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Sample records for transport number measurements

  1. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  3. Measuring collective transport by defined numbers of processive and nonprocessive kinesin motors.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Ken'ya; Furuta, Akane; Toyoshima, Yoko Y; Amino, Misako; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Hiroaki

    2013-01-08

    Intracellular transport is thought to be achieved by teams of motor proteins bound to a cargo. However, the coordination within a team remains poorly understood as a result of the experimental difficulty in controlling the number and composition of motors. Here, we developed an experimental system that links together defined numbers of motors with defined spacing on a DNA scaffold. By using this system, we linked multiple molecules of two different types of kinesin motors, processive kinesin-1 or nonprocessive Ncd (kinesin-14), in vitro. Both types of kinesins markedly increased their processivities with motor number. Remarkably, despite the poor processivity of individual Ncd motors, the coupling of two Ncd motors enables processive movement for more than 1 μm along microtubules (MTs). This improvement was further enhanced with decreasing spacing between motors. Force measurements revealed that the force generated by groups of Ncd is additive when two to four Ncd motors work together, which is much larger than that generated by single motors. By contrast, the force of multiple kinesin-1s depends only weakly on motor number. Numerical simulations and single-molecule unbinding measurements suggest that this additive nature of the force exerted by Ncd relies on fast MT binding kinetics and the large drag force of individual Ncd motors. These features would enable small groups of Ncd motors to crosslink MTs while rapidly modulating their force by forming clusters. Thus, our experimental system may provide a platform to study the collective behavior of motor proteins from the bottom up.

  4. Apparatus for measuring pressure-driven transport through channels at high Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakitsiou, S.; Holst, B.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The pressure-driven gas flow through micro- and nano-porous structures is particularly interesting for innovative technologies such as microelectromechanical and nano-mechanical-electrical systems. The classical continuum assumption breaks down for rarefied flow through channels with a characteristic dimension comparable to the mean free path of the gas. Theories based on molecular interactions have been formulated to predict the flow at high Knudsen numbers. Measuring rarefied gas flow experimentally is a challenge since only a few studies have been able to determine flowrates in the molecular flow regime. Here we present the design of an experimental apparatus, which can be used to measure the flow of gases through nano- and microscale channels in the flow regimes where molecular effects are critical. The equations used to design the apparatus are given, focusing on the slip and transition flow regimes (together sometimes called "Intermediate flow regime"). A channel with a diameter of 325 μm ± 5μm and a length of 2 mm was tested experimentally with the apparatus for a wide range of Knudsen numbers (10-2 < Kn < 1 × 105) demonstrating its suitability through the slip and transition regime (2.23 × 10-2 < Kn < 2.26).

  5. Measuring isotropic subsurface light transport.

    PubMed

    Happel, Kathrin; Dörsam, Edgar; Urban, Philipp

    2014-04-21

    Subsurface light transport can affect the visual appearance of materials significantly. Measuring and modeling this phenomenon is crucial for accurately reproducing colors in printing or for rendering translucent objects on displays. In this paper, we propose an apparatus to measure subsurface light transport employing a reference material to cancel out adverse signals that may bias the results. In contrast to other approaches, the setup enables improved focusing on rough surfaces (e.g. uncoated paper). We derive a measurement equation that may be used to deduce the point spread function (PSF) of subsurface light transport. Main contributions are the usage of spectrally-narrowband exchangeable LEDs allowing spectrally-resolved measurements and an approach based on quadratic programming for reconstructing PSFs in the case of isotropic light transport.

  6. Measuring Distance of Fuzzy Numbers by Trapezoidal Fuzzy Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjari, Tayebeh

    2010-11-01

    Fuzzy numbers and more generally linguistic values are approximate assessments, given by experts and accepted by decision-makers when obtaining value that is more accurate is impossible or unnecessary. Distance between two fuzzy numbers plays an important role in linguistic decision-making. It is reasonable to define a fuzzy distance between fuzzy objects. To achieve this aim, the researcher presents a new distance measure for fuzzy numbers by means of improved centroid distance method. The metric properties are also studied. The advantage is the calculation of the proposed method is far simple than previous approaches.

  7. Transportation optimization with fuzzy trapezoidal numbers based on possibility theory.

    PubMed

    He, Dayi; Li, Ran; Huang, Qi; Lei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric method is introduced to solve fuzzy transportation problem. Considering that parameters of transportation problem have uncertainties, this paper develops a generalized fuzzy transportation problem with fuzzy supply, demand and cost. For simplicity, these parameters are assumed to be fuzzy trapezoidal numbers. Based on possibility theory and consistent with decision-makers' subjectiveness and practical requirements, the fuzzy transportation problem is transformed to a crisp linear transportation problem by defuzzifying fuzzy constraints and objectives with application of fractile and modality approach. Finally, a numerical example is provided to exemplify the application of fuzzy transportation programming and to verify the validity of the proposed methods.

  8. Suspended-sediment transport measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Of the two operationally defined phases of fluvial-sediment transport – suspended load and bedload – collection of suspended-load data is the more common. This is a reflection of a number of factors including the general predominance of suspended load over bedload in mass transport and the greater difficulty and costs associated with collecting bedload data. Acquisition of suspended-sediment data for sediment-transport computations requires collection of water-sediment samples that represent, or can be reliably adjusted to represent, the mean discharge-weighted concentration and particle-size distribution in a cross section at the time of sample collection. Analytical results from a sufficient number of representative samples obtained with concurrent water-discharge values are needed to compute suspended-sediment discharge for the period of interest.

  9. Off-Design Reynolds Number Effects for a Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Wahls, Richard A.; Rivers, S. Melissa

    2005-01-01

    A high Reynolds number wind tunnel test was conducted to assess Reynolds number effects on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of a realistic, second-generation supersonic transport concept. The tests included longitudinal studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of chord Reynolds numbers (8 million to 120 million). Results presented focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities at Mach 0.30 and 0.90 for a configuration without a tail. Static aeroelastic effects, which mask Reynolds number effects, were observed. Reynolds number effects were generally small and the drag data followed established trends of skin friction as a function of Reynolds number. A more nose-down pitching moment was produced as Reynolds number increased because of an outward movement of the inboard leading-edge separation at constant angles of attack. This study extends the existing Reynolds number database for supersonic transports operating at off-design conditions.

  10. Toward a new methodology for measuring the threshold Shields number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Gauthier; Dhont, Blaise; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A number of bedload transport equations involve the threshold Shields number (corresponding to the threshold of incipient motion for particles resting on the streambed). Different methods have been developed for determining this threshold Shields number; they usually assume that the initial streambed is plane prior to sediment transport. Yet, there are many instances in real-world scenarios, in which the initial streambed is not free of bed forms. We are interested in developing a new methodology for determining the threshold of incipient motion in gravel-bed streams in which smooth bed forms (e.g., anti-dunes) develop. Experiments were conducted in a 10-cm wide, 2.5-m long flume, whose initial inclination was 3%. Flows were supercritical and fully turbulent. The flume was supplied with water and sediment at fixed rates. As bed forms developed and migrated, and sediment transport rates exhibited wide fluctuations, measurements had to be taken over long times (typically 10 hr). Using a high-speed camera, we recorded the instantaneous bed load transport rate at the outlet of the flume by taking top-view images. In parallel, we measured the evolution of the bed slope, water depth, and shear stress by filming through a lateral window of the flume. These measurements allowed for the estimation of the space and time-averaged slope, from which we deduced the space and time-averaged Shields number under incipient bed load transport conditions. In our experiments, the threshold Shields number was strongly dependent on streambed morphology. Experiments are under way to determine whether taking the space and time average of incipient motion experiments leads to a more robust definition of the threshold Shields number. If so, this new methodology will perform better than existing approaches at measuring the threshold Shields number.

  11. Relationship between stage II transport and number of chewing strokes as mastication progresses.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shuichiro; Sugita, Daisuke; Matsuo, Koichiro

    2013-10-02

    As mastication progresses, little is known about the occurrence of the stage II transport (oro-pharyngeal bolus transport). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx and the number of chewing strokes. Twenty-five clinical residents with natural dentitions were recruited. The subjects were asked to chew gummy jelly with their preferred rhythm and to swallow the bolus at their preferred timing. To investigate stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx, a transnasal endoscope was used. The number of chewing strokes was measured by electromyographic activity from the masseter muscle. The mean numbers of chewing strokes of pre-stage II transport and post-stage II transport were 29.8 and 8.1, respectively; the difference was significant (p<0.01). The ratio of the number of chewing strokes of pre-stage II transport to that of post-stage II transport was 4.0 to 1.0. This study showed that stage II transport started at four-fifths of the way along the progress of mastication, and that stage II transport and bolus aggregation in the pharynx are related to the number of chewing strokes.

  12. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. N.; Owens, L. R.; Rivers, S. M. B.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and the high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at low speed high-lift and transonic conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on both the Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.90 for a configuration without an empennage.

  13. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  14. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  15. Measuring glomerular number from kidney MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Natesan Ramamurthy, Karthikeyan; Kanberoglu, Berkay; Frakes, David; Bennett, Kevin; Spanias, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the glomerular number in the entire, intact kidney using non-destructive techniques is of immense importance in studying several renal and systemic diseases. Commonly used approaches either require destruction of the entire kidney or perform extrapolation from measurements obtained from a few isolated sections. A recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, based on the injection of a contrast agent (cationic ferritin), has been used to effectively identify glomerular regions in the kidney. In this work, we propose a robust, accurate, and low-complexity method for estimating the number of glomeruli from such kidney MRI images. The proposed technique has a training phase and a low-complexity testing phase. In the training phase, organ segmentation is performed on a few expert-marked training images, and glomerular and non-glomerular image patches are extracted. Using non-local sparse coding to compute similarity and dissimilarity graphs between the patches, the subspace in which the glomerular regions can be discriminated from the rest are estimated. For novel test images, the image patches extracted after pre-processing are embedded using the discriminative subspace projections. The testing phase is of low computational complexity since it involves only matrix multiplications, clustering, and simple morphological operations. Preliminary results with MRI data obtained from five kidneys of rats show that the proposed non-invasive, low-complexity approach performs comparably to conventional approaches such as acid maceration and stereology.

  16. Measurement Corner Mass, Moles and Avogadro's Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses and clarifies the confusion arising from the use of the terms "mass,""volume,""matter,""mole," and "Avogadro's number." Suggests three laboratory activities concerning mass, volume, and number of particles in a given volume. (CS)

  17. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing & transport

    SciTech Connect

    Warhaft, Z.

    1996-12-31

    An overview of recent experiments, in which the author generated high Reynolds number homogeneous grid turbulence, is provided. The author shows that in a small wind tunnel, Reynolds numbers that are sufficiently high (R{sub {lambda}} {approximately} 800, R{sub {ell}} {approximately} 36, 000) such that many of the aspects of turbulence that hitherto have only been observed in large scale anisotropic shear flows, are obtained. In particular the author studied the evolution of the spectrum with Reynolds number, the Kolmogorov constant and the internal intermittency, showing the way they tend to their high Reynolds number asymptotes. Thus the author links previous low Reynolds number laboratory experiments with large scale environmental measurements.

  18. Nonlocal electron transport in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Bendib, A.

    2006-09-15

    The numerical solution of the steady-state electron Fokker-Planck equation perturbed with respect to a global equilibrium is presented in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and the electron-electron collisions are described by the Landau collision operator. The solution is derived in the Fourier space and in the framework of the diffusive approximation which captures the spatial nonlocal effects. The transport coefficients are deduced and used to close a complete set of nonlocal electron fluid equations. This work improves the results of A. Bendib et al. [Phys. Plasmas 9, 1555 (2002)] and of A. V. Brantov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 4633 (2003)] restricted to the local and nonlocal high-Z plasma approximations, respectively. The influence of the magnetic field on the nonlocal effects is discussed. We propose also accurate numerical fits of the relevant transport coefficients with respect to the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L and the atomic number Z, where L is the typical scale length and {lambda}{sub ei} is the electron-ion mean-free-path.

  19. Two phosphonium ionic liquids with high Li(+) transport number.

    PubMed

    Martins, Vitor L; Sanchez-Ramirez, Nédher; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Torresi, Roberto M

    2015-09-21

    This work presents the physicochemical characterization of two ionic liquids (ILs) with small phosphonium cations, triethylpenthylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P2225][Tf2N]) and (2-methoxyethyl)trimethylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P222(201)][Tf2N]), and their mixtures with Li(+). Properties such as the electrochemical window, density, viscosity and ionic conductivity are presented. The diffusion coefficient was obtained using two different techniques, PGSE-NMR and Li electrodeposition with microelectrodes. In addition, the Li(+) transport number was calculated using the PGSE-NMR technique and an electrochemical approach. The use of these three techniques showed that the PGSE-NMR technique underestimates the diffusion coefficient for charged species. The Li(+) transport number was found to be as high as 0.54. Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations were used to evaluate the short-range structure of the liquids. These experiments suggested that the interaction between the Li(+) and the Tf2N(-) anion is similar to that seen with other ILs containing the same anion. However, the MD simulations also showed that the Li(+) ions interact differently with the cation containing an alkyl ether chain. The results found in this work suggest that these Li(+) mixtures have promising potential to be applied as electrolytes in batteries.

  20. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  1. Conditioning natural gas for measurement and transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhard, E.E.

    1984-04-01

    This paper discusses methods of conditioning natural gas for measurement and transportation. Gas mixtures measured at the well head or into a gathering system may not yet be conditioned to pipeline standards at the point of measurement, because title to the gas passes from the seller to the buyer at that point. Therefore, it is sometimes necessary to measure the gas flow without complete conditioning and to do it accurately. Careful study of the conditioning steps that the gas has completed, or that must be performed prior to measurement, will affect selection of the measurement equipment and the success of its operation.

  2. The reactive transport of trichloroethene is influenced by residence time and microbial numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haest, P. J.; Philips, J.; Springael, D.; Smolders, E.

    2011-01-01

    The dechlorination rate in a flow-through porous matrix can be described by the species specific dechlorination rate observed in a liquid batch unless mass transport limitations prevail. This hypothesis was examined by comparing dechlorination rates in liquid batch with that in column experiments at various flow rates (3-9-12 cm day - 1 ). Columns were loaded with an inoculated sand and eluted with a medium containing 1 mM trichloroethene (TCE) for 247 days. Dechlorination in the column treatments increased with decreasing flow rate, illustrating the effect of the longer residence time. Zeroth order TCE or cis-DCE degradation rates were 4-7 folds larger in columns than in corresponding batch systems which could be explained by the higher measured Geobacter and Dehalococcoides numbers per unit pore volume in the columns. The microbial numbers also explained the variability in dechlorination rate among flow rate treatments marked by a large elution of the dechlorinating species' yield as flow increased. Stop flow events did not reveal mass transport limitations for dechlorination. We conclude that flow rate effects on reactive transport of TCE in this coarse sand are explained by residence time and by microbial transport and that mass transport limitations in this porous matrix are limited.

  3. Prandtl-Number Dependence of Heat Transport in Laminar Horizontal Convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga; Wagner, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    We report the Prandtl-number (Pr) and Rayleigh-number (Ra) dependencies of the Reynolds number (Re) and mean convective heat transport, measured by the Nusselt number (Nu), in horizontal convection (HC) systems, where the heat supply and removal are provided exclusively through a lower horizontal surface of a fluid layer. For laminar HC, we find that Re∼Ra^{2/5}Pr^{-4/5}, Nu∼Ra^{1/5}Pr^{1/10} with a transition to Re∼Ra^{1/2}Pr^{-1}, Nu∼Ra^{1/4}Pr^{0} for large Pr. The results are based on direct numerical simulations for Ra from 3×10^{8} to 5×10^{10} and Pr from 0.05 to 50 and are explained by applying the Grossmann-Lohse approach [J. Fluid Mech. 407, 27 (2000)] transferred from the case of Rayleigh-Bénard convection to the case of laminar HC.

  4. Transungual iontophoresis of lithium and sodium: effect of pH and co-ion competition on cationic transport numbers.

    PubMed

    Dutet, Julie; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Iontophoresis has been proposed as an alternative method to deliver drugs into and across the nail plate. However, the knowledge about the rules governing transungual iontophoretic transport numbers is still uncomplete. This work investigated the iontophoretic and passive transungual fluxes of sodium and lithium and the effect of pH and co-ion competition on the cations' transport numbers. The objective was to further investigate whether nails show cation permselectivity at physiological pH and to improve our understanding of transport numbers during transungual iontophoresis. The donor solutions comprised the single ion and binary mixtures of the two cations at different pH. Sodium and lithium iontophoretic fluxes showed low inter-nail variability and were significantly greater than passive fluxes. Cationic transport numbers clearly increased as the pH was sequentially raised from 4.0 to 5.0 and then to 7.0, in agreement with a net negative charge of the human nails at physiological pH. Sodium transport number was maximal when the ion was formulated as a single ion (absence of competing co-ions) and decreased as the molar fraction of lithium was increased in the vehicle. The magnitude of the transport numbers measured and their response to changes in the cations' molar fraction and pH in the donor solution were remarkably similar to those observed during the transdermal iontophoresis. The ratio of lithium and sodium transport numbers was directly proportional to their relative concentration ratios; the proportionality constant being remarkably similar in the 4.0-7.0 pH range as well as to the ratio of the cations' aqueous mobilities. Another interesting similarity with transdermal iontophoresis was the existence of a cationic transport number threshold. On the whole, this work provided some key information about nail permselectivity and transungual transport numbers which will assist to formulate efficiently therapeutic compounds to be delivered iontophoretically

  5. Measurement uncertainty of ester number, acid number and patchouli alcohol of patchouli oil produced in Yogyakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istiningrum, Reni Banowati; Saepuloh, Azis; Jannah, Wirdatul; Aji, Didit Waskito

    2017-03-01

    Yogyakarta is one of patchouli oil distillation center in Indonesia. The quality of patchouli oil greatly affect its market price. Therefore, testing quality of patchouli oil parameters is an important concern, one through determination of the measurement uncertainty. This study will determine the measurement uncertainty of ester number, acid number and content of patchouli alcohol through a bottom up approach. Source contributor to measurement uncertainty of ester number is a mass of the sample, a blank and sample titration volume, the molar mass of KOH, HCl normality, and replication. While the source contributor of the measurement uncertainty of acid number is the mass of the sample, the sample titration volume, the relative mass and normality of KOH, and repetition. Determination of patchouli alcohol by Gas Chromatography considers the sources of measurement uncertainty only from repeatability because reference materials are not available.

  6. Anomalous Transport in Carbonate Rock - Predictions and Quantitative Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Solute transport in rock subsurface is important in a number of applications such as contaminant hydrology, carbon storage and enhanced oil recovery. Carbonate rock contain most of the world's oil reserves and potentially hold a storage capacity for carbon dioxide. Pore structure in carbonate rock introduces an additional complexity in the form of bimodal pore size distributions, which leads to complex anomalous transport behavior and poses a significant challenge for accurate predictions. We present a new modeling concept that simulates flow and transport on micro-CT images containing the information on inter- and intra-grain pore space of carbonate rock. Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow in the image voxels comprising the pore space, streamline-based simulation is used to account for advection, and diffusion is superimposed by random walk. Firstly, the model is validated against the experimental NMR measurements in the dual porosity beadpack. Furthermore, the model predictions are made for a number of carbonate rock images which are then classified in terms of heterogeneity of the inter- and intra-grain pore space, heterogeneity in the flow field, and the mass transfer characteristics of the porous media. Finally, we demonstrate the predictive capabilities of the model through an analysis that includes a number of probability density functions (PDFs) measures of non-Fickian transport on the micro-CT images.

  7. Fluid transport at low Reynolds number with magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, E. M.; Downton, M. T.; Stark, H.

    2009-02-01

    By numerical modeling we investigate fluid transport in low-Reynolds-number flow achieved with a special elastic filament or artifical cilium attached to a planar surface. The filament is made of superparamagnetic particles linked together by DNA double strands. An external magnetic field induces dipolar interactions between the beads of the filament which provides a convenient way of actuating the cilium in a well-controlled manner. The filament has recently been used to successfully construct the first artificial micro-swimmer (R. Dreyfus et al., Nature 437, 862 (2005)). In our numerical study we introduce a measure, which we call pumping performance, to quantify the fluid transport induced by the magnetically actuated cilium and identify an optimum stroke pattern of the filament. It consists of a slow transport stroke and a fast recovery stroke. Our detailed parameter study also reveals that for sufficiently large magnetic fields the artificial cilium is mainly governed by the Mason number that compares frictional to magnetic forces. Initial studies on multi-cilia systems show that the pumping performance is very sensitive to the imposed phase lag between neighboring cilia, i.e., to the details of the initiated metachronal wave.

  8. Calibrating and Measuring Bedload Transport Using a Magnetic Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, J.; Hassan, M. A.

    2004-12-01

    One of the problems in bedload transport research is that no measurement technique has been commonly accepted as superior, and there are no standard protocols. There is a need for continuous bedload measurement to adequately resolve patterns in temporal and spatial variability, especially at high transport rates. Magnetic detection systems are a promising method as they can sense the movement of natural stones, and provide high frequency data in both time and space. A number of magnetic systems have been deployed in the field, but they have not been adequately calibrated. This has limited the analysis to counting the number of pulses, and not allowed confident estimations of the true amount of sediment transport, sediment texture or particle velocities. We developed a series of lab and flume experiments to calibrate the BMD system used by Tunnicliffe et al (2000). Experiments were run with both artificial and natural stones to isolate the effects of particle size, velocity and magnetic content (susceptibility and moment) on the shape of the recorded signal. A large number of experiments were conducted to cover wide range of flow conditions, particle sizes, and particle velocities. The results show that the system is sensitive enough to detect particles down to at least 8mm. Using artificial stones we were able to relate the signal amplitude, width and area to particle size, velocity and magnetic content. These results suggest that the magnetic system can be used to estimate transport rates in natural streams. Work is continuing with natural stones both in the laboratory and the field to further develop of the system. Tunnicliffe, J., Gottesfeld, A.S., and Mohamed, M. 2000. High-resolution measurement of bedload transport, Hydrological Processes, 14, 2631-2643.

  9. Understanding gold nanoisland formation using transport measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Toyanath

    Novel metal nano-clusters are always being an interest of scientists and researchers because of their unique optical and chemical properties. This thesis studies the formation mechanism of gold nanoisland film by studying transport properties. We used layer-by-layer self-assembled multilayer gold samples and annealed them at the temperature ranging from room temperature to 625°C. Transport properties, particularly the resistance and capacitance, were measured in situ during annealing and compared with the surface morphology and UV-vis studies. Five films of the 8-layer gold and one film of the 5-layer silver and 5-layer gold nanoparticle sequentially self-assembled samples were measured. Temperature dependent resistance curves were plotted and analyzed. From the resistance curves, we were able to identify the actual temperature for polymer evaporation and nanoisland formation. These data were re-verified by comparing them with the temperature dependent studies of surface morphology and UV-vis spectroscopy. The effect of measuring condition, like heating rate and pre-annealing time factor, was also analyzed. Particularly, the slow heating and long pre-annealing time effected nanoisland growth mechanism.

  10. Measurement of Transport Properties of Aerosolized Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Airborne engineered nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), functionalized MWCNT, graphene, fullerene, silver and gold nanorods were characterized using a tandem system of a differential mobility analyzer and an aerosol particle mass analyzer to obtain their airborne transport properties and understand their relationship to morphological characteristics. These nanomaterials were aerosolized using different generation methods such as electrospray, pneumatic atomization, and dry aerosolization techniques, and their airborne transport properties such as mobility and aerodynamic diameters, mass scaling exponent, dynamic shape factor, and effective density were obtained. Laboratory experiments were conducted to directly measure mobility diameter and mass of the airborne nanomaterials using tandem mobility-mass measurements. Mass scaling exponents, aerodynamic diameters, dynamic shape factors and effective densities of mobility-classified particles were obtained from particle mass and the mobility diameter. Microscopy analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was performed to obtain morphological descriptors such as envelop diameter, open area, aspect ratio, and projected area diameter. The morphological information from the TEM was compared with measured aerodynamic and mobility diameters of the particles. The results showed that aerodynamic diameter is smaller than mobility diameter below 500 nm by a factor of 2 to 4 for all nanomaterials except silver and gold nanorods. Morphologies of MWCNTs generated by liquid-based method, such as pneumatic atomization, are more compact than those of dry dispersed MWCNTs, indicating that the morphology depends on particle generation method. TEM analysis showed that projected area diameter of MWCNTs appears to be in reasonable agreement with mobility diameter in the size range from 100 – 400 nm. Principal component analysis of the obtained airborne particle

  11. Transportable setup for amplifier phase fidelity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröbs, M.; Bogan, C.; Barke, S.; Kühn, G.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-05-01

    One possible laser source for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) consists of an Ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier originally developed for inter-satellite communication, seeded by the laser used for the technology demonstrator mission LISA Pathfinder. LISA needs to transmit clock information between its three spacecraft to correct for phase noise between the clocks on the individual spacecraft. For this purpose phase modulation sidebands at GHz frequencies will be imprinted on the laser beams between spacecraft. Differential phase noise between the carrier and a sideband introduced within the optical chain must be very low. We report on a transportable setup to measure the phase fidelity of optical amplifiers.

  12. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  13. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  14. Nusselt number measurements for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Nikolaenko, Alexei; Ahlers, Guenter

    2003-08-22

    We present high-precision measurements of the Nusselt number N as a function of the Rayleigh number R for a cylindrical sample of water (Prandtl number sigma=4.4) of height L approximately equal to 50 cm and aspect ratio Gamma identical with D/L approximately equal to 1 (D is the diameter) for 3 x 10(9)< or =R< or =6 x 10(10). For R approximately 3 x 10(9) the data are consistent with existing results for acetone (sigma=4.0, R< or =3 x 10(9)). There the measurements are also consistent with a model by Grossmann and Lohse (GL). As R increases, the measurements fall below the GL prediction. Near R=6 x 10(10) the prediction is 8% above the data.

  15. The new numbers contrast sensitivity chart for contrast sensitivity measurement

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Tulvatana, Wasee; Busayarat, Mathu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop and assess the agreement between the 3 newly made numbers contrast sensitivity charts and the MARS contrast sensitivity chart (MARS) in contrast sensitivity measurement. Methods We developed 3 numbers contrast sensitivity charts for right, left and both eyes. Two hundred subjects were assigned to read numbers 0-9 for determining the degree of difficulty. Selected seven numbers were randomly arranged and the contrast of each number was decreased by the constant factor of 0.04 log units in the units as in the MARS. We assigned 112 subjects with visual acuity range from 20/480 to 20/20 to test once with the new chart and then with MARS Chart monocularly and binocularly by random order. Bland-Altman analysis for comparing two charts was performed. Results Bland-Altman analysis between 2 charts showed the mean differences were 0.04, 0.03, 0.04 log CS and the 95% limit of agreement (LOA) of the bias were (+0.26, −0.19), (+0.26, −0.20), (+0.25, −0.17) log CS for right, left and binocular. The Bland-Altman plot indicates a good concordance in 3 charts. Conclusions These charts show reasonable agreement and can be used interchangeably with the MARS. It is helpful for Thai people who can only read numbers in doing the test. We can use them in routinely contrast sensitivity measurement.

  16. Measurement and modeling of oil slick transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Cathleen E.; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Breivik, Åyvind; Holt, Benjamin; Röhrs, Johannes; Christensen, Kai Hâkon; Espeseth, Martine; Brekke, Camilla; Skrunes, Stine

    2016-10-01

    Transport characteristics of oil slicks are reported from a controlled release experiment conducted in the North Sea in June 2015, during which mineral oil emulsions of different volumetric oil fractions and a look-alike biogenic oil were released and allowed to develop naturally. The experiment used the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to track slick location, size, and shape for ˜8 h following release. Wind conditions during the exercise were at the high end of the range considered suitable for radar-based slick detection, but the slicks were easily detectable in all images acquired by the low noise, L-band imaging radar. The measurements are used to constrain the entrainment length and representative droplet radii for oil elements in simulations generated using the OpenOil advanced oil drift model. Simultaneously released drifters provide near-surface current estimates for the single biogenic release and one emulsion release, and are used to test model sensitivity to upper ocean currents and mixing. Results of the modeling reveal a distinct difference between the transport of the biogenic oil and the mineral oil emulsion, in particular in the vertical direction, with faster and deeper entrainment of significantly smaller droplets of the biogenic oil. The difference in depth profiles for the two types of oils is substantial, with most of the biogenic oil residing below depths of 10 m, compared to the majority of the emulsion remaining above 10 m depth. This difference was key to fitting the observed evolution of the two different types of slicks.

  17. On the Number of Mather Measures of Lagrangian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Patrick

    2010-09-01

    In 1996, Ricardo Ricardo Mañé discovered that Mather measures are in fact the minimizers of a “universal” infinite dimensional linear programming problem. This fundamental result has many applications, of which one of the most important is to the estimates of the generic number of Mather measures. Mañé obtained the first estimation of that sort by using finite dimensional approximations. Recently, we were able, with Gonzalo Contreras, to use this method of finite dimensional approximation in order to solve a conjecture of John Mather concerning the generic number of Mather measures for families of Lagrangian systems. In the present paper we obtain finer results in that direction by applying directly some classical tools of convex analysis to the infinite dimensional problem. We use a notion of countably rectifiable sets of finite codimension in Banach (and Frechet) spaces which may deserve independent interest.

  18. Aerosol measurements of long range transport events from Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P.; Murphy, D.; Cziczo, D.; Thomson, D.; Brock, C.; Wilson, C.; Weber, R.; Sullivan, A.; Orsini, D.

    2003-04-01

    The Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) mission (Monterey, CA, spring 2002) investigated the gas phase and particulate composition of air masses along the western coast of the United States using a host of gas and aerosol instruments aboard the WP-3 aircraft. Several transport events from Asia containing enhanced number and mass concentrations of particles were intercepted during the mission. Within these different layers, a variety of particle modes and compositions were observed, including a) coarse crustal particles transported in the absence of anthropogenic trace gases, b) nucleation-mode particles associated with substantial enhancements in CO, NO_y, and organic tracers of biomass and anthropogenic emissions, and c) accumulation-mode particles found in the presence of CO and HNO_3. The properties, sources, and transport of these different aerosols will be evaluated using individual particle and bulk composition measurements and particle size distributions as determined from the PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), PILS (Particle Into Liquid Sampling), and particle size spectrometers, respectively.

  19. Direct Measurement of Topological Numbers with Spins in Diamond.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fei; Ju, Chenyong; Liu, Ying; Lei, Chao; Wang, Mengqi; Kong, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Pu; Li, Zhaokai; Shi, Fazhan; Jiang, Liang; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-08-05

    Topological numbers can characterize the transition between different topological phases, which are not described by Landau's paradigm of symmetry breaking. Since the discovery of the quantum Hall effect, more topological phases have been theoretically predicted and experimentally verified. However, it is still an experimental challenge to directly measure the topological numbers of various predicted topological phases. In this Letter, we demonstrate quantum simulation of topological phase transition of a quantum wire (QW), by precisely modulating the Hamiltonian of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Deploying a quantum algorithm of finding eigenvalues, we reliably extract both the dispersion relations and topological numbers. This method can be further generalized to simulate more complicated topological systems.

  20. Measurement of Hydrocarbon Transport in Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrocarbon uptake by bacteria has not been extensively studied, and strong evidence for active transport of hydrocarbons is lacking. The volatile nature of hydrocarbons, their hydrophobicity, and their relatively low aqueous solubilities can complicate transport assays. Here we present a detailed...

  1. TRANSPORT PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF HFC-236EA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of transport properties of 1,1,1,2,3,3,-hexafluoropropane (HFC-236ea), with liquid viscosity and thermal conductivity being the two main transport properties of interest. In addition, the specific heat and density of refrigerant/lubrican...

  2. Numerical Upscaling of Transport Through Obstructed Regions Over a Broad Range of Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Mattis, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    While historically flow and transport in porous media has focused on low Reynolds number and Peclet number regimes there are a variety of examples relevant to environmental fluid dynamics where higher Reynolds number flows are important. A common example might include flow and transport through wetlands where plants act as the solid phase of an effective porous medium. In particular, heterogeneity in the flow field due to presence of the solid phases gives rise to complex transport and mixing behaviors that cannot be upscaled at pre-asymptotic times using conventional approaches. We numerically simulate pore-scale flow and transport through obstructed domains over a range of Reynolds numbers from 15 to 280 and then upscale transport. We upscale using a correlated continuous time random walk (correlated CTRW) model, originally introduced in [1]. We then assess the correlated CTRW's ability to predict observables for both asymptotic and pre-asymptotic time scales and compare our results to those of a classical CTRW to determine when velocity correlations must be accounted for. REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Lagrangian statistical model for transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, Physical Review Letters 101 (2008) 090601.

  3. Entanglement, number fluctuations and optimized interferometric phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. Y.; Vaughan, T. G.; Drummond, P. D.; Reid, M. D.

    2012-09-01

    We derive a phase-entanglement criterion for two bosonic modes that is immune to number fluctuations, using the generalized Moore-Penrose inverse to normalize the phase-quadrature operator. We also obtain a phase-squeezing criterion that is immune to number fluctuations using similar techniques. These are used to obtain an operational definition of relative phase-measurement sensitivity via the analysis of phase measurement in interferometry. We show that these criteria are proportional to the enhanced phase-measurement sensitivity. The phase-entanglement criterion is the hallmark of a new type of quantum-squeezing, namely planar quantum-squeezing. This has the property that it squeezes simultaneously two orthogonal spin directions, which is possible owing to the fact that the SU(2) group that describes spin symmetry has a three-dimensional parameter space of higher dimension than the group for photonic quadratures. A practical advantage of planar quantum-squeezing is that, unlike conventional spin-squeezing, it allows noise reduction over all phase angles simultaneously. The application of this type of squeezing is to the quantum measurement of an unknown phase. We show that a completely unknown phase requires two orthogonal measurements and that with planar quantum-squeezing it is possible to reduce the measurement uncertainty independently of the unknown phase value. This is a different type of squeezing compared to the usual spin-squeezing interferometric criterion, which is applicable only when the measured phase is already known to a good approximation or can be measured iteratively. As an example, we calculate the phase entanglement of the ground state of a two-well, coupled Bose-Einstein condensate, similarly to recent experiments. This system demonstrates planar squeezing in both the attractive and the repulsive interaction regime.

  4. Measuring the winding number instability in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollo, Anthony; Petkovic, Ivana; Devoret, Michel; Glazman, Leonid; Harris, Jack

    In equilibrium, a flux-biased superconducting ring occupies a state that is characterized by the integer winding number of its complex order parameter. Transitions between states of differing winding number occur via phase slips of the order parameter. A number of aspects of these phase slips remain poorly understood, including the particular value of flux bias at which the transition occurs, and the particular state into which the system relaxes. We use cantilever torque magnetometry to address these questions by measuring the equilibrium supercurrent in arrays of isolated aluminum rings over a wide range of applied flux and temperature. We fit the measured supercurrent using one-dimensional stationary Ginzburg Landau theory over the entire field range -Bc 3 < B number changes by unity; this may be because the dynamics of the switching events are overdamped in these rings.

  5. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  6. Measuring the Second Chern Number from Nonadiabatic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The geometry and topology of quantum systems have deep connections to quantum dynamics. In this Letter, I show how to measure the non-Abelian Berry curvature and its related topological invariant, the second Chern number, using dynamical techniques. The second Chern number is the defining topological characteristic of the four-dimensional generalization of the quantum Hall effect and has relevance in systems from three-dimensional topological insulators to Yang-Mills field theory. I illustrate its measurement using the simple example of a spin-3 /2 particle in an electric quadrupole field. I show how one can dynamically measure diagonal components of the Berry curvature in an overcomplete basis of the degenerate ground state space and use this to extract the full non-Abelian Berry curvature. I also show that one can accomplish the same ideas by stochastically averaging over random initial states in the degenerate ground state manifold. Finally, I show how this system can be manufactured and the topological invariant measured in a variety of realistic systems, from superconducting qubits to trapped ions and cold atoms.

  7. Measurement of non-volatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the non-volatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a non-volatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol, OA (40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a non-volatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon (BC) with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type

  8. Measuring the lensing potential with tomographic galaxy number counts

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, Francesco; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch

    2015-10-01

    We investigate how the lensing potential can be measured tomographically with future galaxy surveys using their number counts. Such a measurement is an independent test of the standard ΛCDM framework and can be used to discern modified theories of gravity. We perform a Fisher matrix forecast based on galaxy angular-redshift power spectra, assuming specifications consistent with future photometric Euclid-like surveys and spectroscopic SKA-like surveys. For the Euclid-like survey we derive a fitting formula for the magnification bias. Our analysis suggests that the cross correlation between different redshift bins is very sensitive to the lensing potential such that the survey can measure the amplitude of the lensing potential at the same level of precision as other standard ΛCDM cosmological parameters.

  9. Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    of Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014014. Fig. 4 Turbulent transport as a fraction of total transport plotted versus Re for each of four...Diffusion in Turbulent Mixing ,” Phys. Scr ., T142, p. 014062. [9] George, E., Glimm, J., Grove, J. W., Li, X.-L., Liu, Y.-J., Xu, Z.-L., and Zhao, N., 2003...ABSTRACT Turbulent Transport at High Reynolds Numbers in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Context Report Title Mix is a critical input to hydro

  10. Estimating the theoretical semivariogram from finite numbers of measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zheng, Lingyun; Silliman, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate from a theoretical basis the impacts of the number, location, and correlation among measurement points on the quality of an estimate of the semivariogram. The unbiased nature of the semivariogram estimator ??/(r) is first established for a general random process Z(x). The variance of ??z(r) is then derived as a function of the sampling parameters (the number of measurements and their locations). In applying this function to the case of estimating the semivariograms of the transmissivity and the hydraulic head field, it is shown that the estimation error depends on the number of the data pairs, the correlation among the data pairs (which, in turn, are determined by the form of the underlying semivariogram ??(r)), the relative locations of the data pairs, and the separation distance at which the semivariogram is to be estimated. Thus design of an optimal sampling program for semivariogram estimation should include consideration of each of these factors. Further, the function derived for the variance of ??z(r) is useful in determining the reliability of a semivariogram developed from a previously established sampling design.

  11. Convective heat transport in a rotating fluid layer of infinite Prandtl number: optimum fields and upper bounds on Nusselt number.

    PubMed

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2003-02-01

    By means of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence we investigate numerically upper bounds on convective heat transport for the case of infinite fluid layer with stress-free vertical boundaries rotating about a vertical axis. We discuss the case of infinite Prandtl number, 1-alpha solution of the obtained variational problem and optimum fields possessing internal, intermediate, and boundary layers. We investigate regions of Rayleigh and Taylor numbers R and Ta, where no analytical bounds can be derived, and compare the analytical and numerical bounds for these regions of R and Ta where such comparison is possible. The increasing rotation has a different influence on the rescaled optimum fields of velocity w(1), temperature theta(1) and the vertical component of the vorticity f(1). The increasing Ta for fixed R leads to vanishing of the boundary layers of w(1) and theta(1). Opposite to this, the increasing Ta leads first to a formation of boundary layers of the field f(1) but further increasing the rotation causes vanishing of these boundary layers. We obtain optimum profiles of the horizontal averaged total temperature field which could be used as hints for construction of the background fields when applying Doering-Constantin method to the problems of rotating convection. The wave number alpha(1) corresponding to the optimum fields follows the asymptotic relationship alpha(1)=(R/5)(1/4) for intermediate Rayleigh numbers. However, when R becomes large with respect to Ta, after a transition region, the power law for alpha(1) becomes close to the power law for the case without rotation. The Nusselt number Nu is close to the nonrotational bound 0.32R(1/3) for the case of large R and small Ta. Nu decreases with increasing Taylor number. Thus, the upper bounds reflect the tendency of inhibiting thermal convection by increasing rotation for a fixed Rayleigh number. For the regions of Rayleigh and Taylor numbers where the numerical and asymptotic

  12. Low Reynolds number Couette flow facility for drag measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tyler J.; Lang, Amy W.; Wheelus, Jennifer N.; Westcott, Matthew

    2010-09-01

    For this study a new low Reynolds number Couette facility was constructed to investigate surface drag. In this facility, mineral oil was used as the working fluid to increase the shear stress across the surface of the experimental models. A mounted conveyor inside a tank creates a flow above which an experimental model of a flat plate was suspended. The experimental plate was attached to linear bearings on a slide system that connects to a force gauge used to measure the drag. Within the gap between the model and moving belt a Couette flow with a linear velocity profile was created. Digital particle image velocimetry was used to confirm the velocity profile. The drag measurements agreed within 5% of the theoretically predicted Couette flow value.

  13. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  14. Flow Visualization of Low Prandtl Number Fluids using Electrochemical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crunkleton, D.; Anderson, T.; Narayanan, R.; Labrosse, G.

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that residual flows exist in contained liquid metal processes. In 1-g processing, buoyancy forces often drive these flows and their magnitudes can be substantial. It is also known that residual flows can exist during microgravity processing, and although greatly reduced in magnitude, they can influence the properties of the processed materials. Unfortunately, there are very few techniques to visualize flows in opaque, high temperature liquid metals, and those available are not easily adapted to flight investigation. In this study, a novel technique is developed that uses liquid tin as the model fluid and solid-state electrochemical cells constructed from Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) to establish and measure dissolved oxygen boundary conditions. The melt serves as a common electrode for each of the electrochemical cells in this design, while independent reference electrodes are maintained at the outside surfaces of the electrolyte. By constructing isolated electrochemical cells at various locations along the container walls, oxygen is introduced or extracted by imposing a known electrical potential or passing a given current between the melt and the reference electrode. This programmed titration then establishes a known oxygen concentration boundary condition at the selected electrolyte-melt interface. Using the other cells, the concentration of oxygen at the electrolyte-melt interface is also monitored by measuring the open-circuit potentials developed between the melt and reference electrodes. Thus the electrochemical cells serve to both establish boundary conditions for the passive tracer and sense its path. Rayleigh-Benard convection was used to validate the electrochemical approach to flow visualization. Thus, a numerical characterization of the second critical Rayleigh numbers in liquid tin was conducted for a variety of Cartesian aspect ratios. The extremely low Prandtl number of tin represents the lowest value studied numerically

  15. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanming; Ecke, Robert E

    2009-09-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with a Prandtl number (sigma) of about 6, was confined in a cell with a square cross section of 7.3 x 7.3 cm2 and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10(5)numbers 0transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate OmegaD, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range of 10(7) to about 10(9) is roughly 0.29 with a Ro-dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra1/5+b Ra1/3. The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power-law scaling. The data are roughly consistent with an assumption that the enhancement of heat transport owing to rotation is proportional to the number of vortical structures penetrating the boundary layer. We also compare indirect measures of thermal and Ekman boundary layer thicknesses to assess their potential role in controlling heat transport in different regimes of Ra and Ta.

  16. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum random-number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, You-Qi; Guan, Jian-Yu; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The randomness from a quantum random-number generator (QRNG) relies on the accurate characterization of its devices. However, device imperfections and inaccurate characterizations can result in wrong entropy estimation and bias in practice, which highly affects the genuine randomness generation and may even induce the disappearance of quantum randomness in an extreme case. Here we experimentally demonstrate a measurement-device-independent (MDI) QRNG based on time-bin encoding to achieve certified quantum randomness even when the measurement devices are uncharacterized and untrusted. The MDI-QRNG is randomly switched between the regular randomness generation mode and a test mode, in which four quantum states are randomly prepared to perform measurement tomography in real time. With a clock rate of 25 MHz, the MDI-QRNG generates a final random bit rate of 5.7 kbps. Such implementation with an all-fiber setup provides an approach to construct a fully integrated MDI-QRNG with trusted but error-prone devices in practice.

  17. Reynolds Number Effects on a Supersonic Transport at Subsonic High-Lift Conditions (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L.R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    A High Speed Civil Transport configuration was tested in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes of the tests were to assess Reynolds number scale effects and high Reynolds number aerodynamic characteristics of a realistic, second generation supersonic transport while providing data for the assessment of computational methods. The tests included longitudinal and lateral/directional studies at transonic and low-speed, high-lift conditions across a range of Reynolds numbers from that available in conventional wind tunnels to near flight conditions. Results are presented which focus on Reynolds number and static aeroelastic sensitivities of longitudinal characteristics at Mach 0.30 for a configuration without an empennage. A fundamental change in flow-state occurred between Reynolds numbers of 30 to 40 million, which is characterized by significantly earlier inboard leading-edge separation at the high Reynolds numbers. Force and moment levels change but Reynolds number trends are consistent between the two states.

  18. High-Schmidt-number mass transport mechanisms from a turbulent flow to absorbing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer from a turbulent flow to an underlying organic sediment bed populated with DO-absorbing bacteria. Our numerical study relies on a previously developed and tested computational tool that couples a bio-geochemical model for the sediment layer and large-eddy simulation for transport on the water side. Simulations have been carried out in an open channel configuration for different Reynolds numbers (Reτ = 180-1000), Schmidt numbers (Sc = 400-1000), and bacterial populations (χ* = 100-700 mg l-1). We show that the average oxygen flux across the sediment-water interface (SWI) changes with Reτ and Sc, in good agreement with classic heat-and-mass-transfer parametrizations. Time correlations at the SWI show that intermittent peaks in the wall-shear stress initiate the mass transfer and modulate its distribution in space and time. The diffusive sublayer acts as a de-noising filter with respect to the overlying turbulence; the instantaneous mass flux is not affected by low-amplitude background fluctuations in the wall-shear stress but, on the other hand, it is receptive to energetic and coherent near-wall transport events, in agreement with the surface renewal theory. The three transport processes involved in DO depletion (turbulent transport, molecular transport across the diffusive sublayer, and absorption in the organic sediment layer) exhibit distinct temporal and spatial scales. The rapidly evolving near-wall high-speed streaks transport patches of fluid to the edge of the diffusive sublayer, leaving slowly regenerating elongated patches of positive DO concentration fluctuations and mass flux at the SWI. The sediment surface retains the signature of the overlying turbulent transport over long time scales, allowed by the slow bacterial absorption.

  19. Overview of mitigation policies and measures in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, J.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the author looks at the general question of what can be done in the transportation sector to address the problem of greenhouse gas emissions. Obviously, fewer vehicles is less emission. But on a global scale he reviews the population growth in major cities, the type of transport employed, the correlation of vehicle ownership and gross national product, as well as the costs, direct and indirect of letting more personal wealth drive one to personal vehicles as a way to transport oneself to work. The increased speed comes with many costs for the individual and for society. The development of mass transportation systems provides a number of benefits, in the form of urban development, less reliance on imported fuels, transport system health, general health and productivity of work force, and reduced costs to government to support transportation systems.

  20. Measurement of tracheal mucous transport rate in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Hampe, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    Tracheal mucous transport rates were measured in 12 nonanesthetized horses after an intratracheal injection of 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid. The transport rate of the subsequent bolus of radioactivity was determined, using a portable scaler rate meter fitted with a high-energy gamma-scintillation probe. A gamma-scintillation camera was used to verify bolus form and movement in 1 horse. The mean tracheal mucous transport rate was 1.66 +/- 0.24 cm/min.

  1. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  2. Improving Estuarine Transport Models using Satellite Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2013 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Following...and Aqua satellites. Level 2 satellite data with atmospheric corrections are obtained from http://ladsweb.nascom.nasa.gov/, while in-situ data are

  3. The Impact of Early Time Behavior of Solute Transport at High Peclet Number on Upscaled Markovian Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to predict transport of solutes, upscaling techniques are often applied. After the amount of time it takes the solute to sample all of the velocities in the system, the upscaling process is well understood and fairly simple to implement. But in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, this amount of time may be prohibitively long. When there is a need to predict transport at earlier times, the upscaling process is more difficult because the solute tends to stay on or near its initial streamline, inducing a correlation between its average velocity over fixed distances (or times), which must be accounted for. A Spatial Markov model was developed in 2008 that does just that[1]. It accounts for the velocity correlation by treating the transport process as a Markov Chain. This model has been successfully applied to predict solute transport in a large variety of complicated flow fields and is becoming increasing popular. It almost seems as though it works for every situation, but so far no rigorous study has gone into determining its limitations. So we have decided to take a step back and ask: when is this model valid? We understand the asymptotic behavior in the limit as t→ ∞, but what about in the limit as 1/t→ ∞ (or t→ 0)? Are the assumptions of the Spatial Markov model valid over all length (and time) scales? It turns out that the answer is no. At very early times, the transport process is diffusion dominated, leading to non-monotonic correlation between solute particles' average velocity over consecutive space and time steps. The assumptions of the Spatial Markov model only hold after this early diffusive regime ends and the correlation function peaks. We find the location of the peak in the correlation function for transport in simple stratified flows and show the effect of using the Spatial Markov model over length scales on either side of the peak.REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Spatial Markov processes for modeling Lagrangian

  4. Transported acid aerosols measured in southern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Koutrakis, Petros; Allen, George A.; Raizenne, Mark; Stern, Bonnie

    During the period 29 June 1986-9 August 1986, a field health study assessing the acute health effects of air pollutants on children was conducted at a summer girls' camp on the northern shore of Lake Erie in SW Ontario. Continuous air pollution measurements of SO 2, O 3, NO x, particulate sulfates, light scattering, and meteorological measurements including temperature, dew point, and wind speed and direction were made. Twelve-hour integrated samples of size fractioned particles were also obtained using dichotomous samplers and Harvard impactors equipped with an ammonia denuder for subsequent hydrogen ion determination. Particulate samples were analyzed for trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and Neutron Activation, and for organic and elemental carbon by a thermal/optical technique. The measured aerosol was periodically very acidic with observed 12-h averaged H + concentrations in the range < 10-560 nmoles m -3. The aerosol H + appeared to represent the net strong acidity after H 2SO 4 reaction with NH 3(g). Average daytime concentrations were higher than night-time for aerosol H +, sulfate, fine mass and ozone. Prolonged episodes of atmospheric acidity, sulfate, and ozone were associated with air masses arriving at the measurement site from the west and from the southwest over Lake Erie. Sulfate concentrations measured at the lakeshore camp were more than twice those measured at inland sites during extreme pollution episodes. The concentration gradient observed with onshore flow was potentially due to enhanced deposition near the lakeshore caused by discontinuities in the meteorological fields in this region.

  5. Heat transport in low-Rossby-number Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Julien, Keith; Knobloch, Edgar; Rubio, Antonio M; Vasil, Geoffrey M

    2012-12-21

    We demonstrate, via simulations of asymptotically reduced equations describing rotationally constrained Rayleigh-Bénard convection, that the efficiency of turbulent motion in the fluid bulk limits overall heat transport and determines the scaling of the nondimensional Nusselt number Nu with the Rayleigh number Ra, the Ekman number E, and the Prandtl number σ. For E < 1 inviscid scaling theory predicts and simulations confirm the large Ra scaling law Nu-1 ≈ C(1)σ(-1/2)Ra(3/2)E(2), where C(1) is a constant, estimated as C(1) ≈ 0.04 ± 0.0025. In contrast, the corresponding result for nonrotating convection, Nu-1 ≈ C(2)Ra(α), is determined by the efficiency of the thermal boundary layers (laminar: 0.28 ≤ α ≤ 0.31, turbulent: α ~ 0.38). The 3/2 scaling law breaks down at Rayleigh numbers at which the thermal boundary layer loses rotational constraint, i.e., when the local Rossby number ≈ 1. The breakdown takes place while the bulk Rossby number is still small and results in a gradual transition to the nonrotating scaling law. For low Ekman numbers the location of this transition is independent of the mechanical boundary conditions.

  6. Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Ogulei, D.; Hopke, P.K.; Chalupa, D.C.; Utell, M.J.

    2007-02-15

    An advanced receptor model was used to elicit source information based on ambient submicron (0.01-0.47 {mu}m) particle number concentrations, gaseous species, and meteorological variables measured at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation central monitoring site in Rochester, NY. Four seasonal data sets (winter, spring, summer, and fall) were independently investigated. A total of ten different sources were identified, including two traffic factors, two nucleation factors, industrial emissions, residential/commercial heating, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, ozone-rich secondary aerosol, and regionally transported aerosol. The resolved sources were generally characterized by similar number modes for either winter, spring, summer or fall. The size distributions for nucleation were dominated by the smallest particles ({lt}10-30 nm) that gradually grew to larger sizes as could be seen by observing the volume profiles. In addition, the nucleation factors were closely linked to traffic rush hours suggesting that cooling of tail-pipe emissions may have induced nucleation activity in the vicinity of the highways. Industrial emissions were dominated by emissions from coal-fired power plants that were located to the northwest of the sampling site. These facilities represent the largest point emission sources of SO{sub 2}, and probably ultrafine ({lt}0.1 {mu}m) or submicron particles, in Rochester. Regionally transported material was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Air parcel back-trajectories showed transport of air masses from the industrial midwest.

