Science.gov

Sample records for truffles regulate plant

  1. Characterization of natural habitats and diversity of Libyan desert truffles.

    PubMed

    Bouzadi, Mozidi; Grebenc, Tine; Turunen, Ossi; Kraigher, Hojka; Taib, Hassan; Alafai, Abdulhafied; Sbissi, Imed; Assad, Mamdouh El Haj; Bedade, Dattatray; Shamekh, Salem

    2017-10-01

    Desert truffles have traditionally been used as food in Libya. Desert truffle grows and gives fruit sporadically when adequate and properly distributed rainfall occurs with existence of suitable soil and mycorrhizal host plant. The present study aimed to identify and characterize two kinds of wild desert truffles from ecological and nutritional points that were collected from the studied area. The truffle samples were identified as Terfezia (known as red or black truffle) and Tirmania (known as white truffle). The nutritional values (protein, lipid and carbohydrate) of both Libyan wild truffle ( Terfezia and Tirmania) were determined on a dry weight basis and result showed that Tirmania and Terfezia contained 16.3 and 18.5% protein, 6.2 and 5.9% lipid, 67.2 and 65% carbohydrate, respectively, in ascocarp biomass. The soil pH of the upper and lower regions of the Hamada Al-Hamra ranged between 8.2 and 8.5 giving suitable conditions for fructification. The plants, Helianthemum kahiricum and Helianthemum lippii were the dominant plants in Hamada Al-Hamra region found to form a mycorrhiza with desert truffles. The phylogenetic analysis of the genomic rDNA ITS region showed that, out of five collections three represented Tirmania pinoyi (Maire) Malencon, one Tirmania nivea (Desf.) Trappe, and one Terfezia boudieri Chatin.

  2. Current progress on truffle submerged fermentation: a promising alternative to its fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Rui-Sang; Li, Hong-Mei

    2015-03-01

    Truffle (Tuber spp.), also known as "underground gold," is popular in various cuisines because of its unique and characteristic aroma. Currently, truffle fruiting bodies are mostly obtained from nature and semi-artificial cultivation. However, the former source is scarce, and the latter is time-consuming, usually taking 4 to 12 years before harvest of the fruiting body. The truffle submerged fermentation process was first developed in Tang's lab as an alternative to its fruiting bodies. To the best of our knowledge, most reports of truffle submerged fermentation come from Tang's group. This review examines the current state of the truffle submerged fermentation process. First, the strategy to optimize the truffle submerged fermentation process is summarized; the final conditions yielded not only the highest reported truffle biomass but also the highest production of extracellular and intracellular polysaccharides. Second, the comparison of metabolites produced by truffle fermentation and fruiting bodies is presented, and the former were superior to the latter. Third, metabolites (i.e., volatile organic compounds, equivalent umami concentration, and sterol) derived from truffle fermentation could be regulated by fermentation process optimization. These findings indicated that submerged fermentation of truffles can be used for commercial production of biomass and metabolites as a promising alternative to generating its fruiting bodies in bioreactor.

  3. The hidden life of truffles

    Treesearch

    James M. Trappe; Andrew W. Claridge

    2010-01-01

    Truffles, like mushrooms, are the fruit of fungi. These fleshy organs are temporary reproductive structures that produce spores, which eventually germinate and give rise to new offspring. What sets truffles apart from mushrooms is that their spore-laden fruit forms below ground rather than above. Technically, true truffles are those fungi that belong to the Ascomycota...

  4. Truffle renaissance in Poland - history, present and prospects.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Gruszecka, Aleksandra; Hilszczańska, Dorota; Gil, Wojciech; Kosel, Bogusław

    2017-06-15

    The use of truffles in Poland has a long tradition, yet due to some historical aspects, this knowledge was lost. Currently, truffles and truffle orchards are again receiving attention, and thanks to, e.g., historical data, they have solid foundations to be established. Publications relating to truffles between 1661 and 2017 were searched for in international and national databases, such as the database of PhD theses, Google Scholar, and catalogues of the National Library of Poland, the Jagiellonian Digital Library, the University Library of J. Giedroyc in Bialystok and the Lower Silesian Digital Library (DBC). A very meticulous survey of the literature on truffles showed that truffles have been known since at least 1661. In the 18th century, the fungi were considered a non-timber forest product. It is interesting to mention the impact of Polish Count Michał Jan Borch in understanding the nature of truffles. The whitish truffle (Tuber borchii) is named after him. The greatest number of publications regarding truffles can be observed at the first half of the 19th and 20th centuries. The fungi were present not only in cookbooks but also in scientific literature, and aspects of their ecology and medicinal use are considered. The "dark ages" for truffles, mainly for social reasons, occurred after the Second World War. In tough times, when Poland was under Soviet communist control (1945-1989), truffles as a luxurious product have been completely forgotten. However, at the end of the 20th century, truffles started receiving attention in Polish society. Yet, the real awakening began in the first decade of the twenty-first century when the first truffle orchards were established. One of them has already produced the first fruit bodies of summer truffle (Tuber aestivum). Truffles have been present in Polish culture for centuries. Their renaissance indicates the need for fostering sustainable agroforestry-centred initiatives aimed at helping truffle growers in growing the

  5. Instrumental monitoring of the birth and development of truffles in a Tuber melanosporum orchard.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, G; Leonardi, M; Di Carlo, P; Ranalli, D; Zinni, A; De Laurentiis, G

    2014-04-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiotic plants, soil suitability, temperature, and humidity are, by general consensus, considered decisive factors in truffle production. However, experimental approaches to define the environmental conditions that stimulate formation of truffle primordia and promote their growth to maturity have been lacking. By analysis of data of many atmospheric and soil parameters collected since 2009 within a Tuber melanosporum orchard, the trends of metabolic activity, detected as CO2 production in the soil, have been identified as the most reliable parameter to indicate the 'birth' of the truffle primordia. They seem to be produced when mycelial activity is intense and undergoes water stress, after which it resumes. About 6-18 days after recovery of metabolic activity, we could collect primordia of T. melanosporum. Many die or develop too early and consequently rot or are eaten by insect larvae. These events occur several times during summer and autumn, those that 'sprout' in late summer or later grow steadily and reach maturity. Using a particular ground-penetrating radar (GPR) setup to discriminate truffles, we could identify individual truffles in the soil after they have enlarged to at least 6 mm in diameter and follow their growth in volume and diameter over time. These two instrumental methods (CO2 sensor and GPR), although yet to be improved, open new important perspectives to better understand truffle biology and manage truffle orchards to support the newly acquired demonstration of the fundamental role of host plants for the nutrient transfer to the ectomycorrhiza-mycelium-fruiting body complex of T. melanosporum.

  6. Effects of climate on the productivity of desert truffles beneath hyper-arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Bradai, Lyès; Bissati, Samia; Chenchouni, Haroun; Amrani, Khaled

    2015-07-01

    Desert truffles are edible hypogenous fungi that are very well adapted to conditions of aridity in arid and semi-arid regions. This study aims to highlight the influence of climatic factors on the productivity of desert truffles under hyper-arid climatic conditions of the Sahara Desert in Algeria, with assumptions that the more varying climatic factors, mainly rainfall, are more crucial for the development and production of desert truffles. At seven separate sites, desert truffles were collected by systematic sampling between 2006 and 2012. The effects of climate parameters of each site on the productivities (g/ha/year) of desert truffle species were tested using generalized linear models (GLMs). The annual mean of the total production recorded for all three harvested species (Terfezia arenaria, Terfezia claveryi, and Tirmania nivea) was 785.43 ± 743.39 g/ha. Tirmania nivea was commonly present over the sampled sites with an occurrence of 70 ± 10.1%. GLMs revealed that total and specific productivities were closely positively related to autumnal precipitations occurring during October-December, which is the critical pre-breeding period for both desert truffles and host plant species. The other climatic parameters have statistically no effect on the annual variation of desert truffle productivity.

  7. Truffles contain endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes and anandamide.

    PubMed

    Pacioni, Giovanni; Rapino, Cinzia; Zarivi, Osvaldo; Falconi, Anastasia; Leonardi, Marco; Battista, Natalia; Colafarina, Sabrina; Sergi, Manuel; Bonfigli, Antonella; Miranda, Michele; Barsacchi, Daniela; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Truffles are the fruiting body of fungi, members of the Ascomycota phylum endowed with major gastronomic and commercial value. The development and maturation of their reproductive structure are dependent on melanin synthesis. Since anandamide, a prominent member of the endocannabinoid system (ECS), is responsible for melanin synthesis in normal human epidermal melanocytes, we thought that ECS might be present also in truffles. Here, we show the expression, at the transcriptional and translational levels, of most ECS components in the black truffle Tuber melanosporum Vittad. at maturation stage VI. Indeed, by means of molecular biology and immunochemical techniques, we found that truffles contain the major metabolic enzymes of the ECS, while they do not express the most relevant endocannabinoid-binding receptors. In addition, we measured anandamide content in truffles, at different maturation stages (from III to VI), through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, whereas the other relevant endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was below the detection limit. Overall, our unprecedented results suggest that anandamide and ECS metabolic enzymes have evolved earlier than endocannabinoid-binding receptors, and that anandamide might be an ancient attractant to truffle eaters, that are well-equipped with endocannabinoid-binding receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ethnomycological survey of traditional usage and indigenous knowledge on desert truffles among the native Sahara Desert people of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Bradai, Lyès; Neffar, Souad; Amrani, Khaled; Bissati, Samia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-03-13

    Desert truffles are edible hypogeous fungi, highly appreciated by the inhabitants of hot-desert settlements. Native Saharan people use truffles for food, promoting tourism, increasing fertility, and treatment of eye diseases and fatigue. This study consists of a cross-sectional survey focusing on the knowledge, use and ethnomycological practices of desert truffles among the native people of the Algerian Northern Sahara. The study was conducted through direct interviews with 60 truffle-hunters in the regions of Ouargla and Ghardaia. Three species were harvested and consumed by the surveyed subjects: Terfezia claveryi was the most appreciated and most expensive species, followed by Terfezia areanaria moderately preferred, then Tirmania nivea the least appreciated and least expensive. Among the 60 interviewees, 90% rely on the abundance of symbiotic plants (Helianthemum lippii) to harvest truffles, 65% begin harvesting from mid-February to March, after rains of the autumn (38%) and winter (36%), particularly in the Wadi beds (37%) and Daya landscapes (32%). Interviewees harvested truffles mainly for home consumption; however 26.7% sell any harvest surplus, and of those only 15% generate significant revenue from this source, and 73% considered the sale of desert truffles to have low financial value. Desert truffles are used in traditional medicine, especially against eye infections (22%), weakness (19%) and to promote male fertility (19%). In the case of desert truffles for consumption, the surveyed population preferred to prepare the truffles with couscous and meat, or in porridge. Respondents used price as the main criterion for deciding whether to purchase desert truffles. The surveyed trufflers use the knowledge passed from one generation to the next to help ensure a good harvest of truffles during each foray into the desert. Our findings highlight the various uses of truffles in the Sahara Desert, and how these relate to the lifestyle of local people. Copyright

  9. New records of truffle taxa in Tuber and Terfezia from Turkey

    Treesearch

    Michael Angelo Castellano; Aziz Turkoglu

    2012-01-01

    Turkey has one of the richest floras in the northern hemisphere as it is located at the convergence of 3 phytogeographical regions: Euro-Siberian, Mediterranean, and Irano-Turanian. This is reflected in the high number of plant taxa, particularly plant families that have truffles associated with them. The forests of these regions are dominated by ectomycorrhizal...

  10. Mycorrhization of pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with commercial truffle species: Tuber aestivum Vittad. and Tuber borchii Vittad.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Bonito, Gregory; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia

    2012-07-01

    Pecan (Carya illinoinensis) is an economically important nut tree native to the Mississippi basin and cultivated worldwide. In North America, species of truffles are regularly found fruiting in productive pecan orchards and the truffle genus Tuber appears to be abundant in pecan ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities. As an initial step to determine the feasibility of co-cropping European truffle species with pecan, we evaluated whether mycorrhizae of highly esteemed European truffle species (Tuber aestivum Vittad. T. borchii and T. macrosporum) could be formed on pecan seedlings. Seedlings were inoculated with truffle spores and were grown in a greenhouse for 10 months. Levels of EM colonization were estimated visually and quantified by counting EM tips. Ectomycorrhizae were identified both morphologically and molecularly with species-specific amplification and by sequencing of the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA). Both T. borchii and T. aestivum spores produced well-formed ectomycorrhizae on pecan seedlings with average root colonization levels of about 62% and 42%, respectively, whereas no ectomycorrhizae of T. macrosporum were formed. The anatomy and morphology of these truffle ectomycorrhizae on pecan was characterized. The co-cropping of T. aestivum and T. borchii may hold promise as an additional stream of revenue to pecan growers, although, further studies are needed to assess whether this symbiosis is maintained after planting in the field and whether truffle production can be supported by this host species.

  11. Ethnomycological aspects of the desert truffle among native Bahraini and non-Bahraini peoples of the Kingdom of Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Mandeel, Qaher A; Al-Laith, Abdul Ameer A

    2007-03-01

    Bahraini respondents includes looking for an earth bulge with cracks on smooth surfaced sandy-loam soil whereas non-Bahrainis search randomly in unexploited desert habitats (49%) but not always looking for truffles, but by the presence of its host plant Helianthemum spp. (16.3%). For both groups, boiling the cleaned sliced truffle in salts and spices (mean 31%), or by deep-frying in local lamb ghee and spices (26%) is the most preferred way of eating truffles, while eating raw truffles is very rare. Finally, chilling cleaned truffles (45.6%) is the main method of preservation for short periods used by the Bahraini respondents, otherwise freezing (30.4%) is used for prolonged preservation, compared to non-Bahraini respondents who prefer freezing as the primary method (51.4%). Some Bedouins preserve clean truffles by pickling in 3-6% vinegar and salt. The influence of soil and environmental factors on truffle development and the role of desert truffles on traditional information, socioeconomic, ecology and sociocultural folklore in Bahrain are discussed.

  12. Oaks belowground: mycorrhizas, truffles, and small mammals

    Treesearch

    Jonathan Frank; Seth Barry; Joseph Madden; Darlene Southworth

    2008-01-01

    Oaks depend on hidden diversity belowground. Oregon white oaks (Quercus garryana) form ectomycorrhizas with more than 40 species of fungi at a 25-ha site. Several of the most common oak mycorrhizal fungi form hypogeous fruiting bodies or truffles in the upper layer of mineral soil. We collected 18 species of truffles associated with Oregon white...

  13. All-clear for gourmets: truffles not radioactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büntgen, U.; Jäggi, M.; Stobbe, U.; Tegel, W.; Sproll, L.; Eikenberg, J.; Egli, S.

    2016-02-01

    Although ranging among the most expensive gourmet foods, it remains unclear whether Burgundy truffles (Tuber aestivum) accumulate radioactivity at a harmful level comparable to other fungal species. Here, we measure the 137Cs in 82 T. aestivum fruit bodies from Switzerland, Germany, France, Italy, and Hungary. All tested specimens reveal insignificant radiocaesium concentrations, thus providing an all-clear for many truffle hunters and cultivators in large parts of Europe as well as the subsequent chain of dealers and customers from around the world. Our results are particularly relevant in the light of ongoing efforts to cultivate Burgundy truffles, as well as the fact that several forest ecosystems are still highly contaminated with 137Cs, for which mushrooms are one of the main pathways to human diets.

  14. Périgord black truffle genome uncovers evolutionary origins and mechanisms of symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francis; Kohler, Annegret; Murat, Claude; Balestrini, Raffaella; Coutinho, Pedro M; Jaillon, Olivier; Montanini, Barbara; Morin, Emmanuelle; Noel, Benjamin; Percudani, Riccardo; Porcel, Bettina; Rubini, Andrea; Amicucci, Antonella; Amselem, Joelle; Anthouard, Véronique; Arcioni, Sergio; Artiguenave, François; Aury, Jean-Marc; Ballario, Paola; Bolchi, Angelo; Brenna, Andrea; Brun, Annick; Buée, Marc; Cantarel, Brandi; Chevalier, Gérard; Couloux, Arnaud; Da Silva, Corinne; Denoeud, France; Duplessis, Sébastien; Ghignone, Stefano; Hilselberger, Benoît; Iotti, Mirco; Marçais, Benoît; Mello, Antonietta; Miranda, Michele; Pacioni, Giovanni; Quesneville, Hadi; Riccioni, Claudia; Ruotolo, Roberta; Splivallo, Richard; Stocchi, Vilberto; Tisserant, Emilie; Viscomi, Arturo Roberto; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Zampieri, Elisa; Henrissat, Bernard; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Paolocci, Francesco; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone; Wincker, Patrick

    2010-04-15

    The Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) and the Piedmont white truffle dominate today's truffle market. The hypogeous fruiting body of T. melanosporum is a gastronomic delicacy produced by an ectomycorrhizal symbiont endemic to calcareous soils in southern Europe. The worldwide demand for this truffle has fuelled intense efforts at cultivation. Identification of processes that condition and trigger fruit body and symbiosis formation, ultimately leading to efficient crop production, will be facilitated by a thorough analysis of truffle genomic traits. In the ectomycorrhizal Laccaria bicolor, the expansion of gene families may have acted as a 'symbiosis toolbox'. This feature may however reflect evolution of this particular taxon and not a general trait shared by all ectomycorrhizal species. To get a better understanding of the biology and evolution of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, we report here the sequence of the haploid genome of T. melanosporum, which at approximately 125 megabases is the largest and most complex fungal genome sequenced so far. This expansion results from a proliferation of transposable elements accounting for approximately 58% of the genome. In contrast, this genome only contains approximately 7,500 protein-coding genes with very rare multigene families. It lacks large sets of carbohydrate cleaving enzymes, but a few of them involved in degradation of plant cell walls are induced in symbiotic tissues. The latter feature and the upregulation of genes encoding for lipases and multicopper oxidases suggest that T. melanosporum degrades its host cell walls during colonization. Symbiosis induces an increased expression of carbohydrate and amino acid transporters in both L. bicolor and T. melanosporum, but the comparison of genomic traits in the two ectomycorrhizal fungi showed that genetic predispositions for symbiosis-'the symbiosis toolbox'-evolved along different ways in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes.

  15. Effect of water stress on in vitro mycelium cultures of two mycorrhizal desert truffles.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Ródenas, Alfonso; Lozano-Carrillo, M Cecilia; Pérez-Gilabert, Manuela; Morte, Asunción

    2011-05-01

    The ability of two species of desert truffle, Terfezia claveryi strain TcS2 and Picoa lefebvrei strain OL2, to tolerate water stress in pure culture has been investigated. Both T. claveryi and P. lefebvrei strains exhibited a mycelium growth pattern characteristic of drought tolerant species. However, they were only tolerant to moderate water stress, below -1.07 MPa, with the P. lefebvrei isolate being slightly more drought tolerant than the T. claveryi isolate. The increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity observed in both fungi at moderate water stress with respect to the control indicated the functional adaptation of these mycelia to these drought conditions. ALP activity can be used as an indicator of the metabolic activity of these fungi. Slight water stress (-0.45 MPa) could improve mycelial inoculum production of these desert truffles. Moreover, P. lefebvrei could be a good candidate for further desert truffle mycorrhizal plant cultivation programmes in semiarid Mediterranean areas.

  16. Stand conditions associated with truffle abundance in western hemlock/Douglas-fir forests

    Treesearch

    Malcolm North; Joshua Greenberg

    1998-01-01

    Truffles are a staple food source for many forest small mammals yet the vegetation or soil conditions associated with truffle abundance are unknown. We examined the spatial distribution of forest structures, organic layer depth, root density, and two of the most common western North American truffles (Elaphomyces granulatus and Rhizopogon...

  17. The Truffle Microbiome: Species and Geography Effects on Bacteria Associated with Fruiting Bodies of Hypogeous Pezizales.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Bonito, Gregory M

    2016-07-01

    Fungi that produce their fruiting bodies underground within the soil profile are known commonly as truffles. Truffle fruiting bodies harbor a diverse but poorly understood microbial community of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi. In this study, we used next-generation 454 amplicon pyrosequencing of the V1 and V4 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in order to characterize and compare effects of truffle species and geographic origin on the truffle microbiome. We compared truffle microbiomes of the glebal tissue for eight truffle species belonging to four distinct genera within the Pezizales: Tuber, Terfezia, Leucangium, and Kalapuya. The bacterial community within truffles was dominated by Proteobacteria, Bacterioides, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Bacterial richness within truffles was quite low overall, with between 2-23 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Notably, we found a single Bradyrhizobium OTU to be dominant within truffle species belonging to the genus Tuber, irrespective of geographic origin, but not in other truffle genera sampled. This study offers relevant insights into the truffle microbiome and raises questions concerning the recruitment and function of these fungal-associated bacteria consortia.

