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Sample records for transmembrane helix structure

  1. Helix packing in polytopic membrane proteins: role of glycine in transmembrane helix association.

    PubMed Central

    Javadpour, M M; Eilers, M; Groesbeek, M; Smith, S O

    1999-01-01

    The nature and distribution of amino acids in the helix interfaces of four polytopic membrane proteins (cytochrome c oxidase, bacteriorhodopsin, the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and the potassium channel of Streptomyces lividans) are studied to address the role of glycine in transmembrane helix packing. In contrast to soluble proteins where glycine is a noted helix breaker, the backbone dihedral angles of glycine in transmembrane helices largely fall in the standard alpha-helical region of a Ramachandran plot. An analysis of helix packing reveals that glycine residues in the transmembrane region of these proteins are predominantly oriented toward helix-helix interfaces and have a high occurrence at helix crossing points. Moreover, packing voids are generally not formed at the position of glycine in folded protein structures. This suggests that transmembrane glycine residues mediate helix-helix interactions in polytopic membrane proteins in a fashion similar to that seen in oligomers of membrane proteins with single membrane-spanning helices. The picture that emerges is one where glycine residues serve as molecular notches for orienting multiple helices in a folded protein complex. PMID:10465772

  2. Bilayer mechanical properties regulate transmembrane helix mobility and enzymatic state of CD39†

    PubMed Central

    Grinthal, Alison; Guidotti, Guido

    2008-01-01

    CD39 can exist in at least two distinct functional states depending on the presence and intact membrane integration of its two transmembrane helices. In native membranes, the transmembrane helices undergo dynamic rotational motions that are required for enzymatic activity and are regulated by substrate binding. In the present study we show that bilayer mechanical properties regulate conversion between the two enzymatic functional states by modulating transmembrane helix dynamics. Alteration of membrane properties by insertion of cone shaped or inverse cone shaped amphiphiles or by cholesterol removal switches CD39 to the same enzymatic state as does removing or solubilizing the transmembrane domains. The same membrane alterations increase the propensity of both transmembrane helices to rotate within the packed structure, resulting in a structure with greater mobility but not an altered primary conformation. Membrane alteration also abolishes the ability of substrate to stabilize the helices in their primary conformation, indicating a loss of coupling between substrate binding and transmembrane helix dynamics. Removal of either transmembrane helix mimics the effect of membrane alteration on the mobility and substrate sensitivity of the remaining helix, suggesting that the ends of the extracellular domain have intrinsic flexibility. We suggest that a mechanical bilayer property, potentially elasticity, regulates CD39 by altering the balance between stability and flexibility of its transmembrane helices and, in turn, of its active site. PMID:17198399

  3. Multiple site-specific infrared dichroism of CD3-zeta, a transmembrane helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jaume; Briggs, John A G; Arkin, Isaiah T

    2002-02-15

    The structure of the transmembrane domain of CD3-zeta a component of the T-cell receptor involved in signal transduction, has been studied in its native state (a lipid bilayer) by multiple site-specific infrared dichroism. For the first time, the transmembrane domain has been labelled at multiple positions along the sequence, representing a total of 11 samples, each labelled at a different residue with an isotopically modified carbonyl group, (13)C [double bond] (18)O. A strategy is outlined that, based on the above data, can yield the rotational orientation and the local helix tilt for each labelled residue, giving a detailed description of helix geometry. The results obtained indicate that the transmembrane segment is in an alpha-helical conformation throughout, with an average helix tilt of 12 degrees. The N-terminal side of the helix is more tilted than the C-terminal. In an accompanying paper we describe the implementation of the infrared data in a model-building study of the CD3-zeta transmembrane complex. The model obtained is entirely consistent with results based on evolutionary conservation data. Taken together, this study represents the first step towards elucidation of the backbone structure of a transmembrane alpha-helical bundle by infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Val-->Ala mutations selectively alter helix-helix packing in the transmembrane segment of phage M13 coat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Deber, C M; Khan, A R; Li, Z; Joensson, C; Glibowicka, M; Wang, J

    1993-01-01

    Val-->Ala mutations within the effective transmembrane segment of a model single-spanning membrane protein, the 50-residue major coat (gene VIII) protein of bacteriophage M13, are shown to have sequence-dependent impacts on stabilization of membrane-embedded helical dimeric structures. Randomized mutagenesis performed on the coat protein hydrophobic segment 21-39 (YIGYAWAMV-VVIVGATIGI) produced a library of viable mutants which included those in which each of the four valine residues was replaced by an alanine residue. Significant variations found among these Val-->Ala mutants in the relative populations and thermal stabilities of monomeric and dimeric helical species observed on SDS/PAGE, and in the range of their alpha-helix-->beta-sheet transition temperatures confirmed that intramembranous valine residues are not simply universal contributors to membrane anchoring. Additional analyses of (i) nonmutatable sites in the mutant protein library, (ii) the properties of the double mutant V29A-V31A obtained by recycling mutant V31A DNA through mutagenesis procedures, and (iii) energy-minimized helical dimer structures of wild-type and mutant V31A transmembrane regions indicated that the transmembrane hydrophobic core helix of the M13 coat protein can be partitioned into alternating pairs of potential protein-interactive residues (V30, V31; G34, A35; G38, I39) and membrane-interactive residues (M28, V29; I32, V33; T36, I37). The overall results consitute an experimental approach to categorizing the distinctive contributions to structure of the residues comprising a protein-protein packing interface vs. those facing lipid and confirm the sequence-dependent capacity of specific residues within the transmembrane domain to modulate protein-protein interactions which underlie regulatory events in membrane proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8265602

  5. Detergent properties influence the stability of the glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer in lysophosphatidylcholine micelles.

    PubMed

    Stangl, Michael; Veerappan, Anbazhagan; Kroeger, Anja; Vogel, Peter; Schneider, Dirk

    2012-12-19

    Detergents might affect membrane protein structures by promoting intramolecular interactions that are different from those found in native membrane bilayers, and fine-tuning detergent properties can be crucial for obtaining structural information of intact and functional transmembrane proteins. To systematically investigate the influence of the detergent concentration and acyl-chain length on the stability of a transmembrane protein structure, the stability of the human glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimer has been analyzed in lyso-phosphatidylcholine micelles of different acyl-chain length. While our results indicate that the transmembrane protein is destabilized in detergents with increasing chain-length, the diameter of the hydrophobic micelle core was found to be less crucial. Thus, hydrophobic mismatch appears to be less important in detergent micelles than in lipid bilayers and individual detergent molecules appear to be able to stretch within a micelle to match the hydrophobic thickness of the peptide. However, the stability of the GpA TM helix dimer linearly depends on the aggregation number of the lyso-PC detergents, indicating that not only is the chemistry of the detergent headgroup and acyl-chain region central for classifying a detergent as harsh or mild, but the detergent aggregation number might also be important.

  6. De novo design of transmembrane helix-helix interactions and measurement of stability in a biological membrane.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Notman, Rebecca; Dixon, Ann M

    2015-05-01

    Membrane proteins regulate a large number of cellular functions, and have great potential as tools for manipulation of biological systems. Developing these tools requires a robust and quantitative understanding of membrane protein folding and interactions within the bilayer. With this in mind, we have designed a series of proteins to probe the net thermodynamic contribution of well-known sequence motifs to transmembrane helix-helix association in a biological membrane. The proteins were designed from first principles (de novo) using current knowledge about membrane insertion and stabilizing interaction motifs. A simple poly-Leu "scaffold" was decorated with individual helix interaction motifs (G-XXX-G, polar residues, heptad repeat) to create transmembrane helix-helix interactions of increasing strength. The GALLEX assay, an in vivo assay for measurement of transmembrane helix self-association, was combined with computational methods to characterize the relative strength and mode of interaction for each sequence. In addition, the apparent free energy contribution (ΔΔGapp) of each motif to transmembrane helix self-association was measured in a biological membrane, results that are the first of their kind for these de novo designed sequences, and suggest that the free energy barrier to overcoming weak association is quite small (<1.4 kcal mol(-1)) in a natural membrane. By quantifying and rationalizing the contribution of key motifs to transmembrane helix association, our work offers a route to direct the design of novel sequences for use in biotechnology or synthetic biology (e.g. molecular switches) and to predict the effects of sequence modification in known transmembrane domains (for control of cellular processes).

  7. Combined approaches of EPR and NMR illustrate only one transmembrane helix in the human IFITM3

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Shenglong; Zhang, Chengwei; Wang, Wei; Cai, Xiaoying; Yu, Lu; Wu, Fangming; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane protein IFITM3 was known to restrict the entry of a wide spectrum of viruses to the cytosol of the host. The mechanism used by the protein to restrict viral entry is unclear given the unavailability of the membrane topology and structures of the IFITM family proteins. Systematic site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of IFITM3 in detergent micelles identified a single, long transmembrane helix in the C-terminus and an intramembrane segment in the N-terminal hydrophobic region. Solution NMR studies of the same sample verified the secondary structure distribution and demonstrated two rigid regions interacting with the micellar surface. The resulting membrane topology of IFITM3 supports the mechanism of an enhanced restricted membrane hemi-fusion. PMID:27046158

  8. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  9. On the distribution of amino acid residues in transmembrane alpha-helix bundles.

    PubMed Central

    Samatey, F A; Xu, C; Popot, J L

    1995-01-01

    The periodic distribution of residues in the sequence of 469 putative transmembrane alpha-helices from eukaryotic plasma membrane polytopic proteins has been analyzed with correlation matrices. The method does not involve any a priori assumption about the secondary structure of the segments or about the physicochemical properties of individual amino acid residues. Maximal correlation is observed at 3.6 residues per period, characteristic of alpha-helices. A scale extracted from the data describes the propensity of the various residues to lie on the same or on opposite helix faces. The most polar face of transmembrane helices, presumably that buried in the protein core, shows a strong enrichment in aromatic residues, while residues likely to face the fatty acyl chains of lipids are largely aliphatic. PMID:7753846

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Membranes and a Transmembrane Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tap Ha; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    1999-05-01

    Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1.5-ns length were carried out on fully hydrated patches of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. The simulations were performed using different ensembles and electrostatic conditions: a microcanonical ensemble or constant pressure-temperature ensemble, with or without truncated electrostatic interactions. Calculated properties of the membrane patches from the three different protocols were compared to available data from experiments. These data include the resulting overall geometrical dimensions, the order characteristics of the lipid hydrocarbon chains, as well as various measures of the conformations of the polar head groups. The comparisons indicate that the simulation carried out within the microcanonical ensemble with truncated electrostatic interactions yielded results closest to the experimental data, provided that the initial equilibration phase preceding the production run was sufficiently long. The effects of embedding a non-ideal helical protein domain in the membrane patch were studied with the same MD protocols. This simulation was carried out for 2.5 ns. The protein domain corresponds to the seventh transmembrane segment (TMS7) of the human serotonin 5HT 2Areceptor. The peptide is composed of two α-helical segments linked by a hinge domain around a perturbing Asn-Pro motif that produces at the end of the simulation a kink angle of nearly 80° between the two helices. Several aspects of the TMS7 structure, such as the bending angle, backbone Φ and Ψ torsion angles, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and the overall conformation, were found to be very similar to those determined by NMR for the corresponding transmembrane segment of the tachykinin NK-1 receptor. In general, the simulations were found to yield structural and dynamic characteristics that are in good agreement with experiment. These findings support the application of simulation methods to the study

  11. Transmembrane helix straightening and buckling underlies activation of mechanosensitive and thermosensitive K(2P) channels.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-12-17

    Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K(2P) potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K(2P)4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K(2P) modulation, indicate a means for how the K(2P) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ∼40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel.

  12. Specificity in transmembrane helix–helix interactions can define a hierarchy of stability for sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Karen G.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    The folding, stability, and oligomerization of helical membrane proteins depend in part on a precise set of packing interactions between transmembrane helices. To understand the energetic principles of these helix–helix interactions, we have used alanine-scanning mutagenesis and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation to quantitatively examine the sequence dependence of the glycophorin A transmembrane helix dimerization. In all cases, we found that mutations to alanine at interface positions cost free energy of association. In contrast, mutations to alanine away from the dimer interface showed free energies of association that are insignificantly different from wild-type or are slightly stabilizing. Our study further revealed that the energy of association is not evenly distributed across the interface, but that there are several “hot spots” for interaction including both glycines participating in a GxxxG motif. Inspection of the NMR structure indicates that simple principles of protein–protein interactions can explain the changes in energy that are observed. A comparison of the dimer stability between different hydrophobic environments suggested that the hierarchy of stability for sequence variants is conserved. Together, these findings imply that the protein–protein interaction portion of the overall association energy may be separable from the contributions arising from protein–lipid and lipid–lipid energy terms. This idea is a conceptual simplification of the membrane protein folding problem and has implications for prediction and design. PMID:11724930

  13. Transmembrane Helix Straightening and Buckling Underlies Activation of Mechanosensitive and Thermosensitive K2P Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M.; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A.; Minor, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K2P potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K2P4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K2P modulation, indicate a means for how the K2P C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ~40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel. PMID:25500157

  14. Transport of lipophilic carboxylates is mediated by transmembrane helix 2 in multidrug transporter AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Christine; Tam, Heng-Keat; Pos, Klaas M.

    2016-01-01

    The deployment of multidrug efflux pumps is a powerful defence mechanism for Gram-negative bacterial cells when exposed to antimicrobial agents. The major multidrug efflux transport system in Escherichia coli, AcrAB–TolC, is a tripartite system using the proton-motive force as an energy source. The polyspecific substrate-binding module AcrB uses various pathways to sequester drugs from the periplasm and outer leaflet of the inner membrane. Here we report the asymmetric AcrB structure in complex with fusidic acid at a resolution of 2.5 Å and mutational analysis of the putative fusidic acid binding site at the transmembrane domain. A groove shaped by the interface between transmembrane helix 1 (TM1) and TM2 specifically binds fusidic acid and other lipophilic carboxylated drugs. We propose that these bound drugs are actively displaced by an upward movement of TM2 towards the AcrB periplasmic porter domain in response to protonation events in the transmembrane domain. PMID:27982032

  15. The Cα—H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bond: A determinant of stability and specificity in transmembrane helix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Senes, Alessandro; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Engelman, Donald M.

    2001-01-01

    The Cα—H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bond has been given little attention as a determinant of transmembrane helix association. Stimulated by recent calculations suggesting that such bonds can be much stronger than has been supposed, we have analyzed 11 known membrane protein structures and found that apparent carbon α hydrogen bonds cluster frequently at glycine-, serine-, and threonine-rich packing interfaces between transmembrane helices. Parallel right-handed helix–helix interactions appear to favor Cα—H⋅⋅⋅O bond formation. In particular, Cα—H⋅⋅⋅O interactions are frequent between helices having the structural motif of the glycophorin A dimer and the GxxxG pair. We suggest that Cα—H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds are important determinants of stability and, depending on packing, specificity in membrane protein folding. PMID:11481472

  16. The positive inside rule is stronger when followed by a transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Virkki, Minttu T; Peters, Christoph; Nilsson, Daniel; Sörensen, Therese; Cristobal, Susana; Wallner, Björn; Elofsson, Arne

    2014-08-12

    The translocon recognizes transmembrane helices with sufficient level of hydrophobicity and inserts them into the membrane. However, sometimes less hydrophobic helices are also recognized. Positive inside rule, orientational preferences of and specific interactions with neighboring helices have been shown to aid in the recognition of these helices, at least in artificial systems. To better understand how the translocon inserts marginally hydrophobic helices, we studied three naturally occurring marginally hydrophobic helices, which were previously shown to require the subsequent helix for efficient translocon recognition. We find no evidence for specific interactions when we scan all residues in the subsequent helices. Instead, we identify arginines located at the N-terminal part of the subsequent helices that are crucial for the recognition of the marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices, indicating that the positive inside rule is important. However, in two of the constructs, these arginines do not aid in the recognition without the rest of the subsequent helix; that is, the positive inside rule alone is not sufficient. Instead, the improved recognition of marginally hydrophobic helices can here be explained as follows: the positive inside rule provides an orientational preference of the subsequent helix, which in turn allows the marginally hydrophobic helix to be inserted; that is, the effect of the positive inside rule is stronger if positively charged residues are followed by a transmembrane helix. Such a mechanism obviously cannot aid C-terminal helices, and consequently, we find that the terminal helices in multi-spanning membrane proteins are more hydrophobic than internal helices.

  17. Specificity in transmembrane helix-helix interactions mediated by aromatic residues.

    PubMed

    Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Bloch, Itai; Shai, Yechiel

    2007-07-06

    Aromatic residues have been previously shown to mediate the self-assembly of different soluble proteins through pi-pi interactions (McGaughey, G. B., Gagne, M., and Rappe, A. K. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 15458-15463). However, their role in transmembrane (TM) assembly is not yet clear. In this study, we performed statistical analysis of the frequency of occurrence of aromatic pairs in a bacterial TM data base that provided an initial indication that the appearance of a specific aromatic pattern, Aromatic-XX-Aromatic, is not coincidental, similar to the well characterized QXXS motif. The QXXS motif was previously shown to be both critical and sufficient for stabilizing TM self-assembly. Using the ToxR system, we monitored the dimerization propensities of TM domains that contain mutations of interacting residues to aromatic amino acids and demonstrated that aromatic residues can adequately stabilize self-association. Importantly, we have provided an example of a natural TM domain, the cholera toxin secretion protein EpsM, whose TM self-assembly is mediated by an aromatic motif (WXXW). This is, in fact, the first evidence that aromatic residues are involved in the dimerization of a wild type TM domain. The association mediated by aromatic residues was found to be sensitive to the TM sequence, suggesting that aromatic residue motifs can provide a general means for specificity in TM assembly. Molecular dynamics provided a structural explanation for this backbone sequence sensitivity.

  18. Juxta-terminal Helix Unwinding as a Stabilizing Factor to Modulate the Dynamics of Transmembrane Helices.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Armin; Rajagopalan, Venkatesan; Sparks, Kelsey A; Greathouse, Denise V; Koeppe, Roger E

    2016-03-15

    Transmembrane helices of integral membrane proteins often are flanked by interfacial aromatic residues that can serve as anchors to aid the stabilization of a tilted transmembrane orientation. Yet, physical factors that govern the orientation or dynamic averaging of individual transmembrane helices are not well understood and have not been adequately explained. Using solid-state (2) H NMR spectroscopy to examine lipid bilayer-incorporated model peptides of the GWALP23 (acetyl-GGALW(LA)6 LWLAGA-amide) family, we observed substantial unwinding at the terminals of several tilted helices spanning the membranes of DLPC, DMPC, or DOPC lipid bilayers. The fraying of helix ends might be vital for defining the dynamics and orientations of transmembrane helices in lipid bilayer membranes.

  19. Glycine 105 as Pivot for a Critical Knee-like Joint between Cytoplasmic and Transmembrane Segments of the Second Transmembrane Helix in Ca2+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Daiho, Takashi; Yamasaki, Kazuo; Danko, Stefania; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-18

    The cytoplasmic actuator domain of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase undergoes large rotational movements that influence the distant transmembrane transport sites, and a long second transmembrane helix (M2) connected with this domain plays critical roles in transmitting motions between the cytoplasmic catalytic domains and transport sites. Here we explore possible structural roles of Gly(105) between the cytoplasmic (M2c) and transmembrane (M2m) segments of M2 by introducing mutations that limit/increase conformational freedom. Alanine substitution G105A markedly retards isomerization of the phosphoenzyme intermediate (E1PCa2 → E2PCa2 → E2P + 2Ca(2+)), and disrupts Ca(2+) occlusion in E1PCa2 and E2PCa2 at the transport sites uncoupling ATP hydrolysis and Ca(2+) transport. In contrast, this substitution accelerates the ATPase activation (E2 → E1Ca2). Introducing a glycine by substituting another residue on M2 in the G105A mutant (i.e. "G-shift substitution") identifies the glycine positions required for proper Ca(2+) handling and kinetics in each step. All wild-type kinetic properties, including coupled transport, are fully restored in the G-shift substitution at position 112 (G105A/A112G) located on the same side of the M2c helix as Gly(105) facing M4/phosphorylation domain. Results demonstrate that Gly(105) functions as a flexible knee-like joint during the Ca(2+) transport cycle, so that cytoplasmic domain motions can bend and strain M2 in the correct direction or straighten the helix for proper gating and coupling of Ca(2+) transport and ATP hydrolysis.

  20. Role of the Fourth Transmembrane α Helix in the Allosteric Modulation of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Carswell, Casey L; Hénault, Camille M; Murlidaran, Sruthi; Therien, J P Daniel; Juranka, Peter F; Surujballi, Julian A; Brannigan, Grace; Baenziger, John E

    2015-09-01

    The gating of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels is sensitive to a variety of allosteric modulators that act on structures peripheral to those involved in the allosteric pathway leading from the agonist site to the channel gate. One such structure, the lipid-exposed transmembrane α helix, M4, is the target of lipids, neurosteroids, and disease-causing mutations. Here we show that M4 interactions with the adjacent transmembrane α helices, M1 and M3, modulate pLGIC function. Enhanced M4 interactions promote channel function while ineffective interactions reduce channel function. The interface chemistry governs the intrinsic strength of M4-M1/M3 inter-helical interactions, both influencing channel gating and imparting distinct susceptibilities to the potentiating effects of a lipid-facing M4 congenital myasthenic syndrome mutation. Through aromatic substitutions, functional studies, and molecular dynamics simulations, we elucidate a mechanism by which M4 modulates channel function.

  1. Transmembrane Helix Association Affinity Can Be Modulated by Flanking and Noninterfacial Residues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinming; Lazaridis, Themis

    2009-01-01

    The GxxxG sequence motif mediates the association of transmembrane (TM) helices by providing a site of close contact between them. However, it is not sufficient for strong association. For example, both bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) and human erythrocyte protein glycophorin A (GpA) contain a GxxxG motif in their TM domains and form a homodimer, but the association affinity of MCP, measured by the ToxCAT in vivo assay, is dramatically weaker than that of GpA. Even when all interfacial residues of MCP were substituted for those of GpA (MCP-GpA), association remained significantly weaker than in GpA. Here we provide an explanation for these experimental observations using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane (IMM1-GC). The association free energies of GpA29 (GpA with 29 residues all from the wild-type sequence), GpA15p11 (GpA with 15 residues from the wild-type sequence plus 11 flanking residues from the ToxCAT construct), MCP, and MCP-GpA TM helices were calculated and compared. MCP and MCP-GpA have the same flanking residues used in the ToxCAT assay as those in GpA15p11, but the position of the flanking residues relative to the GxxxG motif is different. The calculated association free energies follow experimental observations: the association affinity of MCP-GpA falls between those of GpA15p11 and MCP wild-type. MCP exhibits an equally strong interhelical interaction in the TM domain. A major reason for the weaker association of MCP in the calculations was the noninterfacial residue Lys-40, which in the dimer structure is forced to be buried in the membrane interior. To alleviate the desolvation cost, in MCP and MCP-GpA dimers, Lys-40 gets deprotonated. A second factor that modulates association affinity is the flanking residues. Thanks to them, GpA15p11 exhibits a much stronger association affinity than GpA29. The positioning of the flanking residues is also important, as evidenced by the difference in association affinity between

  2. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  3. Modulation of the oligomerization of myelin proteolipid protein by transmembrane helix interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2010-08-17

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is a highly hydrophobic 276-residue integral membrane protein that constitutes more than 50% of the total protein in central nervous system myelin. Previous studies have shown that this protein exists in myelin as an oligomer rather than as a monomer, and mutations in PLP that lead to neurological disorders such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and spastic paraplegia type 2 have been reported to affect its normal oligomerization. Here we employ peptide-based and in vivo approaches to examine the role of the TM domain in the formation of PLP quaternary structure through homo-oligomeric helix-helix interactions. Focusing on the TM4 alpha-helix (sequence (239)FIAAFVGAAATLVSLLTFMIAATY(262)), the site of several disease-causing point mutations that involve putative small residue helix-helix interaction motifs in the TM4 sequence, we used SDS-PAGE, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, size-exclusion chromatography, and TOXCAT assays in an Escherichia coli membrane to show that the PLP TM4 helix readily assembles into varying oligomeric states. In addition, through targeted studies of the PLP TM4 alpha-helix with point mutations that selectively eliminate these small residue motifs via substitution of Gly, Ala, or Ser residues with Ile residues, we describe a potential mechanism through which disease-causing point mutations can lead to aberrant PLP assembly. The overall results suggest that TM segments in misfolded PLP monomers that expose and/or create surface-exposed helix-helix interaction sites that are normally masked may have consequences for disease.

  4. Intermonomer hydrogen bonds enhance GxxxG-driven dimerization of the BNIP3 transmembrane domain: roles for sequence context in helix-helix association in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lawrie, Charles M.; Sulistijo, Endah S.; MacKenzie, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the sequence dependence of human BNIP3 transmembrane domain dimerization using the biological assay TOXCAT. Mutants in which intermonomer hydrogen bonds between Ser 172 and His 173 are abolished show moderate interaction, indicating that side chain hydrogen bonds contribute to dimer stability but are not essential to dimerization. Mutants in which a GxxxG motif composed of Gly 180 and Gly 184 has been abolished show little or no interaction, demonstrating the critical nature of the GxxxG motif to BNIP3 dimerization. These findings show that side chain hydrogen bonds can enhance the intrinsic dimerization of a GxxxG motif and that sequence context can control how hydrogen bonds influence helix-helix interactions in membranes. The dimer interface mapped by TOXCAT mutagenesis agrees closely with the interfaces observed in the NMR structure and inferred from mutational analysis of dimerization on SDS-PAGE, showing that the native dimer structure is retained in detergents. We show that TOXCAT and SDS-PAGE give complementary and consistent information about BNIP3 TMD dimerization: TOXCAT is insensitive to mutations that have modest effects on self-association in detergents but readily discriminates among mutations that completely disrupt detergent-resistant dimerization. The close agreement between conclusions reached from TOXCAT and SDS-PAGE data for BNIP3 suggests that accurate estimates of the relative effects of mutations on native state protein-protein interactions can be obtained even when the detergent environment is strongly disruptive. PMID:20026130

  5. TOXCAT: A measure of transmembrane helix association in a biological membrane

    PubMed Central

    Russ, William P.; Engelman, Donald M.

    1999-01-01

    The noncovalent association of transmembrane α-helices is a fundamental event in the folding of helical membrane proteins. In this work, a system (TOXCAT) is developed for the study of transmembrane helix–helix oligomerization in a natural membrane environment. This assay uses a chimeric construct composed of the N-terminal DNA binding domain of ToxR (a dimerization-dependent transcriptional activator) fused to a transmembrane domain (tm) of interest and a monomeric periplasmic anchor (the maltose binding protein). Association of the tms results in the ToxR-mediated activation of a reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). The level of CAT expression indicates the strength of tm association. The assay distinguishes between a known dimerizing tm and a mutant in which dimerization is disrupted. In addition, modulation of the chimera concentration shows that the dimerization exhibits concentration dependence in membranes. TOXCAT also is used to select oligomeric tms from a library of randomized sequences, demonstrating the potential of this system to reveal novel oligomerization motifs. The TOXCAT system has been used to investigate glycophorin A tm-mediated dimerization. Although the overall sensitivity of glycophorin A tm dimerization to mutagenesis is found to be similar in membranes and in detergent micelles, several significant differences exist. Mutations to polar residues, which are generally disruptive in SDS, exhibit sequence specificity in membranes, demonstrating both the limitations of detergent micelles and the wider range of application of the TOXCAT system. PMID:9927659

  6. Polar substitutions in helix 3 of the prion protein produce transmembrane isoforms that disturb vesicle trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; Arbelaez, Daniela; Jensen, Kurt; Rincon-Limas, Diego E.; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases encompass a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrP) isoforms. Other conformational variants of PrP have also been proposed to contribute to neurotoxicity in prion diseases, including misfolded intermediates as well as cytosolic and transmembrane isoforms. To better understand PrP neurotoxicity, we analyzed the role of two highly conserved methionines in helix 3 on PrP biogenesis, folding and pathogenesis. Expression of the PrP-M205S and -M205,212S mutants in Drosophila led to hyperglycosylation, intracellular accumulation and widespread conformational changes due to failure of oxidative folding. Surprisingly, PrP-M205S and -M205,212S acquired a transmembrane topology (Ctm) previously linked to mutations in the signal peptide (SP) and the transmembrane domain (TMD). PrP-M205,212S also disrupted the accumulation of key neurodevelopmental proteins in lipid rafts, resulting in shortened axonal projections. These results uncover a new role for the hydrophobic domain in promoting oxidative folding and preventing the formation of neurotoxic Ctm PrP, mechanisms that may be relevant in the pathogenesis of both inherited and sporadic prion diseases. PMID:23771030

  7. Polar substitutions in helix 3 of the prion protein produce transmembrane isoforms that disturb vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Jonatan; Arbelaez, Daniela; Jensen, Kurt; Rincon-Limas, Diego E; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Prion diseases encompass a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrP) isoforms. Other conformational variants of PrP have also been proposed to contribute to neurotoxicity in prion diseases, including misfolded intermediates as well as cytosolic and transmembrane isoforms. To better understand PrP neurotoxicity, we analyzed the role of two highly conserved methionines in helix 3 on PrP biogenesis, folding and pathogenesis. Expression of the PrP-M205S and -M205,212S mutants in Drosophila led to hyperglycosylation, intracellular accumulation and widespread conformational changes due to failure of oxidative folding. Surprisingly, PrP-M205S and -M205,212S acquired a transmembrane topology (Ctm) previously linked to mutations in the signal peptide (SP) and the transmembrane domain (TMD). PrP-M205,212S also disrupted the accumulation of key neurodevelopmental proteins in lipid rafts, resulting in shortened axonal projections. These results uncover a new role for the hydrophobic domain in promoting oxidative folding and preventing the formation of neurotoxic Ctm PrP, mechanisms that may be relevant in the pathogenesis of both inherited and sporadic prion diseases.

  8. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  9. Coupling of Transmembrane Helix Orientation To Membrane Release of the Juxtamembrane Region in FGFR3

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the protein tyrosine kinase receptors requires the coupling of ligand binding to a change in both the proximity and orientation of the single transmembrane (TM) helices of receptor monomers to allow transphosphorylation of the receptor kinase domain. We make use of peptides corresponding to the TM and juxtamembrane (JM) regions of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 to assess how mutations in the TM region (G380R and A391E), which lead to receptor activation, influence the orientation of the TM domain and interactions of the intracellular JM sequence with the membrane surface. On the basis of fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we find that both activating mutations change the TM helix tilt angle relative to the membrane normal and release the JM region from the membrane. These results suggest a general mechanism regarding how the TM–JM region functionally bridges the extracellular and intracellular regions for these receptors. PMID:25010350

  10. Structure of the integrin beta3 transmembrane segment in phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Lau, Tong-Lay; Partridge, Anthony W; Ginsberg, Mark H; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2008-04-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors transduce bidirectional signals across the plasma membrane, with the integrin transmembrane domains acting as conduits in this process. Here, we report the first high-resolution structure of an integrin transmembrane domain. To assess the influence of the membrane model system, structure determinations of the beta3 integrin transmembrane segment and flanking sequences were carried out in both phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles. In bicelles, a 30-residue linear alpha-helix, encompassing residues I693-H772, is adopted, of which I693-I721 appear embedded in the hydrophobic bicelle core. This relatively long transmembrane helix implies a pronounced helix tilt within a typical lipid bilayer, which facilitates the snorkeling of K716's charged side chain out of the lipid core while simultaneously immersing hydrophobic L717-I721 in the membrane. A shortening of bicelle lipid hydrocarbon tails does not lead to the transfer of L717-I721 into the aqueous phase, suggesting that the reported embedding represents the preferred beta3 state. The nature of the lipid headgroup affected only the intracellular part of the transmembrane helix, indicating that an asymmetric lipid distribution is not required for studying the beta3 transmembrane segment. In the micelle, residues L717-I721 are also embedded but deviate from linear alpha-helical conformation in contrast to I693-K716, which closely resemble the bicelle structure.

  11. The aromatic residues Trp and Phe have different effects on the positioning of a transmembrane helix in the microsomal membrane.

    PubMed

    Braun, P; von Heijne, G

    1999-07-27

    We have examined the effect of Trp and Phe residues on the positioning of a poly-Leu transmembrane helix relative to the microsomal membrane by employing a previously described "glycosylation mapping" technique [Nilsson, I. M., Sääf, A., Whitley, P., Gafvelin, G., Waller, C., and von Heijne, G. (1998) J. Mol. Biol. 284, 1165-1175]. Both Trp and Phe tend to push the transmembrane helix into the membrane when inserted in positions flanking the poly-Leu stretch, and Trp (but not Phe) pulls the transmembrane helix toward the lipid-water interface when inserted inside the poly-Leu segment. Thus, the preference of Trp for the lipid-water interface previously suggested on the basis of biophysical studies of model peptides can also be observed for a bona fide transmembrane helix in a biological membrane. We further show that a sufficiently long poly-Trp segment functions as an efficient stop-transfer sequence during protein translocation across the microsomal membrane, despite the preference of Trp residues for the lipid-water interface region.

  12. The collagen triple-helix structure.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, B; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances, principally through the study of peptide models, have led to an enhanced understanding of the structure and function of the collagen triple helix. In particular, the first crystal structure has clearly shown the highly ordered hydration network critical for stabilizing both the molecular conformation and the interactions between triple helices. The sequence dependent nature of the conformational features is also under active investigation by NMR and other techniques. The triple-helix motif has now been identified in proteins other than collagens, and it has been established as being important in many specific biological interactions as well as being a structural element. The nature of recognition and the degree of specificity for interactions involving triple helices may differ from globular proteins. Triple-helix binding domains consist of linear sequences along the helix, making them amenable to characterization by simple model peptides. The application of structural techniques to such model peptides can serve to clarify the interactions involved in triple-helix recognition and binding and can help explain the varying impact of different structural alterations found in mutant collagens in diseased states.

  13. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  14. Location and dynamics of tryptophan in transmembrane alpha-helix peptides: a fluorescence and circular dichroism study.

    PubMed

    de Foresta, Béatrice; Tortech, Ludovic; Vincent, Michel; Gallay, Jacques

    2002-06-01

    Amphiphilic and hydrophobic peptides play a key role in many biological processes. We have developed a reference system for evaluating the insertion of such peptides bearing Trp fluorescent reporter groups into membrane mimetic systems. This system involves a set of six 25-amino acid synthetic peptides that are models of transmembrane alpha-helices. They are Lys-flanked polyLeu sequences, each containing a single Trp residue at a different position (P i, with i=3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13). These peptides were inserted into micelles of a non-ionic detergent, dodecylmaltoside (DM). We analyzed this system by use of circular dichroism and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in combination with Trp quenching with two brominated DM analogs. We found significant variations in the Trp emission maximum according to its position in each peptide (from 327 to 313 nm). This is consistent with the radial insertion of the peptides within DM micelles. We observed characteristic patterns of fluorescence quenching of these peptides in mixed micelles of DM, with either 7,8-dibromododecylmaltoside (BrDM) or 10,11-dibromoundecanoylmaltoside (BrUM), that reflect differences in the accessibility of the Trp residue to the bromine atoms located on the detergent acyl chain. In the isotropic reference solvent, methanol, the alpha-helix content was high and identical (approximately 76%) for all peptides. In DM micelles, the alpha-helix content for P9 to P13 was similar to that in methanol, but slightly lower for P3 to P7. The fluorescence intensity decays were heterogeneous and depended upon the position of the Trp. The Trp dynamics of each peptide are described by sub-nanosecond and nanosecond rotational motions that were significantly lower than those observed in methanol. These results, which precisely describe structural, dynamic and microenvironment parameters of peptide Trp in micelles according to its depth, should be useful for describing the interactions of peptides of biological

  15. NMR Studies in Dodecylphosphocholine of a Fragment Containing the Seventh Transmembrane Helix of a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neumoin, Alexey; Arshava, Boris; Becker, Jeff; Zerbe, Oliver; Naider, Fred

    2007-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of a large segment of Ste2p, the G-protein-coupled α-factor receptor from yeast, were studied in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles using solution NMR spectroscopy. We investigated the 73-residue peptide EL3-TM7-CT40 consisting of the third extracellular loop 3 (EL3), the seventh transmembrane helix (TM7), and 40 residues from the cytosolic C-terminal domain (CT40). The structure reveals the presence of an α-helix in the segment encompassing residues 10–30, which is perturbed around the internal Pro-24 residue. Root mean-square deviation values of individually superimposed helical segments 10–20 and 25–30 were 0.91 ± 0.33 Å and 0.76 ± 0.37 Å, respectively. 15N-relaxation and residual dipolar coupling data support a rather stable fold for the TM7 part of EL3-TM7-CT40, whereas the EL3 and CT40 segments are more flexible. Spin-label data indicate that the TM7 helix integrates into DPC micelles but is flexible around the internal Pro-24 site, exposing residues 22–26 to solution and reveal a second site of interaction with the micelle within a region comprising residues 43–58, which forms part of a less well-defined nascent helix. These findings are discussed in light of previous studies in organic-aqueous solvent systems. PMID:17449670

  16. Mutations Define Cross-talk between the N-terminal Nucleotide-binding Domain and Transmembrane Helix-2 of the Yeast Multidrug Transporter Pdr5

    PubMed Central

    Sauna, Zuben E.; Bohn, Sherry Supernavage; Rutledge, Robert; Dougherty, Michael P.; Cronin, Susan; May, Leopold; Xia, Di; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Golin, John

    2008-01-01

    The yeast Pdr5 multidrug transporter is an important member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of proteins. We describe a novel mutation (S558Y) in transmembrane helix 2 of Pdr5 identified in a screen for suppressors that eliminated Pdr5-mediated cycloheximide hyper-resistance. Nucleotides as well as transport substrates bind to the mutant Pdr5 with an affinity comparable with that for wild-type Pdr5. Wild-type and mutant Pdr5s show ATPase activity with comparable Km(ATP) values. Nonetheless, drug sensitivity is equivalent in the mutant pdr5 and the pdr5 deletion. Finally, the transport substrate clotrimazole, which is a noncompetitive inhibitor of Pdr5 ATPase activity, has a minimal effect on ATP hydrolysis by the S558Y mutant. These results suggest that the drug sensitivity of the mutant Pdr5 is attributable to the uncoupling of NTPase activity and transport. We screened for amino acid alterations in the nucleotide-binding domains that would reverse the phenotypic effect of the S558Y mutation. A second-site mutation, N242K, located between the Walker A and signature motifs of the N-terminal nucleotide-binding domain, restores significant function. This region of the nucleotide-binding domain interacts with the transmembrane domains via the intracellular loop-1 (which connects transmembrane helices 2 and 3) in the crystal structure of Sav1866, a bacterial ATP-binding cassette drug transporter. These structural studies are supported by biochemical and genetic evidence presented here that interactions between transmembrane helix 2 and the nucleotide-binding domain, via the intracellular loop-1, may define at least part of the translocation pathway for coupling ATP hydrolysis to drug transport. PMID:18842589

  17. The control of transmembrane helix transverse position in membranes by hydrophilic residues.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Shyam S; London, Erwin

    2007-12-14

    The ability of hydrophilic residues to shift the transverse position of transmembrane (TM) helices within bilayers was studied in model membrane vesicles. Transverse shifts were detected by fluorescence measurements of the membrane depth of a Trp residue at the center of a hydrophobic sequence. They were also estimated from the effective length of the TM-spanning sequence, derived from the stability of the TM configuration under conditions of negative hydrophobic mismatch. Hydrophilic residues (at the fifth position in a 21-residue hydrophobic sequence composed of alternating Leu and Ala residues and flanked on both ends by two Lys) induced transverse shifts that moved the hydrophilic residue closer to the membrane surface. At pH 7, the dependence of the extent of shift upon the identity of the hydrophilic residue increased in the order: L < G approximately = Y approximately = T < R approximately = H < S < P < K < E approximately = Q < N < D. By varying pH, shifts with ionizable residues fully charged or uncharged were measured, and the extent of shift increased in the order: L < G approximately = Y approximately = H(o) approximately = T < E(o) approximately = R < S < P < K+ < Q approximately = D(o) approximately = H+ < N approximately = E- < D-. The dependence of transverse shifts upon hydrophilic residue identity was consistent with the hypothesis that shift magnitude is largely controlled by the combination of side chain hydrophilicity, ionization state, and ability to position polar groups near the bilayer surface (snorkeling). Additional experiments showed that shift was also modulated by the position of the hydrophilic residue in the sequence and the hydrophobicity of the sequence moved out of the bilayer core upon shifting. Combined, these studies show that the insertion boundaries of TM helices are very sensitive to sequence, and can be altered even by weakly hydrophilic residues. Thus, many TM helices may have the capacity to exist in more than one

  18. Progesterone modulation of transmembrane helix-helix interactions between the α-subunit of Na/K-ATPase and phospholipid N-methyltransferase in the oocyte plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Progesterone binding to the surface of the amphibian oocyte initiates the meiotic divisions. Our previous studies with Rana pipiens oocytes indicate that progesterone binds to a plasma membrane site within the external loop between the M1 and M2 helices of the α-subunit of Na/K-ATPase, triggering a cascade of lipid second messengers and the release of the block at meiotic prophase. We have characterized this site, using a low affinity ouabain binding isoform of the α1-subunit. Results Preparations of isolated plasma membranes from Rana oocytes demonstrate that physiological levels of progesterone (or the non-metabolizable progestin R5020) successively activate phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PE-NMT) and sphingomyelin synthase within seconds. Inhibition of PE-NMT blocks the progesterone induction of meiosis in intact oocytes, whereas its initial product, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine (PME), can itself initiate meiosis in the presence of the inhibitor. Published X-ray crystallographic data on Na/K-ATPase, computer-generated 3D projections, heptad repeat analysis and hydrophobic cluster analysis of the transmembrane helices predict that hydrophobic residues L, V, V, I, F and Y of helix M2 of the α1-subunit interact with F, L, G, L, L and F, respectively, of helix M3 of PE-NMT. Conclusion We propose that progesterone binding to the first external loop of the α1-subunit facilitates specific helix-helix interactions between integral membrane proteins to up-regulate PE-NMT, and, that successive interactions between two or more integral plasma membrane proteins induce the signaling cascades which result in completion of the meiotic divisions. PMID:20500835

  19. Structural alignment of RNA with triple helix structure.

    PubMed

    Wong, Thomas K F; Yiu, S M

    2012-04-01

    Structural alignment is useful in identifying members of ncRNAs. Existing tools are all based on the secondary structures of the molecules. There is evidence showing that tertiary interactions (the interaction between a single-stranded nucleotide and a base-pair) in triple helix structures are critical in some functions of ncRNAs. In this article, we address the problem of structural alignment of RNAs with the triple helix. We provide a formal definition to capture a simplified model of a triple helix structure, then develop an algorithm of O(mn(3)) time to align a query sequence (of length m) with known triple helix structure with a target sequence (of length n) with an unknown structure. The resulting algorithm is shown to be useful in identifying ncRNA members in a simulated genome.

  20. Structure-based statistical analysis of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in determination of the high-resolution structure of membrane proteins now enable analysis of the main features of amino acids in transmembrane (TM) segments in comparison with amino acids in water-soluble helices. In this work, we conducted a large-scale analysis of the prevalent locations of amino acids by using a data set of 170 structures of integral membrane proteins obtained from the MPtopo database and 930 structures of water-soluble helical proteins obtained from the protein data bank. Large hydrophobic amino acids (Leu, Val, Ile, and Phe) plus Gly were clearly prevalent in TM helices whereas polar amino acids (Glu, Lys, Asp, Arg, and Gln) were less frequent in this type of helix. The distribution of amino acids along TM helices was also examined. As expected, hydrophobic and slightly polar amino acids are commonly found in the hydrophobic core of the membrane whereas aromatic (Trp and Tyr), Pro, and the hydrophilic amino acids (Asn, His, and Gln) occur more frequently in the interface regions. Charged amino acids are also statistically prevalent outside the hydrophobic core of the membrane, and whereas acidic amino acids are frequently found at both cytoplasmic and extra-cytoplasmic interfaces, basic amino acids cluster at the cytoplasmic interface. These results strongly support the experimentally demonstrated biased distribution of positively charged amino acids (that is, the so-called the positive-inside rule) with structural data.

  1. TSTMP: target selection for structural genomics of human transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    The TSTMP database is designed to help the target selection of human transmembrane proteins for structural genomics projects and structure modeling studies. Currently, there are only 60 known 3D structures among the polytopic human transmembrane proteins and about a further 600 could be modeled using existing structures. Although there are a great number of human transmembrane protein structures left to be determined, surprisingly only a small fraction of these proteins have ‘selected’ (or above) status according to the current version the TargetDB/TargetTrack database. This figure is even worse regarding those transmembrane proteins that would contribute the most to the structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The database was built by sorting out proteins from the human transmembrane proteome with known structure and searching for suitable model structures for the remaining proteins by combining the results of a state-of-the-art transmembrane specific fold recognition algorithm and a sequence similarity search algorithm. Proteins were searched for homologues among the human transmembrane proteins in order to select targets whose successful structure determination would lead to the best structural coverage of the human transmembrane proteome. The pipeline constructed for creating the TSTMP database guarantees to keep the database up-to-date. The database is available at http://tstmp.enzim.ttk.mta.hu. PMID:27924015

  2. Order Parameters of a Transmembrane Helix in a Fluid Bilayer: Case Study of a WALP Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Andrea; Rougier, Léa; Réat, Valérie; Jolibois, Franck; Saurel, Olivier; Czaplicki, Jerzy; Killian, J. Antoinette; Milon, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A new solid-state NMR-based strategy is established for the precise and efficient analysis of orientation and dynamics of transmembrane peptides in fluid bilayers. For this purpose, several dynamically averaged anisotropic constraints, including 13C and 15N chemical shift anisotropies and 13C-15N dipolar couplings, were determined from two different triple-isotope-labeled WALP23 peptides (2H, 13C, and 15N) and combined with previously published quadrupolar splittings of the same peptide. Chemical shift anisotropy tensor orientations were determined with quantum chemistry. The complete set of experimental constraints was analyzed using a generalized, four-parameter dynamic model of the peptide motion, including tilt and rotation angle and two associated order parameters. A tilt angle of 21° was determined for WALP23 in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, which is much larger than the tilt angle of 5.5° previously determined from 2H NMR experiments. This approach provided a realistic value for the tilt angle of WALP23 peptide in the presence of hydrophobic mismatch, and can be applied to any transmembrane helical peptide. The influence of the experimental data set on the solution space is discussed, as are potential sources of error. PMID:20441750

  3. Structure of FGFR3 transmembrane domain dimer: implications for signaling and human pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Goncharuk, Marina V; Hristova, Kalina; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-11-05

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) transduces biochemical signals via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane, and plays an important role in human development and disease. Eight different pathogenic mutations, implicated in cancers and growth disorders, have been identified in the FGFR3 transmembrane segment. Here, we describe the dimerization of the FGFR3 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking DPC/SDS (9/1) micelles. In the solved NMR structure, the two transmembrane helices pack into a symmetric left-handed dimer, with intermolecular stacking interactions occurring in the dimer central region. Some pathogenic mutations fall within the helix-helix interface, whereas others are located within a putative alternative interface. This implies that although the observed dimer structure is important for FGFR3 signaling, the mechanism of FGFR3-mediated transduction across the membrane is complex. We propose an FGFR3 signaling mechanism that is based on the solved structure, available structures of isolated soluble FGFR domains, and published biochemical and biophysical data.

  4. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  5. De novo design of a transmembrane Zn²⁺-transporting four-helix bundle.

    PubMed

    Joh, Nathan H; Wang, Tuo; Bhate, Manasi P; Acharya, Rudresh; Wu, Yibing; Grabe, Michael; Hong, Mei; Grigoryan, Gevorg; DeGrado, William F

    2014-12-19

    The design of functional membrane proteins from first principles represents a grand challenge in chemistry and structural biology. Here, we report the design of a membrane-spanning, four-helical bundle that transports first-row transition metal ions Zn(2+) and Co(2+), but not Ca(2+), across membranes. The conduction path was designed to contain two di-metal binding sites that bind with negative cooperativity. X-ray crystallography and solid-state and solution nuclear magnetic resonance indicate that the overall helical bundle is formed from two tightly interacting pairs of helices, which form individual domains that interact weakly along a more dynamic interface. Vesicle flux experiments show that as Zn(2+) ions diffuse down their concentration gradients, protons are antiported. These experiments illustrate the feasibility of designing membrane proteins with predefined structural and dynamic properties.

  6. A Deep Conditional Random Field Approach to Transmembrane Topology Prediction and Application to GPCR Three-Dimensional Structure Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongjie; Wang, Kun; Lu, Liyao; Xue, Yu; Lyu, Qiang; Jiang, Min

    2016-08-25

    Transmembrane proteins play important roles in cellular energy production, signal transmission, and metabolism. Many shallow machine learning methods have been applied to transmembrane topology prediction, but the performance was limited by the large size of membrane proteins and the complex biological evolution information behind the sequence. In this paper, we proposed a novel deep approach based on conditional random fields named as dCRF-TM for predicting the topology of transmembrane proteins. Conditional random fields take into account more complicated interrelation between residue labels in full-length sequence than HMM and SVM-based methods. Three widely-used datasets were employed in the benchmark. DCRF-TM had the accuracy 95% over helix location prediction and the accuracy 78% over helix number prediction. DCRF-TM demonstrated a more robust performance on large size proteins (>350 residues) against 11 state-of-the-art predictors. Further dCRF-TM was applied to ab initio modeling three-dimensional structures of seven-transmembrane receptors, also known as G protein-coupled receptors. The predictions on 24 solved G protein-coupled receptors and unsolved vasopressin V2 receptor illustrated that dCRF-TM helped abGPCR-I-TASSER to improve TM-score 34.3% rather than using the random transmembrane definition. 2 out of 5 predicted models caught the experimental verified disulfide bond in vasopressin V2 receptor.

  7. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  8. Structural Role of the Conserved Cysteines in the Dimerization of the Viral Transmembrane Oncoprotein E5

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Hoffmann, Silke; Afonin, Sergii; Vollmer, Stefanie; Benamira, Soraya; Langer, Birgid; Bürck, Jochen; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    The E5 oncoprotein is the major transforming protein of bovine papillomavirus type 1. This 44-residue transmembrane protein can interact with the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, leading to ligand-independent activation and cell transformation. For productive interaction, E5 needs to dimerize via a C-terminal pair of cysteines, though a recent study suggested that its truncated transmembrane segment can dimerize on its own. To analyze the structure of the full protein in a membrane environment and elucidate the role of the Cys-Ser-Cys motif, we produced recombinantly the wild-type protein and four cysteine mutants. Comparison by circular dichroism in detergent micelles and lipid vesicular dispersion and by NMR in trifluoroethanol demonstrates that the absence of one or both cysteines does not influence the highly α-helical secondary structure, nor does it impair the ability of E5 to dimerize, observations that are further supported by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We also observed assemblies of higher order. Oriented circular dichroism in lipid bilayers shows that E5 is aligned as a transmembrane helix with a slight tilt angle, and that this membrane alignment is also independent of any cysteines. We conclude that the Cys-containing motif represents a disordered region of the protein that serves as an extra covalent connection for stabilization. PMID:20858420

  9. Structure of the transmembrane region of the M2 protein H+ channel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Kim, Sanguk; Kovacs, Frank; Cross, Timothy A.