  7. Characterization of Lorenz number with Seebeck coefficient measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun-Sik; Gibbs, Zachary M.; Tang, Yinglu; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    In analyzing zT improvements due to lattice thermal conductivity (κ{sub L}) reduction, electrical conductivity (σ) and total thermal conductivity (κ{sub Total}) are often used to estimate the electronic component of the thermal conductivity (κ{sub E}) and in turn κ{sub L} from κ{sub L} = ∼ κ{sub Total} − LσT. The Wiedemann-Franz law, κ{sub E} = LσT, where L is Lorenz number, is widely used to estimate κ{sub E} from σ measurements. It is a common practice to treat L as a universal factor with 2.44 × 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} (degenerate limit). However, significant deviations from the degenerate limit (approximately 40% or more for Kane bands) are known to occur for non-degenerate semiconductors where L converges to 1.5 × 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} for acoustic phonon scattering. The decrease in L is correlated with an increase in thermopower (absolute value of Seebeck coefficient (S)). Thus, a first order correction to the degenerate limit of L can be based on the measured thermopower, |S|, independent of temperature or doping. We propose the equation: L=1.5+exp[−(|S|)/(116) ] (where L is in 10{sup −8} WΩK{sup −2} and S in μV/K) as a satisfactory approximation for L. This equation is accurate within 5% for single parabolic band/acoustic phonon scattering assumption and within 20% for PbSe, PbS, PbTe, Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.2} where more complexity is introduced, such as non-parabolic Kane bands, multiple bands, and/or alternate scattering mechanisms. The use of this equation for L rather than a constant value (when detailed band structure and scattering mechanism is not known) will significantly improve the estimation of lattice thermal conductivity.

  8. Marine Transportation System Performance Measures Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    impacted by the burning of fossil fuels, it is possible that air pollutants from the MTS are declining, as reflected in the overall decline in...expected to reduce air pollution (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2014b) and is a topic for future performance measure development. Changes in...release of the following pollutants from ships: garbage, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide air emissions, sewage, noxious liquids, and oil

  9. Investigation of Transonic Reynolds Number Scaling on a Twin-Engine Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtin, M. M.; Bogue, D. R.; Om, D.; Rivers, S. M. B.; Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.; Wahls, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses Reynolds number scaling for aerodynamic parameters including force and wing pressure measurements. A full-span model of the Boeing 777 configuration was tested at transonic conditions in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Reynolds numbers (based on mean aerodynamic chord) from 3.0 to 40.0 million. Data was obtained for a tail-off configuration both with and without wing vortex generators and flap support fairings. The effects of aeroelastics were separated from Reynolds number effects by varying total pressure and temperature independently. Data from the NTF at flight Reynolds number are compared with flight data to establish the wind tunnel/flight correlation. The importance of high Reynolds number testing and the need for developing a process for transonic Reynolds number scaling is discussed. This paper also identifies issues that need to be worked for Boeing Commercial to continue to conduct future high Reynolds number testing in the NTF.

  10. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties.

  11. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Ate; van Rheenen, Hans; Ellis, Jean T.; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured the output from an advanced signal processing scheme on the circuit board of the saltiphone. We use a software implementation of this processing scheme to re-analyse data from four miniphones obtained during a field experiment. It is shown that a set of filters remove background noise outside the frequency spectrum of aeolian saltation (at 8 kHz), whereas signals within this frequency spectrum are amplified. The resulting analogue signal is a proxy of the energy. Using an AC pulse convertor, this signal can be converted into a digital and analogue count signal or an analogue energy signal, using a rectifier and integrator. Spatio-temporal correlation between field deployed miniphones increases by using longer integration times for signal processing. To quantify aeolian grain impact, it is suggested to use the analogue energy output, as this mode is able to detect changes in frequency and amplitude. The analogue and digital count signals are able to detect an increase in frequency, but are not able to detect an increase in signal amplitude. We propose a two-stage calibration scheme consisting of (1) a factory calibration, to set the frequency spectrum of the sensor and (2) a standardized drop-test conducted before and after the experiment to evaluate the response of the sensor.

  12. Adaptive Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of a Photon Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaudecerf, B.; Rybarczyk, T.; Gerlich, S.; Gleyzes, S.; Raimond, J. M.; Haroche, S.; Dotsenko, I.; Brune, M.

    2014-02-01

    In many quantum measurements, information is acquired incrementally by the successive interaction of meters with the measured system. Adaptive measurements minimize the use of resources (meters) by adjusting the measurement settings according to available information. We demonstrate an adaptive measurement for nondestructive photon counting in a cavity, based on Ramsey interferometry for Rydberg atoms interacting with the field. Tuning the interferometer in real time, we speed up the measurement by up to 45%. Such adaptive methods are promising for quantum metrology, state preparation, and feedback.

  13. Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

    2009-02-14

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

  14. A Device for Measuring Sonic Velocity and Compressor Mach Number

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1948-07-01

    resonator (the only 4 NACA TN No. 1664 accurate measurement required) is measured, as shomn in figure 1, by means of a mercury manometer . The compressor Mach...tube vs not connected to the ccmpressor inlet until after calibration. The pressure in the device was measured by means of the mercury manometer . Fram

  15. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  16. Automated measurement of fast mitochondrial transport in neurons.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle E; Liu, Xin-An; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing, and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  17. Molecular transport in collagenous tissues measured by gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hunckler, Michael D; Tilley, Jennifer M R; Roeder, Ryan K

    2015-11-26

    Molecular transport in tissues is important for drug delivery, nutrient supply, waste removal, cell signaling, and detecting tissue degeneration. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate gel electrophoresis as a simple method to measure molecular transport in collagenous tissues. The electrophoretic mobility of charged molecules in tissue samples was measured from relative differences in the velocity of a cationic dye passing through an agarose gel in the absence and presence of a tissue section embedded within the gel. Differences in electrophoretic mobility were measured for the transport of a molecule through different tissues and tissue anisotropy, or the transport of different sized molecules through the same tissue. Tissue samples included tendon and fibrocartilage from the proximal (tensile) and distal (compressive) regions of the bovine flexor tendon, respectively, and bovine articular cartilage. The measured electrophoretic mobility was greatest in the compressive region of the tendon (fibrocartilage), followed by the tensile region of tendon, and lowest in articular cartilage, reflecting differences in the composition and organization of the tissues. The anisotropy of tendon was measured by greater electrophoretic mobility parallel compared with perpendicular to the predominate collagen fiber orientation. Electrophoretic mobility also decreased with increased molecular size, as expected. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that gel electrophoresis may be a useful method to measure differences in molecular transport within various tissues, including the effects of tissue type, tissue anisotropy, and molecular size.

  18. Mean Antarctic Circumpolar Current transport measured in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, K. A.; Tracey, K. L.; Watts, D. R.; Chidichimo, M. P.; Chereskin, T. K.

    2016-11-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current is an important component of the global climate system connecting the major ocean basins as it flows eastward around Antarctica, yet due to the paucity of data, it remains unclear how much water is transported by the current. Between 2007 and 2011 flow through Drake Passage was continuously monitored with a line of moored instrumentation with unprecedented horizontal and temporal resolution. Annual mean near-bottom currents are remarkably stable from year to year. The mean depth-independent or barotropic transport, determined from the near-bottom current meter records, was 45.6 sverdrup (Sv) with an uncertainty of 8.9 Sv. Summing the mean barotropic transport with the mean baroclinic transport relative to zero at the seafloor of 127.7 Sv gives a total transport through Drake Passage of 173.3 Sv. This new measurement is 30% larger than the canonical value often used as the benchmark for global circulation and climate models.

  19. Dopamine transporter, gender, and number of sexual partners among young adults.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang; Tong, Yuying; Xie, Cui-Wei; Lange, Leslie A

    2007-03-01

    The dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) codes for a dopamine transporter protein, which limits the level and duration of dopamine receptor activation. The DAT1 gene is a strong candidate gene for reward-seeking behavior. This article reports compelling evidence for the association between the 40 bp variable number of tandem repeats in the DAT1 gene and the self-reported number of sexual partners among young adults in the United States using the sibling subsample of more than 2500 individuals who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We performed tests of genotype-gender interaction as well as analyses stratified by gender. Among the males, possessing one or two alleles of the 10 repeat is associated with an 80-100% increase (P<0.0001, 2df) in the number of sexual partners as compared with the homozygotes for the 9 repeat. The association holds in race/ethnicity-stratified analyses, in Allison's procedure that tests population stratification, and in within-family fixed-effects models. Covariate adjustment for a standard set of socioeconomic factors including religiosity, family structure, parental education, marital and cohabitation history, and neighborhood poverty did not attenuate these associations. Discussion is provided why this finding is absent among females.

  20. Diagnosing ocean energy transports from earth radiation budget measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    The maximum energy production (MEP) principle suggested by Paltridge (1975) is applied to separate the satellite-inferred required total transports into the atmospheric and the oceanic components within a two-dimensional (2D) framework. For this purpose, the required 2D energy transports (Sohn and Smith, 1991) are imposed on Paltridge's energy balance model which is then solved as a variational problem. The results provide separated atmospheric and oceanic transports on a 2D basis such that the total divergence is equal to the net radiation measured from a satellite.

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements using hot-wires at small Peclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of using hot-wires to measure gas thermal conductivity is investigated. When the local Peclet number of a hot-wire is small (Pe<<1), molecular diffusion dominates the heat transport, and the wire becomes less sensitive to velocity. This phenomenon can be utilized to measure the thermal conductivity of the gas. To investigate the viability of the principle of operation, a lumped capacitance model is proposed, capturing the effects of both convection and conduction on heat transfer from the wire. By investigating the sensitivity of the model to velocity, temperature and conduction, it is shown that as wire dimension decreases, the sensor becomes less sensitive to both velocity and temperature and more sensitive to conduction. The model also captures the effect of varying wire dimension as well as overheat ratio.

  2. Prandtl-number dependence of heat transport in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Ahlers, G; Xu, X

    2001-04-09

    We present measurements of the Nusselt number N as a function of the Rayleigh number R and the Prandtl number sigma in cylindrical cells with aspect ratios gamma = 0.5 and 1.0. We used acetone, methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol with Prandtl numbers sigma = 4.0, 6.5, 14.2, and 34.1, respectively, in the range 3x10(7) less, similarR less, similar10(11). At constant R, N(R,sigma) varies with sigma by only about 2%. This result disagrees with the extrapolation of the Grossmann and Lohse theory beyond its range of validity, which implies a decrease by 20% over our sigma range, but agrees with their recent extension of the theory to small Reynolds numbers.

  3. Transport coefficients for the shear dynamo problem at small Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Sridhar, S

    2011-05-01

    We build on the formulation developed in S. Sridhar and N. K. Singh [J. Fluid Mech. 664, 265 (2010)] and present a theory of the shear dynamo problem for small magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers, but for arbitrary values of the shear parameter. Specializing to the case of a mean magnetic field that is slowly varying in time, explicit expressions for the transport coefficients α(il) and η(il) are derived. We prove that when the velocity field is nonhelical, the transport coefficient α(il) vanishes. We then consider forced, stochastic dynamics for the incompressible velocity field at low Reynolds number. An exact, explicit solution for the velocity field is derived, and the velocity spectrum tensor is calculated in terms of the Galilean-invariant forcing statistics. We consider forcing statistics that are nonhelical, isotropic, and delta correlated in time, and specialize to the case when the mean field is a function only of the spatial coordinate X(3) and time τ; this reduction is necessary for comparison with the numerical experiments of A. Brandenburg, K. H. Rädler, M. Rheinhardt, and P. J. Käpylä [Astrophys. J. 676, 740 (2008)]. Explicit expressions are derived for all four components of the magnetic diffusivity tensor η(il)(τ). These are used to prove that the shear-current effect cannot be responsible for dynamo action at small Re and Rm, but for all values of the shear parameter.

  4. Measurement of Rubidium Number Density Under Optically Thick Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-15

    Voigt profiles . A Voigt line shape is represented by equations 4.1 and 4.2. (4.1) gV oigt(λ, λFF ′) = 1 2π √ π ∫ ∞ −∞  ∆λL exp(−t2) (λ− λFF ′ − t ∆λD...various cell conditions of temperature and pressure were then fit to a pressure broadened Voigt profile thereby allowing the determination of the...broadened Voigt profile thereby allowing the determination of the rubidium number den- sity. 1. Background In recent years, alkali metals have garnered a

  5. Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1996-12-01

    In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

  6. Measurement of particle transport coefficients on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, T.C.T.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this thesis was to study the behavior of the plasma transport during the divertor detachment in order to explain the central electron density rise. The measurement of particle transport coefficients requires sophisticated diagnostic tools. A two color interferometer system was developed and installed on Alcator C-Mod to measure the electron density with high spatial ({approx} 2 cm) and high temporal ({le} 1.0 ms) resolution. The system consists of 10 CO{sub 2} (10.6 {mu}m) and 4 HeNe (.6328 {mu}m) chords that are used to measure the line integrated density to within 0.08 CO{sub 2} degrees or 2.3 {times} 10{sup 16}m{sup {minus}2} theoretically. Using the two color interferometer, a series of gas puffing experiments were conducted. The density was varied above and below the threshold density for detachment at a constant magnetic field and plasma current. Using a gas modulation technique, the particle diffusion, D, and the convective velocity, V, were determined. Profiles were inverted using a SVD inversion and the transport coefficients were extracted with a time regression analysis and a transport simulation analysis. Results from each analysis were in good agreement. Measured profiles of the coefficients increased with the radius and the values were consistent with measurements from other experiments. The values exceeded neoclassical predictions by a factor of 10. The profiles also exhibited an inverse dependence with plasma density. The scaling of both attached and detached plasmas agreed well with this inverse scaling. This result and the lack of change in the energy and impurity transport indicate that there was no change in the underlying transport processes after detachment.

  7. The number comb for a soil physical properties dynamic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olechko, K.; Patiño, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose the prime numbers distribution extracted from the soil digital multiscale images and some physical properties time series as the precise indicator of the spatial and temporal dynamics under soil management changes. With this new indicator the soil dynamics can be studied as a critical phenomenon where each phase transition is estimated and modeled by the graph partitioning induced phase transition. The critical point of prime numbers distribution was correlated with the beginning of Andosols, Vertisols and saline soils physical degradation under the unsustainable soil management in Michoacan, Guanajuato and Veracruz States of Mexico. The data banks corresponding to the long time periods (between 10 and 28 years) were statistically compared by RISK 5.0 software and our own algorithms. Our approach makes us able to distill free-form natural laws of soils physical properties dynamics directly from the experimental data. The Richter (1987) and Schmidt and Lipson (2009) original approaches were very useful to design the algorithms to identify Hamiltonians, Lagrangians and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation especially for erosion case.

  8. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P.; Shi, Li

    2015-04-15

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  9. A four-probe thermal transport measurement method for nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyun; Ou, Eric; Sellan, Daniel P; Shi, Li

    2015-04-01

    Several experimental techniques reported in recent years have enabled the measurement of thermal transport properties of nanostructures. However, eliminating the contact thermal resistance error from the measurement results has remained a critical challenge. Here, we report a different four-probe measurement method that can separately obtain both the intrinsic thermal conductance and the contact thermal resistance of individual nanostructures. The measurement device consists of four microfabricated, suspended metal lines that act as resistive heaters and thermometers, across which the nanostructure sample is assembled. The method takes advantage of the variation in the heat flow along the suspended nanostructure and across its contacts to the four suspended heater and thermometer lines, and uses sixteen sets of temperature and heat flow measurements to obtain nine of the thermal resistances in the measurement device and the nanostructure sample, including the intrinsic thermal resistance and the two contact thermal resistances to the middle suspended segment of the nanostructure. Two single crystalline Si nanowires with different cross sections are measured in this work to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. This four-probe thermal transport measurement method can lead to future discoveries of unique size-dependent thermal transport phenomena in nanostructures and low-dimensional materials, in addition to providing reliable experimental data for calibrating theoretical models.

  10. Dynamic characterization of external and internal mass transport in heterotrophic biofilms from microsensors measurements.

    PubMed

    Guimerà, Xavier; Dorado, Antonio David; Bonsfills, Anna; Gabriel, Gemma; Gabriel, David; Gamisans, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of mass transport mechanisms in biofilm-based technologies such as biofilters is essential to improve bioreactors performance by preventing mass transport limitation. External and internal mass transport in biofilms was characterized in heterotrophic biofilms grown on a flat plate bioreactor. Mass transport resistance through the liquid-biofilm interphase and diffusion within biofilms were quantified by in situ measurements using microsensors with a high spatial resolution (<50 μm). Experimental conditions were selected using a mathematical procedure based on the Fisher Information Matrix to increase the reliability of experimental data and minimize confidence intervals of estimated mass transport coefficients. The sensitivity of external and internal mass transport resistances to flow conditions within the range of typical fluid velocities over biofilms (Reynolds numbers between 0.5 and 7) was assessed. Estimated external mass transfer coefficients at different liquid phase flow velocities showed discrepancies with studies considering laminar conditions in the diffusive boundary layer near the liquid-biofilm interphase. The correlation of effective diffusivity with flow velocities showed that the heterogeneous structure of biofilms defines the transport mechanisms inside biofilms. Internal mass transport was driven by diffusion through cell clusters and aggregates at Re below 2.8. Conversely, mass transport was driven by advection within pores, voids and water channels at Re above 5.6. Between both flow velocities, mass transport occurred by a combination of advection and diffusion. Effective diffusivities estimated at different biofilm densities showed a linear increase of mass transport resistance due to a porosity decrease up to biofilm densities of 50 g VSS·L(-1). Mass transport was strongly limited at higher biofilm densities. Internal mass transport results were used to propose an empirical correlation to assess the effective diffusivity

  11. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  12. Measurements of electron number density and plasma temperature using LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-xia; Luo, Wen-feng; He, Jun-fang; Wang, Hong-ying; Yang, Sen-lin; Li, Yuan-yuan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma produced by the radiation of a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser focused onto a standard aluminum alloy E311 was studied spectroscopically. The electron density was inferred by measuring the Stark broadened line profile of Cu I 324.75 nm at a distance of 1.5 mm from the target surface with the laser irradiance of 3.27 GW/cm2. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method with eight neutral iron lines. At the same time, the validity of the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium was discussed in light of the results obtained.

  13. Comparison of sources of submicron particle number concentrations measured at two sites in Rochester, NY.

    PubMed

    Kasumba, John; Hopke, Philip K; Chalupa, David C; Utell, Mark J

    2009-09-01

    Sources contributing to the submicron particles (100-470 nm) measured between January 2002 and December 2007 at two different New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) sites in Rochester, NY were identified and apportioned using a bilinear receptor model, positive matrix factorization (PMF). Measurements of aerosol size distributions and number concentrations for particles in the size range of 10-500 nm have been made since December 2001 to date in Rochester. The measurements are being made using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) consisting of a DMA and a CPC (TSI models 3071 and 3010, respectively). From December 2001 to March 2004, particle measurements were made at the NYS DEC site in downtown Rochester, but it was moved to the eastside of Rochester in May 2004. Each measurement period was divided into three seasons i.e., winter (December, January, and February), summer (June, July, and August), and the transitional periods (March, April, May, September, October, and November) so as to avoid experimental uncertainty resulting from too large season-to-season variability in ambient temperature and solar photon intensity that would lead to unstable/non-stationary size distributions. Therefore, the seasons were analyzed independently for possible sources. Ten sources were identified at both sites and these include traffic, nucleation, residential/commercial heating, industrial emissions, secondary nitrate, ozone- rich secondary aerosol, secondary sulfate, regionally transported aerosol, and a mixed source of nucleation and traffic. These results show that the measured total outdoor particle number concentrations in Rochester generally vary with similar temporal patterns, suggesting that the central monitoring site data can be used to estimate outdoor exposure in other parts of the city.

  14. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  15. Non-spherical aerosol transport under oscillatory shear flows at low-Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shachar Berman, Lihi; Delorme, Yann; Hofemeier, Philipp; Frankel, Steven; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    Most airborne particles are intrinsically non-spherical. In particular, non-spherical particles with high aspect ratios, such as fibers, are acknowledged to be more hazardous than their spherical counterparts due to their ability to penetrate into deeper lung regions, causing serious pulmonary diseases. Not only do particle properties such as size, shape, and density have a major impact on particle transport, for non-spherical aerosols, their orientations also greatly influence particle trajectories due to modified lift and drag characteristics. Until present, however, most of our understanding of the dynamics of inhaled particles in the deep airways of the lungs has been limited to spherical particles only. In the present work, we seek to quantify through numerical simulations the transport of non-spherical airborne particles and their deposition under oscillatory shear flows at low Reynolds numbers, characteristic of acinar airways. Here, the Euler-Lagrangian model is used to solve the translational movement of a fiber, whereas the Eulerian rotational equations are introduced and solved to predict detailed unsteady fiber orientations. Overall, our efforts provide new insight into realistic dynamics of inhaled non-spherical aerosols under characteristic breathing motions.

  16. Lessons learned from the jellyfish: Fluid transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Dabiri, John

    2011-11-01

    Biologically inspired hydrodynamic propulsion and maneuvering strategies promise the advancement of medical implants and novel robotic tools. We have chosen juvenile jellyfish as a model system for investigating fluid dynamics and morphological properties underlying fluid transport by an elastic system at intermediate Reynolds numbers. Recently we have described how natural variations in viscous forces are balanced by changes in jellyfish body shape (phenotypic plasticity), to the effect of facilitating efficient body-fluid interaction. Complementing these studies in our live model organisms, we are also engaged in engineering a synthetic jellyfish, that is, a rhythmically actuated elastomer capable of generating efficient feeding and propulsion currents. The main challenges here are (1) to derive a body shape and deformation suitable for effective fluid transport under physiological fluid conditions, (2) to understand the mechanical properties of actuator and elastomer to derive a design capable of the desired deformation, (3) to establish adequate 3D kinematics of power and recovery stroke, and (4) to evaluate the performance of the design.

  17. Learning from jellyfish: Fluid transport in muscular pumps at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Janna; Dabiri, John

    2010-11-01

    Biologically inspired hydrodynamic propulsion and maneuvering strategies promise the advancement of medical implants and minimally invasive clinical tools. We have chosen juvenile jellyfish as a model system for investigating fluid dynamics and morphological properties underlying fluid transport by a muscular pump at intermediate Reynolds numbers. Recently we have described how natural variations in viscous forces are balanced by changes in jellyfish body shape (phenotypic plasticity), to the effect of facilitating efficient body-fluid interaction. Complementing these studies in our live model organisms, we are also engaged in engineering an artificial jellyfish, that is, a jellyfish-inspired construct of a flexible plastic sheet actuated by a monolayer of rat cardiomyocytes. The main challenges here are (1) to derive a body shape and deformation suitable for effective fluid transport under physiological conditions, (2) to understand the mechanical properties of the muscular film and derive a design capable of the desired deformation, (3) to master the proper alignment and timely contraction of the muscle component needed to achieve the desired deformation, and (4) to evaluate the performance of the design.

  18. Transport coefficients for the shear dynamo problem at small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nishant K.; Sridhar, S.

    2011-05-01

    We build on the formulation developed in S. Sridhar and N. K. Singh [J. Fluid Mech.JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112010003745 664, 265 (2010)] and present a theory of the shear dynamo problem for small magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers, but for arbitrary values of the shear parameter. Specializing to the case of a mean magnetic field that is slowly varying in time, explicit expressions for the transport coefficients αil and ηiml are derived. We prove that when the velocity field is nonhelical, the transport coefficient αil vanishes. We then consider forced, stochastic dynamics for the incompressible velocity field at low Reynolds number. An exact, explicit solution for the velocity field is derived, and the velocity spectrum tensor is calculated in terms of the Galilean-invariant forcing statistics. We consider forcing statistics that are nonhelical, isotropic, and delta correlated in time, and specialize to the case when the mean field is a function only of the spatial coordinate X3 and time τ; this reduction is necessary for comparison with the numerical experiments of A. Brandenburg, K. H. Rädler, M. Rheinhardt, and P. J. Käpylä [Astrophys. J.AJLEEY0004-637X10.1086/527373 676, 740 (2008)]. Explicit expressions are derived for all four components of the magnetic diffusivity tensor ηij(τ). These are used to prove that the shear-current effect cannot be responsible for dynamo action at small Re and Rm, but for all values of the shear parameter.

  19. Energy Dependence of Measured CT Numbers on Substituted Materials Used for CT Number Calibration of Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Jabbari, Nasrollah; aghdasi, Mehdi; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For accurate dose calculations, it is necessary to provide a correct relationship between the CT numbers and electron density in radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs). The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy dependence of measured CT numbers on substituted materials used for CT number calibration of radiotherapy TPSs and the resulting errors in the treatment planning calculation doses. Materials and Methods In this study, we designed a cylindrical water phantom with different materials used as tissue equivalent materials for the simulation of tissues and obtaining the related CT numbers. For evaluating the effect of CT number variations of substituted materials due to energy changing of scanner (kVp) on the dose calculation of TPS, the slices of the scanned phantom at three kVp's were imported into the desired TPSs (MIRS and CorePLAN). Dose calculations were performed on two TPSs. Results The mean absolute percentage differences between the CT numbers of CT scanner and two treatment planning systems for all the samples were 3.22%±2.57% for CorePLAN and 2.88%±2.11% for MIRS. It was also found that the maximum absolute percentage difference between all of the calculated doses from each photon beam of linac (6 and 15 MV) at three kVp's was less than 1.2%. Discussion The present study revealed that, for the materials with effective low atomic number, the mean CT number increased with increasing energy, which was opposite for the materials with an effective high atomic number. We concluded that the tissue substitute materials had a different behavior in the energy ranges from 80 to 130 kVp. So, it is necessary to consider the energy dependence of the substitute materials used for the measurement or calibration of CT number for radiotherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27391672

  20. On-road particle number measurements using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, Jens; Kirchner, Ulf; Vogt, Rainer; Börensen, Christoph; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    In this study the on-road particle number (PN) performance of a Euro-5 direct-injection (DI) gasoline passenger car was investigated. PN emissions were measured using the prototype of a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). PN PEMS correlations with chassis dynamometer tests show a good agreement with a chassis dynamometer set-up down to emissions in the range of 1·1010 #/km. Parallel on-line soot measurements by a photo acoustic soot sensor (PASS) were applied as independent measurement technique and indicate a good on-road performance for the PN-PEMS. PN-to-soot ratios were 1.3·1012 #/mg, which was comparable for both test cell and on-road measurements. During on-road trips different driving styles as well as different road types were investigated. Comparisons to the world harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC) 5.3 and to European field operational test (euroFOT) data indicate the PEMS trips to be representative for normal driving. Driving situations in varying traffic seem to be a major contributor to a high test-to-test variability of PN emissions. However, there is a trend to increasing PN emissions with more severe driving styles. A cold start effect is clearly visible for PN, especially at low ambient temperatures down to 8 °C.

  1. Measurement of the radiative transport properties of reticulated alumina foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.J.; Bohn, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents a method for determining radiative transport properties of reticulated materials. The method has both experimental and analytical components. A polar nephelometer is used to measure the scattering profile of a sample of the reticulated material. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment are then combined with the experimental results to give the scatter albedo and extinction coefficient. This paper presents the results of using this method to determine the radiative transport properties of four different porosities (10, 20, 30, 65 pores per inch) of cylindrical reticulated alumina samples ranging in thickness form 0.5 inches to 2. 5 inches.

  2. An experimental analysis of bed load transport in gravel-bed braided rivers with high grain Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vincenzo, Annamaria; Brancati, Francesco; Pannone, Marilena

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed with nearly uniform fluvial gravel (D50=9 mm, D10=5 mm and D90=13 mm) to analyse the relationship between stream power and bed load transport rate in gravel-bed braided rivers at high grain Reynolds numbers. The values of the unit-width dimensionless bed-load rate qb* and unit-width dimensionless stream power ω* were evaluated in equilibrium conditions based on ten different experimental runs. Then, they were plotted along with values obtained during particularly representative field studies documented in the literature, and a regression law was derived. For comparison, a regression analysis was performed using the data obtained from laboratory experiments characterized by smaller grain sizes and, therefore, referring to relatively low grain Reynolds numbers. A numerical integration of Exner's equation was performed to reconstruct the local and time-dependent functional dependence of qb* and ω*. The results led to the following conclusions: 1) At equilibrium, the reach-averaged bed load transport rate is related to the reach-averaged stream power by different regression laws at high and low grain Reynolds numbers. Additionally, the transition from bed to suspended load transport is accelerated by low Re*, with the corresponding bed load discharge increasing with stream power at a lower, linear rate. 2) When tested against the gravel laboratory measurements, the high Re* power law derived in the present study performs considerably better than do previous formulas. 3) The longitudinal variability of the section-averaged equilibrium stream power is much more pronounced than that characterizing the bed load rate, at least for high Re*. Thus, the stream power and its local-scale heterogeneity seem to be directly responsible for transverse sediment re-distribution and, ultimately, for the determination of the spatial and temporal scales that characterize the gravel bedforms. 4) Finally, the stochastic interpretation of the wetted

  3. Charge transport measurements of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan

    2005-07-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have found a variety of electronic applications. To further realize these applications, a good understanding of the charge transport properties is essential. In this work, charge transport properties have been systematically measured for three types of VACNF forests with Ni as catalyst, namely VACNFs grown by direct current PECVD, and inductively coupled PECVD at both normal pressure and low pressure. The structure and composition of these nanofibers have also been investigated in detail prior to the charge transport measurements. Four-probe I-V measurements on individual nanofibers have been enabled by the fabrication of multiple metal ohmic contacts on individual fibers that exhibited resistance of only a few kO. An O2 plasma reactive ion etch method has been used to achieve ohmic contacts between the nanofibers and Ti/Au, Ag/Au, Cd/Au, and Cr/Au electrodes. Direct current VACNFs exhibit linear I-V behavior at room temperature, with a resistivity of approximately 4.2 x 10-3 O·cm. Our measurements are consistent with a dominant transport mechanism of electrons traveling through intergraphitic planes in the dc VACNFs. The resistivity of these fibers is almost independent of temperature, and the contact resistance decreases as temperature increases. Further studies reveal that the 10--15 nm thick graphitic outer layer dominates the charge transport properties of do VACNFs. This is demonstrated by comparison of charge transport properties of as-grown VACNFs and VACNFs with the outer layer partially removed by oxygen plasma reactive ion etch. The linear I-V behavior of the fibers does not vary as this outer layer becomes thinner, but displays a drastic shift to a rectifying behavior when this layer is completely stripped away from some regions of the nanofiber. This shift may be related with the compositional differences in the outer layer and the inner core of the nanofibers. Two-probe charge transport measurements on

  4. Ion energy analyzer for measurement of ion turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    For local measurement of radial ion thermal transport, we developed a novel time-resolved gridded ion energy analyzer. The turbulent thermal flux is obtained by correlating fluctuations of ion temperature, plasma density and plasma velocity. The simultaneous measurement of the ion current fluctuations from an ion energy analyzer tilde I_{IEA} (t) and the fluctuation of ion saturation current from a conventional Langmuir probe tilde I_{LP} (t) allow us to determine local fluctuations of ion temperature tilde T_i (t). To reduce the effect of plasma potential fluctuations in the energy analyzer measurements, we use special a compensative circuit loop.

  5. A rain splash transport equation assimilating field and laboratory measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, T.; Malmon, D.V.; Mudd, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Process-based models of hillslope evolution require transport equations relating sediment flux to its major controls. An equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow was constructed by modifying an approach developed by Reeve (1982) and parameterizing it with measurements from single-drop laboratory experiments and simulated rainfall on a grassland in East Africa. The equation relates rain splash to hillslope gradient, the median raindrop diameter of a storm, and ground cover density; the effect of soil texture on detachability can be incorporated from other published results. The spatial and temporal applicability of such an equation for rain splash transport in the absence of overland flow on uncultivated hillslopes can be estimated from hydrological calculations. The predicted transport is lower than landscape-averaged geologic erosion rates from Kenya but is large enough to modify short, slowly eroding natural hillslopes as well as microtopographic interrill surfaces between which overland flow transports the mobilized sediment. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Capacitance-Voltage Measurement of Transporting Function at Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Toshiya; Miyahara, Yuji

    In this paper, we report the detection of transporting function at cell membrane using capacitance-voltage (CV) measurement. The detection principle of our devices is based on the field-effect of electrostatic interaction between charged species at cell membrane in solution and surface electrons in silicon crystal through the gate insulator of Si3N4/SiO2 thin double-layer. We designed an oocyte-based field-effect capacitor, on which a Xenopus laevis oocyte was fixed. The transporter of human organic anion transporting peptide C (hOATP-C) was expressed at oocyte membrane by induction of cRNA. The electrical phenomena such as ion or molecular charge flux at the interface between cell membrane and gate surface could be detected as the change of flat band voltage in CV characteristics. The flat band voltage shift decreased with incubation time after introduction of substrate into the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor. The electrical signal is due to the change of charge flux from the oocyte at the gate surface inspired by transporter-substrate binding. The platform based on the oocyte-based field-effect capacitor is suitable for a simple and non-invasive detection system in order to analyze function of transporters related to drug efficacy.

  7. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Noonan, W. A.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1996-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 10--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ, which can be measured with a high-resolution spectrometer. Results of proof-of-principle experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques will be presented. Progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will also be presented. This work is supported by DoE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ NRC-NRL Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., accepted for publication in Rev. Sci. Instrum.

  8. Measurements and models of reactive transport in geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Dror, Ishai; Hansen, Scott K.; Scher, Harvey

    2016-12-01

    Reactive chemical transport plays a key role in geological media across scales, from pore scale to aquifer scale. Systems can be altered by changes in solution chemistry and a wide variety of chemical transformations, including precipitation/dissolution reactions that cause feedbacks that directly affect the flow and transport regime. The combination of these processes with advective-dispersive-diffusive transport in heterogeneous media leads to a rich spectrum of complex dynamics. The principal challenge in modeling reactive transport is to account for the subtle effects of fluctuations in the flow field and species concentrations; spatial or temporal averaging generally suppresses these effects. Moreover, it is critical to ground model conceptualizations and test model outputs against laboratory experiments and field measurements. This review emphasizes the integration of these aspects, considering carefully designed and controlled experiments at both laboratory and field scales, in the context of development and solution of reactive transport models based on continuum-scale and particle tracking approaches. We first discuss laboratory experiments and field measurements that define the scope of the phenomena and provide data for model comparison. We continue by surveying models involving advection-dispersion-reaction equation and continuous time random walk formulations. The integration of measurements and models is then examined, considering a series of case studies in different frameworks. We delineate the underlying assumptions, and strengths and weaknesses, of these analyses, and the role of probabilistic effects. We also show the key importance of quantifying the spreading and mixing of reactive species, recognizing the role of small-scale physical and chemical fluctuations that control the initiation of reactions.

  9. Development of Methods Precision Length Measurement Using Transported Laser Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, E. A.; Epikhin, V. M.; Mazur, M. M.; Suddenok, Y. A.; Shorin, V. N.

    The paper shows the results of a comparison of a developed transported laser interferometer (TLI) with a measurement interferometer XL-80 Renishaw at the distance 0-60 meters. Testings of a breadboard model of the TLI showed that a difference between the travel measurements of the two interferometers does not exceed 6 μm. The mean value of the difference of indications between the TLI and a Renishaw travel measurer at the distance near 58 m approximately equals to 0,5 μm. Root-mean square deviation of the indications of the interferometers approximately equals to 3 μm. At comparison of the sections with the same name between the TLI and the Renishaw travel measurer, measured at different days, a repeatability of the results for the sections with the same name is noted.

  10. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Neri, J. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Noonan, W. A.

    1997-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 1--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ. These Δ λZ will be resolved using an etalon as a narrowband, high-throughput optical filter. Available results from benchtop experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques, and progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will be presented. Work supported by DOE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ National Research Council Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 1032 (1997).

  11. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-07

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown.

  12. Rapid Measurement of Neutron Dose Rate for Transport Index

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.L.

    2000-02-27

    A newly available neutron dose equivalent remmeter with improved sensitivity and energy response has been put into service at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). This instrument is being used to expedite measurement of the Transport Index and as an ALARA tool to identify locations where slightly elevated neutron dose equivalent rates exist. The meter is capable of measuring dose rates as low as 0.2 {mu}Sv per hour (20 {mu}rem per hour). Tests of the angular response and energy response of the instrument are reported. Calculations of the theoretical instrument response made using MCNP{trademark} are reported for materials typical of those being shipped.

  13. Using high time resolution aerosol and number size distribution measurements to estimate atmospheric extinction.

    PubMed

    Malm, William C; McMeeking, Gavin R; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M; Day, Derek E; Collett, Jeffrey L; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy P; Raja, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Rocky Mountain National Park is experiencing reduced visibility and changes in ecosystem function due to increasing levels of oxidized and reduced nitrogen. The Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur (RoMANS) study was initiated to better understand the origins of sulfur and nitrogen species as well as the complex chemistry occurring during transport from source to receptor. As part of the study, a monitoring program was initiated for two 1-month time periods--one during the spring and the other during late summer/fall. The monitoring program included intensive high time resolution concentration measurements of aerosol number size distribution, inorganic anions, and cations, and 24-hr time resolution of PM2.5 and PM10 mass, sulfate, nitrate, carbon, and soil-related elements concentrations. These data are combined to estimate high time resolution concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol mass and fine mass species estimates of ammoniated sulfate, nitrate, and organic and elemental carbon. Hour-by-hour extinction budgets are calculated by using these species concentration estimates and measurements of size distribution and assuming internal and external particle mixtures. Summer extinction was on average about 3 times higher than spring extinction. During spring months, sulfates, nitrates, carbon mass, and PM10 - PM2.5 mass contributed approximately equal amounts of extinction, whereas during the summer months, carbonaceous material extinction was 2-3 times higher than other species.

  14. Cadmium in rice: Transport mechanisms, influencing factors, and minimizing measures.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Li, Hui Yuan; Mo, Ce Hui; Wong, Ming Hung

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation in rice and its subsequent transfer to food chain is a major environmental issue worldwide. Understanding of Cd transport processes and its management aiming to reduce Cd uptake and accumulation in rice may help to improve rice growth and grain quality. Moreover, a thorough understanding of the factors influencing Cd accumulation will be helpful to derive efficient strategies to minimize Cd in rice. In this article, we reviewed Cd transport mechanisms in rice, the factors affecting Cd uptake (including physicochemical characters of soil and ecophysiological features of rice) and discussed efficient measures to immobilize Cd in soil and reduce Cd uptake by rice (including agronomic practices, bioremediation and molecular biology techniques). These findings will contribute to ensuring food safety, and reducing Cd risk on human beings.

  15. Magnetorotational Turbulence Transports Angular Momentum in Stratified Disks with Low Magnetic Prandtl Number but Magnetic Reynolds Number above a Critical Value

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.

    2012-02-14

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm-dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  16. MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE TRANSPORTS ANGULAR MOMENTUM IN STRATIFIED DISKS WITH LOW MAGNETIC PRANDTL NUMBER BUT MAGNETIC REYNOLDS NUMBER ABOVE A CRITICAL VALUE

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.

    2011-10-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) may dominate outward transport of angular momentum in accretion disks, allowing material to fall onto the central object. Previous work has established that the MRI can drive a mean-field dynamo, possibly leading to a self-sustaining accretion system. Recently, however, simulations of the scaling of the angular momentum transport parameter {alpha}{sub SS} with the magnetic Prandtl number Pm have cast doubt on the ability of the MRI to transport astrophysically relevant amounts of angular momentum in real disk systems. Here, we use simulations including explicit physical viscosity and resistivity to show that when vertical stratification is included, mean-field dynamo action operates, driving the system to a configuration in which the magnetic field is not fully helical. This relaxes the constraints on the generated field provided by magnetic helicity conservation, allowing the generation of a mean field on timescales independent of the resistivity. Our models demonstrate the existence of a critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub crit}, below which transport becomes strongly Pm-dependent and chaotic, but above which the transport is steady and Pm-independent. Prior simulations showing Pm dependence had Rm < Rm{sub crit}. We conjecture that this steady regime is possible because the mean-field dynamo is not helicity-limited and thus does not depend on the details of the helicity ejection process. Scaling to realistic astrophysical parameters suggests that disks around both protostars and stellar mass black holes have Rm >> Rm{sub crit}. Thus, we suggest that the strong Pm dependence seen in recent simulations does not occur in real systems.

  17. Functional requirements for the Automated Transportation Management System: TTP number: RL 439002

    SciTech Connect

    Portsmouth, J.H.

    1992-12-31

    This requirements analysis, documents Department of Energy (DOE) transportation management procedures for the purpose of providing a clear and mutual understanding between users and designers of the proposed Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). It is imperative that one understand precisely how DOE currently performs traffic management tasks; only then can an integrated system be proposed that successfully satisfies the major requirements of transportation managers and other system users. Accordingly, this report describes the current workings of DOE transportation organizations and then proposes a new system which represents a synthesis of procedures (both current and desired) which forms the basis for further systems development activities.

  18. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Tick, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer–aquitard complexes.

  19. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

  20. Heat-flux measurement in high-Prandtl-number turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Lam, Siu; Zhou, Sheng-Qi

    2002-02-11

    We report Nusselt number measurements from high Prandtl number turbulent thermal convection experiments. The experiments are conducted in four fluids with the Prandtl number Pr varying from 4 to 1350 and the Rayleigh number Ra from 2x10(7) to 3x10(10), all in a single convection cell of unity aspect ratio. We find that the measured Nusselt number decreased about 20% over the range of Pr spanned in the experiment. The measure data are also found in good agreement with the prediction of a recent theory over the extended range of Pr covered in the experiment.

  1. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  2. Hysteresis in Transport Critical-Current Measurements of Oxide Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, L F; Stauffer, T C

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated magnetic hysteresis in transport critical-current (I c) measurements of Ag-matrix (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10- x (Bi-2223) and AgMg-matrix Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+ x (Bi-2212) tapes. The effect of magnetic hysteresis on the measured critical current of high temperature superconductors is a very important consideration for every measurement procedure that involves more than one sweep of magnetic field, changes in field angle, or changes in temperature at a given field. The existence of this hysteresis is well known; however, the implications for a measurement standard or interlaboratory comparisons are often ignored and the measurements are often made in the most expedient way. A key finding is that I c at a given angle, determined by sweeping the angles in a given magnetic field, can be 17 % different from the I c determined after the angle was fixed in zero field and the magnet then ramped to the given field. Which value is correct is addressed in the context that the proper sequence of measurement conditions reflects the application conditions. The hysteresis in angle-sweep and temperature-sweep data is related to the hysteresis observed when the field is swept up and down at constant angle and temperature. The necessity of heating a specimen to near its transition temperature to reset it to an initial state between measurements at different angles and temperatures is discussed.

  3. Accurate measurement of liquid transport through nanoscale conduits

    PubMed Central

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale liquid transport governs the behaviour of a wide range of nanofluidic systems, yet remains poorly characterized and understood due to the enormous hydraulic resistance associated with the nanoconfinement and the resulting minuscule flow rates in such systems. To overcome this problem, here we present a new measurement technique based on capillary flow and a novel hybrid nanochannel design and use it to measure water transport through single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our results show that silica nanochannels exhibit increased mass flow resistance compared to the classical hydrodynamics prediction. This difference increases with decreasing channel height and reaches 45% in the case of 7 nm nanochannels. This resistance increase is attributed to the formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. By avoiding use of any pressure and flow sensors or any theoretical estimations the hybrid nanochannel scheme enables facile and precise flow measurement through single nanochannels, nanotubes, or nanoporous media and opens the prospect for accurate characterization of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanofluidic systems. PMID:27112404

  4. Linking criteria for incipient motion to field-based measures of bed load transport capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitlick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Early studies of sediment transport, such as those of Gilbert (1914) and Shields (1936), laid the groundwork for countless other studies of bed load entrainment and transport. Gilbert and Shields emphasized somewhat different aspects of sediment transport in their writing, but they had similar objectives in experimenting with conditions that affect both incipient motion and bed load transport capacity. The problem of predicting incipient motion is thus inextricably linked to the problem of predicting bed load transport capacity. In this talk I will discuss field-based approaches for evaluating incipient motion at channel-length scales ranging from a few km to many 10s of km. In the best-case scenario, where time and equipment are available to sample the bed load, the most robust approach for determining incipient motion is to extrapolate from measurements taken over a range of flows, and find the shear stress corresponding to a low but measureable transport rate. Alternatively, if channel properties (width, depth, slope and grain size) can be measured at a sufficient number of locations (say, more than 20), the reference shear stress can be estimated by assuming it scales with the channel-forming (bankfull) shear stress. Another new approach, which makes use of repeat aerial LiDAR and records of daily discharge, is to develop a two-parameter sediment rating curve that produces the same sediment flux for a time series of daily flows as the sediment flux estimated from topographic differencing. Last, in situations where a qualitative (yes/no) assessment of sediment motion is sufficient (e.g. during a reservoir release), longitudinal variations in bed load transport intensity can be detected with acoustical sensors- hydrophones- mounted on a kayak or boat equipped with a global positioning system (GPS). Pros and cons of these different approaches will also be discussed.

  5. k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy: A Method for Accurate Transport Measurements Independent of Fluorophore Photophysics

    PubMed Central

    Kolin, David L.; Ronis, David; Wiseman, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    We present the theory and application of reciprocal space image correlation spectroscopy (kICS). This technique measures the number density, diffusion coefficient, and velocity of fluorescently labeled macromolecules in a cell membrane imaged on a confocal, two-photon, or total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. In contrast to r-space correlation techniques, we show kICS can recover accurate dynamics even in the presence of complex fluorophore photobleaching and/or “blinking”. Furthermore, these quantities can be calculated without nonlinear curve fitting, or any knowledge of the beam radius of the exciting laser. The number densities calculated by kICS are less sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity of the fluorophore distribution than densities measured using image correlation spectroscopy. We use simulations as a proof-of-principle to show that number densities and transport coefficients can be extracted using this technique. We present calibration measurements with fluorescent microspheres imaged on a confocal microscope, which recover Stokes-Einstein diffusion coefficients, and flow velocities that agree with single particle tracking measurements. We also show the application of kICS to measurements of the transport dynamics of α5-integrin/enhanced green fluorescent protein constructs in a transfected CHO cell imaged on a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope using charge-coupled device area detection. PMID:16861272

  6. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Transportability Testing of the Joint Modular Intermodal Platform (JMIP) Number 2, TP-94-01, Transportability Testing Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    AIL-F) Robert Holt /Tom Sieffert, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5001 U.S. Army Joint Munitions Command (AMSJM-T-) Richard Nesbitt, Rock Island, IL 61299...other side from the bail bar end to the rear of JMIP #2. 4. The rails at the front of JMIP #2 did not rest on the PLS truck supports ( frog feet). 5. The...not rest on the PLS truck supports ( frog feet). 5. The rail transport pin holes on JMIP #2 did not line up with the hole on the PLS truck. The rails

  8. Improving sediment transport measurements in the Erlenbach stream using a moving basket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Turowski, Jens; Hegglin, Ramon; Fritschi, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    In the Erlenbach stream, a prealpine torrent in Switzerland, sediment transport has been monitored for more than 25 years. Sediment transporting flood events in the Erlenbach are typically of short duration with a rapid rise of discharge during summer thunderstorms, thus hampering on-site measurements. On average there are more than 20 bedload transport events per year. Near the confluence with the main valley river, there is a stream gauging station and a sediment retention basin with a capacity of about 2,000 m3. The basin is surveyed at regular intervals and after large flood events. In addition, sediment transport has been continuously monitored with a piezoelectric bedload impact sensor (PBIS) array since 1986. The sensor array is mounted flush with the surface of a check dam immediately upstream of the retention basin. The PBIS system was developed to continuously measure the intensity of bedload transport and its relation to stream discharge. To standardize the sensors, the piezoelectric crystals were replaced by geophones in 2000. The geophone measuring system has also been employed at a number of other streams. In 2008, the measuring system in the Erlenbach stream has been enhanced with an automatic system to obtain bedload samples. Movable, slot-type cubic metal baskets are mounted on a rail at the downstream wall of the large check dam above the retention basin. The metal baskets can be moved automatically and individually into the flow according to flow and bedload transport conditions (i.e. geophone recordings). The basket is stopped at the centerline of the approach flow channel of the overflow section to obtain a sediment sample during a limited time interval. The wire mesh of the basket has a spacing of 10 mm to sample all sediment particles coarser than this size (which is about the limiting grain size detected by the geophones). The weight increase due to the collected sediment is measured by weighing cells located in the basket supporting

  9. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  10. Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

  11. Fluorescence measurement of chloride transport in monolayer cultured cells. Mechanisms of chloride transport in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chao, A C; Dix, J A; Sellers, M C; Verkman, A S

    1989-12-01

    The methodology has been developed to measure Cl activity and transport in cultured cells grown on a monolayer using the entrapped Cl-sensitive fluorophore 6-methoxy-N-[3-sulfopropyl] quinolinium (SPQ). The method was applied to a renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PKI, and a nonepithelial cell line, Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. SPQ was nontoxic to cells when present for greater than h in the culture media. To load with SPQ (5 mM), cells were made transiently permeable by exposure to hypotonic buffer (150 mOsm, 4 min). Intracellular fluorescence was monitored continuously by epifluorescence microscopy using low illumination intensity at 360 +/- 5 nm excitation wavelength and photomultiplier detection at greater than 410 nm. Over 60 min at 37 degrees C, there was no photobleaching and less than 10% leakage of SPQ out of cells; intracellular SPQ fluorescence was uniform. SPQ fluorescence was calibrated against intracellular [Cl] using high K solutions containing the ionophores nigericin and tributyltin. The Stern-Volmer constant (Kq) for quenching of intracellular SPQ by Cl was 13 M-1 for fibroblasts and LLC-PKl cells. In the absence of Cl, SPQ lifetime was 26 ns in aqueous solution and 3.7 +/- 0.6 ns in cells, showing that the lower Kq in cells than in free solution (Kq = 118 M-1) was due to SPQ quenching by intracellular anions. To examine Cl transport mechanisms, the time course of intracellular [Cl] was measured in response to rapid Cl addition and removal in the presence of ion or pH gradients. In fibroblasts, three distinct Cl transporting systems were identified: a stilbeneinhibitable Cl/HCO3 exchanger, a furosemide-sensitive Na/K/2Cl cotransporter, and a Ca-regulated Cl conductance. These results establish a direct optical method to measure intracellular [Cl] continuously in cultured cells.

  12. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  13. Skin Friction and Transition Location Measurement on Supersonic Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Olsen, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative skin friction and transition location data in wind tunnel tests performed on two supersonic transport models at Mach 2.40. Oil-film interferometry was useful for verifying boundary layer transition, but careful monitoring of model surface temperatures and systematic examination of the effects of tunnel start-up and shutdown transients will be required to achieve high levels of accuracy for skin friction measurements. A more common technique, use of a subliming solid to reveal transition location, was employed to correct drag measurements to a standard condition of all-turbulent flow on the wing. These corrected data were then analyzed to determine the additional correction required to account for the effect of the boundary layer trip devices.

  14. The Effects of Digital Measuring Equipment on the Concept of Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Poppy; Alexander, Patricia

    Over the last 20 years, the use of calculators and digital measuring equipment has to some extent replaced mathematical mental/written activity and also the use of analogue measuring equipment. This paper explores some aspects of number concept, reading the number line, and estimation from scales. The students being considered are mainly part of a…

  15. Measurements of fluid transport by controllable vertical migrations of plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houghton, Isabel A.; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    Diel vertical migration of zooplankton has been proposed to be a significant contributor to local and possibly large-scale fluid transport in the ocean. However, studies of this problem to date have been limited to order-of-magnitude estimates based on first principles and a small number of field observations. In this work, we leverage the phototactic behavior of zooplankton to stimulate controllable vertical migrations in the laboratory and to study the associated fluid transport and mixing. Building upon a previous prototype system, a laser guidance system induces vertical swimming of brine shrimp (Artemia salina) in a 2.1 meter tall, density-stratified water tank. The animal swimming speed and spacing during the controlled vertical migration is characterized with video analysis. A schlieren imaging system is utilized to visualize density perturbations to a stable stratification for quantification of fluid displacement length scales and restratification timescales. These experiments can add to our understanding of the dynamics of active particles in stratified flows. NSF and US-Israel Binational Science Foundation.