  18. Intraspecific genotypic variability determines concentrations of key truffle volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Splivallo, Richard; Valdez, Nayuf; Kirchhoff, Nina; Ona, Marta Castiella; Schmidt, Jean-Pierre; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Aroma variability in truffles has been attributed to maturation (Tuber borchii), linked to environmental factors (Tuber magnatum), but the involvement of genetic factors has been ignored. We investigated aroma variability in Tuber uncinatum, a species with wide distribution. Our aim was to assess aroma variability at different spatial scales (i.e. trees, countries) and to quantify how aroma was affected by genotype, fruiting body maturity, and geographical origin. A volatile fingerprinting method was used to analyze the aroma of 223 T. uncinatum fruiting bodies from seven European countries. Maturity was estimated from spore melanization. Genotypic fingerprinting was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Discriminant analysis revealed that, regardless of the geographical origin of the truffles, most of the aroma variability was caused by eight-carbon-containing volatiles (C8-VOCs). In an orchard of T. uncinatum, truffles producing different concentrations of C8-VOCs clustered around distinct host trees. This clustering was not associated with maturity, but was associated with fungal genotype. These results indicate that the variation in C8-VOCs in truffles is most likely under genetic control. They exemplify that understanding the factors behind aroma variability requires a holistic approach. Furthermore, they also raise new questions regarding the ecological role of 1-octen-3-ol in truffles. PMID:22394027

  19. Seasonality and abundance of truffles from oak woodlands to red fir forests

    Treesearch

    Malcolm P. North

    2002-01-01

    Truffles are an important food source for many small mammals in forest ecosystems; however, we know little about the seasonality, abundance, or diversity of the truffle community in the Sierra Nevada. This study examined how truffle abundance and diversity varied between oak woodland, ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed-conifer, and red fir (

  20. Studies on volatile organic compounds of some truffles and false truffles.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco; Rana, Gian Luigi; Laurita, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Results of solid phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses, accomplished on sporophores of 11 species of truffles and false truffles, are reported. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in Gautieria morchelliformis were dimethyl sulphide, 1,3-octadiene, 3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol, amorphadiene, isoledene and cis-muurola-3,5-diene. In Hymenogaster luteus var. luteus, presence of 1,3-octadiene, 1-octen-3-ol, 3-octanone, 3-octanol and 4-acetylanisole was revealed. Two VOCs, 4-acetylanisole and β-farnesene, constituted aroma of Hymenogaster olivaceus.Melanogaster broomeanus exhibited as components of its aroma 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylpropanol, isobutyl acetate, 3,7-dimethyl-1,6-octadien-3-ol, 3-octanone and β-curcumene. VOC profile of Octavianina asterosperma was characterised by the presence of dimethyl sulphide, ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, methyl 2-methylbutanoate and 3-octanone. Tuber rufum var. rufum and Pachyphloeus conglomeratus showed the presence of dimethyl sulphide only.

  1. The Asian black truffle Tuber indicum can form ectomycorrhizas with North American host plants and complete its life cycle in non-native soils

    Treesearch

    Gregory Bonito; James M. Trappe; Sylvia Donovan; Rytas Vilgalys

    2011-01-01

    The Asian black truffle Tuber indicum is morphologically and phylogenetically similar to the European black truffle Tuber melanosporum. T. indicum is considered a threat to T. melanosporum trufficulture due to its presumed competitiveness and broad host compatibility. Recently, in independent events,

  2. Multidimensional Gas Chromatography Coupled to Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry/Quadrupole MS with a Low-Bleed Ionic Liquid Secondary Column for the Authentication of Truffles and Products Containing Truffle.

    PubMed

    Sciarrone, Danilo; Schepis, Antonino; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Donato, Paola; Vita, Federico; Creti, Donato; Alpi, Amedeo; Mondello, Luigi

    2018-06-05

    Truffles are among the most expensive foods available in the market, usually used as flavoring additives for their distinctive aroma. The most valuable species is Tuber magnatum Pico, better known as "Alba white truffle", in which bis(methylthio)methane is the key aroma compound. Given the high economical value of genuine white truffles, analytical approaches are required to be able to discriminate between natural or synthetic truffle aroma. Gas chromatography coupled to combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS), exploiting the 13 C/ 12 C ratio abundance of the key flavorings compounds in foods, has been a recognized technique for authenticity and traceability purposes; however, a number of issues have greatly limited its widespread use so far. In the present research, a high-efficiency HS-SPME MDGC-C-IRMS with simultaneous quadrupole MS detection has been applied for the evaluation of bis(methylthio)methane, resolving the coelution occurring with other components. With the aim to minimize the effect of column bleeding on δ 13 C measurement, a medium polarity ionic liquid-based stationary phase was preferred to a polyethylene glycol one, as the secondary column. In total, 24 genuine white truffles harvested in Italy were analyzed, attaining a δ 13 C values between -42.6‰ and -33.9‰, with a maximum standard deviation lower than 0.7‰. Two commercial intact truffles and 14 commercial samples of pasta, sauce, olive oil, cream, honey, and fresh cheese flavored with truffle aroma were analyzed, and the results from δ 13 C measurement were evaluated in comparison with those of genuine "white truffle" range and commercial synthetic bis(methylthio)methane standard.

  3. NATS truffle and truffle-like fungi 10: Pachyphloeus thysellii sp. nov. (Pezizaceae, Pezizomycotina).

    Treesearch

    Wes III Colgan; James M. Trappe

    2004-01-01

    An undescribed truffle found on the Fort Lewis Military Reservation near Olympia, Washington, is described as Pachyphloeus thysellii. This new species, associated with Pseudotsuga menziesii, closely resembles Pachyphloeus prieguensis from southern Europe. It differs from the latter in having yellow veins...

  4. Diversity, ecology, and conservation of truffle fungi in forests of the Pacific Northwest

    Treesearch

    James M. Trappe; Randy Molina; Daniel L. Luoma; Efren Cázares; David Pilz; Jane E. Smith; Michael A. Castellano; Steven L. Miller; Matthew J. Trappe

    2009-01-01

    Forests of the Pacific Northwest have been an epicenter for the evolution of truffle fungi with over 350 truffle species and 55 genera currently identified. Truffle fungi develop their reproductive fruit-bodies typically belowground, so they are harder to find and study than mushrooms that fruit aboveground. Nevertheless, over the last five decades, the Corvallis...

  5. Ideas and perspectives: truffles not radioactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büntgen, U.; Jäggi, M.; Stobbe, U.; Tegel, W.; Sproll, L.; Eikenberg, J.; Egli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Although ranging among the most expensive gourmet foods, it remains unclear if Burgundy truffles (Tuber aestivum) accumulate radioactivity at a harmful level comparable to other fungi. Here, we measure the 137Cs in 82 T. aestivum fruitbodies from Switzerland, Germany, France, Italy and Hungary. All specimens reveal insignificant radiocaesium concentrations, thus providing an all clear for truffle hunters and cultivators in Europe as well as dealers and customers from around the world. Our results are particularly relevant in the light of recent cultivation efforts and the fact that forest ecosystems are still highly contaminated with 137Cs, for which mushrooms are the main pathways to human diets.

  6. Black Truffle Harvesting in Spanish Forests: Trends, Current Policies and Practices, and Implications on its Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Barreda, Sergi; Forcadell, Ricardo; Sánchez, Sergio; Martín-Santafé, María; Marco, Pedro; Camarero, J. Julio; Reyna, Santiago

    2018-04-01

    The European black truffle is a mycorrhizal fungus native to Spanish Mediterranean forests. In most Spanish regions it was originally commercially harvested in the second half of the 20th century. Experts agree that wild truffle yields suffered a sharp decline during the 1970s and 1980s. However, official statistics for Spanish harvest are scarce and seemingly conflicting, and little attention has been paid to the regime for the exploitation of truffle-producing forests and its implications on the sustainability of this resource. Trends in harvest from 1969 to 2013 and current harvesting practices were analyzed as a case study, taking into account that Spain is a major truffle producer worldwide, but at the same time truffles have only recently been exploited. The available statistical sources, which include an increasing proportion of cultivated truffles since the mid-1990s, were explored, with estimates from Truffle Harvesters Federation showing higher consistency. Statistical sources were then compared with proxies for wild harvest (rents from truffle leases in public forests) to corroborate time trends in wild harvesting. Results suggest that black truffle production is recovering in recent years thanks to plantations, whereas wild harvest is still declining. The implications of Spanish legal and institutional framework on sustainability of wild truffle use are reviewed. In the current scenario, the decline of wild harvest is likely to continue and eventually make commercial harvesting economically unattractive, thus aggravating sustainability issues. Strengthening of property rights, rationalization of harvesting pressure, forest planning and involvement of public stakeholders are proposed as corrective measures.

  7. Mycorrhization of pecan (Carya illinoinensis) with black truffles: Tuber melanosporum and Tuber brumale.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Giorgio; Sánchez, Sergio; Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Bonito, Gregory; Falini, Leonardo Baciarelli; Albertini, Emidio; Donnini, Domizia

    2017-04-01

    Pecan, Carya illinoinensis, is an economically important nut producing tree that can establish ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with a high diversity of fungi. In the southern USA, truffles (Tuber spp.) sometimes fruit prolifically in cultivated pecan orchards and regularly associate with pecan roots as ectomycorrhizae (ECMs). It has been demonstrated that some valuable European truffle species (e.g., Tuber borchii and Tuber aestivum) can form ECMs with pecan seedlings in nursery conditions. Thus, pecan may represent an attractive alternative host to forest trees for truffle growers given the potential for co-cropping truffles and pecans. To further explore the capacity of pecan to host truffle symbionts, pecan seedlings were inoculated with species of black truffles that are economically important in Europe, T. melanosporum and T. brumale. Ectomycorrhizae were characterized molecularly and their morphology was described in detail. Mycorrhization rates on pecan roots were assessed over a 2-year period. Tuber melanosporum and T. brumale produced well-formed ECMs with a level of root colonization in the first year of 37.3 and 34.5%, respectively. After 24 months, the level of mycorrhization increased for T. brumale (49.4%) and decreased for T. melanosporum (10.5%) inversely to that of non-target ECM greenhouse contaminants (e.g., Sphaerosporella brunnea, Trichophaea woolhopeia, Pulvinula constellatio). To assess whether mating types segregated in T. melanosporum as been reported for other host species, we amplified the mating-type locus from single T. melanosporum ECM belonging to different seedlings over a 2-year period. The two mating idiomorphs were nearly equally represented along the 2-year time span: MAT 1-1-1 decreased from 59.4% in the first year to 48.5% in the second year after inoculation. Data reported in this study add to knowledge on the mycorrhization of pecan trees with commercial truffles and has application to truffle and nut co-cropping systems.

  8. Effects of forest management on truffle abundance and squirrel diets.

    Treesearch

    A.B. Carey; W. Colgan; J.M. Trappe; R. Molina

    2002-01-01

    Thinning and retention of biological legacies (large live, dead, and fallen trees and their associated biota) during clearcutting are two practices to promote development of late-seral attributes in second-growth forests. We evaluated the effects of these practices on production of truffles and use of truffles as food by northern flying squirrels and Townsend’s...

  9. Lactobacillus plantarum 29 inhibits Penicillium spp. involved in the spoilage of black truffles (Tuber aestivum).

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Elena; Reale, Anna; Tremonte, Patrizio; Maiuro, Lucia; Succi, Mariantonietta; Tipaldi, Luca; Di Renzo, Tiziana; Pannella, Gianfranco; Coppola, Raffaele

    2013-08-01

    The effect of an antifungal culture of Lactobacillus plantarum to be used in the storage at refrigeration temperature of fresh black truffles was examined. The strain was selected among 29 lactobacilli isolated from foods and evaluated for their viability and acidification activity at 4 °C, as well as for their inhibitory activity against 11 Penicillium strains isolated from truffles stored at refrigeration temperature. Lb. plantarum 29 showed the ability to hold not only the growth of Penicillium isolated from truffles, but also that of P. digitatum DSM 2750, a green mold involved in the spoilage of truffles. The antifungal activity was observed in vitro and in situ, and the sensory characteristics of truffles were preserved during the cold storage. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Truffle abundance in riparian and upland mixed-conifer forest of California's southern Sierra Nevada

    Treesearch

    Marc D. Meyer; Malcolm P. North

    2005-01-01

    We compared the abundance, diversity, and composition of truffles in riparian and upland areas within a mixed-conifer forest of the Sierra Nevada of California. We sampled for truffles in a single watershed over two seasons (spring and summer) and 4 years to determine whether truffles were more abundant and diverse in riparian than upland sites in old-growth, mixed-...

  11. Ties that bind: Pacific Northwest truffles, trees, and animals in symbiosis

    Treesearch

    Marie Oliver; Randy Molina; Jane E.  Smith

    2009-01-01

    Soil organisms play essential roles in forest health, and truffle fungi are one of the more fascinating groups of these important organisms. After 40 years of specimen collection and study, scientists with Pacific Northwest Research Station have published a report documenting how truffle fungi affect tree survival and growth, perform valuable functions in nutrient...

  12. The changing ethnoecological cobweb of white truffle (Tuber mangnatum Pico) gatherers in South Piedmont, NW Italy.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Andrea

    2016-04-18

    Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) related to truffles represents an under-investigated area of research in ethnobiology. Nevertheless, truffles, in a few southern European areas, and notably in South Piedmont, represent a crucial component of the local economy and cultural heritage. Thirty-four white truffle (Tuber magnatum Pico) gatherers, locally known as trifulau, aged between 35 and 75 years and living in a few villages and small towns of the Langhe and Roero areas (South Piedmont, NW Italy), were interviewed in-depth during the years 2010-2014 regarding their ecological perceptions, truffle gathering techniques, and the socio-ecological changes that have occurred during the past several decades. A very sophisticated ethnoecological knowledge of the trees, soils, and climatic conditions considered ideal for searching for and finding white truffles was recorded. Moreover, a very intimate connection between gatherers and their dogs plays a fundamental role in the success of the truffle search. However, according to the informants, this complex ethnoecological cobweb among men, truffles, dogs, and the environment has been heavily threatened in the past few decades by major changes: climate change, in which the summer has become a very hot and dry season; social changes, due to a more market-oriented attitude of younger gatherers; and especially environmental and macro-economic dynamics, which followed the remarkable expansion of viticulture in the study area. The TEK of white truffle gatherers indicates the urgent need for fostering sustainable gastronomy-centred initiatives, aimed at increasing the awareness of consumers and food entrepreneurs regarding the co-evolution that has inextricably linked locals, truffles, and their natural environment during the past three centuries.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Volatile Composition in Chinese Truffles via GC × GC/HR-TOF/MS and Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Haitao; Sun, Baoguo; Mao, Xueying; Zhang, Yuyu; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    To compare the volatile compounds of Chinese black truffle and white truffle from Yunnan province, this study presents the application of a direct solvent extraction/solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (DSE-SAFE) coupled with a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) and an electronic nose. Both of the analytical methods could distinguish the aroma profile of the two samples. In terms of the overall profile of truffle samples in this research, more kinds of acids were detected via the method of DSE-SAFE. Besides, compounds identified in black truffle (BT), but not in white truffle (WT), or vice versa, and those detected in both samples at different levels were considered to play an important role in differentiating the two samples. According to the analysis of electronic nose, the two samples could be separated, as well. PMID:27058524

  14. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  15. New records of truffle fungi (Basidiomycetes) from Turkey

    Treesearch

    Aziz Turkoglu; Michael Angelo Castellano

    2013-01-01

    We report the first records of 5 truffle taxa in Turkey: Gymnomyces xanthosporus (Hawker) A.H.Sm., Hymenogaster griseus Vittad., Hymenogaster olivaceous Vittad., Hymenogaster thwaitesii Berk. & Broome, and Hymenogaster vulgaris Tul. & C.Tul. We also report a new...

  16. Book review: Taming the truffle: the history, lore, and science of the ultimate mushroom

    Treesearch

    Jim Trappe

    2008-01-01

    Over the last several decades, dozens of books on truffle cultivation have been published in Italian, French, and Spanish. Much new has been learned about the topic during those decades. Now a definitive book in English has at last appeared, one that brings the science and art of cultivating truffles up to date for the English-speaking audience. As a government...

  17. Turkish truffles I: 18 new records for Turkey

    Treesearch

    Aziz TÜRKOĞLU; Michael Castellano; James Martin TRAPPE; Mehrican YARATANAKUL GÜNGÖR

    2015-01-01

    We report the first records of 18 truffle species in Turkey. Three belong to the Ascomycota: Elaphomyces leucocarpus, E. muricatus, and Genea sphaerica; and 15 to the Basidiomycota: Alpova corsicus, Gautieria otthii, G. retirugosa, G. trabutii, Hymenogaster citrinus, H. hessei, H. luteus, H. lycoperdineus,...

  18. Characterization of Morphology, Volatile Profiles, and Molecular Markers in Edible Desert Truffles from the Negev Desert.

    PubMed

    Kamle, Madhu; Bar, Einat; Lewinsohn, Dalia; Shavit, Elinoar; Roth-Bejerano, Nurit; Kagan-Zur, Varda; Barak, Ze'ev; Guy, Ofer; Zaady, Eli; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Sitrit, Yaron

    2017-03-28

    Desert truffles are mycorrhizal, hypogeous fungi considered a delicacy. On the basis of morphological characters, we identified three desert truffle species that grow in the same habitat in the Negev desert. These include Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.), Tirmania nivea (Desf.) Trappe, and Terfezia boudieri (Chatain), all associated with Helianthemum sessiliflorum. Their taxonomy was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. The main volatiles of fruit bodies of T. boudieri and T. nivea were 1-octen-3-ol and hexanal; however, volatiles of the latter species further included branched-chain amino acid derivatives such as 2-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanal, phenylalanine derivatives such as benzaldehyde and benzenacetaldehyde, and methionine derivatives such as methional and dimethyl disulfide. The least aromatic truffle, P. lefebvrei, contained low levels of 1-octen-3-ol as the main volatile. Axenic mycelia cultures of T. boudieri displayed a simpler volatile profile compared to its fruit bodies. This work highlights differences in the volatile profiles of desert truffles and could hence be of interest for selecting and cultivating genotypes with the most likable aroma.

  19. New records of some Ascomycete truffle fungi from Turkey

    Treesearch

    Aziz TÜRKOÐLU; Michael Angelo CASTELLANO

    2014-01-01

    We report the first records of 6 Ascomycete truffle taxa in Turkey: Genea verrucosa Vittad., Genea klotzschii Berk. & Broome, Stephensia bombycina (Vittad.) Tul. & C.Tul., Terfezia olbiensis Tul. & C.Tul., Tuber excavatum Vittad., and Tuber rufum Pico. We also...

  20. Truffles decontamination treatment by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, M.; Capitani, D.; Mannina, L.; Cristinzio, M.; Ragni, P.; Tata, A.; Coppola, R.

    2004-09-01

    A research project, funded by the Italian Ministry of Research and the European Union, is in progress aimed to develop processes to enhance, by irradiation, the safety and the wholesomeness of fresh products relevant for Italian food industry. Irradiation was performed on truffles, since the bacterial contamination impairs their trade in foreign countries. The microbial population and the shelf life under refrigeration were studied either on samples untreated or on samples submitted to γ-rays in a 1-2.5 kGy dose range. The effect of the treatment was monitored by UV and NMR techniques. Total microbial population and the shelf life prolongation were investigated. The synergistic effect of the dose, the packaging under vacuum and the storage/irradiation temperature resulted in a direct effect on the microbial load, spoilage and shelf life. After the irradiation, small variations in the intensity of some NMR resonances due to aromatic compounds and other unassigned compounds were observed. As confirmed by UV spectrophotometric data, these phenomena seemed to originate from a small degradation of polyphenols; the induced growth of soluble phenols suggested that the 1.5 kGy dose can be considered as the radiation dose threshold beyond which clear chemical modifications on truffles appear.

  1. Mycelial abundance and other factors related to truffle productivity in Tuber melanosporum-Quercus ilex orchards.

    PubMed

    Suz, Laura M; Martín, María P; Oliach, Daniel; Fischer, Christine R; Colinas, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Relative quantification of DNA from Tuber melanosporum mycelia was performed by conventional and real-time PCR in soil from trees in three truffle orchards of different ages to determine: (1) whether burn appearance is related to the amount of T. melanosporum mycelium in soil, and (2) whether productivity onset and truffle production are related to (a) the amount of T. melanosporum mycelium in soil, (b) tree height and diameter, (c) burn extension and (d) surface rock cover. The burn seems to appear only after a certain amount of mycelium has formed. Precociously productive trees presented higher quantities of mycelium than nonproductive trees in the productivity onset study, while highly productive trees presented less quantities of mycelium than nonproductive trees in the productivity study. Trees with high but not excessive surface rock cover showed greater truffle production. Larger trees tended to display a burn earlier than smaller trees.

  2. Characterizing root-associated fungal communities and soils of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stands that naturally produce Oregon white truffles (Tuber oregonense and Tuber gibbosum).

    PubMed

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Lefevre, Charles; Bonito, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Many truffle species in the genus Tuber are endemic to North America. Some of these have commercial value such as Tuber oregonense and Tuber gibbosum, commonly known as Oregon white truffles. Most of what is known about the ecology of these truffles comes from observational data. These truffle species form ectomycorrhizas with Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and sometimes fruit abundantly in early successional forest regrowth. The goal of this study was to characterize fungal communities and soils associated with truffle-producing Douglas-fir sites. We extracted DNA from roots of five trees at four different truffle-producing Douglas-fir sites (n = 20). We amplified the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) and sequenced amplicons with 454 pyrosequencing. After quality filtering, we assembled 15,713 sequences into 150 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Pezizomycetes (Tuber and Pyronemataceae) were the most abundant taxa detected followed by Helotiales. Agaricomycetes represented most by Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae, and Inocybaceae were also abundant. A total of five Tuber species were detected. T. oregonense was the most abundant OTU, followed by T. gibbosum and Wilcoxina mikolae. Fungal root endophytes were also detected and well represented by Chalara and Phialocephala spp. Fungal community structure and soil chemistry differed between sites. This study represents the first characterization of the fungal communities in Douglas-fir stands producing Oregon white truffles. We found that Tuber species can be dominant ectomycorrhizal symbionts of Douglas-fir. Truffle fungi are also important in forest health, food webs, and as a non-timber forest resource that can contribute to rural economies.

