of large and/or mobile vegetations especially when the infecting organism is a staphylococcus and when a systemic embolism has

  14. Psychometric Properties of a Generic, Patient-Centred Palliative Care Outcome Measure of Symptom Burden for People with Progressive Long Term Neurological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Crosby, Vincent; Wilcock, Andrew; Burman, Rachael; Silber, Eli; Hepgul, Nilay; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Higginson, Irene J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standard palliative care outcome measure for people with progressive long term neurological conditions (LTNC). This study aims to determine the psychometric properties of a new 8-item palliative care outcome scale of symptom burden (IPOS Neuro-S8) in this population. Data and Methods Data were merged from a Phase II palliative care intervention study in multiple sclerosis (MS) and a longitudinal observational study in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The IPOS Neuro-S8 was assessed for its data quality, score distribution, ceiling and floor effects, reliability, factor structure, convergent and discriminant validity, concurrent validity with generic (Palliative care Outcome Scale) and condition specific measures (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale; Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire; Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire), responsiveness and minimally clinically important difference. Results Of the 134 participants, MS patients had a mean Extended Disability Status Scale score 7.8 (SD = 1.0), patients with an IPD, MSA or PSP were in Hoehn & Yahr stage 3–5. The IPOS Neuro-S8 had high data quality (2% missing), mean score 8 (SD = 5; range 0–32), no ceiling effects, borderline floor effects, good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.7) and moderate test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient = 0.6). The results supported a moderately correlated two-factor structure (Pearson’s r = 0.5). It was moderately correlated with generic and condition specific measures (Pearson’s r: 0.5–0.6). There was some evidence for discriminant validity in IPD, MSA and PSP (p = 0.020), and for good responsiveness and longitudinal construct validity. Conclusions IPOS Neuro-S8 shows acceptable to promising psychometric properties in common forms of progressive LTNCs. Future work needs to confirm these findings with larger samples and its usefulness in wider disease groups. PMID

  15. Neuropsychiatric Symptom Clusters in Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack by Cognitive Status and Stroke Subtype: Frequency and Relationships with Vascular Lesions, Brain Atrophy and Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adrian; Lau, Alexander Y. L.; Yang, Jie; Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Wenyan; Lam, Bonnie Y. K.; Au, Lisa; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Xiong, Yun-yun; Lo, Eugene S. K.; Law, Lorraine S. N.; Leung, Thomas W. H.; Lam, Linda C. W.; Chan, Anne Y. Y.; Soo, Yannie O. Y.; Leung, Eric Y. L.; Wong, Lawrence K. S.; Mok, Vincent C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study are 1) to examine the frequencies of neuropsychiatric symptom clusters in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) by cognitive level and stroke subtype; and 2) to evaluate effect of demographic, clinical, and neuroimaging measures of chronic brain changes and amyloid upon neuropsychiatric symptom clusters. Methods Hospital-based, cross-sectional study. 518 patients were administered the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) 3–6 months post index admission. NPI symptoms were classified into four symptom clusters (Behavioral Problems, Psychosis, Mood Disturbance & Euphoria) derived from a confirmatory factor analysis of the 12 NPI items. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine independent associations between demographic, clinical and neuroimaging measures of chronic brain changes (white matter changes, old infarcts, whole brain atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy [MTLA] and frontal lobe atrophy [FLA]) with the presence of NPI symptoms and all symptom clusters except euphoria. 11C-Pittsburg Compound B Positron Emission Tomography (11C-PiB PET) was performed in 24 patients to measure amyloid retention for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) pathology. Results 50.6% of the whole sample, including 28.7% cognitively normal and 66.7% of patients with mild cognitive symptoms, had ≥1 NPI symptoms. Frequencies of symptom clusters were largely similar between stroke subtypes. Compared to patients with cardioembolic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage, those with TIA had less frequent mood disturbance. Stroke severity at admission and MTLA were the most robust correlates of symptoms. FLA was associated with behavioral problems cluster only. Frequency of symptom clusters did not differ between patients with and without significant amyloid retention. Conclusion Frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms increased with level of cognitive impairment but was largely similar between stroke subtypes. Stroke severity and MTLA

  16. Molecular characterisation of the 22q13 deletion syndrome supports the role of haploinsufficiency of SHANK3/PROSAP2 in the major neurological symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, H; Wong, A; Shaw, S; Tse, W; Stapleton, G; Phelan, M; Hu, S; Marshall, J; McDermid, H

    2003-01-01

    Methods: The 22q13 deletion syndrome (MIM 606232) is characterised by moderate to profound mental retardation, delay/absence of expressive speech, hypotonia, normal to accelerated growth, and mild dysmorphic features. We have determined the deletion size and parent of origin in 56 patients with this syndrome. Results: Similar to other terminal deletion syndromes, there was an overabundance of paternal deletions. The deletions vary widely in size, from 130 kb to over 9 Mb; however all 45 cases that could be specifically tested for the terminal region at the site of SHANK3 were deleted for this gene. The molecular structure of SHANK3 was further characterised. Comparison of clinical features to deletion size showed few correlations. Some measures of developmental assessment did correlate to deletion size; however, all patients showed some degree of mental retardation and severe delay or absence of expressive speech, regardless of deletion size. Conclusion: Our analysis therefore supports haploinsufficiency of the gene SHANK3, which codes for a structural protein of the postsynaptic density, as a major causative factor in the neurological symptoms of 22q13 deletion syndrome. PMID:12920066

  17. Vitamin E Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Decreases c-Abl/p73 Activation in Niemann-Pick C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Tamara; Contreras, Pablo; Castro, Juan Francisco; Chamorro, David; Balboa, Elisa; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, α-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of α-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The α-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and α-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with α-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. PMID:25079853

  18. [Effects of 3-hydroxypyridine and succinic acid derivates on the dynamics of vertebral/neurologic symptoms after the surgical treatment of disk herniations].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Mester, K M

    2010-01-01

    A study of 3-hydroxypiridine and succinic acid derivates (emoxipin, reamberin and mexidol) effects on the 14 week dynamics of vertebral/neurologic symptoms was performed in 136 patients after the surgical treatment of disk herniations. Data obtained demonstrated the reduction of severity of neurodystrophic and radicular syndromes without significant changes in dorsalgia, psychological maladaptation (PM) and disability scores (DS) during 3.5 months in patients treated with emoxipin (150 mg i.v., daily) for two weeks after the microdiscectomy. The two-week administration of reamberin (400 mg i.v., daily) led to the early attenuation of neuropathic pain. The reduction of sings of radicular compression and DS measured with the Roland-Morris questionnaire were delayed for 3 months. Mexidol (300 mg i.v., once a day during two weeks) demonstrated the highest efficacy. This drug attenuated radicular and neurodystrophic syndromes, nociceptive and neuropathic pain, reduced PM and DS measured with both the Roland-Morris and the Oswestry questionnaires during 14 weeks after the surgery.

  19. Neurological Deficits before and after Surgical Resection of Schwannomas in the Upper Extremities.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Hideyuki

    2016-06-01

    Background Schwannomas are the most common primary solitary tumor among peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The occurrence of transient or permanent neurological deficits after schwannoma resection is more common than previously recognized. Here, the neurological deficits before and after surgical resection of schwannomas in the upper extremities were examined. Methods The study included 43 upper-extremity schwannomas that were treated surgically between January 2000 and July 2013. The neurological status of each patient (such as pain, sensory disturbances, and motor disturbances) was evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at the final postoperative follow-up. Results Out of the 43 cases, 34 cases exhibited neurological symptoms before the operation, and in 31 of the 34 cases, neurological symptoms were either reduced or disappeared after the surgery. In 20 of the 43 cases, new neurological deficits that had not been observed preoperatively were noted immediately postoperatively; the newly acquired neurological deficits disappeared over time in 5 of the 20 cases. Significantly, more newly acquired neurological deficits remained in cases where the tumor was located in the upper arm and elbow than in cases where the tumor was located in the distal forearm. Conclusion New neurological deficits occurred after surgery in about half of the cases. This ratio was higher than expected, suggesting that schwannoma resection is not always a complication-free operation. Therefore, patients should be informed preoperatively about the possibility of neurological deficits. Furthermore, extreme care should be taken not to damage the affected and uninvolved nerves during surgery.

  20. Transient Cocaine-Associated Behavioral Symptoms Rated with a New Instrument, the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms for Cocaine-Induced Psychosis (SAPS-CIP)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi-lang; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pearson, Deborah; Cubells, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic use of cocaine is associated with a variety of behavioral symptoms. The current report describes the assessment of cocaine-related behavioral symptoms (CRB) using the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms of Cocaine-Induced Psychosis (SAPS-CIP). The CRB section, one of the three domains in the SAPS-CIP, consists of sub-domains, including Aggressive/Agitated Behavior, Repetitive/Stereotyped Behavior, Unusual Social or Sexual Behavior. Severity scores are assigned according to operational criteria, and range from 0 (not present) to 5 (severe). We interviewed 261 unrelated cocaine-abusing adults using the SAPS-CIP, and 243 of them met criteria for inclusion in the study. The proportion of subjects endorsing different classes of CRBs varied across categories, with 109 of 243 (44.9%) subjects reporting aggressive and agitated behaviors, 180 subjects (74.1%) repetitive/stereotyped behaviors, and 192 (79.0%) unusual social/sexual behaviors. A substantial minority of the subjects (10.3-25.1%) reported that they experienced marked-to-severe behavioral symptoms associated with cocaine use. The proportions of subjects endorsing CRB did not differ by ethnic/racial group or by sex. Correlations among the different domains of CRB were strong, but behaviors rated in the CRB section were less well correlated with psychotic symptoms, which were rated in the hallucination and delusion sections of the instrument. A variety of CRBs are common in cocaine-dependent subjects, and many of these are highly intercorrelated. CRBs also correlate with hallucinations and delusions induced by cocaine, but to a lesser degree. Our findings suggest that there may be some common vulnerability factors that contribute to both cocaine-induced psychosis and CRBs. PMID:19874151

  1. Iatrogenic neurology.

    PubMed

    Sposato, Luciano A; Fustinoni, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Iatrogenic disease is one of the most frequent causes of hospital admissions and constitutes a growing public health problem. The most common type of iatrogenic neurologic disease is pharmacologic, and the central and peripheral nervous systems are particularly vulnerable. Despite this, iatrogenic disease is generally overlooked as a differential diagnosis among neurologic patients. The clinical picture of pharmacologically mediated iatrogenic neurologic disease can range from mild to fatal. Common and uncommon forms of drug toxicity are comprehensively addressed in this chapter. While the majority of neurologic adverse effects are listed and referenced in the tables, the most relevant issues are further discussed in the text.

  2. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  3. Transient tetraplegia and vegetative dysfunction depending on cervical positioning caused by a cervical spinal chordoma.

    PubMed

    Schulte, T L; Hammersen, S; Heidenreich, J O; Pietilä, T A

    2006-01-01

    A 39-year-old man with acquired torticollis suffering from cervicobrachialgia and neurological deficits is presented. Due to a change in head position a transient reproducible tetraplegia and severe vegetative dysfunctions were caused. The origin of this uncommon serious combination of symptoms and signs was a chordoma of the upper cervical spine. After surgical decompression the patient was free of neurological deficit and pain. Review of the literature did not reveal any similar case.

  4. Neurology and Don Quixote.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Palma, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    Don Quixote de la Mancha, which is considered one of the most important and influential works of Western modern prose, contains many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. In this regard, numerous references to neurology can be found in Cervantes' immortal work. In this study, we aimed to read Don Quixote from a neurologist's point of view, describing the neurological phenomena scattered throughout the novel, including tremors, sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric symptoms, dementia, epilepsy, paralysis, stroke, syncope, traumatic head injury, and headache; we relate these symptoms with depictions of those conditions in the medical literature of the time. We also review Cervantes' sources of neurological information, including the works by renowned Spanish authors such as Juan Huarte de San Juan, Dionisio Daza Chacón and Juan Valverde de Amusco, and we hypothesize that Don Quixote's disorder was actually a neurological condition. Although Cervantes wrote it four centuries ago, Don Quixote contains plenty of references to neurology, and many of the ideas and concepts reflected in it are still of interest.

  5. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case.

  6. Individual differences in nicotine dependence, withdrawal symptoms, and sex predict transient fMRI-BOLD responses to smoking cues.

    PubMed

    McClernon, Francis J; Kozink, Rachel V; Rose, Jed E

    2008-08-01

    Exposure to smoking cues increases craving for cigarettes and can precipitate relapse. Whereas brain imaging studies have identified a distinct network of brain regions subserving the processing of smoking cues, little is known about the influence of individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms on brain cue reactivity. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate relations between individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms and event-related blood oxygen level-dependent responses to visual smoking cues in a sample of 30 smokers. Predictors were self-report nicotine dependence (Fagerström test of nicotine dependence, FTND), prescan withdrawal symptoms (craving and negative affect), and sex. The unique variance of each predictor was examined after controlling for each of the others. Positive associations were observed between FTND and reactivity to cues in right anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) whereas negative associations were observed between prescan craving and reactivity in ventral striatum. Higher negative affect or being male was associated with greater reactivity in left hippocampus and left OFC. Women exhibited greater cue reactivity than men in regions including the cuneus and left superior temporal gyrus. Individual difference factors and withdrawal symptoms were uniquely associated with brain reactivity to smoking cues in regions subserving reward, affect, attention, motivation, and memory. These findings provide further evidence that reactivity to conditioned drug cues is multiply determined and suggest that smoking cessation treatments designed to reduce cue reactivity focus on each of these variables.

  7. Definition and evaluation of transient ischemic attack: a scientific statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Stroke Council; Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Cardiovascular Nursing; and the Interdisciplinary Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease. The American Academy of Neurology affirms the value of this statement as an educational tool for neurologists.

    PubMed

    Easton, J Donald; Saver, Jeffrey L; Albers, Gregory W; Alberts, Mark J; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Feldmann, Edward; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Higashida, Randall T; Johnston, S Claiborne; Kidwell, Chelsea S; Lutsep, Helmi L; Miller, Elaine; Sacco, Ralph L

    2009-06-01

    This scientific statement is intended for use by physicians and allied health personnel caring for patients with transient ischemic attacks. Formal evidence review included a structured literature search of Medline from 1990 to June 2007 and data synthesis employing evidence tables, meta-analyses, and pooled analysis of individual patient-level data. The review supported endorsement of the following, tissue-based definition of transient ischemic attack (TIA): a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia, without acute infarction. Patients with TIAs are at high risk of early stroke, and their risk may be stratified by clinical scale, vessel imaging, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnostic recommendations include: TIA patients should undergo neuroimaging evaluation within 24 hours of symptom onset, preferably with magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion sequences; noninvasive imaging of the cervical vessels should be performed and noninvasive imaging of intracranial vessels is reasonable; electrocardiography should occur as soon as possible after TIA and prolonged cardiac monitoring and echocardiography are reasonable in patients in whom the vascular etiology is not yet identified; routine blood tests are reasonable; and it is reasonable to hospitalize patients with TIA if they present within 72 hours and have an ABCD(2) score >or=3, indicating high risk of early recurrence, or the evaluation cannot be rapidly completed on an outpatient basis.

  8. Neurological assessment.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist.

  9. Neurological Manifestations of Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhotani, Ashjan; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an immune-mediated chorioretinal disease that causes acute visual symptoms with characteristic ophthalmoscopic findings. Neurological complications are rarely reported in the literature. Here we report two new cases of APMPPE that presented with neurological manifestations, one of which was associated with peripheral neuropathy, which has not been described before. Methods A retrospective database review of all patients with a diagnosis of APMPPE was performed. Clinical, ophthalmological, and neurological data were analyzed, and only cases of APMPPE with neurological complications were included. A literature review of several databases was also performed, and previous case reports were reviewed and analyzed in detail. Results In total, 56 cases of APMPPE-associated neurological complications were included in the analyses: 54 from the literature and 2 from our own practice. The most common complication was cerebral vasculitis, which affected 28 patients (50%), followed by headaches in 15 patients (26.8%). The other complications include sixth-cranial-nerve palsy, transient hearing loss, meningoencephalitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and viral meningitis. Conclusions This report adds to the literature of a novel association of APMPPE with peripheral neuropathy, and comprehensively reviews the neurological manifestations of this disease. A high level of suspicion should be applied when dealing with a case of APMPPE. We recommend applying detailed clinical neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging to APMPPE patients, and then early steroid treatment if the examination is positive or even suspicious. Early treatment with steroids and long-term treatment with immunosuppressive azathioprine with interval neurological evaluations will contribute positively to the outcomes and avoid fatal complications, namely strokes. PMID:27819416

  10. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  11. Pathophysiological basis of syncope and neurological conditions that mimic syncope.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, J Gert; Wieling, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    The definition of syncope has clinical and pathophysiological parts. The clinical part is that syncope is a form of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC), while the pathophysiological element is that syncope differs from other forms of TLOC by virtue of the basis of true syncope - specifically cerebral hypoperfusion. As such, the signs and symptoms of syncope rely on three steps, starting with the cause of syncope and including the response of the systemic circulation and neurological effects. The causes of syncope all result in low blood pressure through low peripheral resistance and/or low cardiac output. The next step is the cerebral circulation, which is a large-volume and low-resistance system, characterized by relatively high diastolic flow. The cerebral circulation is usually protected against swings in arterial pressure by cerebral autoregulation, but in abrupt syncope, autoregulation acts too slowly to have much effect. In syncope, diastolic flow velocity is more impaired than systolic flow velocity, probably because closing vascular forces then opposes flow. The third step concerns neurological signs and symptoms; the cerebral cortex first responds by disruption of normal activity, followed by a complete cessation of activity when hypoperfusion deepens. The latter is likely when there is asystole or marked bradycardia. The neurological signs and symptoms suggest different principles: a loss of normal cortical activity, abnormal cortical activity and activity due to disinhibition of brainstem activity.

  12. Are There More Bowel Symptoms in Children with Autism Compared to Normal Children and Children with Other Developmental and Neurological Disorders?: A Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, R. A.; Farnworth, H.; Wright, B.; Allgar, V.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable controversy as to whether there is an association between bowel disorders and autism. Using a bowel symptom questionnaire we compared 51 children with autism spectrum disorder with control groups of 35 children from special school and 112 from mainstream school. There was a significant difference in the reporting of certain…

  13. Neurologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, J F; Lieblich, S E

    1995-07-01

    Neurologic emergencies are rare, and they usually occur in easily identifiable patients, provided that a thorough medical history has been previously obtained. Rare as these may be, however, they occur without warning and are potentially life threatening. Consequently, the dentist should be prepared by virtue of knowledge of the pathophysiology and therapy and by formal training and certification in basic life support.

  14. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: a pilot study to examine its latent structure and the link between psychological state and symptom severity in transient ischaemic attack patients.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, Laura; James, Gill; Sackley, Cath

    2016-07-01

    Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is often associated with anxiety and depression, which may precipitate secondary stroke and interfere with treatment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is widely used to assess these states and to inform the management of any associated psychological problems, but there is considerable debate about what it actually measures. The HADS scores from a range of different clinical groups have been reviewed in order to assess its psychometric properties, but so far, no research has examined either its latent structure when used with TIA patients, or the association between symptom severity and the test's validity. The aims of this study, therefore, were to investigate: (a) the underlying structure of the HADS when used with TIA patients; and (b) the impact of symptom severity on the validity of the HADS. The HADS and a functional capacity measure were administered by post to a sample of 542 confirmed TIA patients. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the HADS scores to establish its underlying structure for this clinical group, and then, sub-sample correlations were undertaken between the anxiety/depression scores for different levels of functional capacity. Two factors emerged, with 13 of the 14 HADS items loading significantly on both, suggesting there is a common affective state underlying the standard anxiety and depression scales. Further data-exploration indicated that convergence between these affective states increased as functional capacity deteriorated. The results suggest firstly that the HADS measures general subjective distress when used with TIA patients, and secondly that the higher reported symptom severity in this clinical group may be associated with reduced affective differentiation. As the ability to retain clear affective discrimination is associated with health and well-being, this could provide a focus for post-TIA rehabilitation.

  15. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  16. [Acute vertigo of neurological origin].

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Højgaard, Joan L Sunnleyg; Kondziella, Daniel

    2013-11-04

    Acute vertigo of neurological origin may be caused by haemorrhages and tumours in the posterior fossa and, most frequently, by ischaemic infarction in the vertebrobasilar circulation. Urgent diagnosis is necessary to avoid further ischaemic episodes, herniation due to cerebellar oedema and/or fatal brainstem infarction. The history should focus on accompanying neurological symptoms. However, vertigo with cerebellar lesions may be monosymptomatic and then bedside evaluation of oculomotor function is the key to correct diagnosis. This paper discusses the pathophysiology, symptomatology and clinical evaluation of acute vertigo of neurological origin.

  17. Upregulation of Shiga toxin receptor CD77/Gb3 and interleukin-1β expression in the brain of EHEC patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome and neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Christian; Krasemann, Susanne; Löffler, Judith; Püschel, Klaus; Magnus, Tim; Glatzel, Markus

    2015-03-01

    In 2011, a large outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections occurred in northern Germany, which mainly affected adults. Out of 3842 patients, 104 experienced a complicated course comprising hemolytic uremic syndrome and neurological complications, including cognitive impairment, aphasia, seizures and coma. T2 hyperintensities on magnet resonance imaging (MRI) bilateral in the thalami and in the dorsal pons were found suggestive of a metabolic toxic effect. Five of the 104 patients died because of toxic heart failure. In the present study, the post-mortem neuropathological findings of the five EHEC patients are described. Histological investigation of 13 brain regions (frontal, temporal, occipital cortex, corpora mammillaria, thalamus, frontal operculum, corona radiata, gyrus angularis, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebellar vermis and cerebellar hemisphere) showed no thrombosis, ischemic changes or fresh infarctions. Further, no changes were found in electron microscopy. In comparison with five age-matched controls, slightly increased activation of microglia and a higher neuronal expression of interleukin-1β and of Shiga toxin receptor CD77/globotriaosylceramide 3 was observed. The findings were confirmed by Western blot analyses. It is suggested that CD77/globotriaosylceramide upregulation may be a consequence to Shiga toxin exposure, whereas increased interleukin-1β expression may point to activation of inflammatory cascades.

  18. Improving Symptom Control, QOL, and Quality of Care for Women with Breast Cancer: Developing a Research Program on Neurological Effects via Doctoral Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    10. FACT-Taxane Sub scale and Composite scores Figures 1. Codes Grouped by Preliminary Categories 5. Participants Description of CIPN Sensory...Minimize or Control CIPN 8. EORTC CIPN20 Item & Subscale Scores 9. FACT-Taxane Item Scores 10. FACT-Taxane Sub scale and Composite scores...16.3 0.13 3 items**** 78.8 83.3 16.1 0.15 Note. *All scores have been transformed to a 0-100 scale and oriented such that 0=severe symptoms/poor

  19. Palliative care and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  20. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  1. Transient Ischemic Attacks Presenting with Dizziness or Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christina A; Kasner, Scott E

    2015-08-01

    Dizziness with or without associated neurologic symptoms is the most common symptom of posterior circulation transient ischemic attack (TIA) and can be more frequent before posterior circulation strokes. This entity carries a high risk of recurrent events and should be considered as a potential cause of spontaneous episodic vestibular syndrome. Diagnostic evaluation should include intracranial and extracranial imaging of the vertebral arteries and basilar artery. Aggressive medical management with antiplatelet therapy, statin use, and risk factor modification is the mainstay of treatment. This article highlights the importance of diagnosing, evaluating, and treating posterior circulation TIAs manifesting as dizziness or vertigo.

  2. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be safe and effective for the treatment of dystonia, spasticity, headache, and other CNS disorders in which muscle hyperactivity gives rise to symptoms. Although initially thought to inhibit acetylcholine release only at the neuromuscular junction, botulinum toxins are now recognized to inhibit acetylcholine release at autonomic cholinergic nerve terminals, as well as peripheral release of neuro-transmitters involved in pain regulation. Its effects are transient and nondestructive, and largely limited to the area in which it is administered. These effects are also graded according to the dose, allowing individualized treatment of patients and disorders. It may also prove to be useful in the control of autonomic dysfunction and sialorrhea. In over 20 years of use in humans, botulinum toxin has accumulated a considerable safety record, and in many cases represents relief for thousands of patients unaided by other therapy. PMID:26487928

  3. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  4. Neurologic Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Lauren M; Grimmnitz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections. This article reviews the subtle presentations, difficult workups, and complicated treatment decisions as they pertain to our older patients."

  5. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders. PMID:25654063

  6. Transient ischemic attack may present a target for normobaric hyperoxia treatment.

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Dimiter I; Mineva, Petya P

    2010-07-01

    According to the new revised tissue-based definition, transient ischemic attack is a transient episode of neurological dysfunction caused by a focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia without acute infarction. This review addresses the pathophysiology of transient ischemic attack and the impact of normobaric hyperoxia on the penumbral tissue. Neuroimaging in transient ischemic attack patients and advances in penumbra imaging allow the transient ischemic attack, from pathophysiological viewpoint, to be defined as an ischemic penumbra of varied duration, which could proceed to a cerebral infarction or reduce to a benign oligemia. Persisting perfusion abnormalities are observed, despite resolution of the neurological symptoms. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that the normobaric hyperoxia treatment is associated with improvement of hemodynamic and metabolic disturbances, particularly in the penumbral tissue. Transient ischemic attack, considered an ischemic penumbra, may present an ideal target for early normobaric hyperoxia therapy, administered as soon as possible after the onset of the neurological deficit. Follow-up perfusion imaging could guide and individualize the treatment.

  7. Update on Paraneoplastic Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2010-01-01

    When patients with cancer develop neurologic symptoms, common causes include metastasis, infections, coagulopathy, metabolic or nutritional disturbances, and neurotoxicity from treatments. A thorough clinical history, temporal association with cancer therapies, and results of ancillary tests usually reveal one of these mechanisms as the etiology. When no etiology is identified, the diagnosis considered is often that of a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder (PND). With the recognition that PNDs are more frequent than previously thought, the availability of diagnostic tests, and the fact that, for some PNDs, treatment helps, PNDs should no longer be considered diagnostic zebras, and when appropriate should be included in the differential diagnosis early in the evaluation. PMID:20479279

  8. Neurological complications of bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Algahtani, Hussein A.; Khan, Abid S.; Khan, Muhammad A.; Aldarmahi, Ahmed A.; Lodhi, Yousif

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review and analyze the neurological complications from bariatric surgery in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from January 2009 to December 2015. Important personal and clinical data were collected from the charts of the patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Data on follow up visit and remote complication if present, was also collected. All patients with neurological complications were reviewed in detail. The significant difference was calculated by using T-test and p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 451 patients underwent bariatric surgery, 15 cases had neurological complications (3%). Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of Wernicke syndrome, vitamin B12 deficiency, Guillain-Barre syndrome and copper deficiency were also identified. Fourteen patients (93.3%) had full recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms; one patient died. Conclusions: Bariatric surgery is not free of potential neurological complications. Complications may affect both central and peripheral nervous system and death is a possibility. Multidisciplinary care including consultation of different teams is highly recommended. PMID:27356656

  9. [Vertigo/dizziness and syncope from a neurological perspective].

    PubMed

    Machetanz, J

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo/dizziness and syncope are among the most frequent clinical entities encountered in neurology. In patients with presumed syncope, it is important to distinguish it from neurological and psychiatric diseases causing a transient loss of consciousness due to another etiology. Moreover, central nervous disorders of autonomic blood pressure regulation as well as affections of the peripheral autonomic nerves can be responsible for the onset of real syncope. This is particularly relevant in recurrent syncope. Vertigo occurs in the context of temporary disorders, relatively harmless diseases associated with chronic impairment, as well as in acute life-threatening states. Patient history and clinical examination play an important role in classifying these symptoms. It is of crucial importance in this context, e.g., to establish whether the patient is experiencing an initial manifestation or whether such episodes have been known to occur recurrently over a longer period of time, as well as how long the episodes last. Clinical investigations include a differential examination of the oculomotor system with particular regard to nystagmus. The present article outlines the main underlying neurological diseases associated with syncope and vertigo, their relevant differential diagnoses as well as practical approaches to their treatment.

  10. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers.

  11. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Vernon, L F; Dooley, J C; Neidorf, D L

    1997-06-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon but probably underdiagnosed condition. There appears to be a predisposition for the condition in middle-aged males and in women in their third trimester of pregnancy. The etiology remains unclear, with theories that include vascular and neurologic disturbances. Clinical signs are usually pain in the hip area with functional disability of the affected limb. Plane film radiographs may be completely normal or show only minimal osteopenia. This report describes a 40-year-old male in whom transient osteoporosis of the hip was diagnosed. The patient's symptoms were initially interpreted as being due to sciatica; however, careful evaluation, further diagnostic work-up in the form of magnetic resonance imaging, and the clinical course of the disease ultimately led to the correct diagnosis. Resolution occurred gradually with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and rest. This case demonstrates the need for further evaluation of patients with hip-area pain who may have negative x-rays of the hip joint but continue to be symptomatic.

  12. [Sleep disorders in neurology. Hypersomnia].

    PubMed

    Stepansky, R; Asenbaum, S; Saletu, B; Zeitlhofer, J

    1997-11-28

    Hypersomnia (excessive sleepiness) accompanies many diseases. 14% of the total Austrian population regularly have problems staying awake during the day or are prone to taking spontaneous naps. Hypersomnia is a symptom of the sleep apnea syndrome, which is a risk factor for cerebrovascular disorders. Daytime sleepiness is also a characteristic symptom of narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, episodic hypersomnia, and many more neurological or psychiatric disorders; it can also be drug induced. Involvement of brain structures which are essential for the regulation of the sleep wake cycle as a result of neurological disorders can likewise lead to hypersomnia. Symptomatic treatment is necessary when treatment of the causal factors is not possible or no improvement has been achieved.

  13. Ion Channels in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravir; Kumar, Dhiraj; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Ambasta, Rashmi K

    2016-01-01

    The convergent endeavors of the neuroscientist to establish a link between clinical neurology, genetics, loss of function of an important protein, and channelopathies behind neurological disorders are quite intriguing. Growing evidence reveals the impact of ion channels dysfunctioning in neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs). Many neurological/neuromuscular disorders, viz, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and age-related disorders are caused due to altered function or mutation in ion channels. To maintain cell homeostasis, ion channels are playing a crucial role which is a large transmembrane protein. Further, these channels are important as it determines the membrane potential and playing critically in the secretion of neurotransmitter. Behind NDDs, losses of pathological proteins and defective ion channels have been reported and are found to aggravate the disease symptoms. Moreover, ion channel dysfunctions are eliciting a range of symptoms, including memory loss, movement disabilities, neuromuscular sprains, and strokes. Since the possible mechanistic role played by aberrant ion channels, their receptor and associated factors in neurodegeneration remained elusive; therefore, it is a challenging task for the neuroscientist to implement the therapeutics for targeting NDDs. This chapter reviews the potential role of the ion channels in membrane physiology and brain homeostasis, where ion channels and their associated factors have been characterized with their functional consequences in neurological diseases. Moreover, mechanistic role of perturbed ion channels has been identified in various NDDs, and finally, ion channel modulators have been investigated for their therapeutic intervention in treating common NDDs.

  14. Neurologic deficits and arachnoiditis following neuroaxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    2003-01-01

    Of late, regional anesthesia has enjoyed unprecedented popularity; this increase in cases has brought a higher frequency of instances of neurological deficit and arachnoiditis that may appear as transient nerve root irritation, cauda equina, and conus medullaris syndromes, and later as radiculitis, clumped nerve roots, fibrosis, scarring dural sac deformities, pachymeningitis, pseudomeningocele, and syringomyelia, etc., all associated with arachnoiditis. Arachnoiditis may be caused by infections, myelograms (mostly from oil-based dyes), blood in the intrathecal space, neuroirritant, neurotoxic and/or neurolytic substances, surgical interventions in the spine, intrathecal corticosteroids, and trauma. Regarding regional anesthesia in the neuroaxis, arachnoiditis has resulted from epidural abscesses, traumatic punctures (blood), local anesthetics, detergents, antiseptics or other substances unintentionally injected into the spinal canal. Direct trauma to nerve roots or the spinal cord may be manifested as paraesthesia that has not been considered an injurious event; however, it usually implies dural penetration, as there are no nerve roots in the epidural space posteriorly. Sudden severe headache while or shortly after an epidural block using the loss of resistance to air approach usually suggests pneumocephalus from an intradural injection of air. Burning severe pain in the lower back and lower extremities, dysesthesia and numbness not following the usual dermatome distribution, along with bladder, bowel and/or sexual dysfunction, are the most common symptoms of direct trauma to the spinal cord. Such patients should be subjected to a neurological examination followed by an MRI of the effected area. Further spinal procedures are best avoided and the prompt administration of IV corticosteroids and NSAIDs need to be considered in the hope of preventing the inflammatory response from evolving into the proliferative phase of arachnoiditis.

  15. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome in Fallopian Tube Cancer.

    PubMed

    Maas, E; Skoberne, T; Werner, A; Braun, S; Jackisch, C

    2014-10-01

    We report on a rare case of paraneoplastic syndrome (PS) that was discovered on completion of diagnostic work-up to be an undifferentiated fallopian tube carcinoma. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to neurology with vertigo, gait ataxia and dysarthria, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke were quickly excluded. Indicative for the further diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome was the identification of onconeuronal antibodies the detection of which can be associated with certain tumour entities. The strongly positive anti-Yo antibody that is formed above all by breast and lung cancers as well as ovarian cancer led to a corresponding staging. The tumour markers CEA, CA 125 and CA 15-3 were in the normal ranges. Mammography and thorax CT were also unremarkable; on transvaginal sonography the internal genitals were inconspicuous except for a follicular cyst on the left. On abdominal CT the only conspicuous finding was a 1.5 cm ovarian cyst. After consensual agreement a bilateral laparoscopic adenexectomy was performed but with unremarkable abdominal findings. The histological examination confirmed a right-sided undifferentiated tubal carcinoma with the provisional classification FIGO IIA. After a stage-related staging operation, the final classification was found to be the FIGO-IIIC stage on account of positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Thus adjuvant chemotherapy with 6 cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel was performed. By means of a timely, guideline-conform therapy for tubal carcinoma, the neurological symptoms and, above all, the dysarthria could be improved after 10 months.