  16. Prediction uncertainty of plume characteristics derived from a small number of measuring points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; van der Zee, S. E. A. T. M.; Leijnse, A.

    A small number of measuring points may inflict a bias on the characterisation of flow and transport based on field experiments in the unsaturated zone. Simulation of pure advective transport of a Gaussian plume through a setup of 30 regularly placed measuring points revealed regular temporal fluctuations about the real spatial moments. An irregular setup predicted both irregular fluctuations and larger discrepancies from the real value. From these considerations, a regular setup is recommended. Spatial moments were sensitive to the plume size relative to the distance between individual measuring points. To reduce prediction errors of the variance, the distance between the measuring points should be less than twice the standard deviation of the examined plume. The total size of the setup should cover several standard deviations of the plume to avoid mass being lost from the monitored area. Numerical simulations of a dispersing plume (comparing calculations based on 9000 nodes with 30 measuring points) revealed that vertical and horizontal centres of mass were predicted well at all degrees of heterogeneity, and the same was the case for horizontal variances. Vertical variances were more susceptible to prediction errors, but estimates were of the same order of magnitude as the real values. Résumé Lorsque l'on cherche à caractériser l'écoulement et le transport à partir d'expériences de terrain dans la zone saturée, il arrive qu'un petit nombre de points introduisent un biais. La simulation d'un transport purement advectif d'un panache gaussien au travers d'un ensemble de 30 points de mesures espacés régulièrement fait apparaître des variations temporelles régulières autour des moments spatiaux réels. Un ensemble irrégulier conduit à prédire à la fois des variations irrégulières et de plus grandes divergences par rapport à la valeur réelle. A partir de ces constations, un ensemble régulier est recommandé. Les moments spatiaux sont apparus

  17. Measuring charge transport from transient photovoltage rise times. A new tool to investigate electron transport in nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Brian C; Bakker, Klaas; Kroeze, Jessica; Smit, Herman; Sommeling, Paul; Durrant, James R

    2006-08-31

    Charge transport rate at open-circuit potential (V(oc)) is proposed as a new characterization method for dye-sensitized (DS) and other nanostructured solar cells. At V(oc), charge density is flat and measurable, which simplifies quantitative comparison of transport and charge density. Transport measured at V(oc) also allows meaningful comparison of charge transport rates between different treatments, temperatures, and types of cells. However, in typical DS cells, charge transport rates at V(oc) often cannot be measured by photocurrent transients or modulation techniques due to RC limitations and/or recombination losses. To circumvent this limitation, we show that charge transport at V(oc) can be determined directly from the transient photovoltage rise time using a simple, zero-free-parameter model. This method is not sensitive to RC limitation or recombination losses. In trap limited devices, such as DS cells, the comparison of transport rates between different devices or conditions is only valid when the Fermi level in the limiting conductor is at the same distance from the band edge. We show how to perform such comparisons, correcting for conduction band shifts using the density of states (DOS) distribution determined from the same photovoltage transients. Last we show that the relationship between measured transport rate and measured charge density is consistent with the trap limited transport model.

  18. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N.

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  19. Transport measurements on monolayer and few-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomaki, Tauno; Zhao, Wenjin; Finney, Joe; Fei, Zaiyao; Nguyen, Paul; McKay, Frank; Cobden, David

    The behavior of the electrical contacts often dominates transport measurements in mono and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) devices. Creating good contacts for some TMDs is particularly challenging since the fabrication procedure should prevent the TMD from oxidizing or chemically interacting with the contacts. In this talk, we discuss our progress on creating mono and few-layer WSe2 devices with both good electrical contacts and minimal effects from the substrate, polymer contamination, oxidation and other chemistry. For example, we have developed a technique for encapsulating metallic contacts and WSe2 flakes together in hexagonal boron nitride with multiple gates to separate and control the contributions from the channel and the Schottky barriers at the contacts. Research supported in part by Samsung GRO grant US 040814

  20. The Indonesian's Road Transportations as the Contexts to Support Primary School Students Learning Number Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairuddin; Darmawijoyo

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the Indonesian's road transportation contexts, namely, angkot, that used in learning and teaching of addition and subtraction in first grade and second grade MIN-2 Palembang. PMRI approach that adopt from RME [Realistic Mathematics Education] was used in this design research. From teaching experiment was founded that the…

  1. Computer Applications in Class and Transportation Scheduling. Educational Management Review Series Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Philip K.

    This document shows how computer technology can aid educators in meeting demands for improved class scheduling and more efficient use of transportation resources. The first section surveys literature on operational systems that provide individualized scheduling for students, varied class structures, and maximum use of space and staff skills.…

  2. High-Schmidt-number mass transport mechanisms from a turbulent flow to absorbing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Piomelli, Ugo; Boegman, Leon

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms involved in dissolved oxygen (DO) transfer from a turbulent flow to an underlying organic sediment bed, populated with DO-absorbing bacteria, relying on the coupling between the bio-geochemistry of the sediment layer and large-eddy simulation for the transport on the water side [Scalo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 117(C6), 2012]. Time correlations at the sediment-water interface (SWI) show that the diffusive sublayer acts as a de-noising filter with respect to the overlying turbulence; the mass flux is not affected by low-amplitude background fluctuations in the wall-shear stress but, rather, by energetic and coherent near-wall transport events, in agreement with the surface renewal theory. The spatial and temporal distribution of the mass flux is therefore modulated by rapidly evolving near-wall high-speed streaks (associated with intermittent peaks in the wall-shear stress) transporting patches of (rich-in-oxygen) fluid to the edge of the diffusive sublayer, leaving slowly-regenerating elongated patches of positive DO concentration fluctuation and mass flux at the SWI. The sediment surface retains the signature of the overlying turbulent transport over long time scales, allowed by the slow bacterial absorption. Currently postdoctoral fellow at Center for Turbulence Research (scalo@stanford.edu).

  3. The European Union: Measuring Counterterrorism Cooperation. Strategic Forum, Number 229, November 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    airports, including screen- ing of luggage for potential explosives. The EU created the Agency for the Management of External Borders ( FRONTEX ...Action Task Force on Money Laundering).19 Moreover, the increase in the number of autonomous EU agencies (for example, FRONTEX , Europol, the...Mediterranean/ Operation Active Endeavor FRONTEX /Schengen Information System II/EU Transport Council/SAFEMED Air/Missile Defense Theater Missile

  4. Electrical and thermal transport measurements on nano-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Wei

    This thesis discusses electrical and thermal transport measurements on C60, carbon nanotubes, and boron-nitride nanotubes. Chapter 1 describes the anomalous resistivity behavior of Ag films on C60 crystals. The correlation of the resistivity anomaly and the structural phase transition is established. Chapter 2 gives an introduction to the physical properties and the synthesis methods of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Chapter 3 shows two different approaches on chemical functionalization of boron-nitride nanotubes. Chapter 4 gives the theoretical background of thermal conductivity, especially for nano-structured materials. A summary of theoretical and experimental works on the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is given. Chapter 5 discusses the experimental results of thermal conductivity of nanotube mats. An absolute value of the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanotubes is bracketed and can be compared to the results of the following chapters on individual nanotubes. Chapter 6 describes the experimental methods of measuring thermal conductivity of individual nanotubes. Chapter 7 shows the 2 temperature dependent thermal conductivity and thermopower of individual nanotubes. Chapter 8 discusses the isotope effect and the diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes. In chapter 9, it is shown that the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is robust against electron irradiation and structural deformation. Importantly, the observation challenges current understandings on the thermal transport of nano-structured materials. In chapter 10, it is shown that it is possible to reversibly tune the thermal conductivity of a multiwalled nanotube by controllably sliding the outer-shells against inner cores. Chapter 11 describes a thermal rectifier by engineering the mass distribution along a nanotube. The observed non-zero thermal rectification effect provides strong evidence for solitons in nanotubes. The soliton model also coherently explains many

  5. Parallel Monte Carlo Particle Transport and the Quality of Random Number Generators: How Good is Good Enough?

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Beck, B R

    2004-12-07

    It might be assumed that use of a ''high-quality'' random number generator (RNG), producing a sequence of ''pseudo random'' numbers with a ''long'' repetition period, is crucial for producing unbiased results in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. While several theoretical and empirical tests have been devised to check the quality (randomness and period) of an RNG, for many applications it is not clear what level of RNG quality is required to produce unbiased results. This paper explores the issue of RNG quality in the context of parallel, Monte Carlo transport simulations in order to determine how ''good'' is ''good enough''. This study employs the MERCURY Monte Carlo code, which incorporates the CNPRNG library for the generation of pseudo-random numbers via linear congruential generator (LCG) algorithms. The paper outlines the usage of random numbers during parallel MERCURY simulations, and then describes the source and criticality transport simulations which comprise the empirical basis of this study. A series of calculations for each test problem in which the quality of the RNG (period of the LCG) is varied provides the empirical basis for determining the minimum repetition period which may be employed without producing a bias in the mean integrated results.

  6. Scalar transport across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in jets: Schmidt number effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Tiago S.; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a passive scalar field near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) is analysed through direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent planar jets, with Reynolds numbers ranging from 142 <= Reλ <= 246 , and Schmidt numbers from 0 . 07 <= Sc <= 7 . The steepness of the scalar gradient, as observed from conditional profiles near the TNTI, increases with the Schmidt number. Conditional scalar gradient budgets show that for low and moderate Schmidt numbers a diffusive superlayer emerges at the TNTI, where the scalar gradient diffusion dominates, while the production is negligible. For low Schmidt numbers the growth of the turbulent front is commanded by the molecular diffusion, whereas the scalar gradient convection is negligible. The authors acknowledge the Laboratory for Advanced Computing at University of Coimbra for providing HPC, computing, consulting resources that have contributed to the research results reported within this paper. URL http://www.lca.uc.pt.

  7. New Approaches to the Measurement of Public Library Use by Individual Patrons. Occasional Paper Number 162.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Philip M.

    Based on the concept that library use measurement should have as its basic starting point the individual patron, a method of data collection and analysis has been developed that explores individual patterns of borrowing over time. The method accounts for the number of visits on which borrowing takes place, number of items borrowed per visit, and…

  8. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  9. 41 CFR 102-117.270 - What are agency performance measures for transportation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION 117-TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT Performance Measures § 102-117.270 What are agency performance... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are agency performance measures for transportation? 102-117.270 Section 102-117.270 Public Contracts and...

  10. Distance-Based Functional Diversity Measures and Their Decomposition: A Framework Based on Hill Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Huo; Chao, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Hill numbers (or the “effective number of species”) are increasingly used to characterize species diversity of an assemblage. This work extends Hill numbers to incorporate species pairwise functional distances calculated from species traits. We derive a parametric class of functional Hill numbers, which quantify “the effective number of equally abundant and (functionally) equally distinct species” in an assemblage. We also propose a class of mean functional diversity (per species), which quantifies the effective sum of functional distances between a fixed species to all other species. The product of the functional Hill number and the mean functional diversity thus quantifies the (total) functional diversity, i.e., the effective total distance between species of the assemblage. The three measures (functional Hill numbers, mean functional diversity and total functional diversity) quantify different aspects of species trait space, and all are based on species abundance and species pairwise functional distances. When all species are equally distinct, our functional Hill numbers reduce to ordinary Hill numbers. When species abundances are not considered or species are equally abundant, our total functional diversity reduces to the sum of all pairwise distances between species of an assemblage. The functional Hill numbers and the mean functional diversity both satisfy a replication principle, implying the total functional diversity satisfies a quadratic replication principle. When there are multiple assemblages defined by the investigator, each of the three measures of the pooled assemblage (gamma) can be multiplicatively decomposed into alpha and beta components, and the two components are independent. The resulting beta component measures pure functional differentiation among assemblages and can be further transformed to obtain several classes of normalized functional similarity (or differentiation) measures, including N-assemblage functional generalizations of

  11. Distance-based functional diversity measures and their decomposition: a framework based on Hill numbers.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Huo; Chao, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Hill numbers (or the "effective number of species") are increasingly used to characterize species diversity of an assemblage. This work extends Hill numbers to incorporate species pairwise functional distances calculated from species traits. We derive a parametric class of functional Hill numbers, which quantify "the effective number of equally abundant and (functionally) equally distinct species" in an assemblage. We also propose a class of mean functional diversity (per species), which quantifies the effective sum of functional distances between a fixed species to all other species. The product of the functional Hill number and the mean functional diversity thus quantifies the (total) functional diversity, i.e., the effective total distance between species of the assemblage. The three measures (functional Hill numbers, mean functional diversity and total functional diversity) quantify different aspects of species trait space, and all are based on species abundance and species pairwise functional distances. When all species are equally distinct, our functional Hill numbers reduce to ordinary Hill numbers. When species abundances are not considered or species are equally abundant, our total functional diversity reduces to the sum of all pairwise distances between species of an assemblage. The functional Hill numbers and the mean functional diversity both satisfy a replication principle, implying the total functional diversity satisfies a quadratic replication principle. When there are multiple assemblages defined by the investigator, each of the three measures of the pooled assemblage (gamma) can be multiplicatively decomposed into alpha and beta components, and the two components are independent. The resulting beta component measures pure functional differentiation among assemblages and can be further transformed to obtain several classes of normalized functional similarity (or differentiation) measures, including N-assemblage functional generalizations of the

  12. Testing a model of componential processing of multi-symbol numbers-evidence from measurement units.

    PubMed

    Huber, Stefan; Bahnmueller, Julia; Klein, Elise; Moeller, Korbinian

    2015-10-01

    Research on numerical cognition has addressed the processing of nonsymbolic quantities and symbolic digits extensively. However, magnitude processing of measurement units is still a neglected topic in numerical cognition research. Hence, we investigated the processing of measurement units to evaluate whether typical effects of multi-digit number processing such as the compatibility effect, the string length congruity effect, and the distance effect are also present for measurement units. In three experiments, participants had to single out the larger one of two physical quantities (e.g., lengths). In Experiment 1, the compatibility of number and measurement unit (compatible: 3 mm_6 cm with 3 < 6 and mm < cm; incompatible: 3 cm_6 mm with 3 < 6 but cm > mm) as well as string length congruity (congruent: 1 m_2 km with m < km and 2 < 3 characters; incongruent: 2 mm_1 m with mm < m, but 3 > 2 characters) were manipulated. We observed reliable compatibility effects with prolonged reaction times (RT) for incompatible trials. Moreover, a string length congruity effect was present in RT with longer RT for incongruent trials. Experiments 2 and 3 served as control experiments showing that compatibility effects persist when controlling for holistic distance and that a distance effect for measurement units exists. Our findings indicate that numbers and measurement units are processed in a componential manner and thus highlight that processing characteristics of multi-digit numbers generalize to measurement units. Thereby, our data lend further support to the recently proposed generalized model of componential multi-symbol number processing.

  13. Tabulated pressure measurements on an executive-type jet transport model with a supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    A 1/9 scale model of an existing executive type jet transport refitted with a supercritical wing was tested on in the 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel. The supercritical wing had the same sweep as the original airplane wing but had maximum thickness chord ratios 33 percent larger at the mean geometric chord and almost 50 percent larger at the wing-fuselage juncture. Wing pressure distributions and fuselage pressure distributions in the vicinity of the left nacelle were measured at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.90 at angles of attack that generally varied from -2 deg to 10 deg. Results are presented in tabular form without analysis.

  14. Measurements of the dependence of the photon-number distribution on the number of modes in parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Dovrat, L; Bakstein, M; Istrati, D; Shaham, A; Eisenberg, H S

    2012-01-30

    Optical parametric down-conversion (PDC) is a central tool in quantum optics experiments. The number of collected down-converted modes greatly affects the quality of the produced photon state. We use Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) number-resolving detectors in order to observe the photon-number distribution of a PDC source, and show its dependence on the number of collected modes. Additionally, we show how the stimulated emission of photons and the partition of photons into several modes determine the overall photon number. We present a novel analytical model for the optical crosstalk effect in SiPM detectors, and use it to analyze the results.

  15. CITATION INDEX AND MEASURES OF ASSOCIATION IN MECHANIZED DOCUMENT RETRIEVAL. RAPPORT NUMMER 2. (REPORT NUMBER 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    CITATION INDEXES, IN COMBINATION WITH REGULAR INDEXES, ARE CREATING NEW METHODS OF INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, WHICH USE SOME MEASURE OF CONNECTION OR ASSOCIATION BETWEEN A GIVEN BASE OF ARTICLES AND OTHER DOCUMENTS IN A COLLECTION. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS OF SUCH A MEASURE ARE--(1) IT SHOULD BE INDIRECTLY PROPORTIONAL TO THE NUMBER OF LINKS IN A CHAIN OF…

  16. Direct Measurements of Eddy Transport and Thermal Dispersion in a High Porosity Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Yi; Simon, David; Gedeon, David

    2004-01-01

    Thermal losses from the hot end to the cold end of a Stirling cycle regenerator due to thermal dispersion through the regenerator matrix may significantly degrade the performance of the machine. Because of poor access to the void spaces within the porous medium, no direct measurements of thermal dispersion have been made and dispersion models have been derived indirectly. This is done by measuring the overall thermal performance of the regenerator and subtracting off the energy transfer caused by molecular conduction and advected enthalpy flows computed from volume-averaged fluid velocity and temperature. In the current program, a large-scale porous matrix consisting of stacked wire screens with a porosity of 90% is installed in a flow rig which is operated in a Reynolds number range that represents Stirling engine regenerator flow. Experiments are conducted to measure turbulent transport of momentum at the exit phase using hot-wires. The relationship of such turbulent transport terms to the thermal dispersion term in the volumetric-averaged energy equation for the regenerator matrix is developed and the measurements are used to determine cross-stream thermal dispersion. A dispersion model based upon the measurements is proposed and compared with models documented in the literature.

  17. Relationship between Objectively Measured Transportation Behaviors and Health Characteristics in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Michelle; Carlson, Jordan A.; Moran, Kevin; Godbole, Suneeta; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    This study used objective Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to investigate the relationship between pedestrian and vehicle trips to physical, cognitive, and psychological functioning in older adults living in retirement communities. Older adults (N = 279; mean age = 83 ± 6 years) wore a GPS and accelerometer for 6 days. Participants completed standard health measures. The Personal Activity and Location Measurement System (PALMS) was used to calculate the average daily number of trips, distance, and minutes traveled for pedestrian and vehicle trips from the combined GPS and accelerometer data. Linear mixed effects regression models explored relationships between these transportation variables and physical, psychological and cognitive functioning. Number, distance, and minutes of pedestrian trips were positively associated with physical and psychological functioning but not cognitive functioning. Number of vehicle trips was negatively associated with fear of falls; there were no other associations between the vehicle trip variables and functioning. Vehicle travel did not appear to be related to functioning in older adults in retirement communities except that fear of falling was related to number of vehicle trips. Pedestrian trips had moderate associations with multiple physical and psychological functioning measures, supporting a link between walking and many aspects of health in older adults. PMID:26528999

  18. Relationship between Objectively Measured Transportation Behaviors and Health Characteristics in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Michelle; Carlson, Jordan A; Moran, Kevin; Godbole, Suneeta; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2015-10-30

    This study used objective Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to investigate the relationship between pedestrian and vehicle trips to physical, cognitive, and psychological functioning in older adults living in retirement communities. Older adults (N = 279; mean age = 83 ± 6 years) wore a GPS and accelerometer for 6 days. Participants completed standard health measures. The Personal Activity and Location Measurement System (PALMS) was used to calculate the average daily number of trips, distance, and minutes traveled for pedestrian and vehicle trips from the combined GPS and accelerometer data. Linear mixed effects regression models explored relationships between these transportation variables and physical, psychological and cognitive functioning. Number, distance, and minutes of pedestrian trips were positively associated with physical and psychological functioning but not cognitive functioning. Number of vehicle trips was negatively associated with fear of falls; there were no other associations between the vehicle trip variables and functioning. Vehicle travel did not appear to be related to functioning in older adults in retirement communities except that fear of falling was related to number of vehicle trips. Pedestrian trips had moderate associations with multiple physical and psychological functioning measures, supporting a link between walking and many aspects of health in older adults.

  19. Effects of droplet interactions on droplet transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of droplet interactions on drag, evaporation, and combustion of a planar droplet array, oriented perpendicular to the approaching flow, are studied numerically. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with variable thermophysical properties, are solved using finite-difference techniques. Parameters investigated include the droplet spacing, droplet Reynolds number, approaching stream oxygen concentration, and fuel type. Results are obtained for the Reynolds number range of 5 to 100, droplet spacing from 2 to 24 diameters, oxygen concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2, and methanol and n-butanol fuels. The calculations show that the gasification rates of interacting droplets decrease as the droplet spacings decrease. The reduction in gasification rates is significant only at small spacings and low Reynolds numbers. For the present array orientation, the effects of interactions on the gasification rates diminish rapidly for Reynolds numbers greater than 10 and spacings greater than 6 droplet diameters. The effects of adjacent droplets on drag are shown to be small.

  20. Ozone Measurements and a 3D Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Frith, Stacey; Steenrod, Steven; Polansky, Brian

    2004-01-01

    We have used our three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM) to calculate the expected reponse of stratospheric composition over the past 30 years to forcing by chlorine and bromine compounds, solar ultraviolet, and volcanic aerosols. The CTM uses off-line winds and temperatures fiom a 50-year run of the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). We compare the total column ozone and the ozone profile fiom the CTM output to a variety of data sources. These include a merged total ozone data set from TOMS and SBUV using the new version 8 algorithm. Total ozone fiom the CTM are compared to ground-station measurements of total ozone at specific locations. Ozone profiles are compared to satellite meausrements fiom SBUV, SAGE, and HALOE. Profiles are also compared to ozonesondes over several locations. The results of the comparisons are quantified by using a time-series statistical analysis to determine trends, solar cycle, and volcanic reponse in both the model and in the data. Initial results indicate that the model responds to forcings in a way that is similar to the observed atmospheric response. The model does seem to be more sensitive to the chlorine and bromine perturbation ihan is the data. Further details and comparisons wiii be discussed.

  1. Determination of the number of atoms present in nano contact based on shot noise measurements with highly stable nano-fabricated electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryoji; Kaneko, Satoshi; Marqués-González, Santiago; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-07-01

    A highly stable experimental setup was developed for the measurement of shot noise in atomic contacts and molecular junctions to determine the number of atoms or molecules present. The use of a nano-fabricated mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) electrode improved the overall stability of the experimental setup. The improved stability of the system and optimization of measurement system enabled us to comprehensively investigate the shot noise as well as charge transport properties in Au atomic contacts and molecular junctions. We present a solid proof that the number of atoms (cross sectional atom) in the Au atomic contacts was exactly one. In the atomic contacts, contribution from the additional channels was under the detection limit. Furthermore, the effect of molecular adsorption on the charge transport in the Au atomic contact was investigated. Additional transport channels were opened by exposing pyrazine molecules to the Au contacts, which gave rise to an increase in the Fano factor in the shot noise.

  2. Protocal for the measurement of hydrocarbon transport in bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic, volatility, and relatively low aqueous solubility of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, transport of these chemicals by bacteria has not been extensively studied. These issues make transport assays difficult to carry out, and as a result, strong evidence for the active tran...

  3. A Reynolds Number Study of Wing Leading-Edge Effects on a Supersonic Transport Model at Mach 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. Susan; Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Chu, Julio

    1999-01-01

    A representative supersonic transport design was tested in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) in its original configuration with small-radius leading-edge flaps and also with modified large-radius inboard leading-edge flaps. Aerodynamic data were obtained over a range of Reynolds numbers at a Mach number of 0.3 and angles of attack up to 16 deg. Increasing the radius of the inboard leading-edge flap delayed nose-up pitching moment to a higher lift coefficient. Deflecting the large-radius leading-edge flap produced an overall decrease in lift coefficient and delayed nose-up pitching moment to even higher angles of attack as compared with the undeflected large- radius leading-edge flap. At angles of attack corresponding to the maximum untrimmed lift-to-drag ratio, lift and drag coefficients decreased while lift-to-drag ratio increased with increasing Reynolds number. At an angle of attack of 13.5 deg., the pitching-moment coefficient was nearly constant with increasing Reynolds number for both the small-radius leading-edge flap and the deflected large-radius leading-edge flap. However, the pitching moment coefficient increased with increasing Reynolds number for the undeflected large-radius leading-edge flap above a chord Reynolds number of about 35 x 10 (exp 6).

  4. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J. Christopher

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen`s work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille`s solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  5. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen's work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille's solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  6. Backward-facing step measurements at low Reynolds number, Re(sub h)=5000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srba; Driver, David M.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study of the flow over a backward-facing step at low Reynolds number was performed for the purpose of validating a direct numerical simulation (DNS) which was performed by the Stanford/NASA Center for Turbulence Research. Previous experimental data on back step flows were conducted at Reynolds numbers and/or expansion ratios which were significantly different from that of the DNS. The geometry of the experiment and the simulation were duplicated precisely, in an effort to perform a rigorous validation of the DNS. The Reynolds number used in the DNS was Re(sub h)=5100 based on step height, h. This was the maximum possible Reynolds number that could be economically simulated. The boundary layer thickness, d, was approximately 1.0 h in the simulation and the expansion ratio was 1.2. The Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness, Re(sub theta), upstream of the step was 610. All of these parameters were matched experimentally. Experimental results are presented in the form of tables, graphs and a floppy disk (for easy access to the data). An LDV instrument was used to measure mean velocity components and three Reynolds stresses components. In addition, surface pressure and skin friction coefficients were measured. LDV measurements were acquired in a measuring domain which included the recirculating flow region.

  7. On the measurement of particle number and mobility in nonideal solutions by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Hackenbrock, C R

    1990-01-01

    Interparticle interactions are incorporated into the theoretical description of the initial amplitude, G(0), of the normalized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy autocorrelation function. Measurements of particle number, aggregate size, and interaction-dependent diffusion are then analyzed in the context of this generalized theory. It is shown that the neglect of interactions can introduce order-of-magnitude errors into estimates of particle number and aggregate size. It is also shown that measurement of G(0) provides an essentially unique method for testing the validity of theories of interaction-dependent membrane protein diffusion. PMID:2383634

  8. Measuring and controlling the transport of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jason R.

    Despite the large body of literature describing the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, few analytical tools are commonly used for their purification and analysis. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic nanoparticles are appealing candidates for biomedical applications and analytical separations. Yet in the absence of methods for assessing and assuring their purity, the ultimate use of magnetic particles and heterostructures is likely to be limited. For magnetic nanoparticles, it is the use of an applied magnetic flux or field gradient that enables separations. Flow based techniques are combined with applied magnetic fields to give methods such as magnetic field flow fractionation and high gradient magnetic separation. Additional techniques have been explored for manipulating particles in microfluidic channels and in mesoporous membranes. This thesis further describes development of these and new analytical tools for separation and analysis of colloidal particles is critically important to enable the practical use of these, particularly for medicinal purposes. Measurement of transport of nanometer scale particles through porous media is important to begin to understand the potential environmental impacts of nanomaterials. Using a diffusion cell with two compartments separated by either a porous alumina or polycarbonate membrane as a model system, diffusive flux through mesoporous materials is examined. Experiments are performed as a function of particle size, pore diameter, and solvent, and the particle fluxes are monitored by the change in absorbance of the solution in the receiving cell. Using the measured extinction coefficient and change in absorbance of the solution as a function of time, the fluxes of 3, 8, and 14 nm diameter CoFe2O4 particles are determined as they are translocated across pores with diameters 30, 50, 100, and 200 nm in hexane and aqueous solutions. In general, flux decreases with increasing particle size and

  9. Measuring the Air Quality and Transportation Impacts of Infill Development

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report summarizes three case studies. The analysis shows how standard forecasting tools can be modified to capture at least some of the transportation and air quality benefits of brownfield and infill development.

  10. [Planning and implementation of protective measures in emergencies during railway transportation of radioactive cargo].

    PubMed

    Romanov, V V; Konin, A P; Popov, S A; Golovanev, S M; Tulushev, V N

    2000-01-01

    Protective measures in emergencies during railway transportation of radioactive cargoes must be planned in advance, by obligatorily taking into account many factors that influence the scope, nature, specific features and consequences of radiation transport accidents. Of great importance are radiation monitoring, protective regimens, and requirements for decontamination of various objects in liquidating the consequences of a radiation transport accident.

  11. Effect of Reynolds number variation on aerodynamics of a hydrogen-fueled transport concept at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penland, Jim A.; Marcum, Don C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Two separate tests have been made on the same blended wing-body hydrogen-fueled transport model at a Mach number of about 6 and a range of Reynolds number (based on theoretical body length) of 1.577 to 55.36 X 10 to the 6th power. The results of these tests, made in a conventional hypersonic blowdown tunnel and a hypersonic shock tunnel, are presented through a range of angle of attack from -1 to 8 deg, with an extended study at a constant angle of attack of 3 deg. The model boundary layer flow appeared to be predominately turbulent except for the low Reynolds number shock tunnel tests. Model wall temperatures varied considerably; the blowdown tunnel varied from about 255 F to 340 F, whereas the shock tunnel had a constant 70 F model wall temperature. The experimental normal-force coefficients were essentially independent of Reynolds number. A current theoretical computer program was used to study the effect of Reynolds number. Theoretical predictions of normal-force coefficients were good, particularly at anticipated cruise angles of attack, that is 2 to 5 deg. Axial-force coefficients were generally underestimated for the turbulent skin friction conditions, and pitching-moment coefficients could not be predicted reliably.

  12. Practical quantum random number generator based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yong; Tian, Liang; Zou, Hongxin

    2010-06-01

    The shot noise of vacuum states is a kind of quantum noise and is totally random. In this paper a nondeterministic random number generation scheme based on measuring the shot noise of vacuum states is presented and experimentally demonstrated. We use a homodyne detector to measure the shot noise of vacuum states. Considering that the frequency bandwidth of our detector is limited, we derive the optimal sampling rate so that sampling points have the least correlation with each other. We also choose a method to extract random numbers from sampling values, and prove that the influence of classical noise can be avoided with this method so that the detector does not have to be shot-noise limited. The random numbers generated with this scheme have passed ent and diehard tests.

  13. Measurements and modeling of deposited particle transport by foot traffic indoors.

    PubMed

    Sippola, Mark R; Sextro, Richard G; Thatcher, Tracy L

    2014-04-01

    Deposited particles are transported into and within buildings by adhering to and releasing from people's shoes. To better understand transport of deposited particulate contaminants and exposures to these materials, experimental data on tracking by foot traffic are needed. Laboratory experiments measured uptake and downlay mass transfer efficiencies of particles between shoes and floors in a step-simulation chamber. Equilibrium uptake transfer fractions, the net mass fraction transferred from floors to shoes after several steps, were also measured. Single-step uptake and downlay transfer efficiencies ranged from 0.02 to 0.22 and equilibrium uptake transfer fractions were 0.10-0.40. Particle size, particle loading, shoe type, floor type, step pressure, and step sequence were all investigated. Experiments demonstrated that single-step downlay transfer efficiencies decrease with each successive step onto clean floors. A simple empirical model is proposed to estimate these transfers as a function of step number. Simulations using the transfer efficiency values measured here illustrate the spread of deposited particles by people walking in a hypothetical hallway. These simulations show that in locations where a few people walk over the same area each minute, tracking can spread deposited material over length scales comparable to building dimensions in just a few hours.

  14. Wind tunnel investigation of an oblique wing transport model at mach numbers between 0.6 and 1.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, R. L.; Beamish, J. K.; Alexander, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Models of three practical oblique-wing transport configurations were tested in the NASA Ames 11 foot wind tunnel. The three configurations used a common forward fuselage, wing, and support system but employed different aft fuselage sections simulating alternate propulsion system installations. These included an integrated propulsion system, pylon-mounted nacelles, and clean (no propulsion system) configuration. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4 and at sweep angles from 0 to 60 degrees. The nominal unit Reynolds number was 1.83 million per meter and the angle of attack range was -3 to +6 degrees. The models were mounted in the tunnel by means of a lower blade support system. The interference effects of this lower blade and the flow inclination were determined by using an image blade system and testing the configuration in both the upright and inverted positions.

  15. Multi-bit quantum random number generation by measuring positions of arrival photons

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Liao, Qinghong; Zhou, Nanrun

    2014-10-15

    We report upon the realization of a novel multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring the arrival positions of photon emitted from a LED using MCP-based WSA photon counting imaging detector. A spatial encoding method is proposed to extract multi-bits random number from the position coordinates of each detected photon. The randomness of bits sequence relies on the intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical processes of photonic emission and subsequent photoelectric conversion. A prototype has been built and the random bit generation rate could reach 8 Mbit/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 16 bits per detected photon. FPGA implementation of Huffman coding is proposed to reduce the bias of raw extracted random bits. The random numbers passed all tests for physical random number generator.

  16. Multi-bit quantum random number generation by measuring positions of arrival photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Liao, Qinghong; Zhou, Nanrun

    2014-10-01

    We report upon the realization of a novel multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring the arrival positions of photon emitted from a LED using MCP-based WSA photon counting imaging detector. A spatial encoding method is proposed to extract multi-bits random number from the position coordinates of each detected photon. The randomness of bits sequence relies on the intrinsic randomness of the quantum physical processes of photonic emission and subsequent photoelectric conversion. A prototype has been built and the random bit generation rate could reach 8 Mbit/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 16 bits per detected photon. FPGA implementation of Huffman coding is proposed to reduce the bias of raw extracted random bits. The random numbers passed all tests for physical random number generator.

  17. Measurement of spatio-temporal transport in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru; Wang, Zhuo; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-03-01

    The live cell is a highly dynamical system with complicated biophysical and biochemical processes taking place at diverse spatiotemporal scales. Though it is well known that microtubules and actin filaments play important roles in intracellular transport, their dynamic behavior is not entirely understood. We propose a unified approach to studying transport in live cells. We used Spatial Light Interference Microscopy, a quantitative phase imaging method developed in our laboratory, to extract cell mass distributions over broad spatiotemporal scales. The dispersion relations for this transport dynamics, i.e. frequency bandwidth vs. spatial frequencies, reveal deterministic mass transport at large spatial scales (w˜q) and diffusive transport at small spatial scales (w˜q̂2). At submicron scales, we observed a w˜q̂3 behavior, which indicates whip-like movements of protein filaments. Further control experiments where both the microtubule and actin polymerization were blocked suggests that essentially actin governs the long spatial scales behavior and microtubules the short scales. This label-free method enables us to access different components of cell dynamics and quantify diffusion coefficients and speed of motor proteins.

  18. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, C. J.; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B.; Iglesias, C. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Nahar, S. N.; Orban, C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2016-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zone. New measurements at the Sandia Z facility with chromium, iron, and nickel are providing a systematic study of how opacity changes with temperature, density, and atomic number. These measurements help further evaluate possibilities for experiment errors and help constrain hypotheses for opacity model refinements. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Prediction and measurement of thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic solids and graphitic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Pamela M.; Smoyer, Justin L.; Duda, John Charles.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon allotropes, there have been many attempts to incorporate such structures into existing thermal abatement technologies. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic materials (i.e., graphite and graphene flakes or stacks) have garnered much interest due to the combination of both their thermal and mechanical properties. However, the introduction of these carbon-based nanostructures into thermal abatement technologies greatly increases the number of interfaces per unit length within the resulting composite systems. Consequently, thermal transport in these systems is governed as much by the interfaces between the constituent materials as it is by the materials themselves. This paper reports the behavior of phononic thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic thin films and graphite substrates. Elastic and inelastic diffusive transport models are formulated to aid in the prediction of conductance at a metal-graphite interface. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductance at Au-graphite interfaces is measured via transient thermoreflectance from 78 to 400 K. It is found that different substrate surface preparations prior to thin film deposition have a significant effect on the conductance of the interface between film and substrate.

  20. Quantitative measurement of the nanoparticle size and number concentration from liquid suspensions by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Baalousha, M; Prasad, A; Lead, J R

    2014-05-01

    Microscopy techniques are indispensable to the nanoanalytical toolbox and can provide accurate information on the number size distribution and number concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) at low concentrations (ca. ppt to ppb range) and small sizes (ca. <20 nm). However, the high capabilities of microscopy techniques are limited by the traditional sample preparation based on drying a small volume of suspension of NPs on a microscopy substrate. This method is limited by low recovery of NPs (ca. <10%), formation of aggregates during the drying process, and thus, the complete misrepresentation of the NP suspensions under consideration. This paper presents a validated quantitative sampling technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) that overcomes the above-mentioned shortcomings and allows full recovery and representativeness of the NPs under consideration by forcing the NPs into the substrate via ultracentrifugation and strongly attaches the NPs to the substrate by surface functionalization of the substrate or by adding cations to the NP suspension. The high efficiency of the analysis is demonstrated by the uniformity of the NP distribution on the substrate (that is low variability between the number of NPs counted on different images on different areas of the substrate), the high recovery of the NPs up to 71%) and the good correlation (R > 0.95) between the mass and number concentrations. Therefore, for the first time, we developed a validated quantitative sampling technique that enables the use of the full capabilities of microscopy tools to quantitatively and accurately determine the number size distribution and number concentration of NPs at environmentally relevant low concentrations (i.e. 0.34-100 ppb). This approach is of high environmental relevance and can be applied widely in environmental nanoscience and nanotoxicology for (i) measuring the number concentration dose in nanotoxicological studies and (ii) accurately measuring the number size distribution of

  1. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  2. Application of PSP to Surface Pressure Measurement in High Knudsen Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hideo; Niimi, Tomohide; Hirako, Madoka; Oshima, Yusuke

    2005-05-01

    The pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique has the capability to be applied to high Knudsen number flows, such as low density gas flows, micro-flows, and so on. In this study, to inspect the feasibility of PSP for measurement of pressure on a solid surface in the high Knudsen number flows, fundamental properties of three types of PSP [PdTFPP, PdOEP and PtTFPP bound by poly(TMSP)] are examined especially in the range of pressure below 130 Pa (about 1 Torr). The pressure sensitivity against nitrogen monoxide is also examined for the above PSPs, to develop a technique for the composite measurement of the flow field structure and the surface pressure, using NO-LIF and PSP, respectively. As an application of PSP to low density gas flows, we measure the pressure distribution on a jet-impinging solid surface using PdOEP/poly(TMSP) with very high pressure sensitivity.

  3. Loss-tolerant measurement-device-independent quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhou, Hongyi; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2015-12-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNGs) output genuine random numbers based upon the uncertainty principle. A QRNG contains two parts in general—a randomness source and a readout detector. How to remove detector imperfections has been one of the most important questions in practical randomness generation. We propose a simple solution, measurement-device-independent QRNG, which not only removes all detector side channels but is robust against losses. In contrast to previous fully device-independent QRNGs, our scheme does not require high detector efficiency or nonlocality tests. Simulations show that our protocol can be implemented efficiently with a practical coherent state laser and other standard optical components. The security analysis of our QRNG consists mainly of two parts: measurement tomography and randomness quantification, where several new techniques are developed to characterize the randomness associated with a positive-operator valued measure.

  4. Hill number as a bacterial diversity measure framework with high-throughput sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sanghoon; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.; Ng, Justin P.; Gentry, Terry J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial diversity is an important parameter for measuring bacterial contributions to the global ecosystem. However, even the task of describing bacterial diversity is challenging due to biological and technological difficulties. One of the challenges in bacterial diversity estimation is the appropriate measure of rare taxa, but the uncertainty of the size of rare biosphere is yet to be experimentally determined. One approach is using the generalized diversity, Hill number (Na), to control the variability associated with rare taxa by differentially weighing them. Here, we investigated Hill number as a framework for microbial diversity measure using a taxa-accmulation curve (TAC) with soil bacterial community data from two distinct studies by 454 pyrosequencing. The reliable biodiversity estimation was obtained when an increase in Hill number arose as the coverage became stable in TACs for a ≥ 1. In silico analysis also indicated that a certain level of sampling depth was desirable for reliable biodiversity estimation. Thus, in order to attain bacterial diversity from second generation sequencing, Hill number can be a good diversity framework with given sequencing depth, that is, until technology is further advanced and able to overcome the under- and random-sampling issues of the current sequencing approaches. PMID:27901123

  5. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  6. Measurement of minority carrier transport parameters in heavily doped n-type silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delalamo, J.; Swanson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of minority transport parameters in heavily doped silicon is covered. The basic transport equations were used to define two independent parameters. Use of special vertical and lateral transistor test devices permitted the measurement of both parameters. Prior studies were normalized to show excellent agreement over the heavy doping region.

  7. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  8. Estimation of volcanic ash emission profiles using ceilometer measurements and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ka Lok; Geiß, Alexander; Gasteiger, Josef; Wagner, Frank; Wiegner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the number of active remote sensing systems grows rapidly, since several national weather services initiated ceilometer networks. These networks are excellent tools to monitor the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds and to validate chemical transport models. Moreover, it is expected that the can be used to refine model calculations to better predict situations that might be dangerous for aviation. As a ceilometer can be considered as a simple single-wavelength backscatter lidar, quantitative aerosol profile information, i.e., the aerosol backscatter coefficient (βp) profile, can be derived provided that the ceilometer is calibrated. Volcanic ash concentration profile can then be estimated by using prior optical properties of volcanic ash. These profiles are then used for the inverse calculation of the emission profile of the volcanic eruption, thus, improving one of the most critical parameters of the numerical simulation. In this study, the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) is used to simulate the dispersion of volcanic ash. We simulate the distribution of ash for a given time/height grid, in order to compute the sensitivity functions for each measurements. As an example we use ceilometer measurements of the German weather service to reconstruct the temporal and spatial emission profile of Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. We have also examined the sensitivity of the retrieved emission profiles to different measurement parameters, e.g., geolocation of the measurement sites, total number of measurement sites, temporal and vertical resolution of the measurements, etc. The first results show that ceilometer measurements in principle are feasible for the inversion of volcanic ash emission profiles.

  9. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-09-25

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons.

  10. A framework for operationalization of strategic plans and metrics for corporate performance measurement in transportation asset management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mteri, Hassan H.

    This thesis investigated the business processes required to translate corporate-level strategic plans into tactical and operational plans in the context of transportation asset management. The study also developed a framework for effective performance measure for departments of transportation. The thesis was based on a case study of transportation agencies in the U.S.A. and Canada. The scope is therefore limited or more directly applicable to transportation assets such as pavement, bridges and culverts. The goal was to address the problem of translating or managing strategic plans, especially in the context of the public sector responsible for operating transportation infrastructure. It was observed that many agencies have been successful in formulating good strategic plans but they have performed relatively poorly in translating such corporate-level strategic plans into operational activities. A questionnaire survey was designed and targeted about 30 state agencies that are currently active in transportation asset management. Twenty one (21) transportation agencies in the USA and Canada responded to the questionnaire. The analysis of the questionnaire data showed that there is a lack of a standard approach to managing corporate strategic plans in transportation agencies. The results also indicated that most transportation agencies operate in three organizational levels but there was no systematic approach of translating goal and objectives from high level to lower levels. Approaches in performance measurement were found to vary from agency to agency. A number of limitations were identified in the existing practice on performance measurements. Key weaknesses include the large number of measures in use (as many as 25 or more), and the disconnection between the measures used and the corporate goals and objectives. Lessons from the private sector were thoroughly reviewed in order to build the groundwork for adapting existing tools to the public sector. The existing

  11. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, G. S.; Shukla, S.; Obreza, T. A.; Harris, W. G.

    2014-08-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils, especially those that are sandy, is adversely impacting P-limited ecosystems like Florida's Everglades. A more developed understanding of P and water management strategies and their effects on P leaching is needed to achieve reductions in subsurface P losses, especially from intensively managed dual cropping systems under plastic mulch in shallow water regions. We compared the effects of conservation P and water management strategies with traditional practices on P transport to groundwater. A 3-year experiment was conducted on hydrologically isolated plots with plastic-mulched successive cropping systems to compare high (HEI) and soil test based recommended (REI) external input (water and fertilizer P) systems with traditional sub-irrigation (seepage), and REI with a potential water conservation subsurface drip irrigation system (REI-SD) with regard to groundwater P concentrations above and below the low conductivity spodic horizon (Bh). The REI treatments had higher available storage for rainfall and P than HEI. Use of both REI systems (REI = 2098 μg/L and REI-SD = 2048 μg/L) reduced groundwater P concentrations above the Bh horizon by 33% compared to HEI (3090 μg/L), and results were significant at the 0.05 level. Although the subsurface drip system saved water, it did not offer any groundwater quality (P) benefit. Mixing and dilution of influent P below the low conductivity Bh horizon between treatments and with the regional groundwater system resulted in no significant differences in groundwater P concentration below the Bh horizon. Groundwater P concentrations from this study were higher than reported elsewhere due to low soil P storage capacity (SPSC), high hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils, and a high water table beneath crop beds. The HEI system leached more P due to ferilizer P in excess of SPSC and used higher irrigation volumes compared with REI systems. Despite a 40% difference in the average

  12. Measurement and modeling of phosphorous transport in shallow groundwater environments.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, G S; Shukla, S; Obreza, T A; Harris, W G

    2014-08-01

    Leaching of phosphorus (P) from agricultural soils, especially those that are sandy, is adversely impacting P-limited ecosystems like Florida's Everglades. A more developed understanding of P and water management strategies and their effects on P leaching is needed to achieve reductions in subsurface P losses, especially from intensively managed dual cropping systems under plastic mulch in shallow water regions. We compared the effects of conservation P and water management strategies with traditional practices on P transport to groundwater. A 3-year experiment was conducted on hydrologically isolated plots with plastic-mulched successive cropping systems to compare high (HEI) and soil test based recommended (REI) external input (water and fertilizer P) systems with traditional sub-irrigation (seepage), and REI with a potential water conservation subsurface drip irrigation system (REI-SD) with regard to groundwater P concentrations above and below the low conductivity spodic horizon (Bh). The REI treatments had higher available storage for rainfall and P than HEI. Use of both REI systems (REI=2098μg/L and REI-SD=2048μg/L) reduced groundwater P concentrations above the Bh horizon by 33% compared to HEI (3090μg/L), and results were significant at the 0.05 level. Although the subsurface drip system saved water, it did not offer any groundwater quality (P) benefit. Mixing and dilution of influent P below the low conductivity Bh horizon between treatments and with the regional groundwater system resulted in no significant differences in groundwater P concentration below the Bh horizon. Groundwater P concentrations from this study were higher than reported elsewhere due to low soil P storage capacity (SPSC), high hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils, and a high water table beneath crop beds. The HEI system leached more P due to ferilizer P in excess of SPSC and used higher irrigation volumes compared with REI systems. Despite a 40% difference in the average amount of

  13. Noninvasive neutron scattering measurements reveal slower cholesterol transport in model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Porcar, L; Woodka, A C; Butler, P D; Perez-Salas, U

    2011-07-20

    Proper cholesterol transport is essential to healthy cellular activity and any abnormality can lead to several fatal diseases. However, complete understandings of cholesterol homeostasis in the cell remains elusive, partly due to the wide variability in reported values for intra- and intermembrane cholesterol transport rates. Here, we used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering to measure cholesterol intermembrane exchange and intramembrane flipping rates, in situ, without recourse to any external fields or compounds. We found significantly slower transport kinetics than reported by previous studies, particularly for intramembrane flipping where our measured rates are several orders of magnitude slower. We unambiguously demonstrate that the presence of chemical tags and extraneous compounds employed in traditional kinetic measurements dramatically affect the system thermodynamics, accelerating cholesterol transport rates by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, this work provides new insights into cholesterol transport process disorders, and challenges many of the underlying assumptions used in most cholesterol transport studies to date.

  14. Noninvasive Neutron Scattering Measurements Reveal Slower Cholesterol Transport in Model Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S.; Porcar, L.; Woodka, A.C.; Butler, P.D.; Perez-Salas, U.

    2011-01-01

    Proper cholesterol transport is essential to healthy cellular activity and any abnormality can lead to several fatal diseases. However, complete understandings of cholesterol homeostasis in the cell remains elusive, partly due to the wide variability in reported values for intra- and intermembrane cholesterol transport rates. Here, we used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering to measure cholesterol intermembrane exchange and intramembrane flipping rates, in situ, without recourse to any external fields or compounds. We found significantly slower transport kinetics than reported by previous studies, particularly for intramembrane flipping where our measured rates are several orders of magnitude slower. We unambiguously demonstrate that the presence of chemical tags and extraneous compounds employed in traditional kinetic measurements dramatically affect the system thermodynamics, accelerating cholesterol transport rates by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, this work provides new insights into cholesterol transport process disorders, and challenges many of the underlying assumptions used in most cholesterol transport studies to date. PMID:21767489

  15. Detailed noise measurements on the SR-7A propeller: Tone behavior with helical tip Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.

    1991-12-01

    Detailed noise measurements were taken on the SR-7A propeller to investigate the behavior of the noise with helical tip Mach number and then to level off as Mach number was increased further. This behavior was further investigated by obtaining detailed pressure-time histories of data. The pressure-time histories indicate that a portion of the primary pressure pulse is progressively cancelled by a secondary pulse which results in the noise leveling off as the helical tip Mach number is increased. This second pulse appears to originate on the same blade as the primary pulse and is in some way connected to the blade itself. This leaves open the possibility of redesigning the blade to improve the cancellation; thereby, the propeller noise is reduced.

  16. Detailed noise measurements on the SR-7A propeller: Tone behavior with helical tip Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed noise measurements were taken on the SR-7A propeller to investigate the behavior of the noise with helical tip Mach number and then to level off as Mach number was increased further. This behavior was further investigated by obtaining detailed pressure-time histories of data. The pressure-time histories indicate that a portion of the primary pressure pulse is progressively cancelled by a secondary pulse which results in the noise leveling off as the helical tip Mach number is increased. This second pulse appears to originate on the same blade as the primary pulse and is in some way connected to the blade itself. This leaves open the possibility of redesigning the blade to improve the cancellation; thereby, the propeller noise is reduced.

  17. The Measurement Properties of the Assessing Math Concepts' Assessments of Primary Students' Number Sense Skills.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christie; Lambert, Richard; Polly, Drew; Wang, Chuang; Pugalee, David

    The purpose of this study was to examine the measurement properties of the Assessing Math Concepts AMC Anywhere Hiding and Ten Frame Assessments, formative assessments of primary students' number sense skills. Each assessment has two parts, where Part 1 is intended to be foundational skills for part two. Part 1 includes manipulatives whereas Part 2 does not. Student data from 228 kindergarten through second grade teachers with a total of 3,666 students was analyzed using Rasch scaling. Data analyses indicated that when the two assessments were examined separately the intended order of item difficulty was clear. When the parts of both assessments were analyzed together, the items in Part 2 were not consistently more difficult that the items in Part 1. This suggests an alternative sequence of tasks in that students may progress from working with a specific number with manipulatives then without manipulatives rather than working with a variety of numbers with manipulatives before moving onto assessments without manipulatives.

  18. Expression and splicing of ABC and SLC transporters in the human blood-brain barrier measured with RNAseq.

    PubMed

    Suhy, Adam M; Webb, Amy; Papp, Audrey C; Geier, Ethan G; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2017-02-07

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) expresses numerous membrane transporters that supply needed nutrients to the central nervous system (CNS), consisting mostly of solute carriers (SLC transporters), or remove unwanted substrates via extrusion pumps through the action of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Previous work has identified many BBB transporters using hybridization arrays or qRT-PCR, using targeted probes. Here we have performed next-generation sequencing of the transcriptome (RNAseq) extracted from cerebral cortex tissues and brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC) obtained from two donors. The same RNA samples had previously been measured for transporter expression using qRT-PCR (Geier et al., 2013), yielding similar expression levels for overlapping mRNAs (R=0.66, p<0.001). RNAseq confirms a number of transporters highly enriched in BMECs (e.g., ABCB1, ABCG2, SLCO2B1, and SLC47A1), but also detects novel BMEC transporters. Multiple splice isoforms detected by RNAseq are either robustly enriched or depleted in BMECs, indicating differential RNA processing in the BBB. The Complete RNAseq data are publically available (GSE94064).