    2001-01-01

    The transmembrane domain of the M2 protein from influenza A virus forms a nearly uniform and ideal helix in a liquid crystalline bilayer environment. The exposure of the hydrophilic backbone structure is minimized through uniform hydrogen bond geometry imposed by the low dielectric lipid environment. A high-resolution structure of the monomer backbone and a detailed description of its orientation with respect to the bilayer were achieved using orientational restraints from solid-state NMR. With this unique information, the tetrameric structure of this H+ channel is constrained substantially. Features of numerous published models are discussed in light of the experimental structure of the monomer and derived features of the tetrameric bundle. PMID:11604531

  10. Arginine substitution of a cysteine in transmembrane helix M8 converts Na+,K+-ATPase to an electroneutral pump similar to H+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Holm, Rikke; Khandelwal, Jaanki; Einholm, Anja P; Andersen, Jens P; Artigas, Pablo; Vilsen, Bente

    2017-01-10

    Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and H(+),K(+)-ATPase are electrogenic and nonelectrogenic ion pumps, respectively. The underlying structural basis for this difference has not been established, and it has not been revealed how the H(+),K(+)-ATPase avoids binding of Na(+) at the site corresponding to the Na(+)-specific site of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (site III). In this study, we addressed these questions by using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with enzymatic, transport, and electrophysiological functional measurements. Replacement of the cysteine C932 in transmembrane helix M8 of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with arginine, present in the H(+),K(+)-ATPase at the corresponding position, converted the normal 3Na(+):2K(+):1ATP stoichiometry of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase to electroneutral 2Na(+):2K(+):1ATP stoichiometry similar to the electroneutral transport mode of the H(+),K(+)-ATPase. The electroneutral C932R mutant of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase retained a wild-type-like enzyme turnover rate for ATP hydrolysis and rate of cellular K(+) uptake. Only a relatively minor reduction of apparent Na(+) affinity for activation of phosphorylation from ATP was observed for C932R, whereas replacement of C932 with leucine or phenylalanine, the latter of a size comparable to arginine, led to spectacular reductions of apparent Na(+) affinity without changing the electrogenicity. From these results, in combination with structural considerations, it appears that the guanidine(+) group of the M8 arginine replaces Na(+) at the third site, thus preventing Na(+) binding there, although allowing Na(+) to bind at the two other sites and become transported. Hence, in the H(+),K(+)-ATPase, the ability of the M8 arginine to donate an internal cation binding at the third site is decisive for the electroneutral transport mode of this pump.

  11. Ring Substituents on Substituted Benzamide Ligands Indirectly Mediate Interactions with Position 7.39 of Transmembrane Helix 7 of the D4 Dopamine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Spencer S.; Cummings, David F.; Teer, Michael E.; Amdani, Shahnawaz

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how specific molecular interactions of dopamine receptor ligand classes vary between D2-like dopamine receptor subtypes, a conserved threonine in transmembrane (TM) helix 7 (Thr7.39), implicated as a key ligand interaction site with biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors, was substituted with alanine in D2 and D4 receptors. Interrogation of different ligand chemotypes for sensitivity to this substitution revealed enhanced affinity in the D4, but not the D2 receptor, specifically for substituted benzamides (SBAs) having polar 4- (para) and/or 5- (meta) benzamide ring substituents. D4-T7.39A was fully functional, and the mutation did not alter the sodium-mediated positive and negative allostery observed with SBAs and agonists, respectively. With the exception of the non-SBA ligand (+)-butaclamol, which, in contrast to certain SBAs, had decreased affinity for the D4-T7.39A mutant, the interactions of numerous other ligands were unaffected by this mutation. SBAs were docked into D4 models in the same mode as observed for eticlopride in the D3 crystal structure. In this mode, interactions with TM5 and TM6 residues constrain the SBA ring position that produces distal steric crowding between pyrrolidinyl/diethylamine moieties and D4-Thr7.39. Ligand-residue interaction energy profiles suggest this crowding is mitigated by substitution with a smaller alanine. The profiles indicate sites that contribute to the SBA binding interaction and site-specific energy changes imparted by the D4-T7.39A mutation. Substantial interaction energy changes are observed at only a few positions, some of which are not conserved among the dopamine receptor subtypes and thus seem to account for this D4 subtype-specific structure-activity relationship. PMID:22588261

  12. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  13. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E; Depriest, Adam D; Cone, Angela C; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  14. Membrane Perturbation of ADP-insensitive Phosphoenzyme of Ca2+-ATPase Modifies Gathering of Transmembrane Helix M2 with Cytoplasmic Domains and Luminal Gating

    PubMed Central

    Danko, Stefania; Yamasaki, Kazuo; Daiho, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Ca2+ transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase involves ATP-dependent phosphorylation of a catalytic aspartic acid residue. The key process, luminal Ca2+ release occurs upon phosphoenzyme isomerization, abbreviated as E1PCa2 (reactive to ADP regenerating ATP and with two occluded Ca2+ at transport sites) → E2P (insensitive to ADP and after Ca2+ release). The isomerization involves gathering of cytoplasmic actuator and phosphorylation domains with second transmembrane helix (M2), and is epitomized by protection of a Leu119-proteinase K (prtK) cleavage site on M2. Ca2+ binding to the luminal transport sites of E2P, producing E2PCa2 before Ca2+-release exposes the prtK-site. Here we explore E2P structure to further elucidate luminal gating mechanism and effect of membrane perturbation. We find that ground state E2P becomes cleavable at Leu119 in a non-solubilizing concentration of detergent C12E8 at pH 7.4, indicating a shift towards a more E2PCa2-like state. Cleavage is accelerated by Mg2+ binding to luminal transport sites and blocked by their protonation at pH 6.0. Results indicate that possible disruption of phospholipid-protein interactions strongly favors an E2P species with looser head domain interactions at M2 and responsive to specific ligand binding at the transport sites, likely an early flexible intermediate in the development towards ground state E2P. PMID:28117348

  15. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    PubMed

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  16. The pore-lining regions in cytochrome c oxidases: A computational analysis of caveolin, cholesterol and transmembrane helix contributions to proton movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. CcO catalyzes a four electron reduction of O2 to water at a catalytic site formed by high-spin heme (a3) and copper atoms (CuB). While it is recognized that proton movement is coupled to oxygen reduction, the proton channel(s) have not been well defined. Using computational methods developed to study protein topology, membrane channels and 3D packing arrangements within transmembrane (TM) helix arrays, we find that subunit-1 (COX-1), subunit-2 (COX-2) and subunit-3 (COX-3) contribute 139, 46 and 25 residues, respectively, to channel formation between the mitochondrial matrix and intermembrane space. Nine of 12 TM helices in COX-1, both helices in COX-2 and 5 of the 6 TM helices in COX-3 are pore-lining regions (possible channel formers). Heme a3 and the CuB sites (as well as the CuA center of COX-2) are located within the channel that includes TM-6, TM-7, TM-10 and TM-11 of COX-1 and are associated with multiple cholesterol and caveolin-binding (CB) motifs. Sequence analysis identifies five CB motifs within COX-1, two within COX-2 and four within COX-3; each caveolin containing a pore-lining helix C-terminal to a TM helix-turn-helix. Channel formation involves interaction between multiple pore-lining regions within protein subunits and/or dimers. PoreWalker analysis lends support to the D-channel model of proton translocation. Under physiological conditions, caveolins may introduce channel formers juxtaposed to those in COX-1, COX-2 and COX-3, which together with cholesterol may form channel(s) essential for proton translocation through the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  17. The Effect of Hydrophilic Substitutions and Anionic Lipids Upon the Transverse Positioning of the Transmembrane Helix of the Erb b2 (neu) Protein Incorporated into Model Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Khurshida; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; London, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    The sequence of the transmembrane (TM) helix of Erb b2, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor family, can influence its activity. In this report, the sequence and lipid dependence of the transverse position of a model membrane-inserted peptide containing the Erb b2 TM helix and juxtamembrane (JM) residues was studied. For the Erb b2 TM helix inserted into phosphatidylcholine vesicles, the activating V664E mutation was found to induce a transverse shift involving the movement of the E residue towards the membrane surface. This shortened the effective length of the TM spanning portion of the sequence. The transverse shift was observed with both the E664 residue in the uncharged and charged state, but the extent of the shift was larger when the E residue was charged. When a series of hydrophilic residues was substituted for V664 the resulting transverse shifts at pH 7 decreased in the order D,H>E>Q>K>G>V. Except for His, this order is strongly correlated to that reported for the degree to which these substitutions induce cellular transformation when introduced into full length Erb b2. To examine the effect of lipid on transverse shift, the uncharged V664Q mutation was studied. The presence of 20% of the anionic lipid dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) in the model membrane vesicles, which introduces a physiologically relevant level of anionic lipid, did not affect the degree of transverse shift. However, in the case of a peptide containing a V674Q substitution, in which the Q is closer to the C-terminal of the Erb b2 TM helix than the N-terminal, transverse shift was suppressed in vesicles containing 20% DOPS. This suggests that the interaction of the cationic JM residues flanking the C-terminus of the Erb b2 TM helix interact with anionic lipids to anchor the C-terminal end of the TM helix. This anchoring site may act as a pivot which amplifies transverse movements of the Erb b2 TM segment to induce a large swinging-type motion in the extracellular domain

  18. Identifying ionic interactions within a membrane using BLaTM, a genetic tool to measure homo- and heterotypic transmembrane helix-helix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schanzenbach, Christoph; Schmidt, Fabian C.; Breckner, Patrick; Teese, Mark G.; Langosch, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of integral membrane protein complexes is frequently supported by transmembrane domain (TMD) interactions. Here, we present the BLaTM assay that measures homotypic as well as heterotypic TMD-TMD interactions in a bacterial membrane. The system is based on complementation of β-lactamase fragments genetically fused to interacting TMDs, which confers ampicillin resistance to expressing cells. We validated BLaTM by showing that the assay faithfully reports known sequence-specific interactions of both types. In a practical application, we used BLaTM to screen a focussed combinatorial library for heterotypic interactions driven by electrostatic forces. The results reveal novel patterns of ionizable amino acids within the isolated TMD pairs. Those patterns indicate that formation of heterotypic TMD pairs is most efficiently supported by closely spaced ionizable residues of opposite charge. In addition, TMD heteromerization can apparently be driven by hydrogen bonding between basic or between acidic residues. PMID:28266525

  19. A method for determining transmembrane helix association and orientation in detergent micelles using small angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Z; Engelman, D M

    1999-01-01

    Solution small angle x-ray scattering can be used to study the association of transmembrane proteins solubilized in detergent micelles. We have used the alpha-helical transmembrane domain of the human erythrocyte glycophorin A (GpA) fused to the carboxyl terminus of monomeric staphylococcal nuclease (SN/GpA) as a model system for study. By matching the average electron density of the detergent micelles to that of the buffer solution, the micelle contribution to the small angle scattering vanishes, and the molecular weight and the radius of gyration of the proteins can be determined. SN/GpA has been found to dimerize in a zwitterionic detergent micelle, N-dodecyl-N,N-(dimethylammonio)butyrate (DDMAB), whose average electron density naturally matches the electron density of an aqueous buffer. The dimerization occurs through the transmembrane domains of GpA. With the aid of the nuclease domain scattering, the orientation of the helices within a dimer can be determined to be parallel by radius of gyration analysis. The association constant of a mutant (G83I) that weakens the GpA dimerization has been determined to be 24 microM in the DDMAB environment. The experimental methods established here could be used to apply solution small angle x-ray scattering to studying the association and interactions of other membrane proteins. PMID:10423450

  20. Transmembrane signaling in the sensor kinase DcuS of Escherichia coli: A long-range piston-type displacement of transmembrane helix 2.

    PubMed

    Monzel, Christian; Unden, Gottfried

    2015-09-01

    The C4-dicarboxylate sensor kinase DcuS is membrane integral because of the transmembrane (TM) helices TM1 and TM2. Fumarate-induced movement of the helices was probed in vivo by Cys accessibility scanning at the membrane-water interfaces after activation of DcuS by fumarate at the periplasmic binding site. TM1 was inserted with amino acid residues 21-41 in the membrane in both the fumarate-activated (ON) and inactive (OFF) states. In contrast, TM2 was inserted with residues 181-201 in the OFF state and residues 185-205 in the ON state. Replacement of Trp 185 by an Arg residue caused displacement of TM2 toward the outside of the membrane and a concomitant induction of the ON state. Results from Cys cross-linking of TM2/TM2' in the DcuS homodimer excluded rotation; thus, data from accessibility changes of TM2 upon activation, either by ligand binding or by mutation of TM2, and cross-linking of TM2 and the connected region in the periplasm suggest a piston-type shift of TM2 by four residues to the periplasm upon activation (or fumarate binding). This mode of function is supported by the suggestion from energetic calculations of two preferred positions for TM2 insertion in the membrane. The shift of TM2 by four residues (or 4-6 Å) toward the periplasm upon activation is complementary to the periplasmic displacement of 3-4 Å of the C-terminal part of the periplasmic ligand-binding domain upon ligand occupancy in the citrate-binding domain in the homologous CitA sensor kinase.

  1. Transmembrane signaling in the sensor kinase DcuS of Escherichia coli: A long-range piston-type displacement of transmembrane helix 2

    PubMed Central

    Monzel, Christian; Unden, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    The C4-dicarboxylate sensor kinase DcuS is membrane integral because of the transmembrane (TM) helices TM1 and TM2. Fumarate-induced movement of the helices was probed in vivo by Cys accessibility scanning at the membrane–water interfaces after activation of DcuS by fumarate at the periplasmic binding site. TM1 was inserted with amino acid residues 21–41 in the membrane in both the fumarate-activated (ON) and inactive (OFF) states. In contrast, TM2 was inserted with residues 181–201 in the OFF state and residues 185–205 in the ON state. Replacement of Trp 185 by an Arg residue caused displacement of TM2 toward the outside of the membrane and a concomitant induction of the ON state. Results from Cys cross-linking of TM2/TM2′ in the DcuS homodimer excluded rotation; thus, data from accessibility changes of TM2 upon activation, either by ligand binding or by mutation of TM2, and cross-linking of TM2 and the connected region in the periplasm suggest a piston-type shift of TM2 by four residues to the periplasm upon activation (or fumarate binding). This mode of function is supported by the suggestion from energetic calculations of two preferred positions for TM2 insertion in the membrane. The shift of TM2 by four residues (or 4–6 Å) toward the periplasm upon activation is complementary to the periplasmic displacement of 3–4 Å of the C-terminal part of the periplasmic ligand-binding domain upon ligand occupancy in the citrate-binding domain in the homologous CitA sensor kinase. PMID:26283365

  2. Secondary structure, orientation, and oligomerization of phospholemman, a cardiac transmembrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Beevers, Andrew J.; Kukol, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Human phospholemman (PLM) is a 72-residue protein, which is expressed at high density in the cardiac plasma membrane and in various other tissues. It forms ion channels selective for K+, Cl−, and taurine in lipid bilayers and colocalizes with the Na+/K+-ATPase and the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger, which may suggest a role in the regulation of cell volume. Here we present the first structural data based on synthetic peptides representing the transmembrane domain of PLM. Perfluoro-octaneoate-PAGE of reconstituted proteoliposomes containing PLM reveals a tetrameric homo-oligomerization. Infrared spectroscopy of proteoliposomes shows that the PLM peptide is completely α-helical, even beyond the hydrophobic core residues. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments reveal that a core of 20–22 residues is not accessible to water, thus embedded in the lipid membrane. The maximum helix tilt is 17° ± 2° obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Thus, our data support the idea of ion channel formation by the PLM transmembrane domain. PMID:16597826

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of human serum paraoxonase 1 in DPPC bilayer reveals a critical role of transmembrane helix H1 for HDL association.

    PubMed

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Rath, Surya Narayan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; De, Sachinandan

    2014-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound mammalian enzyme exhibiting antiatherosclerotic activity. Despite years of research, an accurate model for the binding interaction between PON1 and HDL has not been established. However, it is reported that anchoring of PON1 to HDL is mainly governed by an N-terminal alpha helix H1 and another short helix H2. Here, we studied the molecular association of full-length human PON1 (huPON1) with a HDL-mimetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that H1 is the highly dynamic part of huPON1, showing clockwise rotation of up to 30° within the DPPC bilayer. However, without phospholipid molecules, H1 experiences helical distortions, illustrating an incompatible HDL-anchoring conformation. Snorkeling interactions of K3, R18, and R27 together with aromatic locks formed by Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 are highly essential for anchoring of huPON1 to HDL's surface. Molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area (MM/PBSA) binding free energy calculation revealed that H1 displays greater binding affinity towards lipid molecules compared with H2 and H3, suggesting that H1 is the most probable HDL-binding domain of PON1. Binding free energy decomposition showed that K3, R18, and R27 interact with polar headgroups of DPPC membrane through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 interact with DPPC lipids mainly through van der Waals interaction. Taken together, these results show that the transmembrane helix H1 along with the interfacial positively charged and aromatic resides were crucial for PON1's association with HDL particle. The current study will be useful towards understanding the antiatherosclerotic and bioscavenging properties of this promiscuous enzyme.

  4. Structure of Staphylococcal α-Hemolysin, a Heptameric Transmembrane Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Langzhou; Hobaugh, Michael R.; Shustak, Christopher; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan; Gouaux, J. Eric

    1996-12-01

    The structure of the Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin pore has been determined to 1.9 overset{circ}{mathrm A} resolution. Contained within the mushroom-shaped homo-oligomeric heptamer is a solvent-filled channel, 100 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in length, that runs along the sevenfold axis and ranges from 14 overset{circ}{mathrm A} to 46 overset{circ}{mathrm A} in diameter. The lytic, transmembrane domain comprises the lower half of a 14-strand antiparallel β barrel, to which each protomer contributes two β strands, each 65 overset{circ}{mathrm A} long. The interior of the β barrel is primarily hydrophilic, and the exterior has a hydrophobic belt 28 overset{circ}{mathrm A} wide. The structure proves the heptameric subunit stoichiometry of the α-hemolysin oligomer, shows that a glycine-rich and solvent-exposed region of a water-soluble protein can self-assemble to form a transmembrane pore of defined structure, and provides insight into the principles of membrane interaction and transport activity of β barrel pore-forming toxins.

  5. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  7. Analysis of Structured and Intrinsically Disordered Regions of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; Li, Liwei; Meroueh, Samy O.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Dunker, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins display two major types of transmembrane structures, helical bundles and beta barrels. The main functional roles of transmembrane proteins are the transport of small molecules and cell signaling, and sometimes these two roles are coupled. For cytosolic, water-soluble proteins, signaling and regulatory functions are often carried out by intrinsically disordered regions. Our long range goal is to determine whether integral membrane proteins likewise often use disordered regions for signaling and regulation. Here we carried out a systematic bioinformatics investigation of intrinsically disordered regions obtained from integral membrane proteins for which crystal structures have been determined, and for which the intrinsic disorder was identified as missing electron density. We found 120 disorder-containing integral membrane proteins having a total of 33,675 residues, with 3209 of the residues distributed among 240 different disordered regions. These disordered regions were compared with those obtained from water-soluble proteins with regard to their amino acid compositional biases, and with regard to accuracies of various disorder predictors. The results of these analyses show that the disordered regions from helical bundle integral membrane proteins, those from beta barrel integral membrane proteins, and those from water soluble proteins all exhibit statistically distinct amino acid compositional biases. Despite these differences in composition, current algorithms make reasonably accurate predictions of disorder for these membrane proteins. Although the small size of the current data sets are limiting, these results suggest that developing new predictors that make use of data from disordered regions in helical bundles and beta barrels, especially as these datasets increase in size, will likely lead to significantly more accurate disorder predictions for these two classes of integral membrane proteins. PMID:19585006

  8. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE PAGES

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  9. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  10. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-09

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located).

  11. α-Helix folding in the presence of structural constraints

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Janne A.; Paoli, Beatrice; Muff, Stefanie; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Bredenbeck, Jens; Woolley, G. Andrew; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hamm, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the site-specific folding kinetics of a photoswitchable cross-linked α-helical peptide by using single 13C = 18O isotope labeling together with time-resolved IR spectroscopy. We observe that the folding times differ from site to site by a factor of eight at low temperatures (6°C), whereas at high temperatures (45°C), the spread is considerably smaller. The trivial sum of the site signals coincides with the overall folding signal of the unlabeled peptide, and different sites fold in a noncooperative manner. Moreover, one of the sites exhibits a decrease of hydrogen bonding upon folding, implying that the unfolded state at low temperature is not unstructured. Molecular dynamics simulations at low temperature reveal a stretched-exponential behavior which originates from parallel folding routes that start from a kinetically partitioned unfolded ensemble. Different metastable structures (i.e., traps) in the unfolded ensemble have a different ratio of loop and helical content. Control simulations of the peptide at high temperature, as well as without the cross-linker at low temperature, show faster and simpler (i.e., single-exponential) folding kinetics. The experimental and simulation results together provide strong evidence that the rate-limiting step in formation of a structurally constrained α-helix is the escape from heterogeneous traps rather than the nucleation rate. This conclusion has important implications for an α-helical segment within a protein, rather than an isolated α-helix, because the cross-linker is a structural constraint similar to those present during the folding of a globular protein. PMID:18621686

  12. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor recognition of endocannabinoids via the lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 and anandamide in a phospholipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Diane L.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2006-08-01

    The phospholipid bilayer plays a central role in the lifecycle of the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA). Therefore, the orientation and location of AEA in the phospholipid bilayer with respect to key membrane associated proteins, is a central issue in understanding the mechanism of endocannabinoid signaling. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that a βXX β motif (formed by beta branching amino acids, V6.43 and I6.46) on the lipid face of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in its inactive state may serve as an initial CB1 interaction site for AEA. Eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of AEA were conducted in a model system composed of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 (TMH6) in a 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer. In addition, eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of a low CB1 affinity (20:2, n-6) analog of AEA were conducted in the same model system. AEA was found to exhibit a higher incidence of V6.43/I6.46 groove insertion than did the (20:2, n-6) analog. In certain cases, AEA established a high energy of interaction with TMH6 by first associating with the V6.43/I6.46 groove and then molding itself to the lipid face of TMH6 to establish a hydrogen bonding interaction with the exposed backbone carbonyl of P6.50. Based upon these results, we propose that the formation of this hydrogen bonded AEA/TMH6 complex may be the initial step in CB1 recognition of AEA in the lipid bilayer.

  14. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  15. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  16. Analysis of full and partial agonists binding to beta2-adrenergic receptor suggests a role of transmembrane helix V in agonist-specific conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Cherezov, Vadim; Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Yeager, Mark; Abagyan, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    The 2.4 A crystal structure of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR) in complex with the high-affinity inverse agonist (-)-carazolol provides a detailed structural framework for the analysis of ligand recognition by adrenergic receptors. Insights into agonist binding and the corresponding conformational changes triggering G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation mechanism are of special interest. Here we show that while the carazolol pocket captured in the beta(2)AR crystal structure accommodates (-)-isoproterenol and other agonists without steric clashes, a finite movement of the flexible extracellular part of TM-V helix (TM-Ve) obtained by receptor optimization in the presence of docked ligand can further improve the calculated binding affinities for agonist compounds. Tilting of TM-Ve towards the receptor axis provides a more complete description of polar receptor-ligand interactions for full and partial agonists, by enabling optimal engagement of agonists with two experimentally identified anchor sites, formed by Asp113/Asn312 and Ser203/Ser204/Ser207 side chains. Further, receptor models incorporating a flexible TM-V backbone allow reliable prediction of binding affinities for a set of diverse ligands, suggesting potential utility of this approach to design of effective and subtype-specific agonists for adrenergic receptors. Systematic differences in capacity of partial, full and inverse agonists to induce TM-V helix tilt in the beta(2)AR model suggest potential role of TM-V as a conformational "rheostat" involved in the whole spectrum of beta(2)AR responses to small molecule signals.

  17. Pattern recognition of the secondary structure of proteins (alpha-helix and beta-structure).

    PubMed

    Tohá, J C; Soto, M A; Chinga, H

    1990-09-21

    In this paper, an algorithm for the pattern recognition of secondary structure of proteins is proposed. The procedure simultaneously evaluates the contribution of all the residues of a given peptide to its conformation. By means of the algorithm it is possible to select from a universe of well known proteins the most representative alpha-helix and beta-structure peptides, and to use these peptides, as screening matrices to define the unknown structure of any peptide.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of the M2 helices within the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane domain: structure and collective motions.

    PubMed

    Hung, Andrew; Tai, Kaihsu; Sansom, Mark S P

    2005-05-01

    Multiple nanosecond duration molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the transmembrane region of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor embedded within a bilayer mimetic octane slab. The M2 helices and M2-M3 loop regions were free to move, whereas the outer (M1, M3, M4) helix bundle was backbone restrained. The M2 helices largely retain their hydrogen-bonding pattern throughout the simulation, with some distortions in the helical end and loop regions. All of the M2 helices exhibit bending motions, with the hinge point in the vicinity of the central hydrophobic gate region (corresponding to residues alphaL251 and alphaV255). The bending motions of the M2 helices lead to a degree of dynamic narrowing of the pore in the region of the proposed hydrophobic gate. Calculations of Born energy profiles for various structures along the simulation trajectory suggest that the conformations of the M2 bundle sampled correspond to a closed conformation of the channel. Principal components analyses of each of the M2 helices, and of the five-helix M2 bundle, reveal concerted motions that may be relevant to channel function. Normal mode analyses using the anisotropic network model reveal collective motions similar to those identified by principal components analyses.

  19. Structural dynamics of the myosin relay helix by time-resolved EPR and FRET.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, Roman V; Negrashov, Igor V; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Blakely, Sarah E; Titus, Margaret A; Thomas, David D; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2009-12-22

    We have used two complementary time-resolved spectroscopic techniques, dipolar electron-electron resonance and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine conformational changes in a single structural element of the myosin motor domain, the relay helix, before and after the recovery stroke. Two double-Cys mutants were labeled with optical probes or spin labels, and interprobe distances were determined. Both methods resolved two distinct structural states of myosin, corresponding to straight and bent conformations of the relay helix. The bent state was occupied only upon nucleotide addition, indicating that relay helix, like the entire myosin head, bends in the recovery stroke. However, saturation of myosin with nucleotide, producing a single biochemical state, did not produce a single structural state. Both straight and bent structural states of the relay helix were occupied when either ATP (ADP.BeF(x)) or ADP.P(i) (ADP.AlF(4)) analogs were bound at the active site. A greater population was found in the bent structural state when the posthydrolysis analog ADP.AlF(4) was bound. We conclude that the bending of the relay helix in the recovery stroke does not require ATP hydrolysis but is favored by it. A narrower interprobe distance distribution shows ordering of the relay helix, despite its bending, during the recovery stroke, providing further insight into the dynamics of this energy-transducing structural transition.

  20. Determination of the Dynamics, Structure, and Orientation of the Transmembrane Segment of ErbB2 in Model Membranes Using Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    and J. Schlessinger . 1998. Autoregulatory mechanisms in protein tyrosine kinases. . J. Biol. Chem. 1273:11987-11990. 3. Guy, P. M., J. V. Platko...Biol. Chem. 274: 35985-35990 10. Russ, W. P., and D. M. Engelman. 2000 . The G G motif: a framework for transmembrane helix-helix association. J

  1. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  2. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  3. Structural basis of DNA recognition by PCG2 reveals a novel DNA binding mode for winged helix-turn-helix domains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junfeng; Huang, Jinguang; Zhao, Yanxiang; Liu, Huaian; Wang, Dawei; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Wensheng; Taylor, Ian A.; Peng, You-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The MBP1 family proteins are the DNA binding subunits of MBF cell-cycle transcription factor complexes and contain an N terminal winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) DNA binding domain (DBD). Although the DNA binding mechanism of MBP1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively studied, the structural framework and the DNA binding mode of other MBP1 family proteins remains to be disclosed. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the DBD of PCG2, the Magnaporthe oryzae orthologue of MBP1, bound to MCB–DNA. The structure revealed that the wing, the 20-loop, helix A and helix B in PCG2–DBD are important elements for DNA binding. Unlike previously characterized wHTH proteins, PCG2–DBD utilizes the wing and helix-B to bind the minor groove and the major groove of the MCB–DNA whilst the 20-loop and helix A interact non-specifically with DNA. Notably, two glutamines Q89 and Q82 within the wing were found to recognize the MCB core CGCG sequence through making hydrogen bond interactions. Further in vitro assays confirmed essential roles of Q89 and Q82 in the DNA binding. These data together indicate that the MBP1 homologue PCG2 employs an unusual mode of binding to target DNA and demonstrate the versatility of wHTH domains. PMID:25550425

  4. Structure and Mechanism of Proton Transport Through the Transmembrane Tetrameric M2 Protein Bundle of the Influenza A Virus

    SciTech Connect

    R Acharya; V Carnevale; G Fiorin; B Levine; A Polishchuk; V Balannick; I Samish; R Lamb; L Pinto; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The M2 proton channel from influenza A virus is an essential protein that mediates transport of protons across the viral envelope. This protein has a single transmembrane helix, which tetramerizes into the active channel. At the heart of the conduction mechanism is the exchange of protons between the His37 imidazole moieties of M2 and waters confined to the M2 bundle interior. Protons are conducted as the total charge of the four His37 side chains passes through 2{sup +} and 3{sup +} with a pK{sub a} near 6. A 1.65 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the transmembrane protein (residues 25-46), crystallized at pH 6.5, reveals a pore that is lined by alternating layers of sidechains and well-ordered water clusters, which offer a pathway for proton conduction. The His37 residues form a box-like structure, bounded on either side by water clusters with well-ordered oxygen atoms at close distance. The conformation of the protein, which is intermediate between structures previously solved at higher and lower pH, suggests a mechanism by which conformational changes might facilitate asymmetric diffusion through the channel in the presence of a proton gradient. Moreover, protons diffusing through the channel need not be localized to a single His37 imidazole, but instead may be delocalized over the entire His-box and associated water clusters. Thus, the new crystal structure provides a possible unification of the discrete site versus continuum conduction models.

  5. Modeling of Transmembrane Potential in Realistic Multicellular Structures before Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Murovec, Tomo; Sweeney, Daniel C; Latouche, Eduardo; Davalos, Rafael V; Brosseau, Christian

    2016-11-15

    Many approaches for studying the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced during the treatment of biological cells with pulsed electric fields have been reported. From the simple analytical models to more complex numerical models requiring significant computational resources, a gamut of methods have been used to recapitulate multicellular environments in silico. Cells have been modeled as simple shapes in two dimensions as well as more complex geometries attempting to replicate realistic cell shapes. In this study, we describe a method for extracting realistic cell morphologies from fluorescence microscopy images to generate the piecewise continuous mesh used to develop a finite element model in two dimensions. The preelectroporation TMP induced in tightly packed cells is analyzed for two sets of pulse parameters inspired by clinical irreversible electroporation treatments. We show that high-frequency bipolar pulse trains are better, and more homogeneously raise the TMP of tightly packed cells to a simulated electroporation threshold than conventional irreversible electroporation pulse trains, at the expense of larger applied potentials. Our results demonstrate the viability of our method and emphasize the importance of considering multicellular effects in the numerical models used for studying the response of biological tissues exposed to electric fields.

  6. Ser/Thr Motifs in Transmembrane Proteins: Conservation Patterns and Effects on Local Protein Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; White, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    We combined systematic bioinformatics analyses and molecular dynamics simulations to assess the conservation patterns of Ser and Thr motifs in membrane proteins, and the effect of such motifs on the structure and dynamics of α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. We find that Ser/Thr motifs are often present in β-barrel TM proteins. At least one Ser/Thr motif is present in almost half of the sequences of α-helical proteins analyzed here. The extensive bioinformatics analyses and inspection of protein structures led to the identification of molecular transporters with noticeable numbers of Ser/Thr motifs within the TM region. Given the energetic penalty for burying multiple Ser/Thr groups in the membrane hydrophobic core, the observation of transporters with multiple membrane-embedded Ser/Thr is intriguing and raises the question of how the presence of multiple Ser/Thr affects protein local structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations of four different Ser-containing model TM peptides indicate that backbone hydrogen bonding of membrane-buried Ser/Thr hydroxyl groups can significantly change the local structure and dynamics of the helix. Ser groups located close to the membrane interface can hydrogen bond to solvent water instead of protein backbone, leading to an enhanced local solvation of the peptide. PMID:22836667

  7. Determinants of Cation Permeation and Drug Sensitivity in Predicted Transmembrane Helix 9 and Adjoining Exofacial Re-entrant Loop 5 of Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE1.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Josephson, Colin B; Boucher, Annie; Orlowski, John

    2015-07-17

    Mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) regulate numerous physiological processes and are involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including tissue ischemia and reperfusion injuries, cardiac hypertrophy and failure, and cancer progression. Hence, NHEs are being targeted for pharmaceutical-based clinical therapies, but pertinent information regarding the structural elements involved in cation translocation and drug binding remains incomplete. Molecular manipulations of the prototypical NHE1 isoform have implicated several predicted membrane-spanning (M) helices, most notably M4, M9, and M11, as important determinants of cation permeation and drug sensitivity. Here, we have used substituted-cysteine accessibility mutagenesis and thiol-modifying methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents to further probe the involvement of evolutionarily conserved sites within M9 (residues 342-363) and the adjacent exofacial re-entrant loop 5 between M9 and M10 (EL5; residues 364-415) of a cysteine-less variant of rat NHE1 on its kinetic and pharmacological properties. MTS treatment significantly reduced the activity of mutants containing substitutions within M9 (H353C, S355C, and G356C) and EL5 (G403C and S405C). In the absence of MTS, mutants S355C, G403C, and S405C showed modest to significant decreases in their apparent affinities for Na(+) o and/or H(+) i. In addition, mutations Y370C and E395C within EL5, whereas failing to confer sensitivity to MTS, nevertheless, reduced the affinity for Na(+) o, but not for H(+) i. The Y370C mutant also exhibited higher affinity for ethylisopropylamiloride, a competitive antagonist of Na(+) o transport. Collectively, these results further implicate helix M9 and EL5 of NHE1 as important elements involved in cation transport and inhibitor sensitivity, which may inform rational drug design.

  8. Structural basis of the role of the NikA ribbon-helix-helix domain in initiating bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hitoshi; Furuya, Nobuhisa; Lin, Yi-Jan; Güntert, Peter; Komano, Teruya; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2008-12-19

    Conjugation is a fundamental process for the rapid evolution of bacteria, enabling them, for example, to adapt to various environmental conditions or to acquire multi-drug resistance. NikA is one of the relaxosomal proteins that initiate the intercellular transfer of the R64 conjugative plasmid with the P-type origin of transfer, oriT. The three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal 51 residue fragment of NikA, NikA(1-51), which binds to the 17-bp repeat A sequence in R64 oriT, was determined by NMR to be a homodimer composed of two identical ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) domains, which are commonly found in transcriptional repressors. The structure determination of NikA(1-51) was achieved using automated NOE assignment with CYANA, without measuring filtered NOESY experiments to distinguish between the intra- and intermolecular NOEs, and without any a priori assumption on the tertiary or quaternary structure of the protein. Mutational experiments revealed that the DNA-binding region of the NikA(1-51) dimer is an anti-parallel beta-sheet composed of one beta-strand from each of the N-terminal ends of the two domains. Various biochemical experiments have indicated that the full length NikA(1-109) exists as a homotetramer formed through an alpha-helical domain at the C-terminus, and that the anti-parallel beta-sheets of both dimeric domains bind to two homologous 5 bp internal repeats within repeat A. As a tetramer, the full length NikA(1-109) showed higher affinity to repeat A and bent the oriT duplex more strongly than NikA(1-51) did. Many RHH proteins are involved in specific DNA recognition and in protein-protein interactions. The discovery of the RHH fold in NikA suggests that NikA binds to oriT and interacts with the relaxase, NikB, which is unable to bind to the nick region in oriT without NikA.

  9. Helix-like structure formation of a semi-flexible chain confined in a cylinder channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaohui; Sun, Tieyu; Zhang, Wei-Bing; Lam, Chi-Hang; Zhang, Linxi; Zang, Huaping

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used to study the conformation behavior of a semi-flexible polymer chain confined in a cylinder channel. A novel helix-like structure is found to form during the simulation. Moreover, the detailed characteristic parameters and formation probability of these helix-like structures under moderate conditions are investigated. We find that the structure is not a perfect helix, but a bundle of elliptical turns. In addition, we conduct a statistical analysis for the chain monomer distribution along the radial direction. This research contributes to our understanding of the microscopic conformation of polymer chains in confined environments filled with a solvent. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11504033 and 11404290) and the General Research Fund of Hong Kong Research Council of China (Grant No. 15301014).

  10. The discovery of the -helix and -sheet, the principal structural features of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberg, David

    2003-09-01

    PNAS papers by Linus Pauling, Robert Corey, and Herman Branson in the spring of 1951 proposed the -helix and the -sheet, now known to form the backbones of tens of thousands of proteins. They deduced these fundamental building blocks from properties of small molecules, known both from crystal structures and from Pauling's resonance theory of chemical bonding that predicted planar peptide groups. Earlier attempts by others to build models for protein helices had failed both by including nonplanar peptides and by insisting on helices with an integral number of units per turn. In major respects, the Pauling-Corey-Branson models were astoundingly correct, including bond lengths that were not surpassed in accuracy for >40 years. However, they did not consider the hand of the helix or the possibility of bent sheets. They also proposed structures and functions that have not been found, including the -helix.

  11. DEAD-Box Helicase Proteins Disrupt RNA Tertiary Structure Through Helix Capture

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cynthia; Potratz, Jeffrey P.; Cannon, Brian; Simpson, Zachary B.; Ziehr, Jessica L.; Tijerina, Pilar; Russell, Rick

    2014-01-01

    DEAD-box helicase proteins accelerate folding and rearrangements of highly structured RNAs and RNA–protein complexes (RNPs) in many essential cellular processes. Although DEAD-box proteins have been shown to use ATP to unwind short RNA helices, it is not known how they disrupt RNA tertiary structure. Here, we use single molecule fluorescence to show that the DEAD-box protein CYT-19 disrupts tertiary structure in a group I intron using a helix capture mechanism. CYT-19 binds to a helix within the structured RNA only after the helix spontaneously loses its tertiary contacts, and then CYT-19 uses ATP to unwind the helix, liberating the product strands. Ded1, a multifunctional yeast DEAD-box protein, gives analogous results with small but reproducible differences that may reflect its in vivo roles. The requirement for spontaneous dynamics likely targets DEAD-box proteins toward less stable RNA structures, which are likely to experience greater dynamic fluctuations, and provides a satisfying explanation for previous correlations between RNA stability and CYT-19 unfolding efficiency. Biologically, the ability to sense RNA stability probably biases DEAD-box proteins to act preferentially on less stable misfolded structures and thereby to promote native folding while minimizing spurious interactions with stable, natively folded RNAs. In addition, this straightforward mechanism for RNA remodeling does not require any specific structural environment of the helicase core and is likely to be relevant for DEAD-box proteins that promote RNA rearrangements of RNP complexes including the spliceosome and ribosome. PMID:25350280

  12. Structural and functional characterization of the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-11-26

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO(3)(-) transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala(800)-Lys(967). Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met(858) accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr(926)-Ala(929) only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met(813)-Gly(828)) region and a cryptic (Met(887)-Arg(904)) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp(960). Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro(868)-Leu(967) (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1.

  13. Biochemical and structural consequences of a glycine deletion in the alpha-8 helix of protoporphyrinogen oxidase.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Franck E; Daga, Pankaj R; Duke, Stephen O; Lee, Ryan M; Tranel, Patrick J; Doerksen, Robert J

    2010-07-01

    A rare Gly210 deletion in protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) was recently discovered in herbicide-resistant Amaranthus tuberculatus. According to the published X-ray structure of Nicotiana tabacum PPO, Gly210 is adjacent to, not in, the PPO active site, so it is a matter of interest to determine why its deletion imparts resistance to herbicides. In our kinetic experiments, this deletion did not affect the affinity of protoporphyrinogen IX nor the FAD content, but decreased the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The suboptimal Kcat was compensated by a significant increase in the Kis for inhibitors and a switch in their interactions from competitive to mixed-type inhibition. In our protein modeling studies on herbicide-susceptible PPO and resistant PPO, we show that Gly210 plays a key role in the alphaL helix-capping motif at the C-terminus of the alpha-8 helix which helps to stabilize the helix. In molecular dynamics simulations, the deletion had significant architecture consequences, destabilizing the alpha-8 helix-capping region and unraveling the last turn of the helix, leading to enlargement of the active site cavity by approximately 50%. This seemingly innocuous deletion of Gly210 of the mitochondrial PPO imparts herbicide resistance to this dual-targeted protein without severely affecting its normal physiological function, which may explain why this unusual mutation was the favored evolutionary path for achieving resistance to PPO inhibitors.

  14. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica A; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L; Yario, Therese A; Steitz, Thomas A; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3'-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3' nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a 'helical reset' that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature.

  15. Structures and Energetics of Four Adjacent G·U Pairs That Stabilize an RNA Helix

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaobo; Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Thomas, Leonard M.; Malone, Joshua; Harris, Steven; Schroeder, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Consecutive G·U base pairs inside RNA helices can be destabilizing while those at the ends of helices are thermodynamically stabilizing. To determine if this paradox could be explained by differences in base stacking, we determined the high-resolution (1.32 Å) crystal structure of (5’-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2 and studied three sequences with four consecutive terminal G·U pairs by NMR spectroscopy. In the crystal structure of (5’-GGUGGCUGUU-3')2, the helix is overwound but retains the overall features of A-form RNA. The penultimate base steps at each end of the helix have high base overlap and contribute to the unexpectedly favorable energetic contribution for the 5’-GU-3’/3’-UG-5’ motif in this helix position. The balance of base stacking and helical twist contributes to the positional dependence of G·U pair stabilities. The energetic stabilities and similarity to A-form RNA helices suggest that consecutive G·U pairs would be recognized by RNA helix binding proteins, such as Dicer and Ago. Thus, these results will aid future searches for target sites of small RNAs in gene regulation. PMID:26425937

  16. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica A.; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L.; Yario, Therese A.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly-abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3′-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3′ nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a “helical reset” that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature. PMID:24952594

  17. Structural parameters of the myelin transmembrane proteolipid in reverse micelles.

    PubMed Central

    Binks, B P; Chatenay, D; Nicot, C; Urbach, W; Waks, M

    1989-01-01

    The Folch-Pi proteolipid is the most abundant structural protein from the central nervous system myelin. This protein-lipid complex, normally insoluble in water, requires only a small amount of water for solubilization in reverse micelles of sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in isooctane. The characterization of the proteolipid-free and proteolipid-containing micelles was undertaken by light scattering and fluorescence recovery after fringe pattern photobleaching (FRAPP) experiments. Quasi elastic light scattering (QELS) was carried out at a high (200 mM) AOT concentration, at low water-to-surfactant mole ratio (Wo = 7) and at increasing protein occupancy. Two apparent hydrodynamic radii, differing tenfold in size, were obtained from correlation functions. The smaller one (RaH = 5.2 nm) remains constant and corresponds to that measured for protein-free micelles. The larger one increases linearly with protein concentration. In contrast, FRAPP measurements of self-diffusion coefficients were found unaffected by the proteolipid concentration. Accordingly, they have been performed at constant protein/surfactant mole ratios. The equivalent RH, extrapolated to zero AOT concentration for protein-free reverse micelles (2.9 nm) and in the presence of the proteolipid (4.6 nm), do not reveal the mode of organization previously suggested by QELS measurements. The complex picture emerging from this work represents a first step in the characterization of an integral membrane protein in reverse micelles. PMID:2470431

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of the C-terminal Transmembrane Region of NBCe1-A*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Quansheng; Kao, Liyo; Azimov, Rustam; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Chang, Connie; Kurtz, Ira

    2010-01-01

    NBCe1-A and AE1 both belong to the SLC4 HCO3− transporter family. The two transporters share 40% sequence homology in the C-terminal transmembrane region. In this study, we performed extensive substituted cysteine-scanning mutagenesis analysis of the C-terminal region of NBCe1-A covering amino acids Ala800–Lys967. Location of the introduced cysteines was determined by whole cell labeling with a membrane-permeant biotin maleimide and a membrane-impermeant 2-((5(6)-tetramethylrhodamine)carboxylamino) ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS-TAMRA) cysteine-reactive reagent. The results show that the extracellular surface of the NBCe1-A C-terminal transmembrane region is minimally exposed to aqueous media with Met858 accessible to both biotin maleimide and TAMRA and Thr926–Ala929 only to TAMRA labeling. The intracellular surface contains a highly exposed (Met813–Gly828) region and a cryptic (Met887–Arg904) connecting loop. The lipid/aqueous interface of the last transmembrane segment is at Asp960. Our data clearly determined that the C terminus of NBCe1-A contains 5 transmembrane segments with greater average size compared with AE1. Functional assays revealed only two residues in the region of Pro868–Leu967 (a functionally important region in AE1) that are highly sensitive to cysteine substitution. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal transmembrane region of NBCe1-A is tightly folded with unique structural and functional features that differ from AE1. PMID:20837482

  19. Predicting loop-helix tertiary structural contacts in RNA pseudoknots.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Giedroc, David P; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2010-03-01

    Tertiary interactions between loops and helical stems play critical roles in the biological function of many RNA pseudoknots. However, quantitative predictions for RNA tertiary interactions remain elusive. Here we report a statistical mechanical model for the prediction of noncanonical loop-stem base-pairing interactions in RNA pseudoknots. Central to the model is the evaluation of the conformational entropy for the pseudoknotted folds with defined loop-stem tertiary structural contacts. We develop an RNA virtual bond-based conformational model (Vfold model), which permits a rigorous computation of the conformational entropy for a given fold that contains loop-stem tertiary contacts. With the entropy parameters predicted from the Vfold model and the energy parameters for the tertiary contacts as inserted parameters, we can then predict the RNA folding thermodynamics, from which we can extract the tertiary contact thermodynamic parameters from theory-experimental comparisons. These comparisons reveal a contact enthalpy (DeltaH) of -14 kcal/mol and a contact entropy (DeltaS) of -38 cal/mol/K for a protonated C(+)*(G-C) base triple at pH 7.0, and (DeltaH = -7 kcal/mol, DeltaS = -19 cal/mol/K) for an unprotonated base triple. Tests of the model for a series of pseudoknots show good theory-experiment agreement. Based on the extracted energy parameters for the tertiary structural contacts, the model enables predictions for the structure, stability, and folding pathways for RNA pseudoknots with known or postulated loop-stem tertiary contacts from the nucleotide sequence alone.

  20. Crystal structure of the collagen triple helix model [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3).

    PubMed

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Mazzarella, Lelio; Zagari, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The first report of the full-length structure of the collagen-like polypeptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) is given. This structure was obtained from crystals grown in a microgravity environment, which diffracted up to 1.3 A, using synchrotron radiation. The final model, which was refined to an R(factor) of 0.18, is the highest-resolution description of a collagen triple helix reported to date. This structure provides clues regarding a series of aspects related to collagen triple helix structure and assembly. The strict dependence of proline puckering on the position inside the Pro-Pro-Gly triplets and the correlation between backbone and side chain dihedral angles support the propensity-based mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the analysis of [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) packing, which is governed by electrostatic interactions, suggests that charges may act as locking features in the axial organization of triple helices in the collagen fibrils.

  1. Crystal structure of strychninium chloride dihydrate: Hidden helix in the water/anion tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Białońska, Agata; Ciunik, Zbigniew

    2005-11-01

    The crystal structure of strychninium chloride dihydrate SH +Cl -·2H 2O was determined. The structure is composed of strychnine herring-bone bilayer sheets with channels occupied by the hydrogen bonded anion/water tape between them. Considering different amount of water molecules in isomorphous crystal of SH +Cl -·2H 2O and previously described crystal of strychninium chloride sesquihydrate, we found that water molecules and chloride anions form a left-handed helix. Similarly, anions and water molecules in the crystal of strychnine bromide dihydrate form a left-handed helix related by the two-fold screw axis symmetry. Contrary, in the crystals of strychninium chloride sesquihydrate and SH +Cl -·2H 2O, the helices are related by only translation vector and are stabilized by one or two water bridges, respectively.

  2. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, Neil J.; Hudson, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse.

  3. Shielded helix traveling wave cathode ray tube deflection structure

    DOEpatents

    Norris, N.J.; Hudson, C.L.

    1992-12-15

    Various embodiments of a helical coil deflection structure of a CRT are described and illustrated which provide shielding between adjacent turns of the coil on either three or four sides of each turn in the coil. Threaded members formed with either male or female threads and having the same pitch as the deflection coil are utilized for shielding the deflection coil with each turn of the helical coil placed between adjacent threads which act to shield each coil turn from adjacent turns and to confine the field generated by the coil to prevent or inhibit cross-coupling between adjacent turns of the coil to thereby prevent generation of fast fields which might otherwise deflect the beam out of time synchronization with the electron beam pulse. 13 figs.

  4. Structural determinants of salmon calcitonin bioactivity: the role of the Leu-based amphipathic alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Méndez, Blanca López; Amodeo, Pietro; Morelli, Maria A Castiglione; Nakamuta, Hiromichi; Motta, Andrea

    2006-08-25

    Salmon calcitonin (sCT) forms an amphipathic helix in the region 9-19, with the C-terminal decapeptide interacting with the helix (Amodeo, P., Motta, A., Strazzullo, G., Castiglione Morelli, M. A. (1999) J. Biomol. NMR 13, 161-174). To uncover the structural requirements for the hormone bioactivity, we investigated several sCT analogs. They were designed so as to alter the length of the central helix by removal and/or replacement of flanking residues and by selectively mutating or deleting residues inside the helix. The helix content was assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopies; the receptor binding affinity in human breast cancer cell line T 47D and the in vivo hypocalcemic activity were also evaluated. In particular, by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations we studied Leu(23),Ala(24)-sCT in which Pro(23) and Arg(24) were replaced by helix inducing residues. Compared with sCT, it assumes a longer amphipathic alpha-helix, with decreased binding affinity and one-fifth of the hypocalcemic activity, therefore supporting the idea of a relationship between a definite helix length and bioactivity. From the analysis of other sCT mutants, we inferred that the correct helix length is located in the 9-19 region and requires long range interactions and the presence of specific regions of residues within the sequence for high binding affinity and hypocalcemic activity. Taken together, the structural and biological data identify well defined structural parameters of the helix for sCT bioactivity.

  5. A secondary structural transition in the C-helix promotes gating of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Puljung, Michael C; Zagotta, William N

    2013-05-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels bind second messengers like cAMP to a C-terminal domain, consisting of a β-roll, followed by two α-helices (B- and C-helices). We monitored the cAMP-dependent changes in the structure of the C-helix of a C-terminal fragment of HCN2 channels using transition metal ion FRET between fluorophores on the C-helix and metal ions bound between histidine pairs on the same helix. cAMP induced a change in the dimensions of the C-helix and an increase in the metal binding affinity of the histidine pair. cAMP also caused an increase in the distance between a fluorophore on the C-helix and metal ions bound to the B-helix. Stabilizing the C-helix of intact CNGA1 channels by metal binding to a pair of histidines promoted channel opening. These data suggest that ordering of the C-helix is part of the gating conformational change in cyclic nucleotide-regulated channels.