  16. Transient and reversible parkinsonism after acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Arima, Hajime; Sobue, Kazuya; So, MinHye; Morishima, Tetsuro; Ando, Hirkoshi; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2003-01-01

    Parkinsonism is a rare complication in patients with organophosphate poisoning. To date there have been two cases of transient parkinsonism after acute and severe cholinergic crisis, both of which were successfully treated using amantadine, an anti-parkinsonism drug. We report on an 81-year-old woman who was admitted for the treatment of acute severe organophosphate poisoning. Although acute cholinergic crisis was treated successfully with large doses of atropine and 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (PAM), extrapyramidal manifestations were noticed on hospital day 6. The neurological symptoms worsened, and the diagnosis of parkinsonism was made by a neurologist on hospital day 9. Immediately, biperiden (5mg), an anti-parkinsonism drug, was administered intravenously, and her symptoms markedly improved. From the following day, biperiden (5 mg/day) was given intramuscularly for eight days. Subsequently, neurological symptoms did not relapse, and no drugs were required. Our patient is the third case of parkinsonism developing after an acute severe cholinergic crisis and the first case successfully treated with biperiden. Patients should be carefully observed for the presence of neurological signs in this kind of poisoning. If present, an anti-parkinsonism drug should be considered.

  17. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  18. Migraine aura or transient ischemic attacks? A five-year follow-up case-control study of women with transient central nervous system disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ertresvg, Janne Marit; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Kvavik, Lene Ekern; Johnsen, Hans-Jorgen; Zwart, John-Anker; Helde, Grethe; Bovim, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Background Migraine aura may be difficult to differentiate from transient ischemic attacks and other transient neurological disorders in pregnant women. The aims of the present study were to investigate and diagnose all pregnant women with transient neurological disorders of suspected central nervous system origin, and to compare this group with a control group of pregnant women with regard to vascular risk factors and prognosis. Methods During a 28 month period, 41 patients were detected with transient neurological symptoms during pregnancy. These were studied in detail with thorough clinical and laboratory investigations in order to make a certain diagnosis and to evaluate whether the episodes might be of a vascular nature. For comparison, the same investigations were performed in 41 pregnant controls. To assess the prognosis, both patients and controls were followed with questionnaires every year for five years. Results Migraine with aura was the most common cause of symptoms during pregnancy, occurring in 34 patients, while 2 were diagnosed with stroke, 2 with carpal tunnel syndrome, 1 with partial epilepsy, 1 with multiple sclerosis and 1 with presyncope. Patients had more headache before pregnancy than controls, but the average levels of vascular risk factors were similar. None of the patients or the controls reported cerebrovascular episodes during the five-year follow-up. Conclusion The diagnosis of migraine aura was difficult because for many patients it was their first ever attack and headache tended to be absent or of non-migraineous type. The aura features were more complex, with several aura symptoms and a higher prevalence of sensory and dysphasic aura than usual. Gradually developing aura symptoms, or different aura symptoms occurring in succession as described in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, seem to be useful for differentiating aura from other transient disorders. A meticulous history and clinical neurological examination

  19. Transient cortical blindness as a manifestation of solitary cysticercus granuloma.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shabbir; Hussain, Kosar; Hussain, Sahar

    2012-12-10

    Neurocysticercosis is recognised as a significant cause of neurological morbidity in endemic regions. The wide range of pleomorphic and non-specific neurological manifestations of neurocysticercosis must be kept in mind by physicians, as the disease has shown resurgence in developed countries. When an atypical presentation of an unusual tropical disease occurs in non-endemic regions, the diagnosis is often missed. We describe a case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with a history of transient bilateral loss of vision with headache and vomiting. Brain MRI revealed the presence of a single cysticercus granuloma in the occipital lobe. A diagnosis of symptomatic occipital lobe seizure secondary to neurocysticercosis was made. She was given a course of albendazole. There was no recurrence of symptoms at 3 years follow-up. Occipital seizures that are associated with ictal amaurosis closely mimic basilar migraine. Such cases benefit from neuroimaging in order to rule out the underlying structural causes.

  20. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  1. [Assessment and treatment of conversion disorder: the most fascinating borderline of psychiatry and neurology].

    PubMed

    Vataja, Risto; Leppävuori, Antero

    2012-01-01

    Conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder is a neurological symptom complex originating from psychological factors, which manifests in voluntary motor and sensory functions or as unexplained epilepsy-like seizures. Until the 1980's the disorder was called hysterical neurosis. Later on, various general terms, such as unexplained somatic symptoms, pseudoneurological, somatoformic, psychogenic, or psychosomatic symptoms, have been applied. The latest phrase, functional neurological symptoms, emphasizes the change in the functioning of the nervous system rather than in its structure.

  2. Avoiding Misdiagnosis in Patients with Neurological Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Jennifer V.; Edlow, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 5% of patients presenting to emergency departments have neurological symptoms. The most common symptoms or diagnoses include headache, dizziness, back pain, weakness, and seizure disorder. Little is known about the actual misdiagnosis of these patients, which can have disastrous consequences for both the patients and the physicians. This paper reviews the existing literature about the misdiagnosis of neurological emergencies and analyzes the reason behind the misdiagnosis by specific presenting complaint. Our goal is to help emergency physicians and other providers reduce diagnostic error, understand how these errors are made, and improve patient care. PMID:22888439

  3. [Neurorehabilitation, neurology, rehabilitation medicine].

    PubMed

    Urbán, Edina; Szél, István; Fáy, Veronika; Dénes, Zoltán; Lippai, Zoltán; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-05-30

    We have read several publications of great authority on the neurological profession in the last two years in which were expressed assessments of the current situation combined with opinions about neurology and the necessity to reorganize neurological patient care. These articles took up the question of neurorehabilitation too. The authors, who on a daily basis, deal with the rehabilitation of people with disabilities as a consequence of neurological conditions, summarize some important definitions of rehabilitation medicine and the present system of neurological rehabilitation, as it is defined by the rehabilitation profession.

  4. [Service portfolio in neurology].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M D

    2003-12-01

    The specialist health assistance service book (SB) is the development of a clinical health product directed to the general population. The main objectives are: the offer of a clinical health product or to look for new offers, the evaluation or accreditation of neurological departments, the management of neurological departments, the SB presentation to main skateholder (patients, doctors, managers) and finally to inform patients of the neurological products through health resources map, that allowed them to use it. The SB includes emergency, inpatient and outpatient neurological services, and also specific diagnostic and treatment neurological procedures. In a few departments there will be also clinical units directed to specific neurological diseases or processes. It is important to develop the neurological SB in every department because it can satisfy the patients needs, and allow us to adapt quickly to our changing health reality.

  5. Dysphagia associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, D W

    1994-01-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia results from sensorimotor impairment of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing due to a neurologic disorder. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia include drooling, difficulty initiating swallowing, nasal regurgitation, difficulty managing secretions, choke/cough episodes while feeding, and food sticking in the throat. If unrecognized and untreated, neurogenic dysphagia can lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and respiratory complications. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia may be relatively inapparent on account of both compensation for swallowing impairment and diminution of the laryngeal cough reflex due to a variety of factors. Patients with symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia should undergo videofluoroscopy of swallowing, which in the case of neurogenic dysphagia typically reveals impairment of oropharyngeal motor performance and/or laryngeal protection. The many causes of neurogenic dysphagia include stroke, head trauma, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease and myopathy. Evaluation of the cause of unexplained neurogenic dysphagia should include consultation by a neurologist, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, blood tests (routine studies plus muscle enzymes, thyroid screening, vitamin B12 and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies), electromyography/nerve conduction studies, and, in certain cases, muscle biopsy or cerebrospinal fluid examination. Treatment of neurogenic dysphagia involves treatment of the underlying neurologic disorder (if possible), swallowing therapy (if oral feeding is reasonably safe to attempt) and gastrostomy (if oral feeding is unsafe or inadequate).

  6. [Transient epileptic amnesia].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Yoshizaki, Takahito

    2016-03-01

    Transient amnesia is one of common clinical phenomenon of epilepsy that are encountered by physicians. The amnestic attacks are often associated with persistent memory disturbances. Epilepsy is common among the elderly, with amnesia as a common symptom and convulsions relatively uncommon. Therefore, amnesia due to epilepsy can easily be misdiagnosed as dementia. The term 'transient epileptic amnesia (TEA)' was introduced in the early 1990s by Kapur, who highlighted that amnestic attacks caused by epilepsy can be similar to those occurring in 'transient global amnesia', but are distinguished by features brevity and recurrence. In 1998, Zeman et al. proposed diagnostic criteria for TEA.

  7. Transient neonatal jitteriness due to maternal use of sertraline (Zoloft).

    PubMed

    Santos, Roberto P; Pergolizzi, James J

    2004-06-01

    We describe the occurrence of marked jitteriness and an enhanced startle response in a term infant after being exposed to sertraline in utero. An umbilical cord blood sample taken at the time of birth showed a sertraline concentration (<10 ng/mL) below the reference range. On the third day during the peak of the symptoms, sertraline plasma concentration was <10 ng/mL, while his serotonin level (6 ng/mL) was below the reference range. The neurologic symptoms resolved by the fifth day. To date, there are no reports of transient neonatal jitteriness with maternal use of sertraline documented with low cord and neonatal plasma samples consistent with withdrawal syndrome.

  8. Management of oral secretions in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    McGeachan, Alexander J; Mcdermott, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Sialorrhoea is a common and problematic symptom that arises from a range of neurological conditions associated with bulbar or facial muscle dysfunction. Drooling can significantly affect quality of life due to both physical complications such as oral chapping, and psychological complications such as embarrassment and social isolation. Thicker, tenacious oral and pharyngeal secretions may result from the drying management approach to sialorrhoea. The management of sialorrhoea in neurological diseases depends on the underlying pathology and severity of symptoms. Interventions include anticholinergic drugs, salivary gland-targeted radiotherapy, salivary gland botulinum toxin and surgical approaches. The management of thick secretions involves mainly conservative measures such as pineapple juice as a lytic agent, cough assist, saline nebulisers and suctioning or mucolytic drugs like carbocisteine. Despite a current lack of evidence and variable practice, management of sialorrhoea should form a part of the multidisciplinary approach needed for long-term neurological conditions.

  9. ECT IN NEUROLOGICAL COUNDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Girish, K.; Gangadhar, B.N.; Janakiramaiah, N.

    2002-01-01

    It is a myth that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) produces greater side effects and worsens the neurological condition when used in neurologically ill patients. With the advancement and sophistication in ECT practice standards and modification procedures, it can be safely administered either to treat selected neurological conditions or the co-morbid psychiatric illnesses without additional risks. However ECT should be administered only after thorough evaluation of risks and benefits in such individuals. PMID:21206577

  10. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  11. Neurologic Disorders and Hepatitis E, France, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Despierres, Laura-Anne; Kaphan, Elsa; Attarian, Shahram; Cohen-Bacrie, Stephan; Pelletier, Jean; Pouget, Jean; Motte, Anne; Charrel, Rémi; Gerolami, René

    2011-01-01

    We report meningitis with diffuse neuralgic pain or polyradiculoneuropathy associated with PCR-documented acute hepatitis E in 2 adults. These observations suggest that diagnostic testing for hepatitis E virus should be conducted for patients who have neurologic symptoms and liver cytolysis. PMID:21801637

  12. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  13. Biological therapy and neurological manifestations. What do we know?

    PubMed

    Tejera-Segura, Beatriz; Ferraz-Amaro, Iván

    2016-06-28

    Biological therapy has changed the course of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The safety is well documented in national and international studies. Neurological manifestations are uncommon and it is difficult to establish a clear causal relationship. The neurological signs and symptoms that may appear are multiple and sometimes mimic demyelinating neurological diseases and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Knowledge and disclosure of these cases is essential for a comprehensive management of biological therapy in our patients.

  14. Neurologic complications of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, E; Pfausler, B

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of sepsis and resultant neurologic sequelae has increased, both in industrialized and low- or middle-income countries, by approximately 5% per year. Up to 300 patients per 100 000 population per year are reported to suffer from sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Mortality is up to 30%, depending on the precision of diagnostic criteria. The increasing incidence of sepsis is partially explained by demographic changes in society, with aging, increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients, dissemination of multiresistant pathogens, and greater availability of supportive medical care in both industrialized and middle-income countries. This results in more septic patients being admitted to intensive care units. Septic encephalopathy is a manifestation especially of severe sepsis and septic shock where the neurologist plays a crucial role in diagnosis and management. It is well known that timely treatment of sepsis improves outcome and that septic encephalopathy may precede other signs and symptoms. Particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised patient, the brain may be the first organ to show signs of failure. The neurologist diagnosing early septic encephalopathy may therefore contribute to the optimal management of septic patients. The brain is not only an organ failing in sepsis (a "sepsis victim" - as with other organs), but it also overwhelmingly influences all inflammatory processes on a variety of pathophysiologic levels, thus contributing to the initiation and propagation of septic processes. Therefore, the best possible pathophysiologic understanding of septic encephalopathy is essential for its management, and the earliest possible therapy is crucial to prevent the evolution of septic encephalopathy, brain failure, and poor prognosis.

  15. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lyme disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result in distinctive ... arthritic or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to person in ...

  16. The neurology in Shakespeare.

    PubMed

    Fogan, L

    1989-08-01

    William Shakespeare's 37 plays and poetry contain many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. To support that the Bard could be considered a Renaissance neurologist, the following important neurological phenomena have been selected from his repertoire for discussion: tremors, paralysis and stroke, sleep disturbances, epilepsy, dementia, encephalopathies, and the neurology of syphilis.

  17. A reappraisal of the definition and pathophysiology of the transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Hadjiev, Dimiter Ivanov; Mineva, Petya Pencheva

    2007-03-01

    Recent data on the pathophysiology of brain ischemia obtained by neuroimaging methods and the new concept of transient ischemic attack (TIA) emergency have called for a redefinition of TIA. According to the new definition proposed by the TIA Working Group, TIA is a brief episode of neurological dysfunction caused by focal brain or retinal ischemia with clinical symptoms typically lasting less than one hour and without evidence of acute brain infarction. This new definition leads to a discussion on the duration of the neurological dysfunction and the availability of appropriate neuroimaging for all patients. It has been reported that the diffusion-weighted imaging abnormalities could be seen in TIA patients with durations of the neurological symptoms of less than 30 minutes, but they were not detected in 29% of patients with transient deficit lasting as much as 6 to 24 hours. Persisting perfusion abnormalities in TIA patients are also observed. Therefore, a cutoff period of any duration of TIA is inaccurate. From the pathophysiological viewpoint, TIA may be considered an ischemic penumbra of varied duration, which could proceed to cerebral infarction or reduce to benign oligemia. TIA, characterized as an ischemic penumbra, presents an ideal target for rapid reperfusion and neuroprotection. Follow-up perfusion imaging can guide and individualize its treatment.

  18. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  19. [Depression and neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Piber, D; Hinkelmann, K; Gold, S M; Heesen, C; Spitzer, C; Endres, M; Otte, C

    2012-11-01

    In many neurological diseases a depressive syndrome is a characteristic sign of the primary disease or is an important comorbidity. Post-stroke depression, for example, is a common and relevant complication following ischemic brain infarction. Approximately 4 out of every 10 stroke patients develop depressive disorders in the course of the disease which have a disadvantageous effect on the course and the prognosis. On the other hand depression is also a risk factor for certain neurological diseases as was recently demonstrated in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies which revealed a much higher stroke risk for depressive patients. Furthermore, depression plays an important role in other neurological diseases with respect to the course and quality of life, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. This article gives a review of the most important epidemiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of depressive disorders as a comorbidity of neurological diseases and as a risk factor for neurological diseases.

  20. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed Central

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-01-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers. PMID:2025592

  1. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Deeley, Q

    2017-01-01

    Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis. Before then, other forms of magnetism and ritual healing practices such as exorcism involved unintentionally suggestive verbal and nonverbal stimuli. We consider the derivation of hypnosis from these practices not only to illustrate the range of suggestive processes, but also the consistency with which suggestion has been applied to the production and removal of dissociative and functional neurologic symptoms over many centuries. Nineteenth-century practitioners treated functional symptoms with induction of hypnosis per se; imperative suggestions, or commands for specific effects; "medical clairvoyance" in hypnotic trance, in which patients diagnosed their own condition and predicted the time and manner of their recovery; and suggestion without prior hypnosis, known as "fascination" or "psychotherapeutics." Modern treatments largely involve different types of imperative suggestion with or without hypnosis. However, the therapeutic application of suggestion in hypnosis to functional and other symptoms waned in the first half of the 20th century under the separate pressures of behaviorism and psychoanalysis. In recent decades suggestion in hypnosis has been more widely applied to treating functional neurologic symptoms. Suggestion is typically applied within the context of other

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for clinical applications in neurological and psychiatric disorders: an overview.

    PubMed

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-10-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life.

  3. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

  4. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations.

  5. [Palliative care in neurology].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance.

  6. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  7. Acute transient hemiparesis induced by lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Seyed Hesam; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Jahangard, Samira

    2015-07-01

    According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,in the years from 1959 to 1994, lightning was responsible for more than 3000 deaths and nearly 10,000 casualties. The most important characteristic features of lightning injuries are multisystem involvement and widely variable severity. Lightning strikes are primarily a neurologic injury that affects all 3 components of the nervous system: central, autonomic,and peripheral. Neurologic complications of lightning strikes vary from transient benign symptoms to permanent disability. Many patients experience a temporary paralysis called keraunoparalysis. Here we reported a 22-year-old mountaineer man with complaining of left sided hemiparesis after being hit by a lightning strike in the mountain 3 hours ago. There was no loss of consciousness at hitting time. On arrival the patient was alert, awake and hemodynamically stable. In neurologic examination cranial nerves were intact, left sided upper and lower extremity muscle force was I/V with a combination of complete sensory loss, and right-sided muscle force and sensory examination were normal. There is not any evidence of significant vascular impairment in the affected extremities. Brain MRI and CT scan and cervical MRI were normal. During 2 days of admission, with intravenous hydration, heparin 5000 unit SC q12hr and physical therapy of the affected limbs, motor and sensory function improved and was normal except mild paresthesia. He was discharged 1 day later for outpatient follow up while vitamin B1 100mg orally was prescribed.Paresthesia improved after 3 days without further sequels.

  8. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses.

  9. Childhood organic neurological disease presenting as psychiatric disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Rivinus, T M; Jamison, D L; Graham, P J

    1975-01-01

    Over a period of one year 12 children with complaints which had been diagnosed as due to a psychiatric disorder presented to a paediatric neurological unit where neurological disease was diagnosed. The group was characterized by behavioural symptoms such as deteriorating school performance, visual loss, and postural disturbance, which are unusual in children attending child psychiatric departments. It is suggested that where there is diagnostic uncertainty the presence of these physical symptoms calls for periodic neurological reassessment, and attention is drawn to the rare but serious disorders which may thus be diagnosed. Making an organic diagnosis, however, should not preclude psychosocial management of emotional reactions in these families. PMID:1130816

  10. Koro-like symptoms in two Greek men

    PubMed Central

    Ntouros, Evangelos; Ntoumanis, Athanasios; Bozikas, Vasilios Panteleimon; Donias, Stamatis; Giouzepas, Ioannis; Garyfalos, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Koro syndrome is a psychiatric disorder characterised, in its typical form, by acute and intense anxiety, with complaints in men of a shrinking penis or fear of its retraction into the abdomen and resultant death. Initially, this syndrome was described as a culture specific disorder. Sporadic cases referred to as the koro-like syndrome have been observed in western countries recently. They are more likely to appear in the context of a psychiatric or neurological disorder. The clinical course of culture bound koro syndrome is usually self limited, but in some cases it can be transient or take on a chronic or recurrent form, lasting from days to weeks, months or even years. We present two cases, one of a middle aged man whose koro-like symptoms have persisted for over 18 years in a relapse mode that is rarely observed, and one of a young schizophrenic, who also exhibits koro-like symptoms. PMID:22419951

  11. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neurological complications of AIDS. Some disorders require aggressive therapy while others are treated symptomatically. Medicines range ... certain bacterial infections, and penicillin to treat neurosyphilis. Aggressive antiretroviral therapy is used to treat AIDS dementia ...

  12. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  13. [Transient cortical blindness--a complication after coronary angiography--case report].

    PubMed

    Borowik, Helena; Kułakowska, Alina; Drozdowski, Wiesław; Dubicki, Artur; Kraśnicki, Paweł

    2008-05-01

    Transient cortical blindness is a very rare complication of cardiovascular and cerebral angiography procedures. We present a case of 63-years-old woman, who developed cortical blindness after coronary angiography. Computed tomography (CT) done immediately after blindness appearance showed bilateral hyperintensive areas (probably due to a leakage of contrast medium) in the occipital and parietal cerebral lobes. All visual symptoms disappeared during 48 hours and CT scan repeated after sight recovery did not show any focal lesions in the brain. A breakdown of the blood-brain barrier with direct contrast neurotoxicity seems to be the causal factor of neurological changes observed in our patient after coronary angiography.

  14. Neurological surgery planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Charlie Z. W.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Kadi, A. Majeed

    1993-09-01

    The computer-assisted neurological surgery planning system (NSPS), developed by the Neurological Surgery Department, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, is designed to offer neurosurgeons a safe and accurate method to approach intracranial lesions. Software consisting of the most advanced technologies in computer vision, computer graphics, and stereotactic numeric analysis forms the kernel of the system. Our paper discusses the functionalities and background theories used in NSPS.

  15. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders.

  16. Neurology in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region.

  17. Acute infarction of corpus callosum due to transient obstructive hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kaymakamzade, Bahar; Eker, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the corpus callosum (CC) is not a well-known feature in patients with acute hydrocephalus. Herein, we describe a case with acute CC infarction due to another rare entity; transient obstructive hydrocephalus. A 66-year-old male was admitted with sudden onset right-sided hemiparesia. CT demonstrated a hematoma on the left basal ganglia with extension to all ventricles. The following day, the patient's neurological status progressed to coma and developed bilateral pyramidal signs. MRI demonstrated obstructive hydrocephalus and acute diffuse infarction accompanied by elevation of the CC. On the same day there was improvement in his neurological status with significant decrease in ventricular size and complete resolution of the clot in the third ventricle. The mechanism of signal abnormalities is probably related with the neural compression of the CC against the falx. Presumably, the clot causing obstruction in the third ventricle dissolved or decayed by the help of fibrinolytic activity of CSF, which was raised after IVH and caused spontaneous improvement of hydrocephalus. Bilateral neurological symptoms suggest diffuse axonal damage and normalization of the intracranial pressure should be performed on the early onset of clinical detorioration in order to prevent axonal injury.

  18. Neurologic sequelae of brain tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Nicole J

    2009-11-01

    Neurologic signs and symptoms are often the initial presenting features of a primary brain tumor and may also emerge during the course of therapy or as late effects of the tumor and its treatment. Variables that influence the development of such neurologic complications include the type, size, and location of the tumor, the patient's age at diagnosis, and the treatment modalities used. Heightened surveillance and improved neuroimaging modalities have been instrumental in detecting and addressing such complications, which are often not appreciated until many years after completion of therapy. As current brain tumor therapies are continually refined and newer targeted therapies are developed, it will be important for future cooperative group studies to include systematic assessments to determine the incidence of neurologic complications and to provide a framework for the development of novel strategies for prevention and intervention.

  19. Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

  20. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  1. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    PubMed

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function.

  2. [Neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kunihiko; Muto, Tatsuro

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare autoimmune disease associated with granulomatous inflammation and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated small vessel vasculitis. Following the discovery of ANCA, ANCA-associated vasculitis is established as a disease entity of Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. Clinical and experimental studies have provided evidences that myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which are major antigenic targets for ANCA in neutrophils, are not only disease markers but also involved in the pathogenesis. In addition, recent studies have revealed another potential antigen for ANCA, lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2). Though nervous system manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis are less frequent than classical manifestations in the lungs and kidneys, 20-50% of patients demonstrate neurological involvements. Peripheral nervous system involvement (in generalized Wegener's granulomatosis) is more frequent than central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Multiple mononeuropathy and multiple cranial neuropathy are the most prevalent symptoms. CNS manifestations include cerebrovascular events, pachymeningitis, seizures, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Here we discuss the pathogenic mechanism of ANCA and review the literature regarding neurological involvement in Wegener's granulomatosis.

  3. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present.

  4. Epilepsy, psychiatry, and neurology.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Trimble, Michael R

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the relationship between the psychiatry and neurology of epilepsy, especially in the last 100 years. Throughout most of its recorded history of 3 to 4 millennia epilepsy has been viewed as a supernatural or mental disorder. Although first suggested by Hippocrates in the 5th century B.C., the concept of epilepsy as a brain disorder only began to take root in the 17th and 18th centuries. The discipline of neurology emerged from "nervous disorders" or neuropsychiatry in the late 19th century, when vascular theories of epilepsy predominated. By the turn of the 19th century psychiatry and neurology were diverging and epilepsy remained to some extent in both disciplines. It was only in the middle of the 20th century with the development of electromagnetic theories of epilepsy that the concept of epilepsy per se as a neurological disorder was finally adopted in international classifications of disease. This was associated with a refined definition of the ictal, pre-, post-, and interictal psychological disorders of epilepsy, which have contributed to a renaissance of neuropsychiatry. At the beginning of the 21st century and the centenary of the ILAE psychiatry and neurology have been converging again, led in some respects by epilepsy, which has provided several useful models of mental illness and a bridge between the two disciplines.

  5. Neurologic manifestations of achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Jacqueline T; Bodensteiner, John B; Butler, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the best described and most common form of the congenital short-limbed dwarfing conditions. Achondroplasia is apparent at birth and has a birth prevalence of 1 in 20000-30000 live-born infants. Achondroplasia is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition, although 80% of cases occur sporadically as new events in their families. Achondroplasia is caused, in virtually all of the cases, by a G380R mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). Patients with achondroplasia should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians including geneticists, neurologists, and orthopedists, since there are numerous bony and neurological complications. The most severe complication results from craniocervical stenosis and medullary and upper spinal cord compression, which can have devastating and even lethal sequelae during early childhood. In subsequent decades, including adolescence, spinal cord and nerve compression are more prominent. The neurological complications of achondroplasia have been recognized in adults for more than a century and are attributed to bony defects, connective tissue structures, or both. Similar neurological complications are now appreciated in infants, young children, and teenagers with achondroplasia. Defective connective tissue elements in achondroplasia frequently lead to ligamentous laxity, which can aggravate the complications associated with bony stenosis. Bony abnormalities are known to cause neurological morbidity and lead to a shortened lifespan. Neurological complications associated with achondroplasia are reviewed, including recommendations for the evaluation and management of these clinical problems.

  6. Neurologic complications of immunizations.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, S L; Snead, O C

    1986-12-01

    Although there does appear to be at least a temporal relationship between pertussis immunization and serious acute neurologic illness, data to suggest that children with stable preexisting neurologic disease or positive family history of neurologic disease are at increased risk for complications of pertussis immunizations are inconclusive. Furthermore, there are no firm statistical data concerning the incidence of pertussis vaccine-related encephalopathy. Rather, the literature on pertussis vaccine complications is replete with anecdotal reports and retrospective studies with a number of questionable conclusions drawn from this inadequate data base. Unfortunately, these conclusions have been sensationalized and exploited with litigious fervor to the point that the practice of pertussis immunization is being questioned in the United States. A number of points should be reiterated: pertussis is a dangerous and deadly disease, as seen in the epidemic in Great Britain; pertussis immunization is effective in protecting against the disease; and there is no conclusive proof that the incidence of complications from pertussis vaccination of children with seizure disorders or other preexisting stable neurologic abnormalities is higher, because appropriate studies have not been done to define such a risk. We would do well to keep these facts in mind in order to avoid a disaster similar to the pertussis epidemic in Great Britain. Pertussis vaccination should be given to all children except those with allergic hypersensitivity, a progressive neurologic disorder, or an adverse reaction to a previous pertussis dose.

  7. [Joseph Babinski's contribution to neurological symptomatology].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    Joseph Babinski (1857-1932) was an excellent clinician. André Breton, a French poet, described Babinski's way of clinical examination in his Manifeste du surréalisme (1924), which vividly revealed Babinski's meticulous character. Babinski is well known by his eponymous Babinski reflex. Although some predecessors had described this phenomenon briefly, its meaning was interpreted by Babinski. His contribution to neurological symptomatology was not restricted to his plantar skin reflex, but also to other wide area. In this article, symptoms described by Babinski, i.e. plantar skin reflex, cerebellar symptoms including cerebellar asynergy, adiadochokinesis, dysmetria, cerebellar catalepsy, and rising sign, platysma sign, anosognosia are explained and are critically discussed.

  8. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Issar, Tushar; Krishnan, Arun V

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages. PMID:27867500

  9. Genomics in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-08-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer's disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  10. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  11. NICE and neurology.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David

    2009-10-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is 10 years old and has now issued a number of technology appraisals for new treatments for neurological disorders. Those for multiple sclerosis and dementia have been controversial and have attracted particular media attention, to say nothing of strong feelings within British neurology. Some of its other activities, which include both appraisals of interventions and clinical guidelines, have attracted less notice but form an important part of its remit. There is no doubt that NICE has had an impact on neurological care in the UK which for the most part has been beneficial. It has a vital role in managing the relationship between the NHS and pharma, and helps ensure equity in access to new and potentially expensive treatments.

  12. A Case of Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Mccroskey, Aidan L.; Deyerle, Branden A.

    2016-01-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinical syndrome characterized by the sudden onset of anterograde amnesia, accompanied by repetitive questioning, sometimes with a retrograde component, lasting up to 24 hours, without compromise of other neurologic function. Neuroimaging after an acutetransient global amnesia event often shows transient perturbation of specific hippocampal circuits that are involved in memory processing. Critical clinical distinctions, such as between transient global amnesia and other forms of transient amnesic episodes, as well as important clues to the underlying pathophysiologies are herein reviewed. Finally, we discuss the role of hippocampal insufficiency in the neurobiology of delusions. PMID:27354927

  13. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  14. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  15. Neurologic Complications and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Welch, Kevin C

    2015-10-01

    Risk is inherent with all surgical procedures. Most endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is uncomplicated. Among the many complications inherent with ESS are the neurologic complications, which include cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, traumatic soft tissue and vascular injuries, infection, and seizures. Despite intense review of a patient's preoperative scans, use of stereotactic image guidance, and an expert understanding of anatomy, neurologic complications occur. An understanding of these complications and how to manage them can help to reduce long-term patient injury as well as help prevent recurrence.

  16. [Three patients with the same diagnosis but very different symptoms].

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph A; Rosemann, Thomas

    2015-01-02

    We present three cases of patients with a thoracic disc herniation with misinterpretation of the initial symptoms. In a first case, pulmonary symptoms were prominent; in a second case, the patient complained of cardiac symptoms; and in a third case, the patient reported neurological symptoms. Ineffective investigation of thoracic symptoms should raise the suspicion of a thoracic disc herniation.

  17. Organic vs. functional neurological disorders: The role of childhood psychological trauma.

    PubMed

    Karatzias, Thanos; Howard, Ruth; Power, Kevin; Socherel, Florentina; Heath, Craig; Livingstone, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Although the relationship between psychological trauma and medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) is well established, this relationship is less well understood in people with medically unexplained neurological symptoms. In the present study, we set out to compare people with functional neurological disorders, and organic neurological disorders, in terms of childhood and adulthood traumatic events, traumatic stress, emotional dysregulation and symptoms of depression and anxiety. We have hypothesised that those with functional neurological disorders would be more likely to report childhood and adulthood traumatic life events, traumatic symptomatology, emotional dysregulation and symptoms of anxiety and depression, compared to those with organic neurological disorders. Sample consisted of a consecutive series of people with functional neurological disorders and with organic neurological disorders (n=82) recruited from a hospital in Scotland. Participants completed measures of life events, traumatic stress, emotional regulation, anxiety and depression. The two groups were found to significantly differ in relation to all measures, with the MUS group being more likely to report childhood and adulthood life events, more severe emotional dysregulation, traumatic stress and symptoms of anxiety and stress. Logistic regression analysis revealed that exposure to childhood traumatic life events, specifically childhood sexual abuse, and childhood physical neglect, were the only factors which were significantly associated with membership of the medically unexplained neurological symptoms group. Although further research is required to confirm our findings, our results suggest that identifying and addressing the impact of childhood trauma, may alleviate distress and aid recovery from functional neurological disorders.

  18. Neuroelectronics and Biooptics: Closed-Loop Technologies in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Gelinas, Jennifer N; Soltesz, Ivan; Buzsáki, György

    2015-07-01

    Brain-implanted devices are no longer a futuristic idea. Traditionally, therapies for most neurological disorders are adjusted based on changes in clinical symptoms and diagnostic measures observed over time. These therapies are commonly pharmacological or surgical, requiring continuous or irreversible treatment regimens that cannot respond rapidly to fluctuations of symptoms or isolated episodes of dysfunction. In contrast, closed-loop systems provide intervention only when needed by detecting abnormal neurological signals and modulating them with instantaneous feedback. Closed-loop systems have been applied to several neurological conditions (most notably epilepsy and movement disorders), but widespread use is limited by conceptual and technical challenges. Herein, we discuss how advances in experimental closed-loop systems hold promise for improved clinical benefit in patients with neurological disorders.