  19. Apparatus for the measurement of radionuclide transport rates in rock cores

    SciTech Connect

    Weed, H.C.; Koszykowski, R.F.; Dibley, L.L.; Murray, I.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus and procedure for the study of radionuclide transport in intact rock cores are presented in this report. This equipment more closely simulates natural conditions of radionuclide transport than do crushed rock columns. The apparatus and the procedure from rock core preparation through data analysis are described. The retardation factors measured are the ratio of the transport rate of a non-retarded radionuclide, such as /sup 3/H, to the transport rate of a retarded radionuclide. Sample results from a study of the transport of /sup 95m/Tc and /sup 85/Sr in brine through a sandstone core are included.

  20. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  1. High-speed quantum-random number generation by continuous measurement of arrival time of photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qiurong; Zhao, Baosheng; Hua, Zhang; Liao, Qinghong; Yang, Hao

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel high speed and multi-bit optical quantum random number generator by continuously measuring arrival time of photons with a common starting point. To obtain the unbiased and post-processing free random bits, the measured photon arrival time is converted into the sum of integral multiple of a fixed period and a phase time. Theoretical and experimental results show that the phase time is an independent and uniform random variable. A random bit extraction method by encoding the phase time is proposed. An experimental setup has been built and the unbiased random bit generation rate could reach 128 Mb/s, with random bit generation efficiency of 8 bits per detected photon. The random numbers passed all tests in the statistical test suite.

  2. Multimeridional refraction: dependence of the measurement accuracy on the number of meridians refracted.

    PubMed

    Oechsner, U; Kusel, R

    1997-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of multimeridional refraction measurements was used to investigate the dependence of the accuracy of the measurement on the number of meridians refracted, N, and on the standard deviation of a measurement in a single meridian, sigma. For the description of the measurement errors, the residual refraction values were used, i.e., the parameters of the refraction remaining after application of the measured correction. The distributions of the residual refraction values were found to be independent of the "true" refraction values; in addition, by means of a factor square root of N/sigma, reduced residual refraction values could be defined which also were independent of N and sigma. A vector space proposed by Lakshminarayanan and Varadharajan (based on Long's power matrix) was used to represent the joint distribution of the residual refraction values in three-dimensional space. It was found to be a three-variate Gaussian distribution with zero mean and diagonal covariance matrix. It could further be shown that the vector space proposed by Harris is identical to the one used, up to a linear transformation. Several criteria, based on the one- and three-dimensional distributions and corresponding to different levels of accuracy, are discussed resulting in a wide range of answers about the number of meridians to be refracted.

  3. Photon-number statistics of twin beams: Self-consistent measurement, reconstruction, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Peřina, Jan Jr.; Haderka, Ondřej; Michálek, Václav

    2014-12-04

    A method for the determination of photon-number statistics of twin beams using the joint signal-idler photocount statistics obtained by an iCCD camera is described. It also provides absolute quantum detection efficiency of the camera. Using the measured photocount statistics, quasi-distributions of integrated intensities are obtained. They attain negative values occurring in characteristic strips an a consequence of pairing of photons in twin beams.

  4. Measurement on Nusselt number of regenerator wire meshes by cylindrical probe

    SciTech Connect

    Isshiki, Seita; Sakano, Akira; Ushiyama, Izumi; Isshiki, Naotsugu

    1996-12-31

    The regenerator is an important element in Stirling engines. As a regenerator element, a fire-hardened layer of wire mesh became popular for Stirling engines. However the fire-hardened layer of wire mesh is expensive. Recently packed wire mesh has been used widely in Japan, however basic performance like flow resistance and heat transfer ratio, has not been clarified yet. The authors measured performance of flow resistance and presented the results in last year`s IECEC conference. In the present study, a new method to estimate the Nusselt number of wire meshes in oscillating flow is proposed and reported. This method employs a cylindrical probe having two thermocouples in the axis symmetry direction. The present method has a feature that temperature variation in oscillating flow condition can be estimated without expensive instrument for unsteady measurement. It became clear that the measured Nusselt numbers of usual meshes are from 45% lower to 30% higher than the empirical equation of previous study. The Nusselt number of packed wire mesh became about 1/6 of the equivalent layer of usual mesh. These results shows that a rough estimation of performance of heat transfer is possible by the present method.

  5. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, You-Qi; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jun Pan, Jian-Wei; Huang, Leilei; Payne, Frank

    2015-06-15

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  6. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Nie, You-Qi; Huang, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Payne, Frank; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-06-01

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  7. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, You-Qi; Huang, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Payne, Frank; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-06-01

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  8. Measurement of particle number and related pollutant concentrations in an urban area in South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, D. M.; Teixeira, E. C.; Rolim, S. B. A.; Pereira, F. N.; Wiegand, F.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze atmospheric particle number concentration at Sapucaia do Sul, in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, and associate it with the pollutants NO, NO2, and O3. Measurements were performed in two periods: August to October, in 2010 and 2011. We used the following equipment: the continuous particulate monitor (CPM), the chemiluminescent nitrogen oxide analyzer (AC32M), and the UV photometric ozone analyzer (O342M). Daily and hourly particle number concentrations in fractions PR1.0 (0.3-1.0 μm), PR2.5 (1.0-2.5 μm), and PR10 (2.5-10 μm), and concentrations of pollutants NO, NO2, NOx, and O3 were measured. These data were correlated with meteorological parameters such as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The daily variation of OX (NO2 + O3) and its relation with NO2 were also established. The results obtained for daily particle number concentration (particles L-1) showed that the area of study had higher particle number of PR2.5 and PR1.0 size ranges, with values of 19.5 and 28.51 particles L-1, respectively. Differences in particle number concentrations in PR1 and PR2.5 size ranges were found between weekdays and weekends. The daily variation per hour of concentrations of particle number, NO, and NOx showed peaks during increased traffic flow in the morning and in the evening. NO2 showed peaks at different times, with the first peak (morning) 2 h after the peak of NO, and a second peak in the evening (19:00). This is due to the oxidation of NO and to the photolysis of NO3 formed overnight. Correlation analysis suggests that there may be a relationship between the fine and ultrafine particles and NO, probably indicating that they have similar sources, such as vehicular emissions. In addition, a possible relationship of solar radiation with fine particle number concentrations, as well as with O3 was also observed. The results, too, show an inverse relationship between particle number

  9. Real time measurements of sediment transport and bed morphology during channel altering flow and sediment transport events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Joanna Crowe; Waters, Kevin A.; Cannatelli, Kristen M.

    2015-09-01

    Real-time measurements of bed changes over a reach are a missing piece needed to link bed morphology with sediment transport processes during unsteady flows when the bed adjusts quickly to changing transport rates or visual observation of the bed is precluded by fine sediment in the water column. A new technique is presented that provides continuous measurement of sediment movement over the length of a flume. A bedload monitoring system (BLMS) was developed that makes use of pressure pillows under a false flume bottom to measure sediment and water weights over discrete flume channel sections throughout a flow event. This paper details the construction of the BLMS and provides examples of its use in a laboratory setting to reconstruct bed slopes during unsteady flows and to create a real-time record of sediment transport rates across the flume channel bed during a sediment transporting flow. Data gathered from the BLMS compared well against techniques commonly in use in flume studies. When the BLMS was analyzed in conjunction with bed surface DEMs and differenced DEMs, a complete transport and bed adjustment picture was constructed. The difference DEMs provided information on the spatial extent of bed morphology changes. The BLMS supplied the data record necessary to reconstruct sediment transport records through the downstream channel, including locations and time periods of temporary sediment storage and supply. The BLMS makes it possible to construct a continuous record of the spatial distribution of sediment movement through the flume, including areas of temporary aggradation and degradation. Exciting implications of future research that incorporates a BLMS include a more informed management of river systems as a result of improved temporal predictions of sediment movement and the associated changes in channel slope and bed morphology.

  10. Number and measure: Hermann von Helmholtz at the crossroads of mathematics, physics, and psychology.

    PubMed

    Darrigol, Olivier

    2003-09-01

    In 1887 Helmholtz discussed the foundations of measurement in science as a last contribution to his philosophy of knowledge. This essay borrowed from earlier debates on the foundations of mathematics (Grassmann/Du Bois), on the possibility of quantitative psychology (Fechner/Kries, Wundt/Zeller), and on the meaning of temperature measurement (Maxwell,Mach.). Late nineteenth-century scrutinisers of the foundations of mathematics (Dedekind, Cantor, Frege, Russell) made little of Helmholtz's essay. Yet it inspired two mathematicians with an eye on physics (Poincaré and Hölder), and a few philosopher-physicists (Mach, Duhem,Campbell). The aim of the present paper is to situate Helmholtz's contribution in this complex array of nineteenth-century philosophies of number, quantity, and measurement.

  11. Lagrangian transport model forecasts and a transport climatology for the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (ITCT 2K2) measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Caroline; Cooper, Owen; Stohl, Andreas; Eckhardt, Sabine; James, Paul; Dunlea, Edward; Nicks, Dennis K.; Holloway, John S.; Hübler, Gerd; Parrish, David D.; Ryerson, Tom B.; Trainer, Michael

    2004-04-01

    On the basis of Lagrangian tracer transport simulations this study presents an intercontinental transport climatology and tracer forecasts for the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002 (ITCT 2K2) aircraft measurement campaign, which took place at Monterey, California, in April-May 2002 to measure Asian pollution arriving at the North American West Coast. For the climatology the average transport of an Asian CO tracer was calculated over a time period of 15 years using the particle dispersion model FLEXPART. To determine by how much the transport from Asia to North America during ITCT 2K2 deviated from the climatological mean, the 15-year average for April and May was compared with the average for April and May 2002 and that for the ITCT 2K2 period. It was found that 8% less Asian CO tracer arrived at the North American West Coast during the ITCT 2K2 period compared to the climatological mean. Below 8-km altitude, the maximum altitude of the research aircraft, 13% less arrived. Nevertheless, pronounced layers of Asian pollution were measured during 3 of the 13 ITCT 2K2 flights. FLEXPART was also successfully used as a forecasting tool for the flight planning during ITCT 2K2. It provided 3-day forecasts for three different anthropogenic CO tracers originating from Asia, North America, and Europe. In two case studies the forecast abilities of FLEXPART are analyzed and discussed by comparing the forecasts with measurement data and infrared satellite images. The model forecasts underestimated the measured CO enhancements by about a factor of 4, mainly because of an underestimation of the Asian emissions in the emission inventory and because of biomass-burning influence that was not modeled. Nevertheless, the intercontinental transport and dispersion of pollution plumes were qualitatively well predicted, and on the basis of the model results the aircraft could successfully be guided into the polluted air masses.

  12. Molybdate transport in a chemically complex aquifer: Field measurements compared with solute-transport model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Molybdate was included in the injectate to study the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on its aqueous distribution and to evaluate the reliability of laboratory experiments for identifying and quantifying reactions that control the transport of reactive solutes in groundwater. Transport of molybdate in this aquifer was controlled by adsorption. The amount adsorbed varied with aqueous chemistry that changed with depth as freshwater recharge mixed with a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. Molybdate adsorption was strongest near the water table where pH (5.7) and the concentration of the competing solutes phosphate (2.3 micromolar) and sulfate (86 micromolar) were low. Adsorption of molybdate decreased with depth as pH increased to 6.5, phosphate increased to 40 micromolar, and sulfate increased to 340 micromolar. A one-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model and a two-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model were used to simulate adsorption. Reactions and equilibrium constants for both models were determined in laboratory experiments and used in the reactive-transport model PHAST to simulate the two-dimensional transport of molybdate during the tracer test. No geochemical parameters were adjusted in the simulation to improve the fit between model and field data. Both models simulated the travel distance of the molybdate cloud to within 10% during the 2-year tracer test; however, the two-site diffuse-layer model more accurately simulated the molybdate concentration distribution within the cloud.

  13. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  14. Measurement of phloem transport rates by an indicator-dilution technique. [Triticum aestivum L

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.B. )

    1990-10-01

    An indicator-dilution technique for the measurement of flow rates, commonly used by animal physiologists for circulation measurements, was adapted to the measurement of phloem translocation rates in the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) peduncle. The approach is based on the observation that, during the transport of a given amount of solute, its mean concentration will be inversely proportional to flow rate. For phloem transport in the wheat peduncle, the necessary measurements are (a) the time course of tracer kinetics in the peduncle phloem, (b)the volume of sieve tubes and companion cells in the monitored segment of the peduncle, and (c) the amount of tracer transported past that point. The method was evaluated by in situ monitoring of {sup 32}PO{sub 4} transport in pulse-labeling experiments. Specific activities (i.e. {sup 32}P concentrations) of phloem exudate were in good agreement with those calculated from in situ count rates and measured phloem areas. Mass transport rates, calculated from volume flow rates and phloem exudate dry matter content, also agreed well with expected mass transport rates based on measurements of grain growth rate and net CO{sub 2} exchange by the ear. The indicator-dilution technique appears to offer good precision and accuracy for short-term measurements of phloem transport rates in the wheat peduncle and should be useful for other systems as well.

  15. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  16. Stable determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers by a minimal number of scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Petrini, Michele; Rondi, Luca; Xiao, Jingni

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to establish optimal stability estimates for the determination of sound-hard polyhedral scatterers in RN, N ≥ 2, by a minimal number of far-field measurements. This work is a significant and highly nontrivial extension of the stability estimates for the determination of sound-soft polyhedral scatterers by far-field measurements, proved by one of the authors, to the much more challenging sound-hard case. The admissible polyhedral scatterers satisfy minimal a priori assumptions of Lipschitz type and may include at the same time solid obstacles and screen-type components. In this case we obtain a stability estimate with N far-field measurements. Important features of such an estimate are that we have an explicit dependence on the parameter h representing the minimal size of the cells forming the boundaries of the admissible polyhedral scatterers, and that the modulus of continuity, provided the error is small enough with respect to h, does not depend on h. If we restrict to N = 2 , 3 and to polyhedral obstacles, that is to polyhedra, then we obtain stability estimates with fewer measurements, namely first with N - 1 measurements and then with a single measurement. In this case the dependence on h is not explicit anymore and the modulus of continuity depends on h as well.

  17. Velocity measurements in a high-Reynolds-number, momentum-conserving, axisymmetric, turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, H.J.; Capp, S.P.; George, W.K.

    1994-01-01

    The turbulent flow resulting from a top-hat jet exhausting into a large room was investigated. The Reynolds number based on exit conditions was approximately 10(exp 5). Velocity moments to third order were obtained using flying and stationary hot-wire and burst-mode laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) techniques. The entire room was fully seeded for the LDA measurements. The measurements are shown to satisfy the differential and integral momentum equations for a round jet in an infinite environment. The results differ substantially from those reported by some earlier investigators, both in the level and shape of the profiles. These differences are attributed to the smaller enclosures used in the earlier works and the recirculation within them. Also, the flying hot-wire and burst-mode LDA measurements made here differ from the stationary wire measurements, especially the higher moments and away from the flow centreline. These differences are attributed to the cross-flow and rectification errors on the latter at the high turbulence intensities present in this flow (30% minimum at centreline). The measurements are used, together with recent dissipation measurements, to compute the energy balance for the jet, and an attempt is made to estimate the pressure-velocity and pressure-strain rate correlations.

  18. Interpretation of measurements of the number of muons in extensive air shower experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Raul R.; Conceição, Ruben; Pimenta, Mário; de Souza, Vitor

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyze the energy evolution of the muon content of air showers between 1018.4 and 1019.6 eV to be able to determine the most likely mass composition scenario from future number of muons measurements. The energy and primary mass evolution of the number of muons is studied based on the Heitler-Matthews model and Monte Carlo simulation of the air shower. A simple model to describe the evolution of the first and second moments of number of muons distributions is proposed and validated. An analysis approach based on the comparison between this model's predictions and data to discriminate among a set of composition scenarios is presented and tested with simulations. It is shown that the composition scenarios can be potentially discriminated under the conditions imposed by the method. The discrimination power of the proposed analysis is stable under systematic changes of the absolute number of muons from model predictions and on the scale of the reconstructed energy.

  19. PIV measurements of isothermal plane turbulent impinging jets at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayrullina, A.; van Hooff, T.; Blocken, B.; van Heijst, G. J. F.

    2017-04-01

    This paper contains a detailed experimental analysis of an isothermal plane turbulent impinging jet (PTIJ) for two jet widths at moderate Reynolds numbers (7200-13,500) issued on a horizontal plane at fixed relative distances equal to 22.5 and 45 jet widths. The available literature on such flows is scarce. Previous studies on plane turbulent jets mainly focused on free jets, while most studies on impinging jets focused on the heat transfer between the jet and an impingement plane, disregarding jet development. The present study focuses on isothermal PTIJs at moderate Reynolds numbers characteristic of air curtains. Flow visualisations with fluorescent dye and 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements have been performed. A comparison is made with previous studies of isothermal free turbulent jets at moderate Reynolds numbers. Mean and instantaneous velocity and vorticity, turbulence intensity, and Reynolds shear stress are analysed. The jet issued from the nozzle with higher aspect ratio shows more intensive entrainment and a faster decay of the centreline velocity compared to the jet of lower aspect ratio for the same value of jet Reynolds number. The profiles of centreline and cross-jet velocity and turbulence intensity show that the PTIJs behave as a free plane turbulent jet until 70-75% of the total jet height. Alongside the information obtained on the jet dynamics, the data will be useful for the validation of numerical simulations.

  20. Markstein Numbers of Negatively-Stretched Premixed Flames: Microgravity Measurements and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Driscoll, James F.; Feikema, Douglas A.; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of flame stretch, composed of strain and curvature, plays a major role in the propagation of turbulent premixed flames. Although all forms of stretch (positive and negative) are present in turbulent conditions, little research has been focused on the stretch due to curvature. The present study quantifies the Markstein number (which characterizes the sensitivity of the flame propagation speed to the imposed stretch rate) for an inwardly-propagating flame (IPF). This flame is of interest because it is negatively stretched, and is subjected to curvature effects alone, without the competing effects of strain. In an extension of our previous work, microgravity experiments were run using a vortex-flame interaction to create a pocket of reactants surrounded by an IPF. Computations using the RUN-1DL code of Rogg were also performed in order to explain the measurements. It was found that the Markstein number of an inwardly-propagating flame, for both the microgravity experiment and the computations, is significantly larger than that of an outwardly-propagating flame. Further insight was gained by running the computations for the simplified (hypothetical) cases of one step chemistry, unity Lewis number, and negligible heat release. Results provide additional evidence that the Markstein numbers associated with strain and curvature have different values.

  1. Near-wall effects for momentum, heat and mass transport in gas-particle suspensions at moderate Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radl, Stefan; Municchi, Federico; Goniva, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    Understanding transport phenomena in fluid-particle systems is of primary importance for the design of large-scale equipment, e.g., in the chemical industry. Typically, the analysis of such systems is performed by numerically solving a set of partial differential equations modeling the particle phase and the fluid phase as interpenetrating continua. Such models require a number of closure models that are often constructed via spatial filtering of data obtained from particle-resolved direct numerical simulations (PR-DNS). In the present work we make use of PR-DNS to evaluate corrections to existing closure models. Specifically, we aim on accounting for wall effects on the fluid-particle drag force and the particle-individual Nusselt number. We then propose an improved closure model to be used in particle-unresolved Euler-Lagrange (PU-EL) simulations. We demonstrate that such an advanced closure should account for a dimensionless filter size, as well as a normalized distance from the wall. In addition, we make an attempt to model the filtered fluid velocity profile in wall-bounded suspension flows. The authors acknowledge funding from the European Commission through FP7 Grant Agreement No. 604656, as well as VSC-3 and dcluster.tugraz.at.

  2. High spatial range velocity measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Silva, C. M.; Gnanamanickam, E. P.; Atkinson, C.; Buchmann, N. A.; Hutchins, N.; Soria, J.; Marusic, I.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we detail and analyse a multi-resolution particle image velocity measurement that resolves the wide range of scales prevalent in a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (up to Reτ ≈ 20 000). A unique configuration is utilised, where an array of eight high resolution cameras at two magnification levels are used simultaneously to obtain a large field of view, while still resolving the smaller scales prevalent in the flow. Additionally, a highly magnified field of view targeted at the near wall region is employed to capture the viscous sublayer and logarithmic region, with a spatial resolution of a few viscous length scales. Flow statistics from these measurements show good agreement with prior, well resolved hot-wire anemometry measurements. Analysis shows that the instantaneous wall shear stress can be reliably computed, which is historically known to be challenging in boundary layers. A statistical assessment of the wall shear stress shows good agreement with existing correlations, prior experimental and direct numerical simulation data, extending this view to much higher Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, conditional analysis using multiple magnification levels is detailed, to study near-wall events associated with high skin friction fluctuations and their associated overlaying structures in the log region. Results definitively show that the passage of very large-scale positive (or negative) velocity fluctuations are associated with increased (or reduced) small-scale variance in wall shear stress fluctuations.

  3. Accurate measurement of transgene copy number in crop plants using droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Collier, Ray; Dasgupta, Kasturi; Xing, Yan-Ping; Hernandez, Bryan Tarape; Shao, Min; Rohozinski, Dominica; Kovak, Emma; Lin, Jeanie; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza P; Stover, Ed; McCue, Kent F; Harmon, Frank G; Blechl, Ann; Thomson, James G; Thilmony, Roger

    2017-02-23

    Genetic transformation is a powerful means for the improvement of crop plants, but requires labor and resource intensive methods. An efficient method for identifying single copy transgene insertion events from a population of independent transgenic lines is desirable. Currently transgene copy number is estimated by either Southern blot hybridization analyses or quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments. Southern hybridization is a convincing and reliable method, but it also is expensive, time-consuming and often requires a large amount of genomic DNA and radioactively labeled probes. Alternatively, qPCR requires less DNA and is potentially simpler to perform, but its results can lack the accuracy and precision needed to confidently distinguish between one and two copy events in transgenic plants with large genomes. To address this need, we developed a droplet digital PCR (dPCR)-based method for transgene copy number measurement in an array of crops: rice, citrus, potato, maize, tomato, and wheat. The method utilizes specific primers to amplify target transgenes, and endogenous reference genes in a single duplexed reaction containing thousands of droplets. Endpoint amplicon production in the droplets is detected and quantified using sequence-specific fluorescently labeled probes. The results demonstrate that this approach can generate confident copy number measurements in independent transgenic lines in these crop species. This method and the compendium of probes and primers will be a useful resource for the plant research community, enabling the simple and accurate determination of transgene copy number in these six important crop species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Electronic measurement of strain effects on spin transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Lan; Tinkey, Holly; Appelbaum, Ian

    Spin transport in silicon is limited by the Elliott-Yafet spin relaxation mechanism, which is driven by scattering between degenerate conduction band valleys. Mechanical strain along a valley axis partially breaks this degeneracy, and will ultimately quench intervalley spin relaxation for transitions between states on orthogonal axes. Using a custom-designed and constructed strain probe, we study the effects of uniaxial compressive strain along the < 100 > direction on ballistic tunnel junction devices used to inject spin-polarized electrons into silicon. The effects of strain-induced valley splitting will be presented and compared to our theoretical model. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract No. N000141410317, the National Science Foundation under Contract No. ECCS-1231855, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-13-1-0013, and the Maryland NanoCenter.

  5. Improvement of Pulping Uniformity by Measurement of Single Fiber Kappa Number

    SciTech Connect

    Richard R. Gustafson; James B. Callis

    2001-11-20

    A method to measure the kappa of single fibers by staining with a fluorescent dye, Acridine Orange (AO), has been developed. This method is now applied to develop and automated flow-through instrument that permits routine kappa analysis on thousands of images of AO stained fibers to give the fiber kappa number distribution of a pulp sample in a few minutes. The design and operation of the instrument are similar to that of a flow cytometer but with the addition of extensive fiber imaging capability. Fluorescence measurements in the flow-through instrument are found to be consistent with those made with fluorescence microscope provided the signal processing in the flow-thou instrument is handled propertly. The kappa distributions of pulps that were analyzed by means of a density gradient column are compared to those measured with the flow-through instrument with good results. The kappa distributions of various laboratory pulps and commercial pulps have been measured. It has been found that all pulps are non-uniform but that ommercial pulps generally have broader kappa distributions thatn their laboratory counterparts. The effects of different pulping methods and chip pretreatments on pulp uniformity are discussed in the report. Finally, the application of flow-through fluorescence technology to other single fiber measurements are presented.

  6. Multiple regression based imputation for individualizing template human model from a small number of measured dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nohara, Ryuki; Endo, Yui; Murai, Akihiko; Takemura, Hiroshi; Kouchi, Makiko; Tada, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    Individual human models are usually created by direct 3D scanning or deforming a template model according to the measured dimensions. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate all the necessary dimensions (full set) for the human model individualization from a small number of measured dimensions (subset) and human dimension database. For this purpose, we solved multiple regression equation from the dimension database given full set dimensions as the objective variable and subset dimensions as the explanatory variables. Thus, the full set dimensions are obtained by simply multiplying the subset dimensions to the coefficient matrix of the regression equation. We verified the accuracy of our method by imputing hand, foot, and whole body dimensions from their dimension database. The leave-one-out cross validation is employed in this evaluation. The mean absolute errors (MAE) between the measured and the estimated dimensions computed from 4 dimensions (hand length, breadth, middle finger breadth at proximal, and middle finger depth at proximal) in the hand, 2 dimensions (foot length, breadth, and lateral malleolus height) in the foot, and 1 dimension (height) and weight in the whole body are computed. The average MAE of non-measured dimensions were 4.58% in the hand, 4.42% in the foot, and 3.54% in the whole body, while that of measured dimensions were 0.00%.

  7. Measurement of off-diagonal transport coefficients in two-phase flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, T S; Goode, P A

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent description of low capillary number two-phase flow in porous media relies on the independence of phase transport. An extended Darcy's law with a saturation dependent effective permeability is used for each phase. The driving force for each phase is given by its pressure gradient and the body force. This diagonally dominant form neglects momentum transfer from one phase to the other. Numerical and analytical modeling in regular geometries have however shown that while this approximation is simple and acceptable in some cases, many practical problems require inclusion of momentum transfer across the interface. Its inclusion leads to a generalized form of extended Darcy's law in which both the diagonal relative permeabilities and the off-diagonal terms depend not only on saturation but also on the viscosity ratio. Analogous to application of thermodynamics to dynamical systems, any of the extended forms of Darcy's law assumes quasi-static interfaces of fluids for describing displacement problems. Despite the importance of the permeability coefficients in oil recovery, soil moisture transport, contaminant removal, etc., direct measurements to infer the magnitude of the off-diagonal coefficients have been lacking. The published data based on cocurrent and countercurrent displacement experiments are necessarily indirect. In this paper, we propose a null experiment to measure the off-diagonal term directly. For a given non-wetting phase pressure-gradient, the null method is based on measuring a counter pressure drop in the wetting phase required to maintain a zero flux. The ratio of the off-diagonal coefficient to the wetting phase diagonal coefficient (relative permeability) may then be determined. The apparatus is described in detail, along with the results obtained. We demonstrate the validity of the experimental results and conclude the paper by comparing experimental data to numerical simulation.

  8. Particle number emissions of motor traffic derived from street canyon measurements in a Central European city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, S.; Birmili, W.; Voigtländer, J.; Tuch, T.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Ketzel, M.

    2009-02-01

    A biennial dataset of ambient particle number size distributions (diameter range 4-800 nm) collected in urban air in Leipzig, Germany, was analysed with respect to the influence of traffic emissions. Size distributions were sampled continuously in 2005 and 2006 inside a street canyon trafficked by ca. 10 000 motor vehicles per day, and at a background reference site distant at 1.5 km. Auto-correlation analysis showed that the impact of fresh traffic emissions could be seen most intensely below particle sizes of 60 nm. The traffic-induced concentration increment at roadside was estimated by subtracting the urban background values from the street canyon measurement. To describe the variable dispersion conditions inside the street canyon, micro-meteorological dilution factors were calculated using the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM), driven by above-roof wind speed and wind direction observations. The roadside increment concentrations, dilution factor, and real-time traffic counts were used to calculate vehicle emission factors (aerosol source rates) that are representative of the prevailing driving conditions, i.e. stop-and-go traffic including episodes of fluent traffic flow at speeds up to 40 km h-1. The size spectrum of traffic-derived particles was essentially bimodal - with mode diameters around 12 and 100 nm, while statistical analysis suggested that the emitted number concentration varied with time of day, wind direction, particle size and fleet properties. Significantly, the particle number emissions depended on ambient temperature, ranging between 4.8 (±1.8) and 7.8 (±2.9).1014 p. veh-1 km-1 in summer and winter, respectively. A separation of vehicle types according to vehicle length suggested that lorry-like vehicles emit about 80 times more particle number than passenger car-like vehicles. Using nitrogen oxide (NOx) measurements, specific total particle number emissions of 338 p. (pg NOx)-1 were inferred. The calculated traffic emission factors

  9. Validation of bed-load transport measurements with time-sequenced bathymetric data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in bathymetric data acquisition have made it possible to adopt a new, expedient method for measuring bed load transport in rivers. The method consists of comparing time sequenced bathymetric data sets and utilizing a simple mass conservation relation for bed load transport. Assuming a tri...

  10. The Experimental Measurement of Aerodynamic Heating About Complex Shapes at Supersonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.; Freeman, Delma C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 a wind tunnel test program was implemented to update the experimental data available for predicting protuberance heating at supersonic Mach numbers. For this test the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel was also used. The significant differences for this current test were the advances in the state-of-the-art in model design, fabrication techniques, instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities. This current paper provides a focused discussion of the results of an in depth analysis of unique measurements of recovery temperature obtained during the test.

  11. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the case of measures based on traffic flow changes or reductions in vehicle use, the data must include observed changes in vehicle miles traveled and average speeds. (c) The data must be maintained in such...

  12. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the case of measures based on traffic flow changes or reductions in vehicle use, the data must include observed changes in vehicle miles traveled and average speeds. (c) The data must be maintained in such...

  13. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the case of measures based on traffic flow changes or reductions in vehicle use, the data must include observed changes in vehicle miles traveled and average speeds. (c) The data must be maintained in such...

  14. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the case of measures based on traffic flow changes or reductions in vehicle use, the data must include observed changes in vehicle miles traveled and average speeds. (c) The data must be maintained in such...

  15. 40 CFR 51.213 - Transportation control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the case of measures based on traffic flow changes or reductions in vehicle use, the data must include observed changes in vehicle miles traveled and average speeds. (c) The data must be maintained in such...

  16. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  17. Coordinate regulation of glucose transporter function, number, and gene expression by insulin and sulfonylureas in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P H; Moller, D; Flier, J S; Nayak, R C; Smith, R J

    1989-01-01

    The extrapancreatic actions of sulfonylureas on the glucose transport system were studied in the L6 line of cultured rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M) increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in differentiated L6 myotubes by 30-40% after 8 h of incubation. The sulfonylurea tolazamide (0.6 mg/ml, 22 h) had no effect on glucose uptake in the absence of insulin, but increased insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake twofold. The total cellular content of glucose transporters was assessed with a monoclonal anti-transporter antibody by a solid-phase ELISA method. Insulin (8 h) increased the quantity of glucose transporters, with a maximal twofold increase at 10(-7) M and a dose-response curve similar to that for insulin stimulation of glucose uptake. In spite of its lack of effect on glucose uptake, tolazamide alone (0.6 mg/ml) increased the cellular content of transporters by 70%. The effects of insulin and tolazamide on transporter gene expression were studied with probes derived from Hep G2 glucose transporter cDNA. Insulin increased the transporter mRNA level 1.7-fold, tolazamide increased it 1.5-fold, and the combination of insulin and tolazamide increased transporter mRNA 3-fold. It is concluded that sulfonylureas, together with insulin, enhance glucose uptake in L6 skeletal muscle cells by increasing the number of functioning glucose transport molecules. The long-term regulation of the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle by insulin and sulfonylureas in vivo may involve similar changes in transporter function, number, and gene expression. Images PMID:2661591

  18. Array measurements adapted to the number of available sensors: Theoretical and practical approach for ESAC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.; Garrido, J.; Peláez, J. A.; Martino, S.; Delgado, J.

    2016-05-01

    Array measurements of ambient noise have become a useful technique to estimate the surface wave dispersion curves and subsequently the subsurface elastic parameters that characterize the studied soil. One of the logistical handicaps associated with this kind of measurements is the requirement of several stations recording at the same time, which limits their applicability in the case of research groups without enough infrastructure resources. In this paper, we describe the theoretical basis of the ESAC method and we deduce how the number of stations needed to implement any array layout can be reduced to only two stations. In this way, we propose a new methodology to implement an N stations array layout by using only M stations (M < N), which will be recording in different positions of the original prearranged N stations geometry at different times. We also provide some practical guidelines to implement the proposed approach and we show different examples where the obtained results confirm the theoretical foundations. Thus, the study carried out reflects that we can use a minimum of 2 stations to deploy any array layout originally designed for higher number of sensors.

  19. Time resolved, near wall PIV measurements in a high Reynolds number turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, C.; Soria, J.; Stanislas, M.; Amili, O.; Bellani, G.; Cuvier, C.; Eisfelder, M.; Fiorini, T.; Graf, N.; Klinner, J.

    2016-11-01

    We report on near wall measurements of a turbulent pipe flow at shear Reynolds numbers up to Reτ = 40000 acquired in the CICLoPE facility near Bologna, Italy. With 900 mm diameter and 110 m length the facility offers a well-established turbulent flow with viscous length scales ranging from y+ = 85 μ m at Reτ = 5000 to y+ = 11 μ m at Reτ = 40000 . These length scales can be resolved with a high-speed PIV camera at image magnification near unity. For the measurement the light of a high-speed, double-pulse laser is focused into a 300 μ m thin light sheet that is introduced radially into the pipe. The light scattered by 1 μ m water-glycerol droplet seeding is observed from the side by the camera via a thin high-aspect ratio mirror with a field of view covering 20mm in wall-normal and 5mm in stream-wise direction. Statistically converged velocity profiles could be achieved using 70000 samples per sequence acquired at low laser repetition rates (100Hz). Higher sampling rates of 10 kHz provide temporally coherent data from which frequency spectra can be derived. Preliminary analysis of the data shows a well resolved inner peak that grows with increasing Reynolds number. (Project funding through EuHIT - www.euhit.org)

  20. Drag Measurements over Embedded Cavities in a Low Reynolds Number Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, Caleb; Lang, Amy; Jones, Robert

    2010-11-01

    Recent research has revealed that thin-walled, embedded cavities in low Reynolds number flow have the potential to reduce the net viscous drag force acting on the surface. This reduction is due to the formation of embedded vortices allowing the outer flow to pass over the surface via a roller bearing effect. It is also hypothesized that the scales found on butterfly wings may act in a similar manner to cause a net increase in flying efficiency. In this experimental study, rectangular embedded cavities were designed as a means of successfully reducing the net drag across surfaces in a low Reynolds number flow. A Couette flow was generated via a rotating conveyor belt immersed in a tank of high viscosity mineral oil above which the plates with embedded cavities were placed. Drag induced on the plate models was measured using a force gauge and compared directly to measurements acquired over a flat plate. Various cavity aspect ratios and gap heights were tested in order to determine the conditions under which the greatest drag reductions occurred.

  1. Disordered Fermi liquid in epitaxial graphene from quantum transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Lara-Avila, Samuel; Tzalenchuk, Alexander; Kubatkin, Sergey; Yakimova, Rositza; Janssen, T J B M; Cedergren, Karin; Bergsten, Tobias; Fal'ko, Vladimir

    2011-10-14

    We have performed magnetotransport measurements on monolayer epitaxial graphene and analyzed them in the framework of the disordered Fermi liquid theory. We have separated the electron-electron and weak-localization contributions to resistivity and demonstrated the phase coherence over a micrometer length scale, setting the limit of at least 50 ps on the spin relaxation time in this material.

  2. Optimal Number of Angle Images for Calculating Anterior Angle Volume and Iris Volume Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blieden, Lauren S.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Baker, Laura A.; Bell, Nicholas P.; Fuller, Timothy S.; Mankiewicz, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We determined the optimal number of angle images required to obtain reliable measurements of trabecular-iris circumferential volume (TICV) and iris volume (IV) using swept-source Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (SSFD-ASOCT) scans in narrow angle eyes. Methods. Scleral spur landmarks (SSL) were manually identified on ASOCT angle images from 128 meridians from each of 24 eyes with chronic primary angle closure (PAC) spectrum of disease. The anterior and posterior corneal curves, and the anterior and posterior iris surfaces were identified automatically by the anterior chamber analysis and interpretation (ACAI) software, then manually examined and edited by the reader if required. Trabecular-iris circumferential volume at 750 μm from SSL (TICV750) and IV were subsequently calculated using varying numbers of angle images. Threshold error was determined to be less than the lower 95% confidence limit of mean absolute percent error (MAPE) of the change in TICV or IV resulting from laser peripheral iridotomy, which would be 17% for TICV and 5% for IV, based on previous studies. The optimal number of angle images was the smallest number of images where MAPE was less than this threshold for TICV and IV. Results. A total of 32 equally-spaced angle images (16 meridians) was required to estimate TICV750 and 16 angle images (8 meridians) to estimate IV. Both were within 4.6% and 1.6% of MAPE, respectively. Conclusions. It is possible to determine TICV and IV parameters reliably in narrow angles without evaluating all 128 meridians obtained with SSFD-ASOCT. PMID:25829412

  3. Flow and particle dispersion in a pulmonary alveolus--part I: velocity measurements and convective particle transport.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sudhaker; Prasad, Ajay K

    2010-05-01

    The alveoli are the smallest units of the lung that participate in gas exchange. Although gas transport is governed primarily by diffusion due to the small length scales associated with the acinar region (approximately 500 microm), the transport and deposition of inhaled aerosol particles are influenced by convective airflow patterns. Therefore, understanding alveolar fluid flow and mixing is a necessary first step toward predicting aerosol transport and deposition in the human acinar region. In this study, flow patterns and particle transport have been measured using a simplified in-vitro alveolar model consisting of a single alveolus located on a bronchiole. The model comprises a transparent elastic 5/6 spherical cap (representing the alveolus) mounted over a circular hole on the side of a rigid circular tube (representing the bronchiole). The alveolus is capable of expanding and contracting in phase with the oscillatory flow through the tube. Realistic breathing conditions were achieved by exercising the model at physiologically relevant Reynolds and Womersley numbers. Particle image velocimetry was used to measure the resulting flow patterns in the alveolus. Data were acquired for five cases obtained as combinations of the alveolar-wall motion (nondeforming/oscillating) and the bronchiole flow (none/steady/oscillating). Detailed vector maps at discrete points within a given cycle revealed flow patterns, and transport and mixing of bronchiole fluid into the alveolar cavity. The time-dependent velocity vector fields were integrated over multiple cycles to estimate particle transport into the alveolar cavity and deposition on the alveolar wall. The key outcome of the study is that alveolar-wall motion enhances mixing between the bronchiole and the alveolar fluid. Particle transport and deposition into the alveolar cavity are maximized when the alveolar wall oscillates in tandem with the bronchiole fluid, which is the operating case in the human lung.

  4. Review of Skin Friction Measurements Including Recent High-Reynolds Number Results from NASA Langley NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Hall, Robert M.; Anders, John B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews flat plate skin friction data from early correlations of drag on plates in water to measurements in the cryogenic environment of The NASA Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF) in late 1996. The flat plate (zero pressure gradient with negligible surface curvature) incompressible skin friction at high Reynolds numbers is emphasized in this paper, due to its importance in assessing the accuracy of measurements, and as being important to the aerodynamics of large scale vehicles. A correlation of zero pressure gradient skin friction data minimizing extraneous effects between tests is often used as the first step in the calculation of skin friction in complex flows. Early data compiled by Schoenherr for a range of momentum thickness Reynolds numbers, R(sub Theta) from 860 to 370,000 contained large scatter, but has proved surprisingly accurate in its correlated form. Subsequent measurements in wind tunnels under more carefully controlled conditions have provided inputs to this database, usually to a maximum R(sub Theta) of about 40,000. Data on a large axisymmetric model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility extends the upper limit in incompressible R(sub Theta) to 619,800 using the van Driest transformation. Previous data, test techniques, and error sources ar discussed, and the NTF data will be discussed in detail. The NTF Preston tube and Clauser inferred data accuracy is estimated to be within -2 percent of a power-law curve fit, and falls above the Spalding theory by 1 percent at R(sub Theta) of about 600,000.

  5. Transport currents measured in ring samples: test of superconducting weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Claus, H.; Chen, L.; Paulikas, A. P.; Veal, B. W.; Olsson, B.; Koshelev, A.; Hull, J.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2001-02-01

    The critical current densities in bulk melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O x and across superconducting “weld” joints are measured using scanning Hall probe measurements of the trapped magnetic field in ring samples. With this method, critical current densities are obtained without the use of electrical contacts. Large persistent currents are induced in ring samples at 77 K, after cooling in a 3 kG field. These currents can be determined from the magnetic field they produce. At 77 K a supercurrent exceeding 2000 A (about 10 4 A/cm 2) was induced in a 2 cm diameter ring; this current produces a magnetic field exceeding 1.5 kG in the bore of the ring. We demonstrate that when a ring is cut, and the cut is repaired by a superconducting weld, the weld joint can transmit the same high supercurrent as the bulk.

  6. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  7. Reference dataset of volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties for atmospheric measurement retrievals and transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Andreas; Durant, Adam; Sytchkova, Anna; Diplas, Spyros; Bonadonna, Costanza; Scarnato, Barbara; Krüger, Kirstin; Kylling, Arve; Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions emit up to 50 wt.% (total erupted mass) of fine ash particles (<63 microns), which individually can have theoretical atmospheric lifetimes that span hours to days. Depending on the injection height, fine ash may be subsequently transported and dispersed by the atmosphere over 100s - 1000s km and can pose a major threat for aviation operations. Recent volcanic eruptions, such as the 2010 Icelandic Eyjafjallajökull event, illustrated how volcanic ash can severely impact commercial air traffic. In order to manage the threat, it is important to have accurate forecast information on the spatial extent and absolute quantity of airborne volcanic ash. Such forecasts are constrained by empirically-derived estimates of the volcanic source term and the nature of the constituent volcanic ash properties. Consequently, it is important to include a quantitative assessment of measurement uncertainties of ash properties to provide realistic ash forecast uncertainty. Currently, information on volcanic ash physicochemical and optical properties is derived from a small number of somewhat dated publications. In this study, we provide a reference dataset for physical (size distribution and shape), chemical (bulk vs. surface chemistry) and optical properties (complex refractive index in the UV-vis-NIR range) of a representative selection of volcanic ash samples from 10 different volcanic eruptions covering the full variability in silica content (40-75 wt.% SiO2). Through the combination of empirical analytical methods (e.g., image analysis, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and UV/Vis/NIR/FTIR Spectroscopy) and theoretical models (e.g., Bruggeman effective medium approach), it was possible to fully capture the natural variability of ash physicochemical and optical characteristics. The dataset will be applied in atmospheric measurement retrievals and atmospheric transport modelling to determine

  8. Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N.

    1998-05-01

    Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

  9. Measurements of Electrical Transport Phenomena in Semiconductor Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    equivalent circuit for microwave time-of-flight measurements. 158 xiii 5.2 a) Simplified equivalent circuit . b) Circuit ...process. 219 C.1 Microwave C-V technique. a) Experimental configuration. b) Equivalent circuit for (a). 223 D.1 Test configurations for beam profiling and X...reference point and ,rrors in the quantities W, i, and 4. 5.2. Circuit Effects In this section we present an equivalent circuit model for the

  10. Experimental evidence of interhemispheric transport from airborne carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, R. E.; Gauntner, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    During the period 28-30 October 1977, a Pan American 747-SP aircraft flew around the world with an automated instrument package that included measurements of atmospheric CO made every 4 sec. The flight path extended from San Francisco, over the North Pole to London, south to Capetown, over the South Pole to Auckland, and back to San Francisco. The data collected show large changes with longitude, which are interpreted as direct evidence of interhemispheric mixing. Possible sources for CO are discussed.

  11. Differences in rating curve and hydrograph uncertainty due to streamflow dynamics and number of discharge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstand Poulsen, Jane; Bering Ovesen, Niels; Larsen, Søren Erik; Tornbjerg, Henrik

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty related to the use of rating curves for hydrograph estimation is strongly affected if changes in cross-sectional geometry or friction properties occur, especially if the changes are abrupt. In lowland moderately sized streams in temperate regions, such flow changes are often associated with seasonal weed growth. The gradual increase in channel bed roughness caused by weed growth is commonly accounted for by a likewise gradual shift of the rating curve according to monthly discharge measurements. However, this measurement approach is sensitive to abrupt changes in flow, which occur for instance in dynamic streams exhibiting a large difference between maximum and minimum flow or during high summer flows or winter flooding. Hence, the purpose of this study is to investigate the role that dynamic versus stable streams play in terms of uncertainty of establishing rating curves and calculating hydrographs with the traditional stage-discharge approach. Such an analysis is highly valuable in terms of addressing the possibility of adapting hydrograph estimation procedures to the specific streamflow dynamics, thereby quantifying and potentially lowering the uncertainty of hydrograph estimates. Based on results from the Danish national rainfall-runoff model, ratios between yearly median maximum and median minimum stream discharge were calculated for 15 km2 sub-catchments for the entire country. Based on these values, ten gauging stations were selected, located to cover the range of flow regimes represented by the calculated max/min discharge ratios. The selected gauging stations were all stations that had at least three consecutive years with historical data series where direct stream discharge had been measured twenty or more times each year. Based on these data series, new sub-series were created by continuously thinning out the number of discharge measurements. Then, for each of these constructed data series a rating curve and a hydrograph were established

  12. Hardware random number generator base on monostable multivibrators dedicated for distributed measurement and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel

    2013-10-01

    The hardware random number generator based on the 74121 monostable multivibrators for applications in cryptographically secure distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources was presented. This device was implemented on the basis of the physical electronic vibration generator in which the circuit is composed of two "loop" 74121 monostable multivibrators, D flip-flop and external clock signal source. The clock signal, witch control D flip-flop was generated by a computer on one of the parallel port pins. There was presented programmed the author's acquisition process of random data from the measuring system to a computer. The presented system was designed, builded and thoroughly tested in the term of cryptographic security in our laboratory, what there is the most important part of this publication. Real cryptographic security was tested based on the author's software and the software environment called RDieHarder. The obtained results was here presented and analyzed in detail with particular reference to the specificity of distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources.

  13. Number size distribution measurements of biological aerosols under contrasting environments and seasons from southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Cv, Biju; Krishna, Ravi; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2016-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. Though omnipresent, their concentration and composition exhibit large spatial and temporal variations depending up on their sources, land-use, and local meteorology. The Indian tropical region, which constitutes approximately 18% of the world's total population exhibits vast geographical extend and experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the sources, properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to have significant variations over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the location and seasons. Here we present the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) from two contrasting locations in Southern tropical India measured during contrasting seasons using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS). Measurements were carried out at a pristine high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) during two contrasting seasons, South-West Monsoon (June-August, 2014) and winter (Jan - Feb, 2015) and in Chennai, a coastal urban area, during July - November 2015. FBAP concentrations at both the locations showed large variability with higher concentrations occurring at Chennai. Apart from regional variations, the FBAP concentrations also exhibited variations over two different seasons under the same environmental condition. In Munnar the FBAP concentration increased by a factor of four from South-West Monsoon to winter season. The average size distribution of FBAP at both

  14. Conductive heat flux in measurements of the Nusselt number in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga; Weiss, Stephan; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-10-01

    We propose a recipe to calculate accurately the Nusselt number Nu in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using the measured total heat flux q and known parameters of the fluid and convection cell. More precisely, we present a method to compute the conductive heat flux q ̂, which is a normalization of q in the definition of Nu, for conditions where the fluid parameters may vary strongly across the fluid layer. We show that in the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation and also when the thermal conductivity depends exclusively on the temperature, the value of q ̂ is determined by simple explicit formulas. For a general non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq (NOB) case we propose an iterative procedure to compute q ̂. Using our procedure, we critically analyze some already conducted and some hypothetical experiments and show how q ̂ is influenced by the NOB effects.

  15. Detailed Measurements of Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm J. Andrews, Ph.D.

    2004-12-14

    This project has two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. Also, studies of multi-layer mixing with the existing water channel facility. Over the last twelve (12) months there has been excellent progress, detailed in this report, with both tasks. As of December 10, 2004, the air/helium facility is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Currently experiments with air/helium up to Atwood numbers of 0.25 (the maximum is 0.75, but the highest Reynolds numbers are at 0.25) are being performed. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget, and we expect this to continue for 2005. With interest expressed from LLNL we have continued with initial condition studies using the water channel. This work has also progressed well, with one of the graduate Research Assistants (Mr. Nick Mueschke) visiting LLNL the past two summers to work with Dr. O. Schilling. Several journal papers are in preparation that describe the work. Two MSc.'s have been completed (Mr. Nick Mueschke, and Mr. Wayne Kraft, 12/1/03). Nick and Wayne are both pursuing Ph.D.s' funded by this DOE Alliances project. Presently three (3) Ph.D. graduate Research Assistants are supported on the project, and two (2) undergraduate Research Assistants. During the year two (2) journal papers and two (2) conference papers have been published, ten (10) presentations made at conferences, and three (3) invited presentations.

  16. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  17. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  18. Measurements of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of some amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, Prashant S.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2014-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients of some amino acids, such as DL-aspartic acid-LR(C4H7NO4), L-glutamine (C4H10N2O3), creatine monohydrate LR(C4H9N3O2H2O), creatinine hydrochloride (C4H7N3O·HCl) L-asparagine monohydrate(C4H9N3O2H2O), L-methionine LR(C5H11NO2S), were measured at 122, 356, 511, 662, 1170, 1275 and 1330 keV photon energies using a well-collimated narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 0.101785 at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and effective electron densities (Neff) of amino acids. It was observed that the effective atomic number (Zeff) and effective electron densities (Neff) initially decrease and tend to be almost constant as a function of gamma-ray energy. Zeff and Neff experimental values showed good agreement with the theoretical values with less than 1% error for amino acids.

  19. Fast response temperature and humidity sensors for measurements in high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Arwatz, Gilad; Vallikivi, Margit; Hultmark, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Conventional hot/cold wires have been widely used in measuring velocity and temperature in turbulent flows due to their fine resolutions and fast response. However, for very high Reynolds number flows, limitations on the resolution appear. A very high Reynolds number flow is the atmospheric boundary layer. In order to accurately predict the energy balance at the Earth's surface, one needs information about the different turbulent scalar fields, mainly temperature and humidity, which together with velocity, contribute to the turbulent fluxes away from the surface. The nano-scaled thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) was previously developed at Princeton and has proven to have much higher spatial and temporal resolution than the regular hot wires. Here we introduce new fast-response temperature and humidity sensors that have been developed and tested. These sensors are made in-house using standard MEMS manufacturing techniques, leaving high flexibility in the process for optimization to different conditions. The small dimensions of these novel sensors enable very high spatial resolution while the small thermal mass allows significant improvements in the frequency response. These sensors have shown promising results in acquiring un-biased data of turbulent scalar and vector fields. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  20. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  1. Measuring effective radium concentration with large numbers of samples. Part II--general properties and representativity.

    PubMed

    Girault, Frédéric; Perrier, Frédéric

    2012-11-01

    Effective radium concentration EC(Ra), product of radium concentration and radon emanation, is the source term for radon release into the pore space of rocks and the environment. Over a period of three years, we performed more than 6000 radon-222 accumulation experiments in the laboratory with scintillation flasks and SSNTDs and we obtained experimental EC(Ra) values from more than 1570 rock and soil samples. With this method, which allowed the measurement of EC(Ra) from large numbers of samples with sufficient accuracy and uncertainty, as detailed in the companion paper, the dependence of the emanation factor on temperature and moisture content is revisited. In addition, with such a large EC(Ra) dataset, dispersion of EC(Ra) can be studied at sample-scale (cm to dm) and at scarp-scale (m to tens of m). Furthermore, we are able to discuss the representativity of obtained EC(Ra) values at field-scale, and to investigate the spatial variations of EC(Ra) over kilometric scales, within geological formations and across formations and faults. This experimental study opens new perspectives in the understanding of radium geochemistry and illustrates the importance of studying the radon source term with large numbers of samples for the modelling of geological and environmental processes, and also for the assessment of the radon health hazard.