  6. Structural Basis for Elastic Mechanical Properties of the DNA Double Helix

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Do-Nyun

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the principal structural features of the DNA double helix and their effects on its elastic mechanical properties. We develop, in the pursuit of this purpose, a helical continuum model consisting of a soft helical core and two stiff ribbons wrapping around it. The proposed model can reproduce the negative twist-stretch coupling of the helix successfully as well as its global stretching, bending, and torsional rigidities measured experimentally. Our parametric study of the model using the finite element method further reveals that the stiffness of phosphate backbones is a crucial factor for the counterintuitive overwinding behavior of the duplex and its extraordinarily high torsional rigidity, the major-minor grooves augment the twist-stretch coupling, and the change of the helicity might be responsible for the transition from a negative to a positive twist-stretching coupling when a tensile force is applied to the duplex. PMID:27055239

  7. Structure of the Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns, a Long Tilted Amphipathic Helix

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Daniel; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Bürck, Jochen; Wolf, Moritz; Reißer, Sabine; Luy, Burkhard; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Anne S.; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Erns is an essential virion glycoprotein with RNase activity that suppresses host cellular innate immune responses upon being partially secreted from the infected cells. Its unusual C-terminus plays multiple roles, as the amphiphilic helix acts as a membrane anchor, as a signal peptidase cleavage site, and as a retention/secretion signal. We analyzed the structure and membrane binding properties of this sequence to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. CD spectroscopy in different setups, as well as Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the helical folding and showed that the helix is accommodated in the amphiphilic region of the lipid bilayer with a slight tilt rather than lying parallel to the surface. This model was confirmed by NMR analyses that also identified a central stretch of 15 residues within the helix that is fully shielded from the aqueous layer, which is C-terminally followed by a putative hairpin structure. These findings explain the strong membrane binding of the protein and provide clues to establishing the Erns membrane contact, processing and secretion. PMID:24586172

  8. Structural features and stability of an RNA triple helix in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J A; Hoffman, D W

    1996-01-01

    A 30 nt RNA with a sequence designed to form an intramolecular triple helix was analyzed by one-and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and UV absorption measurements. NMR data show that the RNA contains seven pyrimidine-purine-pyrimidine base triples stabilized by Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen interactions. The temperature dependence of the imino proton resonances, as well as UV absorption data, indicate that the triple helix is highly stable at acidic pH, melting in a single sharp transition centered at 62 degrees C at pH 4.3. The Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen pairings are disrupted simultaneously upon melting. The NMR data are consistent with a structural model where the Watson-Crick paired strands form an A-helix. Results of model building, guided by NMR data, suggest a possible hydrogen bond between the 2' hydroxyl proton of the Hoogsteen strand and a phosphate oxygen of the purine strand. The structural model is discussed in terms of its ability to account for some of the differences in stability reported for RNA and DNA triple helices and provides insight into features that are likely to be important in the design of RNA binding compounds. PMID:8759020

  9. Structural Investigation of the Transmembrane Domain of KCNE1 in Proteoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-transmembrane protein of the KCNE family that modulates the function of voltage-gated potassium channels, including KCNQ1. Hereditary mutations in KCNE1 have been linked to diseases such as long QT syndrome (LQTS), atrial fibrillation, sudden infant death syndrome, and deafness. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 plays a key role in mediating the physical association with KCNQ1 and in subsequent modulation of channel gating kinetics and conductance. However, the mechanisms associated with these roles for the TMD remain poorly understood, highlighting a need for experimental structural studies. A previous solution NMR study of KCNE1 in LMPG micelles revealed a curved transmembrane domain, a structural feature proposed to be critical to KCNE1 function. However, this curvature potentially reflects an artifact of working in detergent micelles. Double electron electron resonance (DEER) measurements were conducted on KCNE1 in LMPG micelles, POPC/POPG proteoliposomes, and POPC/POPG lipodisq nanoparticles to directly compare the structure of the TMD in a variety of different membrane environments. Experimentally derived DEER distances coupled with simulated annealing molecular dynamic simulations were used to probe the bilayer structure of the TMD of KCNE1. The results indicate that the structure is helical in proteoliposomes and is slightly curved, which is consistent with the previously determined solution NMR structure in micelles. The evident resilience of the curvature in the KCNE1 TMD leads us to hypothesize that the curvature is likely to be maintained upon binding of the protein to the KCNQ1 channel. PMID:25234231

  10. Role of positively charged amino acids in the M2D transmembrane helix of Ktr/Trk/HKT type cation transporters.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Akai, Masaro; Zulkifli, Lalu; Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yasuhiro; Goshima, Shinobu; Hazama, Akihiro; Yamagami, Mutsumi; Guy, H Robert; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Studies suggest that Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters have evolved from multiple gene fusions of simple K(+) channels of the KcsA type into proteins that span the membrane at least eight times. Several positively charged residues are present in the eighth transmembrane segment, M2(D), in the transporters but not K(+) channels. Some models of ion transporters require a barrier to prevent free diffusion of ions down their electrochemical gradient, and it is possible that the positively charged residues within the transporter pore may prevent transporters from being channels. Here we studied the functional role of these positive residues in three Ktr/Trk/HKT-type transporters (Synechocystis KtrB-mediated K(+) uniporter, Arabidopsis AtHKT1-mediated Na(+) uniporter and wheat TaHKT1-mediated K(+)/Na(+) symporter) by examining K(+) uptake rates in E. coli, electrophysiological measurements in oocytes and growth rates of E. coli and yeast. The conserved Arg near the middle of the M2(D) segment was essential for the K(+) transport activity of KtrB and plant HKTs. Combined replacement of several positive residues in TaHKT1 showed that the positive residue at the beginning of the M2(D), which is conserved in many K(+) channels, also contributed to cation transport activity. This positive residue and the conserved Arg both face towards the ion conducting pore side. We introduced an atomic-scale homology model for predicting amino acid interactions. Based on the experimental results and the model, we propose that a salt bridge(s) exists between positive residues in the M2(D) and conserved negative residues in the pore region to reduce electrostatic repulsion against cation permeation caused by the positive residue(s). This salt bridge may help stabilize the transporter configuration, and may also prevent the conformational change that occurs in channels.

  11. Mutations in the transmembrane helix S6 of domain IV confer cockroach sodium channel resistance to sodium channel blocker insecticides and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dingxin; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Wang, Xingliang; Wu, Yidong; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Indoxacarb and metaflumizone are two sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs). They preferably bind to and trap sodium channels in the slow-inactivated non-conducting state, a mode of action similar to that of local anesthetics (LAs). Recently, two sodium channel mutations, F1845Y (F(4i15)Y) and V1848I (V(4i18)I), in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain IV (IVS6), were identified to be associated with indoxacarb resistance in Plutella xylostella. F(4i15) is known to be critical for the action of LAs on mammalian sodium channels. Previously, mutation F(4i15)A in a cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, has been shown to reduce the action of lidocaine, a LA, but not the action of SCBIs. In this study, we introduced mutations F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)A/I individually into the cockroach sodium channel, BgNav1-1a, and conducted functional analysis of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We found that both the F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations reduced the inhibition of sodium current by indoxacarb, DCJW (an active metabolite of indoxacarb) and metaflumizone. F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations also reduced the use-dependent block of sodium current by lidocaine. In contrast, substitution V(4i18)A enhanced the action metaflumizone and lidocaine. These results show that both F(4i15)Y and V(4i18)I mutations may contribute to target-site resistance to SCBIs, and provide the first molecular evidence for common amino acid determinants on insect sodium channels involved in action of SCBIs and LA.

  12. Amino-acid solvation structure in transmembrane helices from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna C V; Lindahl, Erik

    2006-12-15

    Understanding the solvation of amino acids in biomembranes is an important step to better explain membrane protein folding. Several experimental studies have shown that polar residues are both common and important in transmembrane segments, which means they have to be solvated in the hydrophobic membrane, at least until helices have aggregated to form integral proteins. In this work, we have used computer simulations to unravel these interactions on the atomic level, and classify intramembrane solvation properties of amino acids. Simulations have been performed for systematic mutations in poly-Leu helices, including not only each amino acid type, but also every z-position in a model helix. Interestingly, many polar or charged residues do not desolvate completely, but rather retain hydration by snorkeling or pulling in water/headgroups--even to the extent where many of them exist in a microscopic polar environment, with hydration levels corresponding well to experimental hydrophobicity scales. This suggests that even for polar/charged residues a large part of solvation cost is due to entropy, not enthalpy loss. Both hydration level and hydrogen bonding exhibit clear position-dependence. Basic side chains cause much less membrane distortion than acidic, since they are able to form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl groups instead of water or headgroups. This preference is supported by sequence statistics, where basic residues have increased relative occurrence at carbonyl z-coordinates. Snorkeling effects and N-/C-terminal orientation bias are directly observed, which significantly reduces the effective thickness of the hydrophobic core. Aromatic side chains intercalate efficiently with lipid chains (improving Trp/Tyr anchoring to the interface) and Ser/Thr residues are stabilized by hydroxyl groups sharing hydrogen bonds to backbone oxygens.

  13. Symmetry of helicoidal biopolymers in the frameworks of algebraic geometry: α-helix and DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Samoylovich, Mikhail; Talis, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The chain of algebraic geometry and topology constructions is mapped on a structural level that allows one to single out a special class of discrete helicoidal structures. A structure that belongs to this class is locally periodic, topologically stable in three-dimensional Euclidean space and corresponds to the bifurcation domain. Singular points of its bounding minimal surface are related by transformations determined by symmetries of the second coordination sphere of the eight-dimensional crystallographic lattice E8. These points represent cluster vertices, whose helicoid joining determines the topology and structural parameters of linear biopolymers. In particular, structural parameters of the α-helix are determined by the seven-vertex face-to-face joining of tetrahedra with the E8 non-integer helical axis 40/11 having a rotation angle of 99°, and the development of its surface coincides with the cylindrical development of the α-helix. Also, packing models have been created which determine the topology of the A, B and Z forms of DNA.

  14. Structure and mechanism of a eukaryotic transmembrane ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Yan, Chuangye; Gong, Xinqi; Du, Mingjian; Shi, Yigong

    2014-02-04

    Vitamin C, also known as ascorbate, is required in numerous essential metabolic reactions in eukaryotes. The eukaryotic ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase cytochrome b561 (Cyt b561), a family of highly conserved transmembrane enzymes, plays an important role in ascorbate recycling and iron absorption. Although Cyt b561 was identified four decades ago, its atomic structure and functional mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of cytochrome b561 from Arabidopsis thaliana in both substrate-free and substrate-bound states. Cyt b561 forms a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of six transmembrane helices and two heme groups. The negatively charged substrate ascorbate, or monodehydroascorbate, is enclosed in a positively charged pocket on either side of the membrane. Two highly conserved amino acids, Lys(81) and His(106), play an essential role in substrate recognition and catalysis. Our structural and biochemical analyses allow the proposition of a general electron transfer mechanism for members of the Cyt b561 family.

  15. Structurally ordered mesoporous carbon nanoparticles as transmembrane delivery vehicle in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Chung, Po-Wen; Slowing, Igor I; Tsunoda, Makoto; Yeung, Edward S; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2008-11-01

    A structurally ordered, CMK-1 type mesoporous carbon nanoparticle (MCN) material was successfully synthesized by using a MCM-48 type mesoporous silica nanoparticle as template. The structure of MCN was analyzed by a series of different techniques, including the scanning and transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and N2 sorption analysis. To the best of our knowledge, no study has been reported prior to our investigation on the utilization of these structurally ordered mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for the delivery of membrane impermeable chemical agents inside of eukaryotic cells. The cellular uptake efficiency and biocompatibility of MCN with human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) were investigated. Our results show that the inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of MCN is very high (>50 microg/mL per million cells) indicating that MCN is fairly biocompatible in vitro. Also, a membrane impermeable fluorescence dye, Fura-2, was loaded to the mesoporous matrix of MCN. We demonstrated that the MCN material could indeed serve as a transmembrane carrier for delivering Fura-2 through the cell membrane to release these molecules inside of live HeLa cells. We envision that further developments of this MCN material will lead to a new generation of nanodevices for transmembrane delivery and intracellular release applications.

  16. Structure and mechanism of a eukaryotic transmembrane ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Yan, Chuangye; Gong, Xinqi; Du, Mingjian; Shi, Yigong

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C, also known as ascorbate, is required in numerous essential metabolic reactions in eukaryotes. The eukaryotic ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase cytochrome b561 (Cyt b561), a family of highly conserved transmembrane enzymes, plays an important role in ascorbate recycling and iron absorption. Although Cyt b561 was identified four decades ago, its atomic structure and functional mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of cytochrome b561 from Arabidopsis thaliana in both substrate-free and substrate-bound states. Cyt b561 forms a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of six transmembrane helices and two heme groups. The negatively charged substrate ascorbate, or monodehydroascorbate, is enclosed in a positively charged pocket on either side of the membrane. Two highly conserved amino acids, Lys81 and His106, play an essential role in substrate recognition and catalysis. Our structural and biochemical analyses allow the proposition of a general electron transfer mechanism for members of the Cyt b561 family. PMID:24449903

  17. Free Energy and Structure of Helix-forming Peptides: A Theoretical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpusenka, Vadzim

    This thesis focuses on the structure and free energy of helical secondary structures of short peptides in a variety of experimental settings. Specifically, the formation of alpha-, pi- and 310-helices was investigated using large-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations with state-of-the-art force fields. In addition, the recently developed Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) and Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) methods were used to calculate the corresponding free energies. The most important results are as follows. For the examined peptide homopolymers, the observed minima on the free energy landscapes (based on suitable collective variables such as the radius of gyration, number of hydrogen bonds, and handedness) were associated with alpha-helices and "globular" or "knot-like" configurations only. No evidence was found to indicate that 310- or pi-helices represent equilibrium structures for these systems. In addition, the free energy landscape of short peptide chains formed by mixing two different amino acids were also examined. These results too indicate that the alpha-helix is only equilibrium helical secondary structure, and that the mixing of different amino acids does not result in the introduction of any significant new minima into the free energy landscapes. These results are in agreement with experimental observations insofar as these indicate that helical structural motifs are primary based on alpha-helices, with 310- and pi-helices being observed only rarely. Although pi- and 310-helices represent nonequilibrium structures, we were still able to estimate their free energies by means of SMD simulations. The helical secondary structure of the examined polypeptide chains is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds. However, there are other mechanisms that may allow for the additional stabilization of these structures. Specifically, in the so-called AK-(4,7) protein, the possible presence of disulfide bonds connecting cysteine residues may

  18. Investigation and direct mapping of the persistent spin helix in confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, Markus; Weingartner, Matthias; Völkl, Roland; Oltscher, Martin; Schuh, Dieter; Bougeard, Dominique; Korn, Tobias; Schüller, Christian

    The spin-orbit field in GaAs-based quantum well (QW) structures typically consists of two different contributions: Dresselhaus and Rashba field. The geometry of the Dresselhaus field, which arises due to the bulk inversion asymmetry, is mostly determined by the growth direction of the quantum well. The Rashba field instead is caused by a structure inversion asymmetry, which can be controlled, e.g. by the modulation doping. For the specific case of a (001)-grown GaAs quantum well with equal strength of Dresselhaus and Rashba fields, the effective spin-orbit field is oriented along the in-plane [110] direction for all k values and the spin splitting for this direction vanishes. For optically injected spins, which are initially oriented perpendicular to the QW plane, a persistent spin helix (PSH) state forms. We use a femtosecond pulsed TiSa-Laser system combined with a magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for time- and space-resolved mapping of the PSH. With this technique, we investigate the PSH behavior in confined structures, e.g., thin channels along the helix direction. Hence we find that lateral confinement increases the effective PSH lifetime drastically. In more complex structures, we observe that PSH formation is even stable under a forced direction change. Financial support by the DFG via SFB 689 and SPP 1285 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Sequence-structure relationship study in all-α transmembrane proteins using an unsupervised learning approach.

    PubMed

    Esque, Jérémy; Urbain, Aurélie; Etchebest, Catherine; de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2015-11-01

    Transmembrane proteins (TMPs) are major drug targets, but the knowledge of their precise topology structure remains highly limited compared with globular proteins. In spite of the difficulties in obtaining their structures, an important effort has been made these last years to increase their number from an experimental and computational point of view. In view of this emerging challenge, the development of computational methods to extract knowledge from these data is crucial for the better understanding of their functions and in improving the quality of structural models. Here, we revisit an efficient unsupervised learning procedure, called Hybrid Protein Model (HPM), which is applied to the analysis of transmembrane proteins belonging to the all-α structural class. HPM method is an original classification procedure that efficiently combines sequence and structure learning. The procedure was initially applied to the analysis of globular proteins. In the present case, HPM classifies a set of overlapping protein fragments, extracted from a non-redundant databank of TMP 3D structure. After fine-tuning of the learning parameters, the optimal classification results in 65 clusters. They represent at best similar relationships between sequence and local structure properties of TMPs. Interestingly, HPM distinguishes among the resulting clusters two helical regions with distinct hydrophobic patterns. This underlines the complexity of the topology of these proteins. The HPM classification enlightens unusual relationship between amino acids in TMP fragments, which can be useful to elaborate new amino acids substitution matrices. Finally, two challenging applications are described: the first one aims at annotating protein functions (channel or not), the second one intends to assess the quality of the structures (X-ray or models) via a new scoring function deduced from the HPM classification.

  20. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  1. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-04-28

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand-strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases.

  2. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  3. Structural organization of a full-length gp130/LIF-R cytokine receptor transmembrane complex

    PubMed Central

    Skiniotis, Georgios; Lupardus, Patrick; Martick, Monika; Walz, Thomas; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Summary gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-Rα). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6Rα hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-Rα heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-Rα/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the ‘tall’ class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others. PMID:18775332

  4. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  5. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no (13)C-(13)C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  6. Crystal structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane subunit reveals another twist.

    PubMed

    Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna; Gourdon, Pontus; Horsefield, Rob; Brive, Lars; Yamamoto, Natsuko; Mori, Hirotada; Snijder, Arjan; Neutze, Richard

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial drug resistance is a serious concern for human health. Multidrug efflux pumps export a broad variety of substrates out of the cell and thereby convey resistance to the host. In Escherichia coli, the AcrB:AcrA:TolC efflux complex forms a principal transporter for which structures of the individual component proteins have been determined in isolation. Here, we present the X-ray structure of AcrB in complex with a single transmembrane protein, assigned by mass spectrometry as YajC. A specific rotation of the periplasmic porter domain of AcrB is also revealed, consistent with the hypothesized "twist-to-open" mechanism for TolC activation. Growth experiments with yajc-deleted E. coli reveal a modest increase in the organism's susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics, but this effect could not conclusively be attributed to the loss of interactions between YajC and AcrB.

  7. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  8. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  9. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Buth, Sergey A; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P; Leiman, Petr G

    2015-08-18

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix.

  10. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4

    PubMed Central

    Buth, Sergey A.; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P.; Leiman, Petr G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix. PMID:26295253

  11. A divalent ion is crucial in the structure and dominant-negative function of ID proteins, a class of helix-loop-helix transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marie Vivian; Jiang, Sizun; Palasingam, Paaventhan; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of DNA binding and differentiation (ID) proteins, a dominant-negative group of helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription regulators, are well-characterized key players in cellular fate determination during development in mammals as well as Drosophila. Although not oncogenes themselves, their upregulation by various oncogenic proteins (such as Ras, Myc) and their inhibitory effects on cell cycle proteins (such as pRb) hint at their possible roles in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, their potency as inhibitors of cellular differentiation, through their heterodimerization with subsequent inactivation of the ubiquitous E proteins, suggest possible novel roles in engineering induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We present the high-resolution 2.1Å crystal structure of ID2 (HLH domain), coupled with novel biochemical insights in the presence of a divalent ion, possibly calcium (Ca2+), in the loop of ID proteins, which appear to be crucial for the structure and activity of ID proteins. These new insights will pave the way for new rational drug designs, in addition to current synthetic peptide options, against this potent player in tumorigenesis as well as more efficient ways for stem cells reprogramming.

  12. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model.

    PubMed

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-06-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures.

  13. Deterministic transfer of spin polarization in wire-like lateral structures via the persistent spin helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, M.; Hanninger, A.; Weingartner, M.; Oltscher, M.; Ciorga, M.; Weiss, D.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Korn, T.; Schüller, C.

    2016-10-01

    We used spatially- and time-resolved Kerr rotation microscopy to show that in lateral wire-like structures, based on a modulation-doped GaAs-AlGaAs quantum well, an optically initialized spin polarization can be deterministically transferred to specific lateral positions, employing the persistent spin helix (PSH). To this end, we show that confinement in two directions leads to a strong enhancement of the effective decay time of spin polarization, which can be exploited to transfer spin polarization over relatively large lateral distances. This is demonstrated by the investigation of L-shaped wire-like lateral structures, where the legs are positioned in directions parallel and perpendicular to the wave vector of the PSH.

  14. NMR structures and localization of the potential fusion peptides and the pre-transmembrane region of SARS-CoV: Implications in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Mukesh; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a serious public health hazard. The S2 subunit of the S glycoprotein of SARS-CoV carries out fusion between the virus and the host cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cell fusion process is not well understood. Current model suggests that a conformational transition, upon receptor recognition, of the two heptad core regions of S2 may expose the hydrophobic fusogenic peptide or fusion peptide for membrane insertion. Three regions of the S2 subunit have been proposed to be involved in cell-cell fusion. The N-terminal fusion peptide (FP, residues 770-788), an internal fusion peptide (IFP, residues 873-888) and the pre-transmembrane region (PTM, residues 1185-1202) demonstrated interactions with model lipid membranes and potentially involved in the fusion process. Here, we have determined atomic resolution structures of these three peptides in DPC detergent micelles by solution NMR. FP assumes α-helical conformation with significant distortion at the central Gly residues; enabling a close packing among sidechains of aromatic residues including W, Y and F. The 3-D structure of PMT is characterized by a helix-loop-helix with extensive aromatic interactions within the helices. IFP adopts a rather straight α-helical conformation defined by packing among sidechains of aromatic and aliphatic residues. Paramagnetic spin labeled NMR has demonstrated surface localization of PMT whereas FP and IFP inserted into the micelles. Collectively, data presented in this study will aid in understanding fusion mechanism of SARS-CoV.

  15. Structural determinants for the membrane insertion of the transmembrane peptide of hemagglutinin from influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Victor, Bruno L; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-11-26

    Membrane fusion is a process involved in a high range of biological functions, going from viral infections to neurotransmitter release. Fusogenic proteins increase the slow rate of fusion by coupling energetically downhill conformational changes of the protein to the kinetically unfavorable fusion of the membrane lipid bilayers. Hemagglutinin is an example of a fusogenic protein, which promotes the fusion of the membrane of the influenza virus with the membrane of the target cell. The N-terminus of the HA2 subunit of this protein contains a fusion domain described to act as a destabilizer of the target membrane bilayers, leading eventually to a full fusion of the two membranes. On the other hand, the C-terminus of the same subunit contains a helical transmembrane domain which was initially described to act as the anchor of the protein to the membrane of the virus. However, in recent years the study of this peptide segment has been gaining more attention since it has also been described to be involved in the membrane fusion process. Yet, the structural characterization of the interaction of such a protein domain with membrane lipids is still very limited. Therefore, in this work, we present a study of this transmembrane peptide domain in the presence of DMPC membrane bilayers, and we evaluate the effect of several mutations, and the effect of peptide oligomerization in this interaction process. Our results allowed us to identify and confirm amino acid residue motifs that seem to regulate the interaction between the segment peptide and membrane bilayers. Besides these sequence requirements, we have also identified length and tilt requirements that ultimately contribute to the hydrophobic matching between the peptide and the membrane. Additionally, we looked at the association of several transmembrane peptide segments and evaluated their direct interaction and stability inside a membrane bilayer. From our results we could conclude that three independent TM peptide

  16. Structural basis for DNA strand separation by the unconventional winged-helix domain of RecQ helicase WRN.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Ken; Kim, Sun-Yong; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2010-02-10

    The RecQ family of DNA helicases including WRN (Werner syndrome protein) and BLM (Bloom syndrome protein) protects the genome against deleterious changes. Here we report the cocrystal structure of the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of human WRN bound to a DNA duplex. In the complex, the RQC domain specifically interacted with a blunt end of the duplex and, surprisingly, unpaired a Watson-Crick base pair in the absence of an ATPase domain. The beta wing, an extended hairpin motif that is characteristic of winged-helix motifs, was used as a "separating knife" to wedge between the first and second base pairs, whereas the recognition helix, a principal component of helix-turn-helix motifs that are usually embedded within DNA grooves, was unprecedentedly excluded from the interaction. Our results demonstrate a function of the winged-helix motif central to the helicase reaction, establishing the first structural paradigm concerning the DNA structure-specific activities of the RecQ helicases.

  17. Structural Requirements in the Transmembrane Domain of GLIC Revealed by Incorporation of Noncanonical Histidine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Rienzo, Matthew; Lummis, Sarah C.R.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The cyanobacterial pentameric ligand-gated ion channel GLIC, a homolog of the Cys-loop receptor superfamily, has provided useful structural and functional information about its eukaryotic counterparts. X-ray diffraction data and site-directed mutagenesis have previously implicated a transmembrane histi-dine residue (His234) as essential for channel function. Here, we investigated the role of His234 via synthesis and incorporation of histidine analogs and α-hydroxy acids using in vivo nonsense suppression. Receptors were expressed heterologously in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to monitor channel activity. We show that an interhelix hydrogen bond involving His234 is important for stabilization of the open state, and that the shape and basicity of its side chain are highly sensitive to perturbations. In contrast, our data show that two other His residues are not involved in the acid-sensing mechanism. PMID:25525989

  18. Solution structure of the region 51–160 of human KIN17 reveals an atypical winged helix domain

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Ludovic; Couprie, Joël; le Maire, Albane; Guilhaudis, Laure; Milazzo-Segalas, Isabelle; Courçon, Marie; Moutiez, Mireille; Gondry, Muriel; Davoust, Daniel; Gilquin, Bernard; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Human KIN17 is a 45-kDa eukaryotic DNA- and RNA-binding protein that plays an important role in nuclear metabolism and in particular in the general response to genotoxics. Its amino acids sequence contains a zinc finger motif (residues 28–50) within a 30-kDa N-terminal region conserved from yeast to human, and a 15-kDa C-terminal tandem of SH3-like subdomains (residues 268–393) only found in higher eukaryotes. Here we report the solution structure of the region 51–160 of human KIN17. We show that this fragment folds into a three-α-helix bundle packed against a three-stranded β-sheet. It belongs to the winged helix (WH) family. Structural comparison with analogous WH domains reveals that KIN17 WH module presents an additional and highly conserved 310-helix. Moreover, KIN17 WH helix H3 is not positively charged as in classical DNA-binding WH domains. Thus, human KIN17 region 51–160 might rather be involved in protein–protein interaction through its conserved surface centered on the 310-helix. PMID:18029424

  19. Structures of Two Arabidopsis thaliana Major Latex Proteins Represent Novel Helix-Grip Folds

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    The major latex proteins (MLP) are a protein family first identified in the latex of opium poppy. They are found only in plants and have 24 identified members in Arabidopsis alone as well as in other plants such as peach, strawberry, melon, cucumber, and soybean. While the function of the MLPs is unknown, they have been associated with fruit and flower development and in pathogen defense responses. Based on modest sequence similarity, they have been characterized as members of the Bet v 1 protein superfamily; however, no structures have yet been reported. As part of an ongoing structural genomics effort, we determined the structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana MLPs: the solution structure of MLP28 (gene product of At1g70830.1) and the crystal structure of At1g24000.1. The structures revealed distinct differences when compared to one another and to the typical Bet v 1 fold. Nevertheless, NMR titration experiments demonstrated that the characteristic Bet v 1 hydrophobic binding pocket of At1g24000.1 is able to bind a ligand, suggesting that it plays a role in the function of the MLPs. A structure-based sequence analysis identified conserved hydrophobic residues in the long alpha helix that contribute to the binding cavity and may specify preferred ligands for the MLP family. PMID:19326460

  20. The position of the Gly-xxx-Gly motif in transmembrane segments modulates dimer affinity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M

    2006-12-01

    Although the intrinsic low solubility of membrane proteins presents challenges to their high-resolution structure determination, insight into the amino acid sequence features and forces that stabilize their folds has been provided through study of sequence-dependent helix-helix interactions between single transmembrane (TM) helices. While the stability of helix-helix partnerships mediated by the Gly-xxx-Gly (GG4) motif is known to be generally modulated by distal interfacial residues, it has not been established whether the position of this motif, with respect to the ends of a given TM segment, affects dimer affinity. Here we examine the relationship between motif position and affinity in the homodimers of 2 single-spanning membrane protein TM sequences: glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 coat protein (MCP). Using the TOXCAT assay for dimer affinity on a series of GpA and MCP TM segments that have been modified with either 4 Leu residues at each end or with 8 Leu residues at the N-terminal end, we show that in each protein, centrally located GG4 motifs are capable of stronger helix-helix interactions than those proximal to TM helix ends, even when surrounding interfacial residues are maintained. The relative importance of GG4 motifs in stabilizing helix-helix interactions therefore must be considered not only in its specific residue context but also in terms of the location of the interactive surface relative to the N and C termini of alpha-helical TM segments.

  1. Structure-function study of the fourth transmembrane segment of the GABAρ1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The Cys-loop family of receptors mediates synaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. These receptors share several structural characteristics and assemble in the plasma membrane as multimers with fivefold symmetry. Of these, the ionotropic GABA receptors are key players in the pathogenesis of diseases like epilepsy, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Different experimental approaches have shed some light on the mechanisms behind the function of these receptors; but little is known about their structure at high resolution. Sequence homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor predicts that ionotropic GABA receptors possess four transmembrane segments (TM1–4) and that TM2 forms the wall of the ion channel. However, the role of the other three segments is unclear. The GABAρ1 receptor plays a fundamental role in the regulation of neurotransmission along the visual pathway, is highly sensitive to GABA, and exhibits little desensitization. In our recent investigations of the role of TM4 in receptor function, a key residue in this domain (W475) was found to be involved in activation of the receptor. Here we have generated a structural model of the GABAρ1 receptor in silico and assessed its validity by electrophysiologically testing nine amino acid substitutions of W475 and deletions of the neighboring residues (Y474 and S476). The results identify a critical linkage between the ligand-binding domain and the TM4 domain and provide a framework for more detailed structure-function analyses of ionotropic GABA receptors. PMID:20876117

  2. Right- and left-handed three-helix proteins. I. Experimental and simulation analysis of differences in folding and structure.

    PubMed

    Glyakina, Anna V; Pereyaslavets, Leonid B; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2013-09-01

    Despite the large number of publications on three-helix protein folding, there is no study devoted to the influence of handedness on the rate of three-helix protein folding. From the experimental studies, we make a conclusion that the left-handed three-helix proteins fold faster than the right-handed ones. What may explain this difference? An important question arising in this paper is whether the modeling of protein folding can catch the difference between the protein folding rates of proteins with similar structures but with different folding mechanisms. To answer this question, the folding of eight three-helix proteins (four right-handed and four left-handed), which are similar in size, was modeled using the Monte Carlo and dynamic programming methods. The studies allowed us to determine the orders of folding of the secondary-structure elements in these domains and amino acid residues which are important for the folding. The obtained data are in good correlation with each other and with the experimental data. Structural analysis of these proteins demonstrated that the left-handed domains have a lesser number of contacts per residue and a smaller radius of cross section than the right-handed domains. This may be one of the explanations of the observed fact. The same tendency is observed for the large dataset consisting of 332 three-helix proteins (238 right- and 94 left-handed). From our analysis, we found that the left-handed three-helix proteins have some less-dense packing that should result in faster folding for some proteins as compared to the case of right-handed proteins.

  3. Comparison of helix interactions in membrane and soluble alpha-bundle proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Patel, Ashish B; Liu, Wei; Smith, Steven O

    2002-01-01

    Helix-helix interactions are important for the folding, stability, and function of membrane proteins. Here, two independent and complementary methods are used to investigate the nature and distribution of amino acids that mediate helix-helix interactions in membrane and soluble alpha-bundle proteins. The first method characterizes the packing density of individual amino acids in helical proteins based on the van der Waals surface area occluded by surrounding atoms. We have recently used this method to show that transmembrane helices pack more tightly, on average, than helices in soluble proteins. These studies are extended here to characterize the packing of interfacial and noninterfacial amino acids and the packing of amino acids in the interfaces of helices that have either right- or left-handed crossing angles, and either parallel or antiparallel orientations. We show that the most abundant tightly packed interfacial residues in membrane proteins are Gly, Ala, and Ser, and that helices with left-handed crossing angles are more tightly packed on average than helices with right-handed crossing angles. The second method used to characterize helix-helix interactions involves the use of helix contact plots. We find that helices in membrane proteins exhibit a broader distribution of interhelical contacts than helices in soluble proteins. Both helical membrane and soluble proteins make use of a general motif for helix interactions that relies mainly on four residues (Leu, Ala, Ile, Val) to mediate helix interactions in a fashion characteristic of left-handed helical coiled coils. However, a second motif for mediating helix interactions is revealed by the high occurrence and high average packing values of small and polar residues (Ala, Gly, Ser, Thr) in the helix interfaces of membrane proteins. Finally, we show that there is a strong linear correlation between the occurrence of residues in helix-helix interfaces and their packing values, and discuss these results with

  4. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Afonina, Zhanna A.; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A.; Spirin, Alexander S.; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-11-01

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  5. Similar structures, different characteristics: circular dichroism of metallic helix arrays with single-, double-, and triple-helical structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Lu, Zeqin; Cheng, Yongzhi; Gong, Rongzhou; Zheng, Yu; Duan, Jian

    2013-04-01

    We fabricated three-dimensional metallic helix arrays with single-, double-, and triple-helical structures. The transmission performances with the normal incident angle were measured in the microwave frequency of 12-18 GHz. For the single- and double-helical structures, giant circular dichroism with fairly wide bands is observed in the transmission spectra. However, the triple-helical structure does not exhibit circular dichroism. Based on the phenomenon of circular dichroism, the single- and double-helical structures can be used as broadband circular polarizers in the microwave region, but triple-helical ones cannot. The experiments have a good agreement with our simulation results, which were studied by the finite-difference time domain method.

  6. Impact of histidine residues on the transmembrane helices of viroporins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Park, Sang Ho; Tian, Ye; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-11-01

    Abstract The role of histidine in channel-forming transmembrane (TM) helices was investigated by comparing the TM helices from Virus protein 'u' (Vpu) and the M2 proton channel. Both proteins are members of the viroporin family of small membrane proteins that exhibit ion channel activity, and have a single TM helix that is capable of forming oligomers. The TM helices from both proteins have a conserved tryptophan towards the C-terminus. Previously, alanine 18 of Vpu was mutated to histidine in order to artificially introduce the same HXXXW motif that is central to the proton channel activity of M2. Interestingly, the mutated Vpu TM resulted in an increase in helix tilt angle of 11° in lipid bilayers compared to the wild-type Vpu TM. Here, we find the reverse, when histidine 37 of the HXXXW motif in M2 was mutated to alanine, it decreased the helix tilt by 10° from that of wild-type M2. The tilt change is independent of both the helix length and the presence of tryptophan. In addition, compared to wild-type M2, the H37A mutant displayed lowered sensitivity to proton concentration. We also found that the solvent accessibility of histidine-containing M2 is greater than without histidine. This suggests that the TM helix may increase the solvent exposure by changing its tilt angle in order to accommodate a polar/charged residue within the hydrophobic membrane region. The comparative results of M2, Vpu and their mutants demonstrated the significance of histidine in a transmembrane helix and the remarkable plasticity of the function and structure of ion channels stemming from changes at a single amino acid site.

  7. Three dimensional structure of the transmembrane region of the proto-oncogenic and oncogenic forms of the neu protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gullick, W J; Bottomley, A C; Lofts, F J; Doak, D G; Mulvey, D; Newman, R; Crumpton, M J; Sternberg, M J; Campbell, I D

    1992-01-01

    The neu proto-oncogene may be converted into a dominantly transforming oncogene by a single point mutation. Substitution of a valine residue at position 664 in the transmembrane region with glutamic acid activates the tyrosine kinase of the molecule and is associated with increased receptor dimerization. Previously we have proposed a model in which the glutamic acid side chain stabilizes receptor dimerization by hydrogen bonding. Other models have been proposed in which the mutation leads to a conformational change in the transmembrane region mimicking that assumed to occur following binding of a natural ligand. Synthetic peptides representing part of the transmembrane region were prepared. Some residues were replaced with serine in order to improve peptide solubility to allow purification and analysis. Both the peptides containing valine and glutamic acid dissolved in water and in an artificial lipid monolayer. The structures of the peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy to be alpha-helical. No significant difference in conformation was observed between the two peptides. This result does not support the model proposing a conformational change. The receptor structures determined experimentally do allow alternative models involving receptor transmembrane region packing. Images PMID:1346763

  8. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-03-03

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor.

  9. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  10. Probabilistic grammatical model for helix‐helix contact site classification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hidden Markov Models power many state‐of‐the‐art tools in the field of protein bioinformatics. While excelling in their tasks, these methods of protein analysis do not convey directly information on medium‐ and long‐range residue‐residue interactions. This requires an expressive power of at least context‐free grammars. However, application of more powerful grammar formalisms to protein analysis has been surprisingly limited. Results In this work, we present a probabilistic grammatical framework for problem‐specific protein languages and apply it to classification of transmembrane helix‐helix pairs configurations. The core of the model consists of a probabilistic context‐free grammar, automatically inferred by a genetic algorithm from only a generic set of expert‐based rules and positive training samples. The model was applied to produce sequence based descriptors of four classes of transmembrane helix‐helix contact site configurations. The highest performance of the classifiers reached AUCROC of 0.70. The analysis of grammar parse trees revealed the ability of representing structural features of helix‐helix contact sites. Conclusions We demonstrated that our probabilistic context‐free framework for analysis of protein sequences outperforms the state of the art in the task of helix‐helix contact site classification. However, this is achieved without necessarily requiring modeling long range dependencies between interacting residues. A significant feature of our approach is that grammar rules and parse trees are human‐readable. Thus they could provide biologically meaningful information for molecular biologists. PMID:24350601

  11. Regio-selective detection of dynamic structure of transmembrane alpha-helices as revealed from (13)C NMR spectra of [3-13C]Ala-labeled bacteriorhodopsin in the presence of Mn2+ ion.

    PubMed

    Tuzi, S; Hasegawa, J; Kawaminami, R; Naito, A; Saitô, H

    2001-07-01

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala-labeled bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were edited to give rise to regio-selective signals from hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helices by using NMR relaxation reagent, Mn(2+) ion. As a result of selective suppression of (13)C NMR signals from the surfaces in the presence of Mn(2+) ions, several (13)C NMR signals of Ala residues in the transmembrane alpha-helices were identified on the basis of site-directed mutagenesis without overlaps from (13)C NMR signals of residues located near the bilayer surfaces. The upper bound of the interatomic distances between (13)C nucleus in bR and Mn(2+) ions bound to the hydrophilic surface to cause suppressed peaks by the presence of Mn(2+) ion was estimated as 8.7 A to result in the signal broadening to 100 Hz and consistent with the data based on experimental finding. The Ala C(beta) (13)C NMR peaks corresponding to Ala-51, Ala-53, Ala-81, Ala-84, and Ala-215 located around the extracellular half of the proton channel and Ala-184 located at the kink in the helix F were successfully identified on the basis of (13)C NMR spectra of bR in the presence of Mn(2+) ion and site-directed replacement of Ala by Gly or Val. Utilizing these peaks as probes to observe local structure in the transmembrane alpha-helices, dynamic conformation of the extracellular half of bR at ambient temperature was examined, and the local structures of Ala-215 and 184 were compared with those elucidated at low temperature. Conformational changes in the transmembrane alpha-helices induced in D85N and E204Q and its long-range transmission from the proton release site to the site around the Schiff base in E204Q were also examined.

  12. Biochemical and structural analysis of Helix pomatia agglutinin. A hexameric lectin with a novel fold.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jean-Frederic; Lescar, Julien; Chazalet, Valérie; Audfray, Aymeric; Gagnon, Jean; Alvarez, Richard; Breton, Christelle; Imberty, Anne; Mitchell, Edward P

    2006-07-21

    Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) is a N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) binding lectin found in the albumen gland of the roman snail. As a constituent of perivitelline fluid, HPA protects fertilized eggs from bacteria and is part of the innate immunity system of the snail. The peptide sequence deduced from gene cloning demonstrates that HPA belongs to a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins recently identified in several invertebrates. This domain is also present in discoidin from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Investigation of the lectin specificity was performed with the use of glycan arrays, demonstrating that several GalNAc-containing oligosaccharides are bound and rationalizing the use of this lectin as a cancer marker. Titration microcalorimetry performed on the interaction between HPA and GalNAc indicates an affinity in the 10(-4) M range with an enthalpy-driven binding mechanism. The crystal structure of HPA demonstrates the occurrence of a new beta-sandwich lectin fold. The hexameric quaternary state was never observed previously for a lectin. The high resolution structure complex of HPA with GalNAc characterizes a new carbohydrate binding site and rationalizes the observed preference for alphaGalNAc-containing oligosaccharides.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of the Transmembrane Protein AmpG from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peizhen; Ying, Jun; Yang, Guangjian; Li, Aifang; Wang, Jian; Lu, Junwan; Wang, Junrong; Xu, Teng; Yi, Huiguang; Li, Kewei; Jin, Shouguang; Bao, Qiyu; Zhang, Kaibo

    2016-01-01

    AmpG is a transmembrane protein with permease activity that transports meuropeptide from the periplasm to the cytoplasm, which is essential for the induction of the ampC encoding β-lactamase. To obtain new insights into the relationship between AmpG structure and function, comparative genomics analysis, secondary and tertiary structure modeling, site-directed mutational analyses and genetic complementation experiments were performed in this study. AmpGs from different genera of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Acinetobacter baumannii) could complement AmpG function in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) to ampicillin is 512 μg/ml for wild type strain PAO1, while it is 32 μg/ml for an ampG deletion mutant strain (PAO1ΔampG) with a corresponding decrease in the activity of the ampC-encoded β-lactamase. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved AmpG residues (G29, A129, Q131 and A197) resulted in a loss of function, resulting in a loss of resistance to ampicillin in PAO1ΔampG. The G29A, G29V, A129T, A129V, A129D, A197S and A197D mutants had lower resistance to ampicillin and significantly decreased activity of the AmpC β-lactamase. The G29A, G29V, A129V, A197S and A197D mutants had decreased ampG mRNA transcript levels. The A129T and A129D mutants had normal ampG mRNA transcript levels, but the function of the protein was drastically reduced. Our experimental results demonstrate that the conserved amino acids played essential roles in maintaining the function of AmpG. Combined with the AmpG structural information, these critical amino acids can be targeted for the development of new anti-bacterial agents. PMID:27959942

  14. Stabilization of the β2-adrenergic Receptor 4-3-5 Helix Interface by Mutagenesis of Glu-1223.41, A Critical Residue in GPCR Structure

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christopher B.; Hanson, Michael A.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) instability represents one of the most profound obstacles to the structural study of GPCRs that bind diffusible ligands. The introduction of targeted mutations at non-conserved residues that lie proximal to helix interfaces has the potential to enhance the fold stability of the receptor helix bundle while maintaining wild-type receptor function. To test this hypothesis, we studied the effect of amino acid substitutions at Glu-1223.41 in the well studied β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), which was predicted from sequence conservation to lie at a position equivalent to the tryptophan interface between transmembrane domains (TMs) 3, 4, and 5. The data indicate that the replacement of Glu-1223.41 with bulky hydrophobic residues, such as tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine increase the yield of functionally folded β2AR by as much as 5-fold. Receptor stability in detergent solution was studied by isothermal denaturation and it was found that the E122W and E122Y mutations enhanced the β2AR thermal half-life by 9.3- and 6.7-fold, respectively at 37 °C. The β1AR was also stabilized by the introduction of tryptophan at Glu-1473.41, and the effect on protein behavior was similar to the rescue of the unstable wild-type receptor by the antagonist propranolol. Molecular modeling of the E122W and E122Y mutants using a previously published β2AR homology model revealed that the tryptophan ring edge and tyrosine hydroxyl are positioned proximal to the helical break in TM5 introduced by the conserved Pro-2115.50, and may stabilize the helix by interacting favorably with the unpaired carbonyl oxygen of Val-2065.45. Conformational flexibility of TM5 is believed to be a general property of rhodopsin-like GPCRs and, therefore, engineering of the TM4-3-5 interface at the 3.41 position may provide a general strategy for the stabilization of other receptors. PMID:18222471

  15. [Study of collagen mimetic peptide's triple-helix structure and its thermostability by circular dichroism].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Wang, Jing-Jie; Chen, Hui-Juan; Xiong, Qing-Qing; Liu, Ling-Rong; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, the authors explore the triple-helix conformation and thermal stability of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) as a function of peptide sequence and/or chain length by circular dichroism(CD). Five CMPs were designed and synthetized varying the number of POG triplets or incorporating an integrin alpha2beta1 binding motif Gly-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg (GFOGER). CD spectroscopy from 260 to 190 nm was recorded to confirm the existence of triple-helix conformation at room temperature, while thermal melting and thermal annealing of triple-helix (thermal unfolding and refolding of triple-helix, respectively) was characterized by monitoring ellipticity at 225 nm as a function of temperature. The results demonstrated that all the CMPs adopted triple-helix conformation, and the thermal stability of the CMPs was enhanced with increasing the number of POG triplets. In contrast to natural collagen, the thermal denaturation processes of CMPs were reversible, i. e. the triple-helix unfolded upon heating while refolded upon cooling. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of "hysteresis" was observed by comparing melting and thermal curves. These findings add new insights to the mechanisms of collagen and CMPs assembly, as well as provide an alternative approach to the fabrication of artificial collagen-likes biomaterials.

  16. Characterization of the metal ion binding helix-hairpin-helix motifs in human DNA polymerase beta by X-ray structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, H; Sawaya, M R

    1996-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies have shown that DNA binding by human polymerase beta (pol beta) occurs primarily through two structurally and sequentially homologous helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motifs, one in the fingers subdomain and the other in the 8-kDa domain [Pelletier, H., Sawaya, M. R., Wolfle, W., Wilson, S. H., & Kraut, J. (1996a) Biochemistry 35, 12742-12761]. In that DNA binding by each HhH motif is facilitated by a metal ion, we set out to determine the identity of the metal ion that most likely binds to the HhH motif in vivo. Crystal soaking experiments were performed on human pol beta-DNA cocrystals with Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, and K+, the four most prevalent metal ions in the cell, and in each case a data set was collected and the resulting structure was refined. Under the conditions tested, the HhH motifs of pol beta have an affinity for these biologically prevalent metal ions in the order Mg2+ < Ca2+ < Na+ < K+, with K+ displaying the strongest binding. Crystals soaked in the presence of Tl+, a commonly used spectroscopic probe for K+, were too X-ray-sensitive to establish the binding behavior of Tl+, but soaking experiments with Ba2+ and Cs+ resulted in relatively stable crystals that gave evidence of metal ion binding in both HhH motifs, confirming that larger monovalent and divalent metal ions are capable of binding to the HhH metal sites. Although Mn2+, which has been categorized as a potent polymerase mutagen, binds to the HhH motifs with a greater affinity than Mg2+, Mn2+ does not bind to the HhH motifs in the presence of equimolar concentrations of Na+. These results suggest that in vivo, where Mn2+ is present only in trace amounts, Mn2+ probably does not have a large effect on DNA binding and may instead manifest a mutagenic effect on pol beta primarily by distorting nucleotide binding or by directly affecting the catalytic step [Pelletier, H., Sawaya, M. R., Wolfle, W., Wilson, S. H., & Kraut, J. (1996b) Biochemistry 35, 12762-12777]. Crystal

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of Transmembrane Segment IV of the Salt Tolerance Protein Sod2*

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Asad; Kemp, Grant; Lee, Brian; Alves, Claudia; Young, Howard; Sykes, Brian D.; Fliegel, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Sod2 is the plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It provides salt tolerance by removing excess intracellular sodium (or lithium) in exchange for protons. We examined the role of amino acid residues of transmembrane segment IV (TM IV) (126FPQINFLGSLLIAGCITSTDPVLSALI152) in activity by using alanine scanning mutagenesis and examining salt tolerance in sod2-deficient S. pombe. Two amino acids were critical for function. Mutations T144A and V147A resulted in defective proteins that did not confer salt tolerance when reintroduced into S. pombe. Sod2 protein with other alanine mutations in TM IV had little or no effect. T144D and T144K mutant proteins were inactive; however, a T144S protein was functional and provided lithium, but not sodium, tolerance and transport. Analysis of sensitivity to trypsin indicated that the mutations caused a conformational change in the Sod2 protein. We expressed and purified TM IV (amino acids 125–154). NMR analysis yielded a model with two helical regions (amino acids 128–142 and 147–154) separated by an unwound region (amino acids 143–146). Molecular modeling of the entire Sod2 protein suggested that TM IV has a structure similar to that deduced by NMR analysis and an overall structure similar to that of Escherichia coli NhaA. TM IV of Sod2 has similarities to TM V of the Zygosaccharomyces rouxii Na+/H+ exchanger and TM VI of isoform 1 of mammalian Na+/H+ exchanger. TM IV of Sod2 is critical to transport and may be involved in cation binding or conformational changes of the protein. PMID:23836910

  18. Secondary Structure and Gating Rearrangements of Transmembrane Segments in Rat P2X4 Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Shai D.; Chang, Tsg-Hui; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2005-01-01

    P2X receptors are cation selective channels that are activated by extracellular nucleotides. These channels are likely formed by three identical or related subunits, each having two transmembrane segments (TM1 and TM2). To identify regions that undergo rearrangement during gating and to probe their secondary structure, we performed tryptophan scanning mutagenesis on the two putative TMs of the rat P2X4 receptor channel. Mutant channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, concentration–response relationships constructed for ATP, and the EC50 estimated by fitting the Hill equation to the data. Of the 22 mutations in TM1 and 24 in TM2, all but one in TM1 and seven in TM2 result in functional channels. Interestingly, the majority of the functional mutants display an increased sensitivity to ATP, and in general these perturbations are more pronounced for TM2 when compared with TM1. For TM1 and for the outer half of TM2, the perturbations are consistent with these regions adopting α-helical secondary structures. In addition, the greatest perturbations in the gating equilibrium occur for mutations near the outer ends of both TM1 and TM2. Surface biotinylation experiments reveal that all the nonfunctional mutants traffic to the surface membrane at levels comparable to the WT channel, suggesting that these mutations likely disrupt ion conduction or gating. Taken together, these results suggest that the outer parts of TM1 and TM2 are helical and that they move during activation. The observation that the majority of nonconducting mutations are clustered toward the inner end of TM2 suggests a critical functional role for this region. PMID:15795310

  19. transFold: a web server for predicting the structure and residue contacts of transmembrane beta-barrels.