  3. New North American truffles (Tuber spp.) and their ectomycorrhizal associations

    Treesearch

    Gonzalo Guevara; Gregory Bonito; James M. Trappe; Efren Cázares; Gwendolyn Williams; Rosanne A. Healy; Christopher Schadt; Rytas. Vigalys

    2013-01-01

    Recent surveys of belowground fungal biodiversity in Mexico and USA have revealed many undescribed truffle species, including many in the genus Tuber. Here we describe seven new species: Tuber beyerlei, T. castilloi, T. guevarai, T. lauryi, T. mexiusanum, T. miquihuanense and T. walkeri. Phylogenetic analyses...

  4. Calongea, a new genus of truffles in the Pezizaceae (Pezizales)

    Treesearch

    Rosanne A. Healy; Gregory Bonito; James M. Trappe

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and LSU rDNA of Pachyphloeus species from Europe and North America revealed a new truffle genus. These molecular analyses plus sequences downloaded from a BLAST search in GenBank indicated that Pachyphloeus prieguensis is within the Pezizaceae but well outside of the genus Pachyphloeus...

  5. Multi-cropping edible truffles and sweet chestnuts: production of high-quality Castanea sativa seedlings inoculated with Tuber aestivum, its ecotype T. uncinatum, T. brumale, and T. macrosporum.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Lafuente, Amaya; Benito-Matías, Luis F; Peñuelas-Rubira, Juan L; Suz, Laura M

    2018-01-01

    The plantation and management of sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) orchards is a common and traditional land use system in many areas of Europe that offers the advantage of simultaneous production of nuts and timber. During the last decades, sweet chestnut has declined dramatically in many regions because of the profound social changes in rural areas coupled with pathogen attacks. Truffles, the hypogeous ascocarps of the ectomycorrhizal genus Tuber, are currently cultivated using host trees inoculated with these fungi for improving production in truffle orchards. The production of good forestry quality chestnut seedlings inoculated with European truffles in nurseries is essential for multi-cropping plantation establishment, but so far, it has not been implemented in agroforestry practices. Moreover, it is necessary to assess the physiological condition of the seedlings due to the high calcium amendment needed for the growth of Tuber spp. mycelium that can become toxic for the host plants. In this study, seedlings of C. sativa were inoculated with Tuber aestivum and its ecotypes T. uncinatum, T. brumale, and T. macrosporum and were grown in a greenhouse using culture conditions favorable for the production of high-quality plants for forestry purposes. At the end of the assay, levels of root colonization and morphological and physiological parameters of the seedlings were measured. The colonization of C. sativa with T. aestivum, its ecotype T. uncinatum, and T. brumale was successful, and the seedlings showed normal growth. Inoculation protocols with T. macrosporum need to be improved. Tuber species formed well-developed ectomycorrhizae on C. sativa in nursery conditions.

  6. A comprehensive resource of genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic sequencing data for the black truffle Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pao-Yang; Montanini, Barbara; Liao, Wen-Wei; Morselli, Marco; Jaroszewicz, Artur; Lopez, David; Ottonello, Simone; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Tuber melanosporum, also known in the gastronomic community as "truffle", features one of the largest fungal genomes (125 Mb) with an exceptionally high transposable element (TE) and repetitive DNA content (>58%). The main purpose of DNA methylation in fungi is TE silencing. As obligate outcrossing organisms, truffles are bound to a sexual mode of propagation, which together with TEs is thought to represent a major force driving the evolution of DNA methylation. Thus, it was of interest to examine if and how T. melanosporum exploits DNA methylation to maintain genome integrity. We performed whole-genome DNA bisulfite sequencing and mRNA sequencing on different developmental stages of T. melanosporum; namely, fruitbody ("truffle"), free-living mycelium and ectomycorrhiza. The data revealed a high rate of cytosine methylation (>44%), selectively targeting TEs rather than genes with a strong preference for CpG sites. Whole genome DNA sequencing uncovered multiple TE-enriched, copy number variant regions bearing a significant fraction of hypomethylated and expressed TEs, almost exclusively in free-living mycelium propagated in vitro. Treatment of mycelia with 5-azacytidine partially reduced DNA methylation and increased TE transcription. Our transcriptome assembly also resulted in the identification of a set of novel transcripts from 614 genes. The datasets presented here provide valuable and comprehensive (epi)genomic information that can be of interest for evolutionary genomics studies of multicellular (filamentous) fungi, in particular Ascomycetes belonging to the subphylum, Pezizomycotina. Evidence derived from comparative methylome and transcriptome analyses indicates that a non-exhaustive and partly reversible methylation process operates in truffles.

  7. Comparative taxonomy of desert truffles of the Australian outback and the African Kalahari

    Treesearch

    James M. Trappe; Gabor M. Kovacs; Andrew W. Claridge

    2010-01-01

    Seven truffle species are reported from the Australian Outback-six Ascomycota (Elderia arenivaga, Mattirolomyces mulpu sp. nov., Mycoclelandia arenacea, M. bulundari, Reddelomyces westraliensis, Ulurua nonparaphysata gen. & sp. nov.) and one Basidiomycota (Horakiella watarrkana sp. nov.) Three...

  8. Truffle abundance and mycophagy by northern flying squirrels in eastern Washington forests.

    Treesearch

    John F. Lehmkuhl; Laura E. Gould; Efren Cazares; David R. Hosford

    2004-01-01

    Although much is known about truffle abundance and rodent mycophagy in mesic Douglas-fir forests in the Pacific Northwest, few data are available for dry interior montane forests dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and grand fir (Abies grandis). Our objective...

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory and antioxidant compounds from the truffle Elaphomyces granulatus

    Treesearch

    Rita Stanikunaite; Shabana I. Khan; James M. Trappe; Samir A. Ross

    2009-01-01

    The ethanol extract of fruiting bodies of Elaphomyces granulatus, a truffle-like fungus, was evaluated for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Inhibition of COX-2 activity was evaluated in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). The extract of E. granulatus caused a 68% inhibition of COX-2 activity at...

  10. Seasonal dynamics of extraradical mycelium and mycorrhizas in a black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) plantation.

    PubMed

    Queralt, Mikel; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan; DE Miguel, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal dynamics of black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) extraradical mycelium as well as the associated mycorrhizal community have been evaluated in a 16-year-old plantation with productive and non-productive trees. Mycelium biomass was seasonally quantified by real-time PCR over two consecutive years and the correlation with environmental variables explored. Extraradical mycelium biomass varied seasonally and between the two consecutive years, being correlated with the precipitation that occurred 1 month before sampling. In addition, productive trees had more mycelium in the brûlé area than non-productive trees did. The ectomycorrhizal community composition inside the burnt areas was seasonally evaluated during a year. Ten mycorrhizal morphotypes were detected; T. melanosporum was the most abundant in productive and non-productive trees. Black truffle mycorrhizas were more abundant (mycorrhizal tips per unit of soil volume) in productive trees, and no seasonal variation was observed. The occurrence of black truffle mycorrhizas was significantly and positively correlated with the biomass of extraradical mycelium. The mycorrhizal community within the brûlé areas was significantly different between productive and non-productive trees, and no variation was detected between seasons. The assessment of the fungal vegetative structures in a mature plantation is of paramount importance to develop trufficulture methods based on the knowledge of the biological cycle of the fungus and its relationships with the associated ectomycorrhizal communities.

  11. Shelf-life extension of fresh Tuber aestivum and Tuber melanosporum truffles by modified atmosphere packaging with microperforated films.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carmen Susana; Blanco, Domingo; Salvador, María Luisa; Venturini, María Eugenia

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to design a modified atmosphere packaging suitable for Tuber melanosporum and Tuber aestivum truffles that extend their shelf life and their availability as a fresh product. Their respiration rates were determined by O(2) depletion and CO(2) formation in closed systems performed at different temperatures: 4, 10, and 23 degrees C. The results were fitted by exponential equations and derivatives of these equations were used to obtain the experimental respiration rates. Our results revealed high respiration rates in both species of truffles and respiratory quotients (RQ) higher than 1 in all the cases studied. A linear dependence of respiration rate, both R(O2) and R(CO2), on O(2) concentration was revealed. A mathematical model was used to predict the evolution of the gaseous composition at 4 degrees C in the interior of polypropylene trays (250 mL) heat sealed with 4 microperforated films of different transmission rates. A microperforated film with 2 holes (90 x 50 microm) was selected to produce an internal atmosphere of 15%CO(2)/7%O(2) at 4 degrees C. The predicted atmosphere composition was confirmed by the experimental results. The quality and microbiological characteristics of fresh truffles, packaged in these conditions, revealed that the microbial counts of pseudomonads and Enterobacteriaceae were decreased, the weight loss was reduced, the typical hard texture was maintained, and the development of mycelium growth was delayed, enabling good scores for aroma and flavor, and therefore prolonging the shelf life of T. melanosporum and T. aestivum truffles to 28 and 21 d, respectively. Practical Application: This study describes the benefits of using MAP with microperforated films in the postharvest storage of Tuber melanosporum and Tuber aestivum fresh truffles. The shelf life of T. aestivum is prolonged to 21 d and of T. melanosporum to beyond 28 d increasing the possibilities for a foreign market.

  12. Using common mycorrhizal networks for controlled inoculation of Quercus spp. with Tuber melanosporum: the nurse plant method.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Guillermo; Palfner, Götz; Chávez, Daniel; Suz, Laura M; Machuca, Angela; Honrubia, Mario

    2013-07-01

    The high cost and restricted availability of black truffle spore inoculum for controlled mycorrhiza formation of host trees produced for truffle orchards worldwide encourage the search for more efficient and sustainable inoculation methods that can be applied globally. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the nurse plant method for the controlled inoculation of Quercus cerris and Quercus robur with Tuber melanosporum by mycorrhizal networks in pot cultures. Pine bark compost, adjusted to pH 7.8 by liming, was used as substrate for all assays. Initially, Q. robur seedlings were inoculated with truffle spores and cultured for 12 months. After this period, the plants presenting 74 % mycorrhizal fine roots were transferred to larger containers. Nurse plants were used for two treatments of two different nursling species: five sterilized acorns or five 45-day-old, axenically grown Q. robur or Q. cerris seedlings, planted in containers around the nurse plant. After 6 months, colonized nursling plant root tips showed that mycorrhiza formation by T. melanosporum was higher than 45 % in the seedlings tested, with the most successful nursling combination being Q. cerris seedlings, reaching 81 % colonization. Bulk identification of T. melanosporum mycorrhizae was based on morphological and anatomical features and confirmed by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA of selected root tips. Our results show that the nurse plant method yields attractive rates of mycorrhiza formation by the Périgord black truffle and suggest that establishing and maintaining common mycorrhizal networks in pot cultures enables sustained use of the initial spore inoculum.

  13. Northern flying squirrel mycophagy and truffle production in fir forests in northeastern California

    Treesearch

    J.R. Waters; K.S. McKelvey; C.J. Zabel; D.L. Luoma

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the results of four studies in which we either examined the feeding habits of the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), a mycophagous (consuming fungi) small mammal, or compared the abundance of truffles (sporocarps of hypogeous mycorrhizal fungi) among different types of fir (Abies) forest....

  14. The aquaporin TcAQP1 of the desert truffle Terfezia claveryi is a membrane pore for water and CO(2) transport.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Ródenas, Alfonso; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Morte, Asunción

    2012-02-01

    Terfezia claveryi is a hypogeous mycorrhizal fungus belonging to the so-called "desert truffles," with a good record as an edible fungus and of considerable economic importance. T. claveryi improves the tolerance to water stress of the host plant Helianthemum almeriense, for which, in field conditions, symbiosis with T. claveryi is valuable for its survival. We have characterized cDNAs from T. claveryi and identified a sequence related to the aquaporin gene family. The full-length sequence was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and was named TcAQP1. This aquaporin gene encoded a functional water-channel protein, as demonstrated by heterologous expression assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mycorrhizal fungal aquaporin increased both water and CO(2) conductivity in the heterologous expression system. The expression patterns of the TcAQP1 gene in mycelium, under different water potentials, and in mycorrhizal plants are discussed. The high levels of water conductivity of TcAQP1 could be related to the adaptation of this mycorrhizal fungus to semiarid areas. The CO(2) permeability of TcAQP1 could be involved in the regulation of T. claveryi growth during presymbiotic phases, making it a good candidate to be considered a novel molecular signaling channel in mycorrhizal fungi.

  15. Observations of northern flying squirrel feeding behavior: use of non-truffle food items.

    Treesearch

    D.R. Thysell; L.J. Villa; A.B. Carey

    1997-01-01

    In the Pacific Northwest, the northern flying squirrel, Glaucomys sabrinus, sumes sporocarps of a wide variety of hypogeous mycorrhizal fungi(truffles). Numerous other foods are also consumed but are not well characterized by fecal pellet analysis either because they are more fully digested (seeds, nuts, fruits, vegetation) or because of the...

  16. The enigmatic truffle Fevansia aurantiaca is an ectomycorrhizal member of the Albatrellus lineage

    Treesearch

    Matthew E. Smith; Karlee J. Schell; Michael Castellano; Matthew J. Trappe; James M. Trappe

    2013-01-01

    Fevansia aurantiaca is an orange-colored truffle that has been collected infrequently in the Pacific Northwest of the USA. This sequestrate, hypogeous fungus was originally thought to be related to the genera Rhizopogon or Alpova in the Boletales, but the large, inflated cells in the trama and the very pale...

  17. Genetic diversity and mating type distribution of Tuber melanosporum and their significance to truffle cultivation in artificially planted truffieres in Australia.

    PubMed

    Linde, C C; Selmes, H

    2012-09-01

    Tuber melanosporum is a truffle native to Europe and is cultivated in countries such as Australia for the gastronomic market, where production yields are often lower than expected. We assessed the genetic diversity of T. melanosporum with six microsatellite loci to assess the effect of genetic drift on truffle yield in Australia. Genetic diversity as assessed on 210 ascocarps revealed a higher allelic diversity compared to previous studies from Europe, suggesting a possible genetic expansion and/or multiple and diverse source populations for inoculum. The results also suggest that the single sequence repeat diversity of locus ME2 is adaptive and that, for example, the probability of replication errors is increased for this locus. Loss of genetic diversity in Australian populations is therefore not a likely factor in limiting ascocarp production. A survey of nursery seedlings and trees inoculated with T. melanosporum revealed that <70% of seedlings and host trees were colonized with T. melanosporum and that some trees had been contaminated by Tuber brumale, presumably during the inoculation process. Mating type (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1) analyses on seedling and four- to ten-year-old host trees found that 100% of seedlings but only approximately half of host trees had both mating types present. Furthermore, MAT1-1-1 was detected significantly more commonly than MAT1-2-1 in established trees, suggesting a competitive advantage for MAT1-1-1 strains. This study clearly shows that there are more factors involved in ascocarp production than just the presence of both mating types on host trees.

  18. Tuber aztecorum sp. nov., a truffle species from Mexico belonging to the Maculatum clade (Tuberaceae, Pezizales)

    Treesearch

    Gonzalo Guevara-Guerrero; Gregory Bonito; Matthew E. Smith; Roseanne Healy; Arthur Grupe; Efren Cazares; Michael A. Castellano; James M. Trappe

    2018-01-01

    A new species of truffle, T. aztecorum, is described from central Mexico. Tuber aztecorum can be distinguished from other related Tuber species synoptically by a combination of morphological features including ascospore size, pellis cells with irregular thickness, cystidia, ascoma colour and associated host...

  19. Truffle abundance in recently prescribed burned and unburned forests in Yosemite National Park: Implications for mycophagous mammals

    Treesearch

    M. Meyer; M. North; S. Roberts

    2008-01-01

    Truffles are an important food resource for wildlife in North American forests, but decades of fire exclusion have altered the availability of this resource. In Yosemite National Park, resource management policies seek to restore essential forest processes such as fire while minimizing adverse...

  20. Genetic Diversity and Mating Type Distribution of Tuber melanosporum and Their Significance to Truffle Cultivation in Artificially Planted Truffiéres in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Selmes, H.

    2012-01-01

    Tuber melanosporum is a truffle native to Europe and is cultivated in countries such as Australia for the gastronomic market, where production yields are often lower than expected. We assessed the genetic diversity of T. melanosporum with six microsatellite loci to assess the effect of genetic drift on truffle yield in Australia. Genetic diversity as assessed on 210 ascocarps revealed a higher allelic diversity compared to previous studies from Europe, suggesting a possible genetic expansion and/or multiple and diverse source populations for inoculum. The results also suggest that the single sequence repeat diversity of locus ME2 is adaptive and that, for example, the probability of replication errors is increased for this locus. Loss of genetic diversity in Australian populations is therefore not a likely factor in limiting ascocarp production. A survey of nursery seedlings and trees inoculated with T. melanosporum revealed that <70% of seedlings and host trees were colonized with T. melanosporum and that some trees had been contaminated by Tuber brumale, presumably during the inoculation process. Mating type (MAT1-1-1 and MAT1-2-1) analyses on seedling and four- to ten-year-old host trees found that 100% of seedlings but only approximately half of host trees had both mating types present. Furthermore, MAT1-1-1 was detected significantly more commonly than MAT1-2-1 in established trees, suggesting a competitive advantage for MAT1-1-1 strains. This study clearly shows that there are more factors involved in ascocarp production than just the presence of both mating types on host trees. PMID:22773652

  1. Squirrels cannot live by truffles alone: a closer look at a northwest keystone complex.

    Treesearch

    Sally Duncan

    2004-01-01

    Tree squirrels in the Pacific Northwest are part of a keystone complex that includes ectomycorrhizal fungi, Douglas-fir, and spotted owls. All three squirrel species—the northern flying squirrel, the Douglas' squirrel, and the Townsend’s squirrel—consume truffles produced by fungal partners of important tree species. The squirrels then spread the spores of these...

  2. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  3. Magic truffles or Philosopher's stones: a legal way to sell psilocybin?

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Manuela; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Marchei, Emilia; Pacifici, Roberta; Saggio, Francesco; Pichini, Simona

    2013-03-01

    "Magic mushrooms" is the most common name given to hallucinogenic fungi containing the psychoactive alkaloids psilocybin and psilocin. In recent years, fungis' sclerotia, commonly called "magic truffles" have become a form of supply of psychoactive Psilocybe alkaloids since Psilocybe sclerotia are not specifically included in the laws banning the sale, the purchase and the use of such substances and mushrooms containing them. A liquid chromatography -tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the rapid determination of psilocybin and psilocin in Psilocybe sclerotia. Following a simple step extraction with methanol, the alkaloids were separated on a reversed-phase column using a gradient of 0.1% formic acid - acetonitrile s a mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min.. Separated analytes were detected by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in the positive ion mode using multiple reaction monitoring. The developed method was linear over the calibration range for all two substances under investigation, with a r(2)  > 0.99. The detection and quantification limits were 0.3 µg and 1 µg per 100 mg truffles, for both psilocin and psilocybin and the intra- and inter-day coefficients of variation were always better than 15%. Using this method, the presence of only psilocybin was demonstrated in examined Psilocybe sclerotia. The content of psilocybin was found to vary over a concentration range of 59.3 to 167.8 µg per 100 mg of fresh sclerotia. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Mycelium growth stimulation of the desert truffle Terfezia claveryi chatin by β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    López-Nicolás, José Manuel; Pérez-Gilabert, Manuela; García-Carmona, Francisco; Lozano-Carrillo, María Cecilia; Morte, Asunción

    2013-01-01

    The commercial value of Terfezia claveryi, an edible desert truffle with important gastronomic, nutritional, and antioxidant properties, has led to growing interest in its cultivation. The erratic and slow growth of T. claveryi mycelium in vitro represents an impairment to obtain mycorrhizal plants, and it makes necessary to find a new culture medium able to overcome these drawbacks. In this work, we analyze the effect of cyclodextrins (CDs) on the growth of T. claveryi mycelium. Different parameters, including colony diameter, growth rate, and colony fresh weight, were evaluated, both in the presence and absence of these encapsulant agents. The results obtained confirm the ability of CDs to stimulate the growth of T. claveryi mycelium when present in the culture medium. A similar effect was observed when CDs were added to the culture medium of Tuber melanosporum. Three natural (α-, β-, and γ) and two modified (hydroxypropil-β and methyl-β) CDs were assayed. The best results were obtained with β-cyclodextrin, but no improvement was observed with its chemically modified derivatives. CDs complex the different compounds present in the culture medium which impair mycelial growth. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Potential aromatic compounds as markers to differentiate between Tuber melanosporum and Tuber indicum truffles.