  2. Transport measurements on a thin Nb film with square array of nanoscale magnetic dots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Luis B.; Mast, David B.

    2002-03-01

    Transport measurements (R vs. T, R vs. B, and V-I characteristics) were made on a thin Nb film deposited on top of a square array of nanoscale magnetic dots [1]. These measurements established that in many ways this system behaved like a Josephson junction array (JJA). We hypothesized that the stray magnetic field of the dots reduced the superconductivity in the Nb film in such a way as to make the film a superconductor-weaker superconductor-superconductor (S-S-S) JJA. Studies of the VIs in the presence of a radio frequency (rf) signal revealed the appearance of Shapiro steps in the VI's. The voltage location at which the steps occurred follow the Josephson relation Vn=n*N*(h/2)*ν, where n=1,2,3, etc, N is the number of junctions along the current direction, and ν is the frequency of the rf signal. Sample provided by Dr. Axel Hoffmann from Argonne National Laboratory and Dr. Ivan K. Schuller from UCSD. [1] J. I. Martin, Y. Jaccard, A. Hoffmann, J. Nogues, J. M. George, J. I. Vicent, and I. K. Schuller, J. Appl. Physics. 84, 411 (1998)

  3. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  4. The Measurement of the Number of Light Neutrino Species at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Within weeks of the start of the data taking at the LEP accelerator, the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments were able to confirm the existence of just three light neutrino species. This measurement relies on the Standard Model relation between the `invisible' width of the Z-boson and the cross-sections for Z-boson production and subsequent decay into hadrons. The full data sample collected by the experiments at and around the Z-boson resonance allows a high-precision measurement of the number of light neutrino species as 2.9840 ± 0.0082. The uncertainty is mostly due to the understanding of the low-angle Bhabha scattering process used to determine the experimental luminosity. This result is independently confirmed by the elegant direct observation of the e^-e^+ to ν bar{ν}γ process, through the detection of an initial-state-radiation photon in otherwise empty detectors. This result confirms expectations from the existence of three charged leptons species, and contributes to the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. Alongside other LEP achievements, the precision of this result is a testament to the global cooperation underpinning CERN's fourth decade. LEP saw the onset of large-scale collaboration across experiments totaling over 2000 scientists, together with a strong partnership within the wider high-energy physics community: from accelerator operations to the understanding of theoretical processes.

  5. Utilizing photon number parity measurements to demonstrate quantum computation with cat-states in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, A.; Ofek, N.; Vlastakis, B.; Sun, L.; Leghtas, Z.; Heeres, R.; Sliwa, K. M.; Mirrahimi, M.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-03-01

    Realizing a working quantum computer requires overcoming the many challenges that come with coupling large numbers of qubits to perform logical operations. These include improving coherence times, achieving high gate fidelities, and correcting for the inevitable errors that will occur throughout the duration of an algorithm. While impressive progress has been made in all of these areas, the difficulty of combining these ingredients to demonstrate an error-protected logical qubit, comprised of many physical qubits, still remains formidable. With its large Hilbert space, superior coherence properties, and single dominant error channel (single photon loss), a superconducting 3D resonator acting as a resource for a quantum memory offers a hardware-efficient alternative to multi-qubit codes [Leghtas et.al. PRL 2013]. Here we build upon recent work on cat-state encoding [Vlastakis et.al. Science 2013] and photon-parity jumps [Sun et.al. 2014] by exploring the effects of sequential measurements on a cavity state. Employing a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to two superconducting resonators in a cQED architecture, we explore further the application of parity measurements to characterizing such a hybrid qubit/cat state architecture. In so doing, we demonstrate the promise of integrating cat states as central constituents of future quantum codes.

  6. Thermal transport in suspended silicon membranes measured by laser-induced transient gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Flick, A.; Duncan, R. A.; Eliason, J. K.; Cuffe, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Peraud, J.-P. M.; Zeng, L.; Lu, Z.; Maznev, A. A.; Wang, E. N.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Sledzinska, M.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Chen, G.; Nelson, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Studying thermal transport at the nanoscale poses formidable experimental challenges due both to the physics of the measurement process and to the issues of accuracy and reproducibility. The laser-induced transient thermal grating (TTG) technique permits non-contact measurements on nanostructured samples without a need for metal heaters or any other extraneous structures, offering the advantage of inherently high absolute accuracy. We present a review of recent studies of thermal transport in nanoscale silicon membranes using the TTG technique. An overview of the methodology, including an analysis of measurements errors, is followed by a discussion of new findings obtained from measurements on both "solid" and nanopatterned membranes. The most important results have been a direct observation of non-diffusive phonon-mediated transport at room temperature and measurements of thickness-dependent thermal conductivity of suspended membranes across a wide thickness range, showing good agreement with first-principles-based theory assuming diffuse scattering at the boundaries. Measurements on a membrane with a periodic pattern of nanosized holes (135nm) indicated fully diffusive transport and yielded thermal diffusivity values in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the results obtained to-date, we conclude that room-temperature thermal transport in membrane-based silicon nanostructures is now reasonably well understood.

  7. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  8. Number Sense and the Calculating Child: Measure, Multiplicity and Mathematical Monsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Children and animals of all kinds are said to develop some degree of number sense. The search for "number neurons" and neural correlates of computational thinking aims to identify biological primitives to explain the emergence of number sense. This work typically looks for the sources of number sense in organisms, but one might extend…

  9. Atmospheric effects on infrared measurements at ground level: Application to monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Vincent; Dumoulin, Jean

    2014-05-01

    and the water. These changes in refractive indexes lead to the evolution of extinction coefficient Kext according to relative humidity. Using such models in very low visibility conditions leads to the following question: Up to which optical depth (i.e. tau=Kext.d) can we use a simple scattering model as Mie Theory? To show the effect of multiple scattering on previous transmission estimation, Monte-Carlo calculations have been performed. Calculations used a software dedicated to photometrical rendering of fog (PROF [5]). Up to an optical depth tau=1, simple and multiple scatterings differ of less than 2%. For tau >1 the simple scattering model is no more available to keep the error less than 10%. Finally, study of fog effect is proposed. Results obtained by numerical simulations but also by experiments carried out in a dedicated fog tunnel are presented and discussed. Perspectives about possible implementation on on site measurement systems are evocated. REFERENCES [1]Proto M. et al., , 2010. Transport infrastructure surveillance and monitoring by electromagnetic sensing: the ISTIMES project. Sensors, 10,10620-10639, doi: 10.3390/s101210620. [2]J. Dumoulin, A. Crinière, R. Averty ," Detection and thermal characterization of the inner structure of the "Musmeci" bridge deck by infrared thermography monitoring ",Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, Volume 10, Number 2, November 2013, IOP Science, doi:10.1088/1742-2132/10/6/064003. [3]Shettle. P. and Fenn R. W., "Models for the aerosols of the lower atmosphere and the effects of humidity variations on their optical properties", Air Force Geophysics Laboratory 79-0214, (1979). [4]30. Hänel, Gottfried, "The properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as functions of the relarive humidity at thermodynamic equilibrium with the surrounding moist air, in Advances in Geophysics, 73-188. Edited by H.E. Landsberg, and J. Van Mieghem, Academic Press, New York, 1976. [5]31. Dumont E., "Semi-Monte Carlo light tracing applied to

  10. Results and perspectives of particle transport measurements in gases in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, Andrei; Balapanov, Daniyar; Beresnev, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Solid or liquid particles floating in a gas belong to dispersed systems, most often referred to as aerosols or dust clouds. They are widely spread in nature, involving both environmental and technological issues. They attract growing attention in microgravity, particularly in complex plasma, simulation of protoplanetary dust clouds, atmospheric aerosol, etc. Brownian random walk, motion of particles in gravity, electrostatic and magnetic fields, are well defined. We present the survey showing that the quantitative description of a vast variety of other types of motion is much less accurate, often known only in a limited region of parameters, sometimes described by the contradictory models, poorly verified experimentally. It is true even for the most extensively investigated transport phenomena - thermophoresis and photophoresis, not to say about diffusiophoresis, gravito-photophoresis, various other types of particle motion driven by physicochemical transformation and accommodation peculiarities on the particle-gas interface, combination of different processes. The number of publications grow very quickly, only those dealing with thermophoresis exceeded 300 in 2015. Hence, there is a strong need in high quality experimental data on particle transport properties with growing interest to expand the scope for non-isometric particles, agglomerates, dense clouds, interrelation with the two-phase flow dynamics. In most cases, the accuracy and sometimes the entire possibility of the measurement is limited by the presence of gravity. Floating particles have the density considerably different from that of the gas. They sediment, often with gliding and tumbling, that perturbs the motion trajectory, local hydrodynamic environment around particles, all together complicating definition of the response. Measurements at very high or very low Knudsen numbers (rarefied gas or too big particles) are of particular difficulty. Experiments assume creating a well-defined force, i

  11. Measurement of Black Carbon and Particle Number Emission Factors from Individual Heavy-Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.

    2009-02-02

    Emission factors for black carbon (BC) and particle number (PN) were measured from 226 individual heavy-duty (HD) diesel-fueled trucks driving through a 1 km-long California highway tunnel in August 2006. Emission factors were based on concurrent increases in BC, PN, and CO{sub 2}B concentrations (measured at 1 Hz) that corresponded to the passage of individual HD trucks. The distributions of BC and PN emission factors from individual HD trucks are skewed, meaning that a large fraction of pollution comes from a small fraction of the in-use vehicle fleet. The highest-emitting 10% of trucks were responsible for {approx} 40% of total BC and PN emissions from all HD trucks. BC emissions were log-normally distributed with a mean emission factor of 1.7 g kg {sup -1} and maximum values of {approx} 10 g kg{sup -1}. Corresponding values for PN emission factors were 4.7 x 10{sup 15} and 4 x 10{sup 16} kg{sup -1}. There was minimal overlap among high-emitters of these two pollutants: only 1 of the 226 HD trucks measured was found to be among the highest 10% for both BC and PN. Monte Carlo resampling of the distribution of BC emission factors observed in this study revealed that uncertainties (1{sigma}) in extrapolating from a random sample of n HD trucks to a population mean emission factor ranged from {+-} 43% for n = 10 to {+-} 8% for n = 300, illustrating the importance of sufficiently large vehicle sample sizes in emissions studies. Studies with low sample sizes are also more easily biased due to misrepresentation of high-emitters. As vehicles become cleaner on average in future years, skewness of the emissions distributions will increase, and thus sample sizes needed to extrapolate reliably from a subset of vehicles to the entire in-use vehicle fleet are expected to become more of a challenge.

  12. Rural Rides--A Practical Handbook for Starting and Operating A Rural Public Transportation System. Program Aid Number 1215.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Farmers Home Administration.

    The transportation needs of the 30% of the population living in rural America, particularly those of the elderly, handicapped, poor, isolated, young, carless, and unemployed, are more critical than the needs of their counterparts in urban areas because of the lack of rural public transportation. Yet, only about 1% of the capitol federal investment…

  13. Spray washing, absorbent cornstarch powder, and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled transport cage flooring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler transport cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Allowing feces to dry is an effective but slow and logistically impractical means to kill Campylobacter in soiled transport cages. ...

  14. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  15. Probability Distributions of Measured Bedload Transport Rates with Application for Computing Sediment Rating Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaeuman, D. A.; Holt, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Variability in fractional bedload transport rates derived from 948 bedload samples collected over a 7-year period at 4 locations along the same river were analyzed to assess the variability in measured transport rates under similar transport conditions. Sediment transport rating curves fit to the sample data show that transport characteristics can vary markedly between sampling locations. In addition, transport rates at the same locations usually exhibit clockwise bedload hysteresis between the rising and falling limbs of the annual flood hydrograph, even though long-term transport characteristics have remained comparatively stable over the period of record. Thus, the full set of sample data was separated into 8 groups, consisting of a rising and falling limb population at each of the 4 locations, for subsequent analysis. This separation was intended to reduce systematic variability caused by seasonal factors and position along the river while ensuring that each group contains a large population of measurements. Within each group, dimensionless fractional transport rates were computed and sorted into bins defined by the ratio of shear stress to reference shear stresses estimated from the sample data for each grain size fraction and sampling location. The mean and standard deviation transport rates computed for each shear stress bin were found to fit Chi-squared cumulative probability functions with means and degrees of freedom that increased with the shear stress ratio. Mean dimensionless transport rates ranged about 0.002 for bins with average shear stresses near the reference value to more than 0.12 for bins with average shear stresses exceeding twice the reference value. The standard deviations in dimensionless transport within bins ranged less than 0.6 times the mean value for large transport rates up to about twice the mean value for small transport rates. The relationship between the means and standard deviation transport rates and the shear stress ratio was

  16. Direct measurement of chiral structure and transport in single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Taoran; Lin, Letian; Qin, Lu-Chang; Washburn, Sean

    2016-11-01

    Electrical devices based on suspended multi-wall carbon nanotubes were constructed and studied. The chiral structure of each shell in a particular nanotube was determined using nanobeam electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. The transport properties of the carbon nanotube were also measured. The nanotube device length was short enough that the transport was nearly ballistic, and multiple subbands contributed to the conductance. Thermal excitation of carriers significantly affected nanotube resistance at room temperature.

  17. Direct and High-Resolution Measurements of Retardation and Transport in Whole Rock Samples under Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Wang, J.

    2001-12-01

    Evaluation of chemical sorption and transport is very important in the investigations of contaminant remediation, risk assessment, and waste disposal (e.g., the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada). Characterization of transport parameters for whole rock samples has typically been performed in batch systems with arbitrary grain sizes and a high water/rock ratio. Measurement of these parameters under conditions more representative of fractured rocks in situ provides a better understanding of the processes occurring there. The effective Kd approach has been commonly employed to quantify the extent of contaminant-medium-fluid interactions. Unrepresentative Kd values will lead to unrealistic assessments of contaminant transport. Experimentally determined Kd values are predominantly obtained from batch experiments under saturated and well-mixed conditions. Batch-sorption experiments can be problematic because: (1) saturated conditions with large waterrock ratios are not representative of the in situ vadose condition, and (2) crushed rock samples are used, with the sample size (in the range of microns to sub-millimeters) chosen more or less arbitrarily and mainly for experimental convenience, and (3) for weakly sorbing contaminants, a batch-sorption approach can yield variable and even negative Kd values, because of the inherent methodology of calculating the Kd values by subtracting two large numbers (i.e., initial and final aqueous concentration). In this work, we use an unsaturated transport-sorption approach to quantify the sorption behavior of contaminants and evaluate the applicability of the conventional batch-sorption approach in unsaturated rock. Transient experiments are designed to investigate water imbibition and chemical transport into the rock sample (with size in the centimeter range) by contacting one end of a sample with water containing chemical tracers. Capillary-driven imbibition transports chemicals farther away

  18. Review of measured vibration and noise environments experienced by passengers in aircraft and in ground transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    Measured vibration and interior noise data are presented for a number of air and surface vehicles. Consideration is given to the importance of direction effects; of vehicle operations such as take-off, cruise, and landing; and of measurement location on the level and frequency of the measurements. Various physical measurement units or descriptors are used to quantify and compare the data. Results suggest the range of vibration and noise associated with a particular mode of transportation and illustrate the comparative levels in terms of each of the descriptors. Collectively, the results form a data base which may be useful in assessing the ride of existing or future systems relative to vehicles in current operation.

  19. Extending monetary values to broader performance and impact measures: Transportation applications and lessons for other fields.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Glen; Lynch, Teresa; Meyer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This article examines recent progress at assigning monetary values to what are normally considered "hard to quantify" benefits of transportation projects. It focuses on three types of impacts - environmental quality, health and wider economic impacts - to examine how transportation project evaluation methods have evolved in recent years and how they compare to methods used for evaluation of non-transportation programs. Examples of recent practice are provided to show how transport agencies are continuing to refine performance measures to include broader impacts in project evaluation. A classification is provided to distinguish direct traveler effects from indirect effects on non-travelers, a step important to maximize coverage and minimize double-counting of impacts. For each type of impact, the paper discusses the range of variation in monetized values and shows that the variation is due less to imprecision in measurement than to fundamental issues about whether to use damage compensation, impact avoidance costs, stated preferences or behavioral valuation perspectives to define those values. Case studies as diverse as Australian roads, Wisconsin energy programs and Appalachian economic development programs are used to show how common methods are evolving among transport and non-transport agencies to improve impact measurement and its use in project evaluation.

  20. Prescriptions for measuring and transporting local angular momenta in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Nichols, David A.; Stein, Leo C.; Vines, Justin

    2016-05-01

    For observers in curved spacetimes, elements of the dual space of the set of linearized Poincaré transformations from an observer's tangent space to itself can be naturally interpreted as local linear and angular momenta. We present an operational procedure by which observers can measure such quantities using only information about the spacetime curvature at their location. When applied by observers near spacelike or null infinity in stationary, vacuum, asymptotically flat spacetimes, there is a sense in which the procedure yields the well-defined linear and angular momenta of the spacetime. We also describe a general method by which observers can transport local linear and angular momenta from one point to another, which improves previous prescriptions. This transport is not path independent in general, but becomes path independent for the measured momenta in the same limiting regime. The transport prescription is defined in terms of differential equations, but it can also be interpreted as parallel transport in a particular direct-sum vector bundle. Using the curvature of the connection on this bundle, we compute and discuss the holonomy of the transport law. We anticipate that these measurement and transport definitions may ultimately prove useful for clarifying the physical interpretation of the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs charges of asymptotically flat spacetimes.

  1. Evaluation of 2001 springtime CO transport over West Africa using MOPITT CO measurements assimilated in a global chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradier, Stéphanie; Attié, Jean-Luc; Chong, Michel; Escobar, Juan; Peuch, Vincent-Henri; Lamarque, Jean-François; Khattatov, Boris; Edwards, David

    2006-07-01

    The global chemistry and transport model MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) is used to investigate the contribution of transport to the carbon monoxide (CO) distribution over West Africa during spring 2001. It is constrained with the CO profiles provided by the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument through a sequential assimilation technique based on a suboptimal Kalman filter. The improvement of tropospheric CO distribution from MOCAGE is evaluated by comparing the model results (with and without assimilation) with the MOPITT CO concentrations observed during the analysed period (between 2001 March 15 to 2001 April 30), and also with independent in situ CMDL and TRACE-P observations. The initial overestimation in high CO emissions areas (Africa, SE Asia and NW coast of South America) is considerably reduced by using the MOPITT CO assimilation. We analysed the assimilated CO for a period of three successive 15 d periods in terms of average fields over West Africa and contributions to the CO budget of transport and chemical sources. It is found that the horizontal and vertical CO distributions are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the large-scale flows during spring, marked by the onset of the low-level southerly monsoon flow and the gradual increase of the well-known African and tropical easterly jets at middle and upper levels, respectively. Total transport by the mean flow (horizontal plus vertical advection) is important in the CO budget since it mostly compensates the local sink or source generated by chemical reactions and small-scale processes. The major source of CO is concentrated in the lower troposphere (1000-800 hPa) mainly due to convergent low-level flow advecting CO from surrounding regions and surface emissions (biomass burning). Vertical transport removes 70% of this low-level CO and redistributes it in the middle troposphere (800-400 hPa) where chemical reactions and horizontal exports

  2. Unified Measurement System with Suction Control for Gas Transport Parameters in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Rouf, M. A.; Hamamoto, S.; Sakaki, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2010-12-01

    Pore geometric parameters including pore size distribution, total and air-filled porosities, pore tortuosity and connectivity strongly influence air flow in porous media, and, thus, characterize gas transport parameters such as gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka. In this study, the gas transport parameters were measured for porous media with varying textures under repeated drying and wetting cycles using a newly-developed measurement system, and the hysteretic behaviors in the gas transport parameters were examined. A unified measurement system with suction control (UMS_SC) was developed for measuring soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters sequentially under drying and wetting cycles. It consisted of a porous plate, diffusion chamber, sample ring (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height), tensiometer, soil moisture sensor, oxygen electrodes and air pressure gauges. Soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters (gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka) for differently textured materials including sand, molten slag , and a mixture material of MS and volcanic ash soil were measured under repeated drying and wetting cycles. The measurement for each porous material was initiated from a full saturation and suction head was increased/decreased in steps in the drainage/wetting cycles. Moreover, independent measurements of Dp and ka were carried out for repacked air-dried samples using a cylindrical mold (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height) in order to obtain the Dp and ka values at a full dry condition. The newly-developed UMS_SC performed well for the applied suction head less than 50 cm of water with corresponding saturation of roughly 0.3-0.5. The gas transport parameters were well measured at each suction head level under repeated drying and wetting cycles, and the measured gas transport parameters including the independent measurements were verified by literature data as well as

  3. A Validation of Eye Movements as a Measure of Elementary School Children's Developing Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael; Heine, Angela; Thaler, Verena; Torbeyns, Joke; De Smedt, Bert; Verschaffel, Lieven; Jacobs, Arthur M.; Stern, Elsbeth

    2008-01-01

    The number line estimation task captures central aspects of children's developing number sense, that is, their intuitions for numbers and their interrelations. Previous research used children's answer patterns and verbal reports as evidence of how they solve this task. In the present study we investigated to what extent eye movements recorded…

  4. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species.

  5. Tabulated pressure measurements on a large subsonic transport model airplane with high bypass ratio, powered, fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flechner, S. G.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation to determine the aerodynamic interference and the jet-wake interference associated with the wing, pylon, and high-bypass-ratio, powered, fan-jet model engines has been conducted on a typical high-wing logistics transport airplane configuration. Pressures were measured on the wing and pylons and on the surfaces of the engine fan cowl, turbine cowl, and plug. Combinations of wing, pylons, engines, and flow-through nacelles were tested, and the pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.700 to 0.825 and angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg.

  6. Lipid Droplets Purified from Drosophila Embryos as an Endogenous Handle for Precise Motor Transport Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, Tobias F.; Longoria, Rafael A.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Shubeita, George T.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins are responsible for long-range transport of vesicles and organelles. Recent works have elucidated the richness of the transport complex, with multiple teams of similar and dissimilar motors and their cofactors attached to individual cargoes. The interaction among these different proteins, and with the microtubules along which they translocate, results in the intricate patterns of cargo transport observed in cells. High-precision and high-bandwidth measurements are required to capture the dynamics of these interactions, yet the crowdedness in the cell necessitates performing such measurements in vitro. Here, we show that endogenous cargoes, lipid droplets purified from Drosophila embryos, can be used to perform high-precision and high-bandwidth optical trapping experiments to study motor regulation in vitro. Purified droplets have constituents of the endogenous transport complex attached to them and exhibit long-range motility. A novel method to determine the quality of the droplets for high-resolution measurements in an optical trap showed that they compare well with plastic beads in terms of roundness, homogeneity, position sensitivity, and trapping stiffness. Using high-resolution and high-bandwidth position measurements, we demonstrate that we can follow the series of binding and unbinding events that lead to the onset of active transport. PMID:24010661

  7. Laser particle counter validation for aeolian sand transport measurements using a highspeed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Campos, Leonardo; Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Oyarte-Gálvez, Loreto; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.

    2017-04-01

    Measuring aeolian sand transport rates in the field has been a long-standing challenge. In this paper, we present the results of a laboratory experiment to test the ability of a laser particle counter sensor (Wenglor) to accurately count sand grains of various grain size classes and stainless steel beads. We compared the count data collected by the Wenglor with images from a Highspeed camera which revealed the actual number of grains passing the laser beam. A Silicon photodiode was used to record the laser intensity reduction induced by the sand grain passage through the laser beam to derive the minimal necessary reduction for the Wenglor to count grains. For the two possible settings of the Wenglor, i.e., Minimal Teach-in or Normal Teach-in, a minimum of 18% and 78% blocking of the laser beam was required for recording a count. This implies that the minimum grain size that can be observed by the Wenglor is 210 ± 3 μm and 495 ± 10 μm for the two settings respectively, which is considerably coarser than previously assumed. Due to the non-uniform power distribution of the laser sensor intensity, at the detection limit of 210 μm, only grains passing through the centre of the beam will be counted.

  8. Density-of-states effective mass and scattering parameter measurements by transport phenomena in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Coutts, T. J.; Kaydanov, V. I.

    2000-02-01

    A novel machine has been developed to measure transport coefficients in the temperature range of 50-350 K of thin films deposited on electrically insulating substrates. The measured coefficients—resistivity, Hall, Seebeck, and Nernst—are applied to solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation to give information about the film's density-of-states effective mass, the Fermi energy level, and an energy-dependent scattering parameter. The machine is designed to eliminate or compensate for simultaneously occurring transport phenomena that would interfere with the desired measured quantity, while allowing for all four coefficients to be measured on the same sample. An average density-of-states effective mass value of 0.29±0.04me was measured on the transparent conductive oxide, cadmium stannate (CTO), over a carrier concentration range of 2-7×1020cm-3. This effective mass value matched previous results obtained by optical and thermoelectric modeling. The measured scattering parameter indicates that neutral impurities or a mixture of scattering mechanisms may inhibit the transport of carriers in CTO.

  9. Flow prediction over a transport multi-element high-lift system and comparison with flight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Hardin, J. D.; Yip, L. P.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate prediction of surface-pressure distributions, merging boundary-layers, and separated-flow regions over multi-element high-lift airfoils is required to design advanced high-lift systems for efficient subsonic transport aircraft. The availability of detailed measurements of pressure distributions and both averaged and time-dependent boundary-layer flow parameters at flight Reynolds numbers is critical to evaluate computational methods and to model the turbulence structure for closure of the flow equations. Several detailed wind-tunnel measurements at subscale Reynolds numbers were conducted to obtain detailed flow information including the Reynolds-stress component. As part of a subsonic-transport high-lift research program, flight experiments are conducted using the NASA-Langley B737-100 research aircraft to obtain detailed flow characteristics for support of computational and wind-tunnel efforts. Planned flight measurements include pressure distributions at several spanwise locations, boundary-layer transition and separation locations, surface skin friction, as well as boundary-layer profiles and Reynolds stresses in adverse pressure-gradient flow.

  10. In-flight pressure distributions and skin-friction measurements on a subsonic transport high-lift wing section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, Long P.; Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.; Hardin, Jay D.; Vandam, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    Flight experiments are being conducted as part of a multiphased subsonic transport high-lift research program for correlation with wind-tunnel and computational results. The NASA Langley Transport Systems Research Vehicle (B737-100 aircraft) is used to obtain in-flight flow characteristics at full-scale Reynolds numbers to contribute to the understanding of 3-D high-lift, multi-element flows including attachment-line transition and relaminarization, confluent boundary-layer development, and flow separation characteristics. Flight test results of pressure distributions and skin friction measurements were obtained for a full-chord wing section including the slat, main-wing, and triple-slotted, Fowler flap elements. Test conditions included a range of flap deflections, chord Reynolds numbers (10 to 21 million), and Mach numbers (0.16 to 0.40). Pressure distributions were obtained at 144 chordwise locations of a wing section (53-percent wing span) using thin pressure belts over the slat, main-wing, and flap elements. Flow characteristics observed in the chordwise pressure distributions included leading-edge regions of high subsonic flows, leading-edge attachment-line locations, slat and main-wing cove-flow separation and reattachment, and trailing-edge flap separation. In addition to the pressure distributions, limited skin-friction measurements were made using Preston-tube probes. Preston-tube measurements on the slat upper surface suggested relaminarization of the turbulent flow introduced by the pressure belt on the slat leading-edge surface when the slat attachment line was laminar. Computational analysis of the in-flight pressure measurements using two-dimensional, viscous multielement methods modified with simple-sweep theory showed reasonable agreement. However, overprediction of the pressures on the flap elements suggests a need for better detailed measurements and improved modeling of confluent boundary layers as well as inclusion of three-dimensional viscous

  11. Measurement of the transport spin polarization of FeV using point-contact Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, William; Osofsky, Mike; Bussman, Konrad; Parker, David S; Cheng, L

    2013-01-01

    The Fe1 xVx alloy system exhibits the lowest known Gilbert relaxation rate of any ferromagnetic metal or binary alloy with G1 435MHz at x1 427% V. Low relaxation rates are of particular interest in modern spin electronic applications involving spin torque. The transport spin polarization of a series of sputtered epitaxial Fe1 xVx samples was measured using point contact Andreev reflection. Values of the transport spin polarization agree well with those measured for pure Fe and are independent of composition. The results indicate that the substitution of up to 50% of V for Fe does not reduce the spin polarization in the alloy.

  12. Spin transport and precession in graphene measured by nonlocal and three-terminal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dankert, André Kamalakar, Mutta Venkata; Bergsten, Johan; Dash, Saroj P.

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the spin transport and precession in graphene by using the Hanle effect in nonlocal and three-terminal measurement geometries. Identical spin lifetimes, spin diffusion lengths, and spin polarizations are observed in graphene devices for both techniques over a wide range of temperatures. The magnitude of the spin signals is well explained by spin transport models. These observations rules out any signal enhancements or additional scattering mechanisms at the interfaces for both geometries. This validates the applicability of both the measurement methods for graphene based spintronics devices and their reliable extractions of spin parameters.

  13. Use of Acoustic Doppler Instruments for Measuring Discharge in Streams with Appreciable Sediment Transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for measuring discharge in streams with sediment transport was discussed. The studies show that the acoustic frequency of an ADCP in combination with the sediment transport characteristics in a river causes the ADCP bottom-tracking algorithms to detect a moving bottom. A moving bottom causes bottom-tracking-referenced water velocities and discharges to be biased low. The results also show that the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) data allows accurate measurement of water velocities and discharges in such cases.

  14. Measurement of Optical, Mechanical and Transport properties of the hexagonal closed packed 4H polytype of metallic silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indrani; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Gohil, Smita; Waghmare, Umesh; Ayyub, Pushan

    2013-03-01

    Optical, mechanical and transport property measurements were done on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp) 4H polytype of Ag with stacking sequence ABCBABCB.. grown as bulk films on Al2O3 substrates. Diffused reflectance measurements done on the 4H films showed a general loss of reflectivity amounting to a decrease of 35% as compared to normal fcc (3C) Ag near 500 nm with a blueshift of 5nm in the bulk plasmon frequency, possibly due to the modified electronic structure of the hcp form. Raman spectroscopic measurements showed the appearance of a peak at 64.3 cm-1 at 4K which underwent ``Mode softening,'' that is shifted to lower wave numbers with increase of temperature and disappeared above 350K. Low temperature transport measurements done on 4H films gave the in-plane resistivity value to be 39 times higher than that of a similarly synthesized fcc Ag film at 295 K. Vicker's microhardness measurements done on the 4H films showed that the 4H samples to be almost 5 times harder than the 3C Ag. Density functional theory simulations were done to obtain the phonon dispersion, band structure and nature of Fermi surface for the 4H Ag which corroborated with the experimental observations. The 4H form appears to be a much less metallic, darker and harder form of Ag.

  15. Comparison of Thermoelectric Transport Measurement Techniques Using n-type PbSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Fedorov, Mikhail I.; Shabaldin, Aleksander A.; Konstantinov, Piotr P.; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-06-01

    We compare high-temperature thermoelectric transport measurements at two different institutes using different setups. The material studied is n-type PbSe doped with Cl. The measurements at the Ioffe Institute used a steady-state design which allowed all three properties to be measured simultaneously from bar-shaped samples. Those at Caltech have used Van der Pauw geometry for resistivity, an oscillation method for the Seebeck coefficient, and a laser flash technique for thermal conductivity. The results for each individual property show differences around 10% in some cases, while the evaluation of overall zT for the three samples with different doping levels is mostly below 10%. The steady-state method at the Ioffe Institute was able to measure thermal conductivity at high temperature as accurately as the laser flash method. In general, great caution is needed for any setup in order to accurately measure high-temperature transport properties and hence zT.

  16. The Influence of Atmospheric Transport Regimes on Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Concentrations Measured at Zeppelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubl, S.; Scheringer, M.; Hungerbuehler, K.

    2013-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of exclusively anthropogenic origin. PCBs are toxic, bioaccumulative and have a great potential of long-range transport. PCBs have been banned globally under the Stockholm convention on POPs since 2004. We analysed times series of 21 PCB congeners ranging from PCB 18 to PCB 187 that have been measured at Zeppelin (Spitsbergen) since 1993. Although primary PCB emissions have been steadily reduced, a strong decreasing trend is not observed in the PCB concentrations in the Arctic. In order to investigate the influence of atmospheric transport on the PCB concentrations and to identify the potential source regions of the PCBs, we calculated footprints for the Zeppelin measurement site using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. Footprints can be interpreted as potential source regions where PCBs may have been picked up. Based on various statistical analyses of the footprints (cluster analysis, k-medoid, silhouette), we identified the prevailing transport regimes for Zeppelin which were represented by 5 different clusters. Cluster 1 and 3 belong to transport regimes with highest residence times over Europe (cluster 1) and North-America (cluster 3); both transport regimes dominantly occur from late fall to early spring. Clusters 2 and 4 represent air masses with surface contact predominantly over the Atlantic Ocean (cluster 2), only occurring during the summer months, and the Arctic Ocean (cluster 4) mainly observed in spring and autumn, but also in summer. Cluster 5 is representative of air originating from the Pacific ocean and eastern Asia; this transport regime occurs mainly in spring and fall. We grouped the PCB concentrations measured at Zeppelin according to the 5 different clusters and calculated the median for each cluster and PCB congener. The median for medium to heavier PCBs is highest for cluster 1 and 3, which represent transport regimes over the continent, suggesting that

  17. [What measures can be taken to reduce the number of smoking adolescents and young women?].

    PubMed

    Errard-Lalande, G; Halimi, A

    2005-04-01

    A proper understanding of the factors exposing adolescents and young women to the risk of smoking dependence is necessary to develop effective preventive measures. These measures will be different depending on whether they are designed for adolescents and young women in general or for the context of pregnancy. For adolescents, efforts should be continued to provide information about smoking and the dangers of tobacco as well as about the social manipulation involved. The image of a natural, active woman, free of tobacco and capable of making her own decisions should be promoted. Health education and communication professionals should make use of different media with an audience among the young. Messages should be validated with a target population before diffusion. A better coherence between the adult and young populations concerning legal obligations and mutual respect is significantly useful. Educational structures (schools and universities) should participate in long-term community projects implicating peer groups and trained professionals. Values which should be reinforced include self-esteem, affirmation of personal competence and difference, self-respect and respect of others. Early identification of factors favoring psychosocial vulnerability at this age is indispensable to facilitate referral to professional support and care centers, the number of which remains insufficient to date. Support when ceasing smoking, based on individual and group assistance, should take into account the individual's phase of maturation, and must be proposed and operated by trained professionals working in a network. During pregnancy, it is crucial to recognize that the woman's specific physical and psychological situation is a unique opportunity to propose a new approach to smoking, taking into consideration the fragile context during this period of maturation and its impact on the woman's general life. Beyond sociopolitical measures and a philosophical debate on the position of

  18. Measurement of bedload transport in sand-bed rivers: a look at two indirect sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Robert R.; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    Sand-bed rivers present unique challenges to accurate measurement of the bedload transport rate using the traditional direct sampling methods of direct traps (for example the Helley-Smith bedload sampler). The two major issues are: 1) over sampling of sand transport caused by “mining” of sand due to the flow disturbance induced by the presence of the sampler and 2) clogging of the mesh bag with sand particles reducing the hydraulic efficiency of the sampler. Indirect measurement methods hold promise in that unlike direct methods, no transport-altering flow disturbance near the bed occurs. The bedform velocimetry method utilizes a measure of the bedform geometry and the speed of bedform translation to estimate the bedload transport through mass balance. The bedform velocimetry method is readily applied for the estimation of bedload transport in large sand-bed rivers so long as prominent bedforms are present and the streamflow discharge is steady for long enough to provide sufficient bedform translation between the successive bathymetric data sets. Bedform velocimetry in small sandbed rivers is often problematic due to rapid variation within the hydrograph. The bottom-track bias feature of the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has been utilized to accurately estimate the virtual velocities of sand-bed rivers. Coupling measurement of the virtual velocity with an accurate determination of the active depth of the streambed sediment movement is another method to measure bedload transport, which will be termed the “virtual velocity” method. Much research remains to develop methods and determine accuracy of the virtual velocity method in small sand-bed rivers.

  19. Changes in the number and size of campsites as determined by inventories and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsley, Lisa H.; Quartaroli, Richard D.; Kearsley, Michael J. C.

    We used three methods to evaluate the effects of the 1996 controlled flood on the number, size, and longevity of large riverside sand deposits used as campsites in Grand Canyon National Park. We performed an inventory of all campsites 2 weeks before, 2 weeks after, and 6 months after the flood. We also performed a reconnaissance analysis of system-wide flood-induced changes to 89% (194 of 218) of all established campsites. We also mapped the area of 50 established campsites 2 weeks before, 2 weeks after, and 6 months after the flood, and of 34 newly-created campsites 2 weeks after and 6 months after the flood. The controlled flood created 84 new campsites and destroyed three. Six months after the flood, 44% of the new deposits were no longer usable as campsites. Loss of new campsites primarily occurred by erosion of the newly-deposited sediment; in some cases, excessively steep riverside slopes made otherwise sufficiently large sand bars inaccessible. The remaining new campsites were on average half the size they had been 2 weeks after the flood. The system-wide reconnaissance analysis show that 2 weeks after the flood 50% of the campsites were substantially larger than they had been before the flood, 39% remained the same size, and 11% were smaller. The 50 established campsites we measured were, on average, 48% larger 2 weeks after the flood than 2 weeks before the flood. After 6 months, most of those 50 campsites had eroded; these sites were, on average, 17% larger than they had been before the flood.

  20. Time-dependent measurement of base pressure in a blowdown tunnel with varying unit Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangovi, S.; Rao, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    An operational characteristic of blowdown-type of wind tunnels is the drop in the stagnation temperature with time and the accompanying change in the test-section unit Reynolds number at constant stagnation pressure and Mach number. This apparent disadvantage can be turned to advantage in some cases where a Reynolds number scan is desired in order to study the effect of unit Reynolds number variation on a particular viscous flow phenomenon. This note presents such an instance arising from recent investigations on base pressure at transonic speeds conducted in the NAL 1-ft tunnel.

  1. The Shoelace Antenna: Measurements of Driven Transport and Prospects for Active Edge Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; Labombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Terry, J. L.; Baek, S. G.; Ennever, P.; Edlund, E.; Han, W.; Burke, W. M.; Wolfe, S. M.; Irby, J. H.; Hughes, J. W.; Fitzgerald, E. W.; Granetz, R. S.; Greenwald, M. J.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Pierson, S. Z.; Porkolab, M.; Vieira, R. F.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    The Shoelace antenna was built to drive edge fluctuations in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, matching the wavenumber (k = 1.5/cm) and frequency (50< f<200 kHz) of the Quasi-Coherent Mode (QCM). This fluctuation is responsible for regulating transport across the plasma boundary in the steady-state, ELM-free Enhanced D α(EDA) H-mode; the goal of the Shoelace antenna is to regulate edge transport actively via the same mechanism. Initial experiments demonstrated that the antenna drove a resonant response in the edge plasma in steady-state EDA and transient, non-ELMy H-modes, but transport measurements were unavailable. In 2016, the Shoelace antenna was relocated to enable direct measurements of driven transport by a reciprocating Mirror Langmuir Probe, while also making available gas puff imaging and reflectometer data to provide radial localization of the driven fluctuation. This talk will describe these measurements, and compare them to those of the intrinsic QCM in the context of assessing the feasibility of achieving active control of edge transport using direct coupling to edge modes. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  2. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    -electrode coupling is further proposed to recover all existing nonlinear current-voltage behaviors including the nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Transport theory based on the exact QDT formalism will be developed in future. In Chapter 8, we study the quantum measurement of a qubit with a quantum-point-contact detector. On the basis of a unified quantum master equation (a form of QDT), we study the measurement-induced relaxation and dephasing of the qubit. Our treatment pays particular attention on the detailed-balance relation, which is a consequence of properly accounting for the energy exchange between the qubit and detector during the measurement process. We also derive a conditional quantum master equation for quantum measurement in general, and study the readout characteristics of the qubit measurement. Our theory is applicable to the quantum measurement at arbitrary voltage and temperature. A number of remarkable new features are found and highlighted in concern with their possible relevance to future experiments. In Chapter 9, we discuss the further development of QDT, aiming at an efficient evaluation of many-electron systems. This will be carried out by reducing the many-particle (Fermion or Boson) QDT to a single-particle one by exploring, e.g. the Wick's contraction theorem. It also results in a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for transport through complex large-scale (e.g. molecules) systems. Primary results of the TDDFT-QDT are reported. In Chapter 10, we summary the thesis, and comment and remark on the future work on both the theoretical and application aspects of QDT.

  3. Influence of medium range transport of particles from nucleation burst on particle number concentration within the urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Morawska, L.; Ristovski, Z. D.; Wainwright, D.

    2012-06-01

    An elevated particle number concentration (PNC) observed during nucleation events could play a significant contribution to the total particle load and therefore to the air pollution in the urban environments. Therefore, a field measurement study of PNC was commenced to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of PNC within the urban airshed of Brisbane, Australia. PNC was monitored at urban (QUT), roadside (WOO) and semi-urban (ROC) areas around the Brisbane region during 2009. During the morning traffic peak period, the highest relative fraction of PNC reached about 5% at QUT and WOO on weekdays. PNC peaks were observed around noon, which correlated with the highest solar radiation levels at all three stations, thus suggesting that high PNC levels were likely to be associated with new particle formation caused by photochemical reactions. Wind rose plots showed relatively higher PNC for the NE direction, which was associated with industrial pollution, accounting for 12%, 9% and 14% of overall PNC at QUT, WOO and ROC, respectively. Although there was no significant correlation between PNC at each station, the variation of PNC was well correlated among three stations during regional nucleation events. In addition, PNC at ROC was significantly influenced by upwind urban pollution during the nucleation burst events, with the average enrichment factor of 15.4. This study provides an insight into the influence of regional nucleation events on PNC in the Brisbane region and it the first study to quantify the effect of urban pollution on semi-urban PNC through the nucleation events.

  4. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  5. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  6. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  7. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  8. Measurement of electron spin transport in graphene on 6H-silicon carbide(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Joseph

    The focus of this thesis is to demonstrate the potential of wafer scale graphene spintronics. Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp 2-bonded carbon atoms that has high carrier mobilities, making it a desirable material for future nanoscale electronic devices. The vision of spintronics is to utilize the spin of the electron to produce novel high-speed low power consuming devices. Materials with long spin relaxation times and spin diffusion lengths are needed to realize these goals. Graphene is an ideal material as it meets these requirements and is amenable to planar device geometries. In this thesis, spin transport in wafer scale epitaxial graphene grown on the silicon face of silicon carbide is demonstrated. Non-local Hanle spin precession measurement devices were fabricated using graphene with and without a hafnium oxide interface layer between the ferromagnetic metal and graphene. The structural properties of the devices were investigated with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The electrical properties of the graphene were measured utilizing Hall transport measurements. The magnetic properties of the contacts were investigated with vibrating sample magnetometery. The processes developed to fabricate the Hanle measurement devices are presented as well. A custom Hanle measurement setup was developed and utilized for the Hanle spin precession measurements. Spin precession is observed in the epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide, with improved spin transport properties with the utilization of a hafnium oxide barrier between the ferromagnetic contacts and graphene. The charge transport and spin transport properties are compared to determine the relevant spin relaxation mechanism in the devices. These results demonstrate that graphene has great potential for wafer scale production of future spintronic devices.

  9. In-flight boundary-layer measurements on a hollow cylinder at a Mach number of 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Gong, L.

    1980-01-01

    Skin temperatures, shear forces, surface static pressures, boundary layer pitot pressures, and boundary layer total temperatures were measured on the external surface of a hollow cylinder that was 3.04 meters long and 0.437 meter in diameter and was mounted beneath the fuselage of the YF-12A airplane. The data were obtained at a nominal free stream Mach number of 3.0 (a local Mach number of 2.9) and at wall to recovery temperature ratios of 0.66 to 0.91. The local Reynolds number had a nominal value of 4,300,000 per meter. Heat transfer coefficients and skin friction coefficients were derived from skin temperature time histories and shear force measurements, respectively. In addition, boundary layer velocity profiles were derived from pitot pressure measurements, and a Reynolds analogy factor was obtained from the heat transfer and skin friction measurements. The measured data are compared with several boundary layer prediction methods.

  10. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  11. On the Dielectric Constant for Acetanilide: Experimental Measurements and Effect on Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Compatangelo, E.; Christiansen, P. L.; Halding, J.; Skovgaard, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the dielectric constant for crystalline acetanilide powder for temperatures ranging from - 140°C to 20°C and for different hydration levels are presented. A Davydov-soliton computer model predicts dramatic changes in the energy transport and storage for typically increased values of the dielectric constant.

  12. Turbulence measurements over immobile gravel with additions of sand from supply limited to capacity transport conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of the turbulence that drives sand transport over and through immobile gravels is relevant to efforts to model sediment movement downstream of dams, where fine sediments are eroded from coarse substrates and are not replaced due to the presence of the upstream dam. The relative elevatio...

  13. Spray washing, absorbent corn starch powder and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled boiler transport cage flooring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most broilers in the U.S. are transported live to slaughter facilities in cages with fiberglass floors. Cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Drying feces out between uses is an effectiv...

  14. Statistical Measurements of Contact Conditions of 478 Transport-airplane Landings During Routine Daytime Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsby, Norman S

    1955-01-01

    Statistical measurements of contact conditions have been obtained, by means of a special photographic technique, of 478 landings of present-day transport airplanes made during routine daylight operations in clear air at the Washington National Airport. From the measurements, sinking speeds, rolling velocities, bank angles, and horizontal speeds at the instant before contact have been evaluated and a limited statistical analysis of the results has been made and is reported in this report.

  15. Gliders Measure Western Boundary Current Transport from the South Pacific to the Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Kessler, W. S.; Sherman, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the Consortium on the Ocean's Role in Climate (CORC) has used repeated glider transects across the southern Solomon Sea to measure the previously nearly unsampled mass and heat transport from the South Pacific to the equatorial zone. Mean transport is dominated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCUC). This low-latitude western boundary current is a major element of the shallow meridional overturning circulation, returning water from the subtropical South Pacific to the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) where it upwells. We find the mean NGCUC to be a jet less than 100 km wide, centered near 300 m depth, with equatorward velocities reaching 35 cm/s and salinity anomalies on isopycnals up to 0.05. Weaker poleward flow is found near the surface in the eastern basin. Equatorward transport above 700 m is typically 20 Sv, but nearly vanished during two La Niñas and reached 25 Sv during an El Niño. Within these events the seasonal cycle cannot yet be defined. Transport variability is strongest outside the boundary current and appears to consist of two independently moving layers with a boundary near 250 m. ENSO variability is predominantly in the upper layer. The relation of Solomon Sea mass and heat transport with ENSO indicators will be discussed The ability to initiate and maintain measurements that support such quantitative analyses with a small effort in a remote site far from research institutions demonstrates that gliders can be a productive part of the global ocean observing system.

  16. Development of high speed continuous transport critical current measurement system for long piece of HTS conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seokho; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Kim, Gyeong-Hun; Ha, Hong-Su; Sim, Kideok; Oh, Sang-Soo; Moon, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    In case of long pieces of HTS conductor, their critical current measurement is an important process for the conductor manufacturer and the customer, however, it is very time consuming process. Conventional critical current measurement is carried out by ‘four probe method’, which increase the transport current and measure the voltage between the fixed voltage taps. Therefore, it consists of conductor moving and measuring process. To speed up the measuring process, longer distance between voltage taps is required. In this case, the measured critical current is averaged and small defects, which can be very crucial for thermal stability, cannot be found. Therefore, the limitation of the voltage tap length should be carefully decided considering the cooling environment. Another non-contact or indirect method is to measure the screening effect of magnetic field and converting the field signal to the critical current, which is called as hall probe method. This process is known as a very efficient way to find local defects and estimate the distribution of the critical current, however, it contains inevitable error and noise because it should measure the small magnetic field signals. This paper describes a new critical current measurement system, which have similar hardware structure of conventional ‘four probe method’. However, it is much faster than other systems using fast feedback control of the transport current while the conductor is continuously moving with high speed. The measured results are compared with the conventional method and hall probe method.

  17. Flight and wind-tunnel measurements showing base drag reduction provided by a trailing disk for high Reynolds number turbulent flow for subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Sheryll Goecke; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of a trailing disk, or trapped vortex concept, in reducing the base drag of a large body of revolution was studied from measurements made both in flight and in a wind tunnel. Pressure data obtained for the flight experiment, and both pressure and force balance data were obtained for the wind tunnel experiment. The flight test also included data obtained from a hemispherical base. The experiment demonstrated the significant base drag reduction capability of the trailing disk to Mach 0.93 and to Reynolds numbers up to 80 times greater than for earlier studies. For the trailing disk data from the flight experiment, the maximum decrease in base drag ranged form 0.08 to 0.07 as Mach number increased from 0.70 to 0.93. Aircraft angles of attack ranged from 3.9 to 6.6 deg for the flight data. For the trailing disk data from the wind tunnel experiment, the maximum decrease in base and total drag ranged from 0.08 to 0.05 for the approximately 0 deg angle of attack data as Mach number increased from 0.30 to 0.82.

  18. Influence of medium range transport of particles from nucleation burst on particle number concentration within the urban airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Morawska, L.; Ristovski, Z. D.; Wainwright, D.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated particle number concentration (PNC) observed during nucleation events could make a significant contribution to the total particle load and thus air pollution in urban environments. Therefore, a field measurement study of PNC was conducted to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of PNC within the urban airshed of Brisbane, Australia. PNC was monitored at urban (QUT), roadside (WOO) and semi-urban (ROC) areas around the Brisbane region during 2009. The results showed that morning traffic exhaust emissions were the main contributor to high PNCs at QUT and WOO which contributed 5.5% and 5.1 5 during the week, respectively, with a less significant contribution on weekends. PNC peaks were observed around noon, which correlated with the highest solar radiation levels at all three stations, thus suggesting that high PNC levels were likely to be associated with new particle formation caused by photochemical reactions. Wind rose plots showed relatively higher PNC for the NE direction, which was associated with industrial pollution, accounting for 12%, 9% and 14% of overall PNC at QUT, WOO and ROC, respectively. Although there was no significant correlation between PNC at each station, the variation of PNC was well correlated among three stations during regional nucleation events. In addition, PNC at ROC was significantly influenced by upwind urban pollution during the nucleation burst events, with the average enrichment factor of 15.4. This study provides an insight into the influence of regional nucleation events on PNC in the Brisbane region and is the first study to quantify the effect of urban pollution on semi-urban PNC through the nucleation events.

  19. Effect of the Number of Variables on Measures of Fit in Structural Equation Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, David A.; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2003-01-01

    Used three approaches to understand the effect of the number of variables in the model on model fit in structural equation modeling through computer simulation. Developed a simple formula for the theoretical value of the comparative fit index. (SLD)

  20. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Turşucu, Ahmet; Uzunoğlu, Zeynep; Korucu, Demet

    2014-09-01

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4≤Z≤82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined.

  1. Measurement of carrier transport and recombination parameter in heavily doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    The minority carrier transport and recombination parameters in heavily doped bulk silicon were measured. Both Si:P and Si:B with bulk dopings from 10 to the 17th and 10 to the 20th power/cu cm were studied. It is shown that three parameters characterize transport in bulk heavily doped Si: the minority carrier lifetime tau, the minority carrier mobility mu, and the equilibrium minority carrier density of n sub 0 and p sub 0 (in p-type and n-type Si respectively.) However, dc current-voltage measurements can never measure all three of these parameters, and some ac or time-transient experiment is required to obtain the values of these parameters as a function of dopant density. Using both dc electrical measurements on bipolar transitors with heavily doped base regions and transients optical measurements on heavily doped bulk and epitaxially grown samples, lifetime, mobility, and bandgap narrowing were measured as a function of both p and n type dopant densities. Best fits of minority carrier mobility, bandgap narrowing and lifetime as a function of doping density (in the heavily doped range) were constructed to allow accurate modeling of minority carrier transport in heavily doped Si.