    PubMed

    Waldispühl, J; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2006-07-01

    Transmembrane beta-barrel (TMB) proteins are embedded in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts. The cellular location and functional diversity of beta-barrel outer membrane proteins makes them an important protein class. At the present time, very few non-homologous TMB structures have been determined by X-ray diffraction because of the experimental difficulty encountered in crystallizing transmembrane (TM) proteins. The transFold web server uses pairwise inter-strand residue statistical potentials derived from globular (non-outer-membrane) proteins to predict the supersecondary structure of TMB. Unlike all previous approaches, transFold does not use machine learning methods such as hidden Markov models or neural networks; instead, transFold employs multi-tape S-attribute grammars to describe all potential conformations, and then applies dynamic programming to determine the global minimum energy supersecondary structure. The transFold web server not only predicts secondary structure and TMB topology, but is the only method which additionally predicts the side-chain orientation of transmembrane beta-strand residues, inter-strand residue contacts and TM beta-strand inclination with respect to the membrane. The program transFold currently outperforms all other methods for accuracy of beta-barrel structure prediction. Available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/transFold.

  20. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H.; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; 671NWFDITNWLWYIK683) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-Δ10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. PMID:26803471

  1. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; (671)NWFDITNWLWYIK(683)) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies.

  2. Structure based aggregation studies reveal the presence of helix-rich intermediate during α-Synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dhiman; Singh, Pradeep K.; Sahay, Shruti; Jha, Narendra Nath; Jacob, Reeba S.; Sen, Shamik; Kumar, Ashutosh; Riek, Roland; Maji, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of nucleation dependent polymerization by α-synuclein (α-Syn) into toxic oligomers and amyloids is important for the drug development against Parkinson's disease. However the structural and morphological characterization during nucleation and subsequent fibrillation process of α-Syn is not clearly understood. Using a variety of complementary biophysical techniques monitoring entire pathway of nine different synucleins, we found that transition of unstructured conformation into β-sheet rich fibril formation involves helix-rich intermediates. These intermediates are common for all aggregating synucleins, contain high solvent-exposed hydrophobic surfaces, are cytotoxic to SHSY-5Y cells and accelerate α-Syn aggregation efficiently. A multidimensional NMR study characterizing the intermediate accompanied with site-specific fluorescence study suggests that the N-terminal and central portions mainly participate in the helix-rich intermediate formation while the C-terminus remained in an extended conformation. However, significant conformational transitions occur at the middle and at the C-terminus during helix to β-sheet transition as evident from Trp fluorescence study. Since partial helix-rich intermediates were also observed for other amyloidogenic proteins such as Aβ and IAPP, we hypothesize that this class of intermediates may be one of the important intermediates for amyloid formation pathway by many natively unstructured protein/peptides and represent a potential target for drug development against amyloid diseases. PMID:25784353

  3. Crystal Structures of the Response Regulator DosR From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Suggest a Helix Rearrangement Mechanism for Phosphorylation Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wisedchaisri, G.; Wu, M.; Sherman, D.R.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-26

    The response regulator DosR is essential for promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under low oxygen conditions in a dormant state and may be responsible for latent tuberculosis in one-third of the world's population. Here, we report crystal structures of full-length unphosphorylated DosR at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and its C-terminal DNA-binding domain at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The full-length DosR structure reveals several features never seen before in other response regulators. The N-terminal domain of the full-length DosR structure has an unexpected ({beta}{alpha}){sub 4} topology instead of the canonical ({beta}{alpha}){sub 5} fold observed in other response regulators. The linker region adopts a unique conformation that contains two helices forming a four-helix bundle with two helices from another subunit, resulting in dimer formation. The C-terminal domain in the full-length DosR structure displays a novel location of helix {alpha}10, which allows Gln199 to interact with the catalytic Asp54 residue of the N-terminal domain. In contrast, the structure of the DosR C-terminal domain alone displays a remarkable unstructured conformation for helix {alpha}10 residues, different from the well-defined helical conformations in all other known structures, indicating considerable flexibility within the C-terminal domain. Our structures suggest a mode of DosR activation by phosphorylation via a helix rearrangement mechanism.

  4. Flanking Polyproline Sequences Inhibit [beta]-Sheet Structure in Polyglutamine Segments by Inducing PPII-like Helix Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, Gregory; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Pahl, Reinhard; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2008-06-24

    Polyglutamine (poly(Q)) expansion is associated with protein aggregation into {beta}-sheet amyloid fibrils and neuronal cytotoxicity. In the mutant poly(Q) protein huntingtin, associated with Huntington's disease, both aggregation and cytotoxicity may be abrogated by a polyproline (poly(P)) domain flanking the C terminus of the poly(Q) region. To understand structural changes that may occur with the addition of the poly(P) sequence, we synthesized poly(Q) peptides with 3-15 glutamine residues and a corresponding set of poly(Q) peptides flanked on the C terminus by 11 proline residues (poly(Q)-poly(P)), as occurs in the huntingtin sequence. The shorter soluble poly(Q) peptides (three or six glutamine residues) showed polyproline type II-like (PPII)-like helix conformation when examined by circular dichroism spectroscopy and were monomers as judged by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), while the longer poly(Q) peptides (nine or 15 glutamine residues) showed a {beta}-sheet conformation by CD and defined oligomers by SEC. Soluble poly(Q)-poly(P) peptides showed PPII-like content but SEC showed poorly defined, overlapping oligomeric peaks, and as judged by CD these peptides retained significant PPII-like structure with increasing poly(Q) length. More importantly, addition of the poly(P) domain increased the threshold for fibril formation to {approx} 15 glutamine residues. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and film CD showed that, while poly(Q) peptides with {ge} 6 glutamine residues formed {beta}-sheet-rich fibrils, only the longest poly(Q)-poly(P) peptide (15 glutamine residues) did so. From these and other observations, we propose that poly(Q) domains exist in a 'tug-of-war' between two conformations, a PPII-like helix and a {beta}-sheet, while the poly(P) domain is conformationally constrained into a proline type II helix (PPII). Addition of poly(P) to the C terminus of a poly(Q) domain induces a PPII-like structure, which opposes the aggregation-prone {beta

  5. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-05-10

    The ENE (element for nuclear expression) is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A) tail or 3'-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of nine known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ∼200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs) of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A) tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless, but not intron-containing, hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits.

  6. Structure and stability of a model three-helix-bundle protein on tailored surfaces.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Thomas A; Rathore, Nitin; de Pablo, Juan J

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of protein molecules with surfaces is important in numerous applications. Theoretical work on protein adsorption has been limited. In particular, it is difficult to obtain quantitative predictions about the structure and stability of proteins on surfaces. In this study, density-of-states-based simulations were performed on a Gō-like model of a three-helix-bundle fragment from protein A (PDB ID: 1bdd). Both mechanical and thermal stability were investigated on neutral and attractive surfaces and compared to that in the absence of a surface. It was found that attaching the peptide to any type of surface decreases its melting temperature by as much as 9 K, depending upon orientation. Calorimetric cooperativity, as measured by van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratios, similarly decreased. It was also found that the mechanical strength of the peptide attached to surfaces is degraded to varying extents, depending upon the surface type and protein orientation. A comparison of mechanical and thermal stability showed that the two are not synonymous, but occur through different pathways, and that system configurations that are more thermally stable are not always so mechanically.

  7. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The ENE (element for nuclear expression) is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding (nc)RNAs from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A) tail or 3′-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of 9 known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ~200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs) of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species, and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A) tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless but not intron-containing hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits. PMID:27134163

  8. Transmembrane domain interactions and residue proline 378 are essential for proper structure, especially disulfide bond formation, in the human vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Tie, Jian-Ke; Zheng, Mei-Yan; Hsiao, Kuang-Ling N; Perera, Lalith; Stafford, Darrel W; Straight, David L

    2008-06-17

    We used recombinant techniques to create a two-chain form (residues 1-345 and residues 346-758) of the vitamin K-dependent gamma-glutamyl carboxylase, a glycoprotein located in the endoplasmic reticulum containing five transmembrane domains. The two-chain carboxylase had carboxylase and epoxidase activities similar to those of one-chain carboxylase. In addition, it had normal affinity for the propeptide of factor IX. We employed this molecule to investigate formation of the one disulfide bond in carboxylase, the transmembrane structure of carboxylase, and the potential interactions among the carboxylase's transmembrane domains. Our results indicate that the two peptides of the two-chain carboxylase are joined by a disulfide bond. Proline 378 is important for the structure necessary for disulfide formation. Results with the P378L carboxylase indicate that noncovalent bonds maintain the two-chain structure even when the disulfide bond is disrupted. As we had previously proposed, the fifth transmembrane domain of carboxylase is the last and only transmembrane domain in the C-terminal peptide of the two-chain carboxylase. We show that the noncovalent association between the two chains of carboxylase involves an interaction between the fifth transmembrane domain and the second transmembrane domain. Results of a homology model of transmembrane domains 2 and 5 suggest that not only do these two domains associate but that transmembrane domain 2 may interact with another transmembrane domain. This latter interaction may be mediated at least in part by a motif of glycine residues in the second transmembrane domain.

  9. Influence of the C-terminus of the glycophorin A transmembrane fragment on the dimerization process.

    PubMed Central

    Orzáez, M.; Pérez-Payá, E.; Mingarro, I.

    2000-01-01

    The monomer-dimer equilibrium of the glycophorin A (GpA) transmembrane (TM) fragment has been used as a model system to investigate the amino acid sequence requirements that permit an appropriate helix-helix packing in a membrane-mimetic environment. In particular, we have focused on a region of the helix where no crucial residues for packing have been yet reported. Various deletion and replacement mutants in the C-terminal region of the TM fragment showed that the distance between the dimerization motif and the flanking charged residues from the cytoplasmic side of the protein is important for helix packing. Furthermore, selected GpA mutants have been used to illustrate the rearrangement of TM fragments that takes place when leucine repeats are introduced in such protein segments. We also show that secondary structure of GpA derivatives was independent from dimerization, in agreement with the two-stage model for membrane protein folding and oligomerization. PMID:10892817

  10. Structure-Based Sequence Alignment of the Transmembrane Domains of All Human GPCRs: Phylogenetic, Structural and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cvicek, Vaclav; Goddard, William A.; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is undergoing a revolution due to increased information about their signaling and the experimental determination of structures for more than 25 receptors. The availability of at least one receptor structure for each of the GPCR classes, well separated in sequence space, enables an integrated superfamily-wide analysis to identify signatures involving the role of conserved residues, conserved contacts, and downstream signaling in the context of receptor structures. In this study, we align the transmembrane (TM) domains of all experimental GPCR structures to maximize the conserved inter-helical contacts. The resulting superfamily-wide GpcR Sequence-Structure (GRoSS) alignment of the TM domains for all human GPCR sequences is sufficient to generate a phylogenetic tree that correctly distinguishes all different GPCR classes, suggesting that the class-level differences in the GPCR superfamily are encoded at least partly in the TM domains. The inter-helical contacts conserved across all GPCR classes describe the evolutionarily conserved GPCR structural fold. The corresponding structural alignment of the inactive and active conformations, available for a few GPCRs, identifies activation hot-spot residues in the TM domains that get rewired upon activation. Many GPCR mutations, known to alter receptor signaling and cause disease, are located at these conserved contact and activation hot-spot residue positions. The GRoSS alignment places the chemosensory receptor subfamilies for bitter taste (TAS2R) and pheromones (Vomeronasal, VN1R) in the rhodopsin family, known to contain the chemosensory olfactory receptor subfamily. The GRoSS alignment also enables the quantification of the structural variability in the TM regions of experimental structures, useful for homology modeling and structure prediction of receptors. Furthermore, this alignment identifies structurally and functionally important residues in all human GPCRs

  11. Structural regularities of helicoidally-like biopolymers in the framework of algebraic topology: II. {alpha}-Helix and DNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Samoylovich, M. I.; Talis, A. L.

    2013-09-15

    The developed apparatus of the 'structural application' of algebraic geometry and topology makes it possible to determine topologically stable helicoidally-like packings of polyhedra (clusters). A packing found is limited by a minimal surface with zero instability index; this surface is set by the Weierstrass representation and corresponds to the bifurcation point. The symmetries of the packings under consideration are determined by four-dimensional polyhedra (polytopes) from a closed sequence, which begins with diamondlike polytope (240). One example of these packings is a packing of tetrahedra, which arises as a result of the multiplication of a peculiar starting aggregation of tetrahedra by a fractional 40/11 axis with an angle of helical rotation of 99 Degree-Sign . The arrangement of atoms in particular positions of this starting aggregation allows one to obtain a model of the {alpha}-helix. This apparatus makes it possible to determine a priori the symmetry parameters of DNA double helices.

  12. Structural implications of a Val-->Glu mutation in transmembrane peptides from the EGF receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, S; Grant, C W; Barber, K R; Giusti, J; Morrow, M R

    2001-01-01

    Certain specific point mutations within the transmembrane domains of class I receptor tyrosine kinases are known to induce altered behavior in the host cell. An internally controlled pair of peptides containing the transmembrane portion of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (ErbB-1) was examined in fluid, fully hydrated lipid bilayers by wide-line 2H-NMR for insight into the physical basis of this effect. One member of the pair encompassed the native transmembrane sequence from ErbB-1, while in the other the valine residue at position 627 was replaced by glutamic acid to mimic a substitution that produces a transformed phenotype in cells. Heteronuclear probes having a defined relationship to the peptide backbone were incorporated by deuteration of the methyl side chains of natural alanine residues. 2H-NMR spectra were recorded in the range 35 degrees C to 65 degrees C in membranes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine. Narrowed spectral components arising from species rotating rapidly and symmetrically within the membrane persisted to very high temperature and appeared to represent monomeric peptide. Probes at positions 623 and 629 within the EGF receptor displayed changes in quadrupole splitting when Val(627) was replaced by Glu, while probes downstream at position 637 were relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate a measurable spatial reorientation in the region of the 5-amino acid motif (residues 624-628) often suggested to be involved in side-to-side interactions of the receptor transmembrane domain. Spectral changes induced by the Val-->Glu mutation in ErbB-1 were smaller than those induced by the analogous oncogenic mutation in the homologous human receptor, ErbB-2 (Sharpe, S., K. R. Barber, and C. W. M. Grant. 2000. Biochemistry. 39:6572-6580). Quadrupole splittings at probe sites examined were only modestly sensitive to temperature, suggesting that each transmembrane peptide behaved as a motionally ordered unit possessing

  13. Structure, attachment properties, and ecological importance of the attachment system of English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Björn; Seidel, Robin; Steinbrecher, Tina; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Root climbers such as English ivy (Hedera helix) rely on specialized adventitious roots for attachment, enabling the plants to climb on a wide range of natural and artificial substrates. Despite their importance for the climbing habit, the biomechanical properties of these specialized adventitious roots compared with standard roots and their performance in the attachment to different host species or inert substrates have not been studied. Here organs and tissues involved in the attachment are characterized and their significance in regard to a broader functional and ecological aspect is discussed. Depending on the substrate, the root clusters show different types of failure modes at various frequencies, demonstrating the close interaction between the climber and its substrates. With a Young’s Modulus of 109.2 MPa, the attachment roots are relatively stiff for non-woody roots. The central cylinders of the attachment roots show a high tensile strength of 38 MPa and a very high extensibility of 34%. In host trees naturally co-distributed with English ivy, a ‘balanced’ occurrence of failure of the attachment system of the climber and the bark of the host is found, suggesting a co-evolution of climber and host. Maximum loads of root clusters normalized by the number of roots match those of individually tested attachment roots. In comparison with most subterranean roots the properties and structure of the attachment roots of English ivy show distinct differences. There exist similarities to the properties found for roots of Galium aparine, suggesting a trend in not fully self-supporting plants towards a higher extensibility. PMID:21914660

  14. Polyproline II helix is a key structural motif of the elastic PEVK segment of titin.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Kan, L; Wang, K

    2001-03-27

    Titin is a family of giant elastic proteins that constitute an elastic sarcomere matrix in striated muscle. In the I-band region of the sarcomere, where titin extends and develops passive force upon stretch, titin is composed of tandem repeats of approximately 100 residue immunoglobin domains and approximately 28-residue PEVK modules. We have performed 2D NMR and circular dichroism (CD) studies of the conformations of one representative 28-mer PEVK module from human fetal titin (PEPPKEVVPEKKAPVAPPKKPEVPPVKV). NMR data of synthetic peptides of this module as well as three constituent peptides of 9 to 12 residues in aqueous solutions reveal distinguishing features for left-handed three-residue per turn PPII helices: the lack of NOE NN(i, i+1), very large NOE alphaN(i, i+1)/NN(i, i+1), no medium range NOE alphaN(i, i+2), and dihedral angles phi and psi values of -78 and 146, respectively. Structural determinations indicate the presence of three short stretches of PPII helices of 4, 5, and 6 residues that are interposed with an unordered, and presumably flexible, spacer region to give one "polyproline II helix-coil" or "PhC" motif for roughly every 10 residues. These peptides also display the characteristic PPII CD spectra: positive peak or negative shoulder band at 223 nm, negative CD band near 200 nm, and biphasic thermal titration curves that reflect varied stability of these PPII helices. We propose that this PhC motif is a fundamental feature and that the number, length, stability, and distribution of PPII is important in the understanding of the elasticity and protein interactions of the PEVK region of titin.

  15. Asymmetry in the triple helix of collagen-like heterotrimers confirms that external bonds stabilize collagen structure.

    PubMed

    Slatter, David A; Miles, Christopher A; Bailey, Allen J

    2003-05-23

    Heating and subsequent cooling mixtures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)(10) and (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) peptides leads to formation of model heterotrimeric collagen helices that can be isolated by HPLC. These heterotrimeric collagen peptide helices are shown to be fundamentally unstable as denaturing then renaturing experiments result in heterotrimeric/homotrimeric mixtures. As the proportion of hydroxyproline-containing chains in the trimers increases, differential scanning calorimetry shows that the helix melting temperatures and denaturation enthalpies increasing non-linearly. Three types of Rich-Crick hydrogen bonds observed by NMR allow modelling of heterotrimeric structures based on published homotrimeric X-ray data. This revealed a small axial movement of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) chains towards the C-terminal of the helix, demonstrating heterotrimeric asymmetry.

  16. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  17. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H.; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W.

    2016-03-15

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; {sup 671}NWFDITNWLWYIK{sup 683}) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. - Highlights: • Four gp41 MPER-based immunogens that resemble fusion intermediates were generated. • C-terminal region of MPER that contains 4E10/10E8 epitopes was highly immunogenic. • Altering 6HB structure can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER. • Induced antibodies targeted multiple residues critical for 4E10/10E8 binding. • Development of immunogens based on fusion intermediates is a promising strategy.

  18. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  19. Phage P4 origin-binding domain structure reveals a mechanism for regulation of DNA-binding activity by homo- and heterodimerization of winged helix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Ziegelin, Günter; Korolev, Sergey; Calendar, Richard; Lanka, Erich; Waksman, Gabriel

    2002-02-01

    The origin-binding domain of the gpalpha protein of phage P4 (P4-OBD) mediates origin recognition and regulation of gpalpha activity by the protein Cnr. We have determined the crystal structure of P4-OBD at 2.95 A resolution. The structure of P4-OBD is that of a dimer with pseudo twofold symmetry. Each subunit has a winged helix topology with a unique structure among initiator proteins. The only structural homologue of the P4-OBD subunit is the DNA-binding domain of the eukaryotic transcriptional activator Rfx1. Based on this structural alignment, a model for origin recognition by the P4-OBD dimer is suggested. P4-OBD mutations that interfere with Cnr binding locate to the dimer interface, indicating that Cnr acts by disrupting the gpalpha dimer. P4-OBD dimerization is mediated by helices alpha1 and alpha3 in both subunits, a mode of winged helix protein dimerization that is reminiscent of that of the eukaryotic transcription factors E2F and DP. This, in turn, suggests that Cnr is also a winged helix protein, a possibility that is supported by previously unreported sequence homologies between Cnr and Rfx1 and homology modelling. Hence, in a mechanism that appears to be conserved from phage to man, the DNA-binding activity of winged helix proteins can be regulated by other winged helix proteins via the versatile use of the winged helix motif as a homo- or heterodimerization scaffold.

  20. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-04-06

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  1. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide

    PubMed Central

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation. PMID:22933857

  2. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting Lipid Effects on the Crystallization and Structure of a Transmembrane Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Hfer, Nicole; Aragao, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating d- and l-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double-stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single-stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis, the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesized lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high-quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  3. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of single helix membrane peptides and proteins for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itaya, Miki; Brett, Ian C; Smith, Steven O

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins function as receptors, channels, transporters, and enzymes. These proteins are generally difficult to express and purify in a functional form due to the hydrophobic nature of their membrane spanning sequences. Studies on membrane proteins with a single membrane spanning helix have been particularly challenging. Single-pass membrane proteins will often form dimers or higher order oligomers in cell membranes as a result of sequence motifs that mediate specific transmembrane helix interactions. Understanding the structural basis for helix association provides insights into how these proteins function. Nevertheless, nonspecific association or aggregation of hydrophobic membrane spanning sequences can occur when isolated transmembrane domains are reconstituted into membrane bilayers or solubilized into detergent micelles for structural studies by solid-state or solution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we outline the methods used to synthesize, purify, and characterize single transmembrane segments for structural studies. Two synthetic strategies are discussed. The first strategy is to express hydrophobic peptides as protein chimera attached to the maltose binding protein. The second strategy is by direct chemical synthesis. Purification is carried out by several complementary chromatography methods. The peptides are solubilized in detergent for solution NMR studies or reconstituted into model membranes for solid-state NMR studies. We describe the methods used to characterize the reconstitution of these systems prior to NMR structural studies to establish if there is nonspecific aggregation.

  4. Structure and regulatory role of the C-terminal winged helix domain of the archaeal minichromosome maintenance complex

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Szambowska, Anna; Häfner, Sabine; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Görlach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) represents the replicative DNA helicase both in eukaryotes and archaea. Here, we describe the solution structure of the C-terminal domains of the archaeal MCMs of Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Those domains consist of a structurally conserved truncated winged helix (WH) domain lacking the two typical ‘wings’ of canonical WH domains. A less conserved N-terminal extension links this WH module to the MCM AAA+ domain forming the ATPase center. In the Sso MCM this linker contains a short α-helical element. Using Sso MCM mutants, including chimeric constructs containing Mth C-terminal domain elements, we show that the ATPase and helicase activity of the Sso MCM is significantly modulated by the short α-helical linker element and by N-terminal residues of the first α-helix of the truncated WH module. Finally, based on our structural and functional data, we present a docking-derived model of the Sso MCM, which implies an allosteric control of the ATPase center by the C-terminal domain. PMID:25712103

  5. On the use of the transmembrane domain of bacteriorhodopsin as a template for modeling the three-dimensional structure of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, L; Ballesteros, J A; Osman, R; Weinstein, H

    1992-01-01

    The molecular architecture of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) is commonly regarded as a structural template for the three-dimensional structure of membrane receptors that are functionally coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (GPCR). More recently, specific molecular models of such GPCR were constructed on the basis of the functional and structural relation of rhodopsin to BR as well as the sequence homology between rhodopsin and the GPCR. Such models of GPCR leave unresolved the difficulty caused by the apparent lack of any significant degree of sequence homology between the seven transmembrane helices (TMH) of BR and the portions in the sequence of the various GPCR that are considered to constitute their transmembrane domains. Evolutionary arguments offered in favor of the structural relation between BR and the opsins, and hence the GPCR, prompted our investigation of the possibility that the sequence homology, including any similarity in the distribution of kink-inducing proline residues among the helices, might have been obscured by the assumption that the TMH maintained their sequential order from BR in the evolution of the mammalian proteins. With a definition of the TMH in the neurotransmitter GPCR guided by hydropathicity predictions, and additional criteria used to define the span of each helix, optimal alignment of each pair of sequences was determined with no gaps allowed in the matching. The resulting alignment proposed here reveals considerable homology between the TMH in BR and those in GPCR, if the sequential order of the helices is ignored. These findings suggest the possibility that exon shuffling could have occurred in the proposed evolution of the GPCR gene from BR and point to a modification of the BR template to account for the correct packing of the helices in the tertiary structures of GPCR. These findings could guide the construction of three-dimensional models of the neurotransmitter GPCR on the basis of specific interhelical

  6. Structure-function analysis of a double-mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein occurring in disorders related to cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fanen, P; Clain, J; Labarthe, R; Hulin, P; Girodon, E; Pagesy, P; Goossens, M; Edelman, A

    1999-06-11

    A number of disorders related to cystic fibrosis have been described since the cloning of the cystic fibrosis gene, including infertility due to the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens. We have identified, in several patients, complex cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotypes like double-mutant alleles. We have now analyzed the structure-function relationships of one of these mutants, R74W-D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, expressed in HeLa cells, to evaluate the contribution of each mutation in the phenotype. We found that R74W cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator appears to be a polymorphism, while D1270N cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator could be responsible for the congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens phenotype. The combination of the two produced a more severe effect on the chloride conductance pathway as well as on the phenotype.

  7. Evolutionary-guided de novo structure prediction of self-associated transmembrane helical proteins with near-atomic accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Barth, P.

    2016-01-01

    How specific protein associations regulate the function of membrane receptors remains poorly understood. Conformational flexibility currently hinders the structure determination of several classes of membrane receptors and associated oligomers. Here we develop EFDOCK-TM, a general method to predict self-associated transmembrane protein helical (TMH) structures from sequence guided by co-evolutionary information. We show that accurate intermolecular contacts can be identified using a combination of protein sequence covariation and TMH binding surfaces predicted from sequence. When applied to diverse TMH oligomers, including receptors characterized in multiple conformational and functional states, the method reaches unprecedented near-atomic accuracy for most targets. Blind predictions of structurally uncharacterized receptor tyrosine kinase TMH oligomers provide a plausible hypothesis on the molecular mechanisms of disease-associated point mutations and binding surfaces for the rational design of selective inhibitors. The method sets the stage for uncovering novel determinants of molecular recognition and signalling in single-spanning eukaryotic membrane receptors. PMID:25995083

  8. Evolutionary-guided de novo structure prediction of self-associated transmembrane helical proteins with near-atomic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Barth, P.

    2015-05-01

    How specific protein associations regulate the function of membrane receptors remains poorly understood. Conformational flexibility currently hinders the structure determination of several classes of membrane receptors and associated oligomers. Here we develop EFDOCK-TM, a general method to predict self-associated transmembrane protein helical (TMH) structures from sequence guided by co-evolutionary information. We show that accurate intermolecular contacts can be identified using a combination of protein sequence covariation and TMH binding surfaces predicted from sequence. When applied to diverse TMH oligomers, including receptors characterized in multiple conformational and functional states, the method reaches unprecedented near-atomic accuracy for most targets. Blind predictions of structurally uncharacterized receptor tyrosine kinase TMH oligomers provide a plausible hypothesis on the molecular mechanisms of disease-associated point mutations and binding surfaces for the rational design of selective inhibitors. The method sets the stage for uncovering novel determinants of molecular recognition and signalling in single-spanning eukaryotic membrane receptors.

  9. Non-Periodic Helix TWT Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    IA-A087 413 LITTON SYSTEMS INC SAN CARLOS CA ELECTRON TUBE DIV F/6 9/1 NON-PERIODIC HELIX TWT STUDY.(U) MAY 80 N00173-76C-014 UNCLASSIFIED ML...IEEEEEEmhEEI U-80 - ’l////////,, 11111 128 25 L1. = *""L 1- 1.8 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART ’IT-, ( (NO-PERIODIC HELIX WTSTUDY0 I EXTENSION OF CONTRACT... Helix Circuit 4 - 2 Non-Periodic Helix Structure 7 3 Unwound Tape for Non-Periodic Helix 8 4 Typical Helix Assembly 10 5 Typical Ladder Assembly 11 6

  10. Explicit water near the catalytic I helix Thr in the predicted solution structure of CYP2A4.

    PubMed

    Gorokhov, Anna; Negishi, Masahiko; Johnson, Eric F; Pedersen, Lars C; Perera, Lalith; Darden, Tom A; Pedersen, Lee G

    2003-01-01

    The solution structure of mouse cytochrome P450 2A4 (CYP2A4), a monooxygenase of deoxysteroids, was obtained using homology modeling and molecular dynamics. The solvent-equilibrated CYP2A4 preserves the essential features of CYP450s. A comparison of the models CYP2A4 and CYP2A4 with testosterone bound CYP2A4/T illustrates the changes induced by the binding of the substrate. Experimental evidence links four amino acid residues to the catalytic activity, substrate specificity, and regioselectivity of this enzyme. Three of the four amino acids are found within contact distance of the testosterone substrate, and therefore may control the binding of the substrate through direct interaction. Remarkably, a water complex previously observed in x-ray crystal structure forms near the bulge in the central I helix that contains a conserved Thr. The properties of the I helix are computed in the context of the presence or absence of ligand.

  11. Structural studies of E73 from a hyperthermophilic archaeal virus identify the “RH3” domain, an elaborated ribbon-helix-helix motif involved in DNA recognition†

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Casey; Goel, Anupam; Tripet, Brian P.; Menon, Smita; Willi, Taylor; Dlakić, Mensur; Young, Mark J.; Lawrence, C Martin; Copié, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses including Sulfolobus spindle-shaped viruses (SSVs) such as SSV-1 and SSV-Ragged Hills exhibit remarkable morphology and genetic diversity. However, they remain poorly understood, in part because their genomes exhibit limited or unrecognizable sequence similarity to genes with known function. Here we report structural and functional studies of E73, a 73-residue homodimeric protein encoded within the SSV-Ragged Hills genome. Despite lacking significant sequence similarity, the NMR structure reveals clear similarity to ribbon-helix-helix (RHH) domains present in numerous proteins involved in transcriptional regulation. In vitro dsDNA binding experiments confirm the ability of E73 to bind dsDNA in a non-specific manner with micromolar affinity, and characterization of the K11E variant confirms the location of the predicted DNA binding surface. E73 is distinct, however, from known RHHs. The RHH motif is elaborated upon by the insertion of a third helix that is tightly integrated into the structural domain, giving rise to the “RH3” fold. Within the homodimer, this helix results in the formation of a conserved, symmetric cleft distal to the DNA binding surface, where it may mediate protein-protein interactions, or contribute to the high thermal stability of E73. Analysis of backbone amide dynamics by NMR provides evidence for a rigid core, and fast ps-ns timescale NH bond vector motions for residues located within the antiparallel β-sheet region of the proposed DNA-binding surface, and slower μs to ms timescale motions for residues in the α1-α2 loop. The role of E73 and its SSV homologs in the viral life cycle are discussed. PMID:22409376

  12. Molecular cloning and transmembrane structure of hCLCA2 from human lung, trachea, and mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Schreur, K D; Ji, H L; Fuller, C M; Pauli, B U

    1999-06-01

    The CLCA family of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels has recently been discovered, with an increasing number of closely related members isolated from different species. Here we report the cloning of the second human homolog, hCLCA2, from a human lung cDNA library. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed additional expression in trachea and mammary gland. A primary translation product of 120 kDa was cleaved into two cell surface-associated glycoproteins of 86 and 34 kDa in transfected HEK-293 cells. hCLCA2 is the first CLCA homolog for which the transmembrane structure has been systematically studied. Glycosylation site scanning and protease protection assays revealed five transmembrane domains with a large, cysteine-rich, amino-terminal extracellular domain. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of hCLCA2-transfected HEK-293 cells detected a slightly outwardly rectifying anion conductance that was increased in the presence of the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and inhibited by DIDS, dithiothreitol, niflumic acid, and tamoxifen. Expression in human trachea and lung suggests that hCLCA2 may play a role in the complex pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  13. Structure of a Virulence Regulatory Factor CvfB Reveals a Novel Winged-helix RNA Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Xu, Qingping; Miyazaki, Shinya; Kaito, Chikara; Farr, Carol L.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY CvfB is a conserved regulatory protein important for the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. We show here that CvfB binds RNA. The crystal structure of the CvfB ortholog from Streptococcus pneumoniae at 1.4 Å resolution reveals a unique RNA binding protein that is formed from a concatenation of well-known structural modules that bind nucleic acids: three consecutive S1 RNA-binding domains and a winged-helix (WH) domain. The third S1 and the WH domains are required for cooperative RNA binding and form a continuous surface that likely contributes to the RNA interaction. The WH domain is critical to CvfB function and contains a unique structural motif. Thus CvfB represents a novel assembly of modules for binding RNA. PMID:20399190

  14. Structure of Amantadine-Bound M2 Transmembrane Peptide of Influenza A in Lipid Bilayers from Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid-State NMR: the Role of Ser31 in Amantadine Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Sarah D.; Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    The M2 proton channel of influenza A is the target of the antiviral drugs amantadine and rimantadine, whose effectiveness has been abolished by a single-site mutation of Ser31 to Asn in the transmembrane domain of the protein. Recent high-resolution structures of the M2 transmembrane domain obtained from detergent-solubilized protein in solution and crystal environments gave conflicting drug binding sites. We present magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR results of Ser31 and a number of other residues in the M2 transmembrane peptide (M2TMP) bound to lipid bilayers. Comparison of the spectra of the membrane-bound apo and complexed M2TMP indicates that Ser31 is the site of the largest chemical shift perturbation by amantadine. The chemical shift constraints lead to a monomer structure with a small kink of the helical axis at Gly34. A tetramer model is then constructed using the helix tilt angle and several interhelical distances previously measured on unoriented bilayer samples. This tetramer model differs from the solution and crystal structures in terms of the openness of the N-terminus of the channel, the constriction at Ser31, and the sidechain conformations of Trp41, a residue important for channel gating. Moreover, the tetramer model suggests that Ser31 may interact with amantadine amine via hydrogen bonding. While the apo and drug-bound M2TMP have similar average structures, the complexed peptide has much narrower linewidths at physiological temperature, indicating drug-induced changes of the protein dynamics in the membrane. Further, at low temperature, several residues show narrower lines in the complexed peptide than the apo peptide, indicating that amantadine binding reduces the conformational heterogeneity of specific residues. The differences of the current solid-state NMR structure of the bilayer-bound M2TMP from the detergent-based M2 structures suggest that the M2 conformation is sensitive to the environment, and care must be taken when interpreting

  15. Molecular thermodynamics of trifluoroethanol-induced helix formation: analysis of the solvation structure and free energy by the 3D-RISM theory.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio; Kidera, Akinori

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces helical structure in peptides and proteins. The molecular mechanism is, however, still not completely elucidated. In this study, the TFE effects on the solvation structure and on the free energy change associated with the helix-coil transition of a polypeptide are analyzed by using the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) molecular theory of solvation. The theoretical result shows that TFE preferentially solvates at low concentrations around 30 vol% both for the helix and coil structures. However, the characteristic preferential solvation is not as significant in the TFE-induced helix stabilization as generally considered. It is also found that the overall energy contributes to the free energy difference more substantially than the solvation entropy.

  16. A tyrosine-containing motif mediates ER retention of CD3-epsilon and adopts a helix-turn structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mallabiabarrena, A; Jiménez, M A; Rico, M; Alarcón, B

    1995-01-01

    The CD3-epsilon endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention motif has been characterized by mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy. Tyr177, Leu180 and Arg183 are involved in ER retention. The motif forms an elongated alpha-helix in which the tyrosine and leucine residues are closely apposed, followed by a beta I' turn that places Arg183 in the vicinity of Leu180. The structure formed by Tyr177 and the leucine in position +3 is reminiscent of the beta-turn structure adopted by tyrosine-containing endocytosis signals. Moreover, substitution of the transferrin receptor (TfR) internalization sequence by the CD3-epsilon motif still allowed the rapid internalization of the TfR and, conversely, the chimeric protein resulting from the substitution of the CD3-epsilon motif by the endocytosis signal of the low density lipoprotein receptor was ER located. These data support the idea of a functional homology between the two types of signal. Images PMID:7774584

  17. From curdlan powder to the triple helix gel structure: an attenuated total reflection-infrared study of the gelation process.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Lafleur, Michel

    2007-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to probe the hydration and gelation of curdlan, a linear polysaccharide built from repeating units of (1-->3)-beta-D-glucose. The spectra have been recorded using a temperature-controlled attenuated total reflection (ATR) device. Thermal gelation of curdlan could therefore be followed in situ and in real time. The transformation of the low-set gel, mainly formed with single helices, into a high-set gel, associated with a triple helix structure, could be directly observed. The relative intensities and positions of characteristic absorption bands in the C-O region (1200-850 cm-1) were found to be representative of the gel structure, as they are believed to be sensitive to the helical conformation of the polymer chains. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is shown to be a useful tool for rapid and efficient characterization of curdlan gels.

  18. Transmembrane signaling proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins and their glycosaminoglycan chains is matched by diverse functions. However, all assume roles as coreceptors, often working alongside high-affinity growth factor receptors or adhesion receptors such as integrins. Other common themes are an ability to signal through their cytoplasmic domains, often to the actin cytoskeleton, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveals roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core proteins has been obtained in mouse knockout experiments. Here some of the latest developments in the field are examined in hopes of stimulating further interest in this fascinating group of molecules.

  19. Transmembrane Helices Tilt, Bend, Slide, Torque, and Unwind between Functional States of Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Ren, Peter X.; Balusu, Rohith; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    The seven-helical bundle of rhodopsin and other G-protein coupled receptors undergoes structural rearrangements as the transmembrane receptor protein is activated. These structural changes are known to involve tilting and bending of various transmembrane helices. However, the cause and effect relationship among structural events leading to a cytoplasmic crevasse for G-protein binding is less well defined. Here we present a mathematical model of the protein helix and a simple procedure to determine multiple parameters that offer precise depiction of a helical conformation. A comprehensive survey of bovine rhodopsin structures shows that the helical rearrangements during the activation of rhodopsin involve a variety of angular and linear motions such as torsion, unwinding, and sliding in addition to the previously reported tilting and bending. These hitherto undefined motion components unify the results obtained from different experimental approaches, and demonstrate conformational similarity between the active opsin structure and the photoactivated structures in crystallo near the retinal anchor despite their marked differences.

  20. Rigid multibody simulation of a helix-like structure: the dynamics of bacterial adhesion pili.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursière, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    We present a coarse-grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymer's force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits, the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include the effects of both unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under the action of external forces and provide a new perspective of the complex bacterial adhesion processes.

  1. Anesthetics Target Interfacial Transmembrane Sites in Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chiara, David C.; Miller, Keith W.

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are a heterogeneous group of small amphiphilic ligands that interact weakly at multiple allosteric sites on many pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs), resulting in either inhibition, potentiation of channel activity, or both. Allosteric principles imply that modulator sites must change configuration and ligand affinity during receptor state transitions. Thus, general anesthetics and related compounds are useful both as state-dependent probes of receptor structure and as potentially selective modulators of pLGIC functions. This review focuses on general anesthetic sites in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which were among the first anesthetic-sensitive pLGIC experimental models studied, with particular focus on sites formed by transmembrane domain elements. Structural models place many of these sites at interfaces between two or more pLGIC transmembrane helices both within subunits and between adjacent subunits, and between transmembrane helices and either lipids (the lipid-protein interface) or water (i.e. the ion channel). A single general anesthetic may bind at multiple allosteric sites in pLGICs, producing a net effect of either inhibition (e.g. blocking the ion channel) or enhanced channel gating (e.g. inter-subunit sites). Other general anesthetic sites identified by photolabeling or crystallography are tentatively linked to functional effects, including intra-subunit helix bundle sites and the lipid-protein interface. PMID:25316107

  2. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the winged helix domain of the meiotic recombination HOP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F; Eyster, Craig A; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H; Pezza, Roberto J

    2014-05-23

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination.

  3. Structural and functional analysis of the transmembrane segment pair VI and VII of the NHE1 isoform of the Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudia; Lee, Brian L; Sykes, Brian D; Fliegel, Larry

    2014-06-10

    Isoform 1 of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE1) is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane pH regulatory protein. It removes one intracellular H(+) in exchange for one extracellular Na(+). The 500 N-terminal amino acids comprise the catalytic membrane domain and fold into 12 transmembrane (TM) segments. To gain insight into the structure and function of human NHE1, a region spanning transmembrane domains VI and VII was expressed and purified, and the structure was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Segment VI includes two structurally conserved regions corresponding to two short α-helices involving residues 229-236 and 239-247. Segment VII includes one long helical region spanning residues 255-274. The NMR structure of the peptide containing transmembrane domains VI and VII was very similar to the previously published structures of the single-transmembrane segments except that TM VII was not kinked. Tryptophan scanning site-directed mutagenesis of TM VI demonstrated that mutation of residues V240-V245 to tryptophan eliminated NHE1 activity when the full length protein was expressed in cells. In contrast, mutants F246W and E247W were functional. Double mutant V242F/F260V retained activity, while the individual mutations were not active. The results suggest that the region of TM VI from V240 to V245 is closely associated with TM VII and that, in agreement with the NMR structure of VI-VII segments, V242 and F260 are in close association. A study of two transmembrane peptides provides further insight into the structure of the NHE1 protein.

  4. Structural basis of typhod: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PilS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  5. Structural basis of typhoid: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PiLS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, A.M.; Saxena, A.; Mok, H. Y.-K.; Swaminathan, K.

    2009-11-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein ({Delta}PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of {Delta}PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 {angstrom}, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  6. Structural Basis of Typhoid: Salmonella typhi Type IVb pilin (PilS) and Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulatory Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  7. Structural Determinants of Binding the Seven-transmembrane Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R).

    PubMed

    Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Yang, Linlin; Song, Gaojie; Dai, Antao; Cai, Xiaoqing; Feng, Yang; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Hanson, Michael A; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2016-06-17

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors. Members of the class B family are distinguished by their large extracellular domain, which works cooperatively with the canonical seven-transmembrane (7TM) helical domain to signal in response to binding of various peptide hormones. We have combined structure-based site-specific mutational studies with molecular dynamics simulations of a full-length model of GLP-1R bound to multiple peptide ligand variants. Despite the high sequence similarity between GLP-1R and its closest structural homologue, the glucagon receptor (GCGR), nearly half of the 62 stably expressed mutants affected GLP-1R in a different manner than the corresponding mutants in GCGR. The molecular dynamics simulations of wild-type and mutant GLP-1R·ligand complexes provided molecular insights into GLP-1R-specific recognition mechanisms for the N terminus of GLP-1 by residues in the 7TM pocket and explained how glucagon-mimicking GLP-1 mutants restored binding affinity for (GCGR-mimicking) GLP-1R mutants. Structural analysis of the simulations suggested that peptide ligand binding mode variations in the 7TM binding pocket are facilitated by movement of the extracellular domain relative to the 7TM bundle. These differences in binding modes may account for the pharmacological differences between GLP-1 peptide variants.

  8. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  9. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    SciTech Connect

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein from P. vivax, a homolog of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), has been solved to a resolution of 1.3 Å. The inferred interaction surface near the anion-binding site is found to include a distinctive left-handed α-helix. The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family.

  10. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36.

    PubMed

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127-279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127-279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions.

  11. Three Dimensional Structure Prediction of Fatty Acid Binding Site on Human Transmembrane Receptor CD36

    PubMed Central

    Tarhda, Zineb; Semlali, Oussama; Kettani, Anas; Moussa, Ahmed; Abumrad, Nada A.; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    CD36 is an integral membrane protein which is thought to have a hairpin-like structure with alpha-helices at the C and N terminals projecting through the membrane as well as a larger extracellular loop. This receptor interacts with a number of ligands including oxidized low density lipoprotein and long chain fatty acids (LCFAs). It is also implicated in lipid metabolism and heart diseases. It is therefore important to determine the 3D structure of the CD36 site involved in lipid binding. In this study, we predict the 3D structure of the fatty acid (FA) binding site [127–279 aa] of the CD36 receptor based on homology modeling with X-ray structure of Human Muscle Fatty Acid Binding Protein (PDB code: 1HMT). Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the resulting model suggests that this model was reliable and stable, taking in consideration over 97.8% of the residues in the most favored regions as well as the significant overall quality factor. Protein analysis, which relied on the secondary structure prediction of the target sequence and the comparison of 1HMT and CD36 [127–279 aa] secondary structures, led to the determination of the amino acid sequence consensus. These results also led to the identification of the functional sites on CD36 and revealed the presence of residues which may play a major role during ligand-protein interactions. PMID:24348024

  12. Structural and functional studies of the HAMP domain of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Ryuta; Falzon, Liliana; Yoshida, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inouye, Masayori

    2007-09-07

    The HAMP domain plays an essential role in signal transduction not only in histidine kinase but also in a number of other signal-transducing receptor proteins. Here we expressed the EnvZ HAMP domain (Arg(180)-Thr(235)) with the R218K mutation (termed L(RK)) or with L(RK) connected with domain A (Arg(180)-Arg(289)) (termed LA(RK)) of EnvZ, an osmosensing transmembrane histidine kinase in Escherichia coli, by fusing it with protein S. The L(RK) and LA(RK) proteins were purified after removing protein S. The CD analysis of the isolated L protein revealed that it consists of a random structure or is unstructured. This suggests that the EnvZ HAMP domain by itself is unable to form a stable structure and that this structural fragility may be important for its role in signal transduction. Interestingly the substitution of Ala(193) in the EnvZ HAMP domain with valine or leucine in Tez1A1, a chimeric protein of Tar and EnvZ, caused a constitutive OmpC phenotype. The CD analysis of LA(RK)(A193L) revealed that this mutated HAMP domain possesses considerable secondary structures and that the thermostability of this entire LA(RK)(A193L) became substantially lower than that of LA(RK) or just domain A, indicating that the structure of the HAMP domain with the A193L mutation affects the stability of downstream domain A. This results in cooperative thermodenaturation of domain A with the mutated HAMP domain. These results are discussed in light of the recently solved NMR structure of the HAMP domain from a thermophilic bacterium (Hulko, M., Berndt, F., Gruber, M., Linder, J. U., Truffault, V., Schultz, A., Martin, J., Schultz, J. E., Lupas, A. N., and Coles, M. (2006) Cell 126, 929-940).

  13. Crystal structure of the complete integrin αVβ3 ectodomain plus an α/β transmembrane fragment

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jian-Ping; Mahalingham, Bhuvaneshwari; Alonso, Jose Luis; Borrelli, Laura Ann; Rui, Xianliang; Anand, Saurabh; Hyman, Bradley T.; Rysiok, Thomas; Müller-Pompalla, Dirk; Goodman, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the crystal structure of 1TM-αVβ3, which represents the complete unconstrained ectodomain plus short C-terminal transmembrane stretches of the αV and β3 subunits. 1TM-αVβ3 is more compact and less active in solution when compared with ΔTM-αVβ3, which lacks the short C-terminal stretches. The structure reveals a bent conformation and defines the α–β interface between IE2 (EGF-like 2) and the thigh domains. Modifying this interface by site-directed mutagenesis leads to robust integrin activation. Fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy of inactive full-length αVβ3 on live cells yields a donor–membrane acceptor distance, which is consistent with the bent conformation and does not change in the activated integrin. These data are the first direct demonstration of conformational coupling of the integrin leg and head domains, identify the IE2–thigh interface as a critical steric barrier in integrin activation, and suggest that inside-out activation in intact cells may involve conformational changes other than the postulated switch to a genu-linear state. PMID:19704023

  14. The conserved transmembrane proteoglycan Perdido/Kon-tiki is essential for myofibrillogenesis and sarcomeric structure in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Moreno, Juan J; Bischoff, Marcus; Martín-Bermudo, Maria D; Estrada, Beatriz

    2014-07-15

    Muscle differentiation requires the assembly of high-order structures called myofibrils, composed of sarcomeres. Even though the molecular organization of sarcomeres is well known, the mechanisms underlying myofibrillogenesis are poorly understood. It has been proposed that integrin-dependent adhesion nucleates myofibrils at the periphery of the muscle cell to sustain sarcomere assembly. Here, we report a role for the gene perdido (perd, also known as kon-tiki, a transmembrane chondroitin proteoglycan) in myofibrillogenesis. Expression of perd RNAi in muscles, prior to adult myogenesis, can induce misorientation and detachment of Drosophila adult abdominal muscles. In comparison to controls, perd-depleted muscles contain fewer myofibrils, which are localized at the cell periphery. These myofibrils are detached from each other and display a defective sarcomeric structure. Our results demonstrate that the extracellular matrix receptor Perd has a specific role in the assembly of myofibrils and in sarcomeric organization. We suggest that Perd acts downstream or in parallel to integrins to enable the connection of nascent myofibrils to the Z-bands. Our work identifies the Drosophila adult abdominal muscles as a model to investigate in vivo the mechanisms behind myofibrillogenesis.

  15. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  16. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  17. Crystal structure of F-93 from Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1, a winged-helix DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Paul; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Kümmel, Daniel; Gauss, George H; Gilmore, John; Wiedenheft, Blake; Young, Mark; Lawrence, C Martin

    2004-11-01

    Sulfolobus spindle-shaped viruses (SSVs), or Fuselloviridae, are ubiquitous crenarchaeal viruses found in high-temperature acidic hot springs around the world (pH /=70 degrees C). Because they are relatively easy to isolate, they represent the best studied of the crenarchaeal viruses. This is particularly true for the type virus, SSV1, which contains a double-stranded DNA genome of 15.5 kilobases, encoding 34 putative open reading frames. Interestingly, the genome shows little sequence similarity to organisms other than its SSV homologues. Together, sequence similarity and biochemical analyses have suggested functions for only 6 of the 34 open reading frames. Thus, even though SSV1 is the best-studied crenarchaeal virus, functions for most (28) of its open reading frames remain unknown. We have undertaken biochemical and structural studies for the gene product of open reading frame F-93. We find that F-93 exists as a homodimer in solution and that a tight dimer is also present in the 2.7-A crystal structure. Further, the crystal structure reveals a fold that is homologous to the SlyA and MarR subfamilies of winged-helix DNA binding proteins. This strongly suggests that F-93 functions as a transcription factor that recognizes a (pseudo-)palindromic DNA target sequence.

  18. Assembly of transmembrane helices of simple polytopic membrane proteins from sequence conservation patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, Yungki; Helms, Volkhard

    2006-09-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of most membrane proteins consist of helix bundles. The seemingly simple task of TM helix bundle assembly has turned out to be extremely difficult. This is true even for simple TM helix bundle proteins, i.e., those that have the simple form of compact TM helix bundles. Herein, we present a computational method that is capable of generating native-like structural models for simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices based on sequence conservation patterns. Thus, the only requirement for our method is the presence of more than 30 homologous sequences for an accurate extraction of sequence conservation patterns. The prediction method first computes a number of representative well-packed conformations for each pair of contacting TM helices, and then a library of tertiary folds is generated by overlaying overlapping TM helices of the representative conformations. This library is scored using sequence conservation patterns, and a subsequent clustering analysis yields five final models. Assuming that neighboring TM helices in the sequence contact each other (but not that TM helices A and G contact each other), the method produced structural models of Calpha atom root-mean-square deviation (CA RMSD) of 3-5 A from corresponding crystal structures for bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, sensory rhodopsin II, and rhodopsin. In blind predictions, this type of contact knowledge is not available. Mimicking this, predictions were made for the rotor of the V-type Na(+)-adenosine triphosphatase without such knowledge. The CA RMSD between the best model and its crystal structure is only 3.4 A, and its contact accuracy reaches 55%. Furthermore, the model correctly identifies the binding pocket for sodium ion. These results demonstrate that the method can be readily applied to ab initio structure prediction of simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices.

  19. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: structural transitions, triple points and collapsed plectonemes

    PubMed Central

    Marko, John F.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained, and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P and L-DNA, to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one “inflated” by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations, and the other “collapsed”, with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound “Q”-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched “S”-DNA and strand-separated “stress-melted” DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or in terms of linking number density, from σ = −5 to +3. PMID:24483501

  20. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: Structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John F.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ =-5 to +3.