    PubMed

    Culleré, Laura; Ferreira, Vicente; Venturini, María E; Marco, Pedro; Blanco, Domingo

    2013-11-01

    The Tuber indicum (Chinese truffle) and Tuber melanosporum (Black truffle) species are morphologically very similar but their aromas are very different. The black truffle aroma is much more intense and complex, and it is consequently appreciated more gastronomically. This work tries to determine whether the differences between the aromatic compounds of both species are sufficiently significant so as to apply them to fraud detection. An olfactometric evaluation (GC-O) of T. indicum was carried out for the first time. Eight important odorants were identified. In order of aromatic significance, these were: 1-octen-3-one and 1-octen-3-ol, followed by two ethyl esters (ethyl isobutyrate and ethyl 2-methylbutyrate), 3-methyl-1-butanol, isopropyl acetate, and finally the two sulfides dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) and dimethylsulfide (DMS). A comparison of this aromatic profile with that of T. melanosporum revealed the following differences: T. indicum stood out for the significant aromatic contribution of 1-octen-3-one and 1-octen-3-ol (with modified frequencies (MF%) of 82% and 69%, respectively), while in the case of T. melanosporum both had modified frequencies of less than 30%. Ethyl isobutyrate, ethyl 2-methylbutyrate and isopropyl acetate were also significantly higher, while DMS and DMDS had low MF (30-40%) compared to T. melanosporum (>70%). The volatile profiles of both species were also studied by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS). This showed that the family of C8 compounds (3-octanone, octanal, 1-octen-3-one, 3-octanol and 1-octen-3-ol) is present in T. indicum at much higher levels. The presence of 1-octen-3-ol was higher by a factor of about 100, while 1-octen-3-one was detected in T. indicum only (there was no chromatographic signal in T. melanosporum). As well as showing the greatest chromatographic differences, these two compounds were also the most powerful from the aromatic viewpoint in the T. indicum olfactometry. Therefore

  6. A dehydration-inducible gene in the truffle Tuber borchii identifies a novel group of dehydrins

    PubMed Central

    Abba', Simona; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola

    2006-01-01

    Background The expressed sequence tag M6G10 was originally isolated from a screening for differentially expressed transcripts during the reproductive stage of the white truffle Tuber borchii. mRNA levels for M6G10 increased dramatically during fruiting body maturation compared to the vegetative mycelial stage. Results Bioinformatics tools, phylogenetic analysis and expression studies were used to support the hypothesis that this sequence, named TbDHN1, is the first dehydrin (DHN)-like coding gene isolated in fungi. Homologs of this gene, all defined as "coding for hypothetical proteins" in public databases, were exclusively found in ascomycetous fungi and in plants. Although complete (or almost complete) fungal genomes and EST collections of some Basidiomycota and Glomeromycota are already available, DHN-like proteins appear to be represented only in Ascomycota. A new and previously uncharacterized conserved signature pattern was identified and proposed to Uniprot database as the main distinguishing feature of this new group of DHNs. Expression studies provide experimental evidence of a transcript induction of TbDHN1 during cellular dehydration. Conclusion Expression pattern and sequence similarities to known plant DHNs indicate that TbDHN1 is the first characterized DHN-like protein in fungi. The high similarity of TbDHN1 with homolog coding sequences implies the existence of a novel fungal/plant group of LEA Class II proteins characterized by a previously undescribed signature pattern. PMID:16512918

  7. Phylogenetic studies of Terfezia pfeilii and Choiromyces echinulatus (Pezizales) support new genera for southern African truffles: Kalaharituber and Eremiomyces.

    Treesearch

    Yael Ferdman; Sharon Aviram; Nurit Roth-Bejerano; James M. Trappe; Varda. Kagan-Zur

    2005-01-01

    The ITS region including the 5.8S rRNA gene as well as the 5' end of the 28S rRNA gene of hypogeous Pezizaceae and Tuberaceae were studied to clarify the generic placement of two southern African desert truffles, Terfezia pfeilii and Choiromyces echinulatus. The results show that...

  8. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genomemore » is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.« less

  9. [Plant hormones, plant growth regulators].

    PubMed

    Végvári, György; Vidéki, Edina

    2014-06-29

    Plants seem to be rather defenceless, they are unable to do motion, have no nervous system or immune system unlike animals. Besides this, plants do have hormones, though these substances are produced not in glands. In view of their complexity they lagged behind animals, however, plant organisms show large scale integration in their structure and function. In higher plants, such as in animals, the intercellular communication is fulfilled through chemical messengers. These specific compounds in plants are called phytohormones, or in a wide sense, bioregulators. Even a small quantity of these endogenous organic compounds are able to regulate the operation, growth and development of higher plants, and keep the connection between cells, tissues and synergy between organs. Since they do not have nervous and immume systems, phytohormones play essential role in plants' life.

  10. Short-term effects of fire and forest thinning on truffle abundance and consumption by Neotamias speciosus in the Sierra Nevada of California

    Treesearch

    Marc D. Meyer; Malcolm P. North; Douglas A. Kelt

    2005-01-01

    In many western North American forests, prescribed burning and mechanical thinning are widely used to reduce fuels and restore stand conditions after a century of fire suppression. Few studies have followed the relative impacts of these treatments on the production and consumption of truffles in forest ecosystems, particularly in the Sierra Nevada of California. Using...

  11. A comprehensive resource of genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic sequencing data for the black truffle Tuber melanosporum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuber melanosporum, also known in the gastronomic community as “truffle”, features one of the largest fungal genomes (125 Mb) with an exceptionally high transposable element (TE) and repetitive DNA content (>58%). The main purpose of DNA methylation in fungi is TE silencing. As obligate outcrossing organisms, truffles are bound to a sexual mode of propagation, which together with TEs is thought to represent a major force driving the evolution of DNA methylation. Thus, it was of interest to examine if and how T. melanosporum exploits DNA methylation to maintain genome integrity. Findings We performed whole-genome DNA bisulfite sequencing and mRNA sequencing on different developmental stages of T. melanosporum; namely, fruitbody (“truffle”), free-living mycelium and ectomycorrhiza. The data revealed a high rate of cytosine methylation (>44%), selectively targeting TEs rather than genes with a strong preference for CpG sites. Whole genome DNA sequencing uncovered multiple TE-enriched, copy number variant regions bearing a significant fraction of hypomethylated and expressed TEs, almost exclusively in free-living mycelium propagated in vitro. Treatment of mycelia with 5-azacytidine partially reduced DNA methylation and increased TE transcription. Our transcriptome assembly also resulted in the identification of a set of novel transcripts from 614 genes. Conclusions The datasets presented here provide valuable and comprehensive (epi)genomic information that can be of interest for evolutionary genomics studies of multicellular (filamentous) fungi, in particular Ascomycetes belonging to the subphylum, Pezizomycotina. Evidence derived from comparative methylome and transcriptome analyses indicates that a non-exhaustive and partly reversible methylation process operates in truffles. PMID:25392735

  12. Effects of electron-beam and gamma irradiation treatments on the microbial populations, respiratory activity and sensory characteristics of Tuber melanosporum truffles packaged under modified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carmen Susana; Venturini, María Eugenia; Marco, Pedro; Oria, Rosa; Blanco, Domingo

    2011-10-01

    The effects of electron-beam or gamma irradiation (doses of 1.5 kGy and 2.5 kGy of either one) on the microbial populations, respiratory activity and sensory characteristics of Tuber melanosporum packaged under modified atmospheres were monitored immediately after treatment, and subsequently every seven days during 35 days of storage at 4 °C. Treatments with 1.5 and 2.5 kGy reduced the total mesophilic aerobes counts respectively by 4.3 and 5.6 log cfu/g for electron-beam treatment, and by 6.4 and 6.6 log cfu/g for gamma irradiation. Other microbial groups studied (Pseudomonas genus, Enterobacteriaceae family, lactic acid bacteria, mesophilic aerobic spores, molds and yeasts) were not detected after the treatments. A decrease in the respiratory activity was detected in all the irradiated batches, indicating that the carbon dioxide levels were lower and the oxygen levels higher than those of the non-irradiated ones. Two species of yeasts, Candida sake and Candida membranifaciens var. santamariae, survived the irradiation treatments and became the dominant microbial populations with counts of up to 7.0 log cfu/g. The growth of these microorganisms was visible on the surface of irradiated truffles from day 21 onwards, affecting the flavor and the general acceptability of the ascocarps. Moreover, a watery exudate was detected in the treated truffles from the third week onwards, so the application of irradiation treatments in doses equal to or above 1.5 kGy did not preserve the quality characteristics of T. melanosporum truffles beyond 28 days. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pikaard, Craig S.; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2014-01-01

    The study of epigenetics in plants has a long and rich history, from initial descriptions of non-Mendelian gene behaviors to seminal discoveries of chromatin-modifying proteins and RNAs that mediate gene silencing in most eukaryotes, including humans. Genetic screens in the model plant Arabidopsis have been particularly rewarding, identifying more than 130 epigenetic regulators thus far. The diversity of epigenetic pathways in plants is remarkable, presumably contributing to the phenotypic plasticity of plant postembryonic development and the ability to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. PMID:25452385

  14. Mushrooms and Truffles: Historical Biofactories for Complementary Medicine in Africa and in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    El Enshasy, Hesham; Elsayed, Elsayed A.; Aziz, Ramlan; Wadaan, Mohamad A.

    2013-01-01

    The ethnopharmaceutical approach is important for the discovery and development of natural product research and requires a deep understanding not only of biometabolites discovery and profiling but also of cultural and social science. For millennia, epigeous macrofungi (mushrooms) and hypogeous macrofungi (truffles) were considered as precious food in many cultures based on their high nutritional value and characterized pleasant aroma. In African and Middle Eastern cultures, macrofungi have long history as high nutritional food and were widely applied in folk medicine. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available information related to the nutritional and medicinal value of African and Middle Eastern macrofungi and to highlight their application in complementary folk medicine in this part of the world. PMID:24348710

  15. Regulating plant physiology with organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Poxson, David J; Karady, Michal; Gabrielsson, Roger; Alkattan, Aziz Y; Gustavsson, Anna; Doyle, Siamsa M; Robert, Stéphanie; Ljung, Karin; Grebe, Markus; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus

    2017-05-02

    The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) provides flow-free and accurate delivery of small signaling compounds at high spatiotemporal resolution. To date, the application of OEIPs has been limited to delivery of nonaromatic molecules to mammalian systems, particularly for neuroscience applications. However, many long-standing questions in plant biology remain unanswered due to a lack of technology that precisely delivers plant hormones, based on cyclic alkanes or aromatic structures, to regulate plant physiology. Here, we report the employment of OEIPs for the delivery of the plant hormone auxin to induce differential concentration gradients and modulate plant physiology. We fabricated OEIP devices based on a synthesized dendritic polyelectrolyte that enables electrophoretic transport of aromatic substances. Delivery of auxin to transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vivo was monitored in real time via dynamic fluorescent auxin-response reporters and induced physiological responses in roots. Our results provide a starting point for technologies enabling direct, rapid, and dynamic electronic interaction with the biochemical regulation systems of plants.

  16. Regulating plant physiology with organic electronics

    PubMed Central

    Poxson, David J.; Karady, Michal; Alkattan, Aziz Y.; Gustavsson, Anna; Robert, Stéphanie; Grebe, Markus; Berggren, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) provides flow-free and accurate delivery of small signaling compounds at high spatiotemporal resolution. To date, the application of OEIPs has been limited to delivery of nonaromatic molecules to mammalian systems, particularly for neuroscience applications. However, many long-standing questions in plant biology remain unanswered due to a lack of technology that precisely delivers plant hormones, based on cyclic alkanes or aromatic structures, to regulate plant physiology. Here, we report the employment of OEIPs for the delivery of the plant hormone auxin to induce differential concentration gradients and modulate plant physiology. We fabricated OEIP devices based on a synthesized dendritic polyelectrolyte that enables electrophoretic transport of aromatic substances. Delivery of auxin to transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in vivo was monitored in real time via dynamic fluorescent auxin-response reporters and induced physiological responses in roots. Our results provide a starting point for technologies enabling direct, rapid, and dynamic electronic interaction with the biochemical regulation systems of plants. PMID:28420793

  17. Plasmodesmal regulation during plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheval, Cecilia; Faulkner, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Contents Summary 62 I. Introduction 62 II. Plasmodesmal regulation is an innate defence response 63 III. Reactive oxygen species regulate plasmodesmal function 63 IV. Plasmodesmal regulation by and of defence-associated small molecules 64 V. Plasmodesmata facilitate systemic defence signalling 64 VI. Virulent pathogens exploit plasmodesmata 66 VII. Outlook 66 Acknowledgements 66 References 66 SUMMARY: Plasmodesmata (PD) are plasma membrane-lined pores that connect neighbouring plant cells, bridging the cell wall and establishing cytoplasmic and membrane continuity between cells. PD are dynamic structures regulated by callose deposition in a variety of stress and developmental contexts. This process crudely controls the aperture of the pore and thus the flux of molecules between cells. During pathogen infection, plant cells initiate a range of immune responses and it was recently identified that, following perception of fungal and bacterial pathogens, plant cells initially close their PD. Systemic defence responses depend on the spread of signals between cells, raising questions about whether PD are in different functional states during different immune responses. It is well established that viral pathogens exploit PD to spread between cells, but it has more recently been identified that protein effectors secreted by fungal pathogens can spread between host cells via PD. It is possible that many classes of pathogens specifically target PD to aid infection, which would infer antagonistic regulation of PD by host and pathogen. How PD regulation benefits both host immune responses and pathogen infection is an important question and demands that we examine the multicellular nature of plant-pathogen interactions. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  19. Minimising toxicity of cadmium in plants--role of plant growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Asgher, Mohd; Khan, M Iqbal R; Anjum, Naser A; Khan, Nafees A

    2015-03-01

    A range of man-made activities promote the enrichment of world-wide agricultural soils with a myriad of chemical pollutants including cadmium (Cd). Owing to its significant toxic consequences in plants, Cd has been one of extensively studied metals. However, sustainable strategies for minimising Cd impacts in plants have been little explored. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are known for their role in the regulation of numerous developmental processes. Among major PGRs, plant hormones (such as auxins, gibberellins, cytokinins, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid), nitric oxide (a gaseous signalling molecule), brassinosteroids (steroidal phytohormones) and polyamines (group of phytohormone-like aliphatic amine natural compounds with aliphatic nitrogen structure) have gained attention by agronomist and physiologist as a sustainable media to induce tolerance in abiotic-stressed plants. Considering recent literature, this paper: (a) overviews Cd status in soil and its toxicity in plants, (b) introduces major PGRs and overviews their signalling in Cd-exposed plants, (c) appraises mechanisms potentially involved in PGR-mediated enhanced plant tolerance to Cd and (d) highlights key aspects so far unexplored in the subject area.

  20. Aquaporins: highly regulated channels controlling plant water relations.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, François; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2014-04-01

    Plant growth and development are dependent on tight regulation of water movement. Water diffusion across cell membranes is facilitated by aquaporins that provide plants with the means to rapidly and reversibly modify water permeability. This is done by changing aquaporin density and activity in the membrane, including posttranslational modifications and protein interaction that act on their trafficking and gating. At the whole organ level aquaporins modify water conductance and gradients at key "gatekeeper" cell layers that impact on whole plant water flow and plant water potential. In this way they may act in concert with stomatal regulation to determine the degree of isohydry/anisohydry. Molecular, physiological, and biophysical approaches have demonstrated that variations in root and leaf hydraulic conductivity can be accounted for by aquaporins but this must be integrated with anatomical considerations. This Update integrates these data and emphasizes the central role played by aquaporins in regulating plant water relations.

  1. Plant dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase optimizes light-regulated growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chen; Pu, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Ying; Jang, Geng-Jen; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2017-09-01

    Light controls vegetative and reproductive development of plants. For a plant, sensing the light input properly ensures coordination with the ever-changing environment. Previously, we found that LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) and LWD2 regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. Here, we identified Arabidopsis YET ANOTHER KINASE1 (AtYAK1), an evolutionarily conserved protein and a member of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs), as an interacting protein of LWDs. Our study revealed that AtYAK1 is an important regulator for various light responses, including the circadian clock, photomorphogenesis and reproductive development. AtYAK1 could antagonize the function of LWDs in regulating the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. By examining phenotypes of atyak1, we found that AtYAK1 regulated light-induced period-length shortening and photomorphogenic development. Moreover, AtYAK1 mediated plant fertility especially under inferior light conditions including low light and short-day length. This study discloses a new regulator connecting environmental light to plant growth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Alternative Splicing in Plant Genes: A Means of Regulating the Environmental Fitness of Plants.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xudong; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2017-02-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription in eukaryotes produces pre-mRNA molecules, which are processed and spliced post-transcriptionally to create translatable mRNAs. More than one mRNA may be produced from a single pre-mRNA by alternative splicing (AS); thus, AS serves to diversify an organism's transcriptome and proteome. Previous studies of gene expression in plants have focused on the role of transcriptional regulation in response to environmental changes. However, recent data suggest that post-transcriptional regulation, especially AS, is necessary for plants to adapt to a changing environment. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of AS during plant development in response to environmental changes. We suggest that alternative gene splicing is a novel means of regulating the environmental fitness of plants.

  3. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  4. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  5. 78 FR 41866 - Restructuring of Regulations on the Importation of Plants for Planting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Parts 319 and 340 [Docket No. APHIS-2008-0011] RIN 0579-AD75 Restructuring of Regulations on the Importation of Plants for Planting AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule; reopening of...

  6. 7 CFR 330.200 - Movement of plant pests regulated; permits required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of plant pests regulated; permits required... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Movement of Plant Pests § 330.200 Movement of...

  7. Phytochrome regulation of plant immunity in vegetation canopies.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier E; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2014-07-01

    Plant immunity against pathogens and herbivores is a central determinant of plant fitness in nature and crop yield in agroecosystems. Plant immune responses are orchestrated by two key hormones: jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). Recent work has demonstrated that for plants of shade-intolerant species, which include the majority of those grown as grain crops, light is a major modulator of defense responses. Light signals that indicate proximity of competitors, such as a low red to far-red (R:FR) ratio, down-regulate the expression of JA- and SA-induced immune responses against pests and pathogens. This down-regulation of defense under low R:FR ratios, which is caused by the photoconversion of the photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) to an inactive state, is likely to help the plant to efficiently redirect resources to rapid growth when the competition threat posed by neighboring plants is high. This review is focused on the molecular mechanisms that link phyB with defense signaling. In particular, we discuss novel signaling players that are likely to play a role in the repression of defense responses under low R:FR ratios. A better understanding of the molecular connections between photoreceptors and the hormonal regulation of plant immunity will provide a functional framework to understand the mechanisms used by plants to deal with fundamental resource allocation trade-offs under dynamic conditions of biotic stress.

  8. Chemical regulators of plant hormones and their applications in basic research and agriculture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Asami, Tadao

    2018-04-20

    Plant hormones are small molecules that play versatile roles in regulating plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. Classic methodologies, including genetics, analytic chemistry, biochemistry, and molecular biology, have contributed to the progress in plant hormone studies. In addition, chemical regulators of plant hormone functions have been important in such studies. Today, synthetic chemicals, including plant growth regulators, are used to study and manipulate biological systems, collectively referred to as chemical biology. Here, we summarize the available chemical regulators and their contributions to plant hormone studies. We also pose questions that remain to be addressed in plant hormone studies and that might be solved with the help of chemical regulators.

  9. Aquaporins: Highly Regulated Channels Controlling Plant Water Relations1

    PubMed Central

    Chaumont, François; Tyerman, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and development are dependent on tight regulation of water movement. Water diffusion across cell membranes is facilitated by aquaporins that provide plants with the means to rapidly and reversibly modify water permeability. This is done by changing aquaporin density and activity in the membrane, including posttranslational modifications and protein interaction that act on their trafficking and gating. At the whole organ level aquaporins modify water conductance and gradients at key “gatekeeper” cell layers that impact on whole plant water flow and plant water potential. In this way they may act in concert with stomatal regulation to determine the degree of isohydry/anisohydry. Molecular, physiological, and biophysical approaches have demonstrated that variations in root and leaf hydraulic conductivity can be accounted for by aquaporins but this must be integrated with anatomical considerations. This Update integrates these data and emphasizes the central role played by aquaporins in regulating plant water relations. PMID:24449709

  10. The N-end rule pathway regulates pathogen responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    de Marchi, Rémi; Sorel, Maud; Mooney, Brian; Fudal, Isabelle; Goslin, Kevin; Kwaśniewska, Kamila; Ryan, Patrick T.; Pfalz, Marina; Kroymann, Juergen; Pollmann, Stephan; Feechan, Angela; Wellmer, Frank; Rivas, Susana; Graciet, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    To efficiently counteract pathogens, plants rely on a complex set of immune responses that are tightly regulated to allow the timely activation, appropriate duration and adequate amplitude of defense programs. The coordination of the plant immune response is known to require the activity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which controls the stability of proteins in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that the N-end rule pathway, a subset of the ubiquitin/proteasome system, regulates the defense against a wide range of bacterial and fungal pathogens in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that this pathway positively regulates the biosynthesis of plant-defense metabolites such as glucosinolates, as well as the biosynthesis and response to the phytohormone jasmonic acid, which plays a key role in plant immunity. Our results also suggest that the arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway regulates the timing and amplitude of the defense program against the model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae AvrRpm1. PMID:27173012

  11. Biosafety, risk assessment and regulation of plant-made pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Penelope A C; Twyman, Richard M

    2009-01-01

    The technology for plant-made pharmaceuticals (PMPs) has progressed significantly over the last few years, with the first commercial products for human use expected to reach the market by 2009 (see Note 1). As part of the 'next generation' of genetically modified (GM) crops, PMPs will be subject to additional biosafety considerations and are set to challenge the complex and overlapping regulations that currently govern GM plants, plant biologics (see Note 2) and 'conventional' pharmaceutical production. The areas of responsibility are being mapped out between the different regulatory agencies (Sparrow, P.A.C., Irwin, J., Dale, P., Twyman, R.M., and Ma, J.K.C. (2007) Pharma-Planta: Road testing the developing regulatory guidelines for plant-made pharmaceuticals. Transgenic Res., 2007), with specific guidelines currently being drawn up for the regulation of PMPs. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the biosafety (see Note 3), risk assessment (see Note 4) and regulation of this emerging technology. While reference will be made to EU regulations, the underlying principles of biosafety and risk assessment are generic to most countries.