  2. Lost in transportation: Information measures and cognitive limits in multilayer navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Porter, Mason A.; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cities and their transportation systems become increasingly complex and multimodal as they grow, and it is natural to wonder whether it is possible to quantitatively characterize our difficulty navigating in them and whether such navigation exceeds our cognitive limits. A transition between different search strategies for navigating in metropolitan maps has been observed for large, complex metropolitan networks. This evidence suggests the existence of a limit associated with cognitive overload and caused by a large amount of information that needs to be processed. In this light, we analyzed the world’s 15 largest metropolitan networks and estimated the information limit for determining a trip in a transportation system to be on the order of 8 bits. Similar to the “Dunbar number,” which represents a limit to the size of an individual’s friendship circle, our cognitive limit suggests that maps should not consist of more than 250 connection points to be easily readable. We also show that including connections with other transportation modes dramatically increases the information needed to navigate in multilayer transportation networks. In large cities such as New York, Paris, and Tokyo, more than 80% of the trips are above the 8-bit limit. Multimodal transportation systems in large cities have thus already exceeded human cognitive limits and, consequently, the traditional view of navigation in cities has to be revised substantially. PMID:26989769

  3. Lost in transportation: Information measures and cognitive limits in multilayer navigation.

    PubMed

    Gallotti, Riccardo; Porter, Mason A; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Cities and their transportation systems become increasingly complex and multimodal as they grow, and it is natural to wonder whether it is possible to quantitatively characterize our difficulty navigating in them and whether such navigation exceeds our cognitive limits. A transition between different search strategies for navigating in metropolitan maps has been observed for large, complex metropolitan networks. This evidence suggests the existence of a limit associated with cognitive overload and caused by a large amount of information that needs to be processed. In this light, we analyzed the world's 15 largest metropolitan networks and estimated the information limit for determining a trip in a transportation system to be on the order of 8 bits. Similar to the "Dunbar number," which represents a limit to the size of an individual's friendship circle, our cognitive limit suggests that maps should not consist of more than 250 connection points to be easily readable. We also show that including connections with other transportation modes dramatically increases the information needed to navigate in multilayer transportation networks. In large cities such as New York, Paris, and Tokyo, more than 80% of the trips are above the 8-bit limit. Multimodal transportation systems in large cities have thus already exceeded human cognitive limits and, consequently, the traditional view of navigation in cities has to be revised substantially.

  4. Electrophoretic NMR measurements of lithium transference numbers in polymer gel electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.; Sanderson, S.; Davey, J.; Uribe, F.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Polymer gel electrolytes are of increasing interest for plastic lithium batteries largely because of their high room temperature conductivity. Several studies have probed their conductivity and electrochemical stability but very little work has been done related to lithium transference numbers. Lithium ion transference numbers, the net number of Faradays carried by lithium upon the passage of 1 Faraday of charge across a cell, are key figures of merit for any potential lithium battery electrolytes. The authors describe here their application of electrophoretic NMR (ENMR) to the determination of transference numbers of lithium ions in polymer gel electrolytes. Two types of polymer gel electrolytes were selected for this study: PAN/PC/EC/LiX and Kynar/PC/LiX. Results obtained for the two types of gels are compared and the effects of anion, polymer-ion interactions and ion-ion interactions on lithium transference numbers are discussed. Significant differences in the behavior of transference numbers with salt concentration are observed for the two types of gels. This may be due to the extent of interaction between the polymer and the ions. Implications for solid polymer electrolytes are discussed.

  5. Long-term Validation of Cloud-droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product (NDROP VAP) Retrieved from Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. S. S.; Riihimaki, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Sivaraman, C.; Shi, Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new cloud-droplet number concentration (NDROP) Value Added Product (VAP) has been produced at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for the 13 years from January 1998 to January 2011. The droplet number concentration values are retrieved from surface radiometer measurements of cloud optical depth from the multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR) and liquid water path from the microwave radiometer (MWR). We validate the NDROP VAP with in situ aircraft measurements from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer probe during the long-term aircraft field campaign, Routine ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO). The NDROP VAP considers entrainment effects rather than assuming an adiabatic cloud, which improves the values of the NDROP VAP by reducing the magnitude of cloud-droplet number concentration. The NDROP VAP captures the primary mode of in situ measured droplet number concentration, but produces too wide a distribution due to too frequent high cloud-droplet number concentrations. The large droplet number concentration error corresponds to errors in the MWR retrievals at low liquid water paths due to the limitations of the instrument. Modification of the NDROP VAP through the diagnosed liquid water path, which is constrained by the coordinated solution using cloud optical depth and cloud-droplet effective radius retrievals, alleviates this problem, leading to better agreement with in situ measurements.

  6. Challenges in Measuring and Predicting Medium Term (Weeks to Annual) Aeolian Sediment Transport in Beach-Dune Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, I.

    2009-05-01

    Coastal dune budgets depend on sediment input by wind from the beach. Calculation of aeolian transport is thus a primary factor to understand coastal dune evolution and beach-dune coupled dynamics. However, measuring aeolian sediment transport in coastal areas presents fundamental technical and conceptual limitations that make numerical modeling difficult. Wind tunnel experiments isolate and reduce the number of variables to study, which is a necessary procedure to clearly manifest mechanistic relationships between cause and effect. But even with refinement and inclusion of new variables, traditional sediment transport formulas derived from wind tunnel experiments do not usually work well in natural areas. Short-term experiments may include precise instrumentation to obtain high frequency, detail time series of variables involved in aeolian transport, but inferring information at larger scales is problematic without knowledge of the timing and magnitude of particular transport events. There are two primary problems in attempting to predict sediment inputs to coastal dunes over periods of weeks, months or years: 1) to determine an appropriate set of predictive equations that incorporate complexities such as surface moisture content, beach width and the presence of vegetation; and 2) to provide quantitative data on these variables for input into the model at this time scale. Remote sensing techniques and the use of GIS software open the possibility to monitor key parameters regulating sediment transport dynamics at high spatial and temporal resolution over time scales beyond short-term experiments. These were applied at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park (Canada), in an attempt to measure factors affecting aeolian sediment input to the foredune at a medium scale. Three digital cameras covering different sections of the beach and foredune provide time series on shoreline position, fetch distances, vegetation cover, ice/snow presence, or superficial

  7. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  8. Ionic diffusion in quartz studied by transport measurements, SIMS and atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartbaeva, Asel; Wells, Stephen A.; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Hinton, Richard W.; Reed, Stephen J. B.

    2005-02-01

    Ionic diffusion in the quartz-β-eucryptite system is studied by DC transport measurements, SIMS and atomistic simulations. Transport data show a large transient increase in ionic current at the α-β phase transition of quartz (the Hedvall effect). The SIMS data indicate two diffusion processes, one involving rapid Li+ motion and the other involving penetration of Al and Li atoms into quartz at the phase transition. Atomistic simulations explain why the fine microstructure of twin domain walls in quartz near the transition does not hinder Li+ diffusion.

  9. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    PubMed

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation.

  10. Measurement of the internal magnetic fluctuation by the transport of runaways on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Jiang, Z. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic fluctuation is important for the study of transport in tokamak plasmas. The runaway electron transport induced by the sawtooth crash can be used to obtain the internal magnetic fluctuation. Inversed sawtooth-like activities on hard x-ray (HXR) fluxes following sawtooth activities were observed after the application of electrode biasing on J-TEXT tokamak. The runaway diffusion coefficient Dr is deduced to be about 30 m2/s according to the time delay of HXR flux peaks to the sawtooth crashes. The averaged value of normalized magnetic fluctuation in the discharges with electrode biasing was increased to the order of 1 × 10-4.

  11. Measurement of the internal magnetic fluctuation by the transport of runaways on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z Y; Huang, D W; Tong, R H; Yan, W; Wei, Y N; Ma, T K; Jiang, Z H; Zhang, X Q; Chen, Z P; Yang, Z J; Zhuang, G

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic fluctuation is important for the study of transport in tokamak plasmas. The runaway electron transport induced by the sawtooth crash can be used to obtain the internal magnetic fluctuation. Inversed sawtooth-like activities on hard x-ray (HXR) fluxes following sawtooth activities were observed after the application of electrode biasing on J-TEXT tokamak. The runaway diffusion coefficient Dr is deduced to be about 30 m(2)/s according to the time delay of HXR flux peaks to the sawtooth crashes. The averaged value of normalized magnetic fluctuation in the discharges with electrode biasing was increased to the order of 1 × 10(-4).

  12. Correlating spin transport and electrode magnetization in a graphene spin valve: Simultaneous magnetic microscopy and non-local measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Andrew J. Page, Michael R.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Chris Hammel, P.; Wen, Hua; Kawakami, Roland K.; McCreary, Kathleen M.

    2015-10-05

    Using simultaneous magnetic force microscopy and transport measurements of a graphene spin valve, we correlate the non-local spin signal with the magnetization of the device electrodes. The imaged magnetization states corroborate the influence of each electrode within a one-dimensional spin transport model and provide evidence linking domain wall pinning to additional features in the transport signal.

  13. Measurements of the number density of water molecules in plasma by using a combined spectral-probe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskiy, A. V.; Ochkin, V. N.; Afonin, O. N.; Antipenkov, A. B.

    2015-09-01

    A novel method for measuring the number density of water molecules in low-temperature plasma is developed. The absolute intensities of rotational lines of the (0,0) band of the OH( A 2Σ- X 2П) transition are used. Lines with sufficiently large rotational quantum numbers referring to the so-called "hot" group of molecules produced by electron-impact dissociative excitation of water molecules are chosen for measurements. The excitation rate of a process with a known cross section is determined by measuring the parameters of plasma electrons by means of the probe method. The measured number densities of molecules are compared with those in the initial plasma-forming mixture. The time evolution of the particle densities in plasma is investigated. The problems of the sensitivity and applicability of the absolute spectral method are considered.

  14. Sequential Measurement of Intermodal Variability in Public Transportation PM2.5 and CO Exposure Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Che, W W; Frey, H Christopher; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-08-16

    A sequential measurement method is demonstrated for quantifying the variability in exposure concentration during public transportation. This method was applied in Hong Kong by measuring PM2.5 and CO concentrations along a route connecting 13 transportation-related microenvironments within 3-4 h. The study design takes into account ventilation, proximity to local sources, area-wide air quality, and meteorological conditions. Portable instruments were compacted into a backpack to facilitate measurement under crowded transportation conditions and to quantify personal exposure by sampling at nose level. The route included stops next to three roadside monitors to enable comparison of fixed site and exposure concentrations. PM2.5 exposure concentrations were correlated with the roadside monitors, despite differences in averaging time, detection method, and sampling location. Although highly correlated in temporal trend, PM2.5 concentrations varied significantly among microenvironments, with mean concentration ratios versus roadside monitor ranging from 0.5 for MTR train to 1.3 for bus terminal. Measured inter-run variability provides insight regarding the sample size needed to discriminate between microenvironments with increased statistical significance. The study results illustrate the utility of sequential measurement of microenvironments and policy-relevant insights for exposure mitigation and management.

  15. Modeling and measurements of magnetic stochasticity and transport in the MST reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Ben

    2002-11-01

    Results from experimental measurements and modeling of stochastic transport are beginning to agree. The modeling was done with a field line tracing code, which uses spatial profiles from a 3-D nonlinear MHD code, DEBS, and incorporates experimentally measured edge fluctuations. The modeling finds good agreement with Rechester - Rosenbluth diffusion just inside the reversal surface, where the islands highly overlap, and diverges from Rechester - Rosenbluth elsewhere. Electron heat transport is measured experimentally and agrees with the model to within a factor of three. Measurements of the drop in electron thermal transport in plasmas where fluctuations are suppressed by current profile manipulation are in agreement with the model. Recent measurements of the confinement of run-away electrons observed in the core suggest reformation of magnetic flux surfaces from a previously stochastic field. The modeling clearly shows this transition in profiles of radial magnetic field line diffusion. In addition we have started modeling of fast ion motion and new results on the effect of magnetic field stochasticity on the ion confinement will be reported. Work supported by U.S. D.O.E.

  16. Testing Observational Tracers of Turbulence with Numerical Simulations: Measuring the Sonic Mach Number in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, B.; Lazarian, A.; Correia, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Astrophysical simulations provide a unique opportunity to test and verify observational diagnostics of the physics of the interstellar medium. In these proceedings, we highlight how s imulations of MHD turbulence can increase the accuracy and understanding of observational tracers of important plasma parameters, such as the sonic Mach number, in molecular clouds. For this purpose we analyze MHD simulations which include post-processing to take radiative transfer effects of 13CO emission and absorption into account. We find very good agreement between the linewidth estimated sonic Mach number and the actual sonic Mach number of the simulations for optically thin 13CO. However, we find that opacity broadening causes Ms to be overestimated by a factor of ≈ 1.16-1.3 when calculated from optically thick 13CO lines. We also find that there is a dependency on the magnetic field: super-Alfvénic turbulence shows increased line broadening as compared with sub-Alfvénic turbulence for all values of optical depth for the line of sight perpendicular to an magnetic field. These results have implications for the observationally derived sonic Mach number-density standard deviation (σρ/<ρ>) relationship, σ2ρ/<ρ>=b2M s2, and the related column density standard deviation (σN/(N)) sonic Mach number relationship, which we briefly discuss. The turbulence sonic Mach number is an important parameter of star formation models and the results highlighted in these proceedings provide researchers with increased understanding of these parameters derived from observations.

  17. Calorimetric measurement of water transport and intracellular ice formation during freezing in cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shoji; Choi, Jeunghwan; Devireddy, Ram V; Bischof, John C

    2012-12-01

    The current study presents a new and novel analysis of heat release signatures measured by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) associated with water transport (WT), intracellular ice formation (IIF) and extracellular ice formation (EIF). Correlative cryomicroscopy experiments were also performed to validate the DSC data. The DSC and cryomicroscopy experiments were performed on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDFs) at various cytocrit values (0-0.8) at various cooling rates (0.5-250 °C/min). A comparison of the cryomicroscopy experiments with the DSC analysis show reasonable agreement in the water transport (cellular dehydration) and IIF characteristics between both the techniques with the caveat that IIF measured by DSC lagged that measured by cryomicroscopy. This was ascribed to differences in the techniques (i.e. cell vs. bulk measurement) and the possibility that not all IIF is associated with visual darkening. High and low rates of 0.5 °C/min and 250 °C/min were chosen as HDFs did not exhibit significant IIF or WT at each of these extremes respectively. Analysis of post-thaw viability data suggested that 10 °C/min was the presumptive optimal cooling rate for HDFs and was independent of the cytocrit value. The ratio of measured heat values associated with IIF (q(IIF)) to the total heat released from both IIF and water transport or from the total cell water content in the sample (q(CW)) was also found to increase as the cooling rate was increased from 10 to 250 °C/min and was independent of the sample cytocrit value. Taken together, these observations suggest that the proposed analysis is capable of deconvolving water transport and IIF data from the measured DSC latent heat thermograms in cell suspensions during freezing.

  18. Experimental container shape dependence and heat transport scaling of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of high-Prandtl-number fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephen; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Both experiments and simulations on Rayleigh-Bénard convection with fluids of Prandtl numbers 5 and below have shown that the container shape influences the flow structure. Here, we investigate similar dependences of convection of fluids with Prandtl numbers of up to 104. The convection cells have aspect ratio of order unity, and we use cubic and cylindrical shapes. Visual analysis using a noninvasive photochromic dye technique indicates the distinct large-scale flow patterns in both square and cylindrical test cells. The stability of these flow patterns is explored. Also presented are results on the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  19. In situ Magnetotransport Measurements in Ultrathin Bi Films: Evidence for Surface-Bulk Coherent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitani, Masaki; Hirahara, Toru; Ichinokura, Satoru; Hanaduka, Masahiro; Shin, Dongyoon; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2014-11-01

    We performed in situ magnetotransport measurements on ultrathin Bi(111) films [4-30 bilayers (BLs), 16-120 Å thick] to elucidate the role of bulk or surface states in the transport phenomena. We found that the temperature dependence of the film conductivity shows no thickness dependence for the 6-16 BL films and is affected by the electron-electron scattering, suggesting surface-state dominant contribution. In contrast, the weak antilocalization effect observed by applying a magnetic field shows clear thickness dependence, indicating bulk transport. This apparent inconsistency is explained by a coherent bulk-surface coupling that produces a single channel transport. For the films thicker than 20 BLs, the behavior changes drastically which can likely be interpreted as a bulk dominant conduction.

  20. Potential of public transit as a transportation control measure: Case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sillings, M.

    1998-07-01

    This report is the final product of the Clean Air Project of the National Association of Regional Councils/NARC. It documents a nationwide study of transit projects and programs initiated in the wake of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments/CAAA and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991/ISTEA. The study purpose was to assess the experience, limitations, and value of public transit as a potential transportation control measure/TCM, i.e., generates significant air quality benefits by eliminating or reducing emissions from motor vehicles. Four in-depth case studies and six additional projects featured as innovations in transportation are offered as examples investigating the potential of transit as a TCM. These case studies and innovations highlight the efforts of ten metropolitan areas and transit agencies which have succeed in developing and implementing innovative transit strategies.

  1. Performance Measurement for Public Services in Academic and Research Libraries. Occasional Paper Number #9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Mary J.

    This paper defines performance measurement as the clarification of objectives and standards, identification of key activities, data collection and analysis, and formative evaluation of services. It then examines some of the factors involved in using performance measurement to evaluate public services activities, and analyzes performance…

  2. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  3. Assessment of sugarcane yield potential across large numbers of genotypes using canopy reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy reflectance indices have been used to monitor plant growth and estimate yields in many field crops. Little is known if canopy reflectance of sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) can be used to estimate growth and yield potential across large numbers of genotypes (clones) in the earl...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Reactivity and Number of Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to wear a pedometer for 14 days. The outcome measure…

  5. Characterization of the transport properties of channel delta-doped structures by light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Young, P. G.; Bibyk, S. B.; Ringel, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The transport properties of channel delta-doped quantum well structures were characterized by conventional Hall effect and light-modulated Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements. The large number of carriers that become available due to the delta-doping of the channel, leads to an apparent degeneracy in the well. As a result of this degeneracy, the carrier mobility remains constant as a function of temperature from 300 K down to 1.4 K. The large amount of impurity scattering, associated with the overlap of the charge carriers and the dopants, resulted in low carrier mobilities and restricted the observation of the oscillatory magneto-resistance used to characterize the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by conventional SdH measurements. By light-modulating the carriers, we were able to observe the SdH oscillation at low magnetic fields, below 1.4 tesla, and derive a value for the quantum scattering time. Our results for the ratio of the transport and quantum scattering times are lower than those previously measured for similar structures using much higher magnetic fields.

  6. Turbulence and transport reduction with innovative plasma shapes in TCV -- correlation ECE measurement and gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochelon, Antoine

    2010-11-01

    Due to turbulence, core energy transport in tokamaks generally exceeds collisional transport by at least an order of magnitude. It is therefore crucial to understand the instabilities driving the turbulent state and to find ways to control them. Shaping the plasma is one of these fundamental tools. In low collisionality plasmas, such as in a reactor, changing triangularity from positive (delta=+0.4) to negative triangularity (delta=-0.4) is shown on TCV to reduce the energy transport by a factor two. This opens the possibility of having H-mode-like confinement time within an L-mode edge, or reduced ELMs. An optimum triangularity can be sought between steep edge barriers (delta>0), plagued by large ELMs, and improved core confinement (delta<0). Recent correlation ECE measurements show that the reduction of transport at negative delta is reflected in a reduction by a factor of two of both the amplitude of temperature fluctuations in the broadband frequency range 30-150 kHz, and the fluctuation correlation length, measured at mid-radius. In addition, the fluctuations amplitude is reduced with increasing collisionality, consistent with a reduction of the Trapped Electron Modes (TEM) drive. The effect of negative triangularity on turbulence and transport is compared to gyrokinetic code results: First, global linear simulations predict shorter radial TEM wavelength, consistent with the shorter radial turbulence correlation length observed. Second, at least close to the strongly shaped plasma boundary, local nonlinear simulations predict lower TEM induced transport with decreased triangularity. Calculations are now being extended to global nonlinear simulations.

  7. Measurements Required to Understand the Lunar Dust Environment and Transport Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F., Jr.; Abbas, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Going back to the lunar surface offers an opportunity to understand the dust environment and associated transport mechanisms. This talk will explore what measurements are required to understand and characterize the dust-plasma environment in which robotic and human activities will be conducted. The understanding gained with the measurements can be used to make informed decisions on engineering solutions and follow-on investigations. Particular focus will be placed on required measurements of the size, spatial and charge distribution of the suspended lunar regolith.

  8. Stability and performance characteristics of a fixed arrow wing supersonic transport configuration (SCAT 15F-9898) at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, J. P.; Jacobs, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    Tests on a 0.015 scale model of a supersonic transport were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20. Tests of the complete model with three wing planforms, two different leading-edge radii, and various combinations of component parts, including both leading- and trailing-edge flaps, were made over an angle-of-attack range from about -6 deg to 13 deg and at sideslip angles of 0 deg and 2 deg.

  9. Analysis of long-range transport of aerosols for Portugal using 3D chemical transport model and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchepel, O.; Ferreira, J.; Fernandes, A. P.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Borrego, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the contribution of long-range transport of mineral dust from North Africa to the air pollution levels in Portugal based on a combination of a modelling approach and satellite observations. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) was applied together with the updated Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (BSC-DREAM8b) to characterise anthropogenic and natural sources of primary aerosols as well as secondary aerosols formation. The modelling results, after their validation and bias removing process, have been used in combination with aerosol measurements provided by Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), using OMAERUV Level-2 v003 product, aiming to better understand the advantages and shortcomings of both, satellite and modelling aerosol data. The data analysis is presented for Portugal for July 2006 focusing on aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and aerosol type. Based on the modelling results, the importance of the long-range transport of mineral dust was demonstrated for the simulation days, achieving a 60% contribution to AOD levels. The mineral dust is affecting atmospheric layers up to 6 km but peak concentrations are presented at layers below 2 km. The model predicts a complex mixture of different types of aerosol for the pixels classified by OMI as "mineral dust" and "sulphates". Although a good agreement between the model outputs and OMI observations has been found in terms of the spatial pattern and AOD correlation is about 0.48 for mineral dust, several problems were identified. The model is systematically underestimating the aerosol concentration at near ground level in comparison with the air quality monitoring stations, while OMI is in general overestimating AOD for the analysed period based on the comparison with AERONET data. Additionally, misclassification of mineral dust for some geographical locations and discontinuity in AOD values along the coastal line at water/land interface in the OMI data are discussed.

  10. PTV measurements of Lagrangian particle transport by surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Whittaker, Colin; Raby, Alison; Taylor, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present detailed PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) measurements of the Lagrangian transport and trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath two-dimensional surface gravity wave groups in a laboratory flume. By focussing our attention on wave groups of moderate steepness, we confirm the predictions of standard second-order multi-chromatic wave theory, in which the body of fluid satisfies the potential flow equations. Particles near the surface are transported forwards and their motion is dominated by Stokes drift. Particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for surface wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. Finally, we provide experimental validation of a simple scaling relationship, derived based under the assumption of separation of scales, for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current. We present results for a range of effective water depths.

  11. Development and verification of a water and sugar transport model using measured stem diameter variations.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, Veerle; Steppe, Kathy

    2010-05-01

    In trees, water and sugars are transported by xylem and phloem conduits which are hydraulically linked. A simultaneous study of both flows is interesting, since they concurrently influence important processes such as stomatal regulation and growth. A few mathematical models have already been developed to investigate the influence of both hydraulically coupled flows. However, none of these models has so far been tested using real measured field data. In the present study, a comprehensive whole-tree model is developed that enables simulation of the stem diameter variations driven by both the water and sugar transport. Stem diameter variations are calculated as volume changes of both the xylem and the phloem tissue. These volume changes are dependent on: (i) water transport according to the cohesion-tension theory; (ii) sugar transport according to the Münch hypothesis; (iii) loading and unloading of sugars; and (iv) irreversible turgor-driven growth. The model considers three main compartments (crown, stem, and roots) and is verified by comparison with actual measured stem diameter variations and xylem sap flow rates. These measurements were performed on a young oak (Quercus robur L.) tree in controlled conditions and on an adult beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree in a natural forest. A good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. Hence, the model seemed to be a realistic representation of the processes observed in reality. Furthermore, the model is able to simulate several physiological variables which are relatively difficult to measure: phloem turgor, phloem osmotic pressure, and Münch's counterflow. Simulation of these variables revealed daily dynamics in their behaviour which were mainly induced by transpiration. Some of these dynamics are experimentally confirmed in the literature, while others are not.

  12. [Measurement of the transport activities of bile salt export pump using chemiluminescence detection method].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kana; Murai, Tsuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Hui, Shu-Ping; Kurosawa, Takao

    2010-05-01

    Monovalent bile acids, such as taurine- and glycine-conjugated bile acids, are excreted into bile by bile salt export pumps (BSEP, ABCB11). Human BSEP (hBSEP) is physiologically important because it was identified as the gene responsible for the genetic disease: progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 2 (PFIC-2). The evaluation of the inhibitory effect of hBSEP transport activity provides significant information for predicting toxic potential in the early phase of drug development. The role and function of hBSEP have been investigated by the examination of the ATP-dependent transport of radioactive isotopically (RI)-labeled bile acid such as a tritium labeled taurocholic acid, in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing cells. The chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD) had been developed for a simple analysis of bile acids in human biological fluids. This method is extremely sensitive and it may be applicable for the measurements of bile acid transport activities by hBSEP vesicles without using RI-labeled bile acid. The present paper deals with an application of the chemiluminescence detection method using 3alpha-HSD with enzyme cycling method to the measurement of ATP-dependent transport activities of taurocholic acid (T-CA) in membrane vesicles obtained from hBSEP-expressing Sf9 cells. Calibration curves for T-CA was linear over the range from 10 to 400 pmol/ml. The values of the kinetic parameters for hBSEP vesicles obtained by the chemiluminescence detection method were comparable with the values of that obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. This assay method was highly useful for the measurements of bile acid transport activities.

  13. Acoustic Intensity Measurements in the Presence of Low Mach Number Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    broadband acoustic holography ,3 intensity measurements in the presence of flow,"𔄁𔄀. 7 in-situ evaluation of the acoustic impedance and sound absorption...Cross Spectra" Ph.D. Thesis, Catholic University, (1987). 3. Loyau, T., Pascal, J., Gaillard, P., "Broadband Acoustic Holography Reconstruction From...AD-A269 995 The Pennsylvania State University APPLIED RESEARCH LABORATORY P.O. Box 30 State College, PA 16804 ACOUSTIC INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN THE

  14. Comparison of bedload transport measurements at the Suggadinbach stream with geophones and modified pipe hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Berktold, Maximilian; Jäger, Gerald; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    A new bedload transport monitoring station has been designed by the Institute of Mountain Risk engineering at the Suggadinbach in Austria (Vorarlberg). In cooperation with the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control the station has been installed in June 2013 in a check dam. Two different types of measuring systems are installed: 13 Swiss type geophone sensors record the vibrations of the transported sediment. Additionally 3 modified Japanese pipe hydrophones are mounted under steel plates in order to record the acoustic signal produced by the sediment transport. Both systems can be compared directly because they are arranged consecutively in flow direction. For calibration of the sensors a series of systematic tests have been carried out during low water conditions. Sediment has been fed by a crane with a concrete container. A flume has been installed in order to obtain controlled flow and transport over the measuring system. Four different grain classes up to 64 mm and a mixture of all classes were tested. A total amount of 4 tons were fed during the experiments. The signal was recorded with 9.6 kHz. Frequency analyses were performed for different grain-classes in order to investigate the influence of the grain-size distribution on the shape of the signal and the influence of neighbouring sensors. The standard evaluation and storage procedure for 1 minute aggregated data show that the modified pipe hydrophone is able to detect finer grain-sizes than the geophone sensor.

  15. Benchmarking Space Radiation Transport Codes Using Measured LET Spectra from the Crater Instrument on LRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Porter, J.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Smith, S. S.; Schwadron, N.; Kasper, J. C.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft measures the energy depositions by solar and galactic cosmic radiations in its silicon detectors. These energy depositions are converted to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, which can contribute to benchmarking space radiation transport codes and also used to estimate doses for the Lunar environment. In this work the Monte Carlo transport code HETC-HEDS (High Energy Transport Code - Human Exploration and Development in Space) and the deterministic NASA space radiation transport code HZETRN2010 are used to estimate LET and dose contributions from the incident primary ions and their charged secondaries produced in nuclear collisions within the components of the CRaTER instrument. Comparisons of the calculated LET spectra with measurements of LET from the CRaTER instrument are made and clearly show the importance of including corrections to the calculated average energy deposition spectra in the silicon detectors using a Vavilov distribution function.

  16. In situ measurements of particulate number density and size distribution from an aircraft. [using light scattering particle counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.

    1974-01-01

    Two different commercial particulate measuring instruments were flown aboard the NASA Convair 990. A condensation nuclei monitor was utilized to measure particles larger than approximately 0.003 micron in diameter. A specially designed pressurization system was used with this monitor at cabin altitude pressure. A near-forward light scattering counter was used to measure the number and size distribution particles in the size range from 0.5 to 5 microns and greater in diameter. Considerable variation in number density was encountered for both classes of particles at the test altitudes ranging from 5 to 12 km. Presence of clouds could be detected by the light scattering instrument because large numbers of particles would then be registered by the instrument, especially in the size range above 5.0 microns in diameter.

  17. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazoe, M.; Kato, T.; Suzuki, K.; Adachi, M.; Shibayama, A.; Hoshi, K.; Itou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Sakurai, H.

    2016-11-01

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states.

  18. Load-pull measurement analysis of AlGaN/GaN HEMT taking into account number of gate fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwat, Pongthavornkamol; Guoguo, Liu; Tingting, Yuan; Yingkui, Zheng; Xinyu, Liu

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates load-pull measurement of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) at different numbers of gate fingers. Scalable small-signal models are extracted to analyze the relationship between each model's parameters and the number of device's gate fingers. The simulated S-parameters from the small-signal models are compared with the reflection coefficients measured from the load-pull measurement system at X-band frequencies of 8.8 and 10.4 GHz. The dependency between the number of device's gate fingers and load-pull characterization is presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61204086).

  19. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, M; Kato, T; Suzuki, K; Adachi, M; Shibayama, A; Hoshi, K; Itou, M; Tsuji, N; Sakurai, Y; Sakurai, H

    2016-11-02

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states.

  20. Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report number 8, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-15

    The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. On the other hand, Mulled Coal does not cause the fugitive and airborne dust problems normally associated with thermally dried coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proved to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality, and at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems.

  1. Measurement of rates of transport across erythrocyte membranes by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Tahir Razi, M.; Rabenstein, Dallas L.

    The use of 1H NMR to monitor the transport of small molecules across the membrane of erythrocytes is evaluated. Cells are separated, as a function of time, from a suspension medium containing the small molecule of interest, and then analyzed for the small molecule by 1H NMR. 1H NMR spectra of either the intact cells or cell lysate are measured by the protein saturation pulse/Fourier transform (PSP/FT) technique. With this technique, interfering hemoglobin resonances are suppressed with a selective presaturation pulse and high-resolution spectra are obtained for small molecules. The detection limit is on the order of 0. 10 m M Membrane transport rates were measured for alanine, penicillamine, N-acetylpenicillamine, and S-methylcysteine.

  2. Protactinium-231 measurement and application to a uranium series transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golian, C.; Nightingale, T.; Airey, P. L.

    1984-06-01

    Precise measurements of small deviations of 230Th/ 234U and 231Pa/ 235U contribute to the modelling of the geochemical transport of uranium series nuclides. The use of alpha-spectrometry to measure the second-order daughter product 227Th was the analytical technique chosen. It was thereby assumed that the intermediate 227Ac is immobile. Complete methematical expressions for the count rate in various regions of the spectrum have been developed. They allow calculation of the initial yield from the cumulative counts of 227Th and the interfering 223Ra. 224Ra and 212Bi for extended time periods. The resulting increase in precision is particularly useful at low levels. The approach to modelling the transport of uranium series nuclides down-gradient of deposits within the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province of the Northern Territory of Australia is outlined. Some preliminary data are presented which call into question the assumption of the immobility of the 227Ac.

  3. Measurement of energetic-particle-driven core magnetic fluctuations and induced fast-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Koliner, J. J.; Eilerman, S.; Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Liu, D.

    2013-03-01

    Internal fluctuations arising from energetic-particle-driven instabilities, including both density and radial magnetic field, are measured in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The fluctuations peak near the core where fast ions reside and shift outward along the major radius as the instability transits from the n = 5 to n = 4 mode. During this transition, strong nonlinear three-wave interaction among multiple modes accompanied by enhanced fast-ion transport is observed.

  4. Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Resultsfrom ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus,Jerry

    2006-06-05

    High precision uranium isotope measurements of marineclastic sediments are used to measure the transport and storage time ofsediment from source to site of deposition. The approach is demonstratedon fine-grained, late Pleistocene deep-sea sediments from Ocean DrillingProgram Site 984A on the Bjorn Drift in the North Atlantic. The sedimentsare siliciclastic with up to 30 percent carbonate, and dated by sigma 18Oof benthic foraminifera. Nd and Sr isotopes indicate that provenance hasoscillated between a proximal source during the last three interglacialperiods volcanic rocks from Iceland and a distal continental sourceduring glacial periods. An unexpected finding is that the 234U/238Uratios of the silicate portion of the sediment, isolated by leaching withhydrochloric acid, are significantly less than the secular equilibriumvalue and show large and systematic variations that are correlated withglacial cycles and sediment provenance. The 234U depletions are inferredto be due to alpha-recoil loss of234Th, and are used to calculate"comminution ages" of the sediment -- the time elapsed between thegeneration of the small (<_ 50 mu-m) sediment grains in the sourceareas by comminution of bedrock, and the time of deposition on theseafloor. Transport times, the difference between comminution ages anddepositional ages, vary from less than 10 ky to about 300 to 400 ky forthe Site 984A sediments. Long transport times may reflect prior storagein soils, on continental shelves, or elsewhere on the seafloor. Transporttime may also be a measure of bottom current strength. During the mostrecent interglacial periods the detritus from distal continental sourcesis diluted with sediment from Iceland that is rapidly transported to thesite of deposition. The comminution age approach could be used to dateQuaternary non-marine sediments, soils, and atmospheric dust, and may beenhanced by concomitant measurement of 226Ra/230Th, 230Th/234U, andcosmogenic nuclides.

  5. Quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulator nanostructures (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lei; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2014-04-01

    We review the recent experimental advances on quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulators with emphasis on quantum oscillation, weak antilocalization and Aharonov-Bohm effect and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect. Following a brief introduction on the topic, we discuss the identification of the topological surface state based on quantum phenomena. Research prospect of topological insulators is described at the end of this article.

  6. Flight-Tests Measurements of Aileron Control Surface Behaviour at Supercritical Mach Numbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-04-01

    location, percent chord 75«0 Type of aileron No aorodynmnic balance, piano hinge on urper surface, power-boost control system, approximately statically...fir.. 1) to compute the moment coeffislcnts rbout the 7𔃿-percent- chord line. These data are orcacntcd In figure 6 and show that for zero...this difference in cehr.viour. ff r i Flii’.üt-test Ecas^rcientE of tho chord ^lse location of the shock at the supercritical lisch numbers at

  7. Microphysics of mass-transport in coupled droplet-pairs at low Reynolds number and the role of convective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qingming; Sau, Amalendu

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial mass-transport and redistribution in the micro-scale liquid droplets are important in diverse fields of research interest. The role of the "inflow" and the "outflow" type convective eddy-pairs in the entrainment of outer solute and internal relocation are examined for different homogeneous and heterogeneous water droplet pairs appearing in a tandem arrangement. Two micro-droplets of pure (rain) water interact with an oncoming outer air stream (Re ≤ 100) contaminated by uniformly distributed SO2. By virtue of separation/attachment induced non-uniform interfacial shear-stress gradient, the well-defined inflow/outflow type pairs of recirculating eddy-based convective motion quickly develops, and the eddies effectively attract/repel the accumulated outer solute and control the physical process of mass-transport in the droplet-pair. The non-uniformly shear-driven flow interaction and bifurcation of the circulatory internal flow lead to growth of important micro-scale "secondary" eddies which suitably regroup with the adjacent "primary" one to create the sustained inflow/outflow type convective dynamics. The presently derived flow characteristics and in-depth analysis help to significantly improve our understanding of the micro-droplet based transport phenomena in a wider context. By tuning "Re" (defined in terms of the droplet diameter and the average oncoming velocity of the outer air) and gap-ratio "α," the internal convective forcing and the solute entrainment efficiency could be considerably enhanced. The quantitative estimates for mass entrainment, convective strength, and saturation characteristics for different coupled micro-droplet pairs are extensively examined here for 0.2 ≤ α ≤ 2.0 and 30 ≤ Re ≤ 100. Interestingly, for the compound droplets, with suitably tuned radius-ratio "B" (of upstream droplet with respect to downstream one) the generated "inflow" type coherent convective dynamics helped to significantly augment the centre

  8. The large volume radiometric calorimeter system: A transportable device to measure scrap category plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M.F.; Wetzel, J.R.; Breakall, K.L.; Lemming, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    An innovative design concept has been used to design a large volume calorimeter system. The new design permits two measuring cells to fit in a compact, nonevaporative environmental bath. The system is mounted on a cart for transportability. Samples in the power range of 0.50 to 12.0 W can be measured. The calorimeters will receive samples as large as 22.0 cm in diameter by 43.2 cm high, and smaller samples can be measured without lengthening measurement time or increasing measurement error by using specially designed sleeve adapters. This paper describes the design considerations, construction, theory, applications, and performance of the large volume calorimeter system. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. IR detector for hydrocarbons concentration measurement in emissions during petroleum and oil products storage and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Andrey O.; Shemanin, Valeriy G.; Chartiy, Pavel V.

    2011-10-01

    A double beam IR detector is developed for light hydrocarbons concentration measurement in emissions from storage vessels during oil and oil products storage and transportation. It was concluded on the basis of chromatogram that main crude losses from evaporation are the share of hydrocarbons light ends from methane to decane. Detector operation is based on spectral transparency measurement in the infrared spectra absorption range. Operational wavelength of infrared radiation makes 3.4 μm. measurement principle is based on concentration calculation proceed from molecule absorption cross-section, optical path length between light emitted diode and reference and signal photodiodes as well as from value of measured signal transmitted through gaging volume. The novel of offering device is an actual paraffin hydrocarbons concentration measurement in emissions and continuous and automatic environment quality control.

  10. Half-life Measurements of Excited Levels in Fission Products around Mass Number 150

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Y.; Shima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Taniguchi, A.; Shibata, M.

    2014-06-15

    A spectrometer to measure nuclear level half-lives has been installed at the on-line isotope separator of the Kyoto University Reactor. This spectrometer consists of a LaBr3 scintillator, a thin plastic scintillator and an HPGe detector. Half-lives are deduced using the β-γ-γ delayed coincidence method. The prompt-time distribution curves measured with the spectrometer give a time resolution (FWHM) of 600 ps for 100-keV γ rays. This resolution means that half-lives down to the subnanosecond range or shorter can be measured. We reported recent measurements of the half-life of {sup 149}Pr and {sup 149}Nd. Some of the more interesting results include the first determination of the half-lives of {sup 149}Pr levels at 86.5 and 125.6 keV, which are 4.2(5) ns and 1.0(2) ns, respectively. In addition, the data indicate that the half-life of the 270.8-keV level in {sup 149}Nd is not 5.1(3) ns as reported previously, but 0.42(3) ns.

  11. THE MEASUREMENT OF VOCATIONAL NEEDS. MINNESOTA STUDIES IN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION, NUMBER 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEISS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    TWO QUESTIONNAIRES FOR MEASURING VOCATIONAL NEEDS WERE DEVELOPED. NEED WAS DEFINED AS "NEED FOR SPECIFIED REINFORCING CONDITIONS IN THE WORK ENVIRONMENT." THE N-FACTORS QUESTIONNAIRE (NFQ) CONSISTED OF 48 TWO-RESPONSE CHOICE ITEMS, FOUR ITEMS FOR EACH OF 12 SCALES--ACHIEVEMENT, AUTHORITY, COWORKERS, CREATIVITY AND CHALLENGE, DEPENDENCE,…

  12. Numbers of Bilingual Children in Speech and Language Therapy: Theory and Practice of Measuring Their Representation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Kirsten

    2001-01-01

    Explores concepts behind measuring representation of bilingual children in speech and language therapy (SLT), with relevance to other services, and discusses practicalities.Interviews were conducted with speech and language therapists or their managers in nine SLT departments. Findings showed that SLTs' and managers perceptions of the linguistic…

  13. Frequency measurements in a finite cylinder wake at a subcritical Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budair, M.; Ayoub, A.; Karamcheti, K.

    1991-01-01

    A spectral study of a hot-wire investigation in the near wake of a finite circular cylinder of high-aspect ratio is reported. The measurements included frequency spectra and cross correlations in spanwise and streamwise directions. The study identifies four spanwise regions, in terms of frequency, in the immediate wake of the finite cylinder.

  14. Half-life Measurements of Excited Levels in Fission Products around Mass Number 150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Y.; Shima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Taniguchi, A.; Shibata, M.

    2014-06-01

    A spectrometer to measure nuclear level half-lives has been installed at the on-line isotope separator of the Kyoto University Reactor. This spectrometer consists of a LaBr3 scintillator, a thin plastic scintillator and an HPGe detector. Half-lives are deduced using the β-γ-γ delayed coincidence method. The prompt-time distribution curves measured with the spectrometer give a time resolution (FWHM) of 600 ps for 100-keV γ rays. This resolution means that half-lives down to the subnanosecond range or shorter can be measured. We reported recent measurements of the half-life of 149Pr and 149Nd. Some of the more interesting results include the first determination of the half-lives of 149Pr levels at 86.5 and 125.6 keV, which are 4.2(5) ns and 1.0(2) ns, respectively. In addition, the data indicate that the half-life of the 270.8-keV level in 149Nd is not 5.1(3) ns as reported previously, but 0.42(3) ns.

  15. Three-dimensional effects on airfoil measurements at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Janik; Miller, Mark; Hultmark, Marcus; Hansen, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum codes (BEM) are widely used in the wind turbine industry to determine a turbine's operational range and its limits. Empirical two-dimensional airfoil data serve as the primary and fundamental input to the BEM code. Consequently, the results of BEM simulations are strongly dependent on the accuracy of these data. In this presentation, an experimental study is described in which airfoils of different aspect ratios were tested at identical Reynolds numbers. A high-pressure wind tunnel facility is used to achieve large Reynolds numbers of Rec = 3 ×106 , even with small chord lengths. This methodology enables testing of very high aspect ratio airfoils to characterize 3-D effects on the lift and drag data. The tests were performed over a large range of angles of attack, which is especially important for wind turbines. The effect of varying aspect ratio on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil is discussed with emphasis on the outcome of a BEM simulation. The project was partially funded by NSF CBET-1435254 (program manager Dr. Gregory Rorrer).

  16. Measuring Cation Transport by Na,K- and H,K-ATPase in Xenopus Oocytes by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Alternative to Radioisotope Assays

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Katharina L.; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Spiller, Susan; Friedrich, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Whereas cation transport by the electrogenic membrane transporter Na+,K+-ATPase can be measured by electrophysiology, the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase is more difficult to investigate. Many transport assays utilize radioisotopes to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio, however, the necessary security measures impose severe restrictions regarding human exposure or assay design. Furthermore, ion transport across cell membranes is critically influenced by the membrane potential, which is not straightforwardly controlled in cell culture or in proteoliposome preparations. Here, we make use of the outstanding sensitivity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) towards trace amounts of chemical elements to measure Rb+ or Li+ transport by Na+,K+- or gastric H+,K+-ATPase in single cells. Using Xenopus oocytes as expression system, we determine the amount of Rb+ (Li+) transported into the cells by measuring samples of single-oocyte homogenates in an AAS device equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) furnace, which is loaded from an autosampler. Since the background of unspecific Rb+ uptake into control oocytes or during application of ATPase-specific inhibitors is very small, it is possible to implement complex kinetic assay schemes involving a large number of experimental conditions simultaneously, or to compare the transport capacity and kinetics of site-specifically mutated transporters with high precision. Furthermore, since cation uptake is determined on single cells, the flux experiments can be carried out in combination with two-electrode voltage-clamping (TEVC) to achieve accurate control of the membrane potential and current. This allowed e.g. to quantitatively determine the 3Na+/2K+ transport stoichiometry of the Na+,K+-ATPase and enabled for the first time to investigate the voltage dependence of cation transport by the electroneutrally operating gastric H+,K+-ATPase. In principle, the assay is not limited to K+-transporting

  17. Cryptographically secure hardware random number generator dedicated for distributed measurement and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, Pawel

    The chaotic signal generator based on the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems for applications in cryptographically secure distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources is presented. This system was implemented on the basis of the physical chaotic electronic vibration generator in which the resonant circuit is composed of two capacitors, two resistors, coil and transistor, called the Colpitts oscillator. The presented system was designed, programmed and thoroughly tested in the term of cryptographic security in our laboratory, what there is the most important part of this publication. True cryptographic security was tested based on the author's software and the software environment called RDieHarder. The obtained results will be here presented and analyzed in detail with particular reference to the specificity of distributed measurement and control systems with asymmetric resources.

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  19. An experimental study of the flow pattern and heat transport behavior in horizontal convection with large Rayleigh number and small aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Huang, Shi-Di

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal convection is a simple conceptual model to understand the role of buoyancy in the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). Here we report an experimental study of the flow pattern and heat transport behavior in horizontal convection with Rayleigh number Ra up to 2 ×1012 and aspect ratio of 0.1 using a long apparatus. Flow visualization studies reveal that it is not necessary for the returning flow to penetrate the strong stratification in the thermal BLs, suggesting that much less energy may be required to maintain a global circulation than is generally believed. Moreover, both the heat transport efficiency and thermal BL thicknesses are found to follow a 0.3 power law, which indicates a stronger heat transport in horizontal convection with large Ra number than is suggested in the literature. These findings on horizontal convection may be relevant to the driving mechanism of the MOC. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK403811.

  20. Modeling fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in loaded bone: potential applications in measuring fluid and solute transport in the osteocytic lacunar-canalicular system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaozhou; Novotny, John E; Wang, Liyun

    2008-12-01

    Solute transport through the bone lacunar-canalicular system is essential for osteocyte viability and function, and it can be measured using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The mathematical model developed here aims to analyze solute transport during FRAP in mechanically loaded bone. Combining both whole bone-level poroelasticity and cellular-level solute transport, we found that load-induced solute transport during FRAP is characterized by an exponential recovery rate, which is determined by the dimensionless Strouhal (St) number that characterizes the oscillation effects over the mean flows, and that significant transport occurs only for St values below a threshold, when the solute stroke displacement exceeds the distance between the source and sink (the canalicular length). This threshold mechanism explains the general flow behaviors such as increasing transport with increasing magnitude and decreasing frequency. Mechanical loading is predicted to enhance transport of all tracers relative to diffusion, with the greatest enhancement for medium-sized tracers and less enhancement for small and large tracers. This study provides guidelines for future FRAP experiments, based on which the model can be used to quantify bone permeability, solute-matrix interaction, and flow velocities. These studies should provide insights into bone adaptation and metabolism, and help to treat various bone diseases and conditions.

  1. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  2. Historical Increase in the Number of Factors Measured by Commercial Tests of Cognitive Ability: Are We Overfactoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Thomas W.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2007-01-01

    A historical increase in the number of factors purportedly measured by commercial tests of cognitive ability may result from four distinct pressures including: increasingly complex models of intelligence, test publishers' desires to provide clinically useful assessment instruments with greater interpretive value, test publishers' desires to…

  3. Power of Latent Growth Modeling for Detecting Linear Growth: Number of Measurements and Comparison with Other Analytic Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; Fan, Xiaotao

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated 2 issues concerning the power of latent growth modeling (LGM) in detecting linear growth: the effect of the number of repeated measurements on LGM's power in detecting linear growth and the comparison between LGM and some other approaches in terms of power for detecting linear growth. A Monte Carlo simulation design was…

  4. A Participatory Approach to the Identification of Measures of Number Sense in Children Prior to School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Sally; Kemp, Coral

    2009-01-01

    The research reported in this paper used a modified Delphi procedure in an attempt to establish a consensus on tasks proposed to assess components of number sense identified as essential for early mathematics success by a broad range of academics with expertise in the area of early mathematics. Tasks included as measures of these components were…

  5. Turbulent-Spot Growth Characteristics: Wind-Tunnel and Flight Measurements of Natural Transition at High Reynolds and Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. P.; Jones, T. V.; LaGraff, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments are described which examine the growth of turbulent spots on a flat plate at Reynolds and Mach numbers typical of gas-turbine blading. A short-duration piston tunnel is employed and rapid-response miniature surface-heat-transfer gauges are used to asses the state of the boundary layer. The leading- and trailing-edge velocities of spots are reported for different external pressure gradients and Mach numbers. Also, the lateral spreading angle is determined from the heat-transfer signals which demonstrate dramatically the reduction in spot growth associated with favorable pressure gradients. An associated experiment on the development of turbulent wedges is also reported where liquid-crystal heat-transfer techniques are employed in low-speed wind tunnel to visualize and measure the wedge characteristics. Finally, both liquid crystal techniques and hot-film measurements from flight tests at Mach number of 0.6 are presented.

  6. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  7. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  8. Aerosol characterization and transport pathway using ground-based measurement and space borne remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyouk, Neda; Léon, Jean-François; Delbarre, Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Using two years measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient retrieval from CALIPSO as a joint NASA-CNES satellite mission along with ground-based measurements of particle mass concentration (PM2.5), we assess particulate matter air quality over different urban and periurban areas in France. In order to understanding the influence of the long range transport onto the local aerosol load we have focused on analysing of pollution event in Lille - urban area and Dunkerque - industrial area. We compared ground- based measurements with CALIPSO measurements. The CALIPSO level 2 aerosol records are more useful because the extinction coefficient is available. We use the extinction coefficient profiles which are provided by CALIPSO to depict the vertical structure of the aerosol properties. The combination of ground- based measurements of PM2.5, aerosol optical thickness (AOT's) obtained by Aeronet network data and CALIOP data enhances the possibilities of studying transport pathway of aerosol in the atmosphere and aerosol optical properties (aerosol extinction coefficient, aerosol optical depth, atmosphere transparency). The linear relationship between AOT _CALIPSO and AOT _ Aeronet network shows a slop of 0.4 in north of France. Moreover, we observed the good relationship between PM2.5 and AOT by CALIPSO profiles with a slope of 57.59 and correlation coefficient of 0.75 over France.

  9. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  10. Optimum number of technical replicates for the measurement of compression of lamb meat.

    PubMed

    Hoban, J M; van de Ven, R J; Hopkins, D L

    2016-05-01

    Up to six (average 4.63) replicate compression values were collected on cooked m. semimembranosus of lambs that had been raised at six sites across southern Australia (n=1817). Measurements on each sample were made with one of two Lloyd Texture analyser machines, with each machine having a 0.63 cm diameter plunger. Based on a log normal model with common variance on the log scale for within sample replicate results, estimates of the within sample variability of compression values were obtained, resulting in a quality control procedure for compression testing based on the coefficient of variation.

  11. Measuring acuity of the approximate number system reliably and validly: the evaluation of an adaptive test procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lindskog, Marcus; Winman, Anders; Juslin, Peter; Poom, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Two studies investigated the reliability and predictive validity of commonly used measures and models of Approximate Number System acuity (ANS). Study 1 investigated reliability by both an empirical approach and a simulation of maximum obtainable reliability under ideal conditions. Results showed that common measures of the Weber fraction (w) are reliable only when using a substantial number of trials, even under ideal conditions. Study 2 compared different purported measures of ANS acuity as for convergent and predictive validity in a within-subjects design and evaluated an adaptive test using the ZEST algorithm. Results showed that the adaptive measure can reduce the number of trials needed to reach acceptable reliability. Only direct tests with non-symbolic numerosity discriminations of stimuli presented simultaneously were related to arithmetic fluency. This correlation remained when controlling for general cognitive ability and perceptual speed. Further, the purported indirect measure of ANS acuity in terms of the Numeric Distance Effect (NDE) was not reliable and showed no sign of predictive validity. The non-symbolic NDE for reaction time was significantly related to direct w estimates in a direction contrary to the expected. Easier stimuli were found to be more reliable, but only harder (7:8 ratio) stimuli contributed to predictive validity. PMID:23964256

  12. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwagi, H. Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S.