  19. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  20. Neurology goes global

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainable ways in tandem with local health care providers when possible. We present a brief overview of critical issues in global neurology, the importance of focusing on benefits to the LMIC, and options for volunteer opportunities in clinical service, education, research, and disaster relief. Finally, we offer practical pointers and resources for planning these experiences. PMID:25110621

  1. Neurology and detective writing.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions.

  2. [Congenital toxoplasmosis: severe ocular and neurological complications].

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Franka; Buzing, Cecile; Sporken, Jan M J; Erasmus, Corry E; van der Flier, Michiel; Semmekrot, Ben A

    2011-01-01

    Two infants with congenital toxoplasmosis are presented. A girl born prematurely was treated postnatally after the mother had received antimicrobial treatment during pregnancy for acute toxoplasmosis. Apart from being small for gestational age, she remained without symptoms and treatment was ceased after 13 months. A 2-month-old boy presented with hydrocephalus and chorioretinitis, consistent with congenital toxoplasmosis. Despite antimicrobial treatment, at 12 months of age he suffered from epilepsy, cerebral palsy and vision impairment. Most infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (2 per 1000 live births in the Netherlands) are asymptomatic at birth. The education of pregnant women is crucial for the prevention of congenital toxoplasmosis. Awareness of antenatal and postnatal presenting signs and symptoms is important for clinicians, because early diagnosis and treatment may minimize sequelae. Untreated, the majority of affected infants will develop chorioretinitis, deafness and/or neurological symptoms.

  3. After the fall: symptoms in bungee jumpers.

    PubMed

    Young, C C; Raasch, W G; Boynton, M D

    1998-05-01

    A survey of 100 professionally supervised bungee jumpers who used an ankle harness in a single leap from a platform reveals that 42 jumpers had a total of 59 minor medical complaints or symptoms after their jumps. Immediate symptoms included musculoskeletal pain in the ankle, neck, back, and chest, neurologic complaints such as dizziness and headache, and blurred vision. Dizziness was the most common symptom, and neurologic complaints outnumbered musculoskeletal symptoms. All complaints resolved within 1 week of the jump except for lacerations sustained by one person who tried to grab the platform as he was jumping.

  4. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided.

  5. Neurological disorders and travel.

    PubMed

    Awada, Adnan; Kojan, Suleiman

    2003-02-01

    Travel is associated with a number of neurological disorders that can be divided into two categories: (1) Neurological infections including encephalitides, neurotuberculosis, neurobrucellosis, cysticercosis and trichinosis. Some of these disorders can be prevented by vaccinations, such as Japanese B encephalitis and rabies, some by the use of insect repellents and some by avoiding raw milk products and undercooked meat. (2) Non-infective neurological disorders, such as acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral oedema, problems occurring during air travel such as syncope, seizures, strokes, nerve compression, barotrauma and vertigo, motion sickness and foodborne neurotoxic disorders such as ciguatera, shellfish poisoning and intoxication by cassava. This group of diseases and disorders could be prevented if the traveller knows about them, applies simple physiological rules, takes some specific medications and knows how to avoid intoxications in certain geographical areas. Meningococcal meningitis, malaria and jet lag syndrome are extensively discussed in other articles of this issue. The discussion in this paper will be limited to the other disorders.

  6. Recovery and neurological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fàbregas, Neus; Bruder, Nicolas

    2007-12-01

    Recovery from general anaesthesia is a period of intense stress for patients: there is sympathetic activation, catecholamine release, and increase in blood pressure or heart rate. Stressful events increase cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen consumption, potentially producing elevation of intracranial pressure and thus, favouring cerebral insults. Measures to prevent agitation, hypertension, shivering, and coughing are therefore very well justified in neurosurgical patients. The rationale for a "rapid-awakening-strategy" after craniotomy with general anaesthesia is that an early diagnosis of postoperative neurological complications is essential to limit potentially devastating consequences and finally improve patient outcome. A trial of early recovery may always be attempted to perform a neurological evaluation. An awake patient is the best and the cheapest neuromonitoring available. If, after surgery, a patient does not rapidly recover consciousness, or a focal neurological deficit becomes apparent, a head CT-scan should be performed as soon as possible to rule out a neurosurgical complication. Close monitoring during the first 24 hours after craniotomy is mandatory.

  7. [Education and training in neurology: update].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Progress in basic neurosciences and advances in technology in the last decades have contributed to clarification of neural mechanisms in behavior or cognition in health and disease. They have elaborated diagnosis and treatment of nervous diseases remarkably. Needs in neurologists in both primary and specific medical services are rapidly increasing, with aging society and progresses in medical care in Japan. Attraction of neurology for students and junior residents is a great concern of Japanese Society of Neurology. In the undergraduate education, recent achievement in basic neurosciences including neurogenetics, molecular cytology, physio-pathology and imaging technique should be taught comprehensively. In the early postgraduate course for two years, neurology is either elective or obligatory depending on the curriculum of training institutions. Work at the stroke care unit is strongly recommended in the course of emergency service, which is mandatory. Experiences in acute infectious diseases, in various stages of neurodegenerative diseases, in collaboration with other specialist doctors for systemic diseases including metabolic or collagen diseases, in collaboration with other medical personnel in care of dementia are all included in advanced stages of postgraduate education before board examination. In summary, studies for practical services as well as clinical researches, teaching of symptoms and signs based on neural functions, and socio-economical issues for chronic nervous diseases in aged society are important in the education in neurology.

  8. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  9. Conversion disorder and mass psychogenic illness in child neurology.

    PubMed

    Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    A common problem faced by neurologists is the existence of disorders that present with neurological symptoms but do not have identifiable neurological bases. Conversion disorder is the most common of these disorders. In some situations, members of a cohesive social group will develop the same or similar symptoms. This review discusses conversion disorder in children, with an emphasis on function movement disorders. It also reviews a recent occurrence of mass psychogenic illness in New York State with discussion of the key features of mass psychogenic illness.

  10. Symptom control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Ingham, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Symptom control has become increasingly recognized as an important goal in patient care. In this article, advances in symptom assessment, and various definitions of symptom improvement are reviewed. Theoretical concepts underlying symptom control and clinically significant change are presented, as well as the role of symptom control as an endpoint in clinical trials. Symptom control is then surveyed in two broad categories for selected symptoms. The first area is therapy related symptoms, secondary to chemotherapy, radiation, hormonal therapy, and surgery. Symptoms reviewed include chemotherapy related mucositis, emesis, fatigue; hot flashes; and radiation related dermatitis, xerostomia, and mucositis. The second area is palliative oncologic approaches to disease-related symptoms. Results in palliative chemotherapy, palliative radiation therapy, cancer pain, and lack of appetite are summarized. Areas requiring further research are noted. Findings are presented in both a clinical and research context to help guide the reader with interpreting symptom control studies.

  11. Neurological complications of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Neurological problems are common in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Over 60% of patients will suffer from symptoms of underlying polyneuropathy due to uraemia or diabetes. Others will have subclinical disease demonstrable by nerve conduction studies. Nerve injury following haemodialysis access surgery is underreported. However, sensory nerve lesions are probably common after most vascular access procedures but are rarely debilitating. Nerve compression syndromes such as carpal tunnel and ulnar compression syndromes are common, especially in patients who have been on dialysis for some years and at least some of these are related to or exacerbated by the access. Recognition is essential as they are eminently treatable by decompression surgery. Tourniquet use appears to be safe for carpal tunnel or ulnar nerve decompression surgery. Ischaemic monomelic neuropathy (IMN) is rare but follows a period of ischaemia during or as a result of access surgery, most commonly to construct a brachial arteriovenous fistula or graft. It is characterised by intense pain, out of proportion to any ischaemia, involves all of the upper limb nerves and may progress to involve the motor nerves eventually resulting in a useless clawed hand. It requires prompt treatment of any residual ischaemia after access creation, if necessary by access ligation, as in the established syndrome, like the even rarer complication of reflex sympathetic dystrophy, it is very difficult to offer any useful treatment other than symptomatic relief and physiotherapy.

  12. Dissociation and functional neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Brown, R J

    2017-01-01

    Dissociation has been cited as a possible psychologic mechanism underpinning functional neurologic disorders (FND) since the 19th century. Since that time, changes in psychiatric classification have created confusion about what the term dissociation actually means. The available evidence suggests that it now refers to at least two qualitatively distinct types of phenomena: detachment (an altered state of consciousness characterized by a sense of separation from the self or world) and compartmentalization (a reversible loss of voluntary control over apparently intact processes and functions), as well as their underlying mechanisms. This chapter considers some of the problems with conflating these phenomena under a single heading as well as the relationship between detachment, compartmentalization, and FND. It is argued that FNDs are fundamentally compartmentalization disorders, but that detachment is often part of the clinical picture and may contribute to the development and maintenance of functional symptoms in many cases. By this view, understanding compartmentalization requires an appreciation of the mechanisms involved in controlling and accessing mental processes and contents. Two possible mechanisms in this regard are described and the evidence for these is considered, followed by a discussion of clinical and empiric implications.

  13. Mild neurological impairment may indicate a psychomotor endophenotype in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Mohammad; Paast, Negin; Karim, Hamid Reza; Faghfori, Sara; Memari, Amir Hossein

    2016-11-30

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show any neurological soft signs compared to healthy controls. Furthermore we sought to examine the role of common symptoms related to BPD, such as depression, anxiety or impulsivity, in association with neurological soft signs. Thirty patients with borderline personality disorder and thirty hospital-based controls were examined for neurological soft signs. The total score of neurological soft signs in BPD was significantly higher than controls. In terms of subscales, patients had higher scores in Sensory Integration and Motor Coordination and other neurological soft signs compared to control group. Multiple regression analysis showed that the impulsivity score was the best significant predictor of neurological soft signs in BPD. The increase of neurological soft signs in patients with BPD may address a non-focal neurological dysfunction in borderline personality disorder.

  14. Neurological complications using a novel retractor system for direct lateral minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Sedra, Fady; Lee, Robert; Dominguez, Ignacio; Wilson, Lester

    2016-09-01

    We describe our experience using the RAVINE retractor (K2M, Leesburg, VA, USA) to gain access to the lateral aspect of the lumbar spine through a retroperitoneal approach. Postoperative neurological adverse events, utilising the mentioned retractor system, were recorded and analysed. We included 140 patients who underwent minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (MI-LLIF) for degenerative spinal conditions between 2011 and 2015 at two major spinal centres. A total of 228 levels were treated, 35% one level, 40% two level, 20% three level and 5% 4 level surgeries. The L4/5 level was instrumented in 28% of cases. 12/140 patients had postoperative neurological complications. Immediately after surgery, 5% of patients (7/140) had transient symptoms in the thigh ranging from sensory loss, pain and paraesthesia, all of which recovered within 12weeks following surgery. There were five cases of femoral nerve palsy (3.6% - two ipsilateral and three contralateral), all of which recovered completely with no residual sensory or motor deficit within 6months. MI-LLIF done with help of the described retractor system has proved a safe and efficient way to achieve interbody fusion with minimal complications, mainly nerve related, that recovered quickly. Judicious use of the technique to access the L4/5 level is advised.

  15. Neurophysiological assessment of divers with medical histories of neurological decompression illness.

    PubMed Central

    Murrison, A W; Glasspool, E; Pethybridge, R J; Francis, T J; Sedgwick, E M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the possibility that subclinical damage may persist after clinical recovery from neurological decompression illness. METHODS--The neuraxes of 71 divers with medical histories of neurological decompression illness and 37 non-diver controls were examined by recording the somatosensory evoked potentials produced on stimulation of the posterior tibial and median nerves. RESULTS--Although the tests gave some objective support for the presence of "soft" residual neurological symptoms and signs, no evidence was given for the presence of subclinical damage. CONCLUSIONS--The contention that neurological damage persists after full clinical recovery from the neurological decompression illness was not supported. PMID:7849848

  16. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  17. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  18. The neurologic manifestations of the acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Herkes, Geoffrey K

    2011-09-01

    The porphyrias are diseases characterised by accumulation of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors owing to enzymatic deficiencies of the haem synthetic pathway. In the acute hepatic porphyrias accumulation of porphyrin precursors, in particular delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), cause dysfunction of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. This leads to the characteristic clinical findings of abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. The exact pathogenic mechanism is not clear but evidence to date suggests both direct toxic effects of ALA and intracellular metabolic derangement contribute to the neurologic disorders. This review explores the mechanisms of neural dysfunction in the acute porphyrias and the resultant clinical features of an acute attack.

  19. [An expert system neurology--possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Bickel, A; Grunewald, M

    2006-12-01

    We present an expert system Neurology, which was developed completely on basis of the commercial available data base program Filemaker-7.0. At present it covers approximately 400 diagnoses of neurological and psychiatric diseases. After the input of cardinal symptoms, course and localisation of the disease the program calculates a first set of possible differential diagnoses and asks for additional symptoms or the performance of apparative diagnostics to investigate the final diagnose. At first, the performance of the expert system was tested with 15 predetermined neurological case reports. Users with different previous knowledge of Neurology performed the input. In this test the program was able to identify the correct diagnose in nearly all cases and the diagnostic proposals were superior to those of the users with minor neurological training. In a second test with real patient data, the rate of correct diagnoses was approximately 80%. In summary, the used computer algorithms proved as appropriate for the aim of giving Neurological diagnoses. Possible additional applications could be student training or the use as interdisciplinary reference work.

  20. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  1. Neurological Manifestations in Parry–Romberg Syndrome: 2 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Vix, Justine; Mathis, Stéphane; Lacoste, Mathieu; Guillevin, Rémy; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Parry–Romberg syndrome (PRS) is a variant of morphea usually characterized by a slowly progressive course. Clinical and radiological involvement of the central nervous system may be observed in PRS. We describe 2 patients with PRS and neurological symptoms (one with trigeminal neuralgia associated with deafness, and the second with hemifacial pain associated with migraine without aura) in conjunction with abnormal cerebral MRI including white matter T2 hyperintensities and enhancement with gadolinium. Despite the absence of specific immunosuppressive treatments, both patients have presented stable imaging during follow-up without any clinical neurologic progression. We have performed a large review of the medical literature on patients with PRS and neurological involvement (total of 129 patients) Central nervous system involvement is frequent among PRS patients and is inconsistently associated with clinical abnormalities. These various neurological manifestations include seizures, headaches, movement disorders, neuropsychological symptoms, and focal symptoms. Cerebral MRI may reveal frequent abnormalities, which can be bilateral or more often homolateral to the skin lesions, localized or so widespread so as to involve the whole hemisphere: T2 hyperintensities, mostly in the subcortical white matter, gadolinium enhancement, brain atrophy, and calcifications. These radiological lesions do not usually progress over time. Steroids or immunosuppressive treatments are controversial since it remains unclear to what extent they are beneficial and there is often no neurological progression. PMID:26181554

  2. Endovascular Treatment of Supra-Aortic Extracranial Stenoses in Patients with Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency Symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zaytsev, A.Y. Stoyda, A.Y.; Smirnov, V.E.; Scherbyuk, A.N.; Kondrashin, S.A; Artukchina, E.G.; Kikevitch, V.A.

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. Stenoses and thromboses of vessels feeding the vertebrobasilar territory can evoke serious disturbances including ischemic stroke. We present our experience of endovascular interventions for patients with signs of vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) resulted from subclavian, vertebral and brachiocephalic arterial stenoses. Methods. Twenty-one patients (10 men) aged from 35 to 84 years (mean 64.3 years) with symptoms compatible with VBI underwent balloon angioplasty and stenting of subclavian (SA), innominate (IA) and vertebral (VA) arteries. Procedures were done by radiologists experienced in systematic stenting of the lesions. VBI was manifested by persistent signs in 15 patients, and by transitory ischemic attacks in the posterior circulatory territory in 4 (19%). Two patients (10%) experienced ischemic strokes (in the vertebrobasilar circulation in both cases). In 3 patients (14%) VBI was accompanied by upper limb vascular insufficiency symptoms. All cases were resistant to medical treatment. A neurologist assessed complaints, initial VBI signs and their alteration after intervention in all patients. Outcomes were measured with the 5-point scale suggested by Malek et al.: (1) excellent result (asymptomatic, no neurologic deficits and no symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (2) good (no neurologic deficits, at most one transient episode of vertebrobasilar ischemia over a period of 3 months after treatment); (3) fair (minimal neurologic deficit and at most one transient episode per month of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (4) poor (no improvement compared with neurologic status before treatment and/or persistent symptoms of vertebrobasilar ischemia); (5) death (regardless of cause). Endovascular treatment was performed for SA stenosis in 15 patients, for SA occlusion in 2, for IA stenosis in 2, and for VA stenosis in 2. There were 15 cases of atherosclerosis, 2 of aortoarteritis, 4 of proximal SA kinking. SA and IA stenoses ranged from 60% to 100% (mean 74

  3. Transient cortical blindness after coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Alp, B N; Bozbuğa, N; Tuncer, M A; Yakut, C

    2009-01-01

    Transient cortical blindness is rarely encountered after angiography of native coronary arteries or bypass grafts. This paper reports a case of transient cortical blindness that occurred 72 h after coronary angiography in a 56-year old patient. This was the patient's fourth exposure to contrast medium. Neurological examination demonstrated cortical blindness and the absence of any focal neurological deficit. A non-contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan of the brain revealed bilateral contrast enhancement in the occipital lobes and no evidence of cerebral haemorrhage, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed no pathology. Sight returned spontaneously within 4 days and his vision gradually improved. A search of the current literature for reported cases of transient cortical blindness suggested that this is a rarely encountered complication of coronary angiography.

  4. The Spectrum of Neurological Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Tanveer P.

    2012-01-01

    The equivalence of brain death with death is largely, although not universally accepted. Patients may have suffered insults such as cardiac arrest, vascular catastrophe, poisoning, or head trauma. Early identification of patients at greatest risk of poor neurologic outcome and management in the appropriate critical care setting is the key to maximizing neurological recovery. Recent technological advances and neuroimaging have made it possible to predict neurological reversibility with great accuracy. Significant improvements in therapy such as hypothermia, will improve outcomes in neurological catastrophies, particularly in anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The clinical spectrum and diagnostic criteria of minimally conscious and vegetative states is reviewed. The current understanding of the differences in prognosis and prediction of meaningful cognitive and functional recovery in each neurological state is described. Establishing an understanding of the ethical principles that guide medical decisions in clinical practice related to different neurological states is evolving into a new field called neuroethics. PMID:23610514

  5. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  6. Child neurology services in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R

    2011-12-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level.

  7. [Functional neurology of blepharospasm].

    PubMed

    León-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Gutiérrez, Claudia; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Benign essential blepharospasm is characterized by abnormal repetitive movements of lid closure and spasm of the orbiculari oculi muscles. Modern theories postulate that this movement disorder originates by abnormal processing of afferent information with further disintegration of the sensorimotor neural program at central levels of the nervous system all of which is seen as dystonic movements in genetically susceptible people. Different investigations including neuroimagin, genetic and neurophysiological studies have discovered new findings on what structures are involved and how this abnormal movement is generated. Among these research is noteworthy the study of electrically elicited blink reflex. It consists of three responses called non-nociceptive (R1), nociceptive (R2) and ultranociceptive (R3). Such blink reflexes, mostly the ultranociceptive response (R3), seem to be very useful to understand more deeply the pathophysiology of this focal dystonia, to perform the functional endophenotyping and to do a more appropriate follow-up of this complex neurological problem.

  8. Beyond the joints: neurological involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose Dionisio

    2012-01-01

    Although arthritis is the most notable component, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder where extra-articular manifestations are common; among them, central and peripheral nervous system involvement is frequent and associated with significant morbidity and, in some cases, reduced life span. It may produce a myriad of symptoms and signs ranging from subtle numbness in a hand, to quadriparesis and sudden death. Central and peripheral neurologic manifestations may arise from structural damage produced by RA in diarthroidal joints, by the systemic inflammatory process of the disease itself or by the drugs used to treat it. Neurologic syndromes may appear suddenly or developed slowly through months, and emerge early or after years of having RA. Neurologic manifestations may be easily overlooked or incorrectly assigned to peripheral arthritis unless the attending physician is aware of these complications. In this article, we review neurologic involvement in RA patients with emphasis on clinical approach for early detection.

  9. Rate and Predictors of Serious Neurologic Causes of Dizziness in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Navi, Babak B.; Kamel, Hooman; Shah, Maulik P.; Grossman, Aaron W.; Wong, Christine; Poisson, Sharon N.; Whetstone, William D.; Josephson, S. Andrew; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Kim, Anthony S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe the rate and predictors of central nervous system (CNS) disease in emergency department (ED) patients with dizziness in the modern era of neuroimaging. Patients and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all adults presenting between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, to an academic ED for a primary triage complaint of dizziness, vertigo, or imbalance. The final diagnosis for the cause of dizziness was independently assigned by 2 neurologists, with a third neurologist resolving any disagreements. The primary outcome was a composite of ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, transient ischemic attack, seizure, brain tumor, demyelinating disease, and CNS infection. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to assess the association between clinical variables and serious CNS causes of dizziness. Results Of 907 patients experiencing dizziness (mean age, 59 years; 58% women [n=529]), 49 (5%) had a serious neurologic diagnosis, including 37 cerebrovascular events. Dizziness was often caused by benign conditions, such as peripheral vertigo (294 patients [32%]) or orthostatic hypotension (121 patients [13%]). Age 60 years or older (odds ratio [OR], 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-11.2), a chief complaint of imbalance (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 2.3-15.2), and any focal examination abnormality (OR, 5.9; 95% CI, 3.1-11.2) were independently associated with serious neurologic diagnoses, whereas isolated dizziness symptoms were inversely associated (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.0-0.7). Conclusion Dizziness in the ED is generally benign, although a substantial fraction of patients harbor serious neurologic disease. Clinical suspicion should be heightened for patients with advanced age, imbalance, or focal deficits. PMID:23063099

  10. Neurology of ciguatera.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera is a widespread ichthyosarcotoxaemia with dramatic and clinically important neurological features. This severe form of fish poisoning may present with either acute or chronic intoxication syndromes and constitutes a global health problem. Ciguatera poisoning is little known in temperate countries as a potentially global problem associated with human ingestion of large carnivorous fish that harbour the bioaccumulated ciguatoxins of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. This neurotoxin is stored in the viscera of fish that have eaten the dinoflagellate and concentrated it upwards throughout the food chain towards progressively larger species, including humans. Ciguatoxin accumulates in all fish tissues, especially the liver and viscera, of "at risk" species. Both Pacific (P-CTX-1) and Caribbean (C-CTX-1) ciguatoxins are heat stable polyether toxins and pose a health risk at concentrations above 0.1 ppb. The presenting signs of ciguatera are primarily neurotoxic in more than 80% of cases. Such include the pathognomonic features of postingestion paraesthesiae, dysaesthesiae, and heightened nociperception. Other sensory abnormalities include the subjective features of metallic taste, pruritus, arthralgia, myalgia, and dental pain. Cerebellar dysfunction, sometimes diphasic, and weakness due to both neuropathy and polymyositis may be encountered. Autonomic dysfunction leads to hypotension, bradycardia, and hypersalivation in severe cases. Ciguatoxins are potent, lipophilic sodium channel activator toxins which bind to the voltage sensitive (site 5) sodium channel on the cell membranes of all excitable tissues. Treatment depends on early diagnosis and the early administration of intravenous mannitol. The early identification of the neurological features in sentinel patients has the potential to reduce the number of secondary cases in cluster outbreaks.

  11. Neurology of ciguatera

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, J

    2001-01-01

    Ciguatera is a widespread ichthyosarcotoxaemia with dramatic and clinically important neurological features. This severe form of fish poisoning may present with either acute or chronic intoxication syndromes and constitutes a global health problem. Ciguatera poisoning is little known in temperate countries as a potentially global problem associated with human ingestion of large carnivorous fish that harbour the bioaccumulated ciguatoxins of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. This neurotoxin is stored in the viscera of fish that have eaten the dinoflagellate and concentrated it upwards throughout the food chain towards progressively larger species, including humans. Ciguatoxin accumulates in all fish tissues, especially the liver and viscera, of "at risk" species. Both Pacific (P-CTX-1) and Caribbean (C-CTX-1) ciguatoxins are heat stable polyether toxins and pose a health risk at concentrations above 0.1 ppb. The presenting signs of ciguatera are primarily neurotoxic in more than 80% of cases. Such include the pathognomonic features of postingestion paraesthesiae, dysaesthesiae, and heightened nociperception. Other sensory abnormalities include the subjective features of metallic taste, pruritis, arthralgia, myalgia, and dental pain. Cerebellar dysfunction, sometimes diphasic, and weakness due to both neuropathy and polymyositis may be encountered. Autonomic dysfunction leads to hypotension, bradycardia, and hypersalivation in severe cases. Ciguatoxins are potent, lipophilic sodium channel activator toxins which bind to the voltage sensitive (site 5) sodium channel on the cell membranes of all excitable tissues. Treatment depends on early diagnosis and the early administration of intravenous mannitol. The early identification of the neurological features in sentinel patients has the potential to reduce the number of secondary cases in cluster outbreaks.

 PMID:11118239

  12. Medical and Nonstroke Neurologic Causes of Acute, Continuous Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Newman-Toker, David E

    2015-08-01

    Most patients with the acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) have vestibular neuritis or stroke or, in the setting of trauma, a posttraumatic vestibular cause. Some medical and nonstroke causes of the AVS must also be considered. Multiple sclerosis is the most common diagnosis in this group. Other less common causes include cerebellar masses, inflammation and infection, mal de debarquement, various toxins, Wernicke disease, celiac-related dizziness, and bilateral vestibulopathy. Finally, there may be unmasking of prior posterior circulation events by various physiologic alterations such as alterations of temperature, blood pressure, electrolytes, or various medications, especially sedating agents.

  13. [Neurological appraisal of children and adolescents with psychotic symptoms].

    PubMed

    Tomás-Vila, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Introduccion. Las manifestaciones psicoticas en la infancia no son infrecuentes; sin embargo, la bibliografia existente acerca de la valoracion neurologica de niños y adolescentes con cuadros psicoticos es muy escasa. Objetivo. Realizar una revision bibliografica no sistematica que permita responder a estas tres cuestiones: cuando debe llevarse a cabo una valoracion neurologica en un niño con rasgos psicoticos?, cuales son las condiciones medicas que pueden incluir un cuadro psicotico en su evolucion? y cual debe ser el procedimiento diagnostico? Desarrollo. Se revisan las enfermedades que pueden presentar sintomatologia psicotica al inicio o durante la evolucion, y se agrupan por patologias: errores congenitos del metabolismo, enfermedades geneticas, enfermedades autoinmunes e infecciosas, malformaciones del sistema nervioso central, epilepsia, patologia vascular, procesos reumatologicos, tumores cerebrales, y farmacos y sustancias psicoactivas. Se propone una pauta diagnostica en la que se valora la informacion obtenida a partir de la anamnesis y la exploracion y la aportacion de cada prueba diagnostica. Conclusiones. El numero de procesos que pueden manifestar sintomatologia psicotica a lo largo de su evolucion es muy elevado, y hay que considerar las claves que ofrecen la anamnesis y la exploracion. Esta revision puede ayudar a neuropediatras y otros especialistas a realizar una valoracion mas sistematizada de niños y adolescentes con cuadros psicoticos.

  14. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way.

  15. Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndromes in Children: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    ALAVI, Samin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) were initially defined as neurological syndromes with unknown etiology that often associate with cancer. This broad definition may lead to misconception that any neurological syndrome, which coincides with a cancer might be considered as PNS. In the last two decades it has been suggested that PNSs are mainly immune-mediated. The detection of onconeural antibodies has been very helpful in indicating the existence of a tumor and defining a given neurological syndrome as paraneoplastic. However, PNS may occur without onconeural antibodies, and the antibodies can occur with no neurological syndrome; thus, their presence should not be the only condition to define a neurological syndrome as paraneoplastic. Diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndromes in children may result in early detection and treatment of the pediatric cancer and can reduce the neurological damage that is the major source of morbidity in children with successfully treated tumors. This study reviews the presenting symptoms, immunology, and management options for paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing on those most commonly reported in children. PMID:24665300

  16. Neurological complications of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Pengiran, T; Wills, A; Holmes, G

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neurological disorders have been reported in association with coeliac disease including epilepsy, ataxia, neuropathy, and myelopathy. The nature of this association is unclear and whether a specific neurological complication occurs in coeliac disease remains unproved. Malabsorption may lead to vitamin and trace element deficiencies. Therefore, patients who develop neurological dysfunction should be carefully screened for these. However, malabsorption does not satisfactorily explain the pathophysiology and clinical course of many of the associated neurological disorders. Other mechanisms proposed include altered autoimmunity, heredity, and gluten toxicity. This review attempts to summarise the literature and suggests directions for future research. PMID:12151653

  17. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cause severe illness and even death. Cutaneous anthrax symptoms can include: A group of small blisters ... on the face, neck, arms, or hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort ...

  18. Endoscopic evaluation of neurological dysphagic patients.

    PubMed

    Coscarelli, S; Verrecchia, L; Coscarelli, A

    2007-12-01

    Dysphagia is a frequent finding in neurological patients and is a symptom related to the severity of the clinical picture. The swallowing impairments, in these patients, increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, that leads to death, in at least 6% of patients, within the first year. Therefore, evaluation of the swallowing status is essential in patients with dysphagia and videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) is the method of choice. It cannot be performed in all patients on account of the complexity of the procedure and since they must be brought to the Radiology Unit. In the 1980, a new bedside method was introduced, namely: fiber-optic endoscopic study of swallow (FESS) which is easy, low-cost, well-tolerated and repeatable. We use this bedside technique to assess swallowing function in patients with dysphagia admitted to acute care units, neurological and internal medicine units. The evaluation aims to indicate the safer nutritional method (oral intake, feeding tube or percutaneous gastrostomy) and, consequently, reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization. We found that more than 50% of the dysphagic patients present cerebrovascular injuries and in 2% of the population, the first diagnostic hypothesis of Myasthenia Gravis can be made with the FESS technique. In 60%, we indicate a change in nutritional method: in 20% we indicate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). With these indications, none of those patients had aspiration pneumonia. Our protocol for the bedside fiberoptic study of neurological patients with dysphagia has demonstrated its efectiveness by eliminating the incidence of aspiration pneumonia.

  19. Child neurology practice and neurological disorders in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Idro, Richard; Newton, Charles; Kiguli, Sarah; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina

    2010-04-01

    Neurological disorders, including neurodevelopmental disorders, have been identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of the greatest threats to global public health. It is generally believed that these conditions are more prevalent in the developing than the developed world because of multiple known risk factors such as infections, malnutrition, and limited resources for obstetric and neonatal management. In East Africa, few investigations have been conducted to obtain data on the magnitude and description of neurological disorders among children, and the practice of child neurology is faced with challenges cutting across areas of health personnel, patient diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation. This article reviews the burden, types, and causes of neurological disorders in the East African region. The challenges and successes in the practice of child neurology and recommendations for the future are discussed.

  20. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  1. [History of neurology and education on neurology in Japan].

    PubMed

    Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2009-11-01

    The first medical society of Japanese neurologists and psychiatrists was founded in 1902, but psychiatrists gradually dominated in number. New "Japanese Society of Neurology" (JSN) was founded in 1960. The number of members was only 643 in 1960, while it rose up to 8,555 in 2009, including regular, junior, senior and associate members. JSN contributed much to solve the causes and treatment of the medicosocial and iatrogenic diseases such as Minamata disease and SMON (subacute myelopticoneuropathy) at its early period. In undergraduate education at medical school neurology is one of the core subjects in the curriculum, and almost all the 80 medical schools have at least one faculty neurologist. The Board of neurology of JSN was started in 1975, as the third earliest of the Japanese Medical Associations. It takes at least 6 years' clinical training after graduating from the medical school to take the neurology Board examinations. By 2009, 4,000 members passed the Board examinations. In 2002 JSN published evidence-based "Treatment Guidelines 2002" of 6 diseases: Parkinson's disease, stroke, chronic headache, dementia and ALS. As to the international issues, JSN hosted the 12th World Congress of Neurology in 1981, and international activities markedly increased after that. The first informal meeting with JSN and Korean Neurological Association (KNA) was held at the 48th JSN Annual Meeting in Nagoya in May 2007. In May 2008 the KNA-JSN 1st Joint symposium was held at the 49th Annual Meeting of JSN in Yokohama on "International comparison of neurological disorders: focusing on spinocerebellar atrophies (SCA) and epilepsies". In May 2009, KNA-JNS 2 nd Joint Symposium was held at the 50th JSN Annual Meeting in Sendai, inviting a speaker from Taiwan Neurological Society, on the subject "History and Education of Neurology in Japan, Korea and Taiwan". In this symposium, a strategy to make up the Northeast Asian Neurological Association was discussed.

  2. The neurological effects of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Aaron; Narvencar, Kedareshwar P S; Sindhoora, K V

    2013-12-15

    Used primarily as a fumigant or as a substrate in chemical processes, methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas. The gas is usually absorbed by inhalation and effects on the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, skin, and brain are seen. Numerous instances of acute and chronic neurologic injury have been reported: acute poisoning results in seizures, myoclonus, ataxia or cerebral oedema beginning as early as 30 min after exposure while subacute or chronic intoxication presents with diverse slowly progressive neurological and neurobehavioral symptoms. Serum bromide levels may be elevated, but often return rapidly to normal. Electroencephalography may show frontally-predominant slow waves or polyspikes with following slow wave, and MRI reveals characteristic involvement in the dentate nucleus of the cerebellum, the brainstem, and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Symmetric and selective lesions in characteristic sites are observed on imaging and on histopathological examination. These are likely produced by methylation of intracellular lipids, protein and glutathione; production of toxic metabolites; defective neurotransmitter function; and abnormal oxidative phosphorylation. This article reviews the toxic effects of this gas, the pathophysiology and symptoms of its effects on the nervous system, and characteristic findings on MRI; and presents an illustrative case of methyl bromide intoxication due to exposure at a factory producing the compound commercially.