  1. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes.

    PubMed

    Marko, John F; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ=-5 to +3.

  2. A model for the [C+-GxC]n triple helix derived from observation of the C+-GxC base triplet in a crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Nunn, C M; Trent, J O; Neidle, S

    1997-10-13

    A molecular modelling study on the [C+-GxC]n triple helix is reported. We have observed the C+-GxC base triplet in the crystal structure of an oligonucleotide-drug complex, between the minor-groove drug netropsin and the decanucleotide d(CGCAATTGCG)2. The complex was crystallised at pH 7.0, but the crystal structure, at a resolution of 2.4 A, shows that a terminal cytosine has become protonated and participates in a parallel C+-GxC base triplet. The structure of this triplet and its associated sugar-phosphate backbones have been energy-refined and then used to generate a triple helix. This has characteristics of the B-type family of DNA structures for two strands, with the third, the C+ strand, having backbone conformations closer to the A family.

  3. Ectopic Expression of a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Gene Transactivates Parallel Pathways of Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis. Structure, Expression Analysis, and Genetic Control of Leucoanthocyanidin 4-Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase Genes in Lotus corniculatus1[W

    PubMed Central

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P.; Madeo, Laura; Arcioni, Sergio; Martens, Stefan; Damiani, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are plant secondary metabolites and are composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units in higher plant species. Due to the ability of PAs to bind reversibly with plant proteins to improve digestion and reduce bloat, engineering this pathway in leaves is a major goal for forage breeders. Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase (LAR), two genes encoding enzymes committed to epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis, respectively, in Lotus corniculatus. We show the presence of two LAR gene families (LAR1 and LAR2) and that the steady-state levels of ANR and LAR1 genes correlate with the levels of PAs in leaves of wild-type and transgenic plants. Interestingly, ANR and LAR1, but not LAR2, genes produced active proteins following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and are affected by the same basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes PA accumulation in cells of palisade and spongy mesophyll. This study provides direct evidence that the same subclass of transcription factors can mediate the expression of the structural genes of both branches of PA biosynthesis. PMID:17098849

  4. Ectopic expression of a basic helix-loop-helix gene transactivates parallel pathways of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. structure, expression analysis, and genetic control of leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase and anthocyanidin reductase genes in Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P; Madeo, Laura; Arcioni, Sergio; Martens, Stefan; Damiani, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are plant secondary metabolites and are composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units in higher plant species. Due to the ability of PAs to bind reversibly with plant proteins to improve digestion and reduce bloat, engineering this pathway in leaves is a major goal for forage breeders. Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase (LAR), two genes encoding enzymes committed to epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis, respectively, in Lotus corniculatus. We show the presence of two LAR gene families (LAR1 and LAR2) and that the steady-state levels of ANR and LAR1 genes correlate with the levels of PAs in leaves of wild-type and transgenic plants. Interestingly, ANR and LAR1, but not LAR2, genes produced active proteins following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and are affected by the same basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes PA accumulation in cells of palisade and spongy mesophyll. This study provides direct evidence that the same subclass of transcription factors can mediate the expression of the structural genes of both branches of PA biosynthesis.

  5. Polysaccharide hydrogels with tunable stiffness and provasculogenic properties via α-helix to β-sheet switch in secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Aurelien; Christensen, Jon; Lüdeke, Steffen; Kohler, Esther; Tobias, Simon; Matloubi, Maziar; Thomann, Ralf; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical aspects of the cellular environment can influence cell function, and in this context hydrogels can serve as an instructive matrix. Here we report that physicochemical properties of hydrogels derived from polysaccharides (agarose, κ-carrageenan) having an α-helical backbone can be tailored by inducing a switch in the secondary structure from α-helix to β-sheet through carboxylation. This enables the gel modulus to be tuned over four orders of magnitude (G′ 6 Pa–3.6 × 104 Pa) independently of polymer concentration and molecular weight. Using carboxylated agarose gels as a screening platform, we demonstrate that soft-carboxylated agarose provides a unique environment for the polarization of endothelial cells in the presence of soluble and bound signals, which notably does not occur in fibrin and collagen gels. Furthermore, endothelial cells organize into freestanding lumens over 100 μm in length. The finding that a biomaterial can modulate soluble and bound signals provides impetus for exploring mechanobiology paradigms in regenerative therapies. PMID:23886665

  6. Hemolytic lectin CEL-III heptamerizes via a large structural transition from α-helices to a β-barrel during the transmembrane pore formation process.

    PubMed

    Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2014-05-02

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) and one oligomerization domain (domain 3). After binding to the cell surface carbohydrate chains through domains 1 and 2, domain 3 self-associates to form transmembrane pores, leading to cell lysis or death, which resembles other pore-forming toxins of diverse organisms. To elucidate the pore formation mechanism of CEL-III, the crystal structure of the CEL-III oligomer was determined. The CEL-III oligomer has a heptameric structure with a long β-barrel as a transmembrane pore. This β-barrel is composed of 14 β-strands resulting from a large structural transition of α-helices accommodated in the interface between domains 1 and 2 and domain 3 in the monomeric structure, suggesting that the dissociation of these α-helices triggered their structural transition into a β-barrel. After heptamerization, domains 1 and 2 form a flat ring, in which all carbohydrate-binding sites remain bound to cell surface carbohydrate chains, stabilizing the transmembrane β-barrel in a position perpendicular to the plane of the lipid bilayer.

  7. Structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana major latex proteins represent novel helix-grip folds

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2009-06-02

    Here we report the first structures of two major latex proteins (MLPs) which display unique structural differences from the canonical Bet v 1 fold described earlier. MLP28 (SwissProt/TrEMBL ID Q9SSK9), the product of gene At1g70830.1, and the At1g24000.1 gene product (Swiss- Prot/TrEMBL ID P0C0B0), proteins which share 32% sequence identity, were independently selected as foldspace targets by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics. The structure of a single domain (residues 17-173) of MLP28 was solved by NMR spectroscopy, while the full-length At1g24000.1 structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. MLP28 displays greater than 30% sequence identity to at least eight MLPs from other species. For example, the MLP28 sequence shares 64% identity to peach Pp-MLP119 and 55% identity to cucumber Csf2.20 In contrast, the At1g24000.1 sequence is highly divergent (see Fig. 1), containing a gap of 33 amino acids when compared with all other known MLPs. Even when the gap is excluded, the sequence identity with MLPs from other species is less than 30%. Unlike some of the MLPs from other species, none of the A. thaliana MLPs have been characterized biochemically. We show by NMR chemical shift mapping that At1g24000.1 binds progesterone, demonstrating that despite its sequence dissimilarity, the hydrophobic binding pocket is conserved and, therefore, may play a role in its biological function and that of the MLP family in general.

  8. NMR Dynamics of Transmembrane and Intracellular Domains of p75NTR in Lipid-Protein Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Mineev, Konstantin S.; Goncharuk, Sergey A.; Kuzmichev, Pavel K.; Vilar, Marçal; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    P75NTR is a type I integral membrane protein that plays a key role in neurotrophin signaling. However, structural data for the receptor in various functional states are sparse and controversial. In this work, we studied the spatial structure and mobility of the transmembrane and intracellular parts of p75NTR, incorporated into lipid-protein nanodiscs of various sizes and compositions, by solution NMR spectroscopy. Our data reveal a high level of flexibility and disorder in the juxtamembrane chopper domain of p75NTR, which results in the motions of the receptor death domain being uncoupled from the motions of the transmembrane helix. Moreover, none of the intracellular domains of p75NTR demonstrated a propensity to interact with the membrane or to self-associate under the experimental conditions. The obtained data are discussed in the context of the receptor activation mechanism. PMID:26287629

  9. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ping; Swanson, Kurt A.; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2014-10-02

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein plays multiple roles in viral entry and egress, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activating the fusion (F) protein to activate membrane fusion and viral entry, and cleaving sialic acid from carbohydrate chains. HN is an oligomeric integral membrane protein consisting of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, a stalk region, and an enzymatically active neuraminidase (NA) domain. Structures of the HN NA domains have been solved previously; however, the structure of the stalk region has remained elusive. The stalk region contains specificity determinants for F interactions and activation, underlying the requirement for homotypic F and HN interactions in viral entry. Mutations of the Newcastle disease virus HN stalk region have been shown to affect both F activation and NA activities, but a structural basis for understanding these dual affects on HN functions has been lacking. Here, we report the structure of the Newcastle disease virus HN ectodomain, revealing dimers of NA domain dimers flanking the N-terminal stalk domain. The stalk forms a parallel tetrameric coiled-coil bundle (4HB) that allows classification of extensive mutational data, providing insight into the functional roles of the stalk region. Mutations that affect both F activation and NA activities map predominantly to the 4HB hydrophobic core, whereas mutations that affect only F-protein activation map primarily to the 4HB surface. Two of four NA domains interact with the 4HB stalk, and residues at this interface in both the stalk and NA domain have been implicated in HN function.

  10. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of DNA Helix Invasion by the Bacterial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase MutM*

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Qi, Yan; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    MutM is a bacterial DNA glycosylase that serves as the first line of defense against the highly mutagenic 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) lesion, catalyzing glycosidic bond cleavage of oxoG to initiate base excision DNA repair. Previous work has shown that MutM actively interrogates DNA for the presence of an intrahelical oxoG lesion. This interrogation process involves significant buckling and bending of the DNA to promote extrusion of oxoG from the duplex. Structural snapshots have revealed several different highly conserved residues that are prominently inserted into the duplex in the vicinity of the target oxoG before and after base extrusion has occurred. However, the roles of these helix-invading residues during the lesion recognition and base extrusion process remain unclear. In this study, we set out to probe the function of residues Phe114 and Met77 in oxoG recognition and repair. Here we report a detailed biochemical and structural characterization of MutM variants containing either a F114A or M77A mutation, both of which showed significant decreases in the efficiency of oxoG repair. These data reveal that Met77 plays an important role in stabilizing the lesion-extruded conformation of the DNA. Phe114, on the other hand, appears to destabilize the intrahelical state of the oxoG lesion, primarily by buckling the target base pair. We report the observation of a completely unexpected interaction state, in which the target base pair is ruptured but remains fully intrahelical; this structure vividly illustrates the disruptive influence of MutM on the target base pair. PMID:23404556

  11. A'-form RNA double helix in the single crystal structure of r(UGAGCUUCGGCUC).

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Fujii, S; Hiroaki, H; Sakata, T; Tanaka, T; Uesugi, S; Tomita, K; Kyogoku, Y

    1999-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the presence of the A'-RNA conformation using the single crystal structure of a tridecamer: r(UGAGCUUCGGCUC). The average A'-RNA conformation deduced from X-ray fiber diffraction data had only been available previously, but now the presence of the A'-RNA conformation has been found in a single crystal structure for the first time. Statistical analysis showed that the A'-RNA conformation is distinguishable from the A-RNA conformation in a plot of the major groove width against the base pair inclination angle. The major groove of the A'-RNA conformation is wide enough to accommodate a protein or peptide while that of the A-RNA conformation is too narrow to do so. The presence of the A'-RNA conformation is significant for protein-RNA interaction. PMID:9927725

  12. Correlation of bistranded clustered abasic DNA lesion processing with structural and dynamic DNA helix distortion

    PubMed Central

    Bignon, Emmanuelle; Gattuso, Hugo; Morell, Christophe; Dehez, François; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Clustered apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP; abasic) DNA lesions produced by ionizing radiation are by far more cytotoxic than isolated AP lesion entities. The structure and dynamics of a series of seven 23-bp oligonucleotides featuring simple bistranded clustered damage sites, comprising of two AP sites, zero, one, three or five bases 3′ or 5′ apart from each other, were investigated through 400 ns explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. They provide representative structures of synthetically engineered multiply damage sites-containing oligonucleotides whose repair was investigated experimentally (Nucl. Acids Res. 2004, 32:5609-5620; Nucl. Acids Res. 2002, 30: 2800–2808). The inspection of extrahelical positioning of the AP sites, bulge and non Watson–Crick hydrogen bonding corroborates the experimental measurements of repair efficiencies by bacterial or human AP endonucleases Nfo and APE1, respectively. This study provides unprecedented knowledge into the structure and dynamics of clustered abasic DNA lesions, notably rationalizing the non-symmetry with respect to 3′ to 5′ position. In addition, it provides strong mechanistic insights and basis for future studies on the effects of clustered DNA damage on the recognition and processing of these lesions by bacterial or human DNA repair enzymes specialized in the processing of such lesions. PMID:27587587

  13. Structural and dynamic study of the tetramerization region of non-erythroid alpha-spectrin: a frayed helix revealed by site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Li, Qufei; Fung, L W-M

    2009-01-13

    The N-terminal region of alpha-spectrin is responsible for its association with beta-spectrin in a heterodimer, forming functional tetramers. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaII-spectrin) has a significantly higher association affinity for beta-spectrin than the homologous erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaI-spectrin). We have previously determined the solution structure of the N-terminal region of alphaI-spectrin by NMR methods, but currently no structural information is available for alphaII-spectrin. We have used cysteine scanning, spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods to study the tetramerization region of alphaII-spectrin. EPR data clearly show that, in alphaII-spectrin, the first nine N-terminal residues were unstructured, followed by an irregular helix (helix C'), frayed at the N-terminal end, but rigid at the C-terminal end, which merges into the putative triple-helical structural domain. The region corresponding to the important unstructured junction region linking helix C' to the first structural domain in alphaI-spectrin was clearly structured. On the basis of the published model for aligning helices A', B', and C', important interactions among residues in helix C' of alphaI- and alphaII-spectrin and helices A' and B' of betaI- and betaII-spectrin are identified, suggesting similar coiled coil helical bundling for spectrin I and II in forming tetramers. The differences in affinity are likely due to the differences in the conformation of the junction regions. Equilibrium dissociation constants of spin-labeled alphaII and betaI complexes from ITC measurements indicate that residues 15, 19, 37, and 40 are functionally important residues in alphaII-spectrin. Interestingly, all four corresponding homologous residues in alphaI-spectrin (residues 24, 28, 46, and 49) have been reported to be clinically significant residues involved in hematological diseases.

  14. Triple-helix DNA structural studies using a Love wave acoustic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-12-15

    The development of sensors for detecting the conformation of surface-attached molecules is an emerging field with significance in the pharmaceutical industry and in drug design. In this work, triplex-forming oligos (TFOs), a separate class of non-natural DNA bending agents that can affect the mechanical properties of DNA through the formation of triple-helical structures of specific conformation and/or flexibility, are used as a model system in combination with an acoustic biosensor to determine molecular geometrical features. In practice, the degree of bending of a specific DNA target caused by a particular TFO was evaluated by measuring the ratio of acoustic energy change over phase change observed during the binding of pre-formed triplex DNA molecules to the device surface. The DNA bending angle derived via acoustic measurements is in excellent agreement with previously reported values using molecular biology techniques. The reported acoustic technique appears quite appealing for the biophysical study of DNA molecules providing rapid qualitative and quantitative information, at the same time holding promise to be developed as a high-throughput method for the evaluation of DNA conformational changes.

  15. Structure and function of transmembrane segment XII in osmosensor and osmoprotectant transporter ProP of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Culham, Doreen E; Vernikovska, Yaroslava I; Keates, Robert A B; Boggs, Joan M; Wood, Janet M

    2007-05-15

    Escherichia coli transporter ProP acts as both an osmosensor and an osmoregulator. As medium osmolality rises, ProP is activated and mediates H+-coupled uptake of osmolytes like proline. A homology model of ProP with 12-transmembrane (TM) helices and cytoplasmic termini was created, and the protein's topology was substantiated experimentally. Residues 468-497, at the end of the C-terminal domain and linked to TM XII, form an intermolecular, homodimeric alpha-helical coiled-coil that tunes the transporter's response to osmolality. We aim to further define the structure and function of ProP residues Q415-E440, predicted to include TM XII. Each residue was replaced with cysteine (Cys) in a histidine-tagged, Cys-less ProP variant (ProP*). Cys at positions 415-418 and 438-440 were most reactive with Oregon Green Maleimide (OGM), suggesting that residues 419 through 437 are in the membrane. Except for V429-I433, reactivity of those Cys varied with helical periodicity. Cys predicted to face the interior of ProP were more reactive than Cys predicted to face the lipid. The former may be exposed to hydrated polar residues in the protein interior, particularly on the periplasmic side. Intermolecular cross-links formed when ProP* variants with Cys at positions 419, 420, 422, and 439 were treated with DTME. Thus TM XII can participate, along its entire length, in the dimer interface of ProP. Cys substitution E440C rendered ProP* inactive. All other variants retained more than 30% of the proline uptake activity of ProP* at high osmolality. Most variants with Cys substitutions in the periplasmic half of TM XII activated at lower osmolalities than ProP*. Variants with Cys substitutions on one face of the cytoplasmic half of TM XII required a higher osmolality to activate. They included elements of a GXXXG motif that are predicted to form the interface of TM XII with TM VII. These studies define the position of ProP TM XII within the membrane, further support the predicted

  16. Highly Coarse-Grained Representations of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Numerous biomolecules and biomolecular complexes, including transmembrane proteins (TMPs), are symmetric or at least have approximate symmetries. Highly coarse-grained models of such biomolecules, aiming at capturing the essential structural and dynamical properties on resolution levels coarser than the residue scale, must preserve the underlying symmetry. However, making these models obey the correct physics is in general not straightforward, especially at the highly coarse-grained resolution where multiple (∼3–30 in the current study) amino acid residues are represented by a single coarse-grained site. In this paper, we propose a simple and fast method of coarse-graining TMPs obeying this condition. The procedure involves partitioning transmembrane domains into contiguous segments of equal length along the primary sequence. For the coarsest (lowest-resolution) mappings, it turns out to be most important to satisfy the symmetry in a coarse-grained model. As the resolution is increased to capture more detail, however, it becomes gradually more important to match modular repeats in the secondary structure (such as helix-loop repeats) instead. A set of eight TMPs of various complexity, functionality, structural topology, and internal symmetry, representing different classes of TMPs (ion channels, transporters, receptors, adhesion, and invasion proteins), has been examined. The present approach can be generalized to other systems possessing exact or approximate symmetry, allowing for reliable and fast creation of multiscale, highly coarse-grained mappings of large biomolecular assemblies. PMID:28043122

  17. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, Richard Wood

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  18. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  19. Molecular dynamics investigations on the effect of D amino acid substitution in a triple-helix structure and the stability of collagen.

    PubMed

    Punitha, V; Raman, S Sundar; Parthasarathi, R; Subramanian, V; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, T

    2009-07-02

    Studies on the structure and stability of peptides and proteins during l-->d configurational change are certainly important for the designing of peptides with new biological activity and protein engineering. The l-->d amino acid (d AA) changes have been observed in aged proteins such as collagen. Hence, in this study, an attempt has been made to explore the effect of the replacement of l amino acid (l AA) in the model collagen-like peptides with d AA and the origin of structural stability (destability) has been traced using the molecular dynamics (MD) method employing the AMBER force field. Our results reveal that the substitution of d AA produces a large local disruption to the triple-helical structure. Formation of a kink (bulge) at the site of substitution is observed from the detailed analysis of MD trajectory. However, this local perturbation of kinked helix changes the direction of the helices and affects the relative orientation of the respective AA residues for helix-helix interaction, enough to affect the overall stability of the model collagen-like peptide. The destabilization energy per d Ala substitution is 7.87 kcal/mol, which is similar to the value for the Gly-->Ala mutation in collagen. Since the Gly-->Ala mutation is involved in genetic disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), the l-->d configurational change may produce a similar effect on collagen.

  20. Snorkeling preferences foster an amino acid composition bias in transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Aaron K; Lee, Yohan; Kim, Sanguk; Bowie, James U

    2004-05-28

    By analyzing transmembrane (TM) helices in known structures, we find that some polar amino acids are more frequent at the N terminus than at the C terminus. We propose the asymmetry occurs because most polar amino acids are better able to snorkel their polar atoms away from the membrane core at the N terminus than at the C terminus. Two findings lead us to this proposition: (1) side-chain conformations are influenced strongly by the N or C-terminal position of the amino acid in the bilayer, and (2) the favored snorkeling direction of an amino acid correlates well with its N to C-terminal composition bias. Our results suggest that TM helix predictions should incorporate an N to C-terminal composition bias, that rotamer preferences of TM side-chains are position-dependent, and that the ability to snorkel influences the evolutionary selection of amino acids for the helix N and C termini.

  1. The vaccinia virus 14-kilodalton (A27L) fusion protein forms a triple coiled-coil structure and interacts with the 21-kilodalton (A17L) virus membrane protein through a C-terminal alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, M I; Rivas, G; Cregut, D; Serrano, L; Esteban, M

    1998-12-01

    The vaccinia virus 14-kDa protein (encoded by the A27L gene) plays an important role in the biology of the virus, acting in virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell fusions. The protein is located on the surface of the intracellular mature virus form and is essential for both the release of extracellular enveloped virus from the cells and virus spread. Sequence analysis predicts the existence of four regions in this protein: a structureless region from amino acids 1 to 28, a helical region from residues 29 to 37, a triple coiled-coil helical region from residues 44 to 72, and a Leu zipper motif at the C terminus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking studies of the purified wild-type protein and several mutant forms, lacking one or more of the above regions or with point mutations, support the above-described structural division of the 14-kDa protein. The two contiguous cysteine residues at positions 71 and 72 are not responsible for the formation of 14-kDa protein trimers. The location of hydrophobic residues at the a and d positions on a helical wheel and of charged amino acids in adjacent positions, e and g, suggests that the hydrophobic and ionic interactions in the triple coiled-coil helical region are involved in oligomer formation. This conjecture was supported by the construction of a three-helix bundle model and molecular dynamics. Binding assays with purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and cytoplasmic extracts from cells infected with a virus that does not produce the 14-kDa protein during infection (VVindA27L) show that the 21-kDa protein (encoded by the A17L gene) is the specific viral binding partner and identify the putative Leu zipper, the predicted third alpha-helix on the C terminus of the 14-kDa protein, as the region involved in protein binding. These findings were confirmed in vivo, following transfection of animal cells with plasmid vectors expressing mutant forms of the 14-kDa protein and

  2. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel.

    PubMed

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-11-03

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization.

  3. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V.; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-01-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization. PMID:26536261

  4. Mechanism of helix induction in poly(4-carboxyphenyl isocyanide) with chiral amines and memory of the macromolecular helicity and its helical structures.

    PubMed

    Hase, Yoko; Nagai, Kanji; Iida, Hiroki; Maeda, Katsuhiro; Ochi, Noriaki; Sawabe, Kyoichi; Sakajiri, Koichi; Okoshi, Kento; Yashima, Eiji

    2009-08-05

    An optically inactive poly(4-carboxyphenyl isocyanide) (poly-1-H) changed its structure into the prevailing, one-handed helical structure upon complexation with optically active amines in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and water, and the complexes show a characteristic induced circular dichroism in the polymer backbone region. Moreover, the macromolecular helicity induced in water and aqueous organic solutions containing more than 50 vol % water could be "memorized" even after complete removal of the chiral amines (h-poly-1b-H), while that induced in DMSO and DMSO-water mixtures containing less than 30 vol % water could not maintain the optical activity after removal of the chiral amines (poly-1a-H). We now report fully detailed studies of the helix induction mechanism with chiral amines and the memory of the macromolecular helicity in water and a DMSO-water mixture by various spectroscopic measurements, theoretical calculations, and persistence length measurements together with X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. From the spectroscopic results, such as circular dichroism (CD), absorption, IR, vibrational CD, and NMR of poly-1a-H, h-poly-1b-H, and original poly-1-H, we concluded that the specific configurational isomerization around the C horizontal lineN double bonds occurs during the helicity induction process in each solvent. In order to obtain the structural information, XRD measurements were done on the uniaxially oriented films of the corresponding methyl esters (poly-1-Me, poly-1a-Me, and h-poly-1b-Me) prepared from their liquid crystalline polymer solutions. On the basis of the XRD analyses, the most plausible helical structure of poly-1a-Me was proposed to be a 9-unit/5-turn helix with two monomer units as a repeating unit, and that of h-poly-1b-Me was proposed to be a 10-unit/3-turn helix consisting of one repeating monomer unit. The density functional theory calculations of poly(phenyl isocyanide), a model polymer of h-poly-1b-Me, afforded a 7-unit/2-turn

  5. Cell-free expression of the APP transmembrane fragments with Alzheimer's disease mutations using algal amino acid mixture for structural NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bocharova, Olga V; Urban, Anatoly S; Nadezhdin, Kirill D; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Structural investigations need ready supply of the isotope labeled proteins with inserted mutations n the quantities sufficient for the heteronuclear NMR. Though cell-free expression system has been widely used in the past years, high startup cost and complex compound composition prevent many researches from the developing this technique, especially for membrane protein production. Here we demonstrate the utility of a robust, cost-optimized cell-free expression technique for production of the physiologically important transmembrane fragment of amyloid precursor protein, APP686-726, containing Alzheimer's disease mutations in the juxtamembrane (E693G, Arctic form) and the transmembrane parts (V717G, London form, or L723P, Australian form). The protein cost was optimized by varying the FM/RM ratio as well as the amino acid concentration. We obtained the wild-type and mutant transmembrane fragments in the pellet mode of continuous exchange cell-free system consuming only commercial algal mixture of the (13)C,(15)N-labeled amino acids. Scaling up analytical tests, we achieved milligram quantity yields of isotope labeled wild-type and mutant APP686-726 for structural studies by high resolution NMR spectroscopy in membrane mimicking environment. The described approach has from 5 to 23-fold cost advantage over the bacterial expression methods described earlier and 1.5 times exceeds our previous result obtained with the longer APP671-726WT fragment.

  6. Effect of secondary structure on the potential of mean force for poly-L-lysine in the alpha-Helix and beta-sheet conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, J.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    2001-10-30

    Because poly-L-lysine (PLL) can exist in the {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet conformation depending on solution preparation and solution conditions, PLL is a suitable candidate to probe the dependence of protein interactions on secondary structure. The osmotic second virial coefficient and weight-average molecular weight are reported from low-angle laser-light scattering measurements for PLL as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet content. Interactions between PLL molecules become more attractive as salt concentration increases due to screening of PLL charge by salt ions and at low salt concentration become more attractive as pH increases due to decreased net charge on PLL. The experimental results show that interactions are stronger for the {beta}-sheet conformation than for the {alpha}-helix conformation. A spherically-symmetric model for the potential of mean force is used to account for specific interactions not described by DLVO theory and to show how differences in secondary structure affect PLL interactions.

  7. Helix movement is coupled to displacement of the second extracellular loop in rhodopsin activation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Shivani; Hornak, Viktor; Yan, Elsa C Y; Syrett, Natalie; Goncalves, Joseph A; Hirshfeld, Amiram; Ziliox, Martine; Sakmar, Thomas P; Sheves, Mordechai; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O; Eilers, Markus

    2009-02-01

    The second extracellular loop (EL2) of rhodopsin forms a cap over the binding site of its photoreactive 11-cis retinylidene chromophore. A crucial question has been whether EL2 forms a reversible gate that opens upon activation or acts as a rigid barrier. Distance measurements using solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy between the retinal chromophore and the beta4 strand of EL2 show that the loop is displaced from the retinal binding site upon activation, and there is a rearrangement in the hydrogen-bonding networks connecting EL2 with the extracellular ends of transmembrane helices H4, H5 and H6. NMR measurements further reveal that structural changes in EL2 are coupled to the motion of helix H5 and breaking of the ionic lock that regulates activation. These results provide a comprehensive view of how retinal isomerization triggers helix motion and activation in this prototypical G protein-coupled receptor.

  8. Structural characterization of triple transmembrane domain containing fragments of a yeast G protein-coupled receptor in an organic : aqueous environment by solution-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fracchiolla, Katrina E; Cohen, Leah S; Arshava, Boris; Poms, Martin; Zerbe, Oliver; Becker, Jeffrey M; Naider, Fred

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes recent biophysical and protein expression experiments on polypeptides containing the N-terminus, the first, second, and third transmembrane (TM) domains and the contiguous loops of the α-factor receptor Ste2p, a G protein-coupled receptor. The 131-residue polypeptide Ste2p(G31-R161), TM1-TM3, was investigated by solution NMR in trifluoroethanol/water. TM1-TM3 contains helical TM domains at the predicted locations, supported by continuous sets of medium-range NOEs. In addition, a short helix N-terminal to TM1 was detected, as well as a short helical stretch in the first extracellular loop. Two 161-residue polypeptides, [Ste2p(M1-R161), NT-TM1-TM3], that contain the entire N-terminal sequence, one with a single mutation, were directly expressed and isolated from Escherichia coli in yields as high as 30 mg/L. Based on its increased stability, the L11P mutant will be used in future experiments to determine long-range interactions. The study demonstrated that 3-TM domains of a yeast G protein-coupled receptor can be produced in isotopically labeled form suitable for solution NMR studies. The quality of spectra is superior to data recorded in micelles and allows more rapid data analysis. No tertiary contacts have been determined, and if present, they are likely transient. This observation supports earlier studies by us that secondary structure was retained in smaller fragments, both in organic solvents and in detergent micelles, but that stable tertiary contacts may only be present when the protein is imbedded in lipids.

  9. The structure of the XPF-ssDNA complex underscores the distinct roles of the XPF and ERCC1 helix- hairpin-helix domains in ss/ds DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Folkers, Gert E; van Dijk, Marc; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2012-04-04

    Human XPF/ERCC1 is a structure-specific DNA endonuclease that nicks the damaged DNA strand at the 5' end during nucleotide excision repair. We determined the structure of the complex of the C-terminal domain of XPF with 10 nt ssDNA. A positively charged region within the second helix of the first HhH motif contacts the ssDNA phosphate backbone. One guanine base is flipped out of register and positioned in a pocket contacting residues from both HhH motifs of XPF. Comparison to other HhH-containing proteins indicates a one-residue deletion in the second HhH motif of XPF that has altered the hairpin conformation, thereby permitting ssDNA interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that ERCC1 in the XPF-ERCC1 heterodimer can bind dsDNA. Combining the two observations gives a model that underscores the asymmetry of the human XPF/ERCC1 heterodimer in binding at an ss/ds DNA junction.

  10. Structural waters in the minor and major grooves of DNA--a major factor governing structural adjustments of the A-T mini-helix.

    PubMed

    Zubatiuk, Tetiana; Shishkin, Oleg; Gorb, Leonid; Hovorun, Dmytro; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-01-15

    The role of microhydration in structural adjustments of the AT-tract in B-DNA was studied at the B97-D/def2-SV(P) level. The (dA:dT)5 complexes with 10 water molecules in minor and 15 water molecules in major grooves were studied. The obtained network of hydrogen bonds revealed the dependence between the groove width and the types of water patterns. In the minor groove, the following patterns were observed: interstrand one-water bridges similar to that of the Dickerson "water spine" and interstrand two-water bridges. The network of structural waters in the major groove is more diverse than that in the minor groove, which agrees with crystallographic data. As the major groove is wider, it is enriched by water molecules forming two- and three-water bridges. Results suggest the nucleobase-water interactions in both grooves prevent AT-tract twisting and its "collapse" along the minor groove. Whereby, a helix structure with narrow minor and wide major grooves is formed. The structural waters affect the polynucleotide conformation so that it becomes similar to poly(dA)·poly(dT) in fibers and acquires features of the A-tracts in DNA in solution. We suggest that formation of specific water patterns in both grooves is the factor responsible for stabilization of A-tracts with a narrowed minor groove, leading in turn to their strong intrinsic bending in DNA.

  11. The Charge Structure of Helix 1 in the Prion Protein Regulates Conversion to Pathogenic PrPSc

    PubMed Central

    Norstrom, Eric M.; Mastrianni, James A.

    2006-01-01

    The prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders linked to a pathogenic conformer (PrPSc) of the normal prion protein (PrPC). Accumulation of PrPSc occurs via a poorly defined process in which PrPSc complexes with and converts endogenous PrPC to nascent PrPSc. Recent experiments have focused on the highly charged first alpha helix (H1) of PrP. It has been proposed that two putative asparagine-to-arginine intrahelical salt bridges stabilize H1 in PrPC yet form intermolecular ionic bonds with adjacent PrP molecules during conversion of PrPC to PrPSc (M. P. Morrissey and E. I. Shakhnovich, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96:11293-11298, 1999). Subsequent work (J. O. Speare et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278:12522-12529, 2003 using a cell-free assay of PrPSc conversion suggested that rather than promoting conversion, the salt bridges stabilize PrPC against it. However, the role of individual H1 charges in PrPSc generation has not yet been investigated. To approach this question, we systematically reversed or neutralized each charged residue in H1 and tested the effect on conversion to PrPSc in scrapie-infected murine neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells. We find that replacements of charged H1 residues with like charges permit conversion, while charge reversals hinder it. Neutralization of charges in the N-terminal (amino acids 143 to 146) but not the C-terminal (amino acids 147 to 151) half of H1 permits conversion, while complete reversal of charge orientation of the putative salt bridges produces a nonconvertible PrP. Circular dichroism spectroscopy studies and confocal microscopy immunofluorescence localization studies indicated that charge substitutions did not alter the secondary structure or cell surface expression of PrPC. These data support the necessity of specific charge orientations in H1 for a productive PrPSc-PrPC complex. PMID:16912302

  12. Common fold in helix-hairpin-helix proteins.

    PubMed

    Shao, X; Grishin, N V

    2000-07-15

    Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) is a widespread motif involved in non-sequence-specific DNA binding. The majority of HhH motifs function as DNA-binding modules, however, some of them are used to mediate protein-protein interactions or have acquired enzymatic activity by incorporating catalytic residues (DNA glycosylases). From sequence and structural analysis of HhH-containing proteins we conclude that most HhH motifs are integrated as a part of a five-helical domain, termed (HhH)(2) domain here. It typically consists of two consecutive HhH motifs that are linked by a connector helix and displays pseudo-2-fold symmetry. (HhH)(2) domains show clear structural integrity and a conserved hydrophobic core composed of seven residues, one residue from each alpha-helix and each hairpin, and deserves recognition as a distinct protein fold. In addition to known HhH in the structures of RuvA, RadA, MutY and DNA-polymerases, we have detected new HhH motifs in sterile alpha motif and barrier-to-autointegration factor domains, the alpha-subunit of Escherichia coli RNA-polymerase, DNA-helicase PcrA and DNA glycosylases. Statistically significant sequence similarity of HhH motifs and pronounced structural conservation argue for homology between (HhH)(2) domains in different protein families. Our analysis helps to clarify how non-symmetric protein motifs bind to the double helix of DNA through the formation of a pseudo-2-fold symmetric (HhH)(2) functional unit.

  13. Changes of properties of the soliton with temperature under influences of structure disorder in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng; Yu, Jia-feng; Liu, Mei-jie

    2010-05-01

    The changes of property of solitons in α-helix protein molecules with three channels under influences of fluctuations of structure parameters and thermal perturbation of medium are extensively investigated using dynamic equations in the improved theory, numerical simulation and Runge-Kutta method. In this investigation the peculiarities of the solitons are given first in the motions of short-time and long-time and its collision features at T = 0 K and biological temperature T = 300 K. This study shows that the solutions of dynamic equations are solitons, which are very stable at T = 0 and 300 K, although its amplitudes and velocity are somewhat decreased relative to that at T = 0 K, the soliton can transport over 1000 amino acid residues, its lifetime is, at least, 120 ps. Subsequently, studies are made of the changes of properties of the soliton with variations of temperature of the medium and fluctuations of structure parameters including mass sequence of amino acid residues and the coupling constant, force constant, dipole-dipole interaction, chain-chain interaction and ground state energy in the α-helix proteins. The investigations indicate that the soliton has high thermal stability and can transport along the molecular chains retaining amplitude, energy and velocity, although the fluctuations of the structure parameters and temperature of the medium increase continually. However, the solitons disperse in larger fluctuations at T = 300 K and higher temperatures than 315 K. Thus it is determined that the critical temperature of the soliton is 315 K. Finally reasons are given for the generation of high thermal stability of the soliton and the correctness of the improved model is demonstrated. It is concluded that the soliton in the improved model is very robust against structure disorder and thermal perturbation of the α-helix protein molecules at 300 K, and is a possible carrier of bio-energy transport, and the improved model is maybe a candidate for the

  14. Development of structural marker peptides for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in cell plasma membrane by reversed-footprinting mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Vahid; Bajrami, Bekim; Nemati, Reza; McShane, Adam J; Rueckert, Franz; Wells, Barrett; Yao, Xudong

    2015-09-01

    A targeted mass spectrometry-based method is presented that adopts the fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) for footprinting of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) membrane transporter at its original plasma membrane location. Two analytical imperatives were sought: (1) overall simplification in data acquisition and analysis and (2) lower quantitation limits, which enabled direct analysis of intrinsically low-abundance transmembrane proteins. These goals were achieved by using a reversed-footprinting technique that monitored the unoxidized peptides remaining after the FPOP treatment. In searching for structurally informative peptides, a workflow was designed for accurate and precise quantitation of CFTR peptides produced from proteolytically digesting the plasma membrane subproteome of cells. This sample preparation strategy mitigated the need for challenging purification of large quantities of structurally intact CFTR. On the basis of the interrogated peptides, it was proposed a concept of the structural marker peptide that could report CFTR structure and function in cells. The reversed-footprinting mass spectrometry extends the FPOP technology to study conformation and interaction changes of low-abundance proteins directly in their endogenous cellular locations.

  15. Changes in apparent free energy of helix-helix dimerization in a biological membrane due to point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Mylinh T.; Jaszewski, Todd M.; Fleming, Karen G.; MacKenzie, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We present an implementation of the TOXCAT membrane protein self-association assay that measures the change in apparent free energy of transmembrane helix dimerization caused by point mutations. Quantifying the reporter gene expression from cells carrying wild type and mutant constructs shows that single point mutations that disrupt dimerization of the transmembrane domain of glycophorin A reproducibly lower the TOXCAT signal more than one hundred-fold. Replicate cultures can show up to three-fold changes in the level of expression of the membrane bound fusion construct, and correcting for these variations improves the precision of the calculated apparent free energy change. The remarkably good agreement between our TOXCAT apparent free energy scale and free energy differences from sedimentation equilibrium studies for point mutants of the glycophorin A transmembrane domain dimer indicate that sequence changes usually affect membrane helix-helix interactions quite similarly in these two very different environments. However, the effects of point mutations at threonine 87 suggest that intermonomer polar contacts by this side chain contribute significantly to dimer stability in membranes but not in detergents. Our findings demonstrate that a comparison of quantitative measurements of helix-helix interactions in biological membranes and genuine thermodynamic data from biophysical measurements on purified proteins can elucidate how changes in the lipidic environment modulate membrane protein stability. PMID:17570394

  16. Crystal structure of a poly(rA) staggered zipper at acidic pH: evidence that adenine N1 protonation mediates parallel double helix formation

    PubMed Central

    Gleghorn, Michael L.; Zhao, Jianbo; Turner, Douglas H.; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2016-01-01

    We have solved at 1.07 Å resolution the X-ray crystal structure of a polyriboadenylic acid (poly(rA)) parallel and continuous double helix. Fifty-nine years ago, double helices of poly(rA) were first proposed to form at acidic pH. Here, we show that 7-mer oligo(rA), i.e. rA7, hybridizes and overlaps in all registers at pH 3.5 to form stacked double helices that span the crystal. Under these conditions, rA7 forms well-ordered crystals, whereas rA6 forms fragile crystalline-like structures, and rA5, rA8 and rA11 fail to crystallize. Our findings support studies from ∼50 years ago: one showed using spectroscopic methods that duplex formation at pH 4.5 largely starts with rA7 and begins to plateau with rA8; another proposed a so-called ‘staggered zipper’ model in which oligo(rA) strands overlap in multiple registers to extend the helical duplex. While never shown, protonation of adenines at position N1 has been hypothesized to be critical for helix formation. Bond angles in our structure suggest that N1 is protonated on the adenines of every other rAMP−rAMP helix base pair. Our data offer new insights into poly(rA) duplex formation that may be useful in developing a pH sensor. PMID:27288442

  17. Measuring the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, R.S.; Das, R.; Harbury, P.A.B.

    2009-05-26

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  18. De novo design of conformationally flexible transmembrane peptides driving membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mathias W.; Weise, Katrin; Ollesch, Julian; Agrawal, Prashant; Stalz, Holger; Stelzer, Walter; Hulsbergen, Frans; de Groot, Huub; Gerwert, Klaus; Reed, Jennifer; Langosch, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    Fusion of biological membranes is mediated by distinct integral membrane proteins, e.g., soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors and viral fusion proteins. Previous work has indicated that the transmembrane segments (TMSs) of such integral membrane proteins play an important role in fusion. Furthermore, peptide mimics of the transmembrane part can drive the fusion of liposomes, and evidence had been obtained that fusogenicity depends on their conformational flexibility. To test this hypothesis, we present a series of unnatural TMSs that were designed de novo based on the structural properties of hydrophobic residues. We find that the fusogenicity of these peptides depends on the ratio of α-helix-promoting Leu and β-sheet-promoting Val residues and is enhanced by helix-destabilizing Pro and Gly residues within their hydrophobic cores. The ability of these peptides to refold from an α-helical state to a β-sheet conformation and backwards was determined under different conditions. Membrane fusogenic peptides with mixed Leu/Val sequences tend to switch more readily between different conformations than a nonfusogenic peptide with an oligo-Leu core. We propose that structural flexibility of these TMSs is a prerequisite of fusogenicity. PMID:15456911

  19. X-ray structure of the T. aquaticus FtsY:GDP complex suggests functional roles for the C-terminal helix of the SRP GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Coon, John S; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M

    2007-03-01

    FtsY and Ffh are structurally similar prokaryotic Signal Recognition Particle GTPases that play an essential role in the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)-mediated cotranslational targeting of proteins to the membrane. The two GTPases assemble in a GTP-dependent manner to form a heterodimeric SRP targeting complex. We report here the 2.1 A X-ray structure of FtsY from T. aquaticus bound to GDP. The structure of the monomeric protein reveals, unexpectedly, canonical binding interactions for GDP. A comparison of the structures of the monomeric and complexed FtsY NG GTPase domain suggests that it undergoes a conformational change similar to that of Ffh NG during the assembly of the symmetric heterodimeric complex. However, in contrast to Ffh, in which the C-terminal helix shifts independently of the other subdomains, the C-terminal helix and N domain of T. aquaticus FtsY together behave as a rigid body during assembly, suggesting distinct mechanisms by which the interactions of the NG domain "module" are regulated in the context of the two SRP GTPases.

  20. Structure of a group A streptococcal phage-encoded virulence factor reveals a catalytically active triple-stranded beta-helix.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicola L; Taylor, Edward J; Lindsay, Anna-Marie; Charnock, Simon J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Dodson, Eleanor J; Davies, Gideon J; Black, Gary W

    2005-12-06

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus) causes severe invasive infections including scarlet fever, pharyngitis (streptococcal sore throat), skin infections, necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease), septicemia, erysipelas, cellulitis, acute rheumatic fever, and toxic shock. The conversion from nonpathogenic to toxigenic strains of S. pyogenes is frequently mediated by bacteriophage infection. One of the key bacteriophage-encoded virulence factors is a putative "hyaluronidase," HylP1, a phage tail-fiber protein responsible for the digestion of the S. pyogenes hyaluronan capsule during phage infection. Here we demonstrate that HylP1 is a hyaluronate lyase. The 3D structure, at 1.8-angstroms resolution, reveals an unusual triple-stranded beta-helical structure and provides insight into the structural basis for phage tail assembly and the role of phage tail proteins in virulence. Unlike the triple-stranded beta-helix assemblies of the bacteriophage T4 injection machinery and the tailspike endosialidase of the Escherichia coli K1 bacteriophage K1F, HylP1 possesses three copies of the active center on the triple-helical fiber itself without the need for an accessory catalytic domain. The triple-stranded beta-helix is not simply a structural scaffold, as previously envisaged; it is harnessed to provide a 200-angstroms-long substrate-binding groove for the optimal reduction in hyaluronan viscosity to aid phage penetration of the capsule.

  1. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    PubMed

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  2. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  3. Nucleic acid binding properties of a helix stabilising nucleoid protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that condenses DNA into compact structures.

    PubMed

    Celestina, F; Suryanarayana, T

    1995-12-01

    Helix stabilising nucleoid protein (HSNP-C') from an acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been characterised with respect to interaction with nucleic acids by gel retardation assay, binding to nucleic acid columns, fluorescence titrations and electron microscopy. The protein exists in solution as very large multimeric aggregates as indicated by cross-linking studies. The protein binds strongly and co-operatively to double stranded DNA. Electron microscopy of the complexes of the protein with DNA shows compact structures suggesting that the protein condenses DNA.

  4. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  5. Structure analysis of the membrane-bound PhoD signal peptide of the Tat translocase shows an N-terminal amphiphilic helix.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marco J; Grage, Stephan L; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Bürck, Jochen; Afonin, Sergii; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-12-01

    Tat signal peptides provide the key signature for proteins that get exported by the bacterial twin arginine translocase. We have characterized the structure of the PhoD signal peptide from Bacillus subtilis in suitable membrane-mimicking environments. High-resolution ¹³C/¹⁵N NMR analysis in detergent micelles revealed a helical stretch in the signal peptide between positions 5 and 15, in good agreement with secondary structure prediction and circular dichroism results. This helix was found to be aligned parallel to the membrane surface according to oriented circular dichroism experiments carried out with planar lipid bilayers. The N-terminal α-helix exhibits a pronounced amphiphilic character, in contrast to the general view in the literature. So far, signal sequences had been supposed to consist of a positively charged N-terminal domain, followed by an α-helical hydrophobic segment, plus a C-terminal domain carrying the peptidase cleavage site. Based on our new structural insights, we propose a model for the folding and membrane interactions of the Tat signal sequence from PhoD.

  6. Modified helix-like instability structure on imploding z-pinch liners that are pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic fielda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awe, T. J.; Jennings, C. A.; McBride, R. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Owen, A. C.; Tomlinson, K.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Jones, M. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratories Z Facility have, for the first time, studied the implosion dynamics of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) style liners that were pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic field. As reported [T. J. Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] when premagnetized with a 7 or 10 T axial field, these liners developed 3D-helix-like hydrodynamic instabilities; such instabilities starkly contrast with the azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities that have been consistently observed in many earlier non-premagnetized experiments. The helical structure persisted throughout the implosion, even though the azimuthal drive field greatly exceeded the expected axial field at the liner's outer wall for all but the earliest stages of the experiment. Whether this modified instability structure has practical importance for magneto-inertial fusion concepts depends primarily on whether the modified instability structure is more stable than standard azimuthally correlated MRT instabilities. In this manuscript, we discuss the evolution of the helix-like instability observed on premagnetized liners. While a first principles explanation of this observation remains elusive, recent 3D simulations suggest that if a small amplitude helical perturbation can be seeded on the liner's outer surface, no further influence from the axial field is required for the instability to grow.

  7. A Sidekick for Membrane Simulations: Automated Ensemble Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Helices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Benjamin A; Halim, Khairul Abd; Buyan, Amanda; Emmanouil, Beatrice; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of transmembrane (TM) α-helices with the phospholipid membrane and with one another are central to understanding the structure and stability of integral membrane proteins. These interactions may be analysed via coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations. To obtain statistically meaningful analysis of TM helix interactions, large (N ca. 100) ensembles of CGMD simulations are needed. To facilitate the running and analysis of such ensembles of simulations we have developed Sidekick, an automated pipeline software for performing high throughput CGMD simulations of α-helical peptides in lipid bilayer membranes. Through an end-to-end approach, which takes as input a helix sequence and outputs analytical metrics derived from CGMD simulations, we are able to predict the orientation and likelihood of insertion into a lipid bilayer of a given helix of family of helix sequences. We illustrate this software via analysis of insertion into a membrane of short hydrophobic TM helices containing a single cationic arginine residue positioned at different positions along the length of the helix. From analysis of these ensembles of simulations we estimate apparent energy barriers to insertion which are comparable to experimentally determined values. In a second application we use CGMD simulations to examine self-assembly of dimers of TM helices from the ErbB1 receptor tyrosine kinase, and analyse the numbers of simulation repeats necessary to obtain convergence of simple descriptors of the mode of packing of the two helices within a dimer. Our approach offers proof-of-principle platform for the further employment of automation in large ensemble CGMD simulations of membrane proteins. PMID:26580541

  8. Probing and improving student's understanding of protein α-helix structure using targeted assessment and classroom interventions in collaboration with a faculty community of practice.

    PubMed

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Villafañe, Sachel M; Lewis, Jennifer E; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of concept inventories and other assessment tools in the molecular life sciences provides instructors with myriad avenues to probe student understanding. For example, although molecular visualization is central to the study of biochemistry, a growing body of evidence suggests that students have substantial limitations in their ability to recognize and interpret basic features of biological macromolecules. In this study, a pre/posttest administered to students at diverse institutions nationwide revealed a robust incorrect idea about the location of the amino acid side chains in the protein α-helix structure. Because this incorrect idea was present even after a semester of biochemistry instruction at a range of institutions, an intervention was necessary. A community of expert biochemistry instructors collaborated to design two active learning classroom activities that systematically examine α-helix structure and function. Several participating faculty used one or both of the activities in their classrooms and some improvement of student understanding of this concept was observed. This study provides a model of how a community of instructors can work together using assessment data to inform targeted changes in instruction with the goal of improving student understanding of fundamental concepts.

  9. Interactions stabilizing the C-terminal helix of human phospholipid scramblase 1 in lipid bilayers: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Venken, Tom; Schillinger, Anne-Sophie; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Reuter, Nathalie

    2017-03-31

    The human phospholipid scramblase 1 (SCR) distributes lipids non-selectively between the cellular membrane leaflets. SCR has long been thought to be mostly localized in the cytoplasm (amino acids 1-287) and anchored to the membrane via the insertion of a 19 amino acid long transmembrane C-terminal helix (CTH, 288-306), which further extends to the exoplasmic side with a 12 amino acid long tail (307-318). Little is known about the structure of this protein, but recent experimental data on two CTH peptides (288-306 and 288-318) show that they insert through phospholipid bilayers and that the presence of cholesterol improves their affinity for lipid vesicles. Yet the sequence of the CTH ((288)KMKAVMIGACFLIDFMFFE(306)) contains an aspartic acid (D301), which is not exactly a prototypical amino acid for single-pass transmembrane helices. In this study, we investigate how the polar aspartate residue is accommodated in lipid bilayers containing POPC with and without cholesterol, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We identify two cholesterol-binding sites: (i) A291, F298 and L299 and (ii) L299, F302 and E306 and suggest that cholesterol plays a role in stabilizing the helix in a transmembrane position. We suggest that the presence of the aspartate could be functionally relevant for the scramblase protein activity.

  10. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  11. Reovirus FAST Proteins Drive Pore Formation and Syncytiogenesis Using a Novel Helix-Loop-Helix Fusion-Inducing Lipid Packing Sensor.