  12. Epigenetic Regulation in Plant Responses to the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Baulcombe, David C.; Dean, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we review environmentally mediated epigenetic regulation in plants using two case histories. One of these, vernalization, mediates adaptation of plants to different environments and it exemplifies processes that are reset in each generation. The other, virus-induced silencing, involves transgenerationally inherited epigenetic modifications. Heritable epigenetic marks may result in heritable phenotypic variation, influencing fitness, and so be subject to natural selection. However, unlike genetic inheritance, the epigenetic modifications show instability and are influenced by the environment. These two case histories are then compared with other phenomena in plant biology that are likely to represent epigenetic regulation in response to the environment. PMID:25183832

  13. Method for regulation of plant lignin composition

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clint

    1999-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the regulation of lignin composition in plant tissue. Plants are transformed with a gene encoding an active F5H gene. The expression of the F5H gene results in increased levels of syringyl monomer providing a lignin composition more easily degraded with chemicals and enzymes.

  14. Regulation of the Rhythmic Emission of Plant Volatiles by the Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lanting; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kang, Ming; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2017-11-13

    Like other organisms, plants have endogenous biological clocks that enable them to organize their metabolic, physiological, and developmental processes. The representative biological clock is the circadian system that regulates daily (24-h) rhythms. Circadian-regulated changes in growth have been observed in numerous plants. Evidence from many recent studies indicates that the circadian clock regulates a multitude of factors that affect plant metabolites, especially emitted volatiles that have important ecological functions. Here, we review recent progress in research on plant volatiles showing rhythmic emission under the regulation of the circadian clock, and on how the circadian clock controls the rhythmic emission of plant volatiles. We also discuss the potential impact of other factors on the circadian rhythmic emission of plant volatiles.

  15. Regulation of Plant Cellular and Organismal Development by SUMO.

    PubMed

    Elrouby, Nabil

    2017-01-01

    This chapter clearly demonstrates the breadth and spectrum of the processes that SUMO regulates during plant development. The gross phenotypes observed in mutants of the SUMO conjugation and deconjugation enzymes reflect these essential roles, and detailed analyses of these mutants under different growth conditions revealed roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses, phosphate starvation, nitrate and sulphur metabolism, freezing and drought tolerance and response to excess copper. SUMO functions also intersect with those regulated by several hormones such as salicylic acid , abscisic acid , gibberellins and auxin, and detailed studies provide mechanistic clues of how sumoylation may regulate these processes. The regulation of COP1 and PhyB functions by sumoylation provides very strong evidence that SUMO is heavily involved in the regulation of light signaling in plants. At the cellular and subcellular levels, SUMO regulates meristem architecture, the switch from the mitotic cycle into the endocycle, meiosis, centromere decondensation and exit from mitosis, transcriptional control, and release from transcriptional silencing. Most of these advances in our understanding of SUMO functions during plant development emerged over the past 6-7 years, and they may only predict a prominent rise of SUMO as a major regulator of eukaryotic cellular and organismal growth and development.

  16. A role for small RNA in regulating innate immunity during plant growth

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yingtian; Wang, Jubin; Tung, Jeffrey; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Yingjia; He, Shuang; Baker, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Plant genomes encode large numbers of nucleotide-binding (NB) leucine-rich repeat (LRR) immune receptors (NLR) that mediate effector triggered immunity (ETI) and play key roles in protecting crops from diseases caused by devastating pathogens. Fitness costs are associated with plant NLR genes and regulation of NLR genes by micro(mi)RNAs and phased small interfering RNAs (phasiRNA) is proposed as a mechanism for reducing these fitness costs. However, whether NLR expression and NLR-mediated immunity are regulated during plant growth is unclear. We conducted genome-wide transcriptome analysis and showed that NLR expression gradually increased while expression of their regulatory small RNAs (sRNA) gradually decreased as plants matured, indicating that sRNAs could play a role in regulating NLR expression during plant growth. We further tested the role of miRNA in the growth regulation of NLRs using the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) resistance gene N, which was targeted by miR6019 and miR6020. We showed that N-mediated resistance to TMV effectively restricted this virus to the infected leaves of 6-week old plants, whereas TMV infection was lethal in 1- and 3-week old seedlings due to virus-induced systemic necrosis. We further found that N transcript levels gradually increased while miR6019 levels gradually decreased during seedling maturation that occurs in the weeks after germination. Analyses of reporter genes in transgenic plants showed that growth regulation of N expression was post-transcriptionally mediated by MIR6019/6020 whereas MIR6019/6020 was regulated at the transcriptional level during plant growth. TMV infection of MIR6019/6020 transgenic plants indicated a key role for miR6019-triggered phasiRNA production for regulation of N-mediated immunity. Together our results demonstrate a mechanistic role for miRNAs in regulating innate immunity during plant growth. PMID:29293695

  17. Boron transport in plants: co-ordinated regulation of transporters

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Kyoko; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    Background The essentiality of boron (B) for plant growth was established >85 years ago. In the last decade, it has been revealed that one of the physiological roles of B is cross-linking the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II in primary cell walls. Borate cross-linking of pectic networks serves both for physical strength of cell walls and for cell adhesion. On the other hand, high concentrations of B are toxic to plant growth. To avoid deficiency and toxicity problems, it is important for plants to maintain their tissue B concentrations within an optimum range by regulating transport processes. Boron transport was long believed to be a passive, unregulated process, but the identification of B transporters has suggested that plants sense and respond to the B conditions and regulate transporters to maintain B homeostasis. Scope Transporters responsible for efficient B uptake by roots, xylem loading and B distribution among leaves have been described. These transporters are required under B limitation for efficient acquisition and utilization of B. Transporters important for tolerating high B levels in the environment have also been identified, and these transporters export B from roots back to the soil. Two types of transporters are involved in these processes: NIPs (nodulin-26-like intrinsic proteins), boric acid channels, and BORs, B exporters. It is demonstrated that the expression of genes encoding these transporters is finely regulated in response to B availability in the environment to ensure tissue B homeostasis. Furthermore, plants tolerant to stress produced by low B or high B in the environment can be generated through altered expression of these transporters. Conclusions The identification of the first B transporter led to the discovery that B transport was a process mediated not only by passive diffusion but also by transporters whose activity was regulated in response to B conditions. Now it is evident that plants sense internal and external B

  18. International regulations regarding exchange of Rubus plant material

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article summarizes the international quarantine regulations regarding plant material exchange for Rubus. US federal importation regulations are summarized along with aspects of Rubus that presented as noxious weed. Requirements for exporting Rubus to foreign countries are also described. Proper...

  19. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of bud dormancy events in perennial plants

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Gabino; Leida, Carmen; Conejero, Ana; Badenes, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Release of bud dormancy in perennial plants resembles vernalization in Arabidopsis thaliana and cereals. In both cases, a certain period of chilling is required for accomplishing the reproductive phase, and several transcription factors with the MADS-box domain perform a central regulatory role in these processes. The expression of DORMANCY-ASSOCIATED MADS-box (DAM)-related genes has been found to be up-regulated in dormant buds of numerous plant species, such as poplar, raspberry, leafy spurge, blackcurrant, Japanese apricot, and peach. Moreover, functional evidence suggests the involvement of DAM genes in the regulation of seasonal dormancy in peach. Recent findings highlight the presence of genome-wide epigenetic modifications related to dormancy events, and more specifically the epigenetic regulation of DAM-related genes in a similar way to FLOWERING LOCUS C, a key integrator of vernalization effectors on flowering initiation in Arabidopsis. We revise the most relevant molecular and genomic contributions in the field of bud dormancy, and discuss the increasing evidence for chromatin modification involvement in the epigenetic regulation of seasonal dormancy cycles in perennial plants. PMID:24917873

  1. Evolution of allosteric regulation in chorismate mutases from early plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Kourtney; Holland, Cynthia K.; Starks, Courtney M.

    Plants, fungi, and bacteria synthesize the aromatic amino acids: l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, and l-tryptophan. Chorismate mutase catalyzes the branch point reaction of phenylalanine and tyrosine biosynthesis to generate prephenate. In Arabidopsis thaliana, there are two plastid-localized chorismate mutases that are allosterically regulated (AtCM1 and AtCM3) and one cytosolic isoform (AtCM2) that is unregulated. Previous analysis of plant chorismate mutases suggested that the enzymes from early plants (i.e. bryophytes/moss, lycophytes, and basal angiosperms) formed a clade distinct from the isoforms found in flowering plants; however, no biochemical information on these enzymes is available. To understand the evolution of allosteric regulation in plantmore » chorismate mutases, we analyzed a basal lineage of plant enzymes homologous to AtCM1 based on sequence similarity. The chorismate mutases from the moss/bryophyte Physcomitrella patens (PpCM1 and PpCM2), the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii (SmCM), and the basal angiosperm Amborella trichopoda (AmtCM1 and AmtCM2) were characterized biochemically. Tryptophan was a positive effector for each of the five enzymes examined. Histidine was a weak positive effector for PpCM1 and AmtCM1. Neither tyrosine nor phenylalanine altered the activity of SmCM; however, tyrosine was a negative regulator of the other four enzymes. Phenylalanine down-regulates both moss enzymes and AmtCM2. The 2.0 Å X-ray crystal structure of PpCM1 in complex with the tryptophan identified the allosteric effector site and reveals structural differences between the R- (more active) and T-state (less active) forms of plant chorismate mutases. Molecular insight into the basal plant chorismate mutases guides our understanding of the evolution of allosteric regulation in these enzymes.« less

  2. Jasmonate-responsive transcription factors regulating plant secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Memelink, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a large variety of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. These compounds play key roles in plant-environment interactions and many of them have pharmacological activity in humans. Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones which induce biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. JAs-responsive transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the JAs-induced accumulation of secondary metabolites belong to different families including AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB and WRKY. Here, we give an overview of the types and functions of TFs that have been identified in JAs-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and highlight their similarities and differences in regulating various biosynthetic pathways. We review major recent developments regarding JAs-responsive TFs mediating secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and provide suggestions for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Treesearch

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  4. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Phytoremediation of Hexachlorocyclohexane-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Chouychai, Waraporn; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Lee, Hung

    2015-01-01

    The influence of three plant growth regulators, indolebutyric acid (IBA), thidiazuron (TDZ) and gibberellic acid (GA3), either individually or in pair-wise combinations, on the ability of waxy corn plant to remove hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) from contaminated soil was studied. Waxy corn seeds were immersed for 3 h in solutions of 1.0 mg/l IBA, 0.01 mg/l TDZ, 0.1 mg/l GA3, or a mixture of two of the growth regulators, and then inoculated in soil contaminated with 46.8 mg/kg HCH for 30 days. Pretreatment of corn seeds with the plant growth regulators did not enhance corn growth when compared with those immersed in distilled water (control), but the pretreatment enhanced HCH removal significantly. On day 30, HCH concentration in the bulk soil planted with corn seeds pretreated with GA3 or TDZ+GA3 decreased by 97.4% and 98.4%, respectively. In comparison, HCH removal in soil planted with non-pretreated control waxy corn seeds was only 35.7%. The effect of several growth regulator application methods was tested with 0.01 mg/l TDZ. The results showed that none of the methods, which ranged from seed immersion, watering in soil, or spraying on shoots, affected HCH removal from soil. However, the method of applying the growth regulators may affect corn growth. Watering the corn plant with TDZ in soil led to higher root fresh weight (2.2 g) and higher root dried weight (0.57 g) than the other treatments (0.2-1.7 g root fresh weight and 0.02-0.43 g root dried weight) on day 30. Varying the concentrations of GA3 did not affect the enhancement of corn growth and HCH removal on day 30. The results showed that plant growth regulators may have potential for use to enhance HCH phytoremediation.

  5. Safety Regulation of Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaoe; Liu, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Yang, LiLi

    2018-01-01

    China’s regulations stipulate that a nuclear power plant license is valid for a design life period (generally 30 or 40 years). Whether the nuclear power plant’s license is renewed after the expiration of the license is to be determined based on the safety and economy of the nuclear power plant..

  6. 78 FR 79636 - Restructuring of Regulations on the Importation of Plants for Planting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ...We are reopening the comment period for our proposed rule that would restructure the regulations governing the importation of plants for planting. We are requesting comments on our proposed framework for integrated pest risk management measures for plants for planting. We are especially interested in: The differences commenters perceive between International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures No. 36 and the North American Plant Protection Organization's Regional Standard for Phytosanitary Measures No. 24, and reasons to prefer one over the other as a basis for such measures; and how to address the risk posed when plant brokers purchase and move plants for planting after they leave their place of production and before they are exported to the United States. This action will allow interested persons additional time to prepare and submit comments on these topics.

  7. Post-translational regulation of WRKY transcription factors in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Nobuaki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Plants have evolved immune system to protect themselves against invading pathogens. Recent research has illustrated that signaling networks, after perception of diverse pathogen-derived signals, facilitate transcriptional reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. WRKY proteins, which comprise a large family of plant transcription factors, are key players in plant immune responses. WRKY transcription factors participate in the control of defense-related genes either as positive or as negative regulators, and essentially are regulated at the transcriptional level. Emerging evidence emphasizes that group I WRKY transcription factors, which contain a conserved motif in the N-terminal region, are also activated by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation, underlining their importance in plant immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis Outbreak Associated with Truffle Oil - District of Columbia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto-Crawford, S Janet; McGee, Sasha; Li, Keith; Hennenfent, Andrew K; Dassie, Kossia; Carney, Jhetari T; Gibson, Arian; Cooper, Ivory; Blaylock, Morris; Blackwell, Reginald; Fields, Angela; Davies-Cole, John

    2017-03-17

    On September 8, 2015, the District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) received a call from a person who reported experiencing gastrointestinal illness after eating at a District of Columbia (DC) restaurant with multiple locations throughout the United States (restaurant A). Later the same day, a local emergency department notified DCDOH to report four persons with gastrointestinal illness, all of whom had eaten at restaurant A during August 30-September 5. Two patients had laboratory-confirmed Salmonella group D by stool culture. On the evening of September 9, a local newspaper article highlighted a possible outbreak associated with restaurant A. Investigation of the outbreak by DCDOH identified 159 patrons who were residents of 11 states and DC with gastrointestinal illness after eating at restaurant A during July 1-September 10. A case-control study was conducted, which suggested truffle oil-containing food items as a possible source of Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis infection. Although several violations were noted during the restaurant inspections, the environmental, laboratory, and traceback investigations did not confirm the contamination source. Because of concern about the outbreak, the restaurant's license was suspended during September 10-15. The collaboration and cooperation of the public, media, health care providers, and local, state, and federal public health officials facilitated recognition of this outbreak involving a pathogen commonly implicated in foodborne illness.

  9. Cellular growth in plants requires regulation of cell wall biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2017-02-01

    Cell and organ morphogenesis in plants are regulated by the chemical structure and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix, the cell wall. The two primary load bearing components in the plant cell wall, the pectin matrix and the cellulose/xyloglucan network, are constantly remodelled to generate the morphological changes required during plant development. This remodelling is regulated by a plethora of loosening and stiffening agents such as pectin methyl-esterases, calcium ions, expansins, and glucanases. The tight spatio-temporal regulation of the activities of these agents is a sine qua non condition for proper morphogenesis at cell and tissue levels. The pectin matrix and the cellulose-xyloglucan network operate in concert and their behaviour is mutually dependent on their chemical, structural and mechanical modifications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging Trends in Epigenetic Regulation of Nutrient Deficiency Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Gunjan; Pandey, Bipin K; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Giri, Jitender

    2016-03-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli largely affect the ionic balance of soil, which have a direct effect on growth and crop yield. Details are fast emerging on the genetic/molecular regulators, at whole-genome levels, of plant responses to mineral deficiencies in model and crop plants. These genetic regulators determine the root architecture and physiological adaptations for better uptake and utilization of minerals from soil. Recent evidence also shows the potential roles of epigenetic mechanisms in gene regulation, driven by minerals imbalance. Mineral deficiency or sufficiency leads to developmental plasticity in plants for adaptation, which is preceded by a change in the pattern of gene expression. Notably, such changes at molecular levels are also influenced by altered chromatin structure and methylation patterns, or involvement of other epigenetic components. Interestingly, many of the changes induced by mineral deficiency are also inheritable in the form of epigenetic memory. Unravelling these mechanisms in response to mineral deficiency would further advance our understanding of this complex plant response. Further studies on such approaches may serve as an exciting interaction model of epigenetic and genetic regulations of mineral homeostasis in plants and designing strategies for crop improvement.

  11. Regulation of potassium transport and signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wu, Wei-Hua

    2017-10-01

    As an essential macronutrient, potassium (K + ) plays crucial roles in diverse physiological processes during plant growth and development. The K + concentration in soils is relatively low and fluctuating. Plants are able to perceive external K + changes and generate chemical and physical signals in plant cells. The signals can be transducted across the plasma membrane and into the cytosol, and eventually regulates the downstream targets, particularly K + channels and transporters. As a result, K + homeostasis in plant cells is modulated, which facilitates plant adaptation to K + deficient conditions. This minireview focuses on the latest research progress in the diverse functions of K + channels and transporters as well as their regulatory mechanisms in plant response to low-K + stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of regulated herbs and plants in plant food supplements and traditional medicines using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Djiogo, C A Sokeng; Bothy, J L; Courselle, P

    2017-08-05

    The identification of a specific toxic or regulated plant in herbal preparations or plant food supplements is a real challenge, since they are often powdered, mixed with other herbal or synthetic powders and compressed into tablets or capsules. The classical identification approaches based on micro- and macroscopy are therefore not possible anymore. In this paper infrared spectroscopy, combined with attenuated total reflectance was evaluated for the screening of plant based preparations for nine specific plants (five regulated and four common plants for herbal supplements). IR and NIR spectra were recorded for a series of self-made triturations of the targeted plants. After pretreatment of the spectral data chemometric classification techniques were applied to both data sets (IR and NIR) separately and the combination of both. The results show that the screening of herbal preparations or plant food supplements for specific plants, using infrared spectroscopy, is feasible. The best model was obtained with the Mid-IR data, using SIMCA as modelling technique. During validation of the model, using an external test set, 21 of 25 were correctly classified and six of the nine targeted plants showed no misclassifications for the selected test set. For the other three a success rate of 50% was obtained. Mid-IR combined with SIMCA can therefore be applied as a first step in the screening of unknown samples, before applying more sophisticated fingerprint approaches or identification tests described in several national and international pharmacopoeia. As a proof of concept five real suspicious samples were successfully screened for the targeted regulated plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimal Regulation of Virtual Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dall Anese, Emiliano; Guggilam, Swaroop S.; Simonetto, Andrea

    This paper develops a real-time algorithmic framework for aggregations of distributed energy resources (DERs) in distribution networks to provide regulation services in response to transmission-level requests. Leveraging online primal-dual-type methods for time-varying optimization problems and suitable linearizations of the nonlinear AC power-flow equations, we believe this work establishes the system-theoretic foundation to realize the vision of distribution-level virtual power plants. The optimization framework controls the output powers of dispatchable DERs such that, in aggregate, they respond to automatic-generation-control and/or regulation-services commands. This is achieved while concurrently regulating voltages within the feeder and maximizing customers' and utility's performance objectives. Convergence andmore » tracking capabilities are analytically established under suitable modeling assumptions. Simulations are provided to validate the proposed approach.« less

  14. Redox regulation of plant stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian; Dong, Zhicheng; Wu, Haijun; Tian, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-10-02

    Despite the importance of stem cells in plant and animal development, the common mechanisms of stem cell maintenance in both systems have remained elusive. Recently, the importance of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) signaling in priming stem cell differentiation has been extensively studied in animals. Here, we show that different forms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have antagonistic roles in plant stem cell regulation, which were established by distinct spatiotemporal patterns of ROS-metabolizing enzymes. The superoxide anion (O2·-) is markedly enriched in stem cells to activate WUSCHEL and maintain stemness, whereas H 2 O 2 is more abundant in the differentiating peripheral zone to promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, H 2 O 2 negatively regulates O2·- biosynthesis in stem cells, and increasing H 2 O 2 levels or scavenging O2·- leads to the termination of stem cells. Our results provide a mechanistic framework for ROS-mediated control of plant stem cell fate and demonstrate that the balance between O2·- and H 2 O 2 is key to stem cell maintenance and differentiation. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional genemore » expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.« less

  16. Mediator: A key regulator of plant development.

    PubMed

    Buendía-Monreal, Manuel; Gillmor, C Stewart

    2016-11-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that regulates transcription at the level of RNA pol II assembly, as well as through regulation of chromatin architecture, RNA processing and recruitment of epigenetic marks. Though its modular structure is conserved in eukaryotes, its subunit composition has diverged during evolution and varies in response to environmental and tissue-specific inputs, suggesting different functions for each subunit and/or Mediator conformation. In animals, Mediator has been implicated in the control of differentiation and morphogenesis through modulation of numerous signaling pathways. In plants, studies have revealed roles for Mediator in regulation of cell division, cell fate and organogenesis, as well as developmental timing and hormone responses. We begin this review with an overview of biochemical mechanisms of yeast and animal Mediator that are likely to be conserved in all eukaryotes, as well as a brief discussion of the role of Mediator in animal development. We then present a comprehensive review of studies of the role of Mediator in plant development. Finally, we point to important questions for future research on the role of Mediator as a master coordinator of development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyanogenic glycoside production in forage plants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhanmin; Zhang, Kaixuan; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanmin; Tang, Yixiong; Georgiev, Milen I; Zhang, Xinquan; Lin, Min; Zhou, Meiliang

    2018-01-01

    The natural products cyanogenic glycosides (CNglcs) are present in various forage plant species including Sorghum spp., Trifolium spp., and Lotus spp. The release of toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from endogenous CNglcs, which is known as cyanogenesis, leads to a serious problem for animal consumption while as defensive secondary metabolites, CNglcs play multiple roles in plant development and responses to adverse environment. Therefore, it is highly important to fully uncover the molecular mechanisms of CNglc biosynthesis and regulation to manipulate the contents of CNglcs in forage plants for fine-tuning the balance between defensive responses and food safety. This review summarizes recent studies on the production, function, polymorphism, and regulation of CNglcs in forage plants, aiming to provide updated knowledge on the ways to manipulate CNglcs for further beneficial economic effects.