  3. Cerebral metastases from lung carcinoma: neurological and CT correlation: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Richmond, B.D.; Klatte, E.C.

    1984-12-01

    To determine the role of brain CT in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients a review was made of the CT and clinical findings in 279 patients. Brain metastases were found in 94.5% of patients with specific abnormal neurological findings, 26.6% of patients with vague neurological signs and symptoms, 11% of patients with oat cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination, and 40% of patients with adenocarcinoma and a normal neurological examination. Brain metastasis was not seen on CT in the 29 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and a normal neurological examination. It is concluded that brain CT is useful for the detection of occult brain metastases, particularly oat cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, in neurologically asymptomatic lung cancer patients.

  4. Enterovirus 71 infection and neurological complications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Since the outbreak of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection in Malaysia in 1997, large epidemics of EV71 have occurred in the Asia-Pacific region. Many children and infants have died from serious neurological complications during these epidemics, and EV71 infection has become a serious public health problem in these areas. EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children, and usually resolves spontaneously. However, EV71 occasionally involves the central nervous system (CNS), and induces diverse neurological complications such as brainstem encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis. Among those complications, brainstem encephalitis is the most critical neurological manifestation because it can cause neurogenic pulmonary hemorrhage/edema leading to death. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus and ataxia, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis, and brainstem lesions on magnetic resonance imaging, in conjunction with the skin rash of HFMD and the isolation of EV71 from a stool, throat-swab, or CSF sample are typical findings indicating CNS involvement of EV71 infection. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone are recommended in cases with severe neurological complications from EV71 infection, such as brainstem encephalitis. Despite the recent discovery of receptors for EV71 in human cells, such as the scavenger receptor B2 and P-selection glycoprotein ligand 1, it is not known why EV71 infection predominantly involves the brainstem. Recently, 3 companies in China have completed phase III clinical trials of EV71 vaccines. However, the promotion and approval of these vaccines in various countries are problems yet to be resolved. PMID:27826325

  5. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes.

  6. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  7. Neurology of Volition

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psychogenic movement disorders, it is also possible to claim volition for presumed involuntary movements (early chorea) or even when no movement is produced (anosognosia). The study of such patients should enlighten traditional models of how the percepts of volition are generated in the brain with regards to movement. We discuss volition and its components as multi-leveled processes with feedforward and feedback information flow, and dependence on prior expectations as well as external and internal cues. PMID:23329204

  8. Neurologic Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord.

  9. History of neurologic examination books

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  10. Neurological effects of pesticide use among farmers in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Yanhong; Cui, Fang; Cai, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaohui; Jin, Yanhong; Robson, Mark G; Li, Mao; Ren, Yuting; Huang, Xusheng; Hu, Ruifa

    2014-04-14

    The intensive use of pesticides has attracted great attention from the Chinese government. However, current regulations have had limited influence on their safe use. Although the acute neurologic effects of pesticides have been well documented, little is known about their cumulative effects. Knowledge of the impact of pesticides on health may convince farmers to minimize their use. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three provinces of China to evaluate the relationship between pesticide exposure and neurological dysfunction. Crop farmers were divided into two groups depending on their level of pesticide exposure. A total of 236 participants were assessed by questionnaire and neurological examination for symptoms and signs of neuropathy. Characteristics of neurologic dysfunction following cumulative low-level exposure were assessed with logistic regression analysis. Farmers exposed to high-level pesticide use had greater risk of developing sensations of numbness or prickling (odds ratio (OR) 2.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-6.36). After adjusting for recent exposure, the risk of numbness or prickling symptoms (OR 2.55, 95% CI: 1.04-6.25) remained statistically significant. Loss of muscle strength and decreased deep tendon reflexes had OR > 2, however, this did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that overuse of pesticides increased risk of neurologic dysfunction among farmers, with somatosensory small fibers most likely affected. Measures that are more efficient should be taken to curb excessive use of pesticides.

  11. Models of progressive neurological dysfunction originating early in life.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Amber L; Rojas-Mancilla, Edgardo; Morales, Paola; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Tasker, R Andrew

    2015-10-17

    It is now well established that many of society's most devastating and costly neurological diseases and disorders arise from trauma at, or shortly after birth. In some cases deficits are seen in childhood and in others they are substantially delayed; arising in adolescence or young adulthood. In either case the initial insult initiates a metabolic and/or neurodegenerative cascade that proceeds, often undetected, for a considerable period of time before diagnosable symptoms appear. This affords a potential for detecting and slowing or arresting degenerative and/or malfunctioning processes prior to the appearance of symptoms, but requires an understanding of the mechanisms involved in the progressive dysfunction that characterizes the disease progression process. While numerous preclinical models of end-stage symptoms of neurological disease are established, animal models of progressive neurological dysfunction have received comparatively less attention. This review attempts to introduce the concept of modelling progressive dysfunction in animals and provides descriptions of the current status of several representative examples of models that have been developed and partially characterized for understanding diseases of the brain that arise either at or near the time of birth in rodents. It is our belief that such models are essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms responsible for progressive neurological dysfunction and hold the potential for identifying targets for early detection and presymptomatic therapy of these conditions.

  12. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients’ mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection. PMID:27051240

  13. Neurological complications of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, David L; Berger, Miles; Mathew, Joseph P; Graffagnino, Carmelo; Milano, Carmelo A; Newman, Mark F

    2014-05-01

    As increasing numbers of elderly people undergo cardiac surgery, neurologists are frequently called upon to assess patients with neurological complications from the procedure. Some complications mandate acute intervention, whereas others need longer term observation and management. A large amount of published literature exists about these complications and guidance on best practice is constantly changing. Similarly, despite technological advances in surgical intervention and modifications in surgical technique to make cardiac procedures safer, these advances often create new avenues for neurological injury. Accordingly, rapid and precise neurological assessment and therapeutic intervention rests on a solid understanding of the evidence base and procedural variables.

  14. A century of Dutch neurology.

    PubMed

    Koehler, P J; Bruyn, G W; Moffie, D

    1998-12-01

    The Netherlands Society of Neurology evolved from the Society of Psychiatry founded in 1871. The name was changed into Netherlands Society of Psychiatry and Neurology (NSPN) in 1897. In the same year, the word neurology was also added to the name of the journal. The Society steadily blossomed, but in 1909 the first signs of dissatisfaction occurred: the Amsterdam Neurologists Society was founded. A few split-offs would follow. The number of members of the NSPN increased from 205 in 1920 to 585 in 1960. In the early 1960s, the Society was reorganised and would consist of two sections, one for psychiatry and one for neurology. However, this would not last, as a full separation was established in 1974. For several reasons, the name of the journal was changed four times until it assumed its present name in 1974. The 100th volume of CNN was not published, as expected. in 1996, but in 1998, because of two skipped publication years, one during WWII and another in the 1970s. During the last decades of the nineteenth century, teaching of neurology was mostly given within the frame of psychiatry, following the German tradition of 'brainpsychiatry' (organic or biologic psychiatry). The first official chair of psychiatry was founded at Utrecht, 1893 (Winkler). In Amsterdam, private teachers such as Delprat taught 'electro-therapy and nervous diseases' since the 1880s. The first extraordinary chair of neurology and electrotherapy was founded for his successor, Wertheim Salomonson in 1899. The first university clinic for psychiatry and neurology started at the Amsterdam Municipal University, when Winkler became professor of psychiatry and neurology in Amsterdam in 1896. Around the turn of the century, chairs of psychiatry and neurology were also founded in Groningen and Leiden. Separate chairs for neurology and psychiatry appeared in Amsterdam in 1923 and in Utrecht in 1936. Following an initiative of Brouwer, the first neurological university clinic opened its doors in

  15. Fermented soybeans, Chungkookjang, prevent hippocampal cell death and β-cell apoptosis by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines in gerbils with transient artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Moon, Bo Reum

    2015-01-01

    Since Chungkookjang, a short-term fermented soybean, is known to improve glucose metabolism and antioxidant activity, it may prevent the neurological symptoms and glucose disturbance induced by artery occlusion. We investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of traditional (TFC) and standardized Chungkookjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis (BLFC) against ischemia/reperfusion damage in the hippocampal CA1 region and against hyperglycemia after transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Gerbils were subjected to either an occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries for 8 min to render them ischemic or a sham operation. Ischemic gerbils were fed either a 40% fat diet containing 10% of either cooked soybean (CSB), TFC, or BLFC for 28 days. Neuronal cell death and cytokine expression in the hippocampus, neurological deficit, serum cytokine levels, and glucose metabolism were measured. TFC and BLFC contained more isoflavonoid aglycones than CSB. Artery occlusion increased the expressions of IL-1β and TNF-α as well as cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and induced severe neurological symptoms. CSB, TFC, and BLFC prevented the neuronal cell death and the symptoms such as dropped eyelid, bristling hair, reduced muscle tone and flexor reflex, and abnormal posture and walking patterns, and suppressed cytokine expressions. CSB was less effective than TFC and BLFC. Artery occlusion induced glucose intolerance due to decreased insulin secretion and β-cell mass. TFC and BLFC prevented the impairment of glucose metabolism by artery occlusion. Especially TFC and BLFC increased β-cell proliferation and suppressed the β-cell apoptosis by suppressing TNF-α and IL-1β which in turn decreased cleaved caspase-3 that caused apoptosis. In conclusion, TFC and BLFC may prevent and alleviate neuronal cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and neurological symptoms and poststroke hyperglycemia in gerbils with artery occlusion. This might be associated with

  16. Fermented soybeans, Chungkookjang, prevent hippocampal cell death and β-cell apoptosis by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines in gerbils with transient artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Kang, Sunna; Moon, Bo Reum

    2016-02-01

    Since Chungkookjang, a short-term fermented soybean, is known to improve glucose metabolism and antioxidant activity, it may prevent the neurological symptoms and glucose disturbance induced by artery occlusion. We investigated the protective effects and mechanisms of traditional (TFC) and standardized Chungkookjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis (BLFC) against ischemia/reperfusion damage in the hippocampal CA1 region and against hyperglycemia after transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. Gerbils were subjected to either an occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries for 8 min to render them ischemic or a sham operation. Ischemic gerbils were fed either a 40% fat diet containing 10% of either cooked soybean (CSB), TFC, or BLFC for 28 days. Neuronal cell death and cytokine expression in the hippocampus, neurological deficit, serum cytokine levels, and glucose metabolism were measured. TFC and BLFC contained more isoflavonoid aglycones than CSB. Artery occlusion increased the expressions of IL-1β and TNF-α as well as cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and induced severe neurological symptoms. CSB, TFC, and BLFC prevented the neuronal cell death and the symptoms such as dropped eyelid, bristling hair, reduced muscle tone and flexor reflex, and abnormal posture and walking patterns, and suppressed cytokine expressions. CSB was less effective than TFC and BLFC. Artery occlusion induced glucose intolerance due to decreased insulin secretion and β-cell mass. TFC and BLFC prevented the impairment of glucose metabolism by artery occlusion. Especially TFC and BLFC increased β-cell proliferation and suppressed the β-cell apoptosis by suppressing TNF-α and IL-1β which in turn decreased cleaved caspase-3 that caused apoptosis. In conclusion, TFC and BLFC may prevent and alleviate neuronal cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region and neurological symptoms and poststroke hyperglycemia in gerbils with artery occlusion. This might be associated with

  17. Prevention of neurological complications using a neural monitoring system with a finger electrode in the extreme lateral interbody fusion approach.

    PubMed

    Narita, Wataru; Takatori, Ryota; Arai, Yuji; Nagae, Masateru; Tonomura, Hitoshi; Hayashida, Tatsuro; Ogura, Taku; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-10-01

    between PP% and threshold values before dissection, but there was no correlation with threshold values after dissection. The thresholds after dissection improved to 11 mA or higher in all patients. There were no serious neurological complications in any patient, but there was a significantly lower incidence of transient neurological symptoms in the finger electrode group (7 [38%] of 18 cases vs 5 [14%] of 36 cases, p = 0.047). CONCLUSIONS The new neural monitoring system using a finger electrode may be useful to prevent XLIF-induced neurological complications.

  18. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  19. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  20. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other.

  1. Depressive syndromes in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Piber, Dominique; Hinkelmann, Kim; Gold, Stefan M; Heesen, Christoph; Spitzer, Carsten; Endres, Matthias; Otte, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Depressive syndromes represent a common and often characteristic feature in a number of neurological disorders. One prominent example is the development of post-stroke depression, which can be observed in more than one-third of stroke survivors in the aftermath of an ischemic stroke. Thus, post-stroke depression represents one of the most prevalent, disabling, and potentially devastating psychiatric post-stroke complications. On the other hand, depressive syndromes may also be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological disorders, as recently revealed by a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies, which demonstrated an increased risk for ischemic events in depressed patients. Moreover, depressive syndromes represent common comorbidities in a number of other neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, or epilepsy, in which depression has a strong impact on both quality of life and outcome of the primary neurological disorder.

  2. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  3. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  4. Neuropsychiatric symptoms and celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Urban-Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Œmigielski, Janusz; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropsychiatric symptoms may represent an atypical manifestation of celiac disease that occur before a gastroenterological diagnosis is made. Some studies suggest that a gluten-free diet is effective in treating the depression, anxiety, and neurological complications associated with celiac disease. Method The article describes the case of a patient suffering from chronic, treatment-resistant symptoms of depression and anxiety. The diagnosis of celiac disease and introduction of an elimination diet caused a significant improvement in mental state and everyday functioning in the presenting patient. Conclusion The presence of persistent anxiety and depressive symptoms, with a poor reaction to pharmacological treatment, indicates a need to identify somatic reasons for the underlying condition. It is important to remember that celiac disease can occur at any age, not only in childhood. The presence of this somatic cause of persistent depressive and anxiety symptoms should be considered in the diagnostic process in adults. PMID:25342904

  5. Neurology in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Singhal, B S; Khadilkar, Satish V

    2014-01-01

    The social and economic impact of neurologic disorders is being increasingly recognized in the developing world. Demographic transition, especially in large Asian populations, has resulted in a significant increase in the elderly population, bringing to the fore neurologic illnesses such as strokes, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. CNS infections such as retroviral diseases, tuberculosis, and malaria still account for high mortality and morbidity. Traumatic brain injury due to traffic accidents takes a high toll of life. Epilepsy continues to be a major health concern with large segments of the developing world's population receiving no treatment. A significant mismatch between the provision of specialized neurologic services and the requirement for them exists, especially in rural areas. Also, health insurance is not available for the majority, with patients having bear the costs themselves, thus limiting the procurement of available healthcare facilities. Neurologic training centers are few and the availability of laboratory facilities and equipment is largely limited to the metropolitan areas. Cultural practices, superstitious beliefs, ignorance, and social stigma may also impede the delivery of neurologic care. Optimizing available human resources, integrating primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare tiers and making medical treatment more affordable will improve the neurologic care in the developing world.

  6. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology.

  7. Endoscopic evaluation of neurological dysphagic patients

    PubMed Central

    Coscarelli, S; Verrecchia, L; Coscarelli, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dysphagia is a frequent finding in neurological patients and is a symptom related to the severity of the clinical picture. The swallowing impairments, in these patients, increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, that leads to death, in at least 6% of patients, within the first year. Therefore, evaluation of the swallowing status is essential in patients with dysphagia and videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) is the method of choice. It cannot be performed in all patients on account of the complexity of the procedure and since they must be brought to the Radiology Unit. In the 1980, a new bedside method was introduced, namely: fiber-optic endoscopic study of swallow (FESS) which is easy, low-cost, well-tolerated and repeatable. We use this bedside technique to assess swallowing function in patients with dysphagia admitted to acute care units, neurological and internal medicine units. The evaluation aims to indicate the safer nutritional method (oral intake, feeding tube or percutaneous gastrostomy) and, consequently, reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization. We found that more than 50% of the dysphagic patients present cerebrovascular injuries and in 2% of the population, the first diagnostic hypothesis of Myasthenia Gravis can be made with the FESS technique. In 60%, we indicate a change in nutritional method: in 20% we indicate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). With these indications, none of those patients had aspiration pneumonia. Our protocol for the bedside fiberoptic study of neurological patients with dysphagia has demonstrated its efectiveness by eliminating the incidence of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:18320832

  8. [Therapeutic armamentarium in neurology: the birth of a new era].

    PubMed

    Belachew, S; Magis, D; Lievens, I; Cuvelier, M L; Rikir, E; Garraux, G; Hotermans, C; Salmon, E; Sadzot, B; Cambron, L; Maquet, P; Poirrier, R; Moonen, G

    2007-01-01

    The field of neurology was long infamous for a lack of therapeutic options. How many of you have once thought: "Neurologists don't cure the disease, they admire it". But those days have passed into history, and the field is now vibrant with new treatments and hope even for patients with the worst neurodegenerative diseases. We summarized in the present review the latest major advances in therapeutic principles and practice for some of the most frequent chronic neurological disorders such as headaches, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementias, Parkinson's disease, sleep/wake disturbances and peripheral neuropathies. We cannot cure or prevent, but we can now halt or control symptoms and disease progression to provide physical and psychological relief, and a better quality of life for patients who suffer from these otherwise devastating neurological conditions.

  9. Neurological counterparts of hyponatremia: pathological mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Faravelli, Irene; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Oldani, Silvia; Fedeli, Carlo; Graziani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mEq/L, represents the most frequent electrolyte disorder in older hospitalized patients. Early recognition of hyponatremia is mandatory, since it represents an independent risk factor that increases hospital mortality by 40 %. Delayed correction of hyponatremia may worsen brain edema, resulting in different degrees of neural damage. However, an overly rapid correction of serum sodium levels can lead to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), a dreadful neurological picture. In recent years, hyponatremia and ODS have received growing attention both in terms of clinical management and pathophysiology, leading to the discovery of new drugs and treatment algorithms. In this review, we recapitulate the pathogenetic background, clinical manifestations, and treatment guidelines of hyponatremia, focusing on the neurological alterations. Neurological symptoms may be neglected when they manifest as early signs of mild hyponatremia, while brain damage can irremediably affect patients' conditions in the context of ODS.

  10. Accommodation of workers with chronic neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bleecker, Margit L; Barnes, Sheryl K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to work is important to those with chronic neurologic disorders (CND) and to the aging workforce. Many signs and symptoms are similar in those with CND and normal aging, but may interfere with the ability to work if not appropriately accommodated. This requires the healthcare provider to recognize the specific features of the CND that interferes with work and how it can be accommodated. Review of the American with Disabilities Act and the subsequent amendment informs the healthcare provider as to what is covered under the law and how the disability can be accommodated. Overall employers want to retain qualified employees and therefore accommodating workers is beneficial to both the employee with CND and the employer.

  11. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  12. Neurologic complications of sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Akila; Adams, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a group of genetic blood disorders that vary in severity, but the most severe forms, primarily homozygous sickle cell anemia, are associated with neurologic complications. Over the last 90 years it has become established that some patients will develop severe arterial disease of the intracranial brain arteries and suffer brain infarction. Smaller infarctions and brain atrophy may also be seen and over time there appear to be negative cognitive effects in some patients, with or without abnormal brain imaging. Focal mononeuropathies and pneumococcal meningitis are also more common in these patients. Brain infarction in children can largely be prevented screening children beginning at age 2 years and instituting regular blood transfusion when the Doppler indicates high stroke risk (>200cm/sec). Iron overload and the uncertain duration of transfusion are disadvantages but overall this approach, tested in a randomized clinical trial, reduced first stroke by over 90%. Secondary stroke prevention has not been subjected to a randomized controlled trial except for one recently stopped comparison of regular transfusions compared to hydroxuyrea (results favored transfusion). The usual stroke prevention agents (such as aspirin or warfarin) have not been rigorously tested. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography give evidence of subtle and sometimes overt brain injury due to stroke in many adults, but a preventive strategy for adults with SCD has not been developed. Bone marrow transplantation is the only cure, but some non-neurologic symptoms can be controlled in adults with hydroxuyrea.

  13. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Berisavac, Ivana I; Pavlović, Aleksandra M; Trajković, Jasna J Zidverc; Šternić, Nadežda M Čovičković; Bumbaširević, Ljiljana G Beslać

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects.

  14. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation.

  15. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Photos ...

  16. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  17. POLG mutations associated with remitting/relapsing neurological events.

    PubMed

    Degos, Bertrand; Laforêt, Pascal; Jardel, Claude; Sedel, Frédéric; Jossay-Winter, Murielle; Romero, Norma B; Lyon-Caen, Olivier; Tourbah, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental data underline the relationship between mitochondria and immune function. Clinical reports of patients presenting with mitochondrial dysfunction associated with dysimmune responses in the central nervous system reinforce this new concept. We describe the first case of a woman presenting with symptoms related to a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the mitochondrial polymerase γ (POLG) gene, associated with neurological events suggestive of a demyelinating process. Clinical examination revealed bilateral ptosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia and axonal sensitive polyneuropathy suggestive of a mitochondrial disease. In line with this, muscle biopsy showed ragged red fibers, and sequencing of POLG revealed two heterozygous mutations. In addition, the patient exhibited relapsing neurological symptoms, and cerebral and spinal MRI mimicking multiple sclerosis. This patient stresses the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. Recent studies suggest that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction could provide benefits in treating some inflammatory diseases.

  18. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-01-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were called ‘hyperexcitability disorders’. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as “anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes.” An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  19. 'Non-Criteria' Neurologic Manifestations of Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A Hidden Kingdom to be Discovered.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Wong, Kah Keng; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neurological manifestations or disorders associated with the central nervous system are among the most common and important clinical characteristics of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Although in the most recently updated (2006) APS classification criteria, the neurological manifestations encompass only transient ischemic attack and stroke, diverse 'non-criteria' neurological disorders or manifestations (i.e., headache, migraine, bipolar disorder, transverse myelitis, dementia, chorea, epileptic seizures, multiple sclerosis, psychosis, cognitive impairment, Tourette's syndrome, parkinsonism, dystonia, transient global amnesia, obsessive compulsive disorder and leukoencephalopathy) have been observed in APS patients. To date, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these abnormal neurological manifestations in APS remain unclear. In vivo experiments and human observational studies indicate the involvement of thrombotic events and/or high titers of antiphospholipid antibodies in the neuro-pathogenic cascade of APS. Although different types of neurologic manifestations in APS patients have successfully been treated with therapies involving anti-thrombotic regimens (i.e., anticoagulants and/or platelet antiaggregants), antineuralgic drugs (i.e., antidepressants, antipsychotics and antiepileptics) and immunosuppressive drugs alone or in combination, evidence-based guidelines for the management of the neurologic manifestations of APS remain unavailable. Therefore, further experimental, clinical and retrospective studies with larger patient cohorts are warranted to elucidate the pathogenic linkage between APS and the central nervous system in addition to randomized controlled trials to facilitate the discovery of appropriate medications for the 'non-criteria' neurologic manifestations of APS.

  20. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  1. Exacerbation of preexisting neurological deficits by neuraxial anesthesia: report of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J Antonio; Reza-Medina, Marisela; Daud, Olga; Lalin-Iglesias, Silvia; Chiodetti, Gustavo; Guevara, Uriah; Wikinski, Jaime A; Torrieri, Alberto

    2005-06-01

    We undertook this case series to determine if preexisting neurological disease is exacerbated by either spinal or epidural anesthesia. In the website of the Arachnoiditis Foundation, we posted an offer to advise anesthesiologists in cases of neurological problems after either of these techniques was used. Contacts were made first by way of the Internet, confirmed by telephone, and maintained by fax, e-mail, or by special mail. Patients here described were cared for and observed by one of the authors, in a hospital, in Argentina or in Mexico. A total of 7 adult, ASA physical status I and II patients, including 3 men and 4 women, with subtle symptoms of neurological disease before anesthesia, are described. Two patients had continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia, 3 had spinals; in 2 more, attempted epidural blocks led to accidental dural puncture and were converted to subarachnoid anesthetics. All patients accepted neuraxial anesthesia without informing the anesthesiologists that they had mild neurological symptoms before surgery. Because anesthesiologists did not specifically inquire about subclinical neurological symptoms or prior neurological disease, anesthesiologists are advised to carefully inquire about prior neurological disease whether neuraxial anesthesia techniques are considered.

  2. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    PubMed

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others.

  3. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  4. A Program for Neurological Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Louis

    A program for neurological organization is explained and its purposes are stated. Hints are given for working with both child and parents; and form for evaluating measures of neuromotor fitness is included. Also provided is a checklist for rating motor exploration, including movements performed lying on the back, on the knees, or standing or on…

  5. Neurologic aspects of drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Harold W; Murtaugh, Reed; Fernandez, Francisco

    2010-02-01

    Neurologic aspects of drug abuse vary. This article explains the general nature of drug abuse, identifies the physiologic effects of certain drugs, and briefly describes the neurobiology of addiction. This article also reviews available treatment options for those addicted to substances of abuse, and clarifies common misconceptions, including the differences between tolerance, abuse, and addiction.

  6. HEW and the neurologically handicapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. V.

    1974-01-01

    Some of the neurological disorders and therapeutic devices are considered with which the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) is most concerned. The organization of the Department, because it is a rather complex one with many different agencies involved, is also described.

  7. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  8. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may be a direct consequence of the disease itself or may be secondary to pain, depression, other sleep disorders or the effects of medications. Insomnia can have a significant impact on the patient's cognitive and physical function and may be associated with psychological distress and depression. Diagnosis of insomnia is primarily based on medical history and validated questionnaires. Actigraphy is a helpful diagnostic tool for assessing the circadian sleep-wake rhythm. For differential diagnosis and to measure the duration of sleep full polysomnography may be recommended. Prior to initiating treatment the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific evidence-based treatment strategies.

  9. Neurological Manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection in Hospitalized Children and Their Long-Term Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Kammer, Jessica; Ziesing, Stefan; Davila, Lukas Aguirre; Bültmann, Eva; Illsinger, Sabine; Das, Anibh M; Haffner, Dieter; Hartmann, Hans

    2016-10-01

    Objective In this retrospective study, we aimed to assess frequency, types, and long-term outcome of neurological disease during acute Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of patients hospitalized with acute M. pneumoniae infection were reviewed. Possible risk factors were analyzed by uni- and multivariate regression. Patients with neurological symptoms were followed up by expanded disability status score (EDSS) and the cognitive problems in children and adolescents (KOPKJ) scale. Results Out of 89 patients, 22 suffered from neurological symptoms and signs. Neurological disorders were diagnosed in 11 patients: (meningo-) encephalitis (n = 6), aseptic meningitis (n = 3), transverse myelitis (n = 1), and vestibular neuritis (n = 1), 11 patients had nonspecific neurological symptoms and signs. Multivariate logistic regression identified lower respiratory tract symptoms as a negative predictor (odds ratio [OR] = 0.1, p < 0.001), a preexisting immune deficit was associated with a trend for a decreased risk (OR = 0.12, p = 0.058). Long-term follow-up after a median of 5.1 years (range, 0.6-13 years) showed ongoing neurological deficits in the EDSS in 8/18, and in the KOPKJ in 7/17. Conclusion Neurological symptoms occurred in 25% of hospitalized pediatric patients with M. pneumoniae infection. Outcome was often favorable, but significant sequels were reported by 45%.

  10. Hypnosis as a model of functional neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Deeley, Q

    2017-01-01

    In the 19th century it was recognized that neurologic symptoms could be caused by "morbid ideation" as well as organic lesions. The subsequent observation that hysteric (now called "functional") symptoms could be produced and removed by hypnotic suggestion led Charcot to hypothesize that suggestion mediated the effects of ideas on hysteric symptoms through as yet unknown effects on brain activity. The advent of neuroimaging 100 years later revealed strikingly similar neural correlates in experiments matching functional symptoms with clinical analogs created by suggestion. Integrative models of suggested and functional symptoms regard these alterations in brain function as the endpoint of a broader set of changes in information processing due to suggestion. These accounts consider that suggestions alter experience by mobilizing representations from memory systems, and altering causal attributions, during preconscious processing which alters the content of what is provided to our highly edited subjective version of the world. Hypnosis as a model for functional symptoms draws attention to how radical alterations in experience and behavior can conform to the content of mental representations through effects on cognition and brain function. Experimental study of functional symptoms and their suggested counterparts in hypnosis reveals the distinct and shared processes through which this can occur.

  11. Implementation and Evaluation 
of a High-Dose Cytarabine Neurologic Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Szoch, Stephanie; Snow Kaiser, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Patients receiving high-dose cytarabine as part of their chemotherapy regimen have a chance of experiencing neurotoxicities. Prompt identification of signs and symptoms can greatly reduce the chance of patients sustaining permanent neurologic damage. This article describes the development and successful implementation of an evidence-based, standardized neurologic assessment and documentation tool that was evaluated using a clinical utility questionnaire and an adherence audit.

  12. Transient Idiopathic Primary Penoscrotal Edema

    PubMed Central

    Namir, Sody A; Trattner, Akiva

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a male born prematurely at 32 weeks gestation by cesarean section following overt symptoms of maternal preeclampsia. He developed severe penoscrotal edema anew one month from birth. No remarkable exposure or trauma was identified. This unexplained swelling remained uniform till 4 months of age, while the penile edema resolved spontaneously. A small benign hydrocele remained unchanged, since onset of the edema and continued after the edema subsided. This is the first report of persistent, but transient penoscrotal edema resolving in a 3 months course, without any apparent explanation, a possible pathogenetic mechanism was suggested. PMID:24082210

  13. Social networks and neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Lang, Catherine E; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-10-01

    Every patient is embedded in a social network of interpersonal connections that influence health outcomes. Neurologists routinely need to engage with a patient's family and friends due to the nature of the illness and its social sequelae. Social isolation is a potent determinant of poor health and neurobiological changes, and its effects can be comparable to those of traditional risk factors. It would seem reasonable, therefore, to map and follow the personal networks of neurology patients. This approach reveals influential people, their habits, and linkage patterns that could facilitate or limit health behaviours. Personal network information can be particularly valuable to enhance risk factor management, medication adherence, and functional recovery. Here, we propose an agenda for research and clinical practice that includes mapping the networks of patients with diverse neurological disorders, evaluating the impact of the networks on patient outcomes, and testing network interventions.

  14. Neurological complications of childhood leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, R H; Marshall, W C; Chessells, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have reviewed the neurological complications not directly attributable to leukaemic infiltration in a group of 438 children with leukaemia or lymphoma. 61 children had one or more complications due chiefly to bleeding, infection, or drug toxicity. Early death from intracranial haemorrhage occurred in 1% of children with lymphoblastic leukaemia and 7% of children with myeloblastic leukaemia. Measles and chicken pox were the most serious infective complications; one child remains severely retarded after presumed measles encephalitis, one child with chicken pox died, and a second remains disabled. 2 additional cases of measles encephalitis and one of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy are described. Drugs which caused neurotoxicity included vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, L-asparaginase, and phenothiazines, but most problems were caused by methotrexate. Methotrexate toxicity was more prevalent and more serious in children who had had previous central nervous system leukaemia. We conclude that viral infections and methotrexate pose the greatest neurological hazards to children with leukaemia. PMID:596922

  15. Molecular mechanisms in neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Cunniff, C

    2001-09-01

    Although many pediatric neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy and mental retardation, are the result of a combination of genetic and environmental factors, many others are the result of mutations of single genes. Most of these single gene traits are inherited in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, or X-linked fashion. The diversity of mutations that are responsible for these diseases produces variability in phenotypic expression. However, there are other important features of many neurologic disorders that cannot be explained by standard models of mendelian inheritance. This review focuses on recently described mechanisms, such as genomic imprinting, germline mosaicism, mitochondrial inheritance, and triplet repeat expansion. The diagnostic evaluation, prognostic significance, and recurrence risk for specific neurogenetic disorders is correlated with these underlying disease mechanisms.

  16. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients.

  17. [Epilepsy, vertigo, dizziness, headache, emesis as neurological manifestation in a Giteleman's Sindrome case].

    PubMed

    Delsere, Mirco; Campogiani, Vincenzo; Carletti, Vincenzo; Mancini, Stefania; Piccinini, Nadia; Castelli, Paolo; Sopranzi, Franco

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a woman presenting the recent onset of multiple seizure and epilepsy episodes combined with other neurological symptoms (e.g. vertigo, dizziness, vomiting, headache). She was resistant to antiepileptic and symptomatic therapy, having been first admitted to the neurology ward and subsequently to the general medicine ward. In this case, several patient assessments and imaging exams were not conclusive evidence of specific etiopathogenesis, or definitive neurological illness; however, the patient showed laboratory indexes compatible with Gitelmans Syndrome. The correction of the electrolytic imbalances of tubulopathy (including low magnesium and potassium levels) led to the progressive improvement of clinical manifestations and the eventual interruption of the antiepileptic therapy.