    PubMed

    Read, Jolene; Clancy, Eileen K; Sarker, Muzaddid; de Antueno, Roberto; Langelaan, David N; Parmar, Hiren B; Shin, Kyungsoo; Rainey, Jan K; Duncan, Roy

    2015-06-01

    Pore formation is the most energy-demanding step during virus-induced membrane fusion, where high curvature of the fusion pore rim increases the spacing between lipid headgroups, exposing the hydrophobic interior of the membrane to water. How protein fusogens breach this thermodynamic barrier to pore formation is unclear. We identified a novel fusion-inducing lipid packing sensor (FLiPS) in the cytosolic endodomain of the baboon reovirus p15 fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein that is essential for pore formation during cell-cell fusion and syncytiogenesis. NMR spectroscopy and mutational studies indicate the dependence of this FLiPS on a hydrophobic helix-loop-helix structure. Biochemical and biophysical assays reveal the p15 FLiPS preferentially partitions into membranes with high positive curvature, and this partitioning is impeded by bis-ANS, a small molecule that inserts into hydrophobic defects in membranes. Most notably, the p15 FLiPS can be functionally replaced by heterologous amphipathic lipid packing sensors (ALPS) but not by other membrane-interactive amphipathic helices. Furthermore, a previously unrecognized amphipathic helix in the cytosolic domain of the reptilian reovirus p14 FAST protein can functionally replace the p15 FLiPS, and is itself replaceable by a heterologous ALPS motif. Anchored near the cytoplasmic leaflet by the FAST protein transmembrane domain, the FLiPS is perfectly positioned to insert into hydrophobic defects that begin to appear in the highly curved rim of nascent fusion pores, thereby lowering the energy barrier to stable pore formation.

  12. Transformation between α-helix and β-sheet structures of one and two polyglutamine peptides in explicit water molecules by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Jung; Okumura, Hisashi; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2014-07-15

    Aggregation of polyglutamine peptides with β-sheet structures is related to some important neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. However, it is not clear how polyglutamine peptides form the β-sheets and aggregate. To understand this problem, we performed all-atom replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations of one and two polyglutamine peptides with 10 glutamine residues in explicit water molecules. Our results show that two polyglutamine peptides mainly formed helix or coil structures when they are separated, as in the system with one-polyglutamine peptide. As the interpeptide distance decreases, the intrapeptide β-sheet structure sometimes appear as an intermediate state, and finally the interpeptide β-sheets are formed. We also find that the polyglutamine dimer tends to form the antiparallel β-sheet conformations rather than the parallel β-sheet, which is consistent with previous experiments and a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation.

  13. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  14. Solution NMR studies reveal the location of the second transmembrane domain of the human sigma-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Roldan, Jose Luis; Ossa, Felipe; Amin, Nader T.; Schnell, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a ligand-regulated membrane chaperone protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and modulation of ion channel activities at the plasma membrane. We report here a solution NMR study of a S1R construct (S1R(Δ35)) in which only the first transmembrane domain and the eight-residue N-terminus have been removed. The second transmembrane helix is found to be composed of residues 91–107, which corresponds to the first steroid binding domain-like region. The cytosolic domain is found to contain three helices, and the secondary structure and backbone dynamics of the chaperone domain are consistent with that determined previously for the chaperone domain alone. The position of TM2 provides a framework for ongoing studies of S1R ligand binding and oligomerisation. PMID:25647032

  15. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen; Han, Yue; Li, Xiaoxia; Deng, Junpeng

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  16. The Crystal Structure of GXGD Membrane Protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    J Hu; Y Xue; S Lee; Y Ha

    2011-12-31

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  17. The crystal structure of GXGD membrane protease FlaK

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian; Xue, Yi; Lee, Sangwon; Ha, Ya

    2011-09-20

    The GXGD proteases are polytopic membrane proteins with catalytic activities against membrane-spanning substrates that require a pair of aspartyl residues. Representative members of the family include preflagellin peptidase, type 4 prepilin peptidase, presenilin and signal peptide peptidase. Many GXGD proteases are important in medicine. For example, type 4 prepilin peptidase may contribute to bacterial pathogenesis, and mutations in presenilin are associated with Alzheimer's disease. As yet, there is no atomic-resolution structure in this protease family. Here we report the crystal structure of FlaK, a preflagellin peptidase from Methanococcus maripaludis, solved at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure contains six transmembrane helices. The GXGD motif and a short transmembrane helix, helix 4, are positioned at the centre, surrounded by other transmembrane helices. The crystal structure indicates that the protease must undergo conformational changes to bring the GXGD motif and a second essential aspartyl residue from transmembrane helix 1 into close proximity for catalysis. A comparison of the crystal structure with models of presenilin derived from biochemical analysis reveals three common transmembrane segments that are similarly arranged around the active site. This observation reinforces the idea that the prokaryotic and human proteases are evolutionarily related. The crystal structure presented here provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of the GXGD proteases, and may facilitate the rational design of inhibitors that target specific members of the family.

  18. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  19. SU-E-T-241: Monte Carlo Simulation Study About the Prediction of Proton-Induced DNA Strand Breakage On the Double Helix Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, J; Park, S; Jeong, J; Jeong, C; Lim, Y; Lee, S; SHIN, D; Incerti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In particle therapy and radiobiology, the investigation of mechanisms leading to the death of target cancer cells induced by ionising radiation is an active field of research. Recently, several studies based on Monte Carlo simulation codes have been initiated in order to simulate physical interactions of ionising particles at cellular scale and in DNA. Geant4-DNA is the one of them; it is an extension of the general purpose Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for the simulation of physical interactions at sub-micrometre scale. In this study, we present Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo simulations for the prediction of DNA strand breakage using a geometrical modelling of DNA structure. Methods: For the simulation of DNA strand breakage, we developed a specific DNA geometrical structure. This structure consists of DNA components, such as the deoxynucleotide pairs, the DNA double helix, the nucleosomes and the chromatin fibre. Each component is made of water because the cross sections models currently available in Geant4-DNA for protons apply to liquid water only. Also, at the macroscopic-scale, protons were generated with various energies available for proton therapy at the National Cancer Center, obtained using validated proton beam simulations developed in previous studies. These multi-scale simulations were combined for the validation of Geant4-DNA in radiobiology. Results: In the double helix structure, the deposited energy in a strand allowed to determine direct DNA damage from physical interaction. In other words, the amount of dose and frequency of damage in microscopic geometries was related to direct radiobiological effect. Conclusion: In this report, we calculated the frequency of DNA strand breakage using Geant4- DNA physics processes for liquid water. This study is now on-going in order to develop geometries which use realistic DNA material, instead of liquid water. This will be tested as soon as cross sections for DNA material become available in Geant4

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Revealed that the Human Polyomavirus JC Virus Agnoprotein Contains an α-Helix Encompassing the Leu/Ile/Phe-Rich Domain

    PubMed Central

    Coric, Pascale; Saribas, A. Sami; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne; White, Martyn K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Agnoprotein is a small multifunctional regulatory protein required for sustaining the productive replication of JC virus (JCV). It is a mostly cytoplasmic protein localizing in the perinuclear area and forms highly stable dimers/oligomers through a Leu/Ile/Phe-rich domain. There have been no three-dimensional structural data available for agnoprotein due to difficulties associated with the dynamic conversion from monomers to oligomers. Here, we report the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a synthetic agnoprotein peptide spanning amino acids Thr17 to Glu55 where Lys23 to Phe39 encompassing the Leu/Ile/Phe-rich domain forms an amphipathic α-helix. On the basis of these structural data, a number of Ala substitution mutations were made to investigate the role of the α-helix in the structure and function of agnoprotein. Single L29A and L36A mutations exhibited a significant negative effect on both protein stability and viral replication, whereas the L32A mutation did not. In addition, the L29A mutant displayed a highly nuclear localization pattern, in contrast to the pattern for the wild type (WT). Interestingly, a triple mutant, the L29A+L32A+L36A mutant, yielded no detectable agnoprotein expression, and the replication of this JCV mutant was significantly reduced, suggesting that Leu29 and Leu36 are located at the dimer interface, contributing to the structure and stability of agnoprotein. Two other single mutations, L33A and E34A, did not perturb agnoprotein stability as drastically as that observed with the L29A and L36A mutations, but they negatively affected viral replication, suggesting that the role of these residues is functional rather than structural. Thus, the agnoprotein dimerization domain can be targeted for the development of novel drugs active against JCV infection. IMPORTANCE Agnoprotein is a small regulatory protein of JC virus (JCV) and is required for the successful completion of the viral replication cycle. It forms

  1. NMR Structure of the C-Terminal Transmembrane Domain of the HDL Receptor, SR-BI, and a Functionally Relevant Leucine Zipper Motif.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Jensen, Davin R; Hanson, Paul J; Lange, Philip T; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Sahoo, Daisy

    2017-03-07

    The interaction of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with its receptor, scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), is critical for lowering plasma cholesterol levels and reducing the risk for cardiovascular disease. The HDL/SR-BI complex facilitates delivery of cholesterol into cells and is likely mediated by receptor dimerization. This work describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to generate the first high-resolution structure of the C-terminal transmembrane domain of SR-BI. This region of SR-BI harbors a leucine zipper dimerization motif, which when mutated impairs the ability of the receptor to bind HDL and mediate cholesterol delivery. These losses in function correlate with the inability of SR-BI to form dimers. We also identify juxtamembrane regions of the extracellular domain of SR-BI that may interact with the lipid surface to facilitate cholesterol transport functions of the receptor.

  2. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (Ncyt/Cexo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders. PMID:26797119

  3. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  4. A c subunit with four transmembrane helices and one ion (Na+)-binding site in an archaeal ATP synthase: implications for c ring function and structure.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Florian; Leone, Vanessa; Langer, Julian D; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Müller, Volker

    2012-11-16

    The ion-driven membrane rotors of ATP synthases consist of multiple copies of subunit c, forming a closed ring. Subunit c typically comprises two transmembrane helices, and the c ring features an ion-binding site in between each pair of adjacent subunits. Here, we use experimental and computational methods to study the structure and specificity of an archaeal c subunit more akin to those of V-type ATPases, namely that from Pyrococcus furiosus. The c subunit was purified by chloroform/methanol extraction and determined to be 15.8 kDa with four predicted transmembrane helices. However, labeling with DCCD as well as Na(+)-DCCD competition experiments revealed only one binding site for DCCD and Na(+), indicating that the mature c subunit of this A(1)A(O) ATP synthase is indeed of the V-type. A structural model generated computationally revealed one Na(+)-binding site within each of the c subunits, mediated by a conserved glutamate side chain alongside other coordinating groups. An intriguing second glutamate located in-between adjacent c subunits was ruled out as a functional Na(+)-binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the c ring of P. furiosus is highly Na(+)-specific under in vivo conditions, comparable with the Na(+)-dependent V(1)V(O) ATPase from Enterococcus hirae. Interestingly, the same holds true for the c ring from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, whose c subunits also feature a V-type architecture but carry two Na(+)-binding sites instead. These findings are discussed in light of their physiological relevance and with respect to the mode of ion coupling in A(1)A(O) ATP synthases.

  5. Primary structure of a copper-binding metallothionein from mantle tissue of the terrestrial gastropod Helix pomatia L.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, B; Dallinger, R; Gehrig, P; Hunziker, P E

    1997-01-01

    A novel copper-binding metallothionein (MT) has been purified from mantle tissue of the terrestrial snail Helix pomatia using gel-permeation chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Copper was removed from the thionein by addition of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. The resulting apothionein (molecular mass 6247 Da) was S-methylated and digested with trypsin, endoproteinase Arg-C and endoproteinase Lys-C. Amino acid sequences of the resulting peptides were determined by collision-induced dissociation tandem MS. The protein is acetylated at its N-terminus, and consists of 64 amino acids, 18 of which are cysteine residues. A comparison with the cadmium-binding MT isolated from the midgut gland of the same species shows an identical arrangement of the cysteines, but an unexpectedly high variability in the other amino acids. The two MT isoforms differ in total length and at 26 positions of their peptide chains. We suggest that the copper-binding MT isoform from the mantle of H. pomatia is responsible for regulatory functions in favour of copper, probably in connection with the metabolism of the copper-bearing protein, haemocyanin. PMID:9359856

  6. The Atlastin C-terminal Tail Is an Amphipathic Helix That Perturbs the Bilayer Structure during Endoplasmic Reticulum Homotypic Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Joseph E.; Desai, Tanvi; Verma, Avani; Ulengin, Idil; Sun, Tzu-Lin; Moss, Tyler J.; Betancourt-Solis, Miguel A.; Huang, Huey W.; Lee, Tina; McNew, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of tubular membranes is required to form three-way junctions found in reticular subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum. The large GTPase Atlastin has recently been shown to drive endoplasmic reticulum membrane fusion and three-way junction formation. The mechanism of Atlastin-mediated membrane fusion is distinct from SNARE-mediated membrane fusion, and many details remain unclear. In particular, the role of the amphipathic C-terminal tail of Atlastin is still unknown. We found that a peptide corresponding to the Atlastin C-terminal tail binds to membranes as a parallel α helix, induces bilayer thinning, and increases acyl chain disorder. The function of the C-terminal tail is conserved in human Atlastin. Mutations in the C-terminal tail decrease fusion activity in vitro, but not GTPase activity, and impair Atlastin function in vivo. In the context of unstable lipid bilayers, the requirement for the C-terminal tail is abrogated. These data suggest that the C-terminal tail of Atlastin locally destabilizes bilayers to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:25555915

  7. Death Receptor 5 Networks Require Membrane Cholesterol for Proper Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Andrew K; Valley, Christopher C; Peery, Stephen L; Brummel, Benjamin; Braun, Anthony R; Karim, Christine B; Sachs, Jonathan N

    2016-12-04

    Death receptor 5 (DR5) is an apoptosis-inducing member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, whose activity has been linked to membrane cholesterol content. Upon ligand binding, DR5 forms large clusters within the plasma membrane that have often been assumed to be manifestations of receptor co-localization in cholesterol-rich membrane domains. However, we have recently shown that DR5 clusters are more than just randomly aggregated receptors. Instead, these are highly structured networks held together by receptor dimers. These dimers are stabilized by specific transmembrane helix-helix interactions, including a disulfide bond in the long isoform of the receptor. The complex relationships among DR5 network formation, transmembrane helix dimerization, membrane cholesterol, and receptor activity has not been established. It is unknown whether the membrane itself plays an active role in driving DR5 transmembrane helix interactions or in the formation of the networks. We show that cholesterol depletion in cells does not inhibit the formation of DR5 networks. However, the networks that form in cholesterol-depleted cells fail to induce caspase cleavage. These results suggest a potential structural difference between active and inactive networks. As evidence, we show that cholesterol is necessary for the covalent dimerization of DR5 transmembrane domains. Molecular simulations and experiments in synthetic vesicles on the DR5 transmembrane dimer suggest that dimerization is facilitated by increased helicity in a thicker bilayer.

  8. Development of a Method for Converting a TAK1 Type I Inhibitor into a Type II or c-Helix-Out Inhibitor by Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD).

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Terushige; Ide, Mitsuaki; Irie, Machiko; Morikami, Kenji; Miura, Takaaki; Nishihara, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for converting a transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) type I inhibitor into a type II or c-helix-out inhibitor by structure-based drug design (SBDD) to achieve an effective strategy for developing these different types of kinase inhibitor in parallel. TAK1 plays a key role in inflammatory and immune signaling, and is therefore considered to be an attractive molecular target for the treatment of human diseases (inflammatory disease, cancer, etc.). We have already reported novel type I TAK1 inhibitor, so we utilized its X-ray information to design a new chemical class type II and c-helix-out inhibitors. To develop the type II inhibitor, we superimposed the X-ray structure of our reported type I inhibitor onto a type II compound that inhibits multiple kinases, and used SBDD to design a new type II inhibitor. For the TAK1 c-helix-out inhibitor, we utilized the X-ray structure of a b-Raf c-helix-out inhibitor to design compounds, because TAK1 is located close to b-Raf in the Sugen kinase tree, so we considered that TAK1 would, similarly to b-Raf, form a c-helix-out conformation. The X-ray crystal structure of the inhibitors in complex with TAK1 confirmed the binding modes of the compounds we designed. This report is notable for being the first discovery of a c-helix-out inhibitor against TAK1.

  9. Topology prediction of Brucella abortus Omp2b and Omp2a porins after critical assessment of transmembrane beta strands prediction by several secondary structure prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Paquet, J Y; Vinals, C; Wouters, J; Letesson, J J; Depiereux, E

    2000-02-01

    In order to propose a reliable model for Brucella porin topology, several structure prediction methods were evaluated in their ability to predict porin topology. Four porins of known structure were selected as test-cases and their secondary structure delineated. The specificity and sensitivity of 11 methods were separately evaluated. Our critical assessment shows that some secondary structure prediction methods (PHD, Dsc, Sopma) originally designed to predict globular protein structure are useful on porin topology prediction. The overall best prediction is obtained by combining these three "generalist" methods with a transmembrane beta strand prediction technique. This "consensus" method was applied to Brucella porins Omp2b and Omp2a, sharing no sequence homology with any other porin. The predicted topology is a 16-stranded antiparallel beta barrel with Omp2a showing a higher number of negatively charged residue in the exposed loops than Omp2b. Experiments are in progress to validate the proposed topology and the functional hypotheses. The ability of the proposed consensus method to predict topology of complex outer membrane protein is briefly discussed.

  10. Transmembrane Helices Tilt, Bend, Slide, Torque, and Unwind between Functional States of Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong; Ren, Peter X.; Balusu, Rohith; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    The seven-helical bundle of rhodopsin and other G-protein coupled receptors undergoes structural rearrangements as the transmembrane receptor protein is activated. These structural changes are known to involve tilting and bending of various transmembrane helices. However, the cause and effect relationship among structural events leading to a cytoplasmic crevasse for G-protein binding is less well defined. Here we present a mathematical model of the protein helix and a simple procedure to determine multiple parameters that offer precise depiction of a helical conformation. A comprehensive survey of bovine rhodopsin structures shows that the helical rearrangements during the activation of rhodopsin involve a variety of angular and linear motions such as torsion, unwinding, and sliding in addition to the previously reported tilting and bending. These hitherto undefined motion components unify the results obtained from different experimental approaches, and demonstrate conformational similarity between the active opsin structure and the photoactivated structures in crystallo near the retinal anchor despite their marked differences. PMID:27658480

  11. Structure of transmembrane domain of lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) reveals key features for substrate specificity in chaperone-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ashok K; Strub, Marie-Paule; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Tjandra, Nico

    2014-12-19

    Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is a highly regulated cellular process that mediates the degradation of a selective subset of cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. Increasing CMA activity is one way for a cell to respond to stress, and it leads to enhanced turnover of non-critical cytosolic proteins into sources of energy or clearance of unwanted or damaged proteins from the cytosol. The lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2a (LAMP-2A) together with a complex of chaperones and co-chaperones are key regulators of CMA. LAMP-2A is a transmembrane protein component for protein translocation to the lysosome. Here we present a study of the structure and dynamics of the transmembrane domain of human LAMP-2A in n-dodecylphosphocholine micelles by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We showed that LAMP-2A exists as a homotrimer in which the membrane-spanning helices wrap around each other to form a parallel coiled coil conformation, whereas its cytosolic tail is flexible and exposed to the cytosol. This cytosolic tail of LAMP-2A interacts with chaperone Hsc70 and a CMA substrate RNase A with comparable affinity but not with Hsp40 and RNase S peptide. Because the substrates and the chaperone complex can bind at the same time, thus creating a bimodal interaction, we propose that substrate recognition by chaperones and targeting to the lysosomal membrane by LAMP-2A are coupled. This can increase substrate affinity and specificity as well as prevent substrate aggregation, assist in the unfolding of the substrate, and promote the formation of the higher order complex of LAMP-2A required for translocation.

  12. Characterization of the denatured structure of pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase from a hyperthermophile under nondenaturing conditions: role of the C-terminal alpha-helix of the protein in folding and stability.

    PubMed

    Iimura, Satoshi; Umezaki, Taro; Takeuchi, Makoto; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Yagi, Hiromasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Akutsu, Hideo; Noda, Yasuo; Segawa, Shin-ichi; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2007-03-27

    The cysteine-free pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase (PCP-0SH) from a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, can be trapped in the denatured state under nondenaturing conditions, corresponding to the denatured structure that exists in equilibrium with the native state under physiological conditions. The denatured state is the initial state (D1 state) in the refolding process but differs from the completely denatured state (D2 state) in the concentrated denaturant. Also, it has been found that the D1 state corresponds to the heat-denatured state. To elucidate the structural basis of the D1 state, H/D exchange experiments with PCP-0SH were performed at pD 3.4 and 4 degrees C. The results indicated that amide protons in the C-terminal alpha6-helix region hardly exchanged in the D1 state with deuterium even after 7 days, suggesting that the alpha6-helix (from Ser188 to Glu205) of PCP-0SH was stably formed in the D1 state. In order to examine the role of the alpha6-helix in folding and stability, H/D exchange experiments with a mutant, A199P, at position 199 in the alpha6-helix region were performed. The alpha6-helix region of A199P in the D1 state was partially unprotected, while some hydrophobic residues were protected against the H/D exchange, although these hydrophobic residues were unprotected in the wild-type protein. These results suggest that the structure of A199P in the D1 state formed a temporary stable denatured structure with a non-native hydrophobic cluster and the unstructured alpha6-helix. Both the stability and the refolding rate decreased by the substitution of Pro for Ala199. We can conclude that the native-like helix (alpha6-helix) of PCP-0SH is already constructed in the D1 state and is necessary for efficient refolding into the native structure and stabilization of PCP-0SH.

  13. Control of Collagen Triple Helix Stability by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Jake, Amanda M; Ngo, Daniel H; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2017-03-10

    The phosphorylation of the collagen triple helix plays an important role in collagen synthesis, assembly, signaling, and immune response, although no reports detailing the effect this modification has on the structure and stability of the triple helix exist. Here we investigate the changes in stability and structure resulting from the phosphorylation of collagen. Additionally, the formation of pairwise interactions between phosphorylated residues and lysine is examined. In all tested cases, phosphorylation increases helix stability. When charged-pair interactions are possible, stabilization via phosphorylation can play a very large role, resulting inasmuch as a 13.0 °C increase in triple helix stability. Two-dimensional NMR and molecular modeling are used to study the local structure of the triple helix. Our results suggest a mechanism of action for phosphorylation in the regulation of collagen and also expand upon our understanding of pairwise amino acid stabilization of the collagen triple helix.

  14. The Hubble Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Hubble Helix Team

    2002-12-01

    For the 14 hours of peak Leonid meteoroid flux in November 2002, the Hubble Space Telescope was pointed away from incoming meteoroids, and the solar arrays were oriented to minimize their cross-section. By coincidence, one of the most prominent planetary nebulae, the Helix Nebula, a.k.a. NGC 7293, was nearly opposite the incoming Leonids and could be observed. A ``Hubble Helix Team'' of volunteers led by M. Meixner (STScI) organized a nine-orbit campaign to observe the Helix with the ACS, WFPC2, NICMOS, and STIS. A contiguous 3 by 3 grid of 4kx4k-pixel ACS images covering much but not all of the Helix was exposed in two filters, Hα +[N II] (F658N) and [O III] (F502N). A few of the WFPC2 images observed in parallel also observed the nebula in [O I] (F631N) or He II 4686 (F469N) or Hα (F656N). NICMOS/NIC3 observations were obtained at two locations on the nebula and two off, in H2 (F212N) and Paschen-α (F187N). A few of the STIS parallel observations in [OII] (F28X0OII) were located on the nebula. The main purpose of this presentation is to advertise to all interested parties the availability of the non-proprietary data via the HST archive. Initial data analysis by the Hubble Helix Team will be presented in this poster.

  15. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  16. Microfibrillar structure of PGG-glucan in aqueous solution as triple-helix aggregates by small angle x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, M; Park, J T; Magee, A S; Conrad, H

    1999-11-01

    The conformation of polysaccharide PGG-Glucan, isolated from yeast cell walls, in aqueous solution was investigated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and multidetector gel permeation chromatography coupled with postcolumn delivery (GPC/PCD) techniques in comparison with scleroglucan. It was shown that both polysaccharides exhibit a rigid rod-like conformation in aqueous solution by SAXS experiments. The mass per unit length (M/L) and radius (R) of rod cross section of PGG-Glucan were measured to be 6300 daltons/nm and 1.89 nm, while those of scleroglucan are 2300 and 0.83, respectively. Utilizing a GPC/light scattering technique, the average aggregation number of PGG-Glucan is 9, while that of scleroglucan is around 3. From the comparison of the M/L and R of the respective rod cross sections as well as their aggregation number data, it is concluded that PGG-Glucan is composed of triple helices, which tend to aggregate as triplets in solution, whereas scleroglucan is composed of a single triple helix. The aggregation number distribution of PGG-Glucan was found to range from 1 to about 25 determined by GPC/PCD. From the observation of a Debye-Scherrer ring type of peak in the macroscopic scattering cross section of PGG-Glucan by SAXS, the existence of a small amount of ordered clusters of PGG-Glucan can be deduced. The "lattice parameter" of these ordered fasces-like clusters is consistent with the radius of the individual triple-helical rods forming a microfibrillar superstructure. These results indicate that higher aggregated forms of PGG-Glucan containing up to 8 triple helices behave as ordered fasces-like clusters. We conclude that PGG-Glucan is triple-helix aggregates formed by rigid rods stacking together side by side. We propose a molecular structural model for PGG-Glucan conformations.

  17. Super D-helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Oh, Phillial

    2001-11-01

    We study the ``Myers effect'' for a bunch of D1-branes with type-IIB superstrings moving in one direction along the branes. We show that the ``blown-up'' configuration is a helical D1-brane, which is self-supported from collapse by the axial momentum flow. The tilting angle of the helix is determined by the number of D1-branes. The radius of the helix is stabilized to a certain value depending on the number of D1-branes and the momentum carried by type-IIB superstrings. This helix is actually a T-dual version of the supertube recently found as the ``blown-up'' configuration of a bunch of type-IIA superstrings carrying a D0-brane charge. It is shown that the helical D1 configuration preserves one-quarter of the supersymmetry of the type-IIB Minkowski vacuum.

  18. Crystal structure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator inhibitory factor Cif reveals novel active-site features of an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Morisseau, Christophe; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2010-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other alpha/beta hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of alpha/beta hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Inhibitory Factor Cif Reveals Novel Active-Site Features of an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, C.; Morisseau, C; Bomberger, J; Stanton, B; Hammock, B; O' Toole, G; Madden, D

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitory factor (Cif) is a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that reduces the quantity of CFTR in the apical membrane of human airway epithelial cells. Initial sequence analysis suggested that Cif is an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but its sequence violates two strictly conserved EH motifs and also is compatible with other {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase family members with diverse substrate specificities. To investigate the mechanistic basis of Cif activity, we have determined its structure at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The catalytic triad consists of residues Asp129, His297, and Glu153, which are conserved across the family of EHs. At other positions, sequence deviations from canonical EH active-site motifs are stereochemically conservative. Furthermore, detailed enzymatic analysis confirms that Cif catalyzes the hydrolysis of epoxide compounds, with specific activity against both epibromohydrin and cis-stilbene oxide, but with a relatively narrow range of substrate selectivity. Although closely related to two other classes of {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase in both sequence and structure, Cif does not exhibit activity as either a haloacetate dehalogenase or a haloalkane dehalogenase. A reassessment of the structural and functional consequences of the H269A mutation suggests that Cif's effect on host-cell CFTR expression requires the hydrolysis of an extended endogenous epoxide substrate.

  20. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  1. Energetics and Structure Prediction of the Network of Homo- and Hetero-Oligomers Formed by the Transmembrane Domains of the ErbReceptor Family of Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    and clones were screened for the presence of the correct insert using restriction digests. The DNA sequences of all clones were TABLE 3: WILD TYPE...HOW THE GENETIC SCREENS ARE THOUGHT TO MEASURE HELIX-HELIX ASSOCIATION IN BACTERIAL MEMBRANES. If the TM segments drive self-association then the ToxR...higher-order oligomer) can bind to the cholera toxin promoter and activate transcription of a reporter gene. Using this assay, Lemmon and colleagues

  2. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Curran, A C; Hwang, I; Corbin, J; Martinez, S; Rayle, D; Sze, H; Harper, J F

    2000-09-29

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  3. Autoinhibition of a calmodulin-dependent calcium pump involves a structure in the stalk that connects the transmembrane domain to the ATPase catalytic domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, A. C.; Hwang, I.; Corbin, J.; Martinez, S.; Rayle, D.; Sze, H.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of Ca(2+)-pumps is important for controlling [Ca(2+)] in the cytosol and organelles of all eukaryotes. Here, we report a genetic strategy to identify residues that function in autoinhibition of a novel calmodulin-activated Ca(2+)-pump with an N-terminal regulatory domain (isoform ACA2 from Arabidopsis). Mutant pumps with constitutive activity were identified by complementation of a yeast (K616) deficient in two Ca(2+)-pumps. Fifteen mutations were found that disrupted a segment of the N-terminal autoinhibitor located between Lys(23) and Arg(54). Three mutations (E167K, D219N, and E341K) were found associated with the stalk that connects the ATPase catalytic domain (head) and with the transmembrane domain. Enzyme assays indicated that the stalk mutations resulted in calmodulin-independent activity, with V(max), K(mATP), and K(mCa(2+)) similar to that of a pump in which the N-terminal autoinhibitor had been deleted. A highly conservative substitution at Asp(219) (D219E) still produced a deregulated pump, indicating that the autoinhibitory structure in the stalk is highly sensitive to perturbation. In plasma membrane H(+)-ATPases from yeast and plants, similarly positioned mutations resulted in hyperactive pumps. Together, these results suggest that a structural feature of the stalk is of general importance in regulating diverse P-type ATPases.

  4. Double Helix Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of James Watson's book, "The Double Helix," as a multidisciplinary way of introducing students to actual science; the scientific method; dilemmas encountered in the world of research; and the rich setting of personalities, politics, and history in post-World War II Europe. (MKR)

  5. Hydrophobic matching controls the tilt and stability of the dimeric platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β transmembrane segment.

    PubMed

    Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Hoffmann, Silke; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; Polyansky, Anton A; Windisch, Dirk; Zeitler, Marcel; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S

    2012-07-27

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptor β is a member of the cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase family and dimerizes upon activation. We determined the structure of the transmembrane segment in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by liquid-state NMR and found that it forms a stable left-handed helical dimer. Solid-state NMR and oriented circular dichroism were used to measure the tilt angle of the helical segments in macroscopically aligned model membranes with different acyl chain lengths. Both methods showed that decreasing bilayer thickness (DEPC-POPC-DMPC) led to an increase in the helix tilt angle from 10° to 30° with respect to the bilayer normal. At the same time, reconstitution of the comparatively long hydrophobic segment became less effective, eventually resulting in complete protein aggregation in the short-chain lipid DLPC. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations of the dimer were carried out in explicit lipid bilayers (DEPC, POPC, DMPC, sphingomyelin), confirming the observed dependence of the helix tilt angle on bilayer thickness. Notably, molecular dynamics revealed that the left-handed dimer gets tilted en bloc, whereas conformational transitions to alternative (e.g. right-handed dimeric) states were not supported. The experimental data along with the simulation results demonstrate a pronounced interplay between the platelet-directed growth factor receptor β transmembrane segment and the bilayer thickness. The effect of hydrophobic mismatch might play a key role in the redistribution and activation of the receptor within different lipid microdomains of the plasma membrane in vivo.

  6. A prominent β-hairpin structure in the winged-helix domain of RECQ1 is required for DNA unwinding and oligomer formation.

    PubMed

    Lucic, Bojana; Zhang, Ying; King, Oliver; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Berti, Matteo; Niesen, Frank H; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A; Pike, Ashley C W; Cooper, Christopher D O; Gileadi, Opher; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    RecQ helicases have attracted considerable interest in recent years due to their role in the suppression of genome instability and human diseases. These atypical helicases exert their function by resolving a number of highly specific DNA structures. The crystal structure of a truncated catalytic core of the human RECQ1 helicase (RECQ1(49-616)) shows a prominent β-hairpin, with an aromatic residue (Y564) at the tip, located in the C-terminal winged-helix domain. Here, we show that the β-hairpin is required for the DNA unwinding and Holliday junction (HJ) resolution activity of full-length RECQ1, confirming that it represents an important determinant for the distinct substrate specificity of the five human RecQ helicases. In addition, we found that the β-hairpin is required for dimer formation in RECQ1(49-616) and tetramer formation in full-length RECQ1. We confirmed the presence of stable RECQ1(49-616) dimers in solution and demonstrated that dimer formation favours DNA unwinding; even though RECQ1 monomers are still active. Tetramers are instead necessary for more specialized activities such as HJ resolution and strand annealing. Interestingly, two independent protein-protein contacts are required for tetramer formation, one involves the β-hairpin and the other the N-terminus of RECQ1, suggesting a non-hierarchical mechanism of tetramer assembly.

  7. Changes in lipid bilayer structure caused by the helix-to-sheet transition of an HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide derivative

    DOE PAGES

    Heller, William T.; Rai, Durgesh K.

    2017-01-16

    HIV-1, like other enveloped viruses, undergoes fusion with the cell membrane to infect it. Viral coat proteins are thought to bind the virus to the membrane and actively fuse the viral and cellular membranes together. The actual molecular mechanism of fusion is challenging to visualize, resulting in the use of model systems. In this paper, the bilayer curvature modifying properties of a synthetic variant of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide with lipid bilayer vesicles composed of a mixture of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoyl phosphatidylserine (DMPS) were studied. In 7:3 DMPC:DMPS vesicles made with deuterium-labeled DMPC, the peptide was observedmore » to undergo a concentration-dependent conformational transition between an α-helix and an antiparallel β-sheet. Through the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and selective deuterium labeling, it was revealed that conformational transition of the peptide is also accompanied by a transition in the structure of the lipid bilayer. In addition to changes in the distribution of the lipid between the leaflets of the vesicle, the SANS data are consistent with two regions having different thicknesses. Finally, of the two different bilayer structures, the one corresponding to the smaller area fraction, being ~8% of the vesicle area, is much thicker than the remainder of the vesicle, which suggests that there are regions of localized negative curvature similar to what takes place at the point of contact between two membranes immediately preceding fusion.« less

  8. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4-7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map-model pairs.

  9. Characterization of a helix-loop-helix (EF hand) motif of silver hake parvalbumin isoform B.

    PubMed

    Revett, S P; King, G; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Hartman, K L; Laue, T M; Nelson, D J

    1997-11-01

    Parvalbumins are a class of calcium-binding proteins characterized by the presence of several helix-loop-helix (EF-hand) motifs. It is suspected that these proteins evolved via intragene duplication from a single EF-hand. Silver hake parvalbumin (SHPV) consists of three EF-type helix-loop-helix regions, two of which have the ability to bind calcium. The three helix-loop-helix motifs are designated AB, CD, and EF, respectively. In this study, native silver hake parvalbumin isoform B (SHPV-B) has been sequenced by mass spectrometry. The sequence indicates that this parvalbumin is a beta-lineage parvalbumin. SHPV-B was cleaved into two major fragments, consisting of the ABCD and EF regions of the native protein. The 33-amino acid EF fragment (residues 76-108), containing one of the calcium ion binding sites in native SHPV-B, has been isolated and studied for its structural characteristics, ability to bind divalent and trivalent cations, and for its propensity to undergo metal ion-induced self-association. The presence of Ca2+ does not induce significant secondary structure in the EF fragment. However, NMR and CD results indicate significant secondary structure promotion in the EF fragment in the presence of the higher charge-density trivalent cations. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis results show that the EF fragment exists in a monomer-dimer equilibrium when complexed with La3+.

  10. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  11. Functional Role of the C-Terminal Amphipathic Helix 8 of Olfactory Receptors and Other G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takaaki; Kawasaki, Takashi; Mine, Shouhei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce various extracellular signals, such as neurotransmitters, hormones, light, and odorous chemicals, into intracellular signals via G protein activation during neurological, cardiovascular, sensory and reproductive signaling. Common and unique features of interactions between GPCRs and specific G proteins are important for structure-based design of drugs in order to treat GPCR-related diseases. Atomic resolution structures of GPCR complexes with G proteins have revealed shared and extensive interactions between the conserved DRY motif and other residues in transmembrane domains 3 (TM3), 5 and 6, and the target G protein C-terminal region. However, the initial interactions formed between GPCRs and their specific G proteins remain unclear. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the murine olfactory receptor S6 (mOR-S6) indicated that the N-terminal acidic residue of helix 8 of mOR-S6 is responsible for initial transient and specific interactions with chimeric Gα15_olf, resulting in a response that is 2.2-fold more rapid and 1.7-fold more robust than the interaction with Gα15. Our mutagenesis analysis indicates that the hydrophobic core buried between helix 8 and TM1–2 of mOR-S6 is important for the activation of both Gα15_olf and Gα15. This review focuses on the functional role of the C-terminal amphipathic helix 8 based on several recent GPCR studies. PMID:27869740

  12. Lasing thresholds of helical photonic structures with different positions of a single light-amplifying helix turn

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, L M; Palto, S P

    2013-09-30

    Numerical simulation is used to assess the lasing threshold of helical structures of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) in which only one turn amplifies light. This turn is located either in the centre of symmetric structures of various sizes or in an arbitrary place in asymmetric structures of preset size. In all cases, we find singularities in light amplification by a one-dimensional CLC structure for the most important band-edge modes (m1, m2 and m3) and plot the threshold gain coefficient k{sub th} against the position of the amplifying turn. For the symmetric structures, the lasing threshold of the m1 mode is shown to vary linearly with the inverse of the square of the cavity length. Moreover, modes with a lower density of photonic states (DOS) in the cavity may have a lower lasing threshold. This can be accounted for by the dependence of the density of photonic states on the position of the amplifying turn and, accordingly, by the nonuniform electromagnetic field intensity distribution along the cavity for different modes. In the asymmetric structures, the same field energy distribution is responsible for a correlation between k{sub th} and DOS curves. (lasers)

  13. Role of Transmembrane Domain 4 in Ligand Permeation by Crithidia fasciculata Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 2 (CfNT2)*

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Cassandra S.; Ullman, Buddy

    2010-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters play essential roles in nutrient uptake, cardiovascular and renal function, and purine analog drug chemotherapies. Limited structural information is available for this family of transporters; however, residues in transmembrane domains 1, 2, 4, and 5 appear to be important for ligand and inhibitor binding. In order to identify regions of the transporter that are important for ligand specificity, a genetic selection for mutants of the inosine-guanosine-specific Crithidia fasciculata nucleoside transporter 2 (CfNT2) that had gained the ability to transport adenosine was carried out in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nearly all positive clones from the genetic selection carried mutations at lysine 155 in transmembrane domain 4, highlighting lysine 155 as a pivotal residue governing the ligand specificity of CfNT2. Mutation of lysine 155 to asparagine conferred affinity for adenosine on the mutant transporter at the expense of inosine and guanosine affinity due to weakened contacts to the purine ring of the ligand. Following systematic cysteine-scanning mutagenesis, thiol-specific modification of several positions within transmembrane domain 4 was found to interfere with inosine transport capability, indicating that this helix lines the water-filled ligand translocation channel. Additionally, the pattern of modification of transmembrane domain 4 suggested that it may deviate from helicity in the vicinity of residue 155. Position 155 was also protected from modification in the presence of ligand, suggesting that lysine 155 is in or near the ligand binding site. Transmembrane domain 4 and particularly lysine 155 appear to play key roles in ligand discrimination and translocation by CfNT2. PMID:20037157

  14. Tailored fibro-porous structure of electrospun polyurethane membranes, their size-dependent properties and trans-membrane glucose diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Burugapalli, Krishna; Song, Wenhui; Halls, Justin; Moussy, Francis; Zheng, Yudong; Ma, Yanxuan; Wu, Zhentao; Li, Kang

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop polyurethane (PU) based fibro-porous membranes and to investigate the size-effect of hierarchical porous structure on permeability and surface properties of the developed electrospun membranes. Non-woven Selectophore™ PU membranes having tailored fibre diameters, pore sizes, and thickness were spun using electrospinning, and their chemical, physical and glucose permeability properties were characterised. Solvents, solution concentration, applied voltage, flow rate and distance to collector, each were systematically investigated, and electrospinning conditions for tailoring fibre diameters were identified. Membranes having average fibre diameters – 347, 738 and 1102 nm were characterized, revealing average pore sizes of 800, 870 and 1060 nm and pore volumes of 44, 63 and 68% respectively. Hydrophobicity increased with increasing fibre diameter and porosity. Effective diffusion coefficients for glucose transport across the electrospun membranes varied as a function of thickness and porosity, indicating high flux rates for mass transport. Electrospun PU membranes having significantly high pore volumes, extensively interconnected porosity and tailorable properties compared to conventional solvent cast membranes can find applications as coatings for sensors requiring analyte exchange. PMID:23170040

  15. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family. PMID:17329808

  16. The crystal structure of Z-(Aib)10-OH at 0.65 Å resolution: three complete turns of 310-helix.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2016-02-01

    The synthetic peptide Z-(Aib)10-OH was crystallized from hot methanol by slow evaporation. The crystal used for data collection reflected synchrotron radiation to sub-atomic resolution, where the bonding electron density becomes visible between the non-hydrogen atoms. Crystals belong to the centrosymmetric space group P1. Both molecules in the asymmetric unit form regular 310 -helices. All residues in each molecule possess the same handedness, which is in contrast to all other crystal structure determined to date of longer Aib-homopeptides. These other peptides are C-terminal protected by OtBu or OMe. In these cases, because of the missing ability of the C-terminal protection group to form a hydrogen bond to the residue i-3, the sense of the helix is reversed in the last residue. Here, the C-terminal OH-groups form hydrogen bonds to the residues i-3, in part mediated by water molecules. This makes Z-(Aib)10-OH an Aib-homopeptide with three complete 310-helical turns in spite of the shorter length it has compared with Z-(Aib)11-OtBu, the only homopeptide to date with three complete turns.

  17. Noncanonical structures and their thermodynamics of DNA and RNA under molecular crowding: beyond the Watson-Crick double helix.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    How does molecular crowding affect the stability of nucleic acid structures inside cells? Water is the major solvent component in living cells, and the properties of water in the highly crowded media inside cells differ from that in buffered solution. As it is difficult to measure the thermodynamic behavior of nucleic acids in cells directly and quantitatively, we recently developed a cell-mimicking system using cosolutes as crowding reagents. The influences of molecular crowding on the structures and thermodynamics of various nucleic acid sequences have been reported. In this chapter, we discuss how the structures and thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids differ under various conditions such as highly crowded environments, compartment environments, and in the presence of ionic liquids, and the major determinants of the crowding effects on nucleic acids are discussed. The effects of molecular crowding on the activities of ribozymes and riboswitches on noncanonical structures of DNA- and RNA-like quadruplexes that play important roles in transcription and translation are also described.

  18. Signal transmission through the CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) transmembrane helices

    PubMed Central

    Wescott, Melanie P.; Kufareva, Irina; Paes, Cheryl; Goodman, Jason R.; Thaker, Yana; Puffer, Bridget A.; Berdougo, Eli; Rucker, Joseph B.; Handel, Tracy M.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The atomic-level mechanisms by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transmit extracellular ligand binding events through their transmembrane helices to activate intracellular G proteins remain unclear. Using a comprehensive library of mutations covering all 352 residues of the GPCR CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), we identified 41 amino acids that are required for signaling induced by the chemokine ligand CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor 1). CXCR4 variants with each of these mutations do not signal properly but remain folded, based on receptor surface trafficking, reactivity to conformationally sensitive monoclonal antibodies, and ligand binding. When visualized on the structure of CXCR4, the majority of these residues form a continuous intramolecular signaling chain through the transmembrane helices; this chain connects chemokine binding residues on the extracellular side of CXCR4 to G protein-coupling residues on its intracellular side. Integrated into a cohesive model of signal transmission, these CXCR4 residues cluster into five functional groups that mediate (i) chemokine engagement, (ii) signal initiation, (iii) signal propagation, (iv) microswitch activation, and (v) G protein coupling. Propagation of the signal passes through a “hydrophobic bridge” on helix VI that coordinates with nearly every known GPCR signaling motif. Our results agree with known conserved mechanisms of GPCR activation and significantly expand on understanding the structural principles of CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27543332

  19. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  20. Structure and mutagenesis of the parainfluenza virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase stalk domain reveals a four-helix bundle and the role of the stalk in fusion promotion.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D; Kors, Christopher A; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 Å, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  1. Structural integrity of {alpha}-helix H12 in translation initiation factor eIF5B is critical for 80S complex stability.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Acker, Michael G; Kim, Joo-Ran; Maher, Kathryn N; Arefin, Shamsul M; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2011-04-01

    Translation initiation factor eIF5B promotes GTP-dependent ribosomal subunit joining in the final step of the translation initiation pathway. The protein resembles a chalice with the α-helix H12 forming the stem connecting the GTP-binding domain cup to the domain IV base. Helix H12 has been proposed to function as a rigid lever arm governing domain IV movements in response to nucleotide binding and as a molecular ruler fixing the distance between domain IV and the G domain of the factor. To investigate its function, helix H12 was lengthened or shortened by one or two turns. In addition, six consecutive residues in the helix were substituted by Gly to alter the helical rigidity. Whereas the mutations had minimal impacts on the factor's binding to the ribosome and its GTP binding and hydrolysis activities, shortening the helix by six residues impaired the rate of subunit joining in vitro and both this mutation and the Gly substitution mutation lowered the yield of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) bound to 80S complexes formed in the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP. Thus, these two mutations, which impair yeast cell growth and enhance ribosome leaky scanning in vivo, impair the rate of formation and stability of the 80S product of subunit joining. These data support the notion that helix H12 functions as a ruler connecting the GTPase center of the ribosome to the P site where Met-tRNA(i)(Met) is bound and that helix H12 rigidity is required to stabilize Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding.

  2. Thermal and Structural Analysis of Co-axial Coupler used in High Power Helix Traveling-Wave Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlaut, Vishant; Alvi, Parvez Ahmad; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar

    2014-07-01

    In traveling-wave tubes (TWTs), coaxial couplers or window assemblies are used for coupling milliwatt (mW) to hundreds of watts of average power. For the proper transformation of impedance of interaction structure to the standard connector, coaxial couplers are suitably modeled as multi-section coaxial transformer. Due to high average power propagation, center conductor of coupler gets heated and the dimensions of multi-section coupler get deformed from its cold condition which causes impedance mismatch and increase of thermal load. Due to impedance mismatch, reflection of RF signal occurs from the couplers causing oscillation and finally leads of destruction of the TWT. This paper presents the thermal and structural analysis of coaxial coupler to quantify the temperature distribution at different regions, deformation of cold dimensions and stress due to material property of window disc.

  3. The poly dA helix: a new structural motif for high performance DNA-based molecular switches

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Sharma, Suruchi; Maiti, Prabal K.; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2009-01-01

    We report a pH-dependent conformational transition in short, defined homopolymeric deoxyadenosines (dA15) from a single helical structure with stacked nucleobases at neutral pH to a double-helical, parallel-stranded duplex held together by AH+-H+A base pairs at acidic pH. Using native PAGE, 2D NMR, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, we have characterized the two different pH dependent forms of dA15. The pH-triggered transition between the two defined helical forms of dA15 is characterized by CD and fluorescence. The kinetics of this conformational switch is found to occur on a millisecond time scale. This robust, highly reversible, pH-induced transition between the two well-defined structured states of dA15 represents a new molecular building block for the construction of quick-response, pH-switchable architectures in structural DNA nanotechnology. PMID:19279188

  4. A Novel Topology of Proline-rich Transmembrane Protein 2 (PRRT2): HINTS FOR AN INTRACELLULAR FUNCTION AT THE SYNAPSE.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Pia; Sterlini, Bruno; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marte, Antonella; Onofri, Franco; Valtorta, Flavia; Maragliano, Luca; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-03-18

    Proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) has been identified as the single causative gene for a group of paroxysmal syndromes of infancy, including epilepsy, paroxysmal movement disorders, and migraine. On the basis of topology predictions, PRRT2 has been assigned to the recently characterized family of Dispanins, whose members share the two-transmembrane domain topology with a large N terminus and short C terminus oriented toward the outside of the cell. Because PRRT2 plays a role at the synapse, it is important to confirm the exact orientation of its N and C termini with respect to the plasma membrane to get clues regarding its possible function. Using a combination of different experimental approaches, including live immunolabeling, immunogold electron microscopy, surface biotinylation and computational modeling, we demonstrate a novel topology for this protein. PRRT2 is a type II transmembrane protein in which only the second hydrophobic segment spans the plasma membrane, whereas the first one is associated with the internal surface of the membrane and forms a helix-loop-helix structure without crossing it. Most importantly, the large proline-rich N-terminal domain is not exposed to the extracellular space but is localized intracellularly, and only the short C terminus is extracellular (N cyt/C exo topology). Accordingly, we show that PRRT2 interacts with the Src homology 3 domain-bearing protein Intersectin 1, an intracellular protein involved in synaptic vesicle cycling. These findings will contribute to the clarification of the role of PRRT2 at the synapse and the understanding of pathogenic mechanisms on the basis of PRRT2-related neurological disorders.

  5. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Benjamin J; Bhate, Manasi P; McDermott, Ann E

    2014-01-07

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98-103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening.

  6. Importance of lipid-pore loop interface for potassium channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Nand, Deepak; Weingarth, Markus; Prokofyev, Alexander; Hornig, Sönke; Cukkemane, Abhishek Arun; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Becker, Stefan; Hulse, Raymond E; Perozo, Eduardo; Pongs, Olaf; Baldus, Marc

    2013-08-06

    Potassium (i.e., K(+)) channels allow for the controlled and selective passage of potassium ions across the plasma membrane via a conserved pore domain. In voltage-gated K(+) channels, gating is the result of the coordinated action of two coupled gates: an activation gate at the intracellular entrance of the pore and an inactivation gate at the selectivity filter. By using solid-state NMR structural studies, in combination with electrophysiological experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the turret region connecting the outer transmembrane helix (transmembrane helix 1) and the pore helix behind the selectivity filter contributes to K(+) channel inactivation and exhibits a remarkable structural plasticity that correlates to K(+) channel inactivation. The transmembrane helix 1 unwinds when the K(+) channel enters the inactivated state and rewinds during the transition to the closed state. In addition to well-characterized changes at the K(+) ion coordination sites, this process is accompanied by conformational changes within the turret region and the pore helix. Further spectroscopic and computational results show that the same channel domain is critically involved in establishing functional contacts between pore domain and the cellular membrane. Taken together, our results suggest that the interaction between the K(+) channel turret region and the lipid bilayer exerts an important influence on the selective passage of potassium ions via the K(+) channel pore.

  7. The Influenza A Virus Non-structural Protein NS1 Upregulates The Expression of Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing 1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, C; Peng, G; Yi, W; Song, H; Liu, F; Liu, X

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection induces a strong immune response and regulates the expression of many host proteins. The collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) protein is a secreted protein that exhibits increased expression during the viral infection process. However, the regulatory function of IAV on CTHRC1 expression is obscure. In this study, we investigated the effect of IAV on CTHRC1 expression and its regulatory mechanism. A total of 106 serum specimens from healthy people and 80 serum specimens from patients infected with IAV were collected. The CTHRC1 levels in the sera from the IVA patients and healthy individuals were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the differences were statistically analysed. A549 cells were infected with the IAV or delNS1 virus. Additionally, A549 cells were cotransfected with a eukaryotic non-structural NS1 protein gene expression plasmid and the CTHRC1 gene promoter reporter plasmid (pCTHRC1-Luc), and, the luciferase activities were assessed. The CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. The serum CTHRC1 level was significantly higher in the IAV patients than in the healthy individuals. IAV upregulated the CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The non-structural NS1 protein specifically activated CTHRC1 gene promoter activity and upregulated CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The activation function had a dose-dependent effect, indicating that influenza virus upregulated CTHRC1 expression through its NS1 protein.