  18. Auxin-BR Interaction Regulates Plant Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huiyu; Lv, Bingsheng; Ding, Tingting; Bai, Mingyi; Ding, Zhaojun

    2018-01-01

    Plants develop a high flexibility to alter growth, development, and metabolism to adapt to the ever-changing environments. Multiple signaling pathways are involved in these processes and the molecular pathways to transduce various developmental signals are not linear but are interconnected by a complex network and even feedback mutually to achieve the final outcome. This review will focus on two important plant hormones, auxin and brassinosteroid (BR), based on the most recent progresses about these two hormone regulated plant growth and development in Arabidopsis, and highlight the cross-talks between these two phytohormones. PMID:29403511

  19. Hormone- and light-regulated nucleocytoplasmic transport in plants: current status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yew; Lee, Hak-Soo; Lee, June-Seung; Kim, Seong-Ki; Kim, Soo-Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The gene regulation mechanisms underlying hormone- and light-induced signal transduction in plants rely not only on post-translational modification and protein degradation, but also on selective inclusion and exclusion of proteins from the nucleus. For example, plant cells treated with light or hormones actively transport many signalling regulatory proteins, transcription factors, and even photoreceptors and hormone receptors into the nucleus, while actively excluding other proteins. The nuclear envelope (NE) is the physical and functional barrier that mediates this selective partitioning, and nuclear transport regulators transduce hormone- or light-initiated signalling pathways across the membrane to mediate nuclear activities. Recent reports revealed that mutating the proteins regulating nuclear transport through the pores, such as nucleoporins, alters the plant's response to a stimulus. In this review, recent works are introduced that have revealed the importance of regulated nucleocytoplasmic partitioning. These important findings deepen our understanding about how co-ordinated plant hormone and light signal transduction pathways facilitate communication between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The roles of nucleoporin components within the nuclear pore complex (NPC) are also emphasized, as well as nuclear transport cargo, such as Ran/TC4 and its binding proteins (RanBPs), in this process. Recent findings concerning these proteins may provide a possible direction by which to characterize the regulatory potential of hormone- or light-triggered nuclear transport.

  20. 76 FR 19908 - Revision of Distilled Spirits Plant Regulations; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... No. TTB-2008-0004; T.D. TTB-92a; Re: T.D. TTB-92] RIN 1513-AA23 Revision of Distilled Spirits Plant... revising its distilled spirits plant regulations in the Federal Register of February 16, 2011 (76 FR 9080... Trade Bureau (TTB) recently published a final rule completely revising its distilled spirits plant...

  1. Plant Growth Regulators as Potential Tools in Aquatic Plant Management: Efficacy and Persistence in Small-Scale Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    gratefully acknowledge the support of the Waterways Experi- ment Station and Drs. Howard Westerdahl and Kurt Getsinger as this research was being conducted...E. Westerdahl , eds., Plant Growth Regulator Society of America, San Antonio, TX, 127-45. Anderson, L. W. J., and Dechoretz, N. (1988). "Bensulfuron...Vegetation Management. J. E. Kaufman and H. E. Westerdahl , eds., Plant Growth Regulator Society of America, San Antonio, TX, 155-86. Herbicide Handbook

  2. Regulation of plant cell wall degradation by light in Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Schmoll, Monika

    2018-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei (syn. Hypocrea jecorina ) is the model organism for industrial production of plant cell wall degradating enzymes. The integration of light and nutrient signals for adaptation of enzyme production in T. reesei emerged as an important regulatory mechanism to be tackled for strain improvement. Gene regulation specific for cellulase inducing conditions is different in light and darkness with substantial regulation by photoreceptors. Genes regulated by light are clustered in the genome, with several of the clusters overlapping with CAZyme clusters. Major cellulase transcription factor genes and at least 75% of glycoside hydrolase encoding genes show the potential of light dependent regulation. Accordingly, light dependent protein complex formation occurs within the promoters of cellulases and their regulators. Additionally growth on diverse carbon sources is different between light and darkness and dependent on the presence of photoreceptors in several cases. Thereby, also light intensity plays a regulatory role, with cellulase levels dropping at higher light intensities dependent in the strain background. The heterotrimeric G-protein pathway is the most important nutrient signaling pathway in the connection with light response and triggers posttranscriptional regulation of cellulase expression. All G-protein alpha subunits impact cellulase regulation in a light dependent manner. The downstream cAMP pathway is involved in light dependent regulation as well. Connections between the regulatory pathways are mainly established via the photoreceptor ENV1. The effect of photoreceptors on plant cell wall degradation also occurs in the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa . In the currently proposed model, T. reesei senses the presence of plant biomass in its environment by detection of building blocks of cellulose and hemicellulose. Interpretation of the respective signals is subsequently adjusted to the requirements in light and darkness (or on the

  3. Roles of plant hormones in the regulation of host-virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Alazem, Mazen; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    Hormones are tuners of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. They are involved in various complicated networks, through which they modulate responses to different stimuli. Four hormones primarily regulate plant defence to pathogens: salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (Et) and abscisic acid (ABA). In susceptible plants, viral infections result in hormonal disruption, which manifests as the simultaneous induction of several antagonistic hormones. However, these antagonistic hormones may exhibit some sequential accumulation in resistant lines. Virus propagation is usually restricted by the activation of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral machinery and/or SA signalling pathway. Several studies have investigated these two systems, using different model viruses. However, the roles of hormones other than SA, especially those with antagonistic properties, such as ABA, have been neglected. Increasing evidence indicates that hormones control components of the small RNA system, which regulates many processes (including the siRNA antiviral machinery and the microRNA system) at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Consequently, cross-talk between the antagonistic SA and ABA pathways modulates plant responses at multiple levels. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the different roles of hormones in the regulation of plant-virus interactions, which are helping us to elucidate the fine tuning of viral and plant systems by hormones. © 2014 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD AND BSPP.

  4. Role of plant growth regulators as chemical signals in plant-microbe interactions: a double edged sword.

    PubMed

    Spence, Carla; Bais, Harsh

    2015-10-01

    Growth regulators act not only as chemicals that modulate plant growth but they also act as signal molecules under various biotic and abiotic stresses. Of all growth regulators, abscisic acid (ABA) is long known for its role in modulating plants response against both biotic and abiotic stress. Although the genetic information for ABA biosynthesis in plants is well documented, the knowledge about ABA biosynthesis in other organisms is still in its infancy. It is known that various microbes including bacteria produce and secrete ABA, but the overall functional significance of why ABA is synthesized by microbes is not known. Here we discuss the functional involvement of ABA biosynthesis by a pathogenic fungus. Furthermore, we propose that ABA biosynthesis in plant pathogenic fungi could be targeted for novel fungicidal discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Plant phospholipase C family: Regulation and functional role in lipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjeet; Bhatnagar, Nikita; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-08-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC), a major membrane phospholipid hydrolyzing enzyme generates signaling messengers such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in animals, and their phosphorylated forms such as phosphatidic acid (PA) and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) are thought to regulate various cellular processes in plants. Based on substrate specificity, plant PLC family is sub-divided into phosphatidylinositol-PLC (PI-PLC) and phosphatidylcholine-PLC (PC-PLC) groups. The activity of plant PLCs is regulated by various factors and the major ones include, Ca(2+) concentration, phospholipid substrate, post-translational modifications and interacting proteins. Most of the PLC members have been localized at the plasma membrane, suited for their function of membrane lipid hydrolysis. Several PLC members have been implicated in various cellular processes and signaling networks, triggered in response to a number of environmental cues and developmental events in different plant species, which makes them potential candidates for genetically engineering the crop plants for stress tolerance and enhancing the crop productivity. In this review article, we are focusing mainly on the plant PLC signaling and regulation, potential cellular and physiological role in different abiotic and biotic stresses, nutrient deficiency, growth and development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conserved versatile master regulators in signalling pathways in response to stress in plants

    PubMed Central

    Balderas-Hernández, Victor E.; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Fraire-Velázquez, Saúl

    2013-01-01

    From the first land plants to the complex gymnosperms and angiosperms of today, environmental conditions have forced plants to develop molecular strategies to surpass natural obstacles to growth and proliferation, and these genetic gains have been transmitted to the following generations. In this long natural process, novel and elaborate mechanisms have evolved to enable plants to cope with environmental limitations. Elements in many signalling cascades enable plants to sense different, multiple and simultaneous ambient cues. A group of versatile master regulators of gene expression control plant responses to stressing conditions. For crop breeding purposes, the task is to determine how to activate these key regulators to enable accurate and optimal reactions to common stresses. In this review, we discuss how plants sense biotic and abiotic stresses, how and which master regulators are implied in the responses to these stresses, their evolution in the life kingdoms, and the domains in these proteins that interact with other factors to lead to a proper and efficient plant response. PMID:24147216

  7. Plant Nitrogen Acquisition Under Low Availability: Regulation of Uptake and Root Architecture.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Takatoshi; Krapp, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire nitrogen nutrients from the soil through their roots mostly in the form of ammonium and nitrate. Since these nutrients are scarce in natural soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses to cope with the environment. One of the most important responses is the regulation of nitrogen acquisition efficiency. This review provides an update on the molecular determinants of two major drivers of the nitrogen acquisition efficiency: (i) uptake activity (e.g. high-affinity nitrogen transporters) and (ii) root architecture (e.g. low-nitrogen-availability-specific regulators of primary and lateral root growth). Major emphasis is laid on the regulation of these determinants by nitrogen supply at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which enables plants to optimize nitrogen acquisition efficiency under low nitrogen availability. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  8. Graphene quantum dots as enhanced plant growth regulators: effects on coriander and garlic plants.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Disha; Erande, Manisha B; Late, Dattatray J

    2015-10-01

    We report investigations on the use of graphene quantum dots for growth enhancement in coriander (Coriandrum sativam L.) and garlic (Allium sativum) plants. The as-received seeds of coriander and garlic were treated with 0.2 mg mL(-1) of graphene quantum dots for 3 h before planting. Graphene quantum dots enhanced the growth rate in coriander and garlic plants, including leaves, roots, shoots, flowers and fruits, when the seeds were treated with graphene quantum dots. Our investigations open up the opportunity to use graphene quantum dots as plant growth regulators that can be used in a variety of other food plants for high yield. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Plant elicitor peptides are conserved signals regulating direct and indirect antiherbivore defense

    PubMed Central

    Huffaker, Alisa; Pearce, Gregory; Veyrat, Nathalie; Erb, Matthias; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Sartor, Ryan; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Vaughan, Martha M.; Alborn, Hans T.; Teal, Peter E. A.; Schmelz, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Insect-induced defenses occur in nearly all plants and are regulated by conserved signaling pathways. As the first described plant peptide signal, systemin regulates antiherbivore defenses in the Solanaceae, but in other plant families, peptides with analogous activity have remained elusive. In the current study, we demonstrate that a member of the maize (Zea mays) plant elicitor peptide (Pep) family, ZmPep3, regulates responses against herbivores. Consistent with being a signal, expression of the ZmPROPEP3 precursor gene is rapidly induced by Spodoptera exigua oral secretions. At concentrations starting at 5 pmol per leaf, ZmPep3 stimulates production of jasmonic acid, ethylene, and increased expression of genes encoding proteins associated with herbivory defense. These include proteinase inhibitors and biosynthetic enzymes for production of volatile terpenes and benzoxazinoids. In accordance with gene expression data, plants treated with ZmPep3 emit volatiles similar to those from plants subjected to herbivory. ZmPep3-treated plants also exhibit induced accumulation of the benzoxazinoid phytoalexin 2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one glucoside. Direct and indirect defenses induced by ZmPep3 contribute to resistance against S. exigua through significant reduction of larval growth and attraction of Cotesia marginiventris parasitoids. ZmPep3 activity is specific to Poaceous species; however, peptides derived from PROPEP orthologs identified in Solanaceous and Fabaceous plants also induce herbivory-associated volatiles in their respective species. These studies demonstrate that Peps are conserved signals across diverse plant families regulating antiherbivore defenses and are likely to be the missing functional homologs of systemin outside of the Solanaceae. PMID:23509266

  10. Ecological regulation of black leaf streak disease driven by plant richness in banana agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Poeydebat, Charlotte; Carval, Dominique; Tixier, Philippe; Daribo, Marie-Odette; De Lapeyre De Bellaire, Luc

    2018-05-04

    Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis, is an important threat to banana production. Although its control relies on costly and unsustainable use of fungicides, ecological regulation of BLSD linked to field-scale plant diversity has received little attention. We monitored banana phytometers in plots in banana-based fields where no fungicides were applied. Within each plot, we measured plant richness in three strata, canopy openness, necrotic leaf removal, Musa abundance and richness. We quantified ecological regulation of five BLSD parameters (inoculum sources, spore abundance, lesion density, incubation time, and the area under the disease progression curve) and identified, using structural equation modeling, the characteristics of the plant community and the mechanisms likely responsible for the regulation. Regulation occurred, but most effectively before lesion formation, and was mainly related to plant richness between 1.5 and 5m high. A barrier effect, rather than a dilution effect, more likely limited spore abundance. Our results support the hypothesis that the potential effects of plant richness on leaf-scale microclimate variability and on the diversity of epiphyllic microorganisms are involved in the regulation of incubation time and lesion density. Field-scale management of plant diversity may be a promising lever to foster ecological regulation of BLSD.

  11. GDSL LIPASE1 Modulates Plant Immunity through Feedback Regulation of Ethylene Signaling1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Gi; Kwon, Sun Jae; Jang, Young Jin; Nam, Myung Hee; Chung, Joo Hee; Na, Yun-Cheol; Guo, Hongwei; Park, Ohkmae K.

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is a key signal in the regulation of plant defense responses. It is required for the expression and function of GDSL LIPASE1 (GLIP1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which plays an important role in plant immunity. Here, we explore molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between GLIP1 and ethylene signaling by an epistatic analysis of ethylene response mutants and GLIP1-overexpressing (35S:GLIP1) plants. We show that GLIP1 expression is regulated by ethylene signaling components and, further, that GLIP1 expression or application of petiole exudates from 35S:GLIP1 plants affects ethylene signaling both positively and negatively, leading to ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 activation and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) down-regulation, respectively. Additionally, 35S:GLIP1 plants or their exudates increase the expression of the salicylic acid biosynthesis gene SALICYLIC ACID INDUCTION-DEFICIENT2, known to be inhibited by EIN3 and EIN3-LIKE1. These results suggest that GLIP1 regulates plant immunity through positive and negative feedback regulation of ethylene signaling, and this is mediated by its activity to accumulate a systemic signal(s) in the phloem. We propose a model explaining how GLIP1 regulates the fine-tuning of ethylene signaling and ethylene-salicylic acid cross talk. PMID:24170202

  12. Plant Nitrogen Acquisition Under Low Availability: Regulation of Uptake and Root Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Kiba, Takatoshi; Krapp, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is a major factor determining plant growth and productivity. Plants acquire nitrogen nutrients from the soil through their roots mostly in the form of ammonium and nitrate. Since these nutrients are scarce in natural soils, plants have evolved adaptive responses to cope with the environment. One of the most important responses is the regulation of nitrogen acquisition efficiency. This review provides an update on the molecular determinants of two major drivers of the nitrogen acquisition efficiency: (i) uptake activity (e.g. high-affinity nitrogen transporters) and (ii) root architecture (e.g. low-nitrogen-availability-specific regulators of primary and lateral root growth). Major emphasis is laid on the regulation of these determinants by nitrogen supply at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which enables plants to optimize nitrogen acquisition efficiency under low nitrogen availability. PMID:27025887

  13. Intersections between immune responses and morphological regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoyuki; Tasaka, Masao

    2010-06-01

    Successful plant pathogens have developed strategies to interfere with the defence mechanisms of their host plants through evolution. Conversely, host plants have evolved systems to counteract pathogen attack. Some pathogens induce pathogenic symptoms on plants that include morphological changes in addition to interference with plant growth. Recent studies, based on molecular biology and genetics using Arabidopsis thaliana, have revealed that factors derived from pathogens can modulate host systems and/or host factors that play important roles in the morphological regulation of host plants. Other reports, meanwhile, have shown that factors known to have roles in plant morphology also function in plant immune responses. Evolutionary conservation of these factors and systems implies that host-pathogen interactions and the evolution they drive have yielded tight links between morphological processes and immune responses. In this review, recent findings about these topics are introduced and discussed.

  14. Chemometrics and chromatographic fingerprints to classify plant food supplements according to the content of regulated plants.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Sokeng Djiogo, C A; Courselle, P

    2017-09-05

    Plant food supplements are gaining popularity, resulting in a broader spectrum of available products and an increased consumption. Next to the problem of adulteration of these products with synthetic drugs the presence of regulated or toxic plants is an important issue, especially when the products are purchased from irregular sources. This paper focusses on this problem by using specific chromatographic fingerprints for five targeted plants and chemometric classification techniques in order to extract the important information from the fingerprints and determine the presence of the targeted plants in plant food supplements in an objective way. Two approaches were followed: (1) a multiclass model, (2) 2-class model for each of the targeted plants separately. For both approaches good classification models were obtained, especially when using SIMCA and PLS-DA. For each model, misclassification rates for the external test set of maximum one sample could be obtained. The models were applied to five real samples resulting in the identification of the correct plants, confirmed by mass spectrometry. Therefore chromatographic fingerprinting combined with chemometric modelling can be considered interesting to make a more objective decision on whether a regulated plant is present in a plant food supplement or not, especially when no mass spectrometry equipment is available. The results suggest also that the use of a battery of 2-class models to screen for several plants is the approach to be preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Plant hormone-mediated regulation of stress responses.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Ravindran, Pratibha; Kumar, Prakash P

    2016-04-14

    Being sessile organisms, plants are often exposed to a wide array of abiotic and biotic stresses. Abiotic stress conditions include drought, heat, cold and salinity, whereas biotic stress arises mainly from bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes and insects. To adapt to such adverse situations, plants have evolved well-developed mechanisms that help to perceive the stress signal and enable optimal growth response. Phytohormones play critical roles in helping the plants to adapt to adverse environmental conditions. The elaborate hormone signaling networks and their ability to crosstalk make them ideal candidates for mediating defense responses. Recent research findings have helped to clarify the elaborate signaling networks and the sophisticated crosstalk occurring among the different hormone signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the roles of the major plant hormones in regulating abiotic and biotic stress responses with special focus on the significance of crosstalk between different hormones in generating a sophisticated and efficient stress response. We divided the discussion into the roles of ABA, salicylic acid, jasmonates and ethylene separately at the start of the review. Subsequently, we have discussed the crosstalk among them, followed by crosstalk with growth promoting hormones (gibberellins, auxins and cytokinins). These have been illustrated with examples drawn from selected abiotic and biotic stress responses. The discussion on seed dormancy and germination serves to illustrate the fine balance that can be enforced by the two key hormones ABA and GA in regulating plant responses to environmental signals. The intricate web of crosstalk among the often redundant multitudes of signaling intermediates is just beginning to be understood. Future research employing genome-scale systems biology approaches to solve problems of such magnitude will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of plant development. Therefore, discovering additional crosstalk

  16. MicroRNA858 Is a Potential Regulator of Phenylpropanoid Pathway and Plant Development1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepika; Tiwari, Manish; Pandey, Ashutosh; Bhatia, Chitra; Sharma, Ashish; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs that function as critical regulators of gene expression. In plants, miRNAs have shown their potential as regulators of growth, development, signal transduction, and stress tolerance. Although the miRNA-mediated regulation of several processes is known, the involvement of miRNAs in regulating secondary plant product biosynthesis is poorly understood. In this study, we functionally characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) miR858a, which putatively targets R2R3-MYB transcription factors involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. Overexpression of miR858a in Arabidopsis led to the down-regulation of several MYB transcription factors regulating flavonoid biosynthesis. In contrast to the robust growth and early flowering of miR858OX plants, reduction of plant growth and delayed flowering were observed in Arabidopsis transgenic lines expressing an artificial miRNA target mimic (MIM858). Genome-wide expression analysis using transgenic lines suggested that miR858a targets a number of regulatory factors that modulate the expression of downstream genes involved in plant development and hormonal and stress responses. Furthermore, higher expression of MYBs in MIM858 lines leads to redirection of the metabolic flux towards the synthesis of flavonoids at the cost of lignin synthesis. Altogether, our study has established the potential role of light-regulated miR858a in flavonoid biosynthesis and plant growth and development. PMID:27208307