  18. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in

  19. HTLV-1 Associated Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Khan, Ishaq Nasib; Farman, Muhammad; Al Karim, Saleh; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Kamal, Muhammad Amjad; Al Ghamdi, Khalid; Harakeh, Steve

    2016-12-22

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus which is endemic to certain regions of the world and infects around 10-20 million people. HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders including mainly HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/Tropical spastic paraparesis. The involvement of the central nervous diseases occurs among: HTLV-1 infected patients from endemic areas, HIV positive individuals and drug users. The ability of HTLV-1 to cause associated neuropathies starts with the virus crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB), then entering and infecting the cells of the central nervous system. As a consequence, to the viral attack, HTLV-1 infected lymphocytes produce pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha, Interleukin 1 beta and interleukin 6 which further disrupts the BBB. Different serological tests have been used in the diagnosis of HTLV-1. These include: ELISA and Western Blotting (WB), Immunofluorescence, Particle Agglutination and Polymerase Chain Reaction which is used as a confirmatory test. Danazol, pentoxifylline, azathioprine and vitamin C have been used in the treatment of the HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders. Other antiviral drugs (lamivudine, zidovudine), monoclonal antibodies (Daclizumab) and therapeutic agents (valporic acid, interferons) have also been evaluated. No known drug, so far, has been shown to be efficacious. The aim of this review is to present the complexities of HTLV-1 associated neurological disorders and their current ongoing treatment. In addition to discussing future possible therapeutic strategies, by targeting HTVL-1 viral components and gene/s products, for the treatment of those neurological conditions.

  20. Bravo! Neurology at the opera.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-01-01

    Opera is a complex musical form that reflects the complexity of the human condition and the human brain. This article presents an introduction to the portrayal of medical professionals in opera, including one neurologist, as well as two characters in whom neurological disease contributes to the action of the musical drama. Consideration is also given to the neuroanatomy and neuropathology of opera singers with further speculation regarding the neural underpinnings of the passion of opera's audience.

  1. Legal challenges in neurological practice

    PubMed Central

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Vooturi, Sudhindra

    2016-01-01

    Clinical neuroscience has made tremendous advances over the last century. Neurology as a discipline is still considered challenging and at times risky due to the natural history and progressive course of few of the neurological diseases. Encouragingly, the patient and their caregivers are now increasingly willing to be actively involved in making decisions. The patients’ relationship with the doctor is a reflection of the society. A society that is orienting itself toward “rating” and “feedback” has made this doctor–patient relationship, a consumer–service provider relationship. This perhaps is due to commercialization of health that usually accompanies globalization. Moreover, a rapid influx of information from potential erroneous sources such as the Internet has also made patient and caregivers not being hesitant to taking legal course in the case of adverse events during treatment or simply because of dissatisfaction. The purpose of the legal process initiated by patients with neurological ailments is more often to compensate for the income lost, physical and psychological anguish that accompanies disease and its treatment, and to fund treatment or rehabilitation requirements. However, it is not clearly established if monetary benefits acquired lead to better opportunities for recovery of the patient. The consumer protection act and commercialization of medical services may well have an adverse effect on the doctor and patient relationship. Hence, there is a great need for all medical professionals to mutually complement and update each other. This review examines legal (litigation) processes with special interest on medicolegal system in patients with neurological ailments and the challenges faced by the neurologist during day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:27891018

  2. [Affective disorders and neurological comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Tassy, S; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Micoulaud Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Mood disorders occupy a vast area in the field of psychiatry. Advances in the study of the brain, but also epidemiology and genetics allow us to make more solid connections between these disorders and neurological disorders, resuming a process of reconciliation between both specialties. The purpose of this short review is to draw the attention of the psychiatrist to these links, especially with a brief presentation of the psychiatric manifestations of a number of neurodegenerative diseases and more particularly frontotemporal dementia.

  3. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  4. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Systematic Review for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES MEDICAL MARIJUANA IN CERTAIN NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS This fact sheet presents the current research on medical marijuana (cannabis) for treating certain neurological disorders. The American ...

  5. Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

  6. Genomic medicine and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R

    2011-07-01

    "Genomic medicine" refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease--as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification--in the context of information provided by an individual patient's personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with "personalized medicine," has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds.

  7. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  8. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is adenosine the common link?

    PubMed

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-10-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the 'adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities' implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic 'comorbidity model', in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain co-morbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions.

  9. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  10. Acupressure for treating neurological disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Sook; Lee, Myeong Soo; Min, Kyungyoon; Lew, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Beom-Joon

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the clinical evidence for or against acupressure as a treatment for neurological disorders. We searched the literature from 12 databases from their inception to July 2010. We included any type of controlled clinical trial (CCT) in which patients with neurological disorders were treated with acupressure. The methodological quality of all clinical trials was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias analysis. In total, two randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and four CCTs were included. Four studies (one RCT and three CCTs) compared the effects of acupressure with routine care or no treatment in patients with stroke and showed significant effects of acupressure on improving patient function and symptoms. One RCT, which compared acupressure with sham acupressure and no treatment in patients with headache, also showed that acupressure significantly reduced headache severity and pain. However, all trials were open to methodological limitations and a high risk of bias. In conclusion, current evidence showing that acupressure is an effective treatment for improving function and symptoms in patients with stroke is limited. However, the evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions concerning the effects of acupressure on other neurological disorders. More rigorous studies are warranted.

  11. Neurologic syndrome in 25 workers from an aluminum smelting plant

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.M.; Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Claypoole, K.H.; Brodkin, C.A.; Townes, B.D. )

    1992-07-01

    This article expands on an earlier series of three patients with a neurologic syndrome, who had all worked in an aluminum smelting plant. Twenty-five symptomatic workers from the same plant were referred for a standardized evaluation, including completion of a health questionnaire, neurologic examination, and neuropsychologic evaluation. An exposure index was calculated for each worker based on level and duration of exposure in the potroom, where exposures were the greatest. This index was correlated with symptoms, signs, and neuropsychologic test scores. Twenty-two (88%) of the patients reported frequent loss of balance, and 21 (84%) reported memory loss. Neurologic examination revealed signs of incoordination in 21 (84%) of the patients. Neuropsychologic test results showed preservation in certain spheres of functioning, such as verbal IQ, with substantial impairment in others, particularly memory functioning. On memory tests, 70% to 75% showed mild or greater impairment. The majority (17 of 19 tested, or 89%) showed depression on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The exposure index was significantly correlated with signs and symptoms of incoordination. This study and others in humans and animals support the existence of a syndrome characterized by incoordination, poor memory, impairment in abstract reasoning, and depression. Aluminum exposure in the potroom seems the most likely cause.

  12. Rett syndrome: disruption of epigenetic control of postnatal neurological functions.

    PubMed

    Pohodich, Amy E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-10-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause a devastating pediatric neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In males, these mutations typically result in severe neonatal encephalopathy and early lethality. On the other hand, owing to expression of the normal allele in ∼50% of cells, females do not suffer encephalopathy but instead develop Rett syndrome. Typically females with Rett syndrome exhibit a delayed onset of neurologic dysfunction that manifests around the child's first birthday and progresses over the next few years. Features of this disorder include loss of acquired language and motor skills, intellectual impairment and hand stereotypies. The developmental regression observed in patients with Rett syndrome arises from altered neuronal function and is not the result of neurodegeneration. Maintenance of an appropriate level of MeCP2 appears integral to the function of healthy neurons as patients with increased levels of MeCP2, owing to duplication of the Xq28 region encompassing the MECP2 locus, also present with intellectual disability and progressive neurologic symptoms. Despite major efforts over the past two decades to elucidate the molecular functions of MeCP2, the mechanisms underlying the delayed appearance of symptoms remain unclear. In this review, we will highlight recent findings that have expanded our knowledge of MeCP2's functions, and we will discuss how epigenetic regulation, chromatin organization and circuit dynamics may contribute to the postnatal onset of Rett syndrome.

  13. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-05

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research.

  14. Transient drainage summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  15. Italian neurology: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Antonio

    Summary This short history of the Italian Society of Neurology focuses on its founders and leading personalities. The article also considers the present and the future of Italian neurology, emphasising in particular the scientific impact of Italian neurological research on the main international journals and the activities undertaken to increase the role of neurologists. PMID:21729588

  16. NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH RELEVANT TO READING--1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ISOM, JOHN B.

    ASPECTS OF NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH ARE PRESENTED UNDER THE TOPICS OF NEUROLOGICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, CEREBRAL DOMINANCE, "SPLIT-BRAIN" SYNDROME, AND SEQUENCING. THE FIRST TWO AREAS INDICATE THAT ASSESSMENT OF A CHILD'S NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT VARIATION OF RATE AND DEGREE OF DEVELOPMENT, AND THAT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF…

  17. [Rapid headache guidelines. Neurology consensus between Neurology (SAN) and Primary Care (SEMERGEN Andalucía). Referral criteria].

    PubMed

    Gil Campoy, J A; González Oria, C; Fernández Recio, M; Gómez Aranda, F; Jurado Cobo, C M; Heras Pérez, J A

    2012-01-01

    Headache is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in our health centers, something which should not be surprising if we consider that is one of the most common symptoms experienced by the population. The main concern of the family physician and emergency physician is to reach a correct diagnosis by clinical history and a basic neurological examination and adapted to the time and means at its disposal. In case of diagnostic doubts or suspected secondary headache, the primary care physician or emergency medical have to refer the patient to be studied and/or treated for Neurology services, such referral shall be made with varying degrees of urgency depending on the presence, or not, of symptoms or signs of alarm. A working group consisting of Neurologists of Sociedad Andaluza de Neurología (SAN) to provide services in different hospitals in Andalucía and Family Physicians representatives of the Sociedad Andaluza de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria (SAMFyC) and the Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN Andalucía), has developed a Quick Guide headache, which addresses the more practical aspects for the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with headache. We show you in this paper, the chapter that deals the alarm criteria and referral.

  18. Dexmedetomidine Protects against Transient Global Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Induced Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xichun; Wang, Qi; Li, Wenzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a major perioperative complication, and diabetes increases the response of oxidative stress and inflammation induced by I/R. The objective of this study was to determine the protective effect of dexmedetomidine against transient global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion induced oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetic rats. Methods Sixty-four rats were assigned into four experimental groups: normoglycemia, normoglycemia + dexmedetomidine, hyperglycemia, and hyperglycemia + dexmedetomidine and all subsequent neurological examinations were evaluated by a blinded observer. Damage to the brain was histologically assessed using the TUNEL staining method while western blotting was used to investigate changes in the expression levels of apoptosis-related proteins as well as the microglia marker, ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1). Water content in the brain was also analyzed. In addition, hippocampal concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and Nox2 (a member of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases), and the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were analyzed. Finally, changes in serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 were detected. Results Results showed that diabetes increased brain water content, the number of apoptotic neurons, early neurological deficit scores, oxidative stress (MDA and Nox2) and inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6) levels following transient global I/R injury, but that these symptoms were attenuated following administration of dexmedetomidine. Conclusions These findings suggest that dexmedetomidine can significantly alleviate damage resulting from I/R, and this mechanism may be related to a reduction in both oxidative stress and inflammation which is normally associated with I/R. PMID:26982373

  19. The addicted brain: imaging neurological complications of recreational drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Filardi, A; Mazón, M

    Recreational drug abuse represents a serious public health problem. Neuroimaging traditionally played a secondary role in this scenario, where it was limited to detecting acute vascular events. However, thanks to advances in knowledge about disease and in morphological and functional imaging techniques, radiologists have now become very important in the diagnosis of acute and chronic neurological complications of recreational drug abuse. The main complications are neurovascular disease, infection, toxicometabolic disorders, and brain atrophy. The nonspecific symptoms and denial of abuse make the radiologist's involvement fundamental in the management of these patients. Neuroimaging makes it possible to detect early changes and to suggest an etiological diagnosis in cases with specific patterns of involvement. We aim to describe the pattern of abuse and the pathophysiological mechanisms of the drugs with the greatest neurological repercussions as well as to illustrate the depiction of the acute and chronic cerebral complications on conventional and functional imaging techniques.

  20. Neurological complications of alcohol and misuse of drugs.

    PubMed

    Welch, Killian A

    2011-08-01

    The nature of many of the symptoms associated with substance and alcohol use means that patients often present to neurologists. The frequently catastrophic consequences of overlooking these patients makes this an important cause to identify. Here I will discuss various acute and non-acute substance misuse associated presentations, with particular emphasis on the neurology. As neurological sequelae are particularly common in alcohol use, there will be an emphasis on this drug while other substances are included when relevant, extending to the recently notorious 'legal highs'. I hope this review will increase vigilance to the possibility of substance use disorder, and persuade neurologists that they have a role in the detection and treatment of these conditions.

  1. Neurologic complication after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Sa Leitao, Davi; Mendonca, Dercio; Iyer, Harish; Kao, Cheng-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications after roller coaster rides are uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate investigation. A 22-year-old healthy African American man presented with a 2-day history of constant occipital headache associated with vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and ambulatory dysfunction. Physical examination showed gait ataxia, slight dysmetria, and vertical nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed early subacute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum in the distribution of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck showed focal dissection of the right vertebral artery at C1 through C2 level. On subsequent questioning, the patient recollected riding a roller coaster 2 weeks before the onset of symptoms. Anticoagulation with heparin was started, and the patient was bridged to oral warfarin. After a 5-day uneventful hospital course, symptoms improved and patient was discharged on oral anticoagulation. Cervicocephalic arterial dissections after roller coaster rides are rarely described in literature. The acceleration and abrupt changes of direction might lead to indirect trauma that is applied to mobile portions of the cervicocephalic arteries leading to intimal tears. Magnetic resonance angiography combined with axial T1-weighted cervical MRI is preferred because it is a high-sensitive, noninvasive test. The rationale for the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelets in patients with cervicocephalic arterial dissection is to prevent early recurrence and infarction. However, a meta-analysis failed to show significant difference in the rates of disability or death between both groups. Therefore, the decision for medical treatment should be made in a case-by-case basis.

  2. [Complete recovery from transient coma in bilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions].

    PubMed

    Casado, J L; Arenas, C; Serrano, V; Moreno Rojas, A; Gil-Néciga, E; Gil-Peralta, A

    1995-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts (BPTI) can begin clinically with transient coma, after which symptoms of fluctuating hypersomnolence, irrational behaviour, or amnesic states may be observed. We present two patients with BPTI who began with coma, recovering spontaneously in under eight hours, with no accompanying symptoms.

  3. Longitudinal course of physical and psychological symptoms after a natural disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Lars; Michélsen, Hans; Schulman, Abbe; Backheden, Hans; Keskinen-Rosenqvist, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Background After disaster, physical symptoms are common although seldom recognized due to lack of knowledge of the course of symptoms and relation to more studied psychological symptoms. Objective This study aimed to investigate the change in the reporting of different physical symptoms after a disaster, including possible factors for change, and whether psychological symptoms predict physical symptoms reporting at a later point in time. Method A longitudinal study of citizens of Stockholm who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A total of 1,101 participants completed questionnaires on somatic symptoms, general distress, posttraumatic stress, exposure, and demographic details 14 months and 3 years after the disaster. Physical symptoms occurring daily or weekly during the last year were investigated in four symptom indices: neurological, cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis to determine odds ratios for a change in symptoms, and pathway analysis to predict the influence of psychological symptoms on physical symptoms. Results There was a general decrease of reporting in all physical symptom indices except the musculoskeletal symptom index. The change in the neurological symptom index showed the strongest association with exposure, and for women. General distress and posttraumatic stress at 14 months postdisaster predicted physical symptoms at 3 years. Conclusion Physical symptoms were predicted by psychological symptoms at an earlier time point, but in a considerable proportion of respondents, physical symptoms existed independently from psychological symptoms. Physicians should be observant on the possible connection of particular pseudoneurological symptoms with prior adversities. PMID:24379941

  4. Clinical symptoms and symptom signatures of Alzheimer's disease subgroups.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Flory, Michael; Soininen, Hilkka

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial disorder that involves several different mechanisms. Over 99% of AD patients suffer from the sporadic form of the disease. Based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42), total tau, and ubiquitin--the markers associated with the histopathological hallmarks of the disease (Aβ plaques and abnormally hyperphosphorylated neurofibrillary tangles)--previous studies identified five subgroups of AD. Here we report the potential diagnostic predictive value of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in aged individuals for AD and differences in the prevalence of these symptoms in the CSF marker-based subgroups of the disease. Analysis of 196 clinically diagnosed AD or Alzheimer with Lewy body, and 75 non-AD neurological and non-neurological control cases, all from a single center, showed that the presence of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, or tremors individually, or the presence of any of these, could diagnose AD with sensitivities and specificities of 14% and 99%; 30% and 99%; 15% and 99%; 16% and 100%; 16% and 96%; and 47% and 92%, respectively. The pattern of the prevalence of the above symptoms varied from AD subgroup to subgroup. Presence of any of these symptoms, as well as presence of each individual symptom except tremors, significantly differentiated AD subgroups from the predominantly control cluster. These findings encourage the exploration of hallucination, hypokinesia, paranoia, rigidity, and tremors in identifying various subgroups of AD for stratification of patients for clinical trials to develop therapeutic drugs. This study is for the special issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease honoring Inge Grundke-Iqbal who made several seminal contributions in AD research.

  5. Ultrasound treatment of neurological diseases--current and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Leinenga, Gerhard; Langton, Christian; Nisbet, Rebecca; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Like cardiovascular disease and cancer, neurological disorders present an increasing challenge for an ageing population. Whereas nonpharmacological procedures are routine for eliminating cancer tissue or opening a blocked artery, the focus in neurological disease remains on pharmacological interventions. Setbacks in clinical trials and the obstacle of access to the brain for drug delivery and surgery have highlighted the potential for therapeutic use of ultrasound in neurological diseases, and the technology has proved useful for inducing focused lesions, clearing protein aggregates, facilitating drug uptake, and modulating neuronal function. In this Review, we discuss milestones in the development of therapeutic ultrasound, from the first steps in the 1950s to recent improvements in technology. We provide an overview of the principles of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound, for surgery and transient opening of the blood-brain barrier, and its application in clinical trials of stroke, Parkinson disease and chronic pain. We discuss the promising outcomes of safety and feasibility studies in preclinical models, including rodents, pigs and macaques, and efficacy studies in models of Alzheimer disease. We also consider the challenges faced on the road to clinical translation.

  6. Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France.

  7. Neurological infections after neuraxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2008-03-01

    Infection is the commonest cause of serious neurologic sequelae of neuraxial anesthesia. The incidence depends on operator skill and patient population. Meningitis, a complication of dural puncture, is usually caused by viridans streptococci. The risk factors are dural puncture during labor, no mask and poor aseptic technique, vaginal infection and bacteremia. Epidural abscess is a complication of epidural catheterization, route of entry the catheter track and the organism usually the staphylococcus. Principal risk factors are prolonged catheterization, poor aseptic technique and traumatic insertion. Prevention includes wearing a mask, using a full sterile technique, avoiding prolonged catheterization and prescribing antibiotics in a high-risk situation.

  8. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Gretchen M; Human, Theresa; Shutter, Lori

    2015-12-01

    The appropriate use of medications during Emergency Neurological Life Support (ENLS) is essential to optimize patient care. Important considerations when choosing the appropriate agent include the patient's organ function and medication allergies, potential adverse drug effects, drug interactions, and critical illness and aging pathophysiologic changes. Critical medications used during ENLS include hyperosmolar therapy, anticonvulsants, antithrombotics, anticoagulant reversal and hemostatic agents, anti-shivering agents, neuromuscular blockers, antihypertensive agents, sedatives, vasopressors and inotropes, and antimicrobials. This article focuses on the important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics characteristics, advantages and disadvantages, and clinical pearls of these therapies, providing practitioners with essential drug information to optimize pharmacotherapy in acutely ill neurocritical care patients.

  9. Emerging and Reemerging Neurologic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The list of emerging and reemerging pathogens that cause neurologic disease is expanding. Various factors, including population growth and a rise in international travel, have contributed to the spread of pathogens to previously nonendemic regions. Recent advances in diagnostic methods have led to the identification of novel pathogens responsible for infections of the central nervous system. Furthermore, new issues have arisen surrounding established infections, particularly in an increasingly immunocompromised population due to advances in the treatment of rheumatologic disease and in transplant medicine. PMID:25360203

  10. Neurology in the market place.

    PubMed

    Williams, I R

    1992-03-01

    The White Paper, "Working for Patients", led to a change in the way in which hospitals were funded from April 1991. The changes will have profound effects on the future shape of health care in the United Kingdom. Neurologists will need to understand the new National Health Service if their patients are to benefit from the changes. If neurology is to survive as a specialty separate from general medicine it will have to show that it can provide quality care which is accessible, relevant, efficient and effective, at a price which Districts can afford.

  11. Clinical neurology in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, Christopher H; Love, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only established therapeutic option for several end-stage respiratory diseases. Limited mostly by lack of suitable allografts, the results have measurably improved over the last decade. Numerous surgical and pharmaceutical improvements have had positive impact on outcomes. The potential for critical care issues and the need for interdisciplinary management remains paramount. Cardiac, renal, and metabolic complications are frequently encountered in the acute postoperative phase. Allograft rejection and infectious diseases as well as problems related to immunosuppressive regimen are seen later after lung transplantation. Neurologic manifestations with a range of etiologies are discussed here in this context.

  12. Neurological Effects of Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Ramona R.; Fertig, Stephanie J.; Desrocher, Rebecca E.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Pancrazio, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, thousands of soldiers and an even greater number of civilians have suffered traumatic injuries due to blast exposure, largely attributed to improvised explosive devices in terrorist and insurgent activities. The use of body armor is allowing soldiers to survive blasts that would otherwise be fatal due to systemic damage. Emerging evidence suggests that exposure to a blast can produce neurological consequences in the brain, but much remains unknown. To elucidate the current scientific basis for understanding blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI), the NIH convened a workshop in April, 2008. A multidisciplinary group of neuroscientists, engineers, and clinicians were invited to share insights on bTBI, specifically pertaining to: physics of blast explosions, acute clinical observations and treatments, preclinical and computational models, and lessons from the international community on civilian exposures. This report provides an overview of the state of scientific knowledge of bTBI, drawing from the published literature, as well as presentations, discussions, and recommendations from the workshop. One of the major recommendations from the workshop was the need to characterize the effects of blast exposure on clinical neuropathology. Clearer understanding of the human neuropathology would enable validation of preclinical and computational models, which are attempting to simulate blast wave interactions with the central nervous system. Furthermore, the civilian experience with bTBI suggests that polytrauma models incorporating both brain and lung injuries may be more relevant to the study of civilian countermeasures than considering models with a neurological focus alone. PMID:20453776

  13. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM.

  14. Dysexecutive syndromes in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Pladdy, B

    2007-09-01

    Damage to the frontal structures may lead to a diverse set of changes in cognitive, behavioral, or emotional domains. While lesion studies have demonstrated distinct impairments related to pathology in different frontal regions, it is clear that the frontal lobe syndrome is not restricted to damage to frontal regions. Therefore, the broad range of impairments in executive functioning evident in neurologic disease is often referred to as the dysexecutive syndrome. This review provides an overview of how executive functioning has been traditionally defined and measured. The components of executive function such as planning, cognitive flexibility and set-shifting, initiation and self-generation, response inhibition, serial ordering and sequencing, are discussed with respect to traditional measures and neural substrates. This is followed by profiles of frontal-executive dysfunction in aging, traumatic brain injury, frontotemporal dementia, and Parkinson's disease. Since no one specific neurologic disorder has a predilection to damage isolated to the frontal lobes, profiles of the dysexecutive syndrome are related to damage to several regions in addition to the frontal lobes. Finally, there is a discussion of ecological validity and the impact of executive deficits on everyday functioning. The recent development of executive tests with greater ecological validity is reviewed and discussed, and suggestions for future directions for research are provided.

  15. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions.

  16. Neurological soft signs in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Their relationship to executive function and parental neurological soft signs.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingbo; Xie, Jingtao; Chen, Gui; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Suhong

    2015-07-30

    The correlations between neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their executive function, symptoms of inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity and the NSS of their parents remain unclear. This study aimed to examine: (1) the prevalence of NSS in children with ADHD and their parents; (2) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and the NSS of their parents; and (3) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and their executive function and symptoms. NSS were assessed with the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 57 children with ADHD (and 80 parents) and 60 healthy children (and 75 parents). Executive function was measured with the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Children with ADHD and their parents had significantly higher NSS than normal children and their parents, respectively, and the NSS of children with ADHD were correlated more strongly with the NSS of their fathers than their mothers. No correlation was found between NSS and BRIEF executive function, but Disinhibition in children with ADHD was significantly correlated with hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. Paternal and maternal NSS provided different predictions for child NSS. It may be that NSS are more likely to be genetically transmitted by fathers.

  17. Neurologic complications of polycythemia and their impact on therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, L.K. )

    1990-03-01

    Polycythemia vera, a clonal stem cell disorder, produces neurologic problems in 50-80% of patients. Some symptoms, such as headache and dizziness, are related to hyperviscosity, and respond immediately to reduction of cell counts. Others seem to result from an associated coagulopathy. Patients with polycythemia tend to develop both arterial and venous thrombosis and are prone to hemorrhages. Treatments for polycythemia include phlebotomy, chlorambucil supplemented with phlebotomy, and {sup 32}P plus phlebotomy. Whatever treatment is chosen, the aim of therapy should be to reduce the hematocrit to approximately 40-45%.37 references.

  18. [Reconciliating neurology and psychiatry: The prototypical case of frontotemporal dementia].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, J; Sarazin, M

    2016-10-20

    Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) in its behavioral variant (bvFTD) is probably one of the conditions that best illustrates the links between psychiatry and neurology. It is indeed admitted that between a third and half of patients with this condition, especially in early-onset forms, receive an initial diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) and are then referred to a psychiatric ward. BvFTD can thus be considered a neurological disorder with a psychiatric presentation. Among psychiatric symptoms reported in this disease, psychotic symptoms (hallucinations, delusions, especially of persecution), which have long been underestimated in bvFTD and are not part of the current diagnostic criteria, are present in about 20% of cases and may be inaugural. They are particularly common in the genetic forms related to a mutation in the C9orf72 gene (up to 50%), and to a lesser extent in the GRN gene (up to 25%). C9orf72 gene mutation is often associated with a family history of dementia or motor neuron disease but also of psychiatric disorders. It has also been described in sporadic presentation forms. Sometimes, the moderate degree of brain atrophy on MRI described in patients carrying this mutation may complicate the differential diagnosis with late-onset psychiatric diseases. In the present article, we underline the importance of considering that psychiatric - especially psychotic - symptoms are not rare in bvFTD, which should lead to a revision of the diagnostic criteria of this disease by taking greater account of this fact. We also propose a diagnostic chart, based on concerted evaluation by neurologists and psychiatrists for cases of atypical psychiatric symptoms (late-onset or pharmacoresistant troubles) leading to consider the possibility of a neurological disorder, in order to shed a new light on these difficult clinical situations. In the field of research, bvFTD may constitute a model to explore the neural basis of certain

  19. Reflections on the brainstem dysfunction in neurologically disabled children.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki

    2009-08-01

    This article deals with the neurological basis of brainstem-related symptoms in disabled children. Synaptic interactions of respiratory and swallowing centers, which are briefly reviewed in this study, highlight the significance of the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) in the stereotyped motor events. Coordination mechanisms between these two central pattern generators are also studied with a focus on the inhibitory action of decrementing expiratory neurons that terminate the inspiratory activity and become activated during swallowing. Dorsal brainstem lesions in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) affect the area including NTS, and result in symptoms of apneusis, facial nerve paresis, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, and laryngeal stridor. Leigh syndrome patients with similar distributions of medullary lesions show increased sighs, post-sigh apnea, hiccups, and vomiting in addition to the symptoms of HIE, suggesting pathologically augmented vagal reflex pathways. The present article also discusses the pathophysiology of laryngeal dystonia in xeroderma pigmentosum group A, self-mutilation in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and sudden unexpected death in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy. Close observation and logical assessment of brainstem dysfunction symptoms should be encouraged in order to achieve better understanding and management of these symptoms in disabled children.

  20. Transient tic disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... tics are severe enough to cause problems at school or work, behavioral techniques and medicines may help. ... Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by ...

  1. Transient cortical blindness after coronary artery angiography.

    PubMed

    Terlecki, Michał; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Rajzer, Marek; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Bazan-Socha, Stanisława; Bryniarski, Leszek; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2013-01-01

    Coronary angiography is the current gold standard for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease and therefore the prevalence of percutaneous coronary procedures such as angiography and angioplasty is high. The occurrence of cerebral complications after coronary angiography and coronary angioplasty is low and it mainly includes transient ischemic attack and stroke. The prevalence of transient cortical blindness after X-ray contrast media is low and it is usually seen after cerebral angiography. Until now only a few cases of transient cortical blindness have been described after coronary artery angiography. Regarding the spread of coronary angiography worldwide and in Poland this complication is uniquely rare. A 32-year-old man with multiple extrasystolic ventricular arrhythmia suggesting Brugada syndrome diagnosis according to morphology of the left bundle branch block and with decreased left ventricular ejection fraction was admitted to the First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Medical College of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. Coronary angiography was performed in order to exclude ischemic etiology of the observed abnormalities. No arteriosclerotic lesions were found in coronary arteries. Transient cortical blindness was observed directly after angiography which may have been caused by the neurotoxic effect of the used X-ray contrast medium. In ophthalmologic and neurologic examination as well as in the cerebral computed tomography scan no pathologies were found. Visual impairment disappeared totally within several hours.

  2. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  3. Interactive videoconsultation is a feasible method for neurological in-patient assessment.

    PubMed

    Craig, J; Patterson, V; Russell, C; Wootton, R

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of interactive videoconsultation (IATV) as a means by which neurologists might assess patients admitted with neurological symptoms to hospitals distant from a neurological centre, we studied 25 unselected patients using interactive videoconsultation (IATV) and then validated the IATV diagnoses and management plans at a later face-to-face consultation. IATV consultation led to an eventual diagnosis in 23 out of 25 patients, with one diagnosis being changed and one remaining uncertain. The IATV management plans were felt to be appropriate for all patients in study. Twelve patients were able to be discharged from hospital on the same day as IATV on the advice of the neurologist. It is therefore practical to assess patients admitted with neurological symptoms to distant hospitals using IATV and this may result in more efficient use of in-patient resources.

  4. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  5. Mouse models for neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Hafezparast, Majid; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Wood, Nicholas W; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2002-08-01

    The mouse has many advantages over human beings for the study of genetics, including the unique property that genetic manipulation can be routinely carried out in the mouse genome. Most importantly, mice and human beings share the same mammalian genes, have many similar biochemical pathways, and have the same diseases. In the minority of cases where these features do not apply, we can still often gain new insights into mouse and human biology. In addition to existing mouse models, several major programmes have been set up to generate new mouse models of disease. Alongside these efforts are new initiatives for the clinical, behavioural, and physiological testing of mice. Molecular genetics has had a major influence on our understanding of the causes of neurological disorders in human beings, and much of this has come from work in mice.

  6. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control.

  7. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved.

  8. Neurological Complication After Low-Voltage Electric Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Min; Ko, Yeong-A; Kim, Joon Sung; Lim, Seong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. However, delayed neurological complications caused by low-voltage electric shock are rarely reported. Here, a case of a man suffering from weakness and aphasia due to the delayed-onset of the peripheral nerve injury and ischemic stroke following an electrical shock is presented. Possible mechanisms underlying the neurological complications include thermal injury to perineural tissue, overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, vascular injury, and histological or electrophysiological changes. Moreover, vasospasms caused by low-voltage alternating current may predispose individuals to ischemic stroke. Therefore, clinicians should consider the possibility of neurological complications, even if the onset of the symptoms is delayed, and should perform diagnostic tests, such as electrophysiology or imaging, when patients present with weakness following an electric injury. PMID:24855625

  9. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  10. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years.

  11. Pediatric neurology of the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Lavely, James A

    2006-05-01

    The neurologic examination in the puppy or kitten can be a challenging experience. Understanding the development of behavior reflexes and movement in puppies and kittens enables us to overcome some of these challenges and to recognize the neurologically abnormal patient. Subsequently,we can identify the neuroanatomic localization and generate a differential diagnosis list. This article first reviews the pediatric neurologic examination and then discusses diseases unique to these individuals.

  12. What is happening to English neurology?

    PubMed

    Morrish, Paul

    2008-12-01

    Neurology in England is expanding rapidly. In 2005 there were, on average, 7.2 (2.5) new and 16.8 (8.6) follow-up appointments per 1,000 population, an increase of 24% and 19% respectively since 2003. The chance of an individual being seen in this specialty varies widely according to primary care trust. This paper considers the causes and implications for neurological health, service delivery and neurology training.

  13. Early Growth and Neurologic Outcomes of Infants with Probable Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Jucelia Sousa Santos; Sousa, Patricia da Silva; Doriqui, Maria Juliana Rodvalho; Ribeiro, Marizelia Rodrigues Costa; Branco, Maria dos Remédios Freitas Carvalho; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; Pacheco, Maria de Jesus Torres; Vieira da Costa, Flavia Regina; Silva, Francelena de Sousa; Simões, Vanda Maria Ferreira; Pacheco, Marcos Antonio Barbosa; Lamy-Filho, Fernando; Lamy, Zeni Carvalho; Soares de Britto e Alves, Maria Teresa Seabra

    2016-01-01

    We report the early growth and neurologic findings of 48 infants in Brazil diagnosed with probable congenital Zika virus syndrome and followed to age 1–8 months. Most of these infants had microcephaly (86.7%) and craniofacial disproportion (95.8%). The clinical pattern included poor head growth with increasingly negative z-scores, pyramidal/extrapyramidal symptoms, and epilepsy. PMID:27767931

  14. Burden of neurological conditions in Canada.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, J; Gomes, J; Darshan, S; Krewski, D

    2016-05-03

    Neurological conditions are among the leading causes of disability in the Canadian population and are associated with a large public health burden. An increase in life expectancy and a declining birth rate has resulted in an aging Canadian population, and the proportion of age-adjusted mortality due to non-communicable diseases has been steadily increasing. These conditions are frequently associated with chronic disability and an increasing burden of care for patients, their families and caregivers. The National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions (NPHSNC) aims to improve knowledge about neurological conditions and their impacts on individuals, their families, caregivers and health care system. The Systematic Review of Determinants of Neurological Conditions, a specific objective within the NPHSNC, is a compendium of systematic reviews on risk factors affecting onset and progression of the following 14 priority neurological conditions: Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), brain tumours (BT), cerebral palsy (CP), dystonia, epilepsy, Huntington's disease (HD), hydrocephalus, multiple sclerosis (MS), muscular dystrophies (MD), neurotrauma, Parkinson's disease (PD), spina bifida (SB), and Tourette's syndrome (TS). The burden of neurological disease is expected to increase as the population ages, and this trend is presented in greater detail for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease because the incidence of these two common neurological diseases increases significantly with age over 65 years. This article provides an overview of burden of neurological diseases in Canada to set the stage for the in-depth systematic reviews of the 14 priority neurological conditions presented in subsequent articles in this issue.