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  13. Measurement and relevance of neuroblastoma DNA copy number changes in the post-genome era.

    PubMed

    Mosse, Yael P; Greshock, Joel; Weber, Barbara L; Maris, John M

    2005-10-18

    The completion of the human genome sequence and the development of high throughput technology present exciting opportunities for the study of cancer cells. High-resolution analysis of chromosomal aberrations provides a global framework for understanding complex patterns in cancer cells, allowing us to ask hypothesis-driven questions. Genome-wide analysis of amplification and deletion of genomic regions is a critical step to resolving the mechanisms of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We used a high-resolution aCGH system that has over 4000 human BAC clones, resulting in an average coverage of 1Mb across the genome, to define whole genome copy number aberrations (CNAs) in a panel of human neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. By combining the aCGH data with meticulous regional validation studies, we showed that array CGH could reliably detect known aberrations including single copy gain or loss, that data correlate well with standard techniques used for the detection of these genetic changes, and that this technique can be used to identify novel regions of genomic imbalance.

  14. Cryogenic wind tunnel technology. A way to measurement at higher Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The goals, design, problems, and value of cryogenic transonic wind tunnels being developed in Europe are discussed. The disadvantages inherent in low-Reynolds-number (Re) wind tunnel simulations of aircraft flight at high Re are reviewed, and the cryogenic tunnel is shown to be the most practical method to achieve high Re. The design proposed for the European Transonic Wind tunnel (ETW) is presented: parameters include cross section. DISPLAY 83A46484/2 = 4 sq m, operating pressure = 5 bar, temperature = 110-120 K, maximum Re = 40 x 10 to the 6th, liquid N2 consumption = 40,000 metric tons/year, and power = 39,5 MW. The smaller Cologne subsonic tunnel being adapted to cryogenic use for preliminary studies is described. Problems of configuration, materials, and liquid N2 evaporation and handling and the research underway to solve them are outlined. The benefits to be gained by the construction of these costly installations are seen more in applied aerodynamics than in basic research in fluid physics. The need for parallel development of both high Re tunnels and computers capable of performing high-Re numerical analysis is stressed.

  15. Multi-energy soft-x-ray technique for impurity transport measurements in the fusion plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaye, S. M.; Kumar, D.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Paul, S.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    A new diagnostic technique was developed to produce high-resolution impurity transport measurements of the steep-gradient edge of fusion plasmas. Perturbative impurity transport measurements were performed for the first time in the NSTX plasma edge (r/a ˜ 0.6 to the SOL) with short neon gas puffs, and the resulting line and continuum emission was measured with the new edge multi-energy soft-x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic. Neon transport is modeled with the radial impurity transport code STRAHL and the resulting x-ray emission is computed using the ADAS atomic database. The radial transport coefficient profiles D(r) and v(r), and the particle flux from the gas puff Φ(t), are the free parameters in this model and are varied to find the best fit to experimental x-ray emissivity measurements, with bolometry used to constrain the impurity source. Initial experiments were successful and results were consistent with previous measurements of core impurity transport and neoclassical transport calculations. New diagnostic tools will be implemented on NSTX-U to further improve these transport measurements.

  16. Measuring phonon mean free path distributions by probing quasiballistic phonon transport in grating nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Lingping; Collins, Kimberlee C.; Hu, Yongjie; Luckyanova, Maria N.; Maznev, Alexei A.; Huberman, Samuel; Chiloyan, Vazrik; Zhou, Jiawei; Huang, Xiaopeng; Nelson, Keith A.; Chen, Gang

    2015-11-27

    Heat conduction in semiconductors and dielectrics depends upon their phonon mean free paths that describe the average travelling distance between two consecutive phonon scattering events. Nondiffusive phonon transport is being exploited to extract phonon mean free path distributions. Here, we describe an implementation of a nanoscale thermal conductivity spectroscopy technique that allows for the study of mean free path distributions in optically absorbing materials with relatively simple fabrication and a straightforward analysis scheme. We pattern 1D metallic grating of various line widths but fixed gap size on sample surfaces. The metal lines serve as both heaters and thermometers in time-domain thermoreflectance measurements and simultaneously act as wiregrid polarizers that protect the underlying substrate from direct optical excitation and heating. We demonstrate the viability of this technique by studying length-dependent thermal conductivities of silicon at various temperatures. The thermal conductivities measured with different metal line widths are analyzed using suppression functions calculated from the Boltzmann transport equation to extract the phonon mean free path distributions with no calibration required. Furthermore, this table-top ultrafast thermal transport spectroscopy technique enables the study of mean free path spectra in a wide range of technologically important materials.

  17. Photosystem I cyclic electron transport: Measurement of ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Cleland, R E; Bendall, D S

    1992-12-01

    Absorbance changes of ferredoxin measured at 463 nm in isolated thylakoids were shown to arise from the activity of the enzyme ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase (FQR) in cyclic electron transport. Under anaerobic conditions in the presence of DCMU and an appropriate concentration of reduced ferredoxin, a light-induced absorbance decrease due to further reduction of Fd was assigned to the oxidation of the other components in the cyclic pathway, primarily plastoquinone. When the light was turned off, Fd was reoxidised and this gave a direct quantitative measurement of the rate of cyclic electron transport due to the activity of FQR. This activity was sensitive to the classical inhibitor of cyclic electron transport, antimycin, and also to J820 and DBMIB. Antimycin had no effect on Fd reduction although this was inhibited by stigmatellin. This provides further evidence that there is a quinone reduction site outside the cytochrome bf complex. The effect of inhibitors of ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase and experiments involving the modification of ferredoxin suggest that there may be some role for the reductase as a component of FQR. Contrary to expectations, NADPH2 inhibited FQR activity; ATP and ADP had no effect.

  18. Neutron spectra and dose-rate measurements around a transport cask for spent reactor fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimpler, Arndt

    1997-02-01

    A storage facility with a capacity of 420 containers is available for the interim storage of spent fuel from power reactors at the village of Gorleben in Germany. During transportation and storage of spent fuel casks radiation exposure of the personnel is dominated by neutrons. The routine control of the dose rate limits according to the transport regulations and the licence of the storage facility is performed with conventional neutron survey meters. These monitors, calibrated for fast neutrons at radionuclide neutron sources, usually overestimate the real dose rate in unknown neutron fields. In this paper, a series of measurements with several monitoring instruments near a transport cask of the CASTOR type is presented. The results are compared with reference data for the does equivalents calculated from the measured fluence spectra using a Bonner multisphere spectrometer. Besides reliable information about neutron spectra and dose rates at the container, it was found that some of the rem counters overestimate the true dose rate by a factor of 2 or more.

  19. Measuring Phonon Mean Free Path Distributions by Probing Quasiballistic Phonon Transport in Grating Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lingping; Collins, Kimberlee C.; Hu, Yongjie; Luckyanova, Maria N.; Maznev, Alexei A.; Huberman, Samuel; Chiloyan, Vazrik; Zhou, Jiawei; Huang, Xiaopeng; Nelson, Keith A.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Heat conduction in semiconductors and dielectrics depends upon their phonon mean free paths that describe the average travelling distance between two consecutive phonon scattering events. Nondiffusive phonon transport is being exploited to extract phonon mean free path distributions. Here, we describe an implementation of a nanoscale thermal conductivity spectroscopy technique that allows for the study of mean free path distributions in optically absorbing materials with relatively simple fabrication and a straightforward analysis scheme. We pattern 1D metallic grating of various line widths but fixed gap size on sample surfaces. The metal lines serve as both heaters and thermometers in time-domain thermoreflectance measurements and simultaneously act as wire-grid polarizers that protect the underlying substrate from direct optical excitation and heating. We demonstrate the viability of this technique by studying length-dependent thermal conductivities of silicon at various temperatures. The thermal conductivities measured with different metal line widths are analyzed using suppression functions calculated from the Boltzmann transport equation to extract the phonon mean free path distributions with no calibration required. This table-top ultrafast thermal transport spectroscopy technique enables the study of mean free path spectra in a wide range of technologically important materials. PMID:26612032

  20. Measuring Phonon Mean Free Path Distributions by Probing Quasiballistic Phonon Transport in Grating Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingping; Collins, Kimberlee C; Hu, Yongjie; Luckyanova, Maria N; Maznev, Alexei A; Huberman, Samuel; Chiloyan, Vazrik; Zhou, Jiawei; Huang, Xiaopeng; Nelson, Keith A; Chen, Gang

    2015-11-27

    Heat conduction in semiconductors and dielectrics depends upon their phonon mean free paths that describe the average travelling distance between two consecutive phonon scattering events. Nondiffusive phonon transport is being exploited to extract phonon mean free path distributions. Here, we describe an implementation of a nanoscale thermal conductivity spectroscopy technique that allows for the study of mean free path distributions in optically absorbing materials with relatively simple fabrication and a straightforward analysis scheme. We pattern 1D metallic grating of various line widths but fixed gap size on sample surfaces. The metal lines serve as both heaters and thermometers in time-domain thermoreflectance measurements and simultaneously act as wire-grid polarizers that protect the underlying substrate from direct optical excitation and heating. We demonstrate the viability of this technique by studying length-dependent thermal conductivities of silicon at various temperatures. The thermal conductivities measured with different metal line widths are analyzed using suppression functions calculated from the Boltzmann transport equation to extract the phonon mean free path distributions with no calibration required. This table-top ultrafast thermal transport spectroscopy technique enables the study of mean free path spectra in a wide range of technologically important materials.

  1. Measuring phonon mean free path distributions by probing quasiballistic phonon transport in grating nanostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Lingping; Collins, Kimberlee C.; Hu, Yongjie; ...

    2015-11-27

    Heat conduction in semiconductors and dielectrics depends upon their phonon mean free paths that describe the average travelling distance between two consecutive phonon scattering events. Nondiffusive phonon transport is being exploited to extract phonon mean free path distributions. Here, we describe an implementation of a nanoscale thermal conductivity spectroscopy technique that allows for the study of mean free path distributions in optically absorbing materials with relatively simple fabrication and a straightforward analysis scheme. We pattern 1D metallic grating of various line widths but fixed gap size on sample surfaces. The metal lines serve as both heaters and thermometers in time-domainmore » thermoreflectance measurements and simultaneously act as wiregrid polarizers that protect the underlying substrate from direct optical excitation and heating. We demonstrate the viability of this technique by studying length-dependent thermal conductivities of silicon at various temperatures. The thermal conductivities measured with different metal line widths are analyzed using suppression functions calculated from the Boltzmann transport equation to extract the phonon mean free path distributions with no calibration required. Furthermore, this table-top ultrafast thermal transport spectroscopy technique enables the study of mean free path spectra in a wide range of technologically important materials.« less

  2. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  3. Phase Averaged Measurements of the Coherent Structure of a Mach Number 0.6 Jet. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of a large scale structure in a Mach number 0.6, axisymmetric jet of cold air was proven. In order to further characterize the coherent structure, phase averaged measurements of the axial mass velocity, radial velocity, and the product of the two were made. These measurements yield information about the percent of the total fluctuations contained in the coherent structure. These measured values were compared to the total fluctuation levels for each quantity and the result expressed as a percent of the total fluctuation level contained in the organized structure at a given frequency. These measurements were performed for five frequencies (St=0.16, 0.32, 0.474, 0.95, and 1.26). All of the phase averaged measurements required that the jet be artificially excited.

  4. Transport and Measurements of High-Current Electron Beams from X pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonov, Alexey V.; Mingaleev, Albert R.; Romanova, Vera M.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Blesener, Isaac C.; Kusse, Bruce R.; Hammer, David A.

    2009-01-21

    Generation of electron beams is an unavoidable property of X-pinches and other pulsed-power-driven pinches of different geometry. Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups with different geometry's are discussed. Of particular interest is the partially neutralized nature of the beam propagating from the X-pinch to a diagnostic system. Two scenarios of electron beam propagation from X-pinch to Faraday cup are analyzed by means of computer simulation using the PIC-code KARAT. The first is longitudinal neutralization by ions extracted from plasma at an output window of the X-pinch diode; the second is the beam transport through a plasma background between the diode and a diagnostic system.

  5. Radicals and Reservoirs in the GMI Chemistry and Transport Model: Comparison to Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Connell, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    We have used a three-dimensional chemistry and transport model (CTM), developed under the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI), to carry out two simulations of the composition of the stratosphere under changing halogen loading for 1995 through 2030. The two simulations differ only in that one uses meteorological fields from a general circulation model while the other uses meteorological fields from a data assimilation system. A single year's winds and temperatures are repeated for each 36-year simulation. We compare results from these two simulations with an extensive collection of data from satellite and ground-based measurements for 1993-2000. Comparisons of simulated fields with observations of radical and reservoir species for some of the major ozone-destroying compounds are of similar quality for both simulations. Differences in the upper stratosphere, caused by transport of total reactive nitrogen and methane, impact the balance among the ozone loss processes and the sensitivity of the two simulations to the change in composition.

  6. Quantitative Limits on Small Molecule Transport via the Electropermeome - Measuring and Modeling Single Nanosecond Perturbations.

    PubMed

    Sözer, Esin B; Levine, Zachary A; Vernier, P Thomas

    2017-12-01

    The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the permeabilization of cell membranes by pulsed electric fields (electroporation) remain obscure despite decades of investigative effort. To advance beyond descriptive schematics to the development of robust, predictive models, empirical parameters in existing models must be replaced with physics- and biology-based terms anchored in experimental observations. We report here absolute values for the uptake of YO-PRO-1, a small-molecule fluorescent indicator of membrane integrity, into cells after a single electric pulse lasting only 6 ns. We correlate these measured values, based on fluorescence microphotometry of hundreds of individual cells, with a diffusion-based geometric analysis of pore-mediated transport and with molecular simulations of transport across electropores in a phospholipid bilayer. The results challenge the "drift and diffusion through a pore" model that dominates conventional explanatory schemes for the electroporative transfer of small molecules into cells and point to the necessity for a more complex model.

  7. Measuring the electronic transport properties of individual nano-objects under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillier, C.; Ayari, A.; Le Floch, S.; Féret, H.; Guiraud, G.; San-Miguel, A.

    2011-09-01

    We describe a setup to carry out electronic transport measurements under high pressures on individual nano-objects. It is based on a home-automated three-stage gas compressor working with argon or helium up to 1 GPa. The setup was successfully tested on contacted individual nanotubes, for which we evidence strong evolutions of the transport properties. These evolutions are related to fundamental issues such as the modification of the nano-object contact resistance, the pressure-induced modification of the nano-object geometry or pressure-induced changes in the intrinsic electronic properties of the nanosystem. A cryostat has also been adapted to the pressure cell, allowing combined pressure and temperature experiments down to 12 K.

  8. Measurements of Electron Transport in Foils Irradiated with a Picosecond Time Scale Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C. R. D.; Hoarty, D. J.; James, S. F.; Swatton, D.; Hughes, S. J.; Morton, J. W.; Guymer, T. M.; Hill, M. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Andrew, J. E.; Comley, A. J.; Shepherd, R.; Dunn, J.; Chen, H.; Schneider, M.; Brown, G.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Emig, J.

    2011-05-06

    The heating of solid foils by a picosecond time scale laser pulse has been studied by using x-ray emission spectroscopy. The target material was plastic foil with a buried layer of a spectroscopic tracer material. The laser pulse length was either 0.5 or 2 ps, which resulted in a laser irradiance that varied over the range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Time-resolved measurements of the buried layer emission spectra using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera were used to infer the density and temperature conditions as a function of laser parameters and depth of the buried layer. Comparison of the data to different models of electron transport showed that they are consistent with a model of electron transport that predicts the bulk of the target heating is due to return currents.

  9. Fast electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on NSTX using a multi-energy SXR array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Bell, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Leblanc, B.; Sabbagh, S.

    2007-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft X-ray array has been developed for fast (<=0.1 ms) time and space-resolved electron temperature, MHD and transport measurements on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The electron temperature is obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the Abel inverted radial emissivity profiles in three energy ranges [1]. The applicability of this diagnostic technique to radio frequency electron heating and current drive experiments, perturbative electron and impurity transport studies, as well as an analysis of the impact of several types of MHD activity such as NTMs, RWMs, ELMs and Fishbones will be discussed. This work supported by U.S. DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 DoE and grant No. DE-FG02-99ER5452 at The Johns Hopkins University. [1] L. F. Delgado-Aparicio, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 49, 1245 (2007).

  10. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; Miles, Natasha; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; O'Dell, Chris; Sweeney, Colm; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  11. Regional analysis techniques for integrating experimental and numerical measurements of transport properties of reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, S. M.; Latham, S.; Middleton, J.; Limaye, A.; Senden, T. J.; Arns, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the mechanisms of micro-structural change and their effect on transport properties using digital core analysis requires balancing field of view and resolution. This typically leads to the compromise of working with relatively small samples, where boundary effects can be substantial. A direct comparison with experiment, as e.g. desirable to eliminate unknown parameters and integrate numerical and physical experiments, needs to consider these boundary effects. Here we develop a workflow to define measuring windows within a sample where these boundary effects are minimised allowing the integration of physical and numerical experiment. We consider in particular sleeve leakage and use a radial partitioning of the solutions to various transport equations to derive relevant regional measures, which may be used for the development of cross-correlations between physical properties. Samples of Bentheimer and Castlegate sandstone as well as Mt. Gambier limestone and a sucrosic dolomite are considered. The sample plugs are encased in rubber sleeves and micro-CT images acquired at ambient conditions. Using these high-resolution images we calculate transport properties, namely permeability and electrical conductivity, and analyse the resulting field solutions with regard to flux across different regions of interest. The latter are selected on the basis of distance to the sample sleeve inner surface. Clear bypassing at the sleeve-sample interface in terms of elevated fluxes is observed for all samples, although to different extent. We consider different sleeve boundary conditions to define a measuring window minimising these effects, use the procedure to compare flux averages defined over these measuring windows with conventional choices of simulation domains, and compare resulting physical cross-correlations.

  12. Vertical Transport Processes for Inert and Scavenged Species: TRACE-A Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The TRACE-A mission of the NASA DC-8 aircraft made a large-scale survey of the tropical and subtropical atmosphere in September and October of 1992. Both In-situ measurements of CO (G. Sachsen NASA Langley) and aerosol size (J. Browell group, NASA Langley) provide excellent data sets with which to constrain vertical transport by planetary boundary layer mixing and deep-cloud cumulus convection. Lidar profiles of aerosol-induced scattering and ozone (also by Bremen) are somewhat require more subtle interpretation as tracers, but the vertical information on layering largely compensates for these complexities. The reason this DC-8 dataset is so useful is that very large areas of biomass burning over Africa and South America provide surface sources of appropriate sizes with which to characterize vertical and horizontal motions; the major limitation of our source description is that biomass burning patterns move considerably every few days, and daily burning inventories are a matter of concurrent, intensive research. We use the Penn State / NCAR MM5 model in an assimilation mode on the synoptic and intercontinental scale, and assess the success it shows in vertical transport descriptions. We find that the general level of emissions suggested by the climatological approach (Will. Has, U. of Montana) appears to be approximately correct, possibly a bit low, for this October, 1992, time period. Vertical transport in planetary boundary layer mixing to 5.5 kin was observed and reproduced in our simulations. Furthermore we find evidence that Blackader "transilient" or matrix-transport scheme is needed, but may require some adaptation in our tracer model: CO seems to exhibit very high values at the top of the planetary boundary layer, a process that stretches the eddy-diffusion parameterization. We will report on progress in improving the deep convective transport of carbon monoxide: the Grail scheme as we used it at 100 kin resolution did not transport enough material to the

  13. Information entropy to measure the spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyao; Huang, Guanhua; Xiong, Yunwu

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the spatial structure of porous media, randomness of groundwater recharge and discharge (rainfall, runoff, etc.) has led to groundwater movement complexity, physical and chemical interaction between groundwater and porous media cause solute transport in the medium more complicated. An appropriate method to describe the complexity of features is essential when study on solute transport and conversion in porous media. Information entropy could measure uncertainty and disorder, therefore we attempted to investigate complexity, explore the contact between the information entropy and complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media using information entropy theory. Based on Markov theory, two-dimensional stochastic field of hydraulic conductivity (K) was generated by transition probability. Flow and solute transport model were established under four conditions (instantaneous point source, continuous point source, instantaneous line source and continuous line source). The spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport process was characterized and evaluated using spatial moment and information entropy. Results indicated that the entropy increased as the increase of complexity of solute transport process. For the point source, the one-dimensional entropy of solute concentration increased at first and then decreased along X and Y directions. As time increased, entropy peak value basically unchanged, peak position migrated along the flow direction (X direction) and approximately coincided with the centroid position. With the increase of time, spatial variability and complexity of solute concentration increase, which result in the increases of the second-order spatial moment and the two-dimensional entropy. Information entropy of line source was higher than point source. Solute entropy obtained from continuous input was higher than instantaneous input. Due to the increase of average length of lithoface, media continuity increased, flow and

  14. High-Reynolds Number Active Blowing Semi-Span Force Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Rhew, Ray D.; Acheson, Michael J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent wind-tunnel tests at the NASA Langley Research Center National Transonic Facility utilized high-pressure bellows to route air to the model for evaluating aircraft circulation control. The introduction of these bellows within the Sidewall Model Support System significantly impacted the performance of the external sidewall mounted semi-span balance. As a result of this impact on the semi-span balance measurement performance, it became apparent that a new capability needed to be built into the National Transonic Facility s infrastructure to allow for performing pressure tare calibrations on the balance in order to properly characterize its performance under the influence of static bellows pressure tare loads and bellows thermal effects. The objective of this study was to design both mechanical calibration hardware and an experimental calibration design that can be employed at the facility in order to efficiently and precisely perform the necessary loadings in order to characterize the semi-span balance under the influence of multiple calibration factors (balance forces/moments and bellows pressure/temperature). Using statistical design of experiments, an experimental design was developed allowing for strategically characterizing the behavior of the semi-span balance for use in circulation control and propulsion-type flow control testing at the National Transonic Facility.

  15. Boundary layer, skin friction, and boattail pressure measurements from the YF-12 airplane at Mach numbers up to 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. F.

    1978-01-01

    In-flight measurements of boundary layer and skin friction data were made on YF-12 airplanes for Mach numbers between 2.0 and 3.0. Boattail pressures were also obtained for Mach numbers between 0.7 and 3.0 with Reynolds numbers up to four hundred million. Boundary layer data measured along the lower fuselage centerline indicate local displacement and momentum thicknesses can be much larger than predicted. Skin friction coefficients measured at two of five lower fuselage stations were significantly less than predicted by flat plate theory. The presence of large differences between measured boattail pressure drag and values calculated by a potential flow solution indicates the presence of vortex effects on the upper boattail surface. At both subsonic and supersonic speeds, pressure drag on the longer of two boattail configurations was equal to or less than the pressure drag on the shorter configuration. At subsonic and transonic speeds, the difference in the drag coefficient was on the order of 0.0008 to 0.0010. In the supersonic cruise range, the difference in the drag coefficient was on the order of 0.002. Boattail drag coefficients are based on wing reference area.

  16. Determination of car on-road black carbon and particle number emission factors and comparison between mobile and stationary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Ferrero, L.; Carriero, M.; Močnik, G.

    2015-01-01

    We have used two methods for measuring emission factors (EFs) in real driving conditions on five cars in a controlled environment: the stationary method, where the investigated vehicle drives by the stationary measurement platform and the composition of the plume is measured, and the chasing method, where a mobile measurement platform drives behind the investigated vehicle. We measured EFs of black carbon and particle number concentration. The stationary method was tested for repeatability at different speeds and on a slope. The chasing method was tested on a test track and compared to the portable emission measurement system. We further developed the data processing algorithm for both methods, trying to improve consistency, determine the plume duration, limit the background influence and facilitate automatic processing of measurements. The comparison of emission factors determined by the two methods showed good agreement. EFs of a single car measured with either method have a specific distribution with a characteristic value and a long tail of super emissions. Measuring EFs at different speeds or slopes did not significantly influence the EFs of different cars; hence, we propose a new description of vehicle emissions that is not related to kinematic or engine parameters, and we rather describe the vehicle EF with a characteristic value and a super emission tail.

  17. Determination of car on-road black carbon and particle number emission factors and comparison between mobile and stationary measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ježek, I.; Drinovec, L.; Ferrero, L.; Carriero, M.; Močnik, G.

    2014-06-01

    We have used two methods for measuring emission factors (EF) in real driving conditions on five cars in a controlled environment: the stationary method, where the investigated vehicle drives by the stationary measurement platform and the composition of the plume is measured; and the chasing method, where a mobile measurement platform drives behind the investigated vehicle. We measured EF of black carbon and particle number concentration. The stationary method was tested for repeatability at different speeds and on a slope. The chasing method was tested on a test track and compared to the portable emission measurement system. We further developed the data processing algorithm for both methods, trying to improve consistency, determine the plume duration, limit the background influence and facilitate automatic processing of measurements. The comparison of emission factors determined by the two methods showed good agreement. EFs of a single car measured with either method have a specific distribution with a characteristic value and a long tail of super emissions. Measuring EFs at different speeds or slopes did not significantly influence the EFs of different cars, hence we propose a new description of vehicle emissions that is not related to kinematic or engine parameters, rather we describe the vehicle EF with a characteristic value and a "super emission" tail.

  18. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Final Cover Soil: Measurements and Model Modification by Dry Bulk Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Kawamoto, K.; Hamamoto, S.; Nagamori, M.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2011-12-01

    Landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Until recently, landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest sources of anthropogenic CH4 emission, the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the greenhouse gases migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill while securing the hydraulic performance. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil, few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils have been done. However, recent soil-gas studies implied that the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size are key parameters to understand landfill gaseous performance. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport. In this study, the effects of compaction level and particle size fraction effects on ka and Dp for landfill final cover soil was investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final cover in Japan. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm, 2120 cm3) at two different compaction levels [(MP):2700 kN/m2 and (SP):600 kN/m2]. After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential of 0.98, 2.94, 9.81, 1235 kPa and with air-dried and oven-dried conditions. Results showed that measured Dp and ka values for the

  19. Controlling and measuring quantum transport of heat in trapped-ion crystals.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, A; Bruderer, M; Plenio, M B

    2013-07-26

    Measuring heat flow through nanoscale devices poses formidable practical difficulties as there is no "ampere meter" for heat. We propose to overcome this problem in a chain of trapped ions, where laser cooling the chain edges to different temperatures induces a heat current of local vibrations (vibrons). We show how to efficiently control and measure this current, including fluctuations, by coupling vibrons to internal ion states. This demonstrates that ion crystals provide an ideal platform for studying quantum transport, e.g., through thermal analogues of quantum wires and quantum dots. Notably, ion crystals may give access to measurements of the elusive bosonic fluctuations in heat currents and the onset of Fourier's law. Our results are strongly supported by numerical simulations for a realistic implementation with specific ions and system parameters.

  20. Parameter estimations for measurements of thermal transport properties with the hot disk thermal constants analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohac, Vlastimil; Gustavsson, Mattias K.; Kubicar, Ludovit; Gustafsson, Silas E.

    2000-06-01

    The objective of this work is to improve measurements of transport properties using the hot disk thermal constants analyzer. The principle of this method is based on the transient heating of a plane double spiral sandwiched between two pieces of the investigated material. From the temperature increase of the heat source, it is possible to derive both the thermal conductivity and the thermal diffusivity from one single transient recording, provided the total time of the measurement is chosen within a correct time window defined by the theory and the experimental situation. Based on a theory of sensitivity coefficients, it is demonstrated how the experimental time window should be selected under different experimental situations. In addition to the theoretical work, measurements on two different materials: poly(methylmethacrylate) and Stainless Steel A 310, with thermal conductivity of 0.2 and 14 W/mK, respectively, have been performed and analyzed based on the developed theory.

  1. H{alpha} measurements and neutral particle transport in Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Yabutani, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Higashizono, Y.; Nagasaki, K.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Sano, F.; Cappa, A.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-10-15

    A multichannel system of the H{alpha}-line emission detector is developed in order to investigate the neutral particle transport in the Heliotron J plasma. The application of a multianode photomultiplier tube to the filter measurement system enables us to observe the H{alpha} emission profile with 32 chords. The absolute calibration with a standard lamp is performed and the cross-talk between each of the adjoining channels is evaluated to be less than 6%, while the photomultiplier tube has a typical cross-talk of 3% in nominal value. The temporal and spatial profiles of the H{alpha} emission are measured in detail in the plasma breakdown by electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The H{alpha} emission profile in the ECH plasma is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation using a three-dimensional mesh model. The fueling rates of the wall recycling and the gas puffing are estimated by means of the simulation and the measurement.

  2. Noncontact temperature measurements in the microgravity fluids and transport phenomena discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salzman, Jack

    1988-01-01

    The program of activities within the Microgravity Fluids and Transport Phenomena Discipline has been structured to enable the systematic pursuit of an increased understanding of low gravity fluid behavior/phenomena in a way which ensures that the results are appropriate to the widest range of applications. This structure is discussed and an overview of some of the activities which are underway is given. Of significance is the fact that in the majority of the current and planned activities, the measurement and, or control of the fluid temperature is a key experiment requirement. In addition, many of the experiments require that the temperature measurement be nonintrusive. A description of these requirements together with the current techniques which are being employed or under study to make these measurements is also discussed.

  3. Removing traffic emissions from CO2 time series measured at a tall tower using mobile measurements and transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Andres; Rella, Chris W.; Göckede, Mathias; Hanson, Chad; Yang, Zhenlin; Law, Beverly E.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide with high precision and accuracy have become increasingly important for climate change research, in particular to inform terrestrial biosphere models. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning have long been recognized to contribute a significant portion of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Here, we present an approach to remove the traffic related carbon dioxide emissions from mole fractions measured at a tall tower by using the corresponding carbon monoxide measurements in combination with footprint analyses and transport modeling. This technique improves the suitability of the CO2 data to be used in inverse modeling approaches of atmosphere-biosphere exchange that do not account for non-biotic portions of CO2. In our study region in Oregon, road traffic emissions are the biggest source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. A three-day mobile campaign covering 1700 km of roads in northwestern Oregon was performed during summer of 2012 using a laser-based Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer. The mobile measurements incorporated different roads including main highways, urban streets, and back-roads, largely within the typical footprint of a tall CO/CO2 observation tower in Oregon's Willamette Valley. For the first time, traffic related CO:CO2 emission ratios were measured directly at the sources during an on-road campaign under a variety of different driving conditions. An average emission ratio of 7.43 (±1.80) ppb CO per ppm CO2 was obtained for the study region and applied to separate the traffic related portion of CO2 from the mole fraction time series. The road traffic related portion of the CO2 mole fractions measured at the tower site reached maximum values ranging from 9.8 to 12 ppm, depending on the height above the surface, during summer 2012.

  4. A nu-space for ICS: characterization and application to measure protein transport in live cells.

    PubMed

    Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Chen, Lingfeng; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Wiseman, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a new generalized theoretical framework for image correlation spectroscopy (ICS). Using this framework, we extend the ICS method in time-frequency (ν, nu) space to map molecular flow of fluorescently tagged proteins in individual living cells. Even in the presence of a dominant immobile population of fluorescent molecules, nu-space ICS (nICS) provides an unbiased velocity measurement, as well as the diffusion coefficient of the flow, without requiring filtering. We also develop and characterize a tunable frequency-filter for STICS that allows quantification of the density, the diffusion coefficient and the velocity of biased diffusion. We show that the techniques are accurate over a wide range of parameter space in computer simulation. We then characterize the retrograde flow of adhesion proteins (α6- and αLβ2-GFP integrins and mCherry-paxillin) in CHO.B2 cells plated on laminin and ICAM ligands respectively. STICS with a tunable frequency filter, in conjunction with nICS, measures two new transport parameters, the density and transport bias coefficient (a measure of the diffusive character of a flow/biased diffusion), showing that molecular flow in this cell system has a significant diffusive component. Our results suggest that the integrinligand interaction, along with the internal myosin-motor generated force, varies for different integrin-ligand pairs, consistent with previous results.

  5. A Backward Modeling Study of Intercontinental Pollution Transport Using Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Huntrieser, H.; Heland, J.; Schlager, H.; Aufmhoff, H.; Arnold, F.; Cooper, O.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we present simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model to study the intercontinental transport of pollution from North America during an aircraft measurement campaign over Europe. The model was used for both the flight planning and a detailed source analysis after the campaign, which is described here with examples from two episodes. First, forward calculations of emission tracers from North America, Europe and Asia were made to understand the transport processes. Both episodes were preceded by stagnant conditions over North America, leading to the accumulation of pollutants in the North American boundary layer. This pollution was then exported by warm conveyor belts to the middle and upper troposphere, and transported rapidly to Europe. Concentrations of many chemical trace species (CO, NOy, CO2, acetone, and several VOCs; O3 in one case) measured aboard the research aircraft were clearly enhanced in the pollution plumes compared to the conditions outside the plumes. Backward simulations with the particle model were introduced as an indispensable tool for a more detailed analysis of the plume's source region. They make trajectory analyses, which to date were mainly used to interpret aircraft measurement data, obsolete for establishing source-receptor relationships. Using an emission inventory, we could decompose the tracer mixing ratios at the receptors (i.e., along the flight tracks) into contributions from every grid cell of the inventory. For both North America plumes, we found that emission sources contributing to the tracer concentrations over Europe were distributed over large areas in North America. In one case, the region around New York was clearly the largest contributor, but in the other case, sources in California, Texas, and Florida contributed almost equally. Smaller contributions were made by sources reaching from the Yucatan peninsula to Canada in this case.

  6. Thermal transport in CO2 laser irradiated fused silica: in situ measurements and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Elhadj, S; Draggoo, V G; Bisson, S E

    2009-07-07

    In situ spatial and temporal temperature measurements of pristine fused silica surfaces heated with a 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser were obtained using an infrared radiation thermometer based on a Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) camera. Laser spot sizes ranged from 250 {micro}m to 1000 {micro}m diameter with peak axial irradiance levels of 0.13 to 16 kW/cm{sup 2}. For temperatures below 2800K, the measured steady-state surface temperature is observed to rise linearly with both increasing beam size and incident laser irradiance. The effective thermal conductivity estimated over this range was approximately 2W/mK, in good agreement with classical calculations based on phonon heat capacities. Similarly, time-dependent temperature measurements up to 2000K yielded thermal diffusivity values which were close to reported values of 7 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s. Above {approx}2800K, the fused silica surface temperature asymptotically approaches 3100K as laser power is further increased, consistent with the onset of evaporative heat losses near the silica boiling point. These results show that in the laser heating regime studied here, the T{sup 3} temperature dependent thermal conductivity due to radiation transport can be neglected, but at temperatures above 2800K heat transport due to evaporation must be considered. The thermal transport in fused silica up to 2800K, over a range of conditions, can then be adequately described by a linear diffusive heat equation assuming constant thermal properties.

  7. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Zhang, M.; Wang, B.

    2008-05-01

    The radioactive species radon (222Rn) has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation. The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations. The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  8. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Zhang, M.; Wang, B.

    2008-02-01

    The radioactive species radon (222Rn) has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation. The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations. The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  9. Coincidence measurements between fragment ions and the number of emitted electrons in heavy ion collisions with polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, T.; Majima, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiple ionization and multifragmentation of a chlorofluorocarbon molecule, CH2FCF3, induced by collisions of 580-keV C+ ions. Coincidence measurements of product ions and the number of emitted electrons from CH2FCF3 were performed under charge-changing conditions of C+ → Cq+ (q = 0, 2, 3). A fully inclusive measurement regardless of outgoing projectile charge state was also performed by making coincidence with a pulsed ion beam. Mass distributions of fragment ions and number distributions of emitted electrons were both found to change greatly according to charge-changing conditions. Highly multiple ionization emitting up to about 10 electrons was observed in electron loss collisions.

  10. Turbulence measurement in a reacting and non-reacting shear layer at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of two component velocity and turbulence measurements are presented which were obtained on a planar reacting shear layer burning hydrogen. Quantitative LDV and temperature measurements are presented with and without chemical reaction within the shear layer at a velocity ratio of 0.34 and a high speed Mach number of 0.7. The comparison showed that the reacting shear layer grew faster than that without reaction. Using a reduced width coordinate, the reacting and non-reacting profiles were very similar. The peak turbulence for both cases was 20 percent.

  11. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Sibylle Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  12. Evaluation of disorder introduced by electrolyte gating through transport measurements in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Andrew; Kumada, Norio; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Irie, Hiroshi; Muraki, Koji; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    We evaluate the degree of disorder in electrolyte-gating devices through transport measurements in graphene. By comparing the mobility in ion- and standard metal-gated devices, we show that the deposition of the ionic liquid introduces charged impurities that limit the mobility in graphene to 3 × 103 cm2 V-1 s-1. At higher temperatures (>50 K), phonons in the ionic liquid further reduce the mobility, making its upper limit 2 × 103 cm2 V-1 s-1 at room temperature. Since the degree of disorder is independent of the base material, these results are valuable for understanding disorder effects in general devices using electrolyte gating.

  13. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  14. Transport properties of the mesothelium and interstitium measured in rabbit pericardium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sonja M Moe; Lai-Fook, Stephen J

    2005-11-01

    The contribution of the pleural mesothelium to pleural liquid and protein transport is still vigorously debated. Recent in vitro studies of stripped pleural membrane and free-standing pericardium have demonstrated active ion solute coupled transport of liquid and transcytosis of protein. However, the relative contribution of the passive transport properties of the pleural mesothelium compared to the pleural interstitium has not been extensively studied. In in vitro studies, we measured the albumin diffusion coefficient, reflection coefficient, hydraulic conductivity and electrical resistance of rabbit pericardium. We used two techniques, treatment with 40 muM nocodazole and a 1-min hypotonic cell lysis with distilled water, to eliminate the effect of the two mesothelial layers on diffusional and hydraulic resistances. Each technique increased the albumin diffusion coefficient and hydraulic conductivity 3- to 4-fold. In hydraulic conductivity experiments using tracer 125I-albumin, nocodazole reduced the reflection coefficient to zero, rendering the pericardium completely permeable to albumin. We applied the cell-lysis technique to the pleural and pericardial mesothelium in sequence to evaluate the separate contribution of each mesothelium. Both diffusional and hydraulic resistances, but not electrical resistance, of the mesothelium were overestimated by the cell-lysis technique. The pleural mesothelium contributed at most 30% of diffusional resistance, 10% of hydraulic resistance and 14% of electrical resistance of the total pericardial resistances. We conclude that the pleural mesothelium is not the primary barrier to protein diffusion or bulk flow of liquid from the pericardial microcirculation to the pleural liquid.

  15. Comparison between Measured and Calculated Sediment Transport Rates in North Fork Caspar Creek, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T. W.; Yarnell, S. M.; Yager, E.; Leidman, S. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Caspar Creek is a gravel-bedded stream located in the Jackson Demonstration State Forest in the coast range of California. The Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed has been actively monitored and studied by the Pacific Southwest Research Station and California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection for over five decades. Although total annual sediment yield has been monitored through time, sediment transport during individual storm events is less certain. At a study site on North Fork Caspar Creek, cross-section averaged sediment flux was collected throughout two storm events in December 2014 and February 2015 to determine if two commonly used sediment transport equations—Meyer-Peter-Müller and Wilcock—approximated observed bedload transport. Cross-section averaged bedload samples were collected approximately every hour during each storm event using a Helley-Smith bedload sampler. Five-minute composite samples were collected at five equally spaced locations along a cross-section and then sieved to half-phi sizes to determine the grain size distribution. The measured sediment flux values varied widely throughout the storm hydrographs and were consistently less than two orders of magnitude in value in comparison to the calculated values. Armored bed conditions, changing hydraulic conditions during each storm and variable sediment supply may have contributed to the observed differences.

  16. Gold nanoparticles grown inside carbon nanotubes: synthesis and electrical transport measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hybrid structures composed of gold nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes were prepared using porous alumina membranes as templates. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized inside the pores of these templates by the non-catalytic decomposition of acetylene. The inner cavity of the supported tubes was used as nanoreactors to grow gold particles by impregnation with a gold salt, followed by a calcination-reduction process. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy techniques. The resulting hybrid products are mainly encapsulated gold nanoparticles with different shapes and dimensions depending on the concentration of the gold precursor and the impregnation procedure. In order to understand the electronic transport mechanisms in these nanostructures, their conductance was measured as a function of temperature. The samples exhibit a ‘non-metallic’ temperature dependence where the dominant electron transport mechanism is 1D hopping. Depending on the impregnation procedure, the inclusion of gold nanoparticles inside the CNTs can introduce significant changes in the structure of the tubes and the mechanisms for electronic transport. The electrical resistance of these hybrid structures was monitored under different gas atmospheres at ambient pressure. Using this hybrid nanostructures, small amounts of acetylene and hydrogen were detected with an increased sensibility compared with pristine carbon nanotubes. Although the sensitivity of these hybrid nanostructures is rather low compared to alternative sensing elements, their response is remarkably fast under changing gas atmospheres. PMID:24910571

  17. Turbulent transport and length scale measurement experiments with comfined coaxial jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Roback, R.

    1984-01-01

    A three phase experimental study of mixing downstream of swirling and nonswirling confined coaxial jets was conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport models currently employed in a variety of computational procedures. The present effort was directed toward the acquisition of length scale and dissipation rate data that provide more accurate inlet boundary conditions for the computational procedures and a data base to evaluate the turbulent transport models in the near jet region where recirculation does not occur, and the acquisition of mass and momentum turbulent transport data for a nonswirling flow condition with a blunt inner jet inlet configuration rather than the tapered inner jet inlet. A measurement technique, generally used to obtain approximate integral length and microscales of turbulence and dissipation rates, was computerized. Results showed the dissipation rate varied by 2 1/2 orders of magnitude across the inlet plane, by 2 orders of magnitude 51 mm from the inlet plane, and by 1 order of magnitude at 102 mm from the inlet plane for a nonswirling flow test conditions.

  18. Incorporation of Fine-Grained Sediment Erodibility Measurements into Sediment Transport Modeling, Capitol Lake, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Elias, Edwin; Jones, Craig

    2008-01-01

    lab with Sedflume, an apparatus for measuring sediment erosion-parameters. In this report, we present results of the characterization of fine-grained sediment erodibility within Capitol Lake. The erodibility data were incorporated into the previously developed hydrodynamic and sediment transport model. Model simulations using the measured erodibility parameters were conducted to provide more robust estimates of the overall magnitudes and spatial patterns of sediment transport resulting from restoration of the Deschutes Estuary.

  19. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatte, C.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.; Nussbaumer, E.; Emmons, L.; Conway, S.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hartley, J.; Benmergui, J.; Lin, J.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate Arctic tropospheric composition using ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra, recorded at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, 80°5' N, 86°42' W) and at Thule (Greenland, 76°53' N, -68°74' W) from 2008 to 2012. The target species: carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), formic acid (HCOOH), and formaldehyde (H2CO) are emitted by biomass burning and can be transported from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. By detecting simultaneous enhancements of three biomass burning tracers (HCN, CO, and C2H6), ten and eight fire events are identified at Eureka and Thule, respectively, within the five-year FTIR timeseries. Analyses of Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) back-trajectories coupled with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire hot spot data, Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model (STILT) footprints, and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) UV aerosol index maps are used to attribute burning source regions and travel time durations of the plumes. By taking into account the effect of aging of the smoke plumes, measured FTIR enhancement ratios were corrected to obtain emission ratios and equivalent emission factors. The means of emission factors for extratropical forest estimated with the two FTIR datasets are 0.39 ± 0.15 g kg-1 for HCN, 1.23 ± 0.49 g kg-1 for C2H6, 0.34 ± 0.16 g kg-1 for C2H2, 2.13 ± 0.92 g kg-1 for HCOOH, and 3.14 ± 1.28 g kg-1 for CH3OH. To improve our knowledge concerning the dynamical and chemical processes associated with Arctic pollution from fires, the two sets of FTIR measurements were compared to the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). Seasonal cycles and day-to-day variabilities were compared to assess the ability of the model to reproduce emissions from fires and their transport. Good agreement in winter

  20. Identifying fire plumes in the Arctic with tropospheric FTIR measurements and transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viatte, C.; Strong, K.; Hannigan, J.; Nussbaumer, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Conway, S.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hartley, J.; Benmergui, J.; Lin, J.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate Arctic tropospheric composition using ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) solar absorption spectra, recorded at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL, Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, 80°05' N, 86°42' W) and at Thule (Greenland, 76°53' N, -68°74' W) from 2008 to 2012. The target species, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), ethane (C2H6), acetylene (C2H2), formic acid (HCOOH), and formaldehyde (H2CO) are emitted by biomass burning and can be transported from mid-latitudes to the Arctic. By detecting simultaneous enhancements of three biomass burning tracers (HCN, CO, and C2H6), ten and eight fire events are identified at Eureka and Thule, respectively, within the 5-year FTIR time series. Analyses of Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model back-trajectories coupled with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire hotspot data, Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model footprints, and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) UV aerosol index maps, are used to attribute burning source regions and travel time durations of the plumes. By taking into account the effect of aging of the smoke plumes, measured FTIR enhancement ratios were corrected to obtain emission ratios and equivalent emission factors. The means of emission factors for extratropical forest estimated with the two FTIR data sets are 0.40 ± 0.21 g kg-1 for HCN, 1.24 ± 0.71 g kg-1 for C2H6, 0.34 ± 0.21 g kg-1 for C2H2, and 2.92 ± 1.30 g kg-1 for HCOOH. The emission factor for CH3OH estimated at Eureka is 3.44 ± 1.68 g kg-1. To improve our knowledge concerning the dynamical and chemical processes associated with Arctic pollution from fires, the two sets of FTIR measurements were compared to the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). Seasonal cycles and day-to-day variabilities were compared to assess the ability of the model to reproduce emissions from fires and

  1. Measurement of the Critical Deposition Velocity in Slurry Transport through a Horizontal Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Furfari, Daniel J.; Kellogg, Michael I.; Park, Walter R.

    2001-03-01

    Critical Deposition Velocity (CDV) is an important design and operational parameter in slurry transport. Almost all existing correlations that are used to predict this parameter have been obtained experimentally from slurry transport tests featuring single solid species in the slurry mixture. No correlations have been obtained to describe this parameter when the slurry mixture contains more than one solid species having a wide range of specific gravities, particle size distributions, and volume concentrations within the overall slurry mixture. There are no physical or empirical bases that can justify the extrapolation or modification of the existing single species correlations to include all these effects. New experiments must be carried out to obtain new correlations that would be suited for these types of slurries, and that would clarify the mechanics of solids deposition as a function of the properties of the various solid species. Our goal in this paper is to describe a robust experimental technique for the accurate determination of the critical deposition velocity associated with the transport of slurries in horizontal or slightly inclined pipes. Because of the relative difficulty encountered during the precise determination of this useful operational parameter, it has been the practice to connect it with some transitional behavior of more easily measurable flow parameters such as the pressure drop along the slurry pipeline. In doing so, the critical deposition velocity loses its unique and precise definition due to the multitude of factors that influence such transitional behaviors. Here, data has been obtained for single species slurries made up of washed garnet and water and flowing through a 1- inch clear pipe. The selected garnet had a narrow particle size distribution with a mean diameter of 100 mm, approximately. The critical deposition velocity was measured for garnet/water slurries of 10, 20, and 30 percent solids concentration by volume.

  2. The Australian methane budget: Interpreting surface and train-borne measurements using a chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Annemarie; Chan Miller, Christopher; Palmer, Paul I.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the Australian methane budget from 2005-2008 using the GEOS-Chem 3D chemistry transport model, focusing on the relative contribution of emissions from different sectors and the influence of long-range transport. To evaluate the model, we use in situ surface measurements of methane, methane dry air column average (XCH4) from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs), and train-borne surface concentration measurements from an in situ FTS along the north-south continental transect. We use gravity anomaly data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment to describe the spatial and temporal distribution of wetland emissions and scale it to a prior emission estimate, which better describes observed atmospheric methane variability at tropical latitudes. The clean air sites of Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim are the least affected by local emissions, while Wollongong, located in the populated southeast with regional coal mining, samples the most locally polluted air masses (2.5% of the total air mass versus <1% at other sites). Averaged annually, the largest single source above background of methane at Darwin is long-range transport, mainly from Southeast Asia, accounting for ˜25% of the change in surface concentration above background. At Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim, emissions from ruminant animals are the largest source of methane above background, at approximately 20% and 30%, respectively, of the surface concentration. At Wollongong, emissions from coal mining are the largest source above background representing 60% of the surface concentration. The train data provide an effective way of observing transitions between urban, desert, and tropical landscapes.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of time-dependent, transport-limited fluorescent boundary measurements in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianshu; Rasmussen, John C; Lee, Jae Hoon; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2007-04-01

    Recently, we have presented and experimentally validated a unique numerical solver of the coupled radiative transfer equations (RTEs) for rapidly computing time-dependent excitation and fluorescent light propagation in small animal tomography. Herein, we present a time-dependent Monte Carlo algorithm to validate the forward RTE solver and investigate the impact of physical parameters upon transport-limited measurements in order to best direct the development of the RTE solver for optical tomography. Experimentally, the Monte Carlo simulations for both transport-limited and diffusion-limited propagations are validated using frequency domain photon migration measurements for 1.0%, 0.5%, and 0.2% intralipid solutions containing 1 microM indocyanine green in a 49 cm3 cylindrical phantom corresponding to the small volume employed in small animal tomography. The comparisons between Monte Carlo simulations and the numerical solutions result in mean percent error in amplitude and the phase shift less than 5.0% and 0.7 degrees, respectively, at excitation and emission wavelengths for varying anisotropic factors, lifetimes, and modulation frequencies. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the accuracy of the forward model is enhanced using (i) suitable source models of photon delivery, (ii) accurate anisotropic factors, and (iii) accurate acceptance angles of collected photons. Monte Carlo simulations also show that the accuracy of the diffusion approximation in the small phantom depends upon (i) the ratio d(phantom)/l(tr), where d(phantom) is the phantom diameter and l(tr) is the transport mean free path; and (ii) the anisotropic factor of the medium. The Monte Carlo simulations validates and guides the future development of an appropriate RTE solver for deployment in small animal optical tomography.

  4. Electrostatic and magnetic measurements of turbulence and transport in Extrap T2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Anders; Sallander, Eva

    1999-10-01

    Langmuir probe and magnetic pick-up coil measurements are used to study edge turbulence in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch. Magnetic fluctuations resonant outside the toroidal field reversal surface are observed where previously only fluctuations in the spectra of potential and electron density and temperature have been measured. Results are presented which imply that these fluctuations are coupled to and also correlated to the internally resonant tearing mode fluctuations. Evidence of coupling between low-frequency (<100 kHz) and high-frequency fluctuations is also presented. The normalized floating potential fluctuations are seen to increase with the edge electron temperature. This causes an increase of the potential and density fluctuation driven transport with the temperature which is faster than linear. These results, in combination, are consistent with a picture where internally resonant fluctuations couple to edge fluctuations through radial heat conduction from the stochastic core to the edge.

  5. Comparison of nickel silicide and aluminium ohmic contact metallizations for low-temperature quantum transport measurements

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We examine nickel silicide as a viable ohmic contact metallization for low-temperature, low-magnetic-field transport measurements of atomic-scale devices in silicon. In particular, we compare a nickel silicide metallization with aluminium, a common ohmic contact for silicon devices. Nickel silicide can be formed at the low temperatures (<400°C) required for maintaining atomic precision placement in donor-based devices, and it avoids the complications found with aluminium contacts which become superconducting at cryogenic measurement temperatures. Importantly, we show that the use of nickel silicide as an ohmic contact at low temperatures does not affect the thermal equilibration of carriers nor contribute to hysteresis in a magnetic field. PMID:21968083

  6. Versatile variable temperature insert at the DEIMOS beamline for in situ electrical transport measurements.

    PubMed

    Joly, L; Muller, B; Sternitzky, E; Faullumel, J G; Boulard, A; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Kappler, J P; Studniarek, M; Bowen, M; Ohresser, P

    2016-05-01

    The design and the first experiments are described of a versatile cryogenic insert used for its electrical transport capabilities. The insert is designed for the cryomagnet installed on the DEIMOS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron dedicated to magnetic characterizations through X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. This development was spurred by the multifunctional properties of novel materials such as multiferroics, in which, for example, the magnetic and electrical orders are intertwined and may be probed using XAS. The insert thus enables XAS to in situ probe this interplay. The implementation of redundant wiring and careful shielding also enables studies on operating electronic devices. Measurements on magnetic tunnel junctions illustrate the potential of the equipment toward XAS studies of in operando electronic devices.