  17. Nitrate Protects Cucumber Plants Against Fusarium oxysporum by Regulating Citrate Exudation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Gu, Zechen; Wang, Ruirui; Sun, Guomei; Zhu, Chen; Guo, Shiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium wilt causes severe yield losses in cash crops. Nitrogen plays a critical role in the management of plant disease; however, the regulating mechanism is poorly understood. Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatic and transcriptome approaches, we analyzed how nitrogen forms regulate the interactions between cucumber plants and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC). Nitrate significantly suppressed Fusarium wilt compared with ammonium in both pot and hydroponic experiments. Fewer FOC colonized the roots and stems under nitrate compared with ammonium supply. Cucumber grown with nitrate accumulated less fusaric acid (FA) after FOC infection and exhibited increased tolerance to chemical FA by decreasing FA absorption and transportation in shoots. A lower citrate concentration was observed in nitrate-grown cucumbers, which was associated with lower MATE (multidrug and toxin compound extrusion) family gene and citrate synthase (CS) gene expression, as well as lower CS activity. Citrate enhanced FOC spore germination and infection, and increased disease incidence and the FOC population in ammonium-treated plants. Our study provides evidence that nitrate protects cucumber plants against F. oxysporum by decreasing root citrate exudation and FOC infection. Citrate exudation is essential for regulating disease development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Post-translational regulation of nitrogen transporters in plants and microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Aurore; Li, Zhi; Gojon, Alain; Schulze, Waltraud; Lejay, Laurence

    2017-05-01

    For microorganisms and plants, nitrate and ammonium are the main nitrogen sources and they are also important signaling molecules controlling several aspects of metabolism and development. Over the past decade, numerous studies revealed that nitrogen transporters are strongly regulated at the transcriptional level. However, more and more reports are now showing that nitrate and ammonium transporters are also subjected to post-translational regulations in response to nitrogen availability. Phosphorylation is so far the most well studied post-translational modification for these transporters and it affects both the regulation of nitrogen uptake and nitrogen sensing. For example, in Arabidopsis thaliana, phosphorylation was shown to activate the sensing function of the root nitrate transporter NRT1.1 and to switch the transport affinity. Also, for ammonium transporters, a phosphorylation-dependent activation/inactivation mechanism was elucidated in recent years in both plants and microorganisms. However, despite the fact that these regulatory mechanisms are starting to be thoroughly described, the signaling pathways involved and their action on nitrogen transporters remain largely unknown. In this review, we highlight the inorganic nitrogen transporters regulated at the post-translational level and we compare the known mechanisms in plants and microorganisms. We then discuss how these mechanisms could contribute to the regulation of nitrogen uptake and/or nitrogen sensing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A Herbivorous Mite Down-Regulates Plant Defence and Produces Web to Exclude Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, Renato A.; Lemos, Felipe; Dias, Cleide R.; Kikuchi, Wagner T.; Rodrigues, Jean C. P.; Pallini, Angelo; Sabelis, Maurice W.; Janssen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Herbivores may interact with each other through resource competition, but also through their impact on plant defence. We recently found that the spider mite Tetranychus evansi down-regulates plant defences in tomato plants, resulting in higher rates of oviposition and population growth on previously attacked than on unattacked leaves. The danger of such down-regulation is that attacked plants could become a more profitable resource for heterospecific competitors, such as the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae. Indeed, T. urticae had an almost 2-fold higher rate of oviposition on leaf discs on which T. evansi had fed previously. In contrast, induction of direct plant defences by T. urticae resulted in decreased oviposition by T. evansi. Hence, both herbivores affect each other through induced plant responses. However, when populations of T. evansi and T. urticae competed on the same plants, populations of the latter invariably went extinct, whereas T. evansi was not significantly affected by the presence of its competitor. This suggests that T. evansi can somehow prevent its competitor from benefiting from the down-regulated plant defence, perhaps by covering it with a profuse web. Indeed, we found that T. urticae had difficulties reaching the leaf surface to feed when the leaf was covered with web produced by T. evansi. Furthermore, T. evansi produced more web when exposed to damage or other cues associated with T. urticae. We suggest that the silken web produced by T. evansi serves to prevent competitors from profiting from down-regulated plant defences. PMID:21887311

  20. Enzyme action in the regulation of plant hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Corey S; Muehler, Ashley M; Jez, Joseph M

    2013-07-05

    Plants synthesize a chemically diverse range of hormones that regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stresses. The major classes of plant hormones are specialized metabolites with exquisitely tailored perception and signaling systems, but equally important are the enzymes that control the dose and exposure to the bioactive forms of these molecules. Here, we review new insights into the role of enzyme families, including the SABATH methyltransferases, the methylesterases, the GH3 acyl acid-amido synthetases, and the hormone peptidyl hydrolases, in controlling the biosynthesis and modifications of plant hormones and how these enzymes contribute to the network of chemical signals responsible for plant growth, development, and environmental adaptation.

  1. Symmetric development: transcriptional regulation of symmetry transition in plants.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Liam

    2014-12-15

    Symmetry breaking and re-establishment is an important developmental process that occurs during the development of multicellular organisms. A new report determines that transcription factors regulate a symmetry transition event in plants by modifying the direction of auxin transport. This provides one of the first mechanistic descriptions of a transition from bilateral to radial symmetry in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA methylation dynamics in plants and mammals: overview of regulation and dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Elhamamsy, Amr Rafat

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is a major epigenetic marking mechanism regulating various biological functions in mammals and plant. The crucial role of DNA methylation has been observed in cellular differentiation, embryogenesis, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. Furthermore, DNA methylation takes part in disease susceptibility, responses to environmental stimuli and the biodiversity of natural populations. In plant, different types of environmental stress have demonstrated the ability to alter the archetype of DNA methylation through the genome, change gene expression and confer a mechanism of adaptation. DNA methylation dynamics are regulated by three processes de novo DNA methylation, methylation maintenance and DNA demethylation. These processes have their similarities and differences between mammals and plants. Furthermore, the dysregulation of DNA methylation dynamics represents one of the primary molecular mechanisms of developing diseases in mammals. This review discusses the regulation and dysregulation of DNA methylation in plants and mammals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Small RNA Regulators of Plant-Hemipteran Interactions: Micromanagers with Versatile Roles

    PubMed Central

    Sattar, Sampurna; Thompson, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) in plants have important roles in regulating biological processes, including development, reproduction, and stress responses. Recent research indicates significant roles for sRNA-mediated gene silencing during plant-hemipteran interactions that involve all three of these biological processes. Plant responses to hemipteran feeding are determined by changes in the host transcriptome that appear to be fine-tuned by sRNAs. The role of sRNA in plant defense responses is complex. Different forms of sRNAs, with specific modes of action, regulate changes in the host transcriptome primarily through post-transcriptional gene silencing and occasionally through translational repression. Plant genetic resistance against hemipterans provides a model to explore the regulatory roles of sRNAs in plant defense. Aphid-induced sRNA expression in resistance genotypes delivers a new paradigm in understanding the regulation of R gene-mediated resistance in host plants. Unique sRNA profiles, including changes in sRNA biogenesis and expression can also provide insights into susceptibility to insect herbivores. Activation of phytohormone-mediated defense responses against insect herbivory is another hallmark of this interaction, and recent studies have shown that regulation of phytohormone signaling is under the control of sRNAs. Hemipterans feeding on resistant plants also show changes in insect sRNA profiles, possibly influencing insect development and reproduction. Changes in insect traits such as fecundity, host range, and resistance to insecticides are impacted by sRNAs and can directly contribute to the success of certain insect biotypes. In addition to causing direct damage to the host plant, hemipteran insects are often vectors of viral pathogens. Insect anti-viral RNAi machinery is activated to limit virus accumulation, suggesting a role in insect immunity. Virus-derived long sRNAs strongly resemble insect piRNAs, leading to the speculation that the pi

  4. ADP1 Affects Plant Architecture by Regulating Local Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  5. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  6. Methods and compositions for regulating gene expression in plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Shunhong (Inventor); Beachy, Roger N. (Inventor); Luis, Maria Isabel Ordiz (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Novel chimeric plant promoter sequences are provided, together with plant gene expression cassettes comprising such sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the chimeric plant promoters comprise the BoxII cis element and/or derivatives thereof. In addition, novel transcription factors are provided, together with nucleic acid sequences encoding such transcription factors and plant gene expression cassettes comprising such nucleic acid sequences. In certain preferred embodiments, the novel transcription factors comprise the acidic domain, or fragments thereof, of the RF2a transcription factor. Methods for using the chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors in regulating the expression of at least one gene of interest are provided, together with transgenic plants comprising such chimeric plant promoter sequences and novel transcription factors.

  7. Nitric Oxide Regulates Protein Methylation during Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiliang; Yang, Huanjie; Mu, Jinye; Lu, Tiancong; Peng, Juli; Deng, Xian; Kong, Zhaosheng; Bao, Shilai; Cao, Xiaofeng; Zuo, Jianru

    2017-08-17

    Methylation and nitric oxide (NO)-based S-nitrosylation are highly conserved protein posttranslational modifications that regulate diverse biological processes. In higher eukaryotes, PRMT5 catalyzes Arg symmetric dimethylation, including key components of the spliceosome. The Arabidopsis prmt5 mutant shows severe developmental defects and impaired stress responses. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating the PRMT5 activity. Here, we report that NO positively regulates the PRMT5 activity through S-nitrosylation at Cys-125 during stress responses. In prmt5-1 plants, a PRMT5 C125S transgene, carrying a non-nitrosylatable mutation at Cys-125, fully rescues the developmental defects, but not the stress hypersensitive phenotype and the responsiveness to NO during stress responses. Moreover, the salt-induced Arg symmetric dimethylation is abolished in PRMT5 C125S /prmt5-1 plants, correlated to aberrant splicing of pre-mRNA derived from a stress-related gene. These findings define a mechanism by which plants transduce stress-triggered NO signal to protein methylation machinery through S-nitrosylation of PRMT5 in response to environmental alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes in host-mycorrhiza relationships revealed by stable isotopes after naturally-induced thinning of the stand: case study on Tuber aestivum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Lauteri, Marco; Ciolfi, Marco; Chiocchini, Francesca; Paris, Pierluigi; Pisanelli, Andrea; Portarena, Silvia; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial plants overcome nutrients and water limitations by forming mutualistic associations with mycorrhizal fungi. Fungi, in return, take advantage from the carbohydrates supplied by the host. Some mycorrhizal fruit bodies, like that of Tuber spp., have a peculiar gastronomic value with many efforts being undertaken to predict and enhance their productivity. However, many issues of truffle-producing mycorrhizal ecology are still poorly understood, in particular optimal conditions favoring fruit formation, potential host plants and host-mycorrhiza relationships. In this study, we tested the applicability of stable isotope measurements under natural abundance to identify the plants which likely host the mycorrhiza of Tuber aestivum and to characterize host-mycorrhizal nutrient, water and carbohydrate exchange under plant natural growing conditions and with the change of the forest cover after naturally occurred thinning. For these purposes, sampling of the fruit bodies of T. aestivum was performed during the growing season 2011 in a mixed broadleaved-coniferous forest in central Italy (initially the site was a manmade pine plantation). Nine truffle-producing parcels were identified with five being composed of the original Pinus pinaster -dominated vegetation and four in which pine was replaced by broadleaf species after both wind-induced thinning and natural dieback of pine trees. Seasonal variation of δ13C, δ15N and δ18O were analyzed in the fungal material, in the surrounding soil and in the plant material of the potential host species (xylem water in the trunk, branches and leaves, recently assimilated carbohydrates in phloem and leaves). The results showed a possibility of the identification of the mycorrhizal host species applying isotope analyses, with mycorrhiza receiving most part of the carbohydrates from the pine in pine-dominated parcels. Interestingly, in thinned parcels, the truffle bodies maintained isotope composition similar to bodies gathered

  9. 20 MW Flywheel frequency regulation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Arseneaux, James

    Hazle designed, built, commissioned, and operates a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania (the Hazle Facility) using flywheel technology developed by its affiliate, Beacon Power, LLC (Beacon Power). The Hazle Facility provides frequency regulation services to the regional transmission organization, PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM), through its participation in PJM’s Regulation Market (a market-based system for the purchase and sale of the Regulation ancillary service). The zero emission Hazle Facility is designed for a 20 year-life over which it is capable of performing at least 100,000 full depth of discharge cycles. To achieve its 20 MWmore » capacity, the Hazle Facility is comprised of two hundred of Beacon Power’s 100 kilowatt (kW)/25 kilowatt/hour (kWh) flywheels connected in parallel. The Hazle Facility can fully respond to a signal from PJM in less than 2 seconds. The Hazle facility was constructed in an economic development zone designated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its construction relied on local contractors and labor for completion.« less

  10. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Freeman, D. Carl; McArthur, E.D.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. ?? 2009 Landes Bioscience.

  11. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, D Carl; McArthur, E Durant; Kim, Yong Ok; Redman, Regina S

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. PMID:19704912

  12. Protein phosphorylation in plant immunity: insights into the regulation of pattern recognition receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang-Jin; Caddell, Daniel F.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2012-01-01

    Plants are continuously challenged by pathogens including viruses, bacteria, and fungi. The plant immune system recognizes invading pathogens and responds by activating an immune response. These responses occur rapidly and often involve post-translational modifications (PTMs) within the proteome. Protein phosphorylation is a common and intensively studied form of these PTMs and regulates many plant processes including plant growth, development, and immunity. Most well-characterized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including Xanthomonas resistance 21, flagellin sensitive 2, and elongation factor-Tu receptor, possess intrinsic protein kinase activity and regulate downstream signaling through phosphorylation events. Here, we focus on the phosphorylation events of plant PRRs that play important roles in the immune response. We also discuss the role of phosphorylation in regulating mitogen-associated protein kinase cascades and transcription factors in plant immune signaling. PMID:22876255

  13. Regulation of Plant Microprocessor Function in Shaping microRNA Landscape.

    PubMed

    Dolata, Jakub; Taube, Michał; Bajczyk, Mateusz; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Bielewicz, Dawid

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small molecules (∼21 nucleotides long) that are key regulators of gene expression. They originate from long stem-loop RNAs as a product of cleavage by a protein complex called Microprocessor. The core components of the plant Microprocessor are the RNase type III enzyme Dicer-Like 1 (DCL1), the zinc finger protein Serrate (SE), and the double-stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1). Microprocessor assembly and its processing of microRNA precursors have been reported to occur in discrete nuclear bodies called Dicing bodies. The accessibility of and modifications to Microprocessor components affect microRNA levels and may have dramatic consequences in plant development. Currently, numerous lines of evidence indicate that plant Microprocessor activity is tightly regulated. The cellular localization of HYL1 is dependent on a specific KETCH1 importin, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 indirectly protects HYL1 from degradation in a light-dependent manner. Furthermore, proper localization of HYL1 in Dicing bodies is regulated by MOS2. On the other hand, the Dicing body localization of DCL1 is regulated by NOT2b, which also interacts with SE in the nucleus. Post-translational modifications are substantial factors that contribute to protein functional diversity and provide a fine-tuning system for the regulation of protein activity. The phosphorylation status of HYL1 is crucial for its activity/stability and is a result of the interplay between kinases (MPK3 and SnRK2) and phosphatases (CPL1 and PP4). Additionally, MPK3 and SnRK2 are known to phosphorylate SE. Several other proteins (e.g., TGH, CDF2, SIC, and RCF3) that interact with Microprocessor have been found to influence its RNA-binding and processing activities. In this minireview, recent findings on the various modes of Microprocessor activity regulation are discussed.

  14. Regulation of Plant Microprocessor Function in Shaping microRNA Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Dolata, Jakub; Taube, Michał; Bajczyk, Mateusz; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Bielewicz, Dawid

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small molecules (∼21 nucleotides long) that are key regulators of gene expression. They originate from long stem–loop RNAs as a product of cleavage by a protein complex called Microprocessor. The core components of the plant Microprocessor are the RNase type III enzyme Dicer-Like 1 (DCL1), the zinc finger protein Serrate (SE), and the double-stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1). Microprocessor assembly and its processing of microRNA precursors have been reported to occur in discrete nuclear bodies called Dicing bodies. The accessibility of and modifications to Microprocessor components affect microRNA levels and may have dramatic consequences in plant development. Currently, numerous lines of evidence indicate that plant Microprocessor activity is tightly regulated. The cellular localization of HYL1 is dependent on a specific KETCH1 importin, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 indirectly protects HYL1 from degradation in a light-dependent manner. Furthermore, proper localization of HYL1 in Dicing bodies is regulated by MOS2. On the other hand, the Dicing body localization of DCL1 is regulated by NOT2b, which also interacts with SE in the nucleus. Post-translational modifications are substantial factors that contribute to protein functional diversity and provide a fine-tuning system for the regulation of protein activity. The phosphorylation status of HYL1 is crucial for its activity/stability and is a result of the interplay between kinases (MPK3 and SnRK2) and phosphatases (CPL1 and PP4). Additionally, MPK3 and SnRK2 are known to phosphorylate SE. Several other proteins (e.g., TGH, CDF2, SIC, and RCF3) that interact with Microprocessor have been found to influence its RNA-binding and processing activities. In this minireview, recent findings on the various modes of Microprocessor activity regulation are discussed. PMID:29922322

  15. Arabidopsis type B cytokinin response regulators ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively regulate plant responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kien Huu; Ha, Chien Van; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yasunari; Tran, Uven Thi; Li, Weiqiang; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Schaller, G. Eric; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to elucidate the functions of three Arabidopsis type B response regulators (ARRs)—namely ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12—in regulating the Arabidopsis plant responses to drought. The arr1,10,12 triple mutant showed a significant increase in drought tolerance versus WT plants, as indicated by its higher relative water content and survival rate on drying soil. This enhanced drought tolerance of arr1,10,12 plants can be attributed to enhanced cell membrane integrity, increased anthocyanin biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, and reduced stomatal aperture, but not to altered stomatal density. Further drought-tolerance tests of lower-order double and single mutants indicated that ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively and redundantly control plant responses to drought, with ARR1 appearing to bear the most critical function among the three proteins. In agreement with these findings, a comparative genome-wide analysis of the leaves of arr1,10,12 and WT plants under both normal and dehydration conditions suggested a cytokinin (CK) signaling-mediated network controlling plant adaptation to drought via many dehydration/drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes that can provide osmotic adjustment and protection to cellular and membrane structures. Expression of all three ARR genes was repressed by dehydration and ABA treatments, inferring that plants down-regulate these genes as an adaptive mechanism to survive drought. Collectively, our results demonstrate that repression of CK response, and thus CK signaling, is one of the strategies plants use to cope with water deficit, providing novel insight for the design of drought-tolerant plants by genetic engineering. PMID:26884175

  16. Arabidopsis type B cytokinin response regulators ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively regulate plant responses to drought.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kien Huu; Ha, Chien Van; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yasunari; Tran, Uven Thi; Li, Weiqiang; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Schaller, G Eric; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to elucidate the functions of three Arabidopsis type B response regulators (ARRs)--namely ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12--in regulating the Arabidopsis plant responses to drought. The arr1,10,12 triple mutant showed a significant increase in drought tolerance versus WT plants, as indicated by its higher relative water content and survival rate on drying soil. This enhanced drought tolerance of arr1,10,12 plants can be attributed to enhanced cell membrane integrity, increased anthocyanin biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, and reduced stomatal aperture, but not to altered stomatal density. Further drought-tolerance tests of lower-order double and single mutants indicated that ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively and redundantly control plant responses to drought, with ARR1 appearing to bear the most critical function among the three proteins. In agreement with these findings, a comparative genome-wide analysis of the leaves of arr1,10,12 and WT plants under both normal and dehydration conditions suggested a cytokinin (CK) signaling-mediated network controlling plant adaptation to drought via many dehydration/drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes that can provide osmotic adjustment and protection to cellular and membrane structures. Expression of all three ARR genes was repressed by dehydration and ABA treatments, inferring that plants down-regulate these genes as an adaptive mechanism to survive drought. Collectively, our results demonstrate that repression of CK response, and thus CK signaling, is one of the strategies plants use to cope with water deficit, providing novel insight for the design of drought-tolerant plants by genetic engineering.

  17. 7 CFR 305.31 - Irradiation treatment of imported regulated articles for certain plant pests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation treatment of imported regulated articles... TREATMENTS Irradiation Treatments § 305.31 Irradiation treatment of imported regulated articles for certain plant pests. (a) Approved doses. Irradiation at the following doses for the specified plant pests...