  15. Neurological risk profile in organic erectile impotence.

    PubMed Central

    Kunesch, E; Reiners, K; Müller-Mattheis, V; Strohmeyer, T; Ackermann, R; Freund, H J

    1992-01-01

    Thirty men who presented with erectile impotence to the urological department underwent a thorough urological, angiological, and neurological examination with complementary neurophysiological tests of somatosensory and sympathetic and parasympathetic function. Most had vascular and neurological abnormalities. Clinical findings and electrophysiological tests for autonomic dysfunction had the highest yield of abnormal results. Nerve conduction studies and pudendal nerve somatosensory evoked potentials were far less informative. The lack of correlation between vascular and general neurological abnormalities emphasises that patients must be screened for both vascular and neurological dysfunction to prevent unrewarding vascular operation in impotent men. PMID:1316429

  16. The neurological legacy of John Russell Reynolds (1828-1896).

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    2007-04-01

    Sir John Russell Reynolds was an eminent and highly influential physician in the Victorian era who held the Presidencies of the Royal College of Physicians of London, and of the British Medical Association. He was the protégée of the great experimental physiologist, Marshall Hall, who discovered the reflex arc, and succeeded to Hall's clinical practice in London. Reynolds' thought and clinical activities linked the emerging British neurology of the first half of the 19th century with its blossoming, particularly in London, from 1860 onwards. In his writings Reynolds was the first English author to apply the approach to classification of neurological disorders that is still often used, though now in modified form. He was also the first to enunciate the notion of positive and negative symptoms arising from neurological disease and to suggest their pathogenesis, and was arguably the originator of the influential concept that an idiopathic disease, epilepsy, existed, one to be distinguished from 'epileptiform' seizures due to brain pathology.

  17. Pathogens and chronic or long-term neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Starakis, Ioannis; Panos, George; Koutras, Angelos; Mazokopakis, Elias E

    2011-03-01

    Infections of the central nervous system may provoke glial and autoimmune responses but a definitive linkage between these infections and the pathogenesis of chronic neurologic disorders is still elusive. There are controversial reports implicating infectious agents in the pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic or long-term neurologic disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and autistic spectrum disorders, but the specific role of bacterial or viral infections in the pathogenesis of these medical entities has not been fully elucidated. Up till now, the evidence is distant from definite, but certain cases may be attributed to infections in the millieu of multiple toxic events such as trauma, nutritional deficits, immune dysregulation and excitotoxicity in genetically vulnerable indiniduals. There is an ongoing debate concering the direct involvement of various infectious agents in the neurodegenerative and neurobehavioral diseases pathogenesis and/or their contribution to the deterioration of the disease or co-morbidity in these patients. These patients are exceptionally difficult to be treated by using single therapeutic modalities, because their disese is multifocal and treatment is aimed to control signs and symptoms rather than the true causes of the disease and its progressive course. Furthermore, even if these causative links were indetifiable, our therapeutic interventions would come too late due to the irreversible damages at the time of the initiation of treatment. Our aim is to comprehensively review all available data suggesting that infections could be common antecedent events of progressive neurologic degenerative or behavioural diseases.

  18. Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jessica R; Eaton, William W; Cascella, Nicola G; Fasano, Alessio; Kelly, Deanna L

    2012-03-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten (a protein present in wheat, rye or barley) that occurs in about 1% of the population and is generally characterized by gastrointestinal complaints. More recently the understanding and knowledge of gluten sensitivity (GS), has emerged as an illness distinct from celiac disease with an estimated prevalence 6 times that of CD. Gluten sensitive people do not have villous atrophy or antibodies that are present in celiac disease, but rather they can test positive for antibodies to gliadin. Both CD and GS may present with a variety of neurologic and psychiatric co-morbidities, however, extraintestinal symptoms may be the prime presentation in those with GS. However, gluten sensitivity remains undertreated and underrecognized as a contributing factor to psychiatric and neurologic manifestations. This review focuses on neurologic and psychiatric manifestations implicated with gluten sensitivity, reviews the emergence of gluten sensitivity distinct from celiac disease, and summarizes the potential mechanisms related to this immune reaction.

  19. Lumbar Disc Herniation Presented with Contralateral Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pius; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to unravel the putative mechanism underlying the neurologic deficits contralateral to the side with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and to elucidate the treatment for this condition. Methods From January 2009 to June 2015, 8 patients with LDH with predominantly contralateral neurologic deficits underwent surgical treatment on the side with LDH with or without decompressing the symptomatic side. A retrospective review of charts and radiological records of these 8 patients was performed. The putative mechanisms underlying the associated contralateral neurological deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and the adequate surgical approach are discussed here. Results MRI revealed a similar laterally skewed paramedian disc herniation, with the apex deviated from the symptomatic side rather than directly compressing the nerve root; this condition may generate a contralateral traction force. EMG revealed radiculopathies in both sides of 6 patients and in the herniated side of 2 patients. Based on EMG findings and the existence of suspicious lateral recess stenosis of the symptomatic side, 6 patients underwent bilateral decompression of nerve roots and 2 were subjected to a microscopic discectomy to treat the asymptomatic disc herniation. No specific conditions such as venous congestion, nerve root anomaly or epidural lipomatosis were observed, which may be considered the putative pathomechanism causing the contralateral neurological deficits. The symptoms resolved significantly after surgery. Conclusion The traction force generated on the contralateral side and lateral recess stenosis, rather than direct compression, may cause the contralateral neurologic deficits observed in LDH. PMID:28264243

  20. Neurological and endocrine phenotypes of fragile X carrier women.

    PubMed

    Hall, D; Todorova-Koteva, K; Pandya, S; Bernard, B; Ouyang, B; Walsh, M; Pounardjian, T; Deburghraeve, C; Zhou, L; Losh, M; Leehey, M; Berry-Kravis, E

    2016-01-01

    Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Premutation carrier (PMC) women (n = 33) and non-carrier controls (n = 13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. The average age of the women was 51 years (n = 46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 PMC women. Seventy percent of the PMC women had an abnormal neurological examination. PMC women had significantly higher scores on the Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) rating scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features.

  1. Neurological and Endocrine Phenotypes of Fragile X Carrier Women

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Deborah; Todorova-Koteva, Kristina; Pandya, Shrikant; Bernard, Bryan; Ouyang, Bichun; Walsh, Maura; Pounardjian, Tamar; Deburghraeve, Cory; Zhou, Lili; Losh, Molly; Leehey, Maureen; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Methods Premutation carrier women (n=33) and non-carrier controls (n=13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. Results The average age of the women was 51 years (n=46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 premutation carrier women. Seventy-percent of the premutation carrier women had an abnormal neurological examination. Premutation carrier women had significantly higher scores on the FXTAS Rating Scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features. PMID:26212380

  2. Memorial symptom assessment scale.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Hwang, Shirley S; Thaler, Howard T; Kasimis, Basil S; Portenoy, Russell K

    2004-04-01

    Patients with advanced illnesses often have multiple symptoms. As interest in palliative care and interventions for symptom control increase, the ability to assess multiple symptoms has become more important. A number of instruments have been developed to meet this need in cancer patients. This article reviews the development and applications of a multidimensional instrument, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has 32 symptoms and three dimensions of frequency, severity, and distress. Shorter versions - The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form (32 symptoms with one dimension) and the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (14 symptoms with one dimension), and a version for children aged 7-12 years, have also been developed. A distinctive feature is the summary subscales for physical distress, psychological distress, and The Global Distress Index. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has proven useful in description of symptom epidemiology, the role of symptoms in pain, fatigue, and spirituality; as a predictor of survival, and in proxy assessments of pain. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has been used in studies of cancer and AIDS patients, and patients with advanced medical illnesses. Possible future roles of instruments such as the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale include use in clinical trials, for pharmacoeconomic analyses, definition of symptom clusters and symptom burden, the development of symptom outcome measures, symptom monitoring, and improving care for patients. Continued research is needed for the versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and other symptom instruments in different populations and applications.

  3. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam.

  4. Toward a Neurology of Loneliness

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter century. The brain is the key organ of social connections and processes, however, and the same objective social relationship can be experienced as caring and protective or as exploitive and isolating. We review evidence that the perception of social isolation (i.e., loneliness) impacts brain and behavior and is a risk factor for broad-based morbidity and mortality. However, the causal role of loneliness on neural mechanisms and mortality is difficult to test conclusively in humans. Mechanistic animal studies provide a lens through which to evaluate the neurological effects of a member of a social species living chronically on the social perimeter. Experimental studies show that social isolation produces significant changes in brain structures and processes in adult social animals. These effects are not uniform across the brain or across species but instead are most evident in brain regions that reflect differences in the functional demands of solitary versus social living for a particular species. The human and animal literatures have developed independently, however, and significant gaps also exist. The current review underscores the importance of integrating human and animal research to delineate the mechanisms through which social relationships impact the brain, health, and well-being. PMID:25222636

  5. Telemedicine in neurology: underutilized potential.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J; Mishra, S K; Yadav, R K

    2005-03-01

    Advances in telecommunication which started with telephone lines, FAX, integrated service digital network (ISDN) lines and now internet have provided an unprecedented opportunity for transfer of knowledge and sharing of information. The information can be used for overlapping applications in patient care, teaching and research. In medicine there is increasing utilization of telemedicine; radiology and pathology being regarded as mature specialties and emergency medicine as maturing specialties compared to other evolving specialties which include psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology and ophthalmology. Of the emergencies, status epilepticus and stroke have high potential for improving patient management. Administration of tPA was more frequent when carried out under telemedicine guidance. Telemedicine has great potential for medical education. The principles of education are in congruence with those of telemedicine and can be closely integrated in the existing medical education system. Our experience of telemedicine as a medical education tool is based on video conferencing with SCB Medical College, Cuttack. We had 30 sessions during 2001 to 2004 in which 2-3 cases were discussed in each session. The patients' details, radiological and neurophysiological findings could be successfully transmitted. These conferences improved the knowledge of participants, provided an opportunity for a second opinion as well as modified the treatment decisions in some cases. The advances in telemedicine should be utilized more extensively in neurology, especially in emergency management, epilepsy and stroke patients as well, as it may have a role in neurophysiology and movement disorders.

  6. Experience from two decades of the Cambridge Rapid Access Neurology Clinic.

    PubMed

    Axinte, Laura T; Fiddes, Barnaby D; Donaghy, Alastair; Whyte, Adam; Allen, Chris; Sawcer, Stephen J; Adam, Robert J; Stacpoole, Sybil R L

    2015-10-01

    We report on the evolution of the rapid access neurology clinic (established in 1995) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. Annualised attendance data demonstrate an ever increasing demand, with primary headache disorders now accounting for more than 40% of referrals. Secondary causes of headache (including intracranial tumours, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, carotid or vertebral artery dissection and subdural haematomas) remain infrequent. In all such cases, there were additional diagnostic clues. The number of patients referred with problems related to chronic neurological diseases has fallen considerably, reflecting the roles of specialist nurses and clinics. Imaging investigation of choice shifted from computerised tomography scan (45 to 16%) towards magnetic resonance imaging (17 to 47%). Management is increasingly on an outpatient basis, often without the need for a follow-up appointment. The experience presented here should inform further development of rapid access neurology clinics across the UK and suggests the need for acute headache services, in line with those for transient ischaemic attack and first seizure.

  7. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  8. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  9. Luminous Extragalactic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Jonker, Peter; Athena Explosive Transients Working Group

    2015-09-01

    The ESA Athena X-ray observatory mission will combine exceptionally high throughout with high spectral-energy resolution and will revolutionise many aspects of high-energy astrophysics. Many of the most powerful transient sources, including gamma-ray bursts and tidal disruptions events, are bright X-ray sources. Athena will be designed to have a fast-response capability permitting efficient observations of many transients. We will summarise the proposed capability of the mission and illustrate science programs to study transients ranging from the most distant GRBs to nuclear activity in nearby galaxies.

  10. Neurology of the H1N1 pandemic in Singapore: a nationwide case series of children and adults.

    PubMed

    Prerna, Asha; Lim, Jocelyn Y X; Tan, Natalie W H; Isa, Mas Suhaila; Oh, Helen May-Lin; Yassin, Norazieda; Low, Chian-Yong; Chan, Derrick W S; Chong, Chia-Yin; Leo, Yee-Sin; Chow, Angela Li-Ping; Tambyah, Paul Ananth; Tan, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Neurologic complications have long been associated with influenza. A novel strain of influenza A (H1N1) first described in humans to have outbreak potential in 2009 in Mexico went on to become the first influenza pandemic of this century. We evaluated the neurologic complications of the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in children and adults admitted to all public hospitals in Singapore during the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic between May 2009 and March 2010. All patients were positive for novel H1N1 infection and presented with neurologic symptoms prior to oseltamivir treatment. Ninety-eight patients (median age 6.6 years, range 0.4-62.6) were identified; 90 % were younger than 18 years; 32 % suffered from preexisting neurological, respiratory, or cardiac disease; and 66 % presented with seizures. Of those presenting with seizures, new onset seizures were the most common manifestation (n = 40, 61.5 %), followed by breakthrough seizures (n = 18, 27.7 %) and status epilepticus (n = 7, 10.8 %). Influenza-associated encephalopathy occurred in 20 %. The majority of children (n = 88) presented with seizures (n = 63, 71.6 %), encephalopathy (n = 19, 21.6 %), and syncope (n = 4, 4.5 %). Among adults, a wider range of neurological conditions were seen, with half of them presenting with an exacerbation of their underlying neurological disease. The neurological symptoms developed at a median of 2 days after the onset of systemic symptoms. The median length of hospital stay was 3 days, and 79 % were monitored in general wards. Neurologic complications associated with the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strain were generally mild and had a good outcome. They occurred more frequently in patients with underlying neurological disorders. Seizures and encephalopathy were the most common manifestations, similar to other influenza virus strains.

  11. Transient cortical blindness after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Raghuveer; Jim, Jeffrey; Derdeyn, Colin P; Sanchez, Luis A

    2011-05-01

    We report a patient who presented with transient cortical blindness 12 hours after completion of a thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair. Computed tomography of the brain demonstrated no acute findings. The patient's symptoms resolved spontaneously after 72 hours. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transient cortical blindness after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. This is an uncommon diagnosis that is important to recognize in a modern vascular surgery practice.

  12. Profile of neurological disorders in an adult neurology clinic in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Akassi, John; Badu, Elizabeth; Okorozo, Aham; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Akpalu, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the burden of neurological disorders is highest among populations in developing countries there is a dearth of data on the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Objective To profile the frequency of neurologic disorders and basic demographic data in an adult neurology out-patient service commissioned in 2011 in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods The study was conducted at the neurology clinic of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Over a three year period, all medical records of patients enrolled at the out-patient neurology clinic was reviewed by a neurologist and neurological diagnoses classified according to ICD-10. Results 1812 adults enrolled for care in the neurology out-patient service between 2011 and 2013. This comprised of 882 males and 930 females (male: female ratio of 1.0: 1.1) with an overall median age of 54 (IQR, 39–69) years. The commonest primary neurological disorders seen were strokes, epilepsy and seizure disorders, and movement disorders at frequencies of 57.1%, 19.8%, and 8.2% respectively. Conclusions Cerebrovascular diseases, epilepsy and movement disorders were among the commonest neurological disorders and the major contributors to neurologic morbidity among Ghanaians in an urban neurology clinic. PMID:27110596

  13. Transient topographical amnesia.

    PubMed Central

    Stracciari, A; Lorusso, S; Pazzaglia, P

    1994-01-01

    Ten healthy middle aged or elderly women experienced isolated episodes of topographical amnesia without an obvious aetiology. It is likely a benign cognitive disorder, similar to transient global amnesia. PMID:7964826

  14. Transient Global Amnesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... global amnesia is a sudden, temporary episode of memory loss that can't be attributed to a ... know well. But that doesn't make your memory loss less disturbing. Fortunately, transient global amnesia is ...

  15. Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; TAO Team

    2016-10-01

    The Transient Astrophysics Observatory (TAO) is a NASA MidEx mission concept (formerly known as Lobster) designed to provide simultaneous wide-field gamma-ray, X-ray, and near-infrared observations of the sky.

  16. High energy transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    A meeting was convened on the campus of the University of California at Santa Cruz during the two-week interval July 11 through July 22, 1983. Roughly 100 participants were chosen so as to give broad representation to all aspects of high energy transients. Ten morning review sessions were held in which invited speakers discussed the current status of observations and theory of the above subjects. Afternoon workshops were also held, usually more than one per day, to informally review various technical aspects of transients, confront shortcomings in theoretical models, and to propose productive courses for future research. Special attention was also given to the instrumentation used to study high energy transient and the characteristics and goals of a dedicated space mission to study transients in the next decade were determined. A listing of articles written by various members of the workshop is included.

  17. [Gene therapy of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Haase, G; Akli, S; Guidotti, J E

    1996-01-01

    In hereditary neurological diseases, gene transfer into neurons is made difficult by: the nature of the cells (postmitotic cells, that cannot be cultured, genetically modified ex vivo, then retransplanted), sometimes, their widespread localization, the blood-brain barrier. However, three viral vectors derived from adenovirus, Herpes simplex virus and adeno-associated virus have been shown to be very efficient in transferring DNA into brain cells. All of these vectors can infect resting cells, especially neurons, and are efficient in vivo. Retroviral vectors which can infect dividing cells only are mainly used for ex vivo genetic modification of cells (neural progenitor cells, myoblasts, fibroblasts) followed by intracerebral transplantation. Alternatively, genetically modified cells can be transplanted in a peripheral site if the transgene product is able to cross the blood-brain barrier or to be transported retrogradely from the nerve terminals. We have especially investigated the potential interest of adenoviral vectors to transfer foreign genes into brain cells and to treat animal models of neurological diseases. These vectors allowed us to transfer the lacZ gene into any neural cell type, including neurons, glia, photoreceptors and olfactory receptors, ex vivo, in cell culture, and in vivo, by stereotactic administration. In addition, axonal transport of adenoviral vectors has been demonstrated, e.g. in the substantia nigra after injection into the striatum, in the olfactory bulb after intranasal instillation and in spinal motor neurons after intramuscular injection. After intracerebroventricular injection, ependymal cells are massively infected and express the transgene for several months, as this is also observed in neurons. Through the spinal canal and cerebrospinal fluid, the vector can diffuse to a considerable distance from the injection point, e.g. to the lumbar spinal cord after injection in the suboccipital region. To test the biological function of

  18. [Neurological diseases in the aged].

    PubMed

    Kameyama, M

    1990-12-01

    In this paper, I described clinical and basic problems on neurology of the aged patients. These studies have been done in various institutions with many co-workers. 1) A PET study revealed some age differences on CBF, CMRO2, or CMRgl. But these results are not so rigid in which much of individual variations should be considered in interpretation. Calendar age is not always compatible to biological age. 2) Saccular aneurysms in the brain artery were found in 7.3% of 1200 routine autopsy series of the aged subjects. Aneurysms with external diameter exceeding 6 mm had been fatally ruptured in 14 (78%) of 18 subjects. 3) Variations of the pyramidal crossing are found responsible for bizarre clinical manifestations. Non-crossing component was more prominent in the right pyramidal tract; consequently, right pyramidal tracts including ventral and lateral one seemed to have more extensive representation in the spinal cord level. 4) I123-IMP SPECT study showed a reduced uptake in the area 4 or area 4-6 of the ALS patients. 5) I introduced a new simplified Wartenberg's maneuver, which is useful for detection of subtle pyramidal dysfunctions. 6) Cases with central pontine myelinolysis and those of paraneoplastic syndrome were presented with an emphasis on their patho-chemical mechanisms. 7) Lewis-Sumner syndrome showing multifocal persistent conduction block is not rare in the aged, in which we have already had some useful therapeutic methods. 8) Dementia complicated with neurodegenerative disease was discussed on its clinical and chemical features of mental disturbances. In ALS-dementia, CSF-homovanilic acid reduced significantly than in the control and L-dopa was effective in some patients. 9) Vascular and Alzheimer-type dementias were presented and discussed on their pathogenetic mechanism according to our recent studies with review of literature.

  19. A case of acute paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in BRAF mutant metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shu F; Atkinson, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    A 58-year-old man with indolent metastatic BRAF mutant melanoma presented with several days' history of progressive ataxia and dysdiadochokinesia. His PET/computed tomography restaging scan indicated two new fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose-avid mesenteric lymph nodes. Meanwhile, his MRI brain and whole spine were within normal limits. A lumbar puncture indicated an elevated protein level with a normal cell count and negative paraneoplastic antibodies. Because of the lack of an alternative differential, the diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndrome was made. He was started on high-dose corticosteroids as well as dabrafenib and trametinib. Despite this, his neurological symptoms continued to progress. Consequently, he was trialed on a course of intravenous immunoglobulin, which stabilized his symptoms. He continued to improve over several weeks, with near-complete resolution of all his neurological symptoms, and showed a complete radiological response of his disease. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of paraneoplastic neurological syndrome with mixed neurology associated with BRAF mutant cutaneous melanoma that responded to BRAF targeted therapy.

  20. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    DOEpatents

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  1. Gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts was made with systems designed at Los Alamos Laboratory for the detection of nuclear explosions beyond the atmosphere. HELIOS-2 was the first gamma ray burst instrument launched; its initial results in 1976, seemed to deepen the mystery around gamma ray transients. Interplanetary spacecraft data were reviewed in terms of explaining the behavior and source of the transients.

  2. Audit of an inpatient neurology consultation service in a tertiary referral centre: value of the consulting neurologist.

    PubMed

    Costello, D J; Renganathan, R; O'Hare, A; Murray, B; Lynch, T

    2005-05-01

    The Mater Misericordiae Hospital is a 575-bed tertiary referral centre with busy medical and surgical subspecialty services (including the national cardiac, cardiothoracic, spinal cord injury and pulmonary hypertension units). An audit of in-patient referrals to a neurology service was carried out over the twelve-month period of January to December 2002 inclusively. Five hundred and seventy seven inpatients were evaluated and managed in conjunction with the referring services. Consultation by the neurological service led to a significant contribution in the management of clinical cases in one of three ways: establishing a de novo diagnosis in patients admitted with active neurological symptoms where no working diagnosis exists (40.7% of referrals), significant alteration in diagnosis where the referring service have already established a specific working diagnosis (11.1% of referrals), or offering advice in the ongoing management of active neurological symptoms when the diagnosis is historically established and secure (48.2% of referrals). In order of frequency the most common reason for referral was stroke (131 cases (22.7%)), seizures unrelated to alcohol (59 cases (10.2%)), alcohol-related neurological problems (55 cases (9.5%)), movement disorders (41 cases (7.1%)), neuromuscular (40 cases (6.9%)), coma (35 cases (6%)), disorders of cognition (31 cases (5.3%)), acute headache (28 case (4.8%)) and functional neurological syndromes (26 cases (4.5%)). This audit highlights the value of a consulting neurology service in a multidisciplinary tertiary referral setting.

  3. [Neurology in Japan before World War II].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Modern Western medicine was introduced into Japan by a Dutch doctor Pompe van Meerdervoort in 1855. A German physician EOE von Balz devoted himself to educating medicine at Tokyo Medical School, the predecessor of the present University of Tokyo for 25 years. Hiroshi Kawahara and Kinnosuke Miura, pioneers of Japan Neurology, received their education by him. Kawahara first described X-linked bulvo-spinal muscular atrophy, and published the first Japanese textbook of clinical neurology in 1897. In 1902, Miura and others founded the Japanese Society of Neuro-Psychiatry, the forerunner of the present " Japanese Society of Neurology ". Both Seizo Katsunuma, Professor of Nagoya University, and Junnjiro Kato, Professor of Tohoku University, succeeded Miura's neurology. Miura investigated into the cause of beriberi, but ended in failure. Hasegawa's proposal at the Diet in 1894 that the Japan Government should found an independent department of neurology in the University of Tokyo was unfortunately rejected. There was no foundation of independent institute, department and clinic of neurology before World War II. Consequently Japanese neurology was on the ebb at that time.

  4. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  5. Chapter 44: history of neurology in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The chapter starts from the Renaissance (although the origins of Italian neurology can be traced back to the Middle Ages), when treatises of nervous system physiopathology still followed Hippocratic and Galenic "humoral" theories. In Italy, as elsewhere in Europe, the concepts of humoral pathology were abandoned in the 18th century, when neurology was influenced by novel trends. Neurology acquired the status of clinical discipline (as "clinic of mental diseases") after national reunification (declared in 1861 but completed much later). At the end of the 19th and first decades of the 20th century, eminent Italian "neuropsychiatrists" (including, among many others, Ugo Cerletti, who introduced electroconvulsive shock therapy in 1938) stimulated novel knowledge and approaches, "centers of excellence" flourished, and "Neurological Institutes" were founded. In the first half of the 20th century, the history of Italian neurology was dominated by World Wars I and II (which stimulated studies on the wounded) and the fascist regime in-between the Wars (when the flow of information was instead very limited). Italy became a republic in 1946, and modern neurology and its distinction from psychiatry were finally promoted. The chapter also provides detailed accounts of scientific societies and journals dedicated to the neurological sciences in Italy.

  6. Movement disorder symptoms associated with Unified ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objectives: The UPDRS is a commonly used neurological measurement to assess the presence and severity of parkinsonian symptoms. It has also been used to assess symptoms associated with Mn exposure. Objectives: to determine 1) if movement disorder symptoms were associated with UPDRS: Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Motor abnormalities; and 2) which symptoms were most related to increased abnormalities on these UPDRS subscales. Participants & Methods: Correlations between self-reported movement disorder symptoms from a health questionnaire and scores obtained on UPDRS: ADL and Motor subscales, and the Bradykinesia domain of the Motor subscale, were assessed during a medical examination among 185 Mn-exposed participants from two Ohio towns. Partial correlations were used for statistical analyses, controlling for age, sex, education and a history of musculoskeletal disease.Results: The presence of movement disorder symptoms was positively associated with ADL (pr =0.647, p = <0.001), Motor (pr =0.449, p = <0.001), and Bradykinesia (pr =0.418, p = <0.001) domains on the UPDRS. Specific movement disorder symptoms most strongly associated with increased ADL and Motor scores included having difficulty getting out of chairs (pr =0.458, p = <0.001), writing (pr =0.481, p = <0.001), skilled movements (pr =0.478, p = <0.001), loss of coordination/balance (pr =0.457, p = <0.001), changes in walking (pr =0.412, p = <0.001) and slowness of movement (pr =0.539, p = <0.0

  7. Neurological abnormalities in young adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Allin, M; Rooney, M; Griffiths, T; Cuddy, M; Wyatt, J; Rifkin, L; Murray, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective Individuals born before 33 weeks' gestation (very preterm, VPT) have an increased likelihood of neurological abnormality, impaired cognitive function, and reduced academic performance in childhood. It is currently not known whether neurological signs detected in VPT children persist into adulthood or become attenuated by maturation of the CNS. Method We assessed 153 VPT individuals and 71 term‐born controls at 17–18 years old, using a comprehensive neurological examination. This examination divides neurological signs into primary and integrative domains, the former representing the localising signs of classical neurology, and the latter representing signs requiring integration between different neural networks or systems. Integrative signs are sub‐divided into three groups: sensory integration, motor confusion, and sequencing. The VPT individuals have been followed up since birth, and neonatal information is available on them, along with the results of neurological assessment at 4 and 8 years of age and neuropsychological assessment at 18 years of age. Results The total neurology score and primary and integrative scores were significantly increased in VPT young adults compared to term‐born controls. Within the integrative domain, sensory integration and motor confusion scores were significantly increased in the VPT group, but sequencing was not significantly different between the VPT and term groups. Integrative neurological abnormalities at 18 were strongly associated with reduced IQ but primary abnormalities were not. Conclusions Neurological signs are increased in VPT adults compared to term‐born controls, and are strongly associated with reduced neuropsychological function. PMID:16543529

  8. Steroid Pulse Therapy May Mitigate Prolonged Neurological Manifestations after Eradication of Severe Plasmodium falciparum Parasitemia

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Chihiro; Inagaki, Akiko; Yamada, Gohei; Morita, Koji; Kitamura, Isamu; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old Japanese man with a high parasitemia of Plasmodium falciparum, returning from Uganda, was admitted to our hospital since his consciousness level rapidly deteriorated after the initial dose of mefloquine. Despite the parasitemia was cleared by quinine by day 7, the coma remained unchanged and diffuse leukoencephalopathy was detected on magnetic resonance image. Steroid pulse therapy was initiated on day 8. Subsequently, the neurological manifestations improved and he was discharged on day 73 without any sequelae. Pathogenesis of P. falciparum causing cerebral malaria is diverse and complex. If neurological symptoms unusually prolong, steroid may be an effective treatment option. PMID:27853090

  9. A new clinical variant of the post-malaria neurological syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pace, Adrian A; Edwards, Simon; Weatherby, Stuart

    2013-11-15

    Post-malaria neurological syndrome (PMNS) is an uncommon, monophasic illness that occurs within two months following recovery from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria. Clinical manifestations of PMNS are variable, but published cases uniformly feature neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms without long tract signs. We describe a case of severe brainstem and spinal cord inflammation with paraplegia and sphincter involvement in a 48 year old woman following recovery from a Pf malarial illness. We propose that this case represents a previously unreported form of PMNS, which has features that distinguish it from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and that the recognised clinical spectrum of PMNS should be extended to include brainstem and spinal cord inflammation.

  10. Neurological complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Hely, M A; Williamson, P M; Terenty, T R

    1984-01-01

    This study documents five patients with neurological disease associated with evidence of recent Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Four patients had encephalitis associated with coma. Two of these had hemiparesis (one with dysphasia), one had seizures, and one had cerebellar and brainstem involvement. Two also had evidence of a radiculopathy and peripheral neuropathy. One patient had aseptic meningitis with later transverse myelitis. Three patients had multiple sites of neurological involvement. Respiratory infections preceded the neurological syndromes in four cases. Antibiotic therapy did not appear to alter the course of the disease. All patients had a favourable outcome.

  11. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books.

    PubMed

    Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Silva, Marcos Martins da

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  12. Localization of Neurologic Lesions in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Kevin E

    2017-03-01

    As stated many times throughout this issue, localization of the origin of neurologic deficits in ruminants is paramount to successful diagnosis and prognosis. This article serves as a guide to answer 2 questions that should be asked when presented with a ruminant with neurologic dysfunction: is the lesion rostral or caudal to the foramen magnum, and does the animal have primary neurologic disease? The answers to these 2 broad questions begin the thought processes to more specifically describe the location and nature of the dysfunction. Challenges often facing the diagnostician include economic constraints, size of the animal, and unruly behavior.

  13. Neurological Basis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Cynthia A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews various models in the neurological conceptualization of attention deficit disorder (ADD), with and without hyperactivity. It discusses neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological perspectives on ADD. (Author/DB)

  14. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly are presented in newborns and infants. Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this group of diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients. The onset of symptoms for neurometabolic disorders appears after an interval of normal or near normal growth and development.Additionally, affected children may fare well until a catabolic crisis occurs. Patients with neurometabolic disorders during metabolic decompensation have severe clinical presentation, which include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, and loss of consciousness. This symptom is often fatal but severe neurological insult and regression in neurodevelopmental milestones can result as a prominent sign in patients who survived. Acute symptoms should be immediately treated regardless of the cause. A number of patients with neurometabolic disorders respond favorably and, in some instances, dramatically respond to treatment. Early detection and early intervention is invaluable in some patients to prevent catabolism and normal or near normal neurodevelopmental milestones. This paper discusses neurometabolic disorders, approaches to this group of diseases (from the view of a pediatric neurologist), clinical and neurological manifestations, neuroimaging and electroencephalography findings, early detection, and early treatment. PMID:25767534

  15. Risk Score for Neurological Complications After Endovascular Treatment of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wenjun; Liu, Aihua; Lv, Xianli; Kang, Huibin; Sun, Liqian; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Jiang, Chuhan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Procedure-related neurological complications are common after endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. We aimed to develop a score to quantify individual patient risk. Methods— We retrospectively analyzed consecutive patients who underwent endovascular treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms between January 2012 and September 2015. After excluding those who lost to follow-up and those with fusiform unruptured intracranial aneurysms, included patients were randomly divided into a derivation group (60%) and a validation group (40%). A neurological complication was defined as any transient or permanent increase in the modified Rankin Scale score after aneurysm embolization. A risk score for neurological complications was derived from multivariable logistic regression analyses in the derivation group and validated in the validation group. Results— Overall, 1060 patients were included (636 in the derivation group and 424 in the validation group). The incidence of neurological complications was 5.5% (95% confidence interval, 3.8%–7.4%). A 3-point risk score (S-C-C) was derived to predict neurological complications (size [≥10 mm=1], core areas [yes=1], and cerebral ischemic comorbidity [yes=1]). The incidence of neurological complications varied from 2.2% in 0-point patients to 25.0% in 3-point patients. The score demonstrated significant discrimination (C-statistic, 0.714; 95% confidence interval, 0.624–0.804) and calibration (McFadden R2, 0.102) in the derivation group. Excellent prediction, discrimination, and calibration properties were reproduced in the validation group. Conclusions— One in 20 patients will develop neurological complications after endovascular treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The S-C-C score may be useful for predicting these adverse outcomes based on variables in daily practice. PMID:26869386

  16. Factitious disorders and malingering in relation to functional neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bass, C; Halligan, P

    2017-01-01

    Interest in malingering has grown in recent years, and is reflected in the exponential increase in academic publications since 1990. Although malingering is more commonly detected in medicolegal practice, it is not an all-or-nothing presentation and moreover can vary in the extent of presentation. As a nonmedical disorder, the challenge for clinical practice remains that malingering by definition is intentional and deliberate. As such, clinical skills alone are often insufficient to detect it and we describe psychometric tests such as symptom validity tests and relevant nonmedical investigations. Finally, we describe those areas of neurologic practice where symptom exaggeration and deception are more likely to occur, e.g., postconcussional syndrome, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, motor weakness and movement disorders, and chronic pain. Factitious disorders are rare in clinical practice and their detection depends largely on the level of clinical suspicion supported by the systematic collection of relevant information from a variety of sources. In this chapter we challenge the accepted DSM-5 definition of factitious disorder and suggest that the traditional glossaries have neglected the extent to which a person's reported symptoms can be considered a product of intentional choice or selective psychopathology largely beyond the subject's voluntary control, or more likely, both. We present evidence to suggest that neurologists preferentially diagnose factitious presentations in healthcare workers as "hysterical," possibly to avoid the stigma of simulated illness.