  8. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits Iks channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (Iks) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed Iks current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert Iks inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K+ current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  9. The transmembrane domains of the bacterial cell division proteins FtsB and FtsL form a stable high-order oligomer.

    PubMed

    Khadria, Ambalika S; Senes, Alessandro

    2013-10-29

    FtsB and FtsL are two essential integral membrane proteins of the bacterial division complex or "divisome", both characterized by a single transmembrane helix and a juxtamembrane coiled coil domain. The two domains are important for the association of FtsB and FtsL, a key event for their recruitment to the divisome, which in turn allows the recruitment of the late divisomal components to the Z-ring and subsequent completion of the division process. Here we present a biophysical analysis performed in vitro that shows that the transmembrane domains of FtsB and FtsL associate strongly in isolation. Using Förster resonance energy transfer, we have measured the oligomerization of fluorophore-labeled transmembrane domains of FtsB and FtsL in both detergent and lipid. The data indicate that the transmembrane helices are likely a major contributor to the stability of the FtsB-FtsL complex. Our analyses show that FtsB and FtsL form a 1:1 higher-order oligomeric complex, possibly a tetramer. This finding suggests that the FtsB-FtsL complex is capable of multivalent binding to FtsQ and other divisome components, a hypothesis that is consistent with the possibility that the FtsB-FtsL complex has a structural role in the stabilization of the Z-ring.

  10. v-SNARE transmembrane domains function as catalysts for vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Dhara, Madhurima; Yarzagaray, Antonio; Makke, Mazen; Schindeldecker, Barbara; Schwarz, Yvonne; Shaaban, Ahmed; Sharma, Satyan; Böckmann, Rainer A; Lindau, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle fusion is mediated by an assembly of SNARE proteins between opposing membranes, but it is unknown whether transmembrane domains (TMDs) of SNARE proteins serve mechanistic functions that go beyond passive anchoring of the force-generating SNAREpin to the fusing membranes. Here, we show that conformational flexibility of synaptobrevin-2 TMD is essential for efficient Ca2+-triggered exocytosis and actively promotes membrane fusion as well as fusion pore expansion. Specifically, the introduction of helix-stabilizing leucine residues within the TMD region spanning the vesicle’s outer leaflet strongly impairs exocytosis and decelerates fusion pore dilation. In contrast, increasing the number of helix-destabilizing, ß-branched valine or isoleucine residues within the TMD restores normal secretion but accelerates fusion pore expansion beyond the rate found for the wildtype protein. These observations provide evidence that the synaptobrevin-2 TMD catalyzes the fusion process by its structural flexibility, actively setting the pace of fusion pore expansion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17571.001 PMID:27343350

  11. Annular Anionic Lipids Stabilize the Integrin αIIbβ3 Transmembrane Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thomas; Suk, Jae-Eun; Ye, Feng; Situ, Alan J.; Mazumder, Parichita; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic membrane-proximal amino acids determine the topology of membrane proteins by interacting with anionic lipids that are restricted to the intracellular membrane leaflet. This mechanism implies that anionic lipids interfere with electrostatic interactions of membrane proteins. The integrin αIIbβ3 transmembrane (TM) complex is stabilized by a membrane-proximal αIIb(Arg995)-β3(Asp723) interaction; here, we examine the influence of anionic lipids on this complex. Anionic lipids compete for αIIb(Arg995) contacts with β3(Asp723) but paradoxically do not diminish the contribution of αIIb(Arg995)-β3(Asp723) to TM complex stability. Overall, anionic lipids in annular positions stabilize the αIIbβ3 TM complex by up to 0.50 ± 0.02 kcal/mol relative to zwitterionic lipids in a headgroup structure-dependent manner. Comparatively, integrin receptor activation requires TM complex destabilization of 1.5 ± 0.2 kcal/mol, revealing a sizeable influence of lipid composition on TM complex stability. We implicate changes in lipid headgroup accessibility to small molecules (physical membrane characteristics) and specific but dynamic protein-lipid contacts in this TM helix-helix stabilization. Thus, anionic lipids in ubiquitous annular positions can benefit the stability of membrane proteins while leaving membrane-proximal electrostatic interactions intact. PMID:25632962

  12. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  13. OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, HELIX HOUSE NO. 1 (S-3) AND TRANSMITTER BLDG. (S-2) AT REAR, LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Insertion of short transmembrane helices by the Sec61 translocon.

    PubMed

    Jaud, Simon; Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Meindl-Beinker, Nadja M; Hübner, Nadja C; Tobias, Douglas J; von Heijne, Gunnar; White, Stephen H

    2009-07-14

    The insertion efficiency of transmembrane (TM) helices by the Sec61 translocon depends on helix amino acid composition, the positions of the amino acids within the helix, and helix length. We have used an in vitro expression system to examine systematically the insertion efficiency of short polyleucine segments (L(n), n = 4 ... 12) flanked at either end by 4-residue sequences of the form XXPX-L(n)-XPXX with X = G, N, D, or K. Except for X = K, insertion efficiency (p) is <10% for n < 8, but rises steeply to 100% for n = 12. For X = K, p is already close to 100% for n = 10. A similar pattern is observed for synthetic peptides incorporated into oriented phospholipid bilayer arrays, consistent with the idea that recognition of TM segments by the translocon critically involves physical partitioning of nascent peptide chains into the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that insertion efficiency is determined primarily by the energetic cost of distorting the bilayer in the vicinity of the TM helix. Very short lysine-flanked leucine segments can reduce the energetic cost by extensive hydrogen bonding with water and lipid phosphate groups (snorkeling) and by partial unfolding.

  15. PS--a program for the analysis of helix geometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J

    2012-03-01

    The structure of helices within proteins is often distorted from the ideal linear topology. Curvature of the helix axis can be measured by determining the radius of a circle fit to the axis. Described here is a method of defining a curved path that places backbone atoms (usually Cα) equidistantly from the path. The variance in the distance of backbone atoms from the helix axis is minimised to produce the parametric equations that describe the intersection of a sphere and a plane. The geometric properties of the helix (including helix radius, radius of curvature, and pitch) can be readily obtained from these equations. The approach is applicable to any form of helix, can use any atom in the peptide to determine the axis, can be applied to any polypeptide including mixed α/β peptides, and does not rely on a regular spacing of peptide monomers in the polypeptide chain.

  16. Improving prediction of helix-helix packing in membrane proteins using predicted contact numbers as restraints.

    PubMed

    Li, Bian; Mendenhall, Jeffrey; Nguyen, Elizabeth Dong; Weiner, Brian E; Fischer, Axel W; Meiler, Jens

    2017-03-06

    One of the challenging problems in tertiary structure prediction of helical membrane proteins (HMPs) is the determination of rotation of α-helices around the helix normal. Incorrect prediction of helix rotations substantially disrupts native residue-residue contacts while inducing only a relatively small effect on the overall fold. We previously developed a method for predicting residue contact numbers (CNs), which measure the local packing density of residues within the protein tertiary structure. In this study, we tested the idea of incorporating predicted CNs as restraints to guide the sampling of helix rotation. For a benchmark set of 15 HMPs with simple to rather complicated folds, the average contact recovery (CR) of best-sampled models was improved for all targets, the likelihood of sampling models with CR greater than 20% was increased for 13 targets, and the average RMSD100 of best-sampled models was improved for 12 targets. This study demonstrated that explicit incorporation of CNs as restraints improves the prediction of helix-helix packing. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  18. Into the Eye of the Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A deep new image of the magnificent Helix planetary nebula has been obtained using the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory. The image shows a rich background of distant galaxies, usually not seen in other images of this object. ESO PR Photo 07a/09 The Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06a/09 Helix Nebula Zoom-in ESO PR Video 06b/09 Pan over the Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06c/09 Zoom and pan over the Helix Nebula The Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, lies about 700 light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius (the Water Bearer). It is one of the closest and most spectacular examples of a planetary nebula. These exotic objects have nothing to do with planets, but are the final blooming of Sun-like stars before their retirement as white dwarfs. Shells of gas are blown off from a star's surface, often in intricate and beautiful patterns, and shine under the harsh ultraviolet radiation from the faint, but very hot, central star. The main ring of the Helix Nebula is about two light-years across or half the distance between the Sun and its closest stellar neighbour. Despite being photographically very spectacular the Helix is hard to see visually as its light is thinly spread over a large area of sky and the history of its discovery is rather obscure. It first appears in a list of new objects compiled by the German astronomer Karl Ludwig Harding in 1824. The name Helix comes from the rough corkscrew shape seen in the earlier photographs. Although the Helix looks very much like a doughnut, studies have shown that it possibly consists of at least two separate discs with outer rings and filaments. The brighter inner disc seems to be expanding at about 100 000 km/h and to have taken about 12 000 years to have formed. Because the Helix is relatively close -- it covers an area of the sky about a quarter of the full Moon -- it can be studied in much greater detail than most other planetary nebulae and has been found to have an unexpected and complex structure. All around the

  19. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  20. A deterministic algorithm for constrained enumeration of transmembrane protein folds.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William Michael; Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Schoeniger, Joseph S.

    2004-07-01

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is presented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations, which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures.

  1. Direct folding simulation of a long helix in explicit water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Lu, Xiaoliang; Duan, Lili; Zhang, Dawei; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-05-01

    A recently proposed Polarizable Hydrogen Bond (PHB) method has been employed to simulate the folding of a 53 amino acid helix (PDB ID 2KHK) in explicit water. Under PHB simulation, starting from a fully extended structure, the peptide folds into the native state as confirmed by measured time evolutions of radius of gyration, root mean square deviation (RMSD), and native hydrogen bond. Free energy and cluster analysis show that the folded helix is thermally stable under the PHB model. Comparison of simulation results under, respectively, PHB and standard nonpolarizable force field demonstrates that polarization is critical for stable folding of this long α-helix.

  2. Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway in a developmental checkpoint monitoring Helix-Loop-Helix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    The E-proteins and Id-proteins are, respectively, the positive and negative heterodimer partners for the basic-helix-loop-helix protein family, and as such contribute to a remarkably large number of cell fate decisions. E-proteins and Id-proteins also function to inhibit or promote cell proliferation and cancer. Using a genetic modifier screen in Drosophila, we show that the Id-protein Extramacrochaetae enables growth by suppressing activation of the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway of tumor suppressors, activation that requires transcriptional activation of the expanded gene by the E-protein Daughterless. Daughterless protein binds to an intronic enhancer in the expanded gene, both activating the SWH pathway independently of the transmembrane protein Crumbs, and bypassing the negative feedback regulation that targets the same expanded enhancer. Thus the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway has a cell-autonomous function to prevent inappropriate differentiation due to transcription factor imbalance, and monitors the intrinsic developmental status of progenitor cells, distinct from any responses to cell-cell interactions. PMID:25579975

  3. A novel mutation in the alpha-helix 1 of the C subunit of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase responsible for optochin resistance of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Cogné, N; Claverys, J; Denis, F; Martin, C

    2000-10-01

    Previously reported mutations involved in optochin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates changed residues 48, 49 or 50, in the transmembrane alpha-helix 2 of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase subunit. We report here an unusual mutation which changes the sequence of the transmembrane alpha-helix 1 of the AtpC subunit. This mutation involves a Gly to Ser substitution resulting from a G to A transition at codon 14 of the atpC gene.

  4. Heavy-Atom Labeled Transmembrane β-Peptides: Synthesis, CD-Spectroscopy, and X-ray Diffraction Studies in Model Lipid Multilayer.

    PubMed

    Rost, Ulrike; Xu, Yihui; Salditt, Tim; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2016-08-18

    Transmembrane β-peptides are promising candidates for the design of well-controlled membrane anchors in lipid membranes. Here, we present the synthesis of transmembrane β-peptides with and without tryptophan anchors, as well as a novel iodine-labeled d-β(3) -amino acid. By using one or more of the heavy-atom labeled amino acids as markers, the orientation of the helical peptide was inferred based on the electron-density profile determined by X-ray reflectivity. The β-peptides were synthesized through manual Fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and reconstituted in unilamellar vesicles forming a right-handed 314 -helix secondary structure, as shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy. We then integrated the β-peptide into solid-supported membrane stacks and carried out X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the β-peptide orientation and its effect on the membrane bilayers. These β-peptides adopt a well-ordered transmembrane motif in the solid-supported model membrane, maintaining the basic structure of the original bilayer with some distinct alterations. Notably, the helical tilt angle, which accommodates the positive hydrophobic mismatch, induces a tilt of the acyl chains. The tilted chains, in turn, lead to a membrane thinning effect.

  5. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  6. The infrared dichroism of transmembrane helical polypeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, P H; Kaufman, B K; McElhaney, R N; Lewis, R N

    1995-01-01

    Polarized attenuated total internal reflectance techniques were applied to study the infrared dichroism of the amide I transition moment in two membrane-bound peptides that are known to form oriented transmembrane helices: gramicidin A in a supported phospholipid monolayer and Ac-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24) in oriented multibilayers. These studies were performed to test the ability of these techniques to determine the orientation of these peptides, to verify the value of optical parameters used to calculate electric field strengths, to examine the common assumptions regarding the amide I transition moment orientation, and to ascertain the effect of surface imperfections on molecular disorder. The two peptides exhibit marked differences in the shape and frequency of their amide I absorption bands. Yet both peptides are highly ordered and oriented with their helical axes perpendicular to the membrane surface. In the alpha-helix formed by L24, there is evidence for a mode with type E1 symmetry contributing to amide I, and the amide I transition moment must be more closely aligned with the peptide C=O (< 34 degrees) than earlier studies have suggested. These results indicate that long-standing assumptions about the orientation of amide I in a peptide require some revision, but that in general, infrared spectroscopy yields reliable information about the orientation of membrane-bound helical peptides. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8599683

  7. The NC16A domain of collagen XVII plays a role in triple helix assembly and stability.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Françoise; Fu, Chang-Ling; Olague-Marchan, Monica; Giudice, George J

    2006-12-01

    Collagen XVII/BP180 is a transmembrane constituent of the epidermal anchoring complex. To study the role of its non-collagenous linker domain, NC16A, in protein assembly and stability, we analyzed the following recombinant proteins: the collagen XVII extracellular domain with or without NC16A, and a pair of truncated proteins comprising the COL15-NC15 stretch expressed with or without NC16A. All four proteins were found to exist as stable collagen triple helices; however, the two missing NC16A exhibited melting temperatures significantly lower than their NC16A-containing counterparts. Protein refolding experiments revealed that the rate of triple helix assembly of the collagen model peptide GPP(10) is greatly increased by the addition of an upstream NC16A domain. In summary, the NC16A linker domain of collagen XVII exhibits a positive effect on both the rate of assembly and the stability of the adjoining collagen structure.

  8. A three-dimensional movie of structural changes in bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Nango, Eriko; Royant, Antoine; Kubo, Minoru; Nakane, Takanori; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Kimura, Tetsunari; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Song, Changyong; Tanaka, Rie; Arima, Toshi; Yamashita, Ayumi; Kobayashi, Jun; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Sugahara, Michihiro; Nam, Daewoong; Nomura, Takashi; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Im, Dohyun; Fujiwara, Takaaki; Yamanaka, Yasuaki; Jeon, Byeonghyun; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Oda, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Masahiro; Andersson, Rebecka; Båth, Petra; Dods, Robert; Davidsson, Jan; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Kawatake, Satoshi; Murata, Michio; Nureki, Osamu; Owada, Shigeki; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Joti, Yasumasa; Schertler, Gebhard; Yabashi, Makina; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Standfuss, Jörg; Neutze, Richard; Iwata, So

    2016-12-23

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a light-driven proton pump and a model membrane transport protein. We used time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an x-ray free electron laser to visualize conformational changes in bR from nanoseconds to milliseconds following photoactivation. An initially twisted retinal chromophore displaces a conserved tryptophan residue of transmembrane helix F on the cytoplasmic side of the protein while dislodging a key water molecule on the extracellular side. The resulting cascade of structural changes throughout the protein shows how motions are choreographed as bR transports protons uphill against a transmembrane concentration gradient.

  9. Unfolding four-helix bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-03-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to describe the early stages of unfolding of cytochromes c‧ and c-b562 . Calculations are based on a step-wise extension of the polypeptide chain subject to the constraint that the spatial relationship among the residues of each triplet is fixed by the native-state crystallographic data. The response of each protein to these structural perturbations allows the evolution of each of the four helices in these two proteins to be differentiated. It is found that the two external helices in c‧ unfold before its two internal helices, whereas exactly the opposite behaviour is demonstrated by c-b562 . Each of these cytochromes has an extended, internal, non-helical ('turning') region that initially lags behind the most labile helix but then, at a certain stage (identified for each cytochrome), unravels before any of the four helices present in the native structure. It is believed that these predictions will be useful in guiding future experimental studies on the unfolding of these two cytochromes.

  10. TRAMPLE: the transmembrane protein labelling environment.

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Rossi, Ivan; Amico, Mauro; Zauli, Andrea; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Casadio, Rita

    2005-07-01

    TRAMPLE (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/biodec/) is a web application server dedicated to the detection and the annotation of transmembrane protein sequences. TRAMPLE includes different state-of-the-art algorithms for the prediction of signal peptides, transmembrane segments (both beta-strands and alpha-helices), secondary structure and fast fold recognition. TRAMPLE also includes a complete content management system to manage the results of the predictions. Each user of the server has his/her own workplace, where the data can be stored, organized, accessed and annotated with documents through a simple web-based interface. In this manner, TRAMPLE significantly improves usability with respect to other more traditional web servers.

  11. The Transmembrane Domain of CEACAM1-4S Is a Determinant of Anchorage Independent Growth and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Erica L.; Mills, David R.; Brilliant, Kate E.; Hixson, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule expressed by epithelial cells in many organs. CEACAM1-4L and CEACAM1-4S, two isoforms produced by differential splicing, are predominant in rat liver. Previous work has shown that downregulation of both isoforms occurs in rat hepatocellular carcinomas. Here, we have isolated an anchorage dependent clone, designated 253T-NT that does not express detectable levels of CEACAM1. Stable transfection of 253-NT cells with a wild type CEACAM1-4S expression vector induced an anchorage independent growth in vitro and a tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. These phenotypes were used as quantifiable end points to examine the functionality of the CEACAM1-4S transmembrane domain. Examination of the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain showed N-terminal GXXXG dimerization sequences and C-terminal tyrosine residues shown in related studies to stabilize transmembrane domain helix-helix interactions. To examine the effects of transmembrane domain mutations, 253-NT cells were transfected with transmembrane domain mutants carrying glycine to leucine or tyrosine to valine substitutions. Results showed that mutation of transmembrane tyrosine residues greatly enhanced growth in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of transmembrane dimerization motifs, in contrast, significantly reduced anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity. 253-NT cells expressing CEACAM1-4S with both glycine to leucine and tyrosine to valine mutations displayed the growth-enhanced phenotype of tyrosine mutants. The dramatic effect of transmembrane domain mutations constitutes strong evidence that the transmembrane domain is an important determinant of CEACAM1-4S functionality and most likely by other proteins with transmembrane domains containing dimerization sequences and/or C-terminal tyrosine residues. PMID:22235309

  12. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins.

  13. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits I(ks) channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-08-26

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (I(ks)) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed I(ks) current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert I(ks) inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K(+) current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes.

  14. Mutagenesis of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein transmembrane domain: role of an interfacial proline residue.

    PubMed

    Williams, K A; Deber, C M

    1993-10-15

    The transmembrane (TM) domain of the 53-residue major coat protein of the M13-related bacteriophage IKe (residues 24-42: LISQTWPVVTTVVVAGVLI) has been subjected to randomized mutagenesis to probe the conformation and stability of the TM domain, as well as the effect of structurally-important residues such as proline. TM mutants were obtained by the Eckstein method of site-directed mutagenesis using the IKe genome as template so as to eliminate the need for subcloning. Over 40 single- and double-site viable mutants of bacteriophage IKe were isolated. Every residue in the TM segment, except the highly conserved Trp29, could be mutated to at least one other residue; polar and charged mutations occurred in the TM segment adjacent to the N-terminal domain (residues 24-28), while non-polar substitutions predominated in the C-terminal portion (residues 30-42). The Pro30 locus tolerated four mutations-Ala, Gly, Cys, and Ser- which represent the four side chains of least volume. Mutant coat proteins obtained directly from the phage in milligram quantities were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE gels. Wild type IKe coat protein solubilized in sodium deoxycholate micelles was found to occur as an alpha-helical, monomeric species which is stable at 95 degrees C, whereas the mutant Pro30-->Gly undergoes an irreversible conformational transition at ca. 90 degrees C to an aggregated beta-sheet structure. The result that Pro30 stabilizes the TM helix in the micellar membrane suggests a sterically-restricted location for the wild type Pro pyrrolidine side chain in the bulky Trp-Pro-Val triad, where it may be positioned to direct the initiation of the subsequent TM core domain helix.

  15. X-ray Crystal Structure of a Metalled Double-Helix Generated by Infinite and Consecutive C*-Ag(I) -C* (C*:N(1) -Hexylcytosine) Base Pairs through Argentophilic and Hydrogen Bond Interactions.

    PubMed

    Terrón, Angel; Moreno-Vachiano, Blas; Bauzá, Antonio; García-Raso, Angel; Fiol, Juan Jesús; Barceló-Oliver, Miquel; Molins, Elies; Frontera, Antonio

    2017-02-10

    The synthesis of a metalled double-helix containing exclusively silver-mediated C*-C* base pairs is reported herein (C*=N(1) hexylcytosine). Remarkably, it is the first crystal structure containing infinite and consecutive C*-Ag(I) -C* base pairs that form a double helix. The Ag(I) ion occupies the center between two C* residues with N(3)-Ag bond lengths of 2.1 Å and short Ag(I) -Ag(I) distances (3.1 Å) suggesting an interesting argentophilic attraction as a stabilization source of the helical disposition. The solid-state structure is further stabilized by metal-mediated base-pairs, hydrogen bonding and π-stacking interactions. Moreover, the angle N(3)-Ag-N(3) is almost linear in the [Ag(N(1) hexylcytosine)2 ](+) motif and the bases are not coplanar, thus generating a double-strand helical aggregate in the solid state. The noncovalent and argentophilic interactions have been rationalized based on DFT calculations.

  16. M2 protein from influenza A: from multiple structures to biophysical and functional insights.

    PubMed

    Cross, Timothy A; Dong, Hao; Sharma, Mukesh; Busath, David D; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-04-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A is a proton channel as a tetramer, with a single transmembrane helix from each monomer lining the pore. Val27 and Trp41 form gates at either end of the pore and His37 mediates the shuttling of protons across a central barrier between the N-terminal and C-terminal aqueous pore regions. Numerous structures of this transmembrane domain and of a longer construct that includes an amphipathic helix are now in the Protein Data Bank. Many structural differences are apparent from samples obtained in a variety of membrane mimetic environments. High-resolution structural results in lipid bilayers have provided novel insights into the functional mechanism of the unique HxxxW cluster in the M2 proton channel.

  17. Molecular Content of the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zack, L. N.; Zeigler, N. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-06-01

    Multiple transitions of H_2CO, HCO^+, and CO were detected at nine positions across the planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula, using the 12m telescope and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). A complete map of the nebula has also been made in the J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO^+ at 89 GHz. HCO^+ emission was found to be widespread across the Helix, and is coincident with the ionized gas as traced in optical images. A complex velocity structure is apparent in the HCO^+ spectra, as well. The CO and H_2CO data (J = 1 → 0, 2 → 1, and 3 → 2) were modeled using a radiative transfer code at the nine positions observed in the Helix. Kinetic temperatures were typically found to be in the range Tkin ≈ 20 - 45 K and the gas density on the order of n(H_2) ≈ 105 cm-3 at these positions. The column densities for CO, H_2CO, and HCO^+ were determined to be 1015, 1012, and 1011 cm-2 respectively, corresponding to fractional abundances, relative to H_2, of f ≈ 10-4, 10-7, and 10-8. The extended distribution of HCO^+ suggests that dense clumps may exist throughout the nebula. Hence, the chemistry of evolved planetary nebulae may be more active than previously thought.

  18. Polyproline and triple helix motifs in host-pathogen recognition.

    PubMed

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Secondary structure elements often mediate protein-protein interactions. Despite their low abundance in folded proteins, polyproline II (PPII) and its variant, the triple helix, are frequently involved in protein-protein interactions, likely due to their peculiar propensity to be solvent-exposed. We here review the role of PPII and triple helix in mediating hostpathogen interactions, with a particular emphasis to the structural aspects of these processes. After a brief description of the basic structural features of these elements, examples of host-pathogen interactions involving these motifs are illustrated. Literature data suggest that the role played by PPII motif in these processes is twofold. Indeed, PPII regions may directly mediate interactions between proteins of the host and the pathogen. Alternatively, PPII may act as structural spacers needed for the correct positioning of the elements needed for adhesion and infectivity. Recent investigations have highlighted that collagen triple helix is also a common target for bacterial adhesins. Although structural data on complexes between adhesins and collagen models are rather limited, experimental and theoretical studies have unveiled some interesting clues of the recognition process. Interestingly, very recent data show that not only is the triple helix used by pathogens as a target in the host-pathogen interaction but it may also act as a bait in these processes since bacterial proteins containing triple helix regions have been shown to interact with host proteins. As both PPII and triple helix expose several main chain non-satisfied hydrogen bond acceptors and donors, both elements are highly solvated. The preservation of the solvation state of both PPII and triple helix upon protein-protein interaction is an emerging aspect that will be here thoroughly discussed.

  19. Interactions between relay helix and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix drive the converter domain rotation during the recovery stroke of myosin II.

    PubMed

    Baumketner, Andrij

    2012-06-01

    Myosin motor protein exists in two alternative conformations, prerecovery state M* and postrecovery state M**, on adenosine triphosphate binding. The details of the M*-to-M** transition, known as the recovery stroke to reflect its role as the functional opposite of the force-generating power stroke, remain elusive. The defining feature of the postrecovery state is a kink in the relay helix, a key part of the protein involved in force generation. In this article, we determine the interactions that are responsible for the appearance of the kink. We design a series of computational models that contain three other segments, relay loop, converter domain, and Src homology 1 (SH1) domain helix, with which relay helix interacts and determine their structure in accurate replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. By conducting an exhaustive combinatorial search among different models, we find that: (1) the converter domain must be attached to the relay helix during the transition, so it does not interfere with other parts of the protein and (2) the structure of the relay helix is controlled by SH1 helix. The kink is strongly coupled to the position of SH1 helix. It arises as a result of direct interactions between SH1 and the relay helix and leads to a rotation of the C-terminal part of the relay helix, which is subsequently transmitted to the converter domain.

  20. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Renfeng; Smith, Lloyd M.; Tong, Xinchun E.

    1995-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis.

  1. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Smith, L.M.; Tong, X.E.

    1995-03-28

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis. 4 figures.

  2. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces.

  3. A statistically derived parameterization for the collagen triple-helix.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Jan K; Goh, M Cynthia

    2002-11-01

    The triple-helix is a unique secondary structural motif found primarily within the collagens. In collagen, it is a homo- or hetero-tripeptide with a repeating primary sequence of (Gly-X-Y)(n), displaying characteristic peptide backbone dihedral angles. Studies of bulk collagen fibrils indicate that the triple-helix must be a highly repetitive secondary structure, with very specific constraints. Primary sequence analysis shows that most collagen molecules are primarily triple-helical; however, no high-resolution structure of any entire protein is yet available. Given the drastic morphological differences in self-assembled collagen structures with subtle changes in assembly conditions, a detailed knowledge of the relative locations of charged and sterically bulky residues in collagen is desirable. Its repetitive primary sequence and highly conserved secondary structure make collagen, and the triple-helix in general, an ideal candidate for a general parameterization for prediction of residue locations and for the use of a helical wheel in the prediction of residue orientation. Herein, a statistical analysis of the currently available high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of model triple-helical peptides is performed to produce an experimentally based parameter set for predicting peptide backbone and C(beta) atom locations for the triple-helix. Unlike existing homology models, this allows easy prediction of an entire triple-helix structure based on all existing high-resolution triple-helix structures, rather than only on a single structure or on idealized parameters. Furthermore, regional differences based on the helical propensity of residues may be readily incorporated. The parameter set is validated in terms of the predicted bond lengths, backbone dihedral angles, and interchain hydrogen bonding.

  4. Analysis of Human Dopamine D3 Receptor Quaternary Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Marsango, Sara; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pou, Chantevy; Varela Liste, María José; Milligan, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor is a class A, rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that can form dimers and/or higher order oligomers. However, the molecular basis for production of these complexes is not well defined. Using combinations of molecular modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and homogenous time-resolved FRET, the interfaces that allow dopamine D3 receptor monomers to interact were defined and used to describe likely quaternary arrangements of the receptor. These were then compared with published crystal structures of dimeric β1-adrenoreceptor, μ-opioid, and CXCR4 receptors. The data indicate important contributions of residues from within each of transmembrane domains I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII as well as the intracellular helix VIII in the formation of D3-D3 receptor interfaces within homo-oligomers and are consistent with the D3 receptor adopting a β1-adrenoreceptor-like quaternary arrangement. Specifically, results suggest that D3 protomers can interact with each other via at least two distinct interfaces: the first one comprising residues from transmembrane domains I and II along with those from helix VIII and a second one involving transmembrane domains IV and V. Moreover, rather than existing only as distinct dimeric species, the results are consistent with the D3 receptor also assuming a quaternary structure in which two transmembrane domain I-II-helix VIII dimers interact to form a ”rhombic” tetramer via an interface involving residues from transmembrane domains VI and VII. In addition, the results also provide insights into the potential contribution of molecules of cholesterol to the overall organization and potential stability of the D3 receptor and possibly other GPCR quaternary structures. PMID:25931118

  5. Status of the HELIX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakely, Scott; Helix Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HELIX, the High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment, is a new balloon-borne superconducting magnet spectrometer designed to make detailed measurements of cosmic-ray chemical and isotopic abundances. Measurements of this kind, in particular of the ratio of radioactive 10Be to 9Be at energies to 3 GeV/nuc, can provide profound insights into cosmic-ray propagation processes and confinement timescales. HELIX is scheduled to make its first flight during the 2019/2020 Antarctic campaign. In this talk, we will discuss the goals and design of the instrument and describe the status of the program.

  6. Proline localized to the interaction interface can mediate self-association of transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Sal-Man, Neta; Gerber, Doron; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of transmembrane domains (TMDs) is a critical step in the function of membrane proteins. In recent years, the role of specific amino acids in TMD-TMD interactions has been better characterized, with more emphasis on polar and aromatic residues. Despite the high abundance of proline residues in TMDs, contribution of proline to TMD-TMD association has not been intensively studied. Here, we evaluated statistically the frequency of appearance, and experimentally the contribution of proline, compared to other hydrophobic amino acids (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, and Met), with regard to TMD-TMD self-assembly. Our model system is the assembly motif ((22)QxxS(25)) found previously in TMDs of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor (Tar-1). Statistically, our data revealed that all different motifs, except PxxS (P/S), have frequencies similar to their theoretical random expectancy within a database of 41916 sequences of TMDs, while PxxS motif is underrepresented. Experimentally, using the ToxR assembly system, the SDS-gel running pattern of biotin-conjugated TMD peptides, and FRET experiments between fluorescence-labeled peptides, we found that only the P/S motif preserves the dimerization ability of wild-type Tar-1 TMD. Although proline is known as a helix breaker in solution, Circular Dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of the P/S and the wild-type peptides are similar. All together, these data suggest that proline can stabilize TM self-assembly when localized to the interaction interface of a transmembrane oligomer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  7. Thermodynamics of Helix-Coil Transitions of Polyalanine in Open Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Suvlu, Dylan; Samaratunga, Seneviratne; Thirumalai, D; Rasaiah, Jayendran C

    2017-01-19

    Understanding structure formation in polypeptide chains and synthetic polymers encapsulated in pores is important in biology and nanotechnology. We present replica exchange molecular dynamics studies of the phase diagram for α-helix formation of capped polyalanine in nanotubes (NT) open to a water reservoir as a function of the NT diameter and hydrophobicity. A helix forms only in a narrow range of diameters, which surprisingly is comparable to the width of the ribosome tunnel. Increasing the hydrophobicity enhances helicity in the NT. Helix formation in polyalanine is driven by a small negative enthalpy and a positive entropy change at ≈300 K, in contrast to the large negative entropy change that destabilizes the helix and favors the coiled state in bulk water. There is an anticorrelation between water density inside the nanotube and structure formation. Confinement-induced helix formation depends on amino acid sequence. There is complete absence of helix in polyglutamine and polyserine confined to a open carbon nanotube.

  8. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  9. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  10. High-resolution structures of collagen-like peptides [(Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4]: implications for triple-helix hydration and Hyp(X) puckering.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Kenji; Hongo, Chizuru; Wu, Guanghan; Mizuno, Kazunori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ebisuzaki, Shutoku; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishino, Norikazu; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2009-05-01

    Structures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4 (ppg9-XYG) where (Xaa, Yaa)=(Pro, Hyp), (Hyp, Pro) or (Hyp, Hyp) were analyzed at high resolution using synchrotron radiation. Molecular and crystal structures of these peptides are very similar to those of the (Pro-Pro-Gly)9 peptide. The results obtained in this study, together with those obtained from related compounds, indicated the puckering propensity of the Hyp in the X position: (1) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Pro(Y) stacking pairs prefer the down-puckering conformation, as in ppg9-OPG, and ppg9-OOG; (2) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Hyp(Y) stacking pairs prefer the up-puckering conformation if there is no specific reason to adopt the down-puckering conformation. Water molecules in these peptide crystals are classified into two groups, the 1st and 2nd hydration waters. Water molecules in the 1st hydration group have direct hydrogen bonds with peptide oxygen atoms, whereas those in the 2nd hydration group do not. Compared with globular proteins, the number of water molecules in the 2nd hydration shell of the ppg9-XYG peptides is very large, likely due to the unique rod-like molecular structure of collagen model peptides. In the collagen helix, the amino acid residues in the X and Y positions must protrude outside of the triple helix, which forces even the hydrophobic side chains, such as Pro, to be exposed to the surrounding water molecules. Therefore, most of the waters in the 2nd hydration shell are covering hydrophobic Pro side chains by forming clathrate structures.

  11. Myc/Max and other helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins bend DNA toward the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, D E; Parent, L A; Sharp, P A

    1992-01-01

    A distinct family of DNA-binding proteins is characterized by the presence of adjacent "basic," helix-loop-helix, and leucine zipper domains. Members of this family include the Myc oncoproteins, their binding partner Max, and the mammalian transcription factors USF, TFE3, and TFEB. Consistent with their homologous domains, these proteins bind to DNA containing the same core hexanucleotide sequence CACGTG. Analysis of the conformation of DNA in protein-DNA complexes has been undertaken with a circular permutation assay. Large mobility anomalies were detected for all basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins tested, suggesting that each protein induced a similar degree of bending. Phasing analysis revealed that basic/helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper proteins orient the DNA bend toward the minor groove. The presence of in-phase spacing between adjacent binding sites for this family of proteins in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer suggests the possible formation of an unusual triple-bended structure and may have implications for the activities of Myc. Images PMID:1465398

  12. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  13. Structural assemblies of the di- and oligomeric G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 in live cells: an MFIS-FRET and integrative modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Greife, Annemarie; Felekyan, Suren; Ma, Qijun; Gertzen, Christoph G. W.; Spomer, Lina; Dimura, Mykola; Peulen, Thomas O.; Wöhler, Christina; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Keitel, Verena; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2016-01-01

    TGR5 is the first identified bile acid-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. So far, structural and multimerization properties are largely unknown for TGR5. We used a combined strategy applying cellular biology, Multiparameter Image Fluorescence Spectroscopy (MFIS) for quantitative FRET analysis, and integrative modelling to obtain structural information about dimerization and higher-order oligomerization assemblies of TGR5 wildtype (wt) and Y111 variants fused to fluorescent proteins. Residue 111 is located in transmembrane helix 3 within the highly conserved ERY motif. Co-immunoprecipitation and MFIS-FRET measurements with gradually increasing acceptor to donor concentrations showed that TGR5 wt forms higher-order oligomers, a process disrupted in TGR5 Y111A variants. From the concentration dependence of the MFIS-FRET data we conclude that higher-order oligomers – likely with a tetramer organization - are formed from dimers, the smallest unit suggested for TGR5 Y111A variants. Higher-order oligomers likely have a linear arrangement with interaction sites involving transmembrane helix 1 and helix 8 as well as transmembrane helix 5. The latter interaction is suggested to be disrupted by the Y111A mutation. The proposed model of TGR5 oligomer assembly broadens our view of possible oligomer patterns and affinities of class A GPCRs. PMID:27833095

  14. Structural assemblies of the di- and oligomeric G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 in live cells: an MFIS-FRET and integrative modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greife, Annemarie; Felekyan, Suren; Ma, Qijun; Gertzen, Christoph G. W.; Spomer, Lina; Dimura, Mykola; Peulen, Thomas O.; Wöhler, Christina; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Keitel, Verena; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2016-11-01

    TGR5 is the first identified bile acid-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. So far, structural and multimerization properties are largely unknown for TGR5. We used a combined strategy applying cellular biology, Multiparameter Image Fluorescence Spectroscopy (MFIS) for quantitative FRET analysis, and integrative modelling to obtain structural information about dimerization and higher-order oligomerization assemblies of TGR5 wildtype (wt) and Y111 variants fused to fluorescent proteins. Residue 111 is located in transmembrane helix 3 within the highly conserved ERY motif. Co-immunoprecipitation and MFIS-FRET measurements with gradually increasing acceptor to donor concentrations showed that TGR5 wt forms higher-order oligomers, a process disrupted in TGR5 Y111A variants. From the concentration dependence of the MFIS-FRET data we conclude that higher-order oligomers – likely with a tetramer organization - are formed from dimers, the smallest unit suggested for TGR5 Y111A variants. Higher-order oligomers likely have a linear arrangement with interaction sites involving transmembrane helix 1 and helix 8 as well as transmembrane helix 5. The latter interaction is suggested to be disrupted by the Y111A mutation. The proposed model of TGR5 oligomer assembly broadens our view of possible oligomer patterns and affinities of class A GPCRs.

  15. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) <==> 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  16. Effect of variations in the structure of a polyleucine-based alpha-helical transmembrane peptide on its interaction with phosphatidylglycerol bilayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Hodges, Robert S; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2004-03-30

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of a cationic alpha-helical transmembrane peptide, acetyl-Lys(2)-Leu(24)-Lys(2)-amide (L(24)), and members of the homologous series of anionic n-saturated diacyl phosphatidylglycerols (PGs). Analogues of L(24), in which the lysine residues were replaced by 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (L(24)DAP), or in which a leucine residue at each end of the polyleucine sequence was replaced by a tryptophan (WL(22)W), were also studied to investigate the roles of lysine side-chain snorkeling and aromatic side-chain interactions with the interfacial region of phospholipid bilayers. The gel/liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of the host PG bilayers is altered by these peptides in a hydrophobic mismatch-dependent manner, as previously found with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers. However, all three peptides reduce the phase transition temperature and enthalpy to a greater extent in anionic PG bilayers than in zwitterionic PC bilayers, with WL(22)W having the largest effect. All three peptides form very stable alpha-helices in PG bilayers, but small conformational changes are induced in response to a mismatch between peptide hydrophobic length and gel-state lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. Moreover, electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions occur between the terminal lysine residues of L(24) and L(24)DAP and the polar headgroups of PG bilayers. However, such interactions were not observed in PG/WL(22)W bilayers, suggesting that the cation-pi interactions between the tryptophan and lysine residues predominate. These results indicate that the lipid-peptide interactions are affected not only by the hydrophobic mismatch between these peptides and the host lipid bilayer, but also by the tryptophan-modulated electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions between the positively charged lysine residues at the termini of these

  17. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  18. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  19. Circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and serology indicate that the structural basis of antigenic variation in foot-and-mouth disease virus is [alpha]-helix formation

    SciTech Connect

    France, L.L.; Piatti, P.G.; Newman, J.F.E.; Brown, F. ); Toth, I.; Gibbons, W.A. )

    1994-08-30

    Seven antigenic variants obtained from a single field isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus, serotype A12, differ only at residues 148 and 153 in the immunodominant loop of viral protein VP1. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the region 141-160 are highly immunogenic. UV circular dichroism shows that (i) in aqueous solution of the peptides are nearly identical, but in 100% trifluoroethanol they display helix-forming properties which correlate well with their serological crossreactivities for anti-peptide sera, and (ii) these properties are insensitive to substitutions at position 153, except for proline, but are highly sensitive to substitutions at position 148. This pattern can be explained by the effects of these substitutions on the amphiphilic character and positions of helices postulated in the region 146-156. Molecular models indicate that residues 147, 148, 150, 151, 153-155, and 157 are most likely to interact with residues of the antibody paratopes. The data are consistent with the existence of an inverse [gamma]-turn around Pro-153, and a [beta]-turn at the cell-attachment site at residues 145-147. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Analysis of dihedral angle preferences for alanine and glycine residues in alpha and beta transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, K M; Krishnaswamy, S

    2015-01-01

    For the past 50 years, the Ramachandran map has been used effectively to study the protein structure and folding. However, though extensive analysis has been done on dihedral angle preferences of residues in globular proteins, related studies and reports of membrane proteins are limited. It is of interest to explore the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions of membrane proteins which are involved in several important and diverse biological processes. Hence, in the present work, a systematic comparative computational analysis has been made on dihedral angle preferences of alanine and glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions (the two major classes of transmembrane proteins) with the aid of the Ramachandran map. Further, the conformational preferences of residues in transmembrane regions were compared with the non-transmembrane regions. We have extracted cation-pi interacting residues present in transmembrane regions and explored the dihedral angle preferences. From our observations, we reveal the higher percentage of occurrences of glycine in alpha and beta transmembrane regions than other hydrophobic residues. Further, we noted a clear shift in ψ-angle preferences of glycine residues from negative bins in alpha transmembrane regions to positive bins in beta transmembrane regions. Also, cation-pi interacting residues in beta transmembrane regions avoid preferring ψ-angles in the range of -59° to -30°. In this article, we insist that the studies on preferences of dihedral angles in transmembrane regions, thorough understanding of structure and folding of transmembrane proteins, can lead to modeling of novel transmembrane regions towards designing membrane proteins.

  1. Effect of variations in the structure of a polyleucine-based alpha-helical transmembrane peptide on its interaction with phosphatidylethanolamine Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Lewis, Ruthven N A H; Hodges, Robert S; McElhaney, Ronald N

    2004-10-01

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of a cationic alpha-helical transmembrane peptide, acetyl-Lys2-Leu24-Lys2-amide (L24), and members of the homologous series of zwitterionic n-saturated diacyl phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs). Analogs of L24, in which the lysine residues were replaced by 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (acetyl-DAP2-Leu24-DAP2-amide (L24DAP)) or in which a leucine residue at each end of the polyleucine sequence was replaced by a tryptophan (Ac-K2-W-L22-W-K2-amide (WL22W)), were also studied to investigate the roles of lysine side-chain snorkeling and aromatic side-chain interactions with the interfacial region of phospholipid bilayers. The gel/liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature of the PE bilayers is altered by these peptides in a hydrophobic mismatch-independent manner, in contrast to the hydrophobic mismatch-dependent manner observed previously with zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. Moreover, all three peptides reduce the phase transition temperature to a greater extent in PE bilayers than in PC and PG bilayers, indicating a greater disruption of PE gel-phase bilayer organization. Moreover, the lysine-anchored L24 reduces the phase transition temperature, enthalpy, and the cooperativity of PE bilayers to a much greater extent than DAP-anchored L24DAP, whereas replacement of the terminal leucines by tryptophan residues (Ac-K2-W-L22-W-K2-amide) only slightly attenuates the effects of this peptide on the chain-melting phase transition of the host PE bilayers. All three peptides form very stable alpha-helices in PE bilayers, but small conformational changes occur in response to mismatch between peptide hydrophobic length and gel-state lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. These results suggest that the lysine snorkeling plays a significant role in the peptide-PE interactions and that cation

  2. The transmembrane topology of Batten disease protein CLN3 determined by consensus computational prediction constrained by experimental data.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Timothy; Mole, Sara E; Jones, David T

    2008-04-02

    The CLN3 gene encodes an integral membrane protein of unknown function. Mutations in CLN3 can cause juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, or Batten disease, an inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease affecting children. Here, we report a topological study of the CLN3 protein using bioinformatic approaches constrained by experimental data. Our results suggest that CLN3 has a six transmembrane helix topology with cytoplasmic N and C-termini, three large lumenal loops, one of which may contain an amphipathic helix, and one large cytoplasmic loop. Surprisingly, varied topological predictions were made using different subsets of orthologous sequences, highlighting the challenges still remaining for bioinformatics.

  3. The helix bundle: A reversible lipid binding motif

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Kiss, Robert S.; Weers, Paul M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are the protein components of lipoproteins that have the innate ability to inter convert between a lipid-free and a lipid-bound form in a facile manner, a remarkable property conferred by the helix bundle motif. Composed of a series of four or five amphipathic α-helices that fold to form a helix bundle, this motif allows the en face orientation of the hydrophobic faces of the α-helices in the protein interior in the lipid-free state. A conformational switch then permits helix-helix interactions to be substituted by helix-lipid interactions upon lipid binding interaction. This review compares the apolipoprotein high resolution structures and the factors that trigger this switch in insect apolipophorin III and the mammalian apolipoproteins, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-I, pointing out the commonalities and key differences in the mode of lipid interaction. Further insights into the lipid bound conformation of apolipoproteins are required to fully understand their functional role under physiological conditions. PMID:19770066

  4. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (without scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER CABLE SUPPORT IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  6. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (with scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  7. VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87) SHOWING MAIN ENTRY DOOR, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Prion protein helix1 promotes aggregation but is not converted into beta-sheet.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens; Skora, Lukasz; Frense, Dieter; Griesinger, Christian; Zweckstetter, Markus; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Kramer, Michael L

    2006-10-06

    Prion diseases are caused by the aggregation of the native alpha-helical prion protein PrP(C) into its pathological beta-sheet-rich isoform PrP(Sc). In current models of PrP(Sc), helix1 is assumed to be preferentially converted into beta-sheet during aggregation of PrP(C). This was supported by the NMR structure of PrP(C) since, in contrast to the isolated helix1, helix2 and helix3 are connected by a small loop and are additionally stabilized by an interhelical disulfide bond. However, helix1 is extremely hydrophilic and has a high helix propensity. This prompted us to investigate the role of helix1 in prion aggregation using humPrP(23-159) including helix1 (144-156) compared with the C-terminal-truncated isoform humPrP(23-144) corresponding to the pathological human stop mutations Q160Stop and Y145Stop, respectively. Most unexpectedly, humPrP(23-159) aggregated significantly faster compared with the truncated fragment humPrP(23-144), clearly demonstrating that helix1 is involved in the aggregation process. However, helix1 is not resistant to digestion with proteinase K in fibrillar humPrP(23-159), suggesting that helix1 is not converted to beta-sheet. This is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy since there is almost no difference in beta-sheet content of humPrP(23-159) fibrils compared with humPrP(23-144). In conclusion, we provide strong direct evidence that in contrast to earlier assumptions helix1 is not converted into beta-sheet during aggregation of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc).

  9. An extended CCR5-ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 serves as a co-receptor for the Human Immunodefficiency Virus type-1, HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing the ECL1 and ECL3 were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study we determined that in aqueous buffer the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168 to K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two dimensional Saturation Transfer Difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed the involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment, in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule and therefore, could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25703038

  10. A direct comparison of helix propensity in proteins and peptides

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeffrey K.; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    1997-01-01

    α-Helical secondary structure occurs widely in globular proteins and its formation is a key step in their folding. As a consequence, understanding the energetics of helix formation is crucial to understanding protein folding and stability. We have measured the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids for an α-helix in an intact protein, ribonuclease T1, and for a 17-residue peptide with a sequence identical to that of the α-helix in the protein. The helix propensities are in excellent agreement. This shows that when compared in the same sequence context, the helix propensities of the nonpolar amino acids are identical in helical peptides and intact proteins, and that conclusions based on studies of the helix-to-coil transitions of peptides may, in favorable cases, be directly applicable to proteins. Our helix propensities based on ribonuclease T1 are in good agreement with those from similar studies of barnase and T4 lysozyme. In contrast, our helix propensities differ substantially from those derived from studies of alanine-stabilized or salt bridge-stabilized model α-helical peptides. PMID:9096306

  11. Structural and functional studies of Stf76 from the Sulfolobus islandicus plasmid–virus pSSVx: a novel peculiar member of the winged helix–turn–helix transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Contursi, Patrizia; Farina, Biancamaria; Pirone, Luciano; Fusco, Salvatore; Russo, Luigi; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid plasmid–virus pSSVx from Sulfolobus islandicus presents an open reading frame encoding a 76 amino acid protein, namely Stf76, that does not show significant sequence homology with any protein with known 3D structure. The recombinant protein recognizes specifically two DNA-binding sites located in its own promoter, thus suggesting an auto-regulated role of its expression. Circular dichroism, spectrofluorimetric, light scattering and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicated a 2:1 molar ratio (protein:DNA) upon binding to the DNA target containing a single site. Furthermore, the solution structure of Stf76, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using chemical shift Rosetta software, has shown that the protein assumes a winged helix–turn–helix fold. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis has been performed for the identification of the residues responsible for DNA interaction. In addition, a model of the Stf76–DNA complex has been built using as template a structurally related homolog. PMID:24682827

  12. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Bereau, Tristan; Bennett, W. F. Drew; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA){sub n} (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide’s insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum—in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  13. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereau, Tristan; Bennett, W. F. Drew; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-12-01

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA)n (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide's insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum—in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  14. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Bennett, W F Drew; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA)n (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide's insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum-in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  15. Identification of Extracellular Segments by Mass Spectrometry Improves Topology Prediction of Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Langó, Tamás; Róna, Gergely; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Turiák, Lilla; Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Várady, György; Drahos, László; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins play crucial role in signaling, ion transport, nutrient uptake, as well as in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the internal and external environment of cells. Despite their important biological functions and abundance, less than 2% of all determined structures are transmembrane proteins. Given the persisting technical difficulties associated with high resolution structure determination of transmembrane proteins, additional methods, including computational and experimental techniques remain vital in promoting our understanding of their topologies, 3D structures, functions and interactions. Here we report a method for the high-throughput determination of extracellular segments of transmembrane proteins based on the identification of surface labeled and biotin captured peptide fragments by LC/MS/MS. We show that reliable identification of extracellular protein segments increases the accuracy and reliability of existing topology prediction algorithms. Using the experimental topology data as constraints, our improved prediction tool provides accurate and reliable topology models for hundreds of human transmembrane proteins. PMID:28211907

  16. Identification of Extracellular Segments by Mass Spectrometry Improves Topology Prediction of Transmembrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Langó, Tamás; Róna, Gergely; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Turiák, Lilla; Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Várady, György; Drahos, László; Vértessy, Beáta G; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2017-02-13

    Transmembrane proteins play crucial role in signaling, ion transport, nutrient uptake, as well as in maintaining the dynamic equilibrium between the internal and external environment of cells. Despite their important biological functions and abundance, less than 2% of all determined structures are transmembrane proteins. Given the persisting technical difficulties associated with high resolution structure determination of transmembrane proteins, additional methods, including computational and experimental techniques remain vital in promoting our understanding of their topologies, 3D structures, functions and interactions. Here we report a method for the high-throughput determination of extracellular segments of transmembrane proteins based on the identification of surface labeled and biotin captured peptide fragments by LC/MS/MS. We show that reliable identification of extracellular protein segments increases the accuracy and reliability of existing topology prediction algorithms. Using the experimental topology data as constraints, our improved prediction tool provides accurate and reliable topology models for hundreds of human transmembrane proteins.