  7. Direct electrical transport measurement on a single thermoelectric nanowire embedded in an alumina template.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedim, Meriam; Cagnon, Laurent; Garagnon, Christophe; Serradeil, Valerie; Bourgault, Daniel

    2016-04-28

    Electrical conductivity is a key parameter to increase the performance of thermoelectric materials. However, the measurement of such performance remains complex for 1D structures, involving tedious processing. In this study, we present a non-destructive, rapid and easy approach for the characterization of electrical conductivity of Bi2Te3 based single nanowires. By controlling the nanowire overgrowth, each nanowire emerges in the form of a micrometric hemisphere constituting a unique contact zone for direct nanoprobing. As nanowires need no preliminary preparation and remain in their template during measurement, we avoid oxidation effects and time-consuming processing. Electrical transport results show a low nanowire resistivity for compact nanowires obtained at low overpotential. Such values are comparable to bulk materials and thin films. This method not only confirmed its reliability, but it could also be adopted for other semiconducting or metallic electrodeposited nanowires.

  8. Rapid measurement of molecular transport and interaction inside living cells using single plane illumination.

    PubMed

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Stakic, Milka; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-11-14

    The ability to measure biomolecular dynamics within cells and tissues is very important to understand fundamental physiological processes including cell adhesion, signalling, movement, division or metabolism. Usually, such information is obtained using particle tracking methods or single point fluctuation spectroscopy. We show that image mean square displacement analysis, applied to single plane illumination microscopy data, is a faster and more efficient way of unravelling rapid, three-dimensional molecular transport and interaction within living cells. From a stack of camera images recorded in seconds, the type of dynamics such as free diffusion, flow or binding can be identified and quantified without being limited by current camera frame rates. Also, light exposure levels are very low and the image mean square displacement method does not require calibration of the microscope point spread function. To demonstrate the advantages of our approach, we quantified the dynamics of several different proteins in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of living cells. For example, from a single measurement, we were able to determine the diffusion coefficient of free clathrin molecules as well as the transport velocity of clathrin-coated vesicles involved in endocytosis. Used in conjunction with dual view detection, we further show how protein-protein interactions can be quantified.

  9. Rapid Measurement of Molecular Transport and Interaction inside Living Cells Using Single Plane Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Stakic, Milka; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The ability to measure biomolecular dynamics within cells and tissues is very important to understand fundamental physiological processes including cell adhesion, signalling, movement, division or metabolism. Usually, such information is obtained using particle tracking methods or single point fluctuation spectroscopy. We show that image mean square displacement analysis, applied to single plane illumination microscopy data, is a faster and more efficient way of unravelling rapid, three-dimensional molecular transport and interaction within living cells. From a stack of camera images recorded in seconds, the type of dynamics such as free diffusion, flow or binding can be identified and quantified without being limited by current camera frame rates. Also, light exposure levels are very low and the image mean square displacement method does not require calibration of the microscope point spread function. To demonstrate the advantages of our approach, we quantified the dynamics of several different proteins in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of living cells. For example, from a single measurement, we were able to determine the diffusion coefficient of free clathrin molecules as well as the transport velocity of clathrin-coated vesicles involved in endocytosis. Used in conjunction with dual view detection, we further show how protein-protein interactions can be quantified. PMID:25394360

  10. Transport in lymphatic capillaries. I. Macroscopic measurements using residence time distribution theory.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Berk, D A; Jain, R K

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel integrative method for characterizing transport in the lymphatic capillaries in the tail of the anesthetized mouse, which is both sensitive and reproducible for quantifying uptake and flow. Interstitially injected, fluorescently labeled macromolecules were used to visualize and quantify these processes. Residence time distribution (RTD) theory was employed to measure net flow velocity in the lymphatic network as well as to provide a relative measure of lymphatic uptake of macromolecules from the interstitium. The effects of particle size and injection pressure were determined. The uptake rate was found to be independent of particle size in the range of a 6- to 18-nm radius; beyond this size, the interstitial matrix seemed to pose a greater barrier. A comparison of 10 vs. 40 cmH2O injection pressure showed a significant influence on the relative uptake rate but not on the net velocity within the network (3.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.8 +/- 1.0 micron/s). This suggested the presence of a systemic driving force for baseline lymph propulsion that is independent of the local pressure gradients driving the uptake. This model can be used to examine various aspects of transport physiology of the initial lymphatics.

  11. Time-Domain Thermoreflectance Measurements of Thermal Transport in Amorphous SiC Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Brian; Hondongwa, Donald; King, Sean

    2010-03-01

    We present ultrafast optical pump-probe measurements of thermal transport in a series of amorphous SiC samples. The samples were grown on Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition utilizing various combinations of methylsilanes and H2 and He diluent gases. The sample films were well characterized and found to have densities (1.3 -- 2.3 g cm-3) and dielectric constants (4.0 -- 7.2) that spanned a wide range of values. Prior to their measurement, the samples were coated with 40-70 nm of polycrystalline Al. The pump-probe measurements were performed at room temperature using a modelocked Ti:sapphire laser that produced sub-picosecond pulses of a few nJ. The pulses heat the Al coating, causing a transient reflectivity change. As the Al film cools into the SiC film, the reflectivity change can be measured, giving a measure of the thermal effusivity of the SiC film. We then extract values for the thermal conductivity of the SiC films and find that it varies from less than half of the thermal conductivity of amorphous SiO2 for the lower density materials to somewhat larger than amorphous SiO2 for the highest density films.

  12. Photocharge transport and recombination measurements in amorphous silicon films and solar cells by photoconductive frequency mixing: Annual subcontract report, 20 April 1998--19 April 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Braunstein, R.; Kattwinkel, A.; Liebe, J.; Sun, G.

    2000-02-28

    In the present phase of the program, the transport parameters of a number of amorphous semiconductors prepared by a number of techniques were determined by the photoconductive frequency mixing technique. This technique enabled the authors to determine the drift mobility, md, and the photomixing lifetime, t. The technique is based on the idea of heterodyne detection for photoconductors. When two similarly polarized monochromatic optical beams of slightly different frequencies are incident upon a photoconductor, the generation rate of electron-hole pairs will produce a photocurrent, when a dc-bias is applied, which will contain components resulting from the square of the sum of the individual incident fields. Consequently, a photocurrent will be produced, which will consist of a direct current and a microwave current corresponding to the beat frequency. These two currents allow a separate determination of the drift mobility and the photomixing lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. In the present work, the longitudinal modes of a He-Ne laser were employed to generate a beat frequency of 252 MHz; all the measurements were performed at this frequency for the data indicated in the accompanying figures. The following topics were explored: Measurements of the charge transport parameters of homogeneous a-SiGe:H alloys produced by NREL employing the hot-wire technique; The change in the charge transport parameters in the transition from hydrogenated amorphous silicon to microcrystalline silicon for material produced by NREL and MVSystems; The improvement in instrumentation of the photomixing measurements; Measurements of the hydrostatic dependency of the transport parameters of amorphous silicon; and Preliminary photomixing measurements on p-i-n devices.

  13. DUF1220 copy number is linearly associated with increased cognitive function as measured by total IQ and mathematical aptitude scores.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jonathon M; Searles, Veronica B; Anderson, Nathan; Keeney, Jonathon; Raznahan, Armin; Horwood, L John; Fergusson, David M; Kennedy, Martin A; Giedd, Jay; Sikela, James M

    2015-01-01

    DUF1220 protein domains exhibit the greatest human lineage-specific copy number expansion of any protein-coding sequence in the genome, and variation in DUF1220 copy number has been linked to both brain size in humans and brain evolution among primates. Given these findings, we examined associations between DUF1220 subtypes CON1 and CON2 and cognitive aptitude. We identified a linear association between CON2 copy number and cognitive function in two independent populations of European descent. In North American males, an increase in CON2 copy number corresponded with an increase in WISC IQ (R (2) = 0.13, p = 0.02), which may be driven by males aged 6-11 (R (2) = 0.42, p = 0.003). We utilized ddPCR in a subset as a confirmatory measurement. This group had 26-33 copies of CON2 with a mean of 29, and each copy increase of CON2 was associated with a 3.3-point increase in WISC IQ (R (2) = 0.22, p = 0.045). In individuals from New Zealand, an increase in CON2 copy number was associated with an increase in math aptitude ability (R (2) = 0.10 p = 0.018). These were not confounded by brain size. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report a replicated association between copy number of a gene coding sequence and cognitive aptitude. Remarkably, dosage variations involving DUF1220 sequences have now been linked to human brain expansion, autism severity and cognitive aptitude, suggesting that such processes may be genetically and mechanistically inter-related. The findings presented here warrant expanded investigations in larger, well-characterized cohorts.

  14. Permalloy and Co50Pd50 as ferromagnetic contacts for magnetoresistance measurements in carbon nanotube-based transport structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotube (CNT) 2-terminal spin-valve devices are presented. Results from samples with both permalloy (Py) and CoPd contacts show repeatable MR switching. In performing gate-dependent MR measurements on the Py-contacted CNTs, two distinct transport regimes are identified, and their transport behavior is discussed with respect to optimizing MR. Results from the first CoPd-contacted CNTs indicate a stable magnetic response with a higher magnitude than that of a Py-contacted nanotube in the same transport regime.

  15. Quantitative measurements and modeling of cargo-motor interactions during fast transport in the living axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamster, Pamela E.; Loewenberg, Michael; Pascal, Jennifer; Chauviere, Arnaud; Gonzales, Aaron; Cristini, Vittorio; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2012-10-01

    The kinesins have long been known to drive microtubule-based transport of sub-cellular components, yet the mechanisms of their attachment to cargo remain a mystery. Several different cargo-receptors have been proposed based on their in vitro binding affinities to kinesin-1. Only two of these—phosphatidyl inositol, a negatively charged lipid, and the carboxyl terminus of the amyloid precursor protein (APP-C), a trans-membrane protein—have been reported to mediate motility in living systems. A major question is how these many different cargo, receptors and motors interact to produce the complex choreography of vesicular transport within living cells. Here we describe an experimental assay that identifies cargo-motor receptors by their ability to recruit active motors and drive transport of exogenous cargo towards the synapse in living axons. Cargo is engineered by derivatizing the surface of polystyrene fluorescent nanospheres (100 nm diameter) with charged residues or with synthetic peptides derived from candidate motor receptor proteins, all designed to display a terminal COOH group. After injection into the squid giant axon, particle movements are imaged by laser-scanning confocal time-lapse microscopy. In this report we compare the motility of negatively charged beads with APP-C beads in the presence of glycine-conjugated non-motile beads using new strategies to measure bead movements. The ensuing quantitative analysis of time-lapse digital sequences reveals detailed information about bead movements: instantaneous and maximum velocities, run lengths, pause frequencies and pause durations. These measurements provide parameters for a mathematical model that predicts the spatiotemporal evolution of distribution of the two different types of bead cargo in the axon. The results reveal that negatively charged beads differ from APP-C beads in velocity and dispersion, and predict that at long time points APP-C will achieve greater progress towards the presynaptic

  16. Aerosol measurements from a recent Alaskan volcanic eruption: Implications for volcanic ash transport predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Catherine F.; Rinkleff, Peter G.; Dehn, Jonathan; Webley, Peter W.; Cahill, Thomas A.; Barnes, David E.

    2010-12-01

    Size and time-resolved aerosol compositional measurements conducted during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano provide quantitative information on the size and concentration of the fine volcanic ash emitted during the eruption and carried and deposited downwind. These data can be used as a starting point to attempt to validate volcanic ash transport models. For the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, an island volcano in south-central Alaska, size and time-resolved aerosol measurements were made using an eight-stage (0.09-0.26, 0.26-0.34, 0.34-0.56, 0.56-0.75, 0.75-1.15, 1.15-2.5, 2.5-5.0, and 5.0-35.0 μm in aerodynamic diameter) Davis Rotating Unit for Monitoring (DRUM) aerosol impactor deployed near ground level in Homer, Alaska, approximately 110 km east-northeast of the volcano. The aerosol samples collected by the DRUM impactor were analyzed for mass and elemental composition every 90 min during a four-week sampling period from January 13 to February 11, 2006, that spanned several explosive episodes during the 2006 eruption. The collected aerosols showed that the size distribution of the volcanic ash fallout changed during this period of eruption. Ash had its highest concentrations in the largest size fraction (5.0-35.0 μm) with no ash present in the less than 1.15 μm size fractions during the short-lived explosive events. In contrast, during the continuous ash emission phase, concentrations of volcanic ash were more significant in the less than 1.15 μm size fractions. Settling velocities dictate that the smaller size particles will transport far from the volcano and, unlike the larger particles, not be retained in the proximal stratigraphic record. These results show that volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) model predictions based on massless tracer particles, such as the predictions from the PUFF VATD model, provide a good first-order approximation of the transport of both large and small volcanic ash particles. Unfortunately, the

  17. Measurements of Tidally Forced Bedforms, Sediment Transport, Flow and Turbulence at New River Inlet, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traykovski, P.; Geyer, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of bedforms and near-bed hydrodynamics in New River Inlet, NC reveal a highly temporally and spatially variable bedform field with rapid migration rates. Time series measurements were conducted at two tidally dominated stations with instrumented frames, and spatial surveys were conducted with a small vessel and REMUS AUV. The spatial surveys showed that the bedforms were largest in the ~3 m deep tidal channels, with wavelengths of ~4 m and heights of ~40 cm. These channels also had the strongest tidal flows with ebb directed velocities of up to 1.5 m/s, and coarsest sand. On the finer grained shoals, bedforms were smaller with wavelengths less than 1 m. Time series measurements of the bedforms taken with rotary sidescan and pencil beam sonars revealed most of the variability occurred at semi-diurnal tidal and spring-neap tidal time scales. The largest ~4 m wavelength bedforms only occurred on spring tides and bedforms were smaller during neap tides. At the measurement sites, the flow and bedforms were tidally dominated with the bedforms responding to wave forcing less than 20% of the time during periods of flood and high tides with energetic wave forcing. On individual tidal cycles, the bedforms changed from ebb directed asymmetry to flood direct asymmetry and migrated approximately one wavelength. The relationship between flow asymmetry, with ebb dominated flows, and bedform migration asymmetry will be examined. Flow and turbulence above the bedforms was measured with a multi-frequency pulse coherent Doppler profiler and two ADVs. The velocity profiles show pronounced wake velocity deficits when large bedform crests were present just upstream of the profiler. Turbulence levels as a function of bedform geometry, location, and forcing flow will be examined. The measurements of flow and turbulence, combined with bedform geometry and migration measurements and suspended sediment transport measurements from a 3-frequency acoustic backscatter system will

  18. Measurement of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mediated by three transport proteins: VDAC1, the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, and the Ca2+ uniporter.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Palty, Raz; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2014-02-01

    Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous cellular signal, with changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration not only stimulating a number of intercellular events but also triggering cell death pathways, including apoptosis. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release play pivotal roles in cellular physiology by regulating intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, energy metabolism and cell death. Ca(2+) transport across the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes is mediated by several proteins, including channels, antiporters, and a uniporter. In this article, we present the background to several methods now established for assaying mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport activity across both mitochondrial membranes. The first of these is Ca(2+) transport mediated by the outer mitochondrial protein, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1, also known as porin 1), both as a purified protein reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer (PLB) or into liposomes and as a mitochondrial membrane-embedded protein. The second method involves isolated mitochondria for assaying the activity of an inner mitochondrial membrane transport protein, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that transports Ca(2+) and is powered by the steep mitochondrial membrane potential. In the event of Ca(2+) overload, this leads to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and cell death. The third method describes how Na(+)-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux mediated by mitochondrial NCLX, a member of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily, can be assayed in digitonin-permeabilized HEK-293 cells. The Ca(2+)-transport assays can be performed under various conditions and in combination with inhibitors, allowing detailed characterization of the transport activity of interest.

  19. Study of compensation in insulating and metallic n-type CdSe using transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, M.; Roy, A.; Sarachik, M.P.; Isaacs, L.L.

    1988-08-15

    The resistivity and the Hall coefficient of indium-doped cadmium selenide with carrier concentrations spanning the insulator-to-metal transition have been measured as a function of temperature. We demonstrate that use of the Hall mobility deduced from these data and careful analysis and application of recent theory yield an estimate of the degree of compensation, K = N/sub A//N/sub D/, for metallic as well as insulating material. Combining these results with Hall coefficient measurements at room temperature, one can then estimate both the number of donors, N/sub D/, and acceptors, N/sub A/. .AE

  20. Effect of data length and bin numbers on distribution entropy (DistEn) measurement in analyzing healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Udhayakumar, Radhagayathri K; Karmakar, Chandan; Peng Li; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Complexity analysis of a given time series is executed using various measures of irregularity, the most commonly used being Approximate entropy (ApEn), Sample entropy (SampEn) and Fuzzy entropy (FuzzyEn). However, the dependence of these measures on the critical parameter of tolerance `r' leads to precarious results, owing to random selections of r. Attempts to eliminate the use of r in entropy calculations introduced a new measure of entropy namely distribution entropy (DistEn) based on the empirical probability distribution function (ePDF). DistEn completely avoids the use of a variance dependent parameter like r and replaces it by a parameter M, which corresponds to the number of bins used in the histogram to calculate it. When tested for synthetic data, M has been observed to produce a minimal effect on DistEn as compared to the effect of r on other entropy measures. Also, DistEn is said to be relatively stable with data length (N) variations, as far as synthetic data is concerned. However, these claims have not been analyzed for physiological data. Our study evaluates the effect of data length N and bin number M on the performance of DistEn using both synthetic and physiologic time series data. Synthetic logistic data of `Periodic' and `Chaotic' levels of complexity and 40 RR interval time series belonging to two groups of healthy aging population (young and elderly) have been used for the analysis. The stability and consistency of DistEn as a complexity measure as well as a classifier have been studied. Experiments prove that the parameters N and M are more influential in deciding the efficacy of DistEn performance in the case of physiologic data than synthetic data. Therefore, a generalized random selection of M for a given data length N may not always be an appropriate combination to yield good performance of DistEn for physiologic data.

  1. Mesoscale Backtracking by Means of Atmospheric Transport Modeling of Xenon Plumes Measured by Radionuclide Gas Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armand, P. P.; Achim, P.; Taffary, T.

    2006-12-01

    The monitoring of atmospheric radioactive xenon concentration is performed for nuclear safety regulatory requirements. It is also planned to be used for the detection of hypothetical nuclear tests in the framework of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). In this context, the French Atomic Energy Commission designed a high sensitive and automated fieldable station, named SPALAX, to measure the activity concentrations of xenon isotopes in the atmosphere. SPALAX stations were set up in Western Europe and have been operated quite continuously for three years or more, detecting principally xenon-133 and more scarcely xenon-135, xenon-133m and xenon-131m. There are around 150 nuclear power plants in the European Union, research reactors, reprocessing plants, medical production and application facilities releasing radioactive xenon in normal or incidental operations. A numerical study was carried out aiming to explain the SPALAX measurements. The mesoscale Atmospheric Transport Modelling involves the MM5 suite (PSU- NCAR) to predict the wind fields on nested domains, and FLEXPART, a 3D Lagrangian particle dispersion code, used to simulate the backward transport of xenon plumes detected by the SPALAX. For every event of detection, at least one potential xenon source has a significant efficiency of emission. The identified likely sources are located quite close to the SPALAX stations (some tens of kilometres), or situated farther (a few hundreds of kilometres). A base line of some mBq per cubic meter in xenon-133 is generated by the nuclear power plants. Peaks of xenon-133 ranging from tens to hundreds of mBq per cubic meter originate from a radioisotope production facility. The calculated xenon source terms required to obtain the SPALAX measurements are discussed and seem consistent with realistic emissions from the xenon sources in Western Europe.

  2. Laboratory Measurements of Fluid Transport Properties on Tight Gas Sandstones and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Daniel; Reitenbach, Viktor

    2014-05-01

    Deep gas reservoirs are of great interest for the E&P industry. Large areas of such reservoirs have permeabilities below 1 mD. The reservoir rocks in these areas show a strong stress sensitivity of the fluid transport properties and a considerable productivity decline due to changing stress conditions during the production process. For correct modeling and simulation of Tight Gas reservoirs it is important to know the behavior of the fluid transport properties under the changing stress condition the reservoir experiences. In several measurement series the effects of changing overburden and pore pressure on Rotliegend sandstone samples from north German Tight Gas reservoirs have been quantified and used to set up correlation functions. With the correlation functions from the own measurements and additional data and correlations from literature a Rock Data Catalog has been developed as tool to help reservoir engineers with modeling and simulation of such reservoirs. The Rock Data Catalog consists of the Rock Database and the Correlation Module. The Rock Database contains general and petrophysical rock data. The Correlation Module uses this data to generate secondary data of e.g. in-situ capillary and hydraulic rock properties with appropriate correlation functions. Viability of the economic gas production from Tight Gas Reservoirs strongly depends on reservoir quality. Therefore identification of high quality reservoir parts or so called Sweet Spots for placing production wells and planning hydraulic fracturing stimulation, is one of key issues of the tight gas reservoir characterization and evaluation. The data and correlation functions collected in the Rock Data Catalog could also be used to identify Sweet Spots in Tight Gas reservoirs. Several rock parameters and properties, which affect the fluid flow in a reservoir (like lithology, clay content, water saturation, permeability, pore size distribution) can be identified and used to set up a Sweet Spot Index as a

  3. Utilizing Turbidity and Measurements of Suspended Sediment Concentrations to Better Understand Sediment Transport within Urban Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, T. M.; Napieralski, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Rouge River watershed in Southeast Michigan is an urban watershed, which has been exposed to more than 100 years of anthropogenic activities related to industrialization and urbanization. This urbanization has degraded water quality by increasing erosion and altering the transport mechanism and chemistry of bed and suspended sediments. This study aims to explore the relationship between development within the Lower Rouge watershed and watershed hydrology through an examination of USGS discharge data, stream water quality and suspended sediment loads during storm and base flow. Two YSI dataloggers are used to continuously measure water quality parameters during baseflow and storm events (varying hydrologic conditions), including: turbidity, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, salinity, total dissolved solids, and temperature. Depth-integrated sediment samples are collected and analyzed for sediment concentration using Imhoff cones and filtration methods. Correlations between discharge weighted continuous turbidity measurements and discharge weighted suspended sediment samples are used to estimate sediment loads; essentially, turbidity readings and measured sediment concentrations form a near-linear relationship. In addition, sediment samples are analyzed for inorganic heavy metal contaminants common to Southeast Michigan to characterize both suspended sediments and sediments frequently deposited on adjacent floodplains. These metals (i.e. Lead, Copper, Chromium, Nickle) are commonly known as the “Michigan Metals” and represent indicator species of mobilized and deposited contaminants associated with urbanization and industrialization. The results will provide a baseline for better understanding the transport and fate of contaminated sediments within the Rouge watershed, as well as guide ongoing development and management practices along the Rouge River.

  4. The Number of Pulses Needed to Measure Corticospinal Excitability by Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Eyes Open vs. Close Condition

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shahid; Yoo, Woo-Kyoung; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lim, Hyun Sun; Rotenberg, Alexander; Abu Jamea, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) enable measures of the corticospinal excitability (CSE). However the reliability of TMS-derived CSE measures is suboptimal due to appreciable pulse-to-pulse MEP amplitude variability. We thus calculated how many TMS–derived MEPs will be needed to obtain a reliable CSE measure in awake adult subjects, in the eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. Methods: Twenty healthy adults (70% male) received 40 consecutive navigated TMS pulses (120% resting motor threshold, RMT) in the EO or EC conditions on two separate days in randomized order. Results: For either the EO or EC condition, the probability that the 95% confidence interval (CI) derived from consecutive MEP amplitude measured included the true CSE, increased when the number of consecutive stimuli increased (EO: p = 0.05; EC: p = 0.001). No significant effect of RMT, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, or gender on the CSE estimates was identified. At least 34 consecutive stimuli were required to obtain a most reliable CSE estimate in the EO condition and 31 in the EC condition. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that >30 consecutive MEPs may be necessary in order to obtain a CSE measure in healthy adults. PMID:28377705

  5. Measurement of total acid number (TAN) and TAN boiling point distribution in petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kuangnan; Edwards, Kathleen E; Dechert, Gary J; Jaffe, Stephen B; Green, Larry A; Olmstead, William N

    2008-02-01

    We report a new method for rapid measurement of total acid number (TAN) and TAN boiling point (BP) distribution for petroleum crude and products. The technology is based on negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for selective ionization of petroleum acid and quantification of acid structures and molecular weight distributions. A chip-based nanoelectrospray system enables microscale (<200 mg) and higher throughput (20 samples/h) measurement. Naphthenic acid structures were assigned based on nominal masses of a set of predefined acid structures. Stearic acid is used as an internal standard to calibrate ESI-MS response factors for quantification purposes. With the use of structure-property correlations, boiling point distributions of TAN values can be calculated from the composition. The rapid measurement of TAN BP distributions by ESI is demonstrated for a series of high-TAN crudes and distillation cuts. TAN values determined by the technique agree well with those by the titration method. The distributed properties compare favorably with those measured by distillation and measurement of TAN of corresponding cuts.

  6. Measured temperature fluctuations and Reynolds number in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with varying roughness size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yichao; Xia, Keqing

    2016-11-01

    We present measurements of the temperature fluctuations σT and of the Reynolds number Re in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in cylindrical cell with pyramid-shaped rough top and bottom plates. To study the effects of roughness size, we varied a roughness parameter λ, defined as a single roughness height h (kept at a constant of 8 mm) over its base width d, from 0.5 to 4.0. Fluorinert Liquid FC-770 was used as the working fluid with the Rayleigh number Ra varying from 4.49 × 109 to 9.94 × 1010 and Prandtl number Pr kept at 23.34. It is found that σT in both cell center and sidewall increases dramatically with λ. The scaling exponent of the normalized σT with respect to Ra increases from -0.16 to -0.09 at cell center and -0.23 to -0.08 near sidewall when λ is increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The Reynolds number Re based on the circulation time of the large-scale circulation (LSC) also increases with λ, suggesting a faster LSC. The scaling exponent of Re with respect to Ra increases from 0.47 to 0.55 with λ increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The study reveals that the flow and temperature fluctuations are very sensitive to the perturbation induced by rough plate with vary λ. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grant Council under Grant Number N_CUHK437/15.

  7. A backward modeling study of intercontinental pollution transport using aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohl, A.; Forster, C.; Eckhardt, S.; Spichtinger, N.; Huntrieser, H.; Heland, J.; Schlager, H.; Wilhelm, S.; Arnold, F.; Cooper, O.

    2003-06-01

    In this paper we present simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model to study the intercontinental transport of pollution from North America during an aircraft measurement campaign over Europe. The model was used for both the flight planning and a detailed source analysis after the campaign, which is described here with examples from two episodes. Forward calculations of emission tracers from North America, Europe, and Asia were made in order to understand the transport processes. Both episodes were preceded by stagnant conditions over North America, leading to the accumulation of pollutants in the North American boundary layer. Both anthropogenic sources and, to a lesser extent, forest fire emissions contributed to this pollution, which was then exported by warm conveyor belts to the middle and upper troposphere, where it was transported rapidly to Europe. Concentrations of many trace gases (CO, NOy, CO2, acetone, and several volatile organic compounds; O3 in one case) and of ambient atmospheric ions measured aboard the research aircraft were clearly enhanced in the pollution plumes compared to the conditions outside the plumes. Backward simulations with the particle model were introduced as an indispensable tool for a more detailed analysis of the plume's source region. They make trajectory analyses (which, to date, were mainly used to interpret aircraft measurement data) obsolete. Using an emission inventory, we could decompose the tracer mixing ratios at the receptors (i.e., along the flight tracks) into contributions from every grid cell of the inventory. For both plumes we found that emission sources contributing to the tracer concentrations over Europe were distributed over large areas in North America. In one case, sources in California, Texas, and Florida contributed almost equally, and smaller contributions were also made by other sources located between the Yucatan Peninsula and Canada. In the other case, sources in eastern North America

  8. An Analysis and Review of Measures and Relationships in Space Transportation Affordability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar; McCleskey, Carey

    2014-01-01

    The affordability of transportation to or from space is of continued interest across numerous and diverse stakeholders in our aerospace industry. Such an important metric as affordability deserves a clear understanding among stakeholders about what is meant by affordability, costs, and related terms, as otherwise it's difficult to see where specific improvements are needed or where to target specific investments. As captured in the famous words of Lewis Carroll, "If you don't know where you are going, any road will get you there". As important as understanding a metric may be, with terms such as costs, prices, specific costs, average costs, marginal costs, etc., it is equally important to understand the relationship among these measures. In turn, these measures intermingle with caveats and factors that introduce more measures in need of a common understanding among stakeholders. These factors include flight rates, capability, and payload. This paper seeks to review the costs of space transportation systems and the relationships among the many factors involved in costs from the points of view of diverse decision makers. A decision maker may have an interest in acquiring a single launch considering the best price (along with other factors in their business case), or an interest in many launches over time. Alternately, a decision maker may have a specific interest in developing a space transportation system that will offer certain prices, or flight rate capability, or both, at a certain up-front cost. The question arises for the later, to reuse or to expend? As it is necessary in thinking about the future to clearly understand the past and the present, this paper will present data and graphics to assist stakeholders in visualizing trends and the current state of affairs in the launch industry. At all times, raw data will be referenced (or made available separately) alongside detailed explanations about the data, so as to avoid the confusion or misleading conclusions

  9. Fundamental mismatches between measurements and models in aeolian sediment transport prediction: The role of small-scale variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Martin, Raleigh L.; Kok, Jasper F.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting aeolian sediment transport is a long-standing and difficult challenge that is important to a variety of scientific disciplines, including geology, geomorphology, agriculture, meteorology, and climatology. Here, we argue that improvements in predictions of aeolian sediment transport are limited by incompatibilities between empirical measurements and mathematical models. We focus on the spatial and temporal variability in transport. Measurements indicate considerable variability on small time (second) and length (meter) scales, yet models are almost ubiquitously based on assumptions of time and space-invariant transport. Mismatches between measurements and models limit summative predictive capacity by reducing the ability to use measured data to test and drive models. We suggest: (i) revising model conceptualizations and evaluating the representativeness of steady state saltation to constrain the realism of existing models, (ii) improving and optimizing measurement technology to produce more reliable and accurate measurements, (iii) explicitly specifying the scale of measurements, and (iv) designing variable matching tests between models and measurements to work around measurement limitations. Continuing with the status quo, where measurements and models are dealt with separately, is likely to erode summative predictive capacity.

  10. Viscous flow through slowly expanding or contracting porous walls with low seepage Reynolds number: a model for transport of biological fluids through vessels.

    PubMed

    Dinarvand, Saeed

    2011-10-01

    In this article, the problem of laminar, isothermal, incompressible and viscous flow in a rectangular domain bounded by two moving porous walls, which enable the fluid to enter or exit during successive expansions or contractions, is investigated. The governing non-linear equations and their associated boundary conditions are transformed into a highly non-linear ordinary differential equation. The series solution of the problem is obtained by utilising the homotopy perturbation method. Graphical results are presented to investigate the influence of the non-dimensional wall dilation rate and seepage Reynolds number (Re) on the velocity, normal pressure distribution and wall shear stress. Since the transport of biological fluids through contracting or expanding vessels is characterised by low seepage Res, the current study focuses on the viscous flow driven by small wall contractions and expansions of two weakly permeable walls.

  11. Direct measurement of calcium transport across chloroplast inner-envelope vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Roh, M.H.; Shingles, R.; Cleveland, M.J.; McCarty, R.E.

    1998-12-01

    The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} movement across the inner-envelope membrane of pea (Pisum sativum L.) chloroplasts was directly measured by stopped-flow spectrofluorometry using membrane vesicles loaded with the Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive fluorophore fura-2. Calibration of fura-2 fluorescence was achieved by combining a ratiometric method with Ca{sup 2+}-selective minielectrodes to determine pCa values. The initial rate of Ca{sup 2+} influx in predominantly right-side-out inner-envelope membrane vesicles was greater than that in largely inside-out vesicles. Ca{sup 2+} movement was stimulated by an inwardly directed electrochemical proton gradient across the membrane vesicles, an effect that was diminished by the addition of valinomycin in the presence of K{sup +}. In addition, Ca{sup 2+} was shown to move across the membrane vesicles in the presence of K{sup +} diffusion potential gradient. The potential-stimulated rate of Ca{sup 2+} transport was slightly inhibited by diltiazem and greatly inhibited by ruthenium red. Other pharmacological agents such as LaCl{sub 3}, verapamil, and nifedipine had little or no effect. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} transport across the chloroplast inner envelope can occur by a potential-stimulated uniport mechanism.

  12. Advanced Transport Delay Compensation Algorithms: Results of Delay Measurement and Piloted Performance Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of delay measurement and piloted performance tests that were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the adaptive compensator and the state space compensator for alleviating the phase distortion of transport delay in the visual system in the VMS at the NASA Langley Research Center. Piloted simulation tests were conducted to assess the effectiveness of two novel compensators in comparison to the McFarland predictor and the baseline system with no compensation. Thirteen pilots with heterogeneous flight experience executed straight-in and offset approaches, at various delay configurations, on a flight simulator where different predictors were applied to compensate for transport delay. The glideslope and touchdown errors, power spectral density of the pilot control inputs, NASA Task Load Index, and Cooper-Harper rating of the handling qualities were employed for the analyses. The overall analyses show that the adaptive predictor results in slightly poorer compensation for short added delay (up to 48 ms) and better compensation for long added delay (up to 192 ms) than the McFarland compensator. The analyses also show that the state space predictor is fairly superior for short delay and significantly superior for long delay than the McFarland compensator.

  13. GIS measured environmental correlates of active school transport: A systematic review of 14 studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Emerging frameworks to examine active school transportation (AST) commonly emphasize the built environment (BE) as having an influence on travel mode decisions. Objective measures of BE attributes have been recommended for advancing knowledge about the influence of the BE on school travel mode choice. An updated systematic review on the relationships between GIS-measured BE attributes and AST is required to inform future research in this area. The objectives of this review are: i) to examine and summarize the relationships between objectively measured BE features and AST in children and adolescents and ii) to critically discuss GIS methodologies used in this context. Methods Six electronic databases, and websites were systematically searched, and reference lists were searched and screened to identify studies examining AST in students aged five to 18 and reporting GIS as an environmental measurement tool. Fourteen cross-sectional studies were identified. The analyses were classified in terms of density, diversity, and design and further differentiated by the measures used or environmental condition examined. Results Only distance was consistently found to be negatively associated with AST. Consistent findings of positive or negative associations were not found for land use mix, residential density, and intersection density. Potential modifiers of any relationship between these attributes and AST included age, school travel mode, route direction (e.g., to/from school), and trip-end (home or school). Methodological limitations included inconsistencies in geocoding, selection of study sites, buffer methods and the shape of zones (Modifiable Areal Unit Problem [MAUP]), the quality of road and pedestrian infrastructure data, and school route estimation. Conclusions The inconsistent use of spatial concepts limits the ability to draw conclusions about the relationship between objectively measured environmental attributes and AST. Future research should explore

  14. Benefit of Measuring Anterior Segment Structures Using an Increased Number of Optical Coherence Tomography Images: The Chinese American Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Benjamin Y.; Israelsen, Paul; Pan, Billy X.; Wang, Dandan; Jiang, Xuejuan; Varma, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of analyzing an increased number of anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) images on measurement values of various anterior segment parameters. Methods Subjects for this cross-sectional study were recruited from the Chinese American Eye Study (CHES), a population-based study in Los Angeles, CA. Thirty-two AS-OCT images were acquired from one eye each of 83 consecutive subjects. Sixteen parameters were analyzed in each image, including angle opening distance (AOD), angle recess area (ARA), trabecular iris space area (TISA), trabecular iris angle (TIA), scleral spur angle (SSAngle), lens vault (LV), pupillary diameter (PD), anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber width (ACW), iris area (IA), and anterior chamber area (ACA). Data from 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 OCT images were averaged across subjects to calculate the range and mean of measurement values for each parameter. Results Anatomical variations were poorly captured with fewer OCT images for AOD, ARA, TISA, SSAngle, IA, and LV. For these parameters, the range and mean of measurement values obtained from one OCT image deviated from 32-image values by up to 43.9% and 13.3% of the 32-image mean, respectively. These deviations decreased when additional OCT images were analyzed. Deviations from 32-image range and mean values were less pronounced regardless of image number for PD, ACD, ACW, and ACA, measuring up to 3.5% and 5.0%, respectively. Conclusions A multi-image approach should be the standard in OCT-based studies of AOD, ARA, TISA, TIA, SSAngle, IA, and LV. PMID:27893097

  15. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  16. Electron temperature measurements and heat transport improvement in the RFX-mod experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfier, Alberto; Bonomo, Federica; Franz, Paolo; Marrelli, Lionello; Pasqualotto, Roberto; Piovesan, Paolo; Spizzo, Gianluca; Annibaldi, Silvia Valeria

    2007-11-01

    Electron temperature profiles at about 1keV have been measured in the RFX-mod experiment during the recent high plasma current campaign (Ip>1.2MA, ne˜4.10^19): peaked Te profiles, obtained through the Thomson scattering diagnostic, are characterized by a steep gradient in the core during the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state. The formation of well defined magnetic flux surfaces during QSH states determines a reduction of thermal heat conductivity, whose estimate is essential to quantify this transport improvement. We apply the M1TeV code [1] to various experimental scenarios in order to estimate heat diffusivity, then also calculating electron confinement time: in this study, we consider the effect of the increase of plasma current and also of eventual external current drive. [1] F.Porcelli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1458 (1999).

  17. Time-domain measurement of optical transport in silicon micro-ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Pernice, Wolfram H P; Li, Mo; Tang, Hong X

    2010-08-16

    We perform time-domain measurements of optical transport dynamics in silicon nano-photonic devices. Using pulsed optical excitation the thermal and carrier induced optical nonlinearities of micro-ring resonators are investigated, allowing for identification of their individual contributions. Under pulsed excitation build-up of free carriers and heat in the waveguides leads to a beating oscillation of the cavity resonance frequency. When employing a burst of pulse trains shorter than the carrier life-time, the slower heating effect can be separated from the faster carrier effect. Our scheme provides a convenient way to thermally stabilize optical resonators for high-power time-domain applications and nonlinear optical conversion.

  18. Static and dynamic pressure measurements on a NACA 0012 airfoil in the Ames High Reynolds Number Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdevitt, J. B.; Okuno, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    The supercritical flows at high subsonic speeds over a NACA 0012 airfoil were studied to acquire aerodynamic data suitable for evaluating numerical-flow codes. The measurements consisted primarily of static and dynamic pressures on the airfoil and test-channel walls. Shadowgraphs were also taken of the flow field near the airfoil. The tests were performed at free-stream Mach numbers from approximately 0.7 to 0.8, at angles of attack sufficient to include the onset of buffet, and at Reynolds numbers from 1 million to 14 million. A test action was designed specifically to obtain two-dimensional airfoil data with a minimum of wall interference effects. Boundary-layer suction panels were used to minimize sidewall interference effects. Flexible upper and lower walls allow test-channel area-ruling to nullify Mach number changes induced by the mass removal, to correct for longitudinal boundary-layer growth, and to provide contouring compatible with the streamlines of the model in free air.

  19. Measurement of absolute CO number densities in CH3F/O2 plasmas by optical emission self-actinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Kaler, Sanbir; Lou, Qiaowei; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2014-02-01

    CH3F/O2 inductively coupled plasmas at 10 mTorr were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy. A ‘self-actinometry’ method was developed to measure the absolute number density of CO that formed in reactions following dissociation of CH3F and O2 in the plasma. In this method, small amounts of CO were added to the plasma, leading to small increases in the CO emission intensity. By carefully accounting for small perturbations to the plasma electron density and/or electron energy distribution, and by showing that very little of the CO added to the plasma was decomposed by electron impact or other reactions, it was possible to derive absolute number densities for the CO content of the plasma. With equal fractions (0.50) of CH3F and O2 in the feed gas, the CO mole fraction as a function of plasma power saturated at a value of 0.20-0.25. As O2 in the feed gas was varied at a constant power of 100 W, the CO mole fraction went through a maximum of about 0.25 near an O2 feed gas fraction of 0.5. The relative CO number densities determined by ‘standard’ actinometry followed the same functional dependence as the absolute mole fractions determined by self-actinometry, aided by the fact that electron temperature did not change appreciably with power or feed gas composition.

  20. Assessing the Ecological Response of Dung Beetles in an Agricultural Landscape Using Number of Individuals and Biomass in Diversity Measures.

    PubMed

    Cultid-Medina, C A; Escobar, F

    2016-04-01

    The global increase in demand for productive land requires us to increase our knowledge of the value of agricultural landscapes for the management and conservation of biodiversity, particularly in tropical regions. Thus, comparative studies of how different community attributes respond to changes in land use under different levels of deforestation intensity would be useful. We analyzed patterns of dung beetle diversity in an Andean region dominated by sun-grown coffee. Diversity was estimated using two measures of species abundance (the number of individuals and biomass) and was compared among four types of vegetation cover (forest, riparian forest, sun-grown coffee, and pastures) in three landscape plots with different degrees of deforestation intensity (low, intermediate, and high). We found that dung beetle diversity patterns differed between types of vegetation cover and degree of deforestation, depending on whether the number of individuals or biomass was used. Based on biomass, inequality in the dung beetle community was lowest in the forest, and increased in the sun-grown coffee and pastures across all levels of deforestation, particularly for the increasing dominance of large species. The number of beetles and biomass indicate that the spatial dominance of sun-grown coffee does not necessarily imply the drastic impoverishment of dung beetle diversity. In fact, for these beetles, it would seem that the landscape studied has not yet crossed "a point of no return." This system offers a starting point for exploring biodiversity management and conservation options in the sun-grown coffee landscapes of the Colombian Andes.

  1. On measurements and their quality. Paper 4: verbal anchors and the number of response options in rating scales.

    PubMed

    Beckstead, Jason W

    2014-05-01

    This is the last in a short series of papers on measurement theory and practice with particular relevance to intervention research in nursing, midwifery, and healthcare. Understanding how it is that people respond to the questions posed by researchers is fundamental to progress in the social and health sciences. For decades methodologists in psychology, marketing, education, and survey research have studied this issue. In this paper I review this diverse empirical literature to synthesize basic principles for creating rating scales which can reduce measurement error and increase the quality of resulting data. After introducing a theoretical framework known as the cognitive aspects of survey methods (CASM), I review the fundamentals of psychological scaling theory and discuss how it has been used to study the meanings of verbal response options and provide an illustration of how the quality of measurements may be influenced by our choice of the verbal phrases we present as response options. Next, I review the research on the optimal number of response options to use in various measurement situations and how verbal and numeric anchors can combine to influence data quality. Finally, I summarize the issues covered and present recommendations for best practice when creating and using rating scales in research.

  2. Classical and quantum phase transitions revealed using transport and x-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arnab

    I present the experimental studies of phase transitions in three different compounds in this thesis. The first one, SrCu2(BO3)2 is a physical realization of the Shastry-Sutherland model where, using precise lattice measurements, we examined the pressure-dependent phase diagram. We found two separate quantum phase transitions in the compound, the first one being a second order transition from a dimer to an intermediate magnetic state, and the second being a first order monoclinic distortion from the intermediate state to a presumed magnetically ordered state. In the second compound, NiS2, using a combination of transport and x-ray diffraction we proved that neither magnetism nor lattice symmetry, but rather electron-electron correlations, plays an active role in the insulator-metal phase transition in pure NiS2 under high pressure. Following this we make an attempt to delve the critical scaling laws using high pressure transport measurements in a helium dilution refrigerator. We observed a resistivity drop of over five orders and an effective of mass enhancement near the critical region. I detail the technical endeavors adopted for leading us to the critical behavior. The third compound, TbTe3, was believed to show only one charge density wave (CDW). We discovered a second CDW, but at a much lower transition temperature to the first one. Our results pointed to bidirectional ordering in TbTe3, a compound that has been otherwise considered a canonical model for one-dimensional CDW physics. The order parameter for this new CDW appears to deviate from standard mean-field behavior. This is only the second rare-earth telluride for which a q-vector has been determined for a second CDW, and the first for which the temperature dependence of that q-vector was characterized.

  3. CALIPSO Measurements of Saharan Dust Properties near Source and Transport Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Liu, Z.; Tackett, J. L.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, a collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. We exploit the large data set generated by CALIPSO between 2006 - 2013 to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of Saharan dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on the morphology, vertical extent and size of Saharan dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source (Lat 0o to 40o Lon -20o to 20o) to the same distributions in the far field or transport region (Lat 0o to 40o Lon -80o to -20o). To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  4. Earth strain measurements with the transportable laser ranging system: Field techniques and planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, H. J.; Cahill, T.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of the transportable laser ranging system for monitoring the ground deformation around satellite ranging stations and other geodetic control points was examined with emphasis on testing the usefulness of the relative alteration technique. The temporal variation of the ratio of the length of each survey line to the mean length of all survey lines in a given area is directly related to the mean shear strain rate for the area. The data from a series of experimental measurements taken over the Los Angeles basin from a TLRS station at Mt. Wilson show that such ratios can be determined to an accuracy of one part in 10 million with a measurement program lasting for three days and without using any corrections for variations in atmospheric conditions. A numerical experiment using a set of hypothetical data indicates that reasonable estimates of the present shear strain rate and the direction of the principal axes in southern California can be deduced from such measurements over an interval of one to two years.

  5. A Segment-Based Trajectory Similarity Measure in the Urban Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yingchi; Zhong, Haishi; Xiao, Xianjian; Li, Xiaofang

    2017-03-06

    With the rapid spread of built-in GPS handheld smart devices, the trajectory data from GPS sensors has grown explosively. Trajectory data has spatio-temporal characteristics and rich information. Using trajectory data processing techniques can mine the patterns of human activities and the moving patterns of vehicles in the intelligent transportation systems. A trajectory similarity measure is one of the most important issues in trajectory data mining (clustering, classification, frequent pattern mining, etc.). Unfortunately, the main similarity measure algorithms with the trajectory data have been found to be inaccurate, highly sensitive of sampling methods, and have low robustness for the noise data. To solve the above problems, three distances and their corresponding computation methods are proposed in this paper. The point-segment distance can decrease the sensitivity of the point sampling methods. The prediction distance optimizes the temporal distance with the features of trajectory data. The segment-segment distance introduces the trajectory shape factor into the similarity measurement to improve the accuracy. The three kinds of distance are integrated with the traditional dynamic time warping algorithm (DTW) algorithm to propose a new segment-based dynamic time warping algorithm (SDTW). The experimental results show that the SDTW algorithm can exhibit about 57%, 86%, and 31% better accuracy than the longest common subsequence algorithm (LCSS), and edit distance on real sequence algorithm (EDR) , and DTW, respectively, and that the sensitivity to the noise data is lower than that those algorithms.

  6. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  7. A Segment-Based Trajectory Similarity Measure in the Urban Transportation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingchi; Zhong, Haishi; Xiao, Xianjian; Li, Xiaofang

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid spread of built-in GPS handheld smart devices, the trajectory data from GPS sensors has grown explosively. Trajectory data has spatio-temporal characteristics and rich information. Using trajectory data processing techniques can mine the patterns of human activities and the moving patterns of vehicles in the intelligent transportation systems. A trajectory similarity measure is one of the most important issues in trajectory data mining (clustering, classification, frequent pattern mining, etc.). Unfortunately, the main similarity measure algorithms with the trajectory data have been found to be inaccurate, highly sensitive of sampling methods, and have low robustness for the noise data. To solve the above problems, three distances and their corresponding computation methods are proposed in this paper. The point-segment distance can decrease the sensitivity of the point sampling methods. The prediction distance optimizes the temporal distance with the features of trajectory data. The segment-segment distance introduces the trajectory shape factor into the similarity measurement to improve the accuracy. The three kinds of distance are integrated with the traditional dynamic time warping algorithm (DTW) algorithm to propose a new segment–based dynamic time warping algorithm (SDTW). The experimental results show that the SDTW algorithm can exhibit about 57%, 86%, and 31% better accuracy than the longest common subsequence algorithm (LCSS), and edit distance on real sequence algorithm (EDR) , and DTW, respectively, and that the sensitivity to the noise data is lower than that those algorithms. PMID:28272315

  8. Chemical Processing and Transport in the Stratospheric Vortex and Subvortex from Satellite Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; MacKenzie, Ian; Chipperfield, Martyn; Feng, Wuhu; Sander, Stanley; Froidevaux, Lucien; Livesey, Nathaniel; Bernath, Peter; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris

    A suite of atmospheric composition measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura satellite and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) on Canada's SCISAT-1 mission is used to study chemical processing in and dispersal of chemically-processed air from the lower stratospheric polar vortices. In particular, interannual and interhemispheric variability in chlorine activation and deactivation are investigated using measurements of ClO, HCl, and ClONO2. Theoretical understanding is assessed by comparing measurements to customized runs of the SLIMCAT 3D chemical transport model. Results are shown from a newly-updated version of the model that incorporates a sophisticated microphysical scheme as a fully-coupled module, allowing polar stratospheric cloud formation and sedimentation to be calculated interactively in full-chemistry simulations. The impact of recently-published ClOOCl absorption cross sections, which yield a stratospheric ClOOCl photolysis rate substantially lower than previous estimates, on the agreement between modelled and measured chlorine species is evaluated. In addition, measurements of HNO3 and O3 and SLIMCAT results are related to mixing diagnostics to track the springtime export of denitrified, ozone-depleted air from the "subvortex", the transition zone (potential temperatures of 350-450 K) between the region above of strong confinement inside the polar vortex and the region below of less restricted exchange with lower-latitude air. Particularly over Antarctica, such mixing of processed air out of the subvortex may significantly affect the composition of the midlatitude lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere.

  9. Dust Transport into the Arctic: Time for Routine In Situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R. C.; Jefferson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Long range transport of Asian dust into the Arctic has been observed for many years. The dust often contains anthropogenic aerosols such as black carbon. Radiation measurements beneath a dust layer over the NOAA Barrow Observatory showed cooling of the surface by >5 Wm-2/day with calculated heating of 3 K/day within the layer. Airborne vertical profiles of aerosols were conducted across the Arctic Basin during the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP, 1983-91) and the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes Affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC, 2008). The most salient observation from these profiles was that aerosol concentrations above the top of the marine boundary (cloud) layer were often an order of magnitude greater than within the boundary layer or at the surface. Lidar measurements from Barrow and Alert show that there are layers of dust and haze flowing into the Arctic Basin that are not detected at the surface or are measured only as minor aerosol perturbations. There are programs conducting aerosol measurements in the Arctic with UAVs, but these are limited in scope and not conducted on a year around basis. Models of Arctic aerosol distributions and concentrations do not adequately describe either surface aerosol measurements or aerosols above the marine boundary layer. Climate models are not able to adequately describe the forces involved in the accelerating melting of the Arctic ice cap. There are conjectures that dust and black carbon aerosols on the ice may be contributing to this melting. Considering their importance in Arctic climate forcing, we suggest that atmospheric and climate modeling scientists have an obligation to develop a plan for sustained profiling of aerosol optical properties (light scattering and absorption) and cloud nucleating properties (CCN and IN) in the Arctic. These profiles need to extend from near the surface through the marine cloud layer and into the upper reaches of the free troposphere

  10. Uncertainty in Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) Doppler Lidar Products and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmer, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is both a high spectral resolution lidar and Doppler lidar currently being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use as a demonstrator instrument for NASA’s Aerosol Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) Mission. CATS is intended to fly on NASA’s high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. CATS will be capable of measuring both aerosol properties and horizontal wind velocity as a function of altitude. The accuracy of these measurements is important to the success of the instrument and the ACE mission. Uncertainty equation