  17. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s (PD), Alzheimer’s (AD), and Huntington’s diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  18. Neurological disorders in Gulf War veterans

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Michael R; Brix, Kelley Ann

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of neurological function in Gulf War veterans (GWV). Twenty-two studies were reviewed, including large hospitalization and registry studies, large population-based epidemiological studies, investigations of a single military unit, small uncontrolled studies of ill veterans and small controlled studies of veterans. In nearly all studies, neurological function was normal in most GWVs, except for a small proportion who were diagnosed with compression neuropathies (carpal tunnel syndrome or ulnar neuropathy). In the great majority of controlled studies, there were no differences in the rates of neurological abnormalities in GWVs and controls. In a national US study, the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) seems to be significantly increased in GWVs, compared to the rate in controls. However, it is possible that military service, in general, might be associated with an increased risk of ALS, rather than Gulf War service in particular. Taken together, the conclusion is that if a neurological examination in a GWV is within normal limits, then extensive neurological testing is unlikely to diagnose occult neurological disorders. PMID:16687265

  19. Sandfly virus seroconversion associated with neurologic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Makranz, Chen; Qutteineh, Hiba; Bin, Hanna; Lustig, Yaniv; Gomori, John Moshe; Honig, Asaf; Bayya, Abed El-Raouf; Moses, Allon E.; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Averbuch, Diana; Eichel, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and unique neurologic manifestations of sandfly viruses (SFVs) in the Jerusalem area. Methods: We identified all patients with acute seroconversion to SFV at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centers during the years 2008–2013 and retrospectively collected and analyzed the clinical and imaging data. Results: Nine patients (ranging from 1.5 to 85 years old) were identified. Presentation included acute neurologic disease, mostly with fever, change in consciousness and behavior, seizures, headache, meningitis, limb paresis, or myelitis. Eight patients had clinical signs of meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis alone. Four patients had myelitis. MRI identified pathologic symmetrical changes in the basal ganglia, thalami, and other deep structures in 5 patients, and additional myelitis of the spine was noted on imaging in 3 patients. Seven patients had long-term follow-up: 4 completely recovered and 3 had remaining neurologic sequelae, among them 1 with permanent severe brain damage. Conclusion: Neurologic involvement associated with acute SFV infections is considered to be benign. However, in this series, all 9 patients presented with significant neurologic pathology associated with a unique finding of myelitis and symmetrical basal ganglia, thalami, or white matter involvement. Thus, acute SFV infection should be included in the differential diagnosis in febrile onset of neurologic manifestations and neuroradiologic changes. PMID:26767189

  20. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders.

  1. EEG in Sarcoidosis Patients Without Neurological Findings.

    PubMed

    Bilgin Topçuoğlu, Özgür; Kavas, Murat; Öztaş, Selahattin; Arınç, Sibel; Afşar, Gülgün; Saraç, Sema; Midi, İpek

    2017-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease affecting nervous system in 5% to 10% of patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the most sensitive method for detecting neurosarcoidosis. However, the most common findings in MRI are the nonspecific white matter lesions, which may be unrelated to sarcoidosis and can occur because of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, and other inflammatory or infectious disorders, as well. Autopsy studies report more frequent neurological involvement than the ante mortem studies. The aim of this study is to assess electroencephalography (EEG) in sarcoidosis patients without neurological findings in order to display asymptomatic neurological dysfunction. We performed EEG on 30 sarcoidosis patients without diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis or prior neurological comorbidities. Fourteen patients (46.7%) showed intermittant focal and/or generalized slowings while awake and not mentally activated. Seven (50%) of these 14 patients with EEG slowings had nonspecific white matter changes while the other half showed EEG slowings in the absence of MRI changes. We conclude that EEG slowings, when normal variants (psychomotor variant, temporal theta of elderly, frontal theta waves) are eliminated, may be an indicator of dysfunction in brain activity even in the absence of MRI findings. Hence, EEG may contribute toward detecting asymptomatic neurological dysfunction or probable future neurological involvement in sarcoidosis patients.

  2. Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S.; Quimby, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) was designed to explicitly to chart the transient sky with a particular focus on events which lie in the nova-supernova gap. With its innovative two-telescope architecture it achieves both high cadence and large areal rate of coverage. PTF was commissioned during the summer of 2009. PTF is now finding an extragalactic transient every 20 minutes and a Galactic (strong) variable every 10 minutes. Spectroscopy undertaken at Keck and Palomar has allowed us: identify an emerging class of ultra-luminous supernovae, discover luminous red novae, undertake UV spectroscopy of Ia supernovae, discover supernovae powered by something other than Nickel-56, clarification of sub-classes of core collapse and thermo-nuclear explosions, map the systematics of core collapse supernovae, a trove of eclipsing binaries and many others.

  3. [Sexuality of patients with neurological disability: Perception of healthcare professionals of a neurologic rehabilitation hospital unit].

    PubMed

    Babany, F; Hamdoun, S; Denys, P; Amarenco, G

    2016-12-01

    Sexual disorders are common after neurological diseases. The reconstruction of sexuality is a major issue after neurologic disability. Why is this topic not covered in rehabilitation medicine except specialized service? The aim of this pilot study was to assess the perception of the healthcare professionals (HCPs) and to understand why this topic was not addressed. We conducted a pilot, observational, monocentric study from February to March 2016 in HCPs from a neurologic rehabilitation hospital unit.

  4. Movement disorder symptoms associated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in two manganese (Mn)-exposed communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: The UPDRS is a commonly used neurological measurement to assess the presence and severity of parkinsonian symptoms. It has also been used to assess symptoms associated with Mn exposure. Objectives: to determine 1) if movement disorder symptoms were associated with UP...

  5. A Clinical Study of ADHD Symptoms with Relation to Symptoms of Learning Disorders in Schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talero-Gutierrez, Claudia; Van Meerbeke, Alberto Velez; Reyes, Rodrigo Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible relationships between symptoms of ADHD and of learning disorder (LD) in a population geographically, culturally, and linguistically distinct from previous studies. Method: The authors evaluated a cross section of 834 Colombian schoolchildren for childhood neurological pathologies on the basis of a medical…

  6. The pathology of transient regional osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, E F

    1998-01-01

    Biopsy specimens from 19 patients with transient regional osteoporosis were studied. All patients presented with pain. There were nine patients with transient osteoporosis of the hip. Six of these specimens were therapeutic core biopsies, and three were femoral heads removed during total hip replacement. The other patients with osteoporosis in different locations had biopsies to rule out infection or neoplasm. Five of these patients had transient osteoporosis of the knee. Three had ankle involvement and two had involvement of the tibial shaft. Plain radiographs were available for study in all cases, and either a bone scan or an MRI was studied in each case. Except for one patient who was lost to follow-up, all had resolution of symptoms and radiographic changes. The histologic changes in the biopsies were distinctive, although they were present in varying degrees. There was edema and reactive bone formation in the marrow spaces. In addition, osteoclastic bone resorption was active in 14 of the 19 cases. Although lipid cysts were sometimes found in the marrow spaces, there was no evidence of fat necrosis or bone necrosis. The high bone turnover and absence of fat necrosis suggests that this disorder is a vasomotor response rather than an early stage of osteonecrosis. Awareness of these characteristic histologic changes should enable the pathologist to make a specific diagnosis of transient regional osteoporosis when a biopsy is required.

  7. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    PubMed

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  8. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  9. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research.

  10. Is there an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lisa M; Mills, Kerry; Clarke, Robert; Dangour, Alan D

    2015-08-28

    Low vitamin B12 status is common in older people; however, its public health significance in terms of neurological manifestations remains unclear. The present systematic review evaluated the association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function and clinically relevant neurological outcomes in adults aged 50+ years. A systematic search of nine bibliographic databases (up to March 2013) identified twelve published articles describing two longitudinal and ten cross-sectional analyses. The included study populations ranged in size (n 28-2287) and mean/median age (range 65-81 years). Studies reported various neurological outcomes: nerve function; clinically measured signs and symptoms of nerve function; self-reported neurological symptoms. Studies were assessed for risk of bias, and results were synthesised qualitatively. Among the general population groups of older people, one longitudinal study reported no association, and four of seven cross-sectional studies reported limited evidence of an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes. Among groups with clinical and/or biochemical evidence of low vitamin B12 status, one longitudinal study reported an association of vitamin B12 status with some, but not all, neurological outcomes and three cross-sectional analyses reported no association. Overall, there is limited evidence from observational studies to suggest an association of vitamin B12 status with neurological function in older people. The heterogeneity and quality of the evidence base preclude more definitive conclusions, and further high-quality research is needed to better inform understanding of public health significance in terms of neurological function of vitamin B12 status in older people.

  11. [Effect of pharmacologic treatment of the nutritional status of neurologic patients].

    PubMed

    Piñeiro Corrales, Guadalupe; Vázquez López, Cristina; Álvarez Payero, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Clinical manifestations accompanying neurological diseases are diverse and affect multiple organs. Nutritional status of patients with certain neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Epilepsy and Multiple Sclerosis can be altered because of symptoms associated with disease course, including certain micronutrient deficiency (folic acid, zinc, vitamin B6 and B12, vitamin D, vitamin E and vitamin C), changes in energy expenditure, intake decreased, gastrointestinal disorders and dysfunction of the bone mass. Also, we have to take in account other factors as: advanced age, multiple co morbidities, polypharmacy, the use of herbal products, social habits, diet and pharmacological treatments effect. An assessment of the factors related to neurological treatment that cause alterations in metabolic and nutritional status was performed: side effects of anti-Parkinson drugs, antiepileptic drugs, and multiple sclerosis drugs; drug-nutrient interactions; and nutrient-drug interactions.

  12. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Maria Usman; Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-12-16

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance.

  13. Adhesive arachnoiditis in mixed connective tissue disease: a rare neurological manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, James Anthony Joseph; Fraser, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The overall incidence of neurological manifestations is relatively low among patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We recently encountered a case of autoimmune adhesive arachnoiditis in a young woman with 7 years history of MCTD who presented with severe back pain and myeloradiculopathic symptoms of lower limbs. To the best of our knowledge, adhesive arachnoiditis in an MCTD patient has never been previously reported. We report here this rare case, with the clinical picture and supportive ancillary data, including serology, cerebral spinal fluid analysis, electrophysiological evaluation and spinal neuroimaging, that is, MRI and CT (CT scan) of thoracic and lumbar spine. Her neurological deficit improved after augmenting her immunosuppressant therapy. Our case suggests that adhesive arachnoiditis can contribute to significant neurological deficits in MCTD and therefore requires ongoing surveillance. PMID:27986694

  14. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-18

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7-11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21-29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  15. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  16. Neurologic and Cardiovascular Complications in Pediatric Life Threatening Imipramine Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam L; Fung, Ching K; Lee, Vivian W; Cheung, Kam L; Wong, William; Leung, Alexander K C

    2015-01-01

    We present an 18-month boy with imipramine poisoning to illustrate the neuro-cardiac toxic effects of this potentially deadly poison in children. The toddler ingested an unknown amount of imipramine from a non-childproof bottle which clearly labelled that the drug must be kept out of reach from children. He developed neurologic and cardiac symptoms. Electrocardiography (ECG) showed tachycardia and widened QRS. He was immediately treated with bicarbonate infusion and made an uneventful recovery. This is the youngest and only reported case of symptomatic imipramine ingestion in our locality. Imipramine has been surpassed by newer antidepressants for the treatment of depression in the past decade. Literature is searched to review the mortality rate in young children. Intensive care neuro-cardiac support contributes to the favorable outcome. Despite clear labelling of the bottle, carelessness on the part of the adult and the use of non-childproof bottle are definite preventable factor to such potentially fatal ingestion.

  17. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed.

  18. The clinical syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Vinod K; Johnson-Hamerman, Lois

    2015-02-01

    Clinicians have hypothesized a spectrum of minor neurologic manifestations, consistent with neuroanatomical reports and collectively termed as a "syndrome of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND)," which can occur in the absence of classical kernicterus. The current review builds on these initial reports with a focus on clinical signs and symptoms that are assessed by standardized tools and manifest from neonatal age to childhood. These clinical manifestations are characterized by the following domains: (i) neuromotor signs; (ii) muscle tone abnormalities; (iii) hyperexcitable neonatal reflexes; (iv) variety of neurobehavior manifestations; (v) speech and language abnormalities; and (vi) evolving array of central processing abnormalities, such as sensorineural audiology and visuomotor dysfunctions. Concerns remain that the most vulnerable infants are likely to acquire BIND, either because their exposure to bilirubin is not identified as severe enough to need treatment or is prolonged but slightly below current threshold levels for intervention. Knowing that a total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB) level is not the most precise indicator of neurotoxicity, the role of expanded biomarkers or a "bilirubin panel" has yet to be validated in prospective studies. Future studies that correlate early "toxic" bilirubin exposure to long-term academic potential of children are needed to explore new insights into bilirubin's effect on the structural and functional maturation of an infant's neural network topology.

  19. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L; Ohl, Dana A; Lynne, Charles M; Sønksen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery, diabetes, congenital spinal abnormalities, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications, injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant. Retrograde ejaculation is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases. Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used in more severe cases. If these measures fail, surgical sperm retrieval can be attempted. Ejaculation with penile vibratory stimulation can be done by some spinal cord injured men and their partners at home, followed by in-home insemination if circumstances and sperm quality are adequate. The other options always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate. PMID:22138899

  20. Transient lingual papillitis.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  1. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Transient familial hyperbilirubinemia is a metabolic disorder that is passed down through families. Babies with ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Jaundice Metabolic Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  2. Lightning-Transient Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grumm, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Battery-powered system operates for more than one year. Recorder digitizes and records up to 146 current samples at selected intervals during lightning stroke. System continues to store time tags of lightning strokes even if transient current memory is full.

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a TIA or a major stroke. It's important to call 9-1-1 immediately for any stroke symptoms. ... All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. The content in this library is for educational purposes only, and therefore is ...

  4. Hypophosphatemia and neurological changes secondary to oral caloric intake: a variant of hyperalimentation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silvis, S E; DiBartolomeo, A G; Aaker, H M

    1980-03-01

    Previous reports have described a syndrome of paresthesias, weakness, seizures and hypophosphatemia in patients and animals receiving intravenous hyperalimentation. In this report we describe a group of five patients who developed this syndrome while on oral caloric intake and three patients who received only modest amounts of hyperalimentation therapy. As an experimental corollary, studies were performed in starved and normal dogs with calories infused via an intragastric catheter. The serum inorganic phosphorus (Pi) fell slightly in normal animals from 4.8-2.5 mg. %. In the starved dogs with diarrhea or vomiting the Pi fell gradually from 4.8-1.6. In starved dogs without gastrointestinal symptoms the Pi fell precipitously from 3.7-1.4 mg % on the first day of infusion and remained at that level. Approximately 50% of the starved animals developed the neurological syndrome; none of the normal animals had neurological symptoms.

  5. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Stephen K.; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.

    2010-01-01

    Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases. PMID:21085524

  6. A survey of neurological decompression illness in commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Wong, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in the northern district of Yamaguchi, Japan to determine the relationship between neurological diving accidents and risk factors among commercial breath-hold divers (Ama). A questionnaire was distributed to 381 Ama divers who are members of the Ama diving union. We sought information on their dive practices (depth of single dive, single dive time, surface interval, length of dive shifts, lunch break) and the presence or absence of medical problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetic mellitus and other issues. Of the 381 Ama divers, 173 responded (45%): 29 were Funado (assisted-descent using weights) and 144 Cachido (unassisted) divers. Twelve had experienced strokelike symptoms during or after repetitive breath-hold diving; 11 were assisted and one unassisted (Funado vs. Cachido). Only two of 12 divers with neurological diving accidents had musculoskeletal symptoms. Neurological events were significantly correlated with dive depth, dive time, and surface interval; however, they were not related to medical history. Neurological diving accidents are more likely to happen among assisted Ama divers than unassisted ones. Repetitive breath-hold diving with a deep dive depth, long dive time, and short surface interval predisposes divers to decompression illness, which characteristically manifests as cerebral stroke.

  7. Neurologic Complications Caused by Epstein-Barr Virus in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna; Breńska, Iwona; Jończyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Kemnitz, Paweł; Pieczonka-Ruszkowska, Ilona; Mania, Anna; Służewski, Wojciech; Figlerowicz, Magdalena

    2016-05-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the medical documentation of 194 children infected with Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms and the presence of the viral capsid antigen IgM antibody. Patients with severe neurologic complications also underwent neurologic examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electroencephalography (EEG). There were 2 peaks in incidence of infection; the first one in young children aged 1 to 5 years represented 62.0% of cases. The second peak (24.6% of patients) occurred in teenagers. Febrile seizures were confirmed in 3.1% of affected children younger than 5 years and headaches in 24.2% patients, mostly older children. Ten children presented severe, neurologic complications: meningoencephalitis, acute encephalitis, acute cerebellitis, transverse myelitis, and myeloradiculitis. Our study identified a variety of Epstein-Barr virus-related neurologic complications. Epstein-Barr virus should be routinely tested for when a child presents with an apparent neuroinfection as it is a common pathogen that can induce a wide variety of signs and symptoms.

  8. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  9. Transient infantile hyperthyrotropinaemia. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Miyai, K; Amino, N; Nishi, K; Fujie, T; Nakatani, K; Nose, O; Harada, T; Yabuuchi, H; Doi, K; Yamamoto, T; Satake, R; Tsuruhara, T; Oura, T

    1979-01-01

    A case of transient hyperthyrotropinaemia was found by mass screening for neonatal hypothyroidism using the paired TSH assay method. The patient was a baby boy born at term after a normal pregnancy who grew without any abnormal signs or symptoms. For the first 7 months after birth, his serum TSH was abnormally high while his total serum T4, T3, and free T4, T3 were within normal limits, exept for slightly low free T4 level at 7 months. The raised serum TSH decreased spontaneously to within normal limits after he was 9 months old. PMID:533303

  10. Paroxysmal sneezing at the onset of syncopes and transient ischemic attack revealing a papillary cardiac fibroelastoma.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Stéphane; Lamy, Matthias; Ciron, Jonathan; Iljicsov, Anna; Arjmand, Roxana; Agius, Pierre; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Sneezing can at times be associated with neurological disorders. The "sneeze center" is localized in the lateral medulla. We report the case of a 50-year-old man who presented three episodes of sneezing, two of them followed by an episode of transient gait instability and dizziness and the third one followed by an episode of transient left hemiparesis due to fibroelastoma of the aortic cardiac valve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a transient ischemic attack due to cardiac papillary fibroelastoma and revealed by violent episodes of sneezing.

  11. Rheumatologic and neurological events in an elderly patient with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Rué, Marjory; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Sibon, Igor; Richez, Christophe; Taine, Laurence; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Arveiler, Benoit; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Lacombe, Didier; Tison, François; Goizet, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Sparse scalp hair, a peculiar shape of the nose, and cone-shaped epiphyses of the phalanges are the hallmarks of the tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndromes (TRPS). Short stature, hip dysplasia, and malformations of inner organs including mitral valve prolpase have also often been described for these conditions. Here, we described a 64-year-old woman with molecularly proved TRPS I and several atypical late-onset rheumatologic and neurological symptoms.

  12. Looks can be deceiving: three cases of neurological diseases mimicking Guillain-Barrè syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, G; Nicoletti, A; Fermo, S Lo; Mostile, G; Giliberto, C; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) is an acute, paralyzing, inflammatory peripheral nerve disease, featured by monophasic disease course, symmetrical limb weakness and areflexia. Several pathologies can mimic the clinical presentation of GBS, making hard the differential diagnosis for patients complaining of acute flaccid paralysis. In this paper we describe three cases of different neurological diseases presenting with acute motor symptoms mimicking GBS, reviewing the relevant literature on misdiagnosis of GBS.

  13. Heavy cannabis use prior psychosis in schizophrenia: clinical, cognitive and neurological evidences for a new endophenotype?

    PubMed

    Mallet, Jasmina; Ramoz, Nicolas; Le Strat, Yann; Gorwood, Philip; Dubertret, Caroline

    2017-02-11

    Cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, and is considered to impact late neurodevelopment. Neurological soft signs (NSS) associated with schizophrenia are considered as markers of early neurodevelopmental impairment. Our study examines the association between heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis and clinical, neuropsychological and neurological symptoms, including NSS. In a cross-sectional study, we consecutively included 61 patients with schizophrenia (34 reporting heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis and 27 not reporting such use), in the setting of a University Hospital and a Medical Center. Symptoms assessment and substance use disorder were evaluated with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies. NSS were assessed with the Neurological Evaluation Scale. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. All patients underwent a battery of neurocognitive tests evaluating attention, memory and executive functions domains. Patients with heavy cannabis use before the onset of psychosis showed significantly less NSS (p < 0.05), less negative symptoms (p < 10(-3)) and a better cognitive functioning in different domains [median reaction time (p = 0.03), episodic memory (p = 0.04), visuoconstructive praxs (p = 0.03) than their non-heavy user counterparts]. Confounding effects of alcohol and tobacco were taken into account. Age and gender were not statistically different between the two groups (p = 0.70 and p = 0.16, respectively). Our study supports the clinical, neuropsychological and neurological specificity associated with the heavy use of cannabis before the onset of schizophrenia. Patients with heavy cannabis use before the onset of schizophrenia may exhibit later neurodevelopmental impairment than those who do not report such use. Schizophrenia associated with heavy cannabis use could represent a specific phenotype.

  14. [Sir William Richard Gowers: author of the "bible of neurology"].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2014-11-01

    William Richard Gowers is one of the great pioneers in neurology and the author of the well-known neurology textbook, "A Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System." His concepts of neurology are based on meticulously and carefully accumulated knowledge of history, observations, and neurological examinations of patients with various neurological diseases. He is not only a great neurologist but also a great teacher who loves teaching students and physicians through well-prepared lectures. We can glean the essence of the field of neurology through his life story and numerous writings concerning neurological diseases.

  15. The neurogenomics view of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2013-06-01

    The availability of high-throughput genome sequencing technologies is expected to revolutionize our understanding of not only hereditary neurological diseases but also sporadic neurological diseases. The molecular bases of sporadic diseases, particularly those of sporadic neurodegenerative diseases, largely remain unknown. As potential molecular bases, various mechanisms can be considered, which include those underlying apparently sporadic neurological diseases with low-penetrant mutations in the gene for hereditary diseases, sporadic diseases with de novo mutations, and sporadic diseases with variations in disease-susceptible genes. With unprecedentedly robust power, high-throughput genome sequencing technologies will enable us to explore all of these possibilities. These new technologies will soon be applied in clinical practice. It will be a new era of datacentric clinical practice.

  16. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  17. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  18. Targeting sonic hedgehog signaling in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Tomar, Sunil; Sharma, Diksha; Mahindroo, Neeraj; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling influences neurogenesis and neural patterning during the development of central nervous system. Dysregulation of Shh signaling in brain leads to neurological disorders like autism spectrum disorder, depression, dementia, stroke, Parkinson's diseases, Huntington's disease, locomotor deficit, epilepsy, demyelinating disease, neuropathies as well as brain tumors. The synthesis, processing and transport of Shh ligand as well as the localization of its receptors and signal transduction in the central nervous system has been carefully reviewed. Further, we summarize the regulation of small molecule modulators of Shh pathway with potential in neurological disorders. In conclusion, further studies are warranted to demonstrate the potential of positive and negative regulators of the Shh pathway in neurological disorders.

  19. Glutamine Synthetase: Role in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Norenberg, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an ATP-dependent enzyme found in most species that synthesizes glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. In brain, GS is exclusively located in astrocytes where it serves to maintain the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as nitrogen metabolism. Changes in the activity of GS, as well as its gene expression, along with excitotoxicity, have been identified in a number of neurological conditions. The literature describing alterations in the activation and gene expression of GS, as well as its involvement in different neurological disorders, however, is incomplete. This review summarizes changes in GS gene expression/activity and its potential contribution to the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders, including hepatic encephalopathy, ischemia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, Parkinson's disease, and astroglial neoplasms. This review also explores the possibility of targeting GS in the therapy of these conditions.

  20. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    PubMed

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  1. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:27299282

  2. Brain Monitoring in Critically Neurologically Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Salazar; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of neurologic injury and the evolution of severe neurologic injury is limited in comatose or critically ill patients that lack a reliable neurologic examination. For common yet severe pathologies such as the comatose state after cardiac arrest, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), critical medical decisions are made on the basis of the neurologic injury. Decisions regarding active intensive care management, need for neurosurgical intervention, and withdrawal of care, depend on a reliable, high-quality assessment of the true state of neurologic injury, and have traditionally relied on limited assessments such as intracranial pressure monitoring and electroencephalogram. However, even within TBI there exists a spectrum of disease that is likely not captured by such limited monitoring and thus a more directed effort towards obtaining a more robust biophysical signature of the individual patient must be undertaken. In this review, multimodal monitoring including the most promising serum markers of neuronal injury, cerebral microdialysis, brain tissue oxygenation, and pressure reactivity index to access brain microenvironment will be discussed with their utility among specific pathologies that may help determine a more complete picture of the neurologic injury state for active intensive care management and long-term outcomes. Goal-directed therapy guided by a multi-modality approach appears to be superior to standard intracranial pressure (ICP) guided therapy and should be explored further across multiple pathologies. Future directions including the application of optogenetics to evaluate brain injury and recovery and even as an adjunct monitoring modality will also be discussed. PMID:28035993

  3. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  4. Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... restore) the body's blood cells. Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Painless, swollen lymph nodes in the neck, underarm, or ... the search box) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, or groin ...

  5. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  6. PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms As with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD ...

  7. Neurologic morbidity and quality of life in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raja B.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ledet, Davonna S.; Morris, E. Brannon; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.; Krull, Kevin R.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Crom, Debbie; Browne, Emily; Zhu, Liang; Rai, Shesh; Srivastava, Deokumar; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with potentially neurotoxic drugs and neurologic complications in long-term survivors are inadequately studied. This study investigated neurologic morbidity and its effect on quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Methods Prospective, single institution, cross-sectional, institutional review board-approved study of long-term ALL survivors. Participants were recruited from institutional clinics. Participants answered an investigator-administered questionnaire followed by evaluation by a neurologist. Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed. Results Of the 162 participants recruited over a 3-year period, 83.3 % reported at least one neurologic symptom of interest, 16.7 % had single symptom, 11.1 % had two symptoms, and 55.6 % had three or more symptoms. Symptoms were mild and disability was low in the majority of participants with neurologic symptoms. Median age at ALL diagnosis was 3.9 years (0.4–18.6), median age at study enrollment was 15.7 years (6.9–28.9), and median time from completion of ALL therapy was 7.4 years (1.9–20.3). On multivariable analyses, female sex correlated with presence of dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, and neuropathy; use of≥10 doses of triple intrathecal chemotherapy correlated with uri-nary incontinence, back pain, and neuropathy; cranial radiation with ataxia; history of ALL relapse with fatigue; and CNS leukemia at diagnosis with seizures. Decline in mental QOL was associated with migraine and tension type headaches, while physical QOL was impaired by presence of dizziness and falls. Overall, good QOL and physical function was maintained by a majority of participants. Conclusions Neurologic symptoms were present in 83 % long-term ALL survivors. Symptoms related morbidity and QOL impairment is low in majority of survivors. Female sex, ≥10 doses of intrathecal chemotherapy, and history of ALL relapse predispose to impaired QOL

  8. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  9. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual's molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases.

  10. Neurological Complications in Controlled HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kate M; Brew, Bruce J

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, there have been great advances in therapies for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that have allowed suppression of the virus and its effects on the body. Despite this progress, neurological complications persist in HIV-infected individuals. In this review we consider the possible ways that HIV might cause neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation. We discuss the spectrum of neurological disorders caused by HIV and its treatment, with a particular focus on both HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and peripheral neuropathies. Since there has been a shift to HIV being a chronic illness, we also review the increasing prevalence of cerebrovascular disease and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Paraneoplastic Neurological Disorder in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sze Yin; Kongg, Min Han; Yunus, Mohd Razif Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorder (PND) is a condition due to immune cross-reactivity between the tumour cells and the normal tissue, whereby the “onconeural” antibodies attack the normal host nervous system. It can present within weeks to months before or after the diagnosis of malignancies. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is associated with paraneoplastic syndrome, for example, dermatomyositis, and rarely with a neurological disorder. We report on a case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma with probable PND. Otolaryngologists, oncologists and neurologists need to be aware of this condition in order to make an accurate diagnosis and to provide prompt treatment. PMID:28381934

  12. Paraneoplastic Neurologic Disorders: A Brief Overview

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Immune-mediated paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND) may affect any part of the nervous system, and can mimic many non-cancer associated disorders. The availability of diagnostic tests based on the presence of specific anti-neuronal antibodies facilitates diagnosis and can suggest treatment strategies. Once thought to be poorly responsive to therapies, it is now recognized that there is a subgroup of PND, mostly associated with antibodies to antigens on the neuronal cell surface that are highly treatment responsive. For all PND, identification and treatment of the underlying tumor is the most effective step in the potential control or stabilization of the neurological disorder. PMID:23264806

  13. Richard Bright and his neurological studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2009-01-01

    Richard Bright was one of the famous triumvirate of Guy's Hospital physicians in the Victorian era. Remembered for his account of glomerulonephritis (Bright's disease) he also made many important and original contributions to medicine and neurology. These included his work on cortical epileptogenesis, descriptions of simple partial (Jacksonian) seizures, infantile convulsions, and a variety of nervous diseases. Most notable were his reports of neurological studies including papers on traumatic tetanus, syringomyelia, arteries of the brain, contractures of spinal origin, tumours of the base of the brain, and narcolepsy. His career and these contributions are outlined.

  14. Genetic testing for paediatric neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Valente, Enza Maria; Ferraris, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Paediatric neurological disorders encompass a large group of clinically heterogeneous diseases, of which some are known to have a genetic cause. Over the past few years, advances in nosological classifications and in strategies for molecular testing have substantially improved the diagnosis, genetic counselling, and clinical management of many patients, and have facilitated the possibility of prenatal diagnoses for future pregnancies. However, the increasing availability of genetic tests for paediatric neurological disorders is raising important questions with regard to the appropriateness, choice of protocols, interpretation of results, and ethical and social concerns of these services. In this Review, we discuss these topics and how these concerns affect genetic counselling.

  15. Transient Global Amnesia: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea

    2016-08-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department.

  16. [Nationwide questionnaire study in "the Model Core Curriculum" and current status for the undergraduate education in neurology].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Kwak, Shin; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nakashima, Kenji; Amano, Takahiro; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Uozumi, Takenori; Kohara, Nobuo; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Tamagawa, Akira; Toyoshima, Itaru; Mizutani, Tomohiko; Yoshii, Fumihito; Sobue, Gen; Shimizu, Teruo

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the current state of education for undergraduates, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology for undergraduate education sent a questionnaire on the 2001-version of Model Core Curriculum to the department of neurology in 80 medical universities and their 7 associate medical institutes throughout Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of those 87 institutes (64.4%). According to the answers, the Core Curriculum was introduced to the program of undergraduate education in 93% of those 56 universities. For the revision of neurology part in the current Core Curriculum, there are number of requests for improving the description on the neurological examination, list of common symptoms and disorders, and addition of therapeutics. Despite application of the Model Core Curriculum in medical education, the present study disclosed that there were considerable difference in the number and content of the lectures, and the duration of clinical clerkship in neurology ward. These differences of the curriculum and training program depends on not only the number of staffs, but also whether they are working as staffs in a department of neurology or as a small group of neurologists within a department other than neurology.

  17. STD Symptoms: Common STDs and Their Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant woman with syphilis to be treated. Primary syphilis The first sign of syphilis, which may occur ... the second (secondary) or third (tertiary) stage. Secondary syphilis Signs and symptoms of secondary syphilis may begin ...

  18. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause the following signs and symptoms— Vaginal ...