  17. A model for the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ion channel: structure of the transmembrane M2 segments as a pentameric assembly in a lipid bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Leonor; Klein, Michael L.

    2003-03-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is the neurotransmitter gated ion channel responsible for the fast propagation of electrical signals between cells at the nerve-muscle synapse and neurons. The current model for the pore region of the nAChR consists of a bundle of five M2 alpha helices, which is supported by recent solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments on micelle samples and oriented (DMPC) bilayers. In order to investigate the structure and properties of pore forming region of a simple model for the nAChR, we have performed a molecular dynamics simulation study of the homo-pentameric bundle of M2 peptides in a DMPC lipid bilayer at similar conditions to those of the NMR experiments. During the nanosecond time scale investigated, the peptide bundle adopts a left-handed supercoil structure and the calculated average tilt of the helices agrees well with the recent NMR data. The water filled bundle displays a funnel-like structure. We focuss on those aspects of the structure and dynamics relevant to the function of the channel.

  18. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  19. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20.

  20. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musser, Jim

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  1. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the HIV gp41 membrane fusion protein supports intermolecular antiparallel β sheet fusion peptide structure in the final six-helix bundle state.

    PubMed

    Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J; Zheng, Zhaoxiong; Weliky, David P

    2014-03-06

    The HIV gp41 protein catalyzes fusion between viral and target cell membranes. Although the ~20-residue N-terminal fusion peptide (FP) region is critical for fusion, the structure of this region is not well characterized in large gp41 constructs that model the gp41 state at different times during fusion. This paper describes solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of FP structure in a membrane-associated construct (FP-Hairpin), which likely models the final fusion state thought to be thermostable trimers with six-helix bundle structure in the region C-terminal of the FP. The SSNMR data show that there are populations of FP-Hairpin with either α helical or β sheet FP conformation. For the β sheet population, measurements of intermolecular (13)C-(13)C proximities in the FP are consistent with a significant fraction of intermolecular antiparallel β sheet FP structure with adjacent strand crossing near L7 and F8. There appears to be negligible in-register parallel structure. These findings support assembly of membrane-associated gp41 trimers through interleaving of N-terminal FPs from different trimers. Similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 70 N-terminal residues of gp41 (N70), which is a model for part of the putative pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41. FP assembly may therefore occur at an early fusion stage. On a more fundamental level, similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 34 N-terminal gp41 residues (FP34) and support the hypothesis that the FP is an autonomous folding domain.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Interferon Gamma Receptor Alpha Chain from Chicken Reveals an Undetected Extra Helix Compared with the Human Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Zhiguang; Qi, Jianxun; Sun, Yanling; Lu, Guangwen; Shi, Yi; Wang, Xiaojia

    2014-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is an important cytokine that induces antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects on target cells, and is also crucial in the early defense against intracellular parasites, such as Listeria monocytogenes and Toxoplasma gondii. The biological activity of IFN-γ relies upon the formation of a complex with its 2 receptors, the interferon gamma alpha chain (IFNGR1) and beta chain (IFNGR2), which are type II cytokine receptors. Structural models of ligand–receptor interaction and complex structure of chicken IFNs with their receptors have remained elusive. Here we report the first structure of Gallus gallus (chicken) IFNGR1 (chIFNGR1) at 2.0 Å by molecule replacement according to the structure of selenomethionine substituted chIFNGR1. The structural comparison reveals its structural similarities with other class II cytokine receptors, despite divergent primary sequences. We further investigate the ligand–receptor interaction properties of chicken IFN-γ (chIFN-γ) and chIFNGR1 using size-exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance techniques. These data aid in the understanding of the interaction of chicken (avian) IFN-γ with its receptors and its signal transduction. PMID:24283193

  3. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway.

  4. Dispersion relations for a plasma-filled helix-loaded-waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.A.; Hooper, E.B.; Stallard, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The propagation of waves on bounded, magnetized plasma columns arises in connection with a variety of applications. To this end dispersion relations axe developed for a variety of multi-region circularly symmetric configurations. These include, a sheath helix in free space, a plasma column in free space, a plasma filled conducting tube, a plasma filled sheath-helix in free space, a sheath helix within a conducting cylinder, a plasma filled sheath-helix within a conducting cylinder, and a plasma column within a sheath-helix contained within a conducting cylinder. The latter configuration is of the most interest for whistler wave excitation for plasma thruster applications, since it includes the effect of a vacuum region separating the plasma column from the helical excitation structure.

  5. Trimerization of the HIV Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers Modulates Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Binding.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Timothy M; Baksh, Michael M; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Fiedler, Jason D; Sligar, Stephen G; Finn, M G; Zwick, Michael B; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-02-18

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 is an established target of antibodies that neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates. To evaluate the role of the transmembrane (TM) domain, synthetic MPER-derived peptides were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles using natural and designed TM domains, and antibody affinity was measured using immobilized and solution-based techniques. Peptides incorporating the native HIV TM domain exhibit significantly stronger interactions with neutralizing antibodies than peptides with a monomeric TM domain. Furthermore, a peptide with a trimeric, three-helix bundle TM domain recapitulates the binding profile of the native sequence. These studies suggest that neutralizing antibodies can bind the MPER when the TM domain is a three-helix bundle and this presentation could influence the binding of neutralizing antibodies to the virus. Lipid-bilayer presentation of viral antigens in Nanodiscs is a new platform for evaluating neutralizing antibodies.

  6. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J. . E-mail: n.j.dimmock@warwick.ac.uk

    2005-07-05

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, {beta}-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell.

  7. Helix O modulates voltage dependency of CLC-1.

    PubMed

    Seong, Ju Yong; Ha, Kotdaji; Hong, Chansik; Myeong, Jongyun; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Yang, Dongki; So, Insuk

    2017-02-01

    The chloride channel (CLC) family of proteins consists of channels and transporters that share similarities in architecture and play essential roles in physiological functions. Among the CLC family, CLC-1 channels have the representative homodimeric double-barreled structure carrying two gating processes. One is protopore gating that acts on each pore independently by glutamate residue (Eext). The other is common gating that closes both pores simultaneously in association with large conformational changes across each subunit. In skeletal muscle, CLC-1 is associated with maintaining normal sarcolemmal excitability, and a number of myotonic mutants were reported to modify the channel gating of CLC-1. In this study, we characterized highly conserved helix O as a key determinant of structural stability in CLC-1. Supporting this hypothesis, myotonic mutant (G523D) at N-terminal of helix O showed the activation at hyperpolarizing membrane potentials with a reversed voltage dependency. However, introducing glutamate at serine residue (S537) at the C-terminal of the helix O on G523D restored WT-like voltage dependency of the common gate and showed proton insensitive voltage dependency. To further validate this significant site, site-specific mutagenesis experiments was performed on V292 that is highly conserved as glutamate in antiporter and closely located to S537 and showed that this area is essential for channel function. Taken together, the results of our study suggest the importance of helix O as the main contributor for stable structure of evolutionary conserved CLC proteins and its key role in voltage dependency of the CLC-1. Furthermore, the C-terminal of the helix O can offer a clue for possible proton involvement in CLC-1 channel.

  8. Dual circular polarization gaps in helix photonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tzu-Hung; Chien, Lung-Yu Chang; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-09-21

    Chiral structures exhibit strong interactions with circularly polarized light, and have been demonstrated to show many polarization-dependent properties. Various chiral structures exhibit some level of circular dichroism, where right-handed and left-handed circularly polarized waves experience different transmission. In this study, we use a dielectric helix array as a model system to examine the interactions of circularly polarized light with helical structures. Our results show that circular polarization band gaps can be formed in a dielectric helix array not only by light having the same handedness with the structure but also by light with the opposite handedness, resulting from additional chiral motifs induced by the arrangement of helices. Dual polarization band gaps can thus be tailored by varying the geometrical parameters, and circular-polarization dependent properties can be manipulated for optoelectronic devices and applications.

  9. Proposal of a new hydrogen-bonding form to maintain curdlan triple helix.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Kentaro; Uezu, Kazuya; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    Curdlan and other beta-1,3-D-glucans form right-handed triple helices, and it has been believed that the intermolecular H-bond is present at the center of the helix to maintain the structure. In this H-bond model, three secondary OH groups form an inequilateral hexagonal shape perpendicular to the helix axis. This hexagonal form seems to be characteristic for beta-1,3-D-glucans and is widely accepted. We carried out MOPAC and ab initio calculations for the curdlan helix, and we propose a new intermolecular H-bonding model. In our model, the H-bonds are formed between the O2-atoms on different x-y planes along the curdlan helix, hence the H-bonds are not perpendicular to the helix axis. The new H-bonds are connected along the helix, traversing three curdlan chains to make a left-handed helix. Therefore, the H-bonding array leads to a reverse helix of the main chain. According to our MOPAC calculation, this model is more stable than the previous one. We believe that the continuous H-bonding array is stabilized by cooperative phenomena in the polymeric system.

  10. Type VIa β-turn-fused helix N-termini: A novel helix N-cap motif containing cis proline.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Rubin; Ganguly, Himal K; Modugula, E K; Basu, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    Helix N-capping motifs often form hydrogen bonds with terminal amide groups which otherwise would be free. Also, without an amide hydrogen, proline (trans) is over-represented at helix N-termini (N1 position) because this naturally removes the need to hydrogen bond one terminal amide. However, the preference of cisPro, vis-à-vis helix N-termini, is not known. We show that cisPro (αR or PPII ) often appears at the N-cap position (N0) of helices. The N-cap cisPro(αR ) is associated with a six-residue sequence motif - X(-2) -X(-1) -cisPro-X(1) -X(2) -X(3) - with preference for Glu/Gln at X(-1) , Phe/Tyr/Trp at X(1) and Ser/Thr at X(3) . The motif, formed by the fusion of a helix and a type VIa β-turn, contains a hydrogen bond between the side chain of X(-1) and the side chain/backbone of X(3) , a α-helical hydrogen bond between X(-2) and X(2) and stacking interaction between cisPro and an aromatic residue at X(1) . NMR experiments on peptides containing the motif and its variants showed that local interactions associated with the motif, as found in folded proteins, were not enough to significantly tilt the cis/trans equilibrium towards cisPro. This suggests that some other evolutionary pressure must select the cisPro motif (over transPro) at helix N-termini. Database analysis showed that >C = O of the pre-cisPro(αR ) residue at the helix N-cap, directed opposite to the N→C helical axis, participates in long-range interactions. We hypothesize that the cisPro(αR ) motif is preferred at helix N-termini because it allows the helix to participate in long-range interactions that may be structurally and functionally important.

  11. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Robert W; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-06-14

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides.

  12. Collagen model peptides: Sequence dependence of triple-helix stability.

    PubMed

    Persikov, A V; Ramshaw, J A; Brodsky, B

    2000-01-01

    The triple helix is a specialized protein motif, found in all collagens as well as in noncollagenous proteins involved in host defense. Peptides will adopt a triple-helical conformation if the sequence contains its characteristic features of Gly as every third residue and a high content of Pro and Hyp residues. Such model peptides have proved amenable to structural studies by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, suitable for thermodynamic and kinetic analysis, and a valuable tool in characterizing the binding activities of the collagen triple helix. A systematic approach to understanding the amino acid sequence dependence of the collagen triple helix has been initiated, based on a set of host-guest peptides of the form, (Gly-Pro-Hyp)(3)-Gly-X-Y-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(4). Comparison of their thermal stabilities has led to a propensity scale for the X and Y positions, and the additivity of contributions of individual residues is now under investigation. The local and global stability of the collagen triple helix is normally modulated by the residues in the X and Y positions, with every third position occupied by Gly in fibril-forming collagens. However, in collagen diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, a single Gly may be substituted by another residue. Host-guest studies where the Gly is replaced by various amino acids suggest that the identity of the residue in the Gly position affects the degree of destabilization and the clinical severity of the disease.

  13. A catastrophe theory model of the conflict helix, with tests.

    PubMed

    Rummel, R J

    1987-10-01

    Macro social field theory has undergone extensive development and testing since the 1960s. One of these has been the articulation of an appropriate conceptual micro model--called the conflict helix--for understanding the process from conflict to cooperation and vice versa. Conflict and cooperation are viewed as distinct equilibria of forces in a social field; the movement between these equilibria is a jump, energized by a gap between social expectations and power, and triggered by some minor event. Quite independently, there also has been much recent application of catastrophe theory to social behavior, but usually without a clear substantive theory and lacking empirical testing. This paper uses catastrophe theory--namely, the butterfly model--mathematically to structure the conflict helix. The social field framework and helix provide the substantive interpretation for the catastrophe theory; and catastrophe theory provides a suitable mathematical model for the conflict helix. The model is tested on the annual conflict and cooperation between India and Pakistan, 1948 to 1973. The results are generally positive and encouraging.

  14. A specific interface between integrin transmembrane helices and affinity for ligand.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Springer, Timothy A; Takagi, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Conformational communication across the plasma membrane between the extracellular and intracellular domains of integrins is beginning to be defined by structural work on both domains. However, the role of the alpha and beta subunit transmembrane domains and the nature of signal transmission through these domains have been elusive. Disulfide bond scanning of the exofacial portions of the integrin alpha(IIbeta) and beta(3) transmembrane domains reveals a specific heterodimerization interface in the resting receptor. This interface is lost rather than rearranged upon activation of the receptor by cytoplasmic mutations of the alpha subunit that mimic physiologic inside-out activation, demonstrating a link between activation of the extracellular domain and lateral separation of transmembrane helices. Introduction of disulfide bridges to prevent or reverse separation abolishes the activating effect of cytoplasmic mutations, confirming transmembrane domain separation but not hinging or piston-like motions as the mechanism of transmembrane signaling by integrins.

  15. A modular strategy for the semi-synthesis of a K+ channel: Investigating interactions of the pore helix

    PubMed Central

    Komarov, Alexander G.; Linn, Kellie M.; Devereaux, Jordan J.; Valiyaveetil, Francis I.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical synthesis is a powerful method for precise modification of the structural and electronic properties of proteins. The difficulties in the synthesis and purification of peptides containing transmembrane segments have presented obstacles to the chemical synthesis of integral membrane proteins. Here, we present a modular strategy for the semi-synthesis of integral membrane proteins in which solid phase peptide synthesis is limited to the region of interest, while the rest of the protein is obtained by recombinant means. This modular strategy considerably simplifies the synthesis and purification steps that have previously hindered the chemical synthesis of integral membrane proteins. We develop a sumo-fusion and proteolysis approach for obtaining the N-terminal cysteine containing membrane spanning peptides required for the semi-synthesis. We demonstrate the feasibility of the modular approach by the semi-synthesis of full-length KcsA K+ channels in which only regions of interest, such as the selectivity filter or the pore helix, are obtained by chemical synthesis. The modular approach is used to investigate the hydrogen bond interactions of a tryptophan residue in the pore helix, tryptophan 68, by substituting it with the iso-steric analog, β-(3-benzothienyl)-L-alanine (3BT). A functional analysis of the 3BT mutant channels indicates that the K+ conduction and selectivity of the 3BT mutant channels are similar to the wild type, but the mutant channels show a three-fold increase in Rb+ conduction. These results suggest that the hydrogen bond interactions of tryptophan 68 are essential for optimizing the selectivity filter for K+ conduction over Rb+ conduction. PMID:19803500

  16. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  17. Structure-based functional study reveals multiple roles of transmembrane segment IX and loop VIII-IX in NhaA Na+/H+ antiporter of Escherichia coli at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Tzubery, Tzvi; Rimon, Abraham; Padan, Etana

    2008-06-06

    The three-dimensional crystal structure of Escherichia coli NhaA determined at pH 4 provided the first structural insights into the mechanism of antiport and pH regulation of a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. However, because NhaA is activated at physiological pH (pH 6.5-8.5), many questions pertaining to the active state of NhaA have remained open including the structural and physiological roles of helix IX and its loop VIII-IX. Here we studied this NhaA segment (Glu(241)-Phe(267)) by structure-based biochemical approaches at physiological pH. Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis identified new mutations affecting the pH dependence of NhaA, suggesting their contribution to the "pH sensor." Furthermore mutation F267C reduced the H(+)/Na(+) stoichiometry of the antiporter, and F267C/F344C inactivated the antiporter activity. Tests of accessibility to [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate bromide, a membrane-impermeant positively charged SH reagent with a width similar to the diameter of hydrated Na(+), suggested that at physiological pH the cytoplasmic cation funnel is more accessible than at acidic pH. Assaying intermolecular cross-linking in situ between single Cys replacement mutants uncovered the NhaA dimer interface at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane; between Leu(255) and the cytoplasm, many Cys replacements cross-link with various cross-linkers spanning different distances (10-18 A) implying a flexible interface. L255C formed intermolecular S-S bonds, cross-linked only with a 5-A cross-linker, and when chemically modified caused an alkaline shift of 1 pH unit in the pH dependence of NhaA and a 6-fold increase in the apparent K(m) for Na(+) of the exchange activity suggesting a rigid point in the dimer interface critical for NhaA activity and pH regulation.

  18. Fluorescence mapping of mitochondrial TIM23 complex reveals a water-facing, substrate-interacting helix surface.

    PubMed

    Alder, Nathan N; Jensen, Robert E; Johnson, Arthur E

    2008-08-08

    Protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by the TIM23 complex. While its central component, Tim23, is believed to form a protein-conducting channel, the regions of this subunit that face the imported protein are unknown. To examine Tim23 structure and environment in intact membranes at high resolution, various derivatives, each with a single, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe positioned at a specific site, were assembled into functional TIM23 complexes in active mitochondria and analyzed by multiple spectral techniques. Probes placed sequentially throughout a transmembrane region that was identified by crosslinking as part of the protein-conducting channel revealed an alpha helix in an amphipathic environment. Probes on the aqueous-facing helical surface specifically underwent spectral changes during protein import, and their accessibility to hydrophilic quenching agents is considered in terms of channel gating. This approach has therefore provided an unprecedented view of a translocon channel structure in an intact, fully operational, membrane-embedded complex.

  19. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  20. Differential stability of the triple helix of (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 in H2O and D2O: thermodynamic and structural explanations.

    PubMed

    Gough, C A; Bhatnagar, R S

    1999-12-01

    (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 [(PPG10)], a collagen-like polypeptide, forms a triple-helical, polyproline-II structure in aqueous solution at temperatures somewhat lower than physiological, with a melting temperature of 24.5 degrees C. In this article, we present circular dichroism spectra that demonstrate an increase of the melting temperature with the addition of increasing amounts of D2O to an H2O solution of (PPG)10, with the melting temperature reaching 40 degrees C in pure D2O. A thermodynamic analysis of the data demonstrates that this result is due to an increasing enthalpy of unfolding in D2O vs. H2O. To provide a theoretical explanation for this result, we have used a model for hydration of (PPG)10 that we developed previously, in which inter-chain water bridges are formed between sterically crowded waters and peptide bond carbonyls. Energy minimizations were performed upon this model using hydrogen bond parameters for water, and altered hydrogen bond parameters that reproduced the differences in carbonyl oxygen-water oxygen distances found in small-molecule crystal structures containing oxygen-oxygen hydrogen bonds between organic molecules and H2O or D2O. It was found that using hydrogen bond parameters that reproduced the distance typical of hydrogen bonds to D2O resulted in a significant lowering of the potential energy of hydrated (PPG)10. This lowering of the energy involved energetic terms that were only indirectly related to the altered hydrogen bond parameters, and were therefore not artifactual; the intra-(PPG10) energy, plus the water-(PPG10) van der Waals energy (not including hydrogen bond interactions), were lowered enough to qualitatively account for the lower enthalpy of the triple-helical conformation, relative to the unfolded state, in D2O vs. H2O. This result indicates that the geometry of the carbonyl-D2O hydrogen bonds allows formation of good hydrogen bonds without making as much of an energetic sacrifice from other factors as in the case of

  1. Proline-induced hinges in transmembrane helices: possible roles in ion channel gating.

    PubMed

    Tieleman, D P; Shrivastava, I H; Ulmschneider, M R; Sansom, M S

    2001-08-01

    A number of ion channels contain transmembrane (TM) alpha-helices that contain proline-induced molecular hinges. These TM helices include the channel-forming peptide alamethicin (Alm), the S6 helix from voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the D5 helix from voltage-gated chloride (CLC) channels. For both Alm and KvS6, experimental data implicate hinge-bending motions of the helix in an aspect of channel gating. We have compared the hinge-bending motions of these TM helices in bilayer-like environments by multi-nanosecond MD simulations in an attempt to describe motions of these helices that may underlie possible modes of channel gating. Alm is an alpha-helical channel-forming peptide, which contains a central kink associated with a Gly-x-x-Pro motif in its sequence. Simulations of Alm in a TM orientation for 10 ns in an octane slab indicate that the Gly-x-x-Pro motif acts as a molecular hinge. The S6 helix from Shaker Kv channels contains a Pro-Val-Pro motif. Modeling studies and recent experimental data suggest that the KvS6 helix may be kinked in the vicinity of this motif. Simulations (10 ns) of an isolated KvS6 helix in an octane slab and in a POPC bilayer reveal hinge-bending motions. A pattern-matching approach was used to search for possible hinge-bending motifs in the TM helices of other ion channel proteins. This uncovered a conserved Gly-x-Pro motif in TM helix D5 of CLC channels. MD simulations of a model of hCLC1-D5 spanning an octane slab suggest that this channel also contains a TM helix that undergoes hinge-bending motion. In conclusion, our simulations suggest a model in which hinge-bending motions of TM helices may play a functional role in the gating mechanisms of several different families of ion channels.

  2. Nucleobase-Modified PNA Suppresses Translation by Forming a Triple Helix with a Hairpin Structure in mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Tamaki; Hnedzko, Dziyana; Rozners, Eriks; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-01-18

    Compounds that bind specifically to double-stranded regions of RNA have potential as regulators of structure-based RNA function; however, sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA is challenging. The modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with unnatural nucleobases enables the formation of PNA-RNA triplexes. Herein, we demonstrate that a 9-mer PNA forms a sequence-specific PNA-RNA triplex with a dissociation constant of less than 1 nm at physiological pH. The triplex formed within the 5' untranslated region of an mRNA reduces the protein expression levels both in vitro and in cells. A single triplet mismatch destabilizes the complex, and in this case, no translation suppression is observed. The triplex-forming PNAs are unique and potent compounds that hold promise as inhibitors of cellular functions that are controlled by double-stranded RNAs, such as RNA interference, RNA editing, and RNA localization mediated by protein-RNA interactions.

  3. Structure of a truncation mutant of the nuclear export factor CRM1 provides insights into the auto-inhibitory role of its C-terminal helix.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Bernaudat, Florent; Langer, Karla; Oliva, Mizar F; Fornerod, Maarten; Schoehn, Guy; Müller, Christoph W; Petosa, Carlo

    2013-08-06

    Chromosome region maintenance 1/exportin1/Xpo1 (CRM1) associates with the GTPase Ran to mediate the nuclear export of proteins bearing a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). CRM1 consists of helical hairpin HEAT repeats and a C-terminal helical extension (C-extension) that inhibits the binding of NES-bearing cargos. We report the crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of a human CRM1 mutant with enhanced NES-binding activity due to deletion of the C-extension. We show that loss of the C-extension leads to a repositioning of CRM1's C-terminal repeats and to a more extended overall conformation. Normal mode analysis predicts reduced rigidity for the deletion mutant, consistent with an observed decrease in thermal stability. Point mutations that destabilize the C-extension shift CRM1 to the more extended conformation, reduce thermal stability, and enhance NES-binding activity. These findings suggest that an important mechanism by which the C-extension regulates CRM1's cargo-binding affinity is by modulating the conformation and flexibility of its HEAT repeats.

  4. The role of glycine (residue 89) in the central helix of EF-hand protein troponin-C exposed following amino-terminal alpha-helix deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, X. L.; Akella, A. B.; Su, H.; Gulati, J.

    1994-01-01

    Because an N-terminal alpha-helical (N-helix) arm and a KGK-triplet (residues 88KGK90) in the central helix of troponin-C (TnC) are missing in calmodulin, several recent studies have attempted to elucidate the structure-function correlations of these units. Presently, with a family of genetically manipulated derivatives especially developed for this study and tested on permeabilized isolated single skeletal muscle fiber segments, we explored the specificities of the amino acid residues within the N-helix and the KGK-triplet in TnC. Noticeably, the amino acid compositions vary between the N-helices of the cardiac and skeletal TnC isoforms. On the other hand, the KGK-triplet is located similarly in both TnC isoforms. We previously indicated that deletion of the N-helix (mutant delta Nt) diminishes the tension obtained on activation with maximal calcium, but the contractile function is revived by the superimposed deletion of the 88KGK90-triplet (mutant delta Nt delta KGK; see Gulati J, Babu A, Su H, Zhang YF, 1993, J Biol Chem 268:11685-11690). Using this functional test, we find that replacement of Gly-89 with a Leu or an Ala could also overcome the contractile defect associated with N-helix deletion. On the other hand, replacement of the skeletal TnC N-helix with cardiac type N-helix was unable to restore contractile function. The findings indicate a destabilizing influence of Gly-89 residue in skeletal TnC and suggest that the N-terminal arm in normal TnC serves to moderate this effect. Moreover, specificity of the N-helix between cardiac and skeletal TnCs raises the possibility that resultant structural disparities are also important for the functional distinctions of the TnC isoforms. PMID:7703855

  5. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-11-18

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediated by α-helices. Thus, α-helical decoys have been proposed as potential targeted therapies for pathologic bHLH transcription. Here, we developed a library of stabilized α-helices of OLIG2 (SAH-OLIG2) to test the capacity of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides to disrupt OLIG2 homodimerization, which drives the development and chemoresistance of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of human brain cancer. Although stapling successfully reinforced the α-helical structure of bHLH constructs of varying length, sequence-specific dissociation of OLIG2 dimers from DNA was not achieved. Re-evaluation of the binding determinants for OLIG2 self-association and stability revealed an unanticipated role of the C-terminal domain. These data highlight potential pitfalls in peptide-based targeting of bHLH transcription factors given the liabilities of their positively charged amino acid sequences and multifactorial binding determinants.

  6. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix.

    PubMed

    Chow, W Ying; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J; Slatter, David A; Reid, David G; Wales, David J; Farndale, Richard W; Duer, Melinda J

    2015-07-29

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  7. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  8. BuD, a helix-loop-helix DNA-binding domain for genome modification.

    PubMed

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; López-Méndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-07-01

    DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific protein-DNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing `toolkits' for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helix-loop-helix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin β (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  9. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix. PMID:26220399

  10. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  11. A genome-wide survey on basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in giant panda.

    PubMed

    Dang, Chunwang; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Debao; Yao, Qin; Chen, Keping

    2011-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a critically endangered mammalian species. Studies on functions of regulatory proteins involved in developmental processes would facilitate understanding of specific behavior in giant panda. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins play essential roles in a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms. bHLH family members have been identified in over 20 organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse and human. Our present study identified 107 bHLH family members being encoded in giant panda genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they belong to 44 bHLH families with 46, 25, 15, 4, 11 and 3 members in group A, B, C, D, E and F, respectively, while the remaining 3 members were assigned into "orphan". Compared to mouse, the giant panda does not encode seven bHLH proteins namely Beta3a, Mesp2, Sclerax, S-Myc, Hes5 (or Hes6), EBF4 and Orphan 1. These results provide useful background information for future studies on structure and function of bHLH proteins in the regulation of giant panda development.

  12. Rational design of a triple helix-specific intercalating ligand.

    PubMed

    Escudé, C; Nguyen, C H; Kukreti, S; Janin, Y; Sun, J S; Bisagni, E; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1998-03-31

    DNA triple helices offer new perspectives toward oligonucleotide-directed gene regulation. However, the poor stability of some of these structures might limit their use under physiological conditions. Specific ligands can intercalate into DNA triple helices and stabilize them. Molecular modeling and thermal denaturation experiments suggest that benzo[f]pyrido[3, 4-b]quinoxaline derivatives intercalate into triple helices by stacking preferentially with the Hoogsteen-paired bases. Based on this model, it was predicted that a benzo[f]quino[3,4-b]quinoxaline derivative, which possesses an additional aromatic ring, could engage additional stacking interactions with the pyrimidine strand of the Watson-Crick double helix upon binding of this pentacyclic ligand to a triplex structure. This compound was synthesized. Thermal denaturation experiments and inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage show that this new compound can indeed stabilize triple helices with great efficiency and specificity and/or induce triple helix formation under physiological conditions.

  13. Single-spanning transmembrane domains in cell growth and cell-cell interactions: More than meets the eye?

    PubMed

    Hubert, Pierre; Sawma, Paul; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Khao, Jonathan; Hénin, Jérôme; Bagnard, Dominique; Sturgis, James

    2010-01-01

    As a whole, integral membrane proteins represent about one third of sequenced genomes, and more than 50% of currently available drugs target membrane proteins, often cell surface receptors. Some membrane protein classes, with a defined number of transmembrane (TM) helices, are receiving much attention because of their great functional and pharmacological importance, such as G protein-coupled receptors possessing 7 TM segments. Although they represent roughly half of all membrane proteins, bitopic proteins (with only 1 TM helix) have so far been less well characterized. Though they include many essential families of receptors, such as adhesion molecules and receptor tyrosine kinases, many of which are excellent targets for biopharmaceuticals (peptides, antibodies, et al.). A growing body of evidence suggests a major role for interactions between TM domains of these receptors in signaling, through homo and heteromeric associations, conformational changes, assembly of signaling platforms, etc. Significantly, mutations within single domains are frequent in human disease, such as cancer or developmental disorders. This review attempts to give an overview of current knowledge about these interactions, from structural data to therapeutic perspectives, focusing on bitopic proteins involved in cell signaling.

  14. Sensory domain contraction in histidine kinase CitA triggers transmembrane signaling in the membrane-bound sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Michele; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Graf, Sabrina; Unden, Gottfried; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam; Griesinger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use membrane-integral sensor histidine kinases (HK) to perceive stimuli and transduce signals from the environment to the cytosol. Information on how the signal is transmitted across the membrane by HKs is still scarce. Combining both liquid- and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that structural rearrangements in the extracytoplasmic, citrate-sensing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of HK CitA are identical for the isolated domain in solution and in a longer construct containing the membrane-embedded HK and lacking only the kinase core. We show that upon citrate binding, the PAS domain contracts, resulting in a shortening of the C-terminal β-strand. We demonstrate that this contraction of the PAS domain, which is well characterized for the isolated domain, is the signal transmitted to the transmembrane (TM) helices in a CitA construct in liposomes. Putting the extracytoplasmic PAS domain into context of the membrane-embedded CitA construct slows down citrate-binding kinetics by at least a factor of 60, confirming that TM helix motions are linked to the citrate-binding event. Our results are confirmation of a hallmark of the HK signal transduction mechanism with atomic resolution on a full-length construct lacking only the kinase core domain. PMID:28265100

  15. Sensory domain contraction in histidine kinase CitA triggers transmembrane signaling in the membrane-bound sensor.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Michele; Schomburg, Benjamin; Giller, Karin; Graf, Sabrina; Unden, Gottfried; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam; Griesinger, Christian

    2017-03-21

    Bacteria use membrane-integral sensor histidine kinases (HK) to perceive stimuli and transduce signals from the environment to the cytosol. Information on how the signal is transmitted across the membrane by HKs is still scarce. Combining both liquid- and solid-state NMR, we demonstrate that structural rearrangements in the extracytoplasmic, citrate-sensing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of HK CitA are identical for the isolated domain in solution and in a longer construct containing the membrane-embedded HK and lacking only the kinase core. We show that upon citrate binding, the PAS domain contracts, resulting in a shortening of the C-terminal β-strand. We demonstrate that this contraction of the PAS domain, which is well characterized for the isolated domain, is the signal transmitted to the transmembrane (TM) helices in a CitA construct in liposomes. Putting the extracytoplasmic PAS domain into context of the membrane-embedded CitA construct slows down citrate-binding kinetics by at least a factor of 60, confirming that TM helix motions are linked to the citrate-binding event. Our results are confirmation of a hallmark of the HK signal transduction mechanism with atomic resolution on a full-length construct lacking only the kinase core domain.

  16. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  17. Genetic algorithms as a tool for helix design - computational and experimental studies on prion protein helix 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Jan; Schwarzinger, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary computing is a general optimization mechanism successfully implemented for a variety of numeric problems in a variety of fields, including structural biology. We here present an evolutionary approach to optimize helix stability in peptides and proteins employing the AGADIR energy function for helix stability as scoring function. With the ability to apply masks determining positions, which are to remain constant or fixed to a certain class of amino acids, our algorithm is capable of developing stable helical scaffolds containing a wide variety of structural and functional amino acid patterns. The algorithm showed good convergence behaviour in all tested cases and can be parameterized in a wide variety of ways. We have applied our algorithm for the optimization of the stability of prion protein helix 1, a structural element of the prion protein which is thought to play a crucial role in the conformational transition from the cellular to the pathogenic form of the prion protein, and which therefore poses an interesting target for pharmacological as well as genetic engineering approaches to counter the as of yet uncurable prion diseases. NMR spectroscopic investigations of selected stabilizing and destabilizing mutations found by our algorithm could demonstrate its ability to create stabilized variants of secondary structure elements.

  18. The Mtr4 ratchet helix and arch domain both function to promote RNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lacy L; Jackson, Ryan N; Rexhepaj, Megi; King, Alejandra Klauer; Lott, Lindsey K; van Hoof, Ambro; Johnson, Sean J

    2014-12-16

    Mtr4 is a conserved Ski2-like RNA helicase and a subunit of the TRAMP complex that activates exosome-mediated 3'-5' turnover in nuclear RNA surveillance and processing pathways. Prominent features of the Mtr4 structure include a four-domain ring-like helicase core and a large arch domain that spans the core. The 'ratchet helix' is positioned to interact with RNA substrates as they move through the helicase. However, the contribution of the ratchet helix in Mtr4 activity is poorly understood. Here we show that strict conservation along the ratchet helix is particularly extensive for Ski2-like RNA helicases compared to related helicases. Mutation of residues along the ratchet helix alters in vitro activity in Mtr4 and TRAMP and causes slow growth phenotypes in vivo. We also identify a residue on the ratchet helix that influences Mtr4 affinity for polyadenylated substrates. Previous work indicated that deletion of the arch domain has minimal effect on Mtr4 unwinding activity. We now show that combining the arch deletion with ratchet helix mutations abolishes helicase activity and produces a lethal in vivo phenotype. These studies demonstrate that the ratchet helix modulates helicase activity and suggest that the arch domain plays a previously unrecognized role in unwinding substrates.

  19. α-Synuclein Populates Both Elongated and Broken Helix States on Small Unilamellar Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2011-01-01

    The misfolding of the protein α-synuclein (αS) has been implicated in the molecular chain of events leading to Parkinson disease. Physiologically, αS undergoes a transition from a random coil to helical conformation upon encountering synaptic vesicle membranes. On analogous small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), the conformation of αS is dominated by a single elongated αS helix. However, alternative broken helix states have been postulated, mandating experimental clarification. Here, the upper limit for the free energy difference between elongated and broken helix conformations on SUVs resembling synaptic vesicles was determined to be 1.2 ± 0.4 kcal/mol, which amounts to a population ratio of 7.6:1 between both states (12% broken helices). In response to helix breaks at different positions, αS rearranged in an opportunistic manner, thereby minimizing helix abrogations to as little as one to two turns. Enthalpy and entropy measurements of gel state SUV-αS interactions indicated that broken helix states retain the ability to relieve membrane-packing stress. Thus, broken helix states are a distinct physiological feature of the vesicle-bound αS state, making it a “checkered” protein of multiple parallel conformations. A continuous interconversion between structural states may contribute to pathological αS misfolding. PMID:21524999

  20. Intramolecular triple helix as a model for regular polyribonucleotide (CAA)(n).

    PubMed

    Efimov, Alexander V; Spirin, Alexander S

    2009-10-09

    The regular (CAA)(n) polyribonucleotide, as well as the omega leader sequence containing (CAA)-rich core, have recently been shown to form cooperatively melted and compact structures. In this report, we propose a structural model for the (CAA)(n) sequence in which the polyribonucleotide chain is folded upon itself, so that it forms an intramolecular triple helix. The triple helix is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between bases thus forming coplanar triads, and by stacking interactions between the base triads. A distinctive feature of the proposed triple helix is that it does not contain the canonical double-helix elements. The difference from the known triple helices is that Watson-Crick hydrogen bond pairings do not take place in the interactions between the bases within the base triads.

  1. A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality.

    PubMed

    Roche, Cécile; Sun, Hao-Jan; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Araoka, Fumito; Partridge, Benjamin E; Peterca, Mihai; Wilson, Daniela A; Prendergast, Margaret E; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    The functions of complex crystalline systems derived from supramolecular biological and non-biological assemblies typically emerge from homochiral programmed primary structures via first principles involving secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures. In contrast, heterochiral and racemic compounds yield disordered crystals, amorphous solids or liquids. Here, we report the self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives in a supramolecular helix that in turn self-organizes in columnar hexagonal crystalline domains regardless of the enantiomeric purity of the perylene bisimide. We show that both homochiral and racemic perylene bisimide compounds, including a mixture of 21 diastereomers that cannot be deracemized at the molecular level, self-organize to form single-handed helical assemblies with identical single-crystal-like order. We propose that this high crystalline order is generated via a cogwheel mechanism that disregards the chirality of the self-assembling building blocks. We anticipate that this mechanism will facilitate access to previously inaccessible complex crystalline systems from racemic and homochiral building blocks.

  2. Helix-helix interactions in membrane domains of bitopic proteins: Specificity and role of lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Pavlov, Konstantin V; Akimov, Sergey A; Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Efremov, Roman G; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2017-04-01

    Interaction between transmembrane helices often determines biological activity of membrane proteins. Bitopic proteins, a broad subclass of membrane proteins, form dimers containing two membrane-spanning helices. Some aspects of their structure-function relationship cannot be fully understood without considering the protein-lipid interaction, which can determine the protein conformational ensemble. Experimental and computer modeling data concerning transmembrane parts of bitopic proteins are reviewed in the present paper. They highlight the importance of lipid-protein interactions and resolve certain paradoxes in the behavior of such proteins. Besides, some properties of membrane organization provided a clue to understanding of allosteric interactions between distant parts of proteins. Interactions of these kinds appear to underlie a signaling mechanism, which could be widely employed in the functioning of many membrane proteins. Treatment of membrane proteins as parts of integrated fine-tuned proteolipid system promises new insights into biological function mechanisms and approaches to drug design. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  3. Effect of the Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis Deletion on the Conformational Dynamics of Signal-Anchor Transmembrane Segment 1 of Red Cell Anion Exchanger 1 (AE1, Band 3, or SLC4A1)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The first transmembrane (TM1) helix in the red cell anion exchanger (AE1, Band 3, or SLC4A1) acts as an internal signal anchor that binds the signal recognition particle and directs the nascent polypeptide chain to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane where it moves from the translocon laterally into the lipid bilayer. The sequence N-terminal to TM1 forms an amphipathic helix that lies at the membrane interface and is connected to TM1 by a bend at Pro403. Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO) is a red cell abnormality caused by a nine-amino acid deletion (Ala400–Ala408) at the N-terminus of TM1. Here we demonstrate, by extensive (∼4.5 μs) molecular dynamics simulations of TM1 in a model 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane, that the isolated TM1 peptide is highly dynamic and samples the structure of TM1 seen in the crystal structure of the membrane domain of AE1. The SAO deletion not only removes the proline-induced bend but also causes a “pulling in” of the part of the amphipathic helix into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, as well as the C-terminal of the peptide. The dynamics of the SAO peptide very infrequently resembles the structure of TM1 in AE1, demonstrating the disruptive effect the SAO deletion has on AE1 folding. These results provide a precise molecular view of the disposition and dynamics of wild-type and SAO TM1 in a lipid bilayer, an important early biosynthetic intermediate in the insertion of AE1 into the ER membrane, and extend earlier results of cell-free translation experiments. PMID:28068080

  4. A Cytosolic Amphiphilic α-Helix Controls the Activity of the Bile Acid-sensitive Ion Channel (BASIC).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Löhrer, Daniel; Alsop, Richard J; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Wirtz, Monika; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2016-11-18

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the degenerin/epithelial Na(+) channel (Deg/ENaC) family of ion channels. It is mainly found in bile duct epithelial cells, the intestinal tract, and the cerebellum and is activated by alterations of its membrane environment. Bile acids, one class of putative physiological activators, exert their effect by changing membrane properties, leading to an opening of the channel. The physiological function of BASIC, however, is unknown. Deg/ENaC channels are characterized by a trimeric subunit composition. Each subunit is composed of two transmembrane segments, which are linked by a large extracellular domain. The termini of the channels protrude into the cytosol. Many Deg/ENaC channels contain regulatory domains and sequence motifs within their cytosolic domains. In this study, we show that BASIC contains an amphiphilic α-helical structure within its N-terminal domain. This α-helix binds to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane and stabilizes a closed state. Truncation of this domain renders the channel hyperactive. Collectively, we identify a cytoplasmic domain, unique to BASIC, that controls channel activity via membrane interaction.

  5. Structures of SemiSWEET transporters in two distinct conformations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chao; Chen, Li-Qing; Xu, Sophia; Perry, Kay; Frommer, Wolf B.; Feng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    SemiSWEETs and SWEETs are mono- and disaccharide transporters present from Archaea to higher plants and humans1-3. SWEETs play crucial roles in cellular sugar efflux processes, i.e. phloem loading4, pollen nutrition5 and nectar secretion6. Their bacterial homologs, SemiSWEETs, are among the smallest known transporters1,3. Here we show SemiSWEET, consisting of a triple-helix-bundle (THB), forms a symmetric parallel dimer to create the translocation pathway. Two SemiSWEET isoforms were crystallized in apparent open and occluded states, indicating that SemiSWEETs/SWEETs are transporters that undergo rocking-type movements during the transport cycle. The topology of THB is similar to the basic building block in MFS transporters (GLUTs, SUTs), indicating that they may have evolved from an ancestral THB into a parallel configuration to produce 6/6+1 transmembrane-helix pores for SemiSWEETs/SWEETs, and an antiparallel configuration of 2×2 THBs to generate 12 transmembrane-helix pores for MFS transporters. Given the similarity of SemiSWEETs/SWEETs to PQ-loop amino acid transporters and mitochondrial MPC organic acid transporters, the structures characterized here may also be relevant for other MtN3 clan transporters7-9. PMID:25186729

  6. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  7. Non-random distribution of amino acids in the transmembrane segments of human type I single span membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Landolt-Marticorena, C; Williams, K A; Deber, C M; Reithmeier, R A

    1993-02-05

    The distribution of amino acids in the transmembrane segments and flanking regions of 115 human type I single span (amino terminus extracellular and carboxyl terminus cytosolic) plasma membrane proteins was found to be non-random. In this sample, Ile was preferentially localized to the amino-terminal region of the hydrophobic transmembrane segments, followed by Val, while Leu predominated in the carboxyl-terminal half of the segment. Although Gly residues were preferentially located in the transmembrane segment, this residue was excluded from the carboxyl-terminal and adjacent boundary regions. Aromatic residues (Tyr, Trp and Phe) occurred preferentially at the cytoplasmic boundary, with Trp also favored at the extracellular boundary. The extracellular flanking sequence amino-terminal to the transmembrane segment was enriched in residues predicted to initiate helix formation (Pro, Asn and Ser), while Arg and Lys were enriched in the cytoplasmic flank where they may function as topological determinants. The positional preferences of these particular amino acids within the transmembrane segment and flanking regions suggests that, in addition to lipid-protein interactions, these residues may participate in specific protein-protein interactions. A consensus sequence motif for type I membrane proteins is proposed and its role in the biosynthesis, folding, assembly and function of these segments is discussed.

  8. Triple Helix Formation in a Topologically Controlled DNA Nanosystem.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yutaro; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki

    2016-04-11

    In the present study, we demonstrate single-molecule imaging of triple helix formation in DNA nanostructures. The binding of the single-molecule third strand to double-stranded DNA in a DNA origami frame was examined using two different types of triplet base pairs. The target DNA strand and the third strand were incorporated into the DNA frame, and the binding of the third strand was controlled by the formation of Watson-Crick base pairing. Triple helix formation was monitored by observing the structural changes in the incorporated DNA strands. It was also examined using a photocaged third strand wherein the binding of the third strand was directly observed using high-speed atomic force microscopy during photoirradiation. We found that the binding of the third strand could be controlled by regulating duplex formation and the uncaging of the photocaged strands in the designed nanospace.

  9. Molecular consequences of Ds insertion into and excision from the helix-loop-helix domain of the maize R gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Wang, L; Kermicle, J L; Wessler, S R

    1998-01-01

    The R and B proteins of maize are required to activate the transcription of several genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. To determine the structural requirements for R function in vivo, we are exploiting its sensitive mutant phenotype to identify transposon (Ds) insertions that disrupt critical domains. Here we report that the ability of the r-m1 allele to activate transcription of at least three structural genes is reduced to only 2% of wild-type activity because of a 396-bp Ds element in helix 2 of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif. Residual activity likely results from the synthesis of a mutant protein that contains seven additional amino acids in helix 2. This protein is encoded by a transcript where most of the Ds sequence has been spliced from pre-mRNA. Two phenotypic classes of stable derivative alleles, very pale and extremely pale, condition <1% of wild-type activity as a result of the presence of two- and three-amino-acid insertions, respectively, at the site of Ds excision. Localization of these mutant proteins to the nucleus indicates a requirement for an intact bHLH domain after nuclear import. The fact that deletion of the entire bHLH domain has only a minor effect on R protein activity while these small insertions virtually abolish activity suggests that deletion of the bHLH domain may bypass a requirement for bHLH-mediated protein-protein interactions in the activation of the structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9832539

  10. Silver conical helix broadband plasmonic nanoantenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhkhiz, Nader; Moshaii, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The discrete dipole approximation method is used to investigate the optical extinction spectra and the electric field enhancement of Ag conical helix (CH) nanostructures. Based on an expected similarity between the radio frequency response of the antenna with the infrared and the visible response of the nanoantenna, the Ag CH nanostructures were designed as a broadband nanoantenna. It is shown that with engineering the structure parameters of the CH nanostructure the plasmonic response of the nanostructure can be designed for a desirable application. In addition, the change of the substrate material for the nanohelix growth is shown to have infinitesimal effect on the resonance peaks of the conical nanohelix. However, varying the surrounding medium can lead to considerable red-shifting of the plasmonic resonance peaks (up to 230 nm). Calculations of the near field around the helical nanoantenna show that the smaller and the larger sides of the CH are related to the plasmonic resonance peaks at low and high wavelengths, respectively. The calculation result for the extinction spectrum has also been compared with similar experimental data for a 2-pitch Ag conical nanohelix and a relatively good agreement between the numerical calculation and the experiment has been obtained.

  11. An immunodominant epitope of myelin basic protein is an amphipathic alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ian R; Feix, Jimmy B; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2004-02-13

    Myelin basic protein is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis. One of its dominant antigenic epitopes is segment Pro85 to Pro96 (human sequence numbering, corresponding to Pro82 to Pro93 in the mouse). There have been several, contradictory predictions of secondary structure in this region; either beta-sheet, alpha-helix, random coil, or combinations thereof have all been proposed. In this paper, molecular dynamics and site-directed spin labeling in aqueous solution indicate that this segment forms a transient alpha-helix, which is stabilized in 30% trifluoroethanol. When bound to a myelin-like membrane surface, this antigenic segment exhibits a depth profile that is characteristic of an amphipathic alpha-helix, penetrating up to 12 A into the bilayer. The alpha-helix is tilted approximately 9 degrees, and the central lysine is in an ideal snorkeling position for side-chain interaction with the negatively charged phospholipid head groups.

  12. Contribution of dipole-dipole interactions to the stability of the collagen triple helix.

    PubMed

    Improta, Roberto; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2008-05-01

    Unveiling sequence-stability and structure-stability relationships is a major goal of protein chemistry and structural biology. Despite the enormous efforts devoted, answers to these issues remain elusive. In principle, collagen represents an ideal system for such investigations due to its simplified sequence and regular structure. However, the definition of the molecular basis of collagen triple helix stability has hitherto proved to be a difficult task. Particularly puzzling is the decoding of the mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by imino acids. Although the propensity-based model, which correlates the propensities of the individual imino acids with the structural requirements of the triple helix, is able to explicate most of the experimental data, it is unable to predict the rather high stability of peptides embedding Gly-Hyp-Hyp triplets. Starting from the available X-ray structures of this polypeptide, we carried out an extensive quantum chemistry analysis of the mutual interactions established by hydroxyproline residues located at the X and Y positions of the Gly-X-Y motif. Our data clearly indicate that the opposing rings of these residues establish significant van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions that play an important role in triple helix stabilization. These findings suggest that triple helix stabilization can be achieved by distinct structural mechanisms. The interplay of these subtle but recurrent effects dictates the overall stability of this widespread structural motif.

  13. Localization of binding sites of Ulex europaeus I, Helix pomatia and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins and analysis of their backbone structures by several glycosidases and poly-N-acetyllactosamine-specific lectins in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Imai, S; Haga, S; Nagaike, C; Morimura, Y; Hatake, K

    1996-09-01

    Several studies have shown the deletion of blood group A or B antigens and the accumulation of H antigens in human breast carcinomas. Other studies have independently demonstrated that the binding sites of lectins such as Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I-B4 (GSAI-B4) are highly expressed in these cells. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms of malignant transformation and metastasis of carcinoma cells, it is important to understand the relationship between such phenotypically distinct events. For this purpose, we examined whether the binding sites of these lectins and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) are expressed concomitantly in the same carcinoma cells and analyzed their backbone structures. The expression of the binding sites of these lectins was observed independently of the blood group (ABO) of the patients and was not affected by the histological type of the carcinomas. Observation of serial sections stained with these lectins revealed that the distribution of HPA binding sites was almost identical to that of GSAI-B4 in most cases. Furthermore, in some cases, UEA-I binding patterns were similar to those of HPA and GSAI-B4 but in other cases, mosaic staining patterns with these lectins were also observed, i.e., some cell clusters were stained with both HPA and GSAI-B4 but not with UEA-I and adjacent cell clusters were stained only with UEA-I. Digestion with endo-beta-galactosidase or N-glycosidase F markedly reduced the staining intensity of these lectins. Together with the reduction of staining by these lectins, reactivity with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II appeared in carcinoma cells following endo-beta-galactosidase digestion. Among the lectins specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine, Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (LEA) most vividly and consistently stained the cancer cells. Next to LEA, pokeweed mitogen agglutinin was also effective in staining these cells. Carcinoma cells reactive with these

  14. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R

    2011-11-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus-truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets.

  15. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V be