  19. Photoacoustic transient imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschi, J. L.; Marty-Dessus, D.; Severac, H.; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Bastie, A.

    1993-01-01

    A collimated laser diode associated with a small, short focal length objective lens produces a focused laser beam on the top of a sample glued onto a piezoelectric transducer. This laser beam is horizontally scanned on the surface and its intensity is modulated by a square wave using a TTL signal generator. This system induces acoustic waves in the sample. With a specially designed control circuitry, by combining this acoustic signal and the scanned laser beam, imaging of the subsurface is possible. The transient analysis developed is described and we show how to select cut-away views of the subsurface specimen with some applications in failure analysis of integrated circuits. We present the apparatus, the transient photoacoustic signal theory, and make a comparison between scanning photoacoustic (SPAM) and scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM).

  20. Unusual CRTS Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Williams, R.; Graham, M. J.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Christensen, E.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.

    2008-10-01

    We have detected an optical transient of unknown nature in Catalina 0.7m Schmidt telescope images from 28 Sep 2008 UT. The object has the following parameters:

    CSS080928:160837+041626 2008-09-28 UT 02:50:49 RA 16:08:37.23 Dec 04:16:26.7 Mag 17.7 Type ?
    A possible uncataloged match to the transient is present in SDSS images with magnitude r~22.5.

  1. Synthesized light transients.

    PubMed

    Wirth, A; Hassan, M Th; Grguras, I; Gagnon, J; Moulet, A; Luu, T T; Pabst, S; Santra, R; Alahmed, Z A; Azzeer, A M; Yakovlev, V S; Pervak, V; Krausz, F; Goulielmakis, E

    2011-10-14

    Manipulation of electron dynamics calls for electromagnetic forces that can be confined to and controlled over sub-femtosecond time intervals. Tailored transients of light fields can provide these forces. We report on the generation of subcycle field transients spanning the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet frequency regimes with a 1.5-octave three-channel optical field synthesizer and their attosecond sampling. To demonstrate applicability, we field-ionized krypton atoms within a single wave crest and launched a valence-shell electron wavepacket with a well-defined initial phase. Half-cycle field excitation and attosecond probing revealed fine details of atomic-scale electron motion, such as the instantaneous rate of tunneling, the initial charge distribution of a valence-shell wavepacket, the attosecond dynamic shift (instantaneous ac Stark shift) of its energy levels, and its few-femtosecond coherent oscillations.

  2. Recognition of error symptoms in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Sridhar, V.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for automatically detecting symptoms of frequently occurring errors in large computer systems is developed. The proposed symptom recognition methodology and its validation are based on probabilistic techniques. The technique is shown to work on real failure data from two CYBER systems at the University of Illinois. The methodology allows for the resolution between independent and dependent causes and, also quantifies a measure of the strength of relationship among errors. Comparison made with failure/repair information obtained from field maintenance engineers shows that in 85% of the cases, the error symptoms recognized by our approach correspond to real system problems. Further, the remaining 15% although not directly supported by field data, were confirmed as valid problems. Some of these were shown to be persistent problems which otherwise would have been considered as minor transients and hence ignored.

  3. Transient Pulse Monitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-20

    connection to the test solar array pannels . One radiated electromagnetic signal sensor will be placed on one of the solar array panels (Figures 6 and 7). The...22 02 Spacecraft, Charging , Discharge, Transient, Environment 19. ABSTRACT (Cmntnue on mromN ifesor AWMI endwtfr by blok numfber) SRI International is...6 2.1.2 Particle Interactions with Satellite Materials: Charging ........................ 6 2.1.3 Discharges and Their Effects on Systems

  4. Coherent Transient Systems Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-17

    europium doped yttrium silicate in collaboration with IBM Almaden Research Center. Research into divalent ion doped crystals as photon gated materials...demonstration of the coherent transient continuous optical processor was performed in europium doped yttrium silicate. Though hyperfine split ground...materials. Research into divalent samarium doped into other hosts is incomplete and may produce better results. Preliminary measurements on Tm:KCl revealed

  5. Transient Detection Using Wavelets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    signaL and transients are nonstationary. A new technique for the analysis of this type of signal, called the Wavelet Transform , was applied to artificial...and real signals. A brief theoretical comparison between the Short Time Fourier Transform and the Wavelet Transform is introduced A multisolution...analysis approach for implementing the transform was used. Computer code for the Discrete Wavelet Transform was implemented. Different types of wavelets to use as basis functions were evaluated. (KAR) P. 2

  6. Lunar transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1991-03-01

    Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

  7. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  8. Neurologic impairment following closed head injury predicts post-traumatic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Villasana, L.E.; Westbrook, G.L.; Schnell, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian hippocampus, neurogenesis persists into adulthood, and increased generation of newborn neurons could be of clinical benefit following concussive head injuries. Post-traumatic neurogenesis has been well documented using “open” traumatic brain injury (TBI) models in rodents; however, human TBI most commonly involves closed head injury. Here we used a closed head injury (CHI) model to examine post-traumatic hippocampal neurogenesis in mice. All mice were subjected to the same CHI protocol, and a gross-motor based injury severity score was used to characterize neurologic impairment one hour after the injury. When analyzed 2 weeks later, post-traumatic neurogenesis was significantly increased only in mice with a high degree of transient neurologic impairment immediately after injury. This increase was associated with an early increase in c-fos activity, and subsequent reactive astrocytosis and microglial activation in the dentate gyrus. Our results demonstrate that the initial degree of neurologic impairment after closed head injury predicts the induction of secondary physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, and that animals with severe neurologic impairment early after injury manifest an increase in post-traumatic neurogenesis in the absence of gross anatomic pathology. PMID:24861442

  9. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  10. Neurological adverse events in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy: a prospective imaging and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to investigate the frequency of neurological adverse events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondylarthropathies (SpA) treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α antagonists. Methods Seventy-seven patients eligible for anti-TNFα therapy were evaluated. There were 36 patients with RA, 41 with SpA [24 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and 17 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)]. All patients had a complete physical and neurological examination. Brain and cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurophysiological tests were performed in all patients before the initiation of anti-TNFα therapy and after a mean of 18 months or when clinical symptoms and signs indicated a neurological disease. Exclusion criteria included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, heart arrhythmias, atherothrombotic events, vitamin B12 and iron deficiency, head and neck trauma and neurological surgeries. Results Two patients did not receive anti-TNFα therapy because brain MRIs at baseline revealed lesions compatible with demyelinating diseases. Thus, 75 patients received anti-TNFα (38 infliximab, 19 adalimumab and 18 etanercept). Three patients developed neurological adverse events. A 35-year-old man with PsA after 8 months of infliximab therapy presented with paresis of the left facial nerve and brain MRI showed demyelinating lesions. Infliximab was discontinued and he was treated with pulses of corticosteroids recovering completely after two months. The second patient was a 45-year-old woman with RA who after 6 months of adalimumab therapy presented with optic neuritis. The third patient was a 50-year-old woman with AS, whom after 25 months of infliximab therapy, presented with tingling and numbness of the lower extremities and neurophysiological tests revealed peripheral neuropathy. In both patients anti-TNF were discontinued and they improved without treatment after 2 months. The rest of our patients showed no symptoms and MRIs

  11. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  16. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  17. Classroom Correlates of Neurological "Soft Signs".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartlage, Patricia L.; Hartlage, Lawrence C.

    This study investigated the relationships between 19 neurological abnormalities in school children and measures of school performance in reading, math, and nonacademic classroom behaviors. The sample of 45 children was given a standardized achievement test and the Draw-a-Person instrument to obtain academic variables. Nonacademic behaviors…

  18. Spatial contrast sensitivity in clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Bulens, C; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Wildt, G J; Keemink, C J

    1988-01-01

    We studied contrast sensitivity function in normal subjects and in three illustrative cases with various neurological disorders. This was done by measuring contrast sensitivity over a range of spatial frequencies for vertical sinewave grating stimuli. It is demonstrated that contrast sensitivity function can give information about visual function not obtainable by conventional test procedures.

  19. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  20. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  1. [The neurological complications of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Arauz-Góngora, A A; Souta-Meiriño, C A; Cotter-Lemus, L E; Guzmán-Rodríguez, C; Méndez-Domínguez, A

    1998-01-01

    We review the neurologic complications of 131 episodes of infective endocarditis, and the influences of some factors that are considered risk factors at its presentation, like the presence of vegetations detected by echocardiography, type and location of involved valve, or bacterial culture. Neurologic complications occurred in 28 patients (21.4%), 4 of them were excluded because of the absence of neuroimaging studies. In 21 patients the underlying cardiac pathology was valve disease and in the remaining 3 patients was congenital heart disease. 11 patients had native valve endocarditis and 10 prosthetic valve endocarditis. The cultured bacteria were Streptococcus viridans in 8 cases and Staphylococcus aureus in 7. The most frequent complication was cerebrovascular with incidence of cerebral embolism, and intracerebral hemorrhage of 62.5% and 8.3% respectively. Echocardiographic evidence of vegetation was seen in 18 patients, and cerebral embolism were noted in 12. Death occurred in 29% of patients with neurologic complications and 27% without. Two of nine patients who underwent open-heat surgery died. We conclude that there is no difference in the incidence of neurologic complications between mitral and aortic valve groups, neither when comparing native and prosthetic valve groups. Open-heart surgery does not increase mortality in this group of patients.

  2. The Transformation: Monarch Institute for Neurological Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Those utilizing the Monarch Institute and its powerful website include educational and mental health professionals looking for training, or employers seeking qualified workers who happen to have neurological differences. Most are students and their parents who are worried and in pain because they have a problem. The young person is not progressing…

  3. Neurological benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Dyall, S C; Michael-Titus, A T

    2008-01-01

    The central nervous system is highly enriched in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of the omega-6 and omega-3 series. The presence of these fatty acids as structural components of neuronal membranes influences cellular function both directly, through effects on membrane properties, and also by acting as a precursor pool for lipid-derived messengers. An adequate intake of omega-3 PUFA is essential for optimal visual function and neural development. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that increased intake of the long-chain omega-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), may confer benefits in a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders, and in particular neurodegenerative conditions. However, the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are still poorly understood. Recent evidence also indicates that in addition to the positive effects seen in chronic neurodegenerative conditions, omega-3 PUFA may also have significant neuroprotective potential in acute neurological injury. Thus, these compounds offer an intriguing prospect as potentially new therapeutic approaches in both chronic and acute conditions. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence of the neurological benefits of omega-3 PUFA, looking specifically at neurodegenerative conditions and acute neurological injury.

  4. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  5. Sleep disorders in children with neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Zucconi, M; Bruni, O

    2001-12-01

    Pediatric neurologic diseases are often associated with different kinds of sleep disruption (mainly insomnia, less frequently hypersomnia or parasomnias). Due to the key-role of sleep for development, the effort to ameliorate sleep patterns in these children could have important prognostic benefits. Study of sleep architecture and organization in neurologic disorders could lead to a better comprehension of the pathogenesis and a better treatment of the disorders. This article focuses on the following specific neurologic diseases: nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and abnormal motor behaviors of epileptic origin, evaluating differential diagnosis with parasomnias; achondroplasia, confirming the crucial role of craniofacial deformity in determining sleep-disordered breathing; neuromuscular diseases, mainly Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and myotonic dystrophy; cerebral palsy, evaluating either the features of sleep architecture and the importance of the respiratory problems associated; headaches, confirming the strict relationships with sleep in terms of neurochemical and neurobehavioral substrates; and finally a review on the effectiveness of melatonin for sleep problems in children with neurologic syndromes and mental retardation, blindness, and epilepsy.

  6. Negative symptoms: psychopathological models.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Djenderdjian, A; Shamasunder, P; Costa, J; Herrera, J; Sramek, J

    1991-01-01

    The psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia have been broadly divided into positive and negative symptom groups. Even though there is no definitive consensus, psychomotor agitation, motor excitement, hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder constitute positive and psychomotor retardation, amotivation, apathy and decreased emotional expression are grouped into negative symptoms. The negative symptoms have been reported to appear late in the course of the illness and resistant to treatment with neuroleptics. While these claims have not been substantiated, the current interest on negative symptoms is related to the fact that many nonfunctioning institutionalized as well as ambulatory schizophrenics manifest negative symptoms. As chronic psychiatric beds have become scarce, many patients with negative symptoms who were harbored in the chronic mental hospitals have been released to the community care and some of these patients live on the streets. Thus their visibility has challenged psychiatry to focus its efforts on the etiology and treatment of negative symptoms. PMID:2049366

  7. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  8. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    PubMed

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  9. Measurement, evaluation, and assessment of peripheral neurological disorders caused by hand-transmitted vibration.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Regular exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can result in symptoms and signs of peripheral vascular, neurological and other disorders collectively known as the hand-arm vibration syndrome. The measurement of the effects of hand-transmitted vibration involves converting the evidence of disorder (symptoms and signs) into information that can be stored. Evaluation requires the use of scales on which to indicate the severity of the various symptoms and signs. Assessment involves a judgement of severity relative to a criterion, usually for a specific purpose (e.g. to decide on removal from work or compensation). The measurement and evaluation of symptoms and signs is necessary when monitoring patient health and when performing epidemiological studies for research. The assessment of the severity of the hand-arm vibration syndrome is currently performed with staging systems, but the criteria are not clear and not related to defined methods for measuring or evaluating the symptoms and signs. Recognizing that similar symptoms can occur without injury from occupational exposures to hand-transmitted vibration, this paper attempts to define significant peripheral neurological symptoms caused by hand-transmitted vibration (i.e. 'unusual symptoms') and how these symptoms and related signs may be measured. Scales for evaluating the symptoms (e.g. their extent) and the related signs (e.g. their probability relative to the probability of the sign being present in persons not exposed to vibration) are defined. A method of relating unusual symptoms to both the signs of disorder and the pattern of vibration exposure is illustrated. Assessments of severity will vary according to the reasons for assessing the health effects of vibration, and will depend on local practice and convenience, but a way of combining evaluations of symptoms and signs is demonstrated in a staging system. Although inherently complex, the methods may assist the collection of data required to improve

  10. The sensitivity and specificity of the neurological examination in polyneuropathy patients with clinical and electrophysiological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Alabdali, Majed; Alsulaiman, Abdulla; Albulaihe, Hana; Breiner, Ari; Katzberg, Hans D.; Aljaafari, Danah; Lovblom, Leif E.; Bril, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy is one of the most prevalent neurologic disorders. Although several studies explored the role of the neurological examination in polyneuropathy, they were mostly restricted to specific subgroups of patients and have not correlated examination findings with symptoms and electrophysiological results. Objectives To explore the sensitivity and specificity of different neurological examination components in patients with diverse etiologies for polyneuropathy, find the most sensitive combination of examination components for polyneuropathy detection, and correlate examination findings with symptoms and electrophysiological results. Methods Patients with polyneuropathy attending the neuromuscular clinic from 01/2013 to 09/2015 were evaluated. Inclusion criteria included symptomatic polyneuropathy, which was confirmed by electrophysiological studies. 47 subjects with no symptoms or electrophysiological findings suggestive for polyneuropathy, served as controls. Results The total cohort included 312 polyneuropathy patients, with a mean age of 60±14 years. Abnormal examination was found in 95%, most commonly sensory findings (86%). The most common abnormal examination components were impaired ankle reflexes (74%), vibration (73%), and pinprick (72%) sensation. Combining ankle reflex examination with vibration or pinprick perception had the highest sensitivity, of 88%. The specificities of individual examination component were generally high, excluding ankle reflexes (62%), and vibration perception (77%). Abnormal examination findings were correlated with symptomatic weakness and worse electrophysiological parameters. Conclusion The neurological examination is a valid, sensitive and specific tool for diagnosing polyneuropathy, and findings correlate with polyneuropathy severity. Ankle reflex examination combined with either vibration or pinprick sensory testing is the most sensitive combination for diagnosing polyneuropathy, and should be

  11. Evaluation of Early Postoperative Neurological Complications Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OTAN, Emrah; AYDIN, Cemalettin; YÖNDER, Hüseyin; KAYAALP, Cüneyt; KAPLAN, Yüksel; YILMAZ, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation is one of the best treatment options for end-stage liver disease. In Turkey, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is performed more frequently than cadaveric transplantation, because organ donation is unpopular in our country. Neurological complications contribute to poor postoperative outcomes after liver transplantation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the outcomes of LDLT patients in whom such complications developed early during postoperative follow-up in the intensive care unit. Methods Of 217 LDLTs performed between August 2011 and August 2012, neurology consultations were arranged for 29 patients (13.36%) because of development of new-onset neurological symptoms and/or findings in patients with neurologically uneventful preoperative histories. We retrospectively collected data on age, gender, primary disease, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and postoperative hospitalization duration of those who survived. The indications for neurological consultation and diagnoses were categorized into acute confusion/encephalopathy, epileptic seizures, leukoencephalopathy, and focal neurological deficits. The immunosuppressive treatment regimens prescribed were also considered. The outcomes of the 2 groups (with and without neurological complications) were compared. Results The mean patient age was 44.52±16.24 years, and males predominated (65.5%, n=19). Acute confusion/encephalopathy was the most frequent complication (62.1%, n=18), followed by epileptic seizures (27.6%, n=8), cerebrovascular disease (6.9%, n=2), and leukoencephalopathy (3.4%, n=1). Statistically significant between-group differences in age (44.5±16.2 vs. 34.33±20.98 years; p<0.001), and proportions of patients with a disease of viral etiology (55.17% vs. 35.63%, p<0.05), were evident. Mortality was significantly higher in the group with neurological complications (65.5% vs. 37.32%, p<0.05). The duration of postoperative hospitalization

  12. Long-term neurological conditions: management at the interface between neurology, rehabilitation and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Sykes, Nigel; Silber, Eli

    2008-04-01

    Long-term neurological conditions (LTNCs) comprise a diverse set of conditions resulting from injury or disease of the nervous system that will affect an individual for life. Some 10 million people in the UK are living with a neurological condition which has a significant impact on their lives, and they make up 19% of hospital admissions. These guidelines build on the Quality Requirements in the National Service Framework for Long-term (Neurological) Conditions to explore the interaction between specialist neurology, rehabilitation and palliative care services, and how they may best work together to provide long-term support for people with LTNCs and the family members who care for them. The guidelines also provide some practical advice for other clinicians when caring for someone with an LTNC, and outline indications for specialist referral. This article provides a brief summary. Full details of the methods and literature evaluation, as well as tools for implementation, are available in the full guideline.

  13. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  14. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  15. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  16. Transient transformation of plants.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw D; Doherty, Angela; Sparks, Caroline A

    2009-01-01

    Transient expression in plants is a valuable tool for many aspects of functional genomics and promoter testing. It can be used both to over-express and to silence candidate genes. It is also scaleable and provides a viable alternative to microbial fermentation and animal cell culture for the production of recombinant proteins. It does not depend on chromosomal integration of heterologous DNA so is a relatively facile procedure and can lead to high levels of transgene expression. Recombinant DNA can be introduced into plant cells via physical methods, via Agrobacterium or via viral vectors.

  17. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

    1989-07-18

    A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

  18. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  19. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  20. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  1. Insights into the Pathology of the α3 Na+/K+-ATPase Ion Pump in Neurological Disorders; Lessons from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Thomas H.; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane Na+-/K+ ATPase is located at the plasma membrane of all mammalian cells. The Na+-/K+ ATPase utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis to extrude three Na+ cations and import two K+ cations into the cell. The minimum constellation for an active Na+-/K+ ATPase is one alpha (α) and one beta (β) subunit. Mammals express four α isoforms (α1−4), encoded by the ATP1A1-4 genes, respectively. The α1 isoform is ubiquitously expressed in the adult central nervous system (CNS) whereas α2 primarily is expressed in astrocytes and α3 in neurons. Na+ and K+ are the principal ions involved in action potential propagation during neuronal depolarization. The α1 and α3 Na+-/K+ ATPases are therefore prime candidates for restoring neuronal membrane potential after depolarization and for maintaining neuronal excitability. The α3 isoform has approximately four-fold lower Na+ affinity compared to α1 and is specifically required for rapid restoration of large transient increases in [Na+]i. Conditions associated with α3 deficiency are therefore likely aggravated by suprathreshold neuronal activity. The α3 isoform been suggested to support re-uptake of neurotransmitters. These processes are required for normal brain activity, and in fact autosomal dominant de novo mutations in ATP1A3 encoding the α3 isoform has been found to cause the three neurological diseases Rapid Onset Dystonia Parkinsonism (RDP), Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood (AHC), and Cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy, and sensorineural hearing loss (CAPOS). All three diseases cause acute onset of neurological symptoms, but the predominant neurological manifestations differ with particularly early onset of hemiplegic/dystonic episodes and mental decline in AHC, ataxic encephalopathy and impairment of vision and hearing in CAPOS syndrome and late onset of dystonia/parkinsonism in RDP. Several mouse models have been generated to study the in vivo consequences of Atp1a3 modulation

  2. Catatonia in Neurologic and Psychiatric Patients at a Tertiary Neurological Center.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Fricchione, Gregory L; Ojeda-Lopez, M Carmen; Perez-González, Andres F; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence, phenomenology, treatment, and outcome of neurological patients and psychiatric patients with catatonia at a tertiary neurological center. Clinical variables included nosological diagnoses and complications. Admission length and days with catatonia were used as outcome measures. Of 2,044 patients who were evaluated prospectively, 68 (3.32%) had catatonia, 42 (61.7%) were neurological patients, 19 (27.9%) were psychiatric patients, and 7 (10.2%) had drug-related diagnoses. Of all patients, the ratio of neurological to psychiatric patients was 3:1. Encephalitis was the most common diagnosis (N=26 [38.2%]), followed by schizophrenia (N=12 [17.6%]). Psychiatric patients exhibited a stuporous type of catatonia (15 [83.3%] versus 14 [33.3%], p>0.001), whereas neurological patients exhibited a mixed form of catatonia (25 [59.5%] versus 1 [5.6], p<0.001). Neurological patients had more complications, longer hospitalizations, and more days with catatonia. A total of 56 patients (82.3%) received lorazepam, and 14 patients (20.5%) underwent ECT. Second- and third-line treatments included amantadine, bromocriptine, and levodopa. Catatonia is a prevalent syndrome that can remit with proper and opportune treatment.

  3. Transient cortical blindness following vertebral angiography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lo, Lai Wan; Chan, Ho Fung; Ma, Ka Fai; Cheng, Lik Fai; Chan, Tony Kt

    2015-02-01

    Transient cortical blindness (TCB) is a rare but well-known complication of cerebral angiography. Its pathophysiology remains uncertain. We would like to report a case of TCB in a patient during a follow up vertebral angiogram for post-coil embolization of left posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Patient's vision was resumed spontaneously within 24 hours after angiography, with no residual neurological deficit in subsequent clinical follow up. Multi-modality imaging evaluation including vertebral angiography, brain CT and MRI performed on same day are presented.

  4. Transient perioperative brainstem paralysis secondary to a local anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Joannides, Alexis J; Santarius, Thomas; Fernandes, Helen M; Laing, Rodney J C; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2012-07-01

    Local anesthesia is widely used, in isolation or in conjunction with general anesthesia. The authors describe 2 adolescent patients presenting with absent brainstem reflexes and delayed awakening following elective foramen magnum decompression for Chiari Type I malformation. In both cases, neurological deficits were closely associated with the administration of a levobupivacaine field block following wound closure. In the absence of any structural or biochemical abnormalities, and with spontaneous recovery approximating the anesthetic half-life, the authors' observations are consistent with transient brainstem paralysis caused by perioperative local anesthetic infiltration.

  5. Transient dynamics in motor control of patients with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Labrie, Christiane; Vasilakos, Konstantinon

    1991-10-01

    Experimental observations of movement disorders including tremor and voluntary microdisplacements recorded in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a simple visuomotor tracking task are analyzed. The performance of patients with PD having a very large amplitude tremor is characterized either by the intermittent appearance of transient dynamics or by the presence of sudden transitions in the amplitude or frequency of the signal. The need to develop new tools to characterize changes in dynamics (i.e., transitions) and to redefine neurological degeneration, such as Parkinson's disease, in terms of qualitative changes in oscillatory behaviors is emphasized.

  6. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    PubMed

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  7. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Symptoms and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jasona, Leonard A.; Zinn, Marcie L.; Zinn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide with an estimated one million cases in the United States. Hurdles to establishing consensus to achieve accurate evaluation of patients with ME continue, fueled by poor agreement about case definitions, slow progress in development of standardized diagnostic approaches, and issues surrounding research priorities. Because there are other medical problems, such as early MS and Parkinson’s Disease, which have some similar clinical presentations, it is critical to accurately diagnose ME to make a differential diagnosis. In this article, we explore and summarize advances in the physiological and neurological approaches to understanding, diagnosing, and treating ME. We identify key areas and approaches to elucidate the core and secondary symptom clusters in ME so as to provide some practical suggestions in evaluation of ME for clinicians and researchers. This review, therefore, represents a synthesis of key discussions in the literature, and has important implications for a better understanding of ME, its biological markers, and diagnostic criteria. There is a clear need for more longitudinal studies in this area with larger data sets, which correct for multiple testing. PMID:26411464

  8. Symptoms of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Mucormycosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing ...

  9. Italian neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Serrati, C; Zolo, P; Cataldo, N; Ripellino, C

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cognition is an important part of major depressive disorder (MDD) evaluation and a crucial issue is the physicians' perception of cognitive dysfunction in MDD that remains nowadays a little known matter. The present study aims at investigating the understanding of neurologists' perception about cognitive dysfunction in MDD. An on-line survey addressed to 85 Italian neurologists in the period between May and June 2015 was performed. The questionnaire comprised three sections: the first section collecting information on neurologists' socio-demographic profile, the second investigating cognitive symptoms relevance in relation with different aspects and the third one explicitly focusing on cognitive symptoms in MDD. Cognitive symptoms are considered most significant among DSM-5 symptoms to define the presence of a Major Depressive Episode in a MDD, to improve antidepressant therapy adherence, patients' functionality and concurrent neurological condition, once resolved. Furthermore, an incongruity came to light from this survey: the neurologists considered cognitive symptoms a not relevant aspect to choose the antidepressant treatment in comparison with the other DSM-5 symptoms on one side, but they declared the opposite in the third part of the questionnaire focused on cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms appeared to be a relevant aspect in MDD and neurologists have a clear understanding of this issue. Nevertheless, the discrepancy between neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms and the antidepressant treatment highlights the feeling of an unmet need that could be filled increasing the awareness of existing drugs with pro-cognitive effects.

  10. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Claassen, Jan; Riviello, James J; Silbergleit, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Patients with prolonged or rapidly recurring convulsions lasting more than 5 min are in status epilepticus (SE) and require immediate resuscitation. Although there are relatively few randomized clinical trials, available evidence and experience suggest that early and aggressive treatment of SE improves patient outcomes, for which reason this was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. The current approach to the emergency treatment of SE emphasizes rapid initiation of adequate doses of first-line therapy, as well as accelerated second-line anticonvulsant drugs and induced coma when these fail, coupled with admission to a unit capable of neurological critical care and electroencephalography monitoring. This protocol will focus on the initial treatment of SE but also review subsequent steps in the protocol once the patient is hospitalized.

  11. Brain biopsy in benign neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, C E; Love, S; Hardie, R J; Edwards, R J; Scolding, N J; Rice, C M

    2012-05-01

    Brain biopsy is well established in clinical practice when there is suspicion of CNS malignancy. However, there is little consensus regarding the indications for brain biopsy in non-malignant neurological disease. This is due in no small part to limitations in the available literature pertaining to diagnostic brain biopsies. The published evidence largely comprises small, retrospective, single-centre analyses performed over long time periods, including non-homogeneous patient groups with considerable variation in reported outcomes. Here we present pragmatic guidance for those clinicians considering diagnostic brain biopsy in a patient with non-neoplastic neurological disease and highlight practice points with the aim of maximising the probability of gaining clinically useful information from the procedure.

  12. Neurological outcome after experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bickenbach, Johannes; Biener, Ingeborg; Czaplik, Michael; Nolte, Kay; Dembinski, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Rossaint, Rolf; Fries, Michael

    2011-12-15

    We examined the influences of acute lung injury and hypoxia on neurological outcome. Functional performance was assessed using a neurocognitive test and a neurologic deficit score (NDS) five days before. On experimental day, mechanically ventilated pigs were randomized to hypoxia only (HO group, n=5) or to acute lung injury (ALI group, n=5). Hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, systemic cytokines and further physiologic variables were obtained at baseline, at the time of ALI, 2, 4 and 8h thereafter. Subsequently, injured lungs were recruited and animals weaned from the ventilator. Neurocognitive testing was re-examined for five days. Then, brains were harvested for neurohistopathology. After the experiment, neurocognitive performance was significantly worsened and the NDS increased in the ALI group. Histopathology revealed no significant differences. Oxygenation was comparable between groups although significantly higher inspiratory pressures occured after ALI. Cytokines showed a trend towards higher levels after ALI. Neurocognitive compromise after ALI seems due to a more pronounced inflammatory response and complex mechanical ventilation.

  13. [Neurological disorders associated with gluten sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lahoz, C; Mauri-Capdevila, G; Vega-Villar, J; Rodrigo, L

    2011-09-01

    Gluten sensitivity is a systemic autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals on ingesting gluten. It can appear at any age, then becoming a permanent condition. It is more frequent in women, as happens with other autoimmune diseases. Celiac disease is the intestinal form and the most important manifestation among a set of gluten-induced autoimmune pathologies that affect different systems. Neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity, with or without enteropathy, are also frequent, their pathogenesis including an immunological attack on the central and peripheral nervous tissue accompanied by neurodegenerative changes. The clinical manifestations are varied, but the most common syndromes are cerebellar ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. Finally, gluten sensitivity is associated to a varying degree, with other complex diseases and could influence their evolution. The early detection of cases of gluten sensitivity with neurological manifestations and subsequent treatment with the gluten-free diet could provide remarkable benefits to the patients.

  14. The neurology of aretaeus: radix pedis neurologia.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2013-01-01

    Aretaeus (Aretaios) was a physician born in Cappadocia in about the 2nd century AD, a student of medicine and physician in Alexandria. His works are found in eight books which espoused the physiological and pathological views of the Hippocratic principles derived from the pneumatists and the eclectic schools. Though he has been called the forgotten physician, it has been said that: 'after Hippocrates no single Greek author has equalled Aretaios'. In order to give an indication of his neurological legacy, this paper offers a summary of and quotations from his principal neurological contributions: migraine, vertigo, tetanus, epilepsy, melancholia, strokes and paralysis. One of his most important discoveries was the notion that the pyramidal tract decussates.

  15. Emergency neurological care of strokes and bleeds

    PubMed Central

    Birenbaum, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and brain hemorrhage are common and challenging problems faced by emergency physicians. In this article, important details in the diagnosis and clinical management of these neurological emergencies are presented with the following goals: 1) To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the approach to the identification and management of patients who have sustained ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes; 2) to explain the importance and application of commonly used national stroke scoring and outcome scales; 3) to improve the ability to recognize important aspects in the approach and comprehensive treatment of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms; and 4) to demonstrate the difficulties in the neurological, neurosurgical, and endovascular treatment of these catastrophic diseases. PMID:20165722

  16. Astrogliopathology in neurological, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Astroglial cells represent a main element in the maintenance of homeostasis and providing defense to the brain. Consequently, their dysfunction underlies many, if not all, neurological, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. General astrogliopathy is evident in diametrically opposing morpho-functional changes in astrocytes, i.e. their hypertrophy along with reactivity or atrophy with asthenia. Neurological disorders with astroglial participation can be genetic, of which Alexander disease is a primary sporadic astrogliopathy, environmentally caused, such as heavy metal encephalopathies, or neurodevelopmental in origin. Astroglia also play a role in major neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from schizophrenia to depression, as well as in additive disorders. Furthermore, astroglia contribute to neurodegenerative processes seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. PMID:25843667

  17. Protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Farooqui, Tahira; Koh, Hwee-Ling; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide (NO) production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) including β-amyloid (Aβ) formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis are presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in neurological disorders. PMID:26236231

  18. Psychiatry and neurology: from dualism to integration.

    PubMed

    Sobański, Jerzy A; Dudek, Dominika

    2013-01-01

    The two objectives of the following paper are: to make few remarks on the topic absorbing neurologists, psychiatrists, and neuropsychiatrists - integration and division of their specialties; and to describe the situation in Poland, reflected in the latest literature. The authors describe the former and present processes of approaches and divisions in psychiatry and neurology. They indicate dissemination of mutual methods of structural and action brain neuroimaging, neurophysiology, neurogenetics, and advanced neurophysiology diagnostics. As it seems, even the effectiveness of psychotherapy, has recently been associated with changes in brain in functional and even structural markers. The authors indicate the value of the strive to join the still divided specialties, reflected worldwide in attempts of common education and clinical cooperation of physicians. It can be expected that subsequent years will bring further triumphs of neuropsychiatry - a field that combines psychiatry and neurology.

  19. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual’s molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  20. [Bioethics in Russian neurology and epileptology].

    PubMed

    Mikhalovska-Karlova, E P

    2016-01-01

    Historical roots and further development of bioethics in domestic neurology and epileptology are considered. The main bioethical principles were established during the formation of the Russian clinical school and neurosciences. It is most distinctly seen in the development of bioethics in neurology and epileptology. In the author's opinion, the Russian scientist V.M. Bekhterev had played a prominent role in the field. In the time when the term "bioethics" was not coined and its principles were not formulated, V.M. Bekhterev had created the Russian league against epilepsy and established the foundations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) as the organizations working on the problems of medical and social care to patients with epilepsy. In Russia, the Russian society of neurologists has been doing a great work in the field.