  18. Regulation of aquaporins in plants under stress.

    PubMed

    Kapilan, Ranganathan; Vaziri, Maryam; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2018-01-16

    Aquaporins (AQP) are channel proteins belonging to the Major Intrinsic Protein (MIP) superfamily that play an important role in plant water relations. The main role of aquaporins in plants is transport of water and other small neutral molecules across cellular biological membranes. AQPs have remarkable features to provide an efficient and often, specific water flow and enable them to transport water into and out of the cells along the water potential gradient. Plant AQPs are classified into five main subfamilies including the plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), nodulin 26 like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) and X intrinsic proteins (XIPs). AQPs are localized in the cell membranes and are found in all living cells. However, most of the AQPs that have been described in plants are localized to the tonoplast and plasma membranes. Regulation of AQP activity and gene expression, are also considered as a part of the adaptation mechanisms to stress conditions and rely on complex processes and signaling pathways as well as complex transcriptional, translational and posttranscriptional factors. Gating of AQPs through different mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, tetramerization, pH, cations, reactive oxygen species, phytohormones and other chemical agents, may play a key role in plant responses to environmental stresses by maintaining the uptake and movement of water in the plant body.

  19. PARylation of the forkhead-associated domain protein DAWDLE regulates plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baomin; Ma, Shisong; Chen, Sixue; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Shuxin; Yu, Bin; Yu, Yu; Le, Brandon; Chen, Xuemei; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) plays a crucial role in controlling various cellular responses. However, PARylation targets and their functions remain largely elusive. Here, we deployed an Arabidopsis protein microarray coupled with in vitro PARylation assays to globally identify PARylation targets in plants. Consistent with the essential role of PARylation in plant immunity, the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain protein DAWDLE (DDL), one of PARP2 targets, positively regulates plant defense to both adapted and non-adapted pathogens. Arabidopsis PARP2 interacts with and PARylates DDL, which was enhanced upon treatment of bacterial flagellin. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis identified multiple PARylation sites of DDL by PARP2. Genetic complementation assays indicate that DDL PARylation is required for its function in plant immunity. In contrast, DDL PARylation appears to be dispensable for its previously reported function in plant development partially mediated by the regulation of microRNA biogenesis. Our study uncovers many previously unknown PARylation targets and points to the distinct functions of DDL in plant immunity and development mediated by protein PARylation and small RNA biogenesis, respectively. © 2016 The Authors.

  20. Regulation of Na+ and K+ homeostasis in plants: towards improved salt stress tolerance in crop plants

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Diego M.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress that results in considerable crop yield losses worldwide. However, some plant genotypes show a high tolerance to soil salinity, as they manage to maintain a high K+/Na+ ratio in the cytosol, in contrast to salt stress susceptible genotypes. Although, different plant genotypes show different salt tolerance mechanisms, they all rely on the regulation and function of K+ and Na+ transporters and H+ pumps, which generate the driving force for K+ and Na+ transport. In this review we will introduce salt stress responses in plants and summarize the current knowledge about the most important ion transporters that facilitate intra- and intercellular K+ and Na+ homeostasis in these organisms. We will describe and discuss the regulation and function of the H+-ATPases, H+-PPases, SOS1, HKTs, and NHXs, including the specific tissues where they work and their response to salt stress. PMID:28350038

  1. A Potassium-Dependent Oxygen Sensing Pathway Regulates Plant Root Hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Zaigham; Canut, Matthieu; Tournaire-Roux, Colette; Martinière, Alexandre; Boursiac, Yann; Loudet, Olivier; Maurel, Christophe

    2016-09-22

    Aerobic organisms survive low oxygen (O2) through activation of diverse molecular, metabolic, and physiological responses. In most plants, root water permeability (in other words, hydraulic conductivity, Lpr) is downregulated under O2 deficiency. Here, we used a quantitative genetics approach in Arabidopsis to clone Hydraulic Conductivity of Root 1 (HCR1), a Raf-like MAPKKK that negatively controls Lpr. HCR1 accumulates and is functional under combined O2 limitation and potassium (K(+)) sufficiency. HCR1 regulates Lpr and hypoxia responsive genes, through the control of RAP2.12, a key transcriptional regulator of the core anaerobic response. A substantial variation of HCR1 in regulating Lpr is observed at the Arabidopsis species level. Thus, by combinatorially integrating two soil signals, K(+) and O2 availability, HCR1 modulates the resilience of plants to multiple flooding scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding brassinosteroid-regulated mechanisms to improve stress tolerance in plants: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Akram, Asim; Ashraf, Muhammad Yasin; Raheel, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana Nauman; Hussain, Rai Altaf; Anwar, Irfan; Aurangzaib, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal plant hormones involved in regulation of physiological and molecular processes to ameliorate various biotic and abiotic stresses. Exogenous application of BRs to improve stress tolerance in plants has recently become a high research priority. Several studies have revealed the involvement of these steroidal hormones in upregulation of stress-related defense genes and their cross talk with other metabolic pathways. This is likely to stimulate research on many unanswered questions regarding their role in enhancing the ability of plants to tolerate adverse environmental conditions. Thus, this review appraises new insights on mechanisms mediating BR-regulated changes in plants, focused mainly on their involvement in regulation of physiological and molecular mechanisms under stress conditions. Herein, examples of BR-stimulated modulation of antioxidant defense system and upregulation of transcription factors in plants exposed to various biotic (bacterial, viral, and fungal attack) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, heat, low temperature, and heavy metal stress) are discussed. Based on these insights, future research in the current direction can be helpful to increase our understanding of BR-mediated complex and interrelated processes under stress conditions.

  3. Global Regulation of Plant Immunity by Histone Lysine Methyl Transferases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghun; Fu, Fuyou; Xu, Siming; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2016-07-01

    Posttranslational modification of histones modulates gene expression affecting diverse biological functions. We showed that the Arabidopsis thaliana histone methyl transferases SET DOMAIN GROUP8 (SDG8) and SDG25 regulate pep1-, flg22-, and effector-triggered immunity as well as systemic acquired resistance. Genome-wide basal and induced transcriptome changes regulated by SDG8 and/or SDG25 showed that two genes of the SDG-dependent transcriptome, CAROTENOID ISOMERASE2 (CCR2) and ECERIFERUM3 (CER3), were also required for plant immunity, establishing mechanisms in defense functions for SDG8 and SDG25. CCR2 catalyzes the biosynthesis of carotenoids, whereas CER3 is involved in the biosynthesis of cuticular wax. SDG8 and SDG25 affected distinct and overlapping global and locus-specific histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) methylations. Loss of immunity in sdg mutants was attributed to altered global and CCR2- and CER3-specific histone lysine methylation (HLM). Loss of immunity in sdg, ccr2, and cer3 mutants was also associated with diminished accumulation of lipids and loss of cuticle integrity. In addition, sdg8 and sdg25 mutants were impaired in H2B ubiquitination (H2Bubn) at CCR2, CER3, and H2Bubn regulated R gene, SNC1, revealing crosstalk between the two types of histone modifications. In summary, SDG8 and SDG25 contribute to plant immunity directly through HLM or indirectly through H2Bubn and by regulating expression of plant immunity genes, accumulation of lipids, biosynthesis of carotenoids, and maintenance of cuticle integrity. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Book review: Tesoros de nuestros montes: trufas de Andalucia

    Treesearch

    James M. Trappe

    2009-01-01

    "What are truffles"," opens with a dramatic painting of lightning, tree roots, mycorrhizae and truffles to introduce truffles in history, including ancient speculations (myths) about their origin. A new one to me is that they come from the testicles of Adonis, buried and multiplied by The Furies. Indeed, one Spanish term for a truffle is "turma de...

  5. Recent advances on the development and regulation of flower color in ornamental plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Daqiu; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Flower color is one of the most important features of ornamental plants. Its development and regulation are influenced by many internal and external factors. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of color development and its regulation provides an important theoretical basis and premise for the cultivation and improvement of new color varieties of ornamental plants. This paper outlines the functions of petal tissue structure, as well as the distribution and type of pigments, especially anthocyanins, in color development. The progress of research on flower color regulation with a focus on physical factors, chemical factors, and genetic engineering is introduced. The shortcomings of flower color research and the potential directions for future development are explored to provide a broad background for flower color improvements in ornamental plants. PMID:25964787

  6. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  7. Reactive oxygen species and redox regulation in mesophyll and bundle sheath cells of C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Turkan, Ismail; Uzilday, Baris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Bräutigam, Andrea; Ozgur, Rengin

    2018-02-26

    Redox regulation, antioxidant defence and ROS signalling are critical in realizing and tuning metabolic activities. However, our concepts were mostly developed for C3 plants since Arabidopsis thaliana is major model. Efforts to convert C3 plants to C4 plants to increase yield (see C4 rice; c4rice.irri.org/) entails better understanding of these processes in C4 plants. Various photosynthetic enzymes that take part in light reactions and carbon reactions are regulated via redox components such as thioredoxins as redox transmitters and peroxiredoxins. Due to this, understanding redox regulation in mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts of C4 plants is of paramount importance. It appears impossible to utilize efficient C4 photosynthesis without understanding its exact redox needs and regulation mechanisms used during light reactions. In this review we will discuss available knowledge on redox regulation in C3 and C4 plants with special emphasis on mesophyll and bundle sheath differences in C4. In these two cell types of C4 plants, linear and cyclic electron transport in chloroplasts operate differentially when compared to C3 chloroplasts, changing the redox needs of the cell. Therefore, the focus is given to photosynthetic light reactions, ROS production dynamics, antioxidant defence and thiol based redox regulation with the aim to draw a picture of current knowledge.

  8. Regulating Intracellular Calcium in Plants: From Molecular Genetics to Physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Heven Sze

    To grow, develop, adapt, and reproduce, plants have evolved mechanisms to regulate the uptake, translocation and sorting of calcium ions into different cells and subcellular compartments. Yet how plants accomplish this remarkable feat is still poorly understood. The spatial and temporal changes in intracellular [Ca2+] during growth and during responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli indicate that Ca2+ influx and efflux transporters are diverse and tightly regulated in plants. The specific goals were to determine the biological roles of multiple Ca pumps (ECAs) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We had pioneered the use of K616 yeast strain to functionallymore » express plant Ca pumps, and demonstrated two distinct types of Ca pumps in plants (Sze et al., 2000. Annu Rev Plant Biol. 51,433). ACA2 represented one type that was auto-inhibited by the N-terminal region and stimulated by calmodulin. ECA1 represented another type that was not sensitive to calmodulin and phylogenetically distinct from ACAs. The goal to determine the biological roles of multiple ECA-type Ca pumps in Arabidopsis has been accomplished. Although we demonstrated ECA1 was a Ca pump by functional expression in yeast, the in vivo roles of ECAs was unclear. A few highlights are described. ECA1 and/or ECA4 are Ca/Mn pumps localized to the ER and are highly expressed in all cell types. Using homozygous T-DNA insertional mutants of eca1, we demonstrated that the ER-bound ECA1 supports growth and confers tolerance of plants growing on medium low in Ca or containing toxic levels of Mn. This is the first genetic study to determine the in vivo function of a Ca pump in plants. A phylogenetically distinct ECA3 is also a Ca/Mn pump that is localized to endosome, such as post-Golgi compartments. Although it is expressed at lower levels than ECA1, eca3 mutants are impaired in Ca-dependent root growth and in pollen tube elongation. Increased secretion of wall proteins in mutants suggests that Ca

  9. Genome-Wide Binding Analysis of the Transcription Activator IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 Reveals a Complex Network Regulating Rice Plant Architecture[W

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-01-01

    IDEAL PLANT ARCHITECTURE1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR1 or PROMOTER BINDING FACTOR2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate DENSE AND ERECT PANICLE1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture. PMID:24170127

  10. Tick Tock: Circadian Regulation of Plant Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; McClung, C Robertson; Zhang, Chong

    2017-08-04

    Many living organisms on Earth have evolved the ability to integrate environmental and internal signals to determine time and thereafter adjust appropriately their metabolism, physiology, and behavior. The circadian clock is the endogenous timekeeper critical for multiple biological processes in many organisms. A growing body of evidence supports the importance of the circadian clock for plant health. Plants activate timed defense with various strategies to anticipate daily attacks of pathogens and pests and to modulate responses to specific invaders in a time-of-day-dependent manner (gating). Pathogen infection is also known to reciprocally modulate clock activity. Such a cross talk likely reflects the adaptive nature of plants to coordinate limited resources for growth, development, and defense. This review summarizes recent progress in circadian regulation of plant innate immunity with a focus on the molecular events linking the circadian clock and defense. More and better knowledge of clock-defense cross talk could help to improve disease resistance and productivity in economically important crops.

  11. Ethylene sensitivity and relative air humidity regulate root hydraulic properties in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Ibort, Pablo; Molina, Sonia; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    The effect of ethylene and its precursor ACC on root hydraulic properties, including aquaporin expression and abundance, is modulated by relative air humidity and plant sensitivity to ethylene. Relative air humidity (RH) is a main factor contributing to water balance in plants. Ethylene (ET) is known to be involved in the regulation of root water uptake and stomatal opening although its role on plant water balance under different RH is not very well understood. We studied, at the physiological, hormonal and molecular levels (aquaporins expression, abundance and phosphorylation state), the plant responses to exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; precursor of ET) and 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB; inhibitor of ET biosynthesis), after 24 h of application to the roots of tomato wild type (WT) plants and its ET-insensitive never ripe (nr) mutant, at two RH levels: regular (50%) and close to saturation RH. Highest RH induced an increase of root hydraulic conductivity (Lp o ) of non-treated WT plants, and the opposite effect in nr mutants. The treatment with ACC reduced Lp o in WT plants at low RH and in nr plants at high RH. The application of AIB increased Lp o only in nr plants at high RH. In untreated plants, the RH treatment changed the abundance and phosphorylation of aquaporins that affected differently both genotypes according to their ET sensitivity. We show that RH is critical in regulating root hydraulic properties, and that Lp o is affected by the plant sensitivity to ET, and possibly to ACC, by regulating aquaporins expression and their phosphorylation status. These results incorporate the relationship between RH and ET in the response of Lp o to environmental changes.

  12. An Intrinsic MicroRNA Timer Regulates Progressive Decline in Shoot Regenerative Capacity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-Qi; Lian, Heng; Tang, Hongbo; Dolezal, Karel; Zhou, Chuan-Miao; Yu, Sha; Chen, Juan-Hua; Chen, Qi; Liu, Hongtao; Ljung, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells are totipotent and competent to regenerate from differentiated organs. It has been shown that two phytohormones, auxin and cytokinin, play critical roles within this process. As in animals, the regenerative capacity declines with age in plants, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that an age-regulated microRNA, miR156, regulates shoot regenerative capacity. As a plant ages, the gradual increase in miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors leads to the progressive decline in shoot regenerative capacity. In old plants, SPL reduces shoot regenerative capacity by attenuating the cytokinin response through binding with the B-type ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORs, which encode the transcriptional activators in the cytokinin signaling pathway. Consistently, the increased amount of exogenous cytokinin complements the reduced shoot regenerative capacity in old plants. Therefore, the recruitment of age cues in response to cytokinin contributes to shoot regenerative competence. PMID:25649435

  13. Population genetics of the westernmost distribution of the glaciations-surviving black truffle Tuber melanosporum.

    PubMed

    García-Cunchillos, Iván; Sánchez, Sergio; Barriuso, Juan José; Pérez-Collazos, Ernesto

    2014-04-01

    The black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) is an important natural resource due to its relevance as a delicacy in gastronomy. Different aspects of this hypogeous fungus species have been studied, including population genetics of French and Italian distribution ranges. Although those studies include some Spanish populations, this is the first time that the genetic diversity and genetic structure of the wide geographical range of the natural Spanish populations have been analysed. To achieve this goal, 23 natural populations were sampled across the Spanish geographical distribution. ISSR technique demonstrated its reliability and capability to detect high levels of polymorphism in the species. Studied populations showed high levels of genetic diversity (h N  = 0.393, h S  = 0.678, Hs = 0.418), indicating a non threatened genetic conservation status. These high levels may be a consequence of the wide distribution range of the species, of its spore dispersion by animals, and by its evolutionary history. AMOVA analysis showed a high degree of genetic structure among populations (47.89%) and other partitions as geographical ranges. Bayesian genetic structure analyses differentiated two main Spanish groups separated by the Iberian Mountain System, and showed the genetic uniqueness of some populations. Our results suggest the survival of some of these populations during the last glaciation, the Spanish southern distribution range perhaps surviving as had occurred in France and Italy, but it is also likely that specific northern areas may have acted as a refugia for the later dispersion to other calcareous areas in the Iberian Peninsula and probably France.

  14. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Ahn, Yul-Kuyn

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si), the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review. PMID:28824681

  15. Regulation of galactan synthase expression to modify galactan content in plants

    DOEpatents

    None

    2017-08-22

    The disclosure provides methods of engineering plants to modulate galactan content. Specifically, the disclosure provides methods for engineering a plant to increase the galactan content in a plant tissue by inducing expression of beta-1,4-galactan synthase (GALS), modulated by a heterologous promoter. Further disclosed are the methods of modulating expression level of GALS under the regulation of a transcription factor, as well as overexpression of UDP-galactose epimerse in the same plant tissue. Tissue specific promoters and transcription factors can be used in the methods are also provided.

  16. Mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. A.; Myers, P. N.

    1995-01-01

    The authors introduce the chapter with a discussion of lessons from nature, agriculture, and landscapes; terms and definitions; and an historical perspective of mechanical stress regulation of plant growth and development. Topics include developmental responses to mechanical stress; mechanical stress-environment interactions; metabolic, productivity, and compositional changes; hormonal involvement; mechanoperception and early transduction mechanisms; applications in agriculture; and research implications. The discussion of hormonal involvement in mechanical stress physiology includes ethylene, auxin, gibberellins, and other phytohormones. The discussion of applications in agriculture examines windbreaks, nursery practices, height control and conditioning, and enhancement of growth and productivity. Implications for research are related to handling plant materials, space biology, and future research needs.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of development and pathogenesis in fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Akanksha; Jeon, Junhyun

    2017-08-01

    Evidently, epigenetics is at forefront in explaining the mechanisms underlying the success of human pathogens and in the identification of pathogen-induced modifications within host plants. However, there is a lack of studies highlighting the role of epigenetics in the modulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal plant pathogens. In this review, we attempt to highlight and discuss the role of epigenetics in the regulation of the growth and pathogenicity of fungal phytopathogens using Magnaporthe oryzae, a devastating fungal plant pathogen, as a model system. With the perspective of wide application in the understanding of the development, pathogenesis and control of other fungal pathogens, we attempt to provide a synthesized view of the epigenetic studies conducted on M. oryzae to date. First, we discuss the mechanisms of epigenetic modifications in M. oryzae and their impact on fungal development and pathogenicity. Second, we highlight the unexplored epigenetic mechanisms and areas of research that should be considered in the near future to construct a holistic view of epigenetic functioning in M. oryzae and other fungal plant pathogens. Importantly, the development of a complete understanding of the modulation of epigenetic regulation in fungal pathogens can help in the identification of target points to combat fungal pathogenesis. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  18. Getting a sense for signals: regulation of the plant iron deficiency response

    PubMed Central

    Hindt, Maria N.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the Fe deficiency response in plants is necessary for improving both plant health and the human diet, which relies on Fe from plant sources. In this review we focus on the regulation of the two major strategies for iron acquisition in plants, exemplified by the model plants Arabidopsis and rice. Critical to our knowledge of Fe homeostasis in plants is determining how Fe is sensed and how this signal is transmitted and integrated into a response. We will explore the evidence for an Fe sensor in plants and summarize the recent findings on hormones and signaling molecules which contribute to the Fe deficiency response. PMID:22483849

  19. Global Regulation of Plant Immunity by Histone Lysine Methyl Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghun; Xu, Siming; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of histones modulates gene expression affecting diverse biological functions. We showed that the Arabidopsis thaliana histone methyl transferases SET DOMAIN GROUP8 (SDG8) and SDG25 regulate pep1-, flg22-, and effector-triggered immunity as well as systemic acquired resistance. Genome-wide basal and induced transcriptome changes regulated by SDG8 and/or SDG25 showed that two genes of the SDG-dependent transcriptome, CAROTENOID ISOMERASE2 (CCR2) and ECERIFERUM3 (CER3), were also required for plant immunity, establishing mechanisms in defense functions for SDG8 and SDG25. CCR2 catalyzes the biosynthesis of carotenoids, whereas CER3 is involved in the biosynthesis of cuticular wax. SDG8 and SDG25 affected distinct and overlapping global and locus-specific histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) methylations. Loss of immunity in sdg mutants was attributed to altered global and CCR2- and CER3-specific histone lysine methylation (HLM). Loss of immunity in sdg, ccr2, and cer3 mutants was also associated with diminished accumulation of lipids and loss of cuticle integrity. In addition, sdg8 and sdg25 mutants were impaired in H2B ubiquitination (H2Bubn) at CCR2, CER3, and H2Bubn regulated R gene, SNC1, revealing crosstalk between the two types of histone modifications. In summary, SDG8 and SDG25 contribute to plant immunity directly through HLM or indirectly through H2Bubn and by regulating expression of plant immunity genes, accumulation of lipids, biosynthesis of carotenoids, and maintenance of cuticle integrity. PMID:27354553

  20. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G; Jackson, Robert B; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-03

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (∼1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  1. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ying; Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (˜1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant-water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change.

  2. 50 CFR 23.3 - What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply? 23.3 Section 23.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN...

  3. 50 CFR 23.3 - What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply? 23.3 Section 23.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN...

  4. 50 CFR 23.3 - What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply? 23.3 Section 23.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN...

  5. 50 CFR 23.3 - What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply? 23.3 Section 23.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN...

  6. 50 CFR 23.3 - What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What other wildlife and plant regulations may apply? 23.3 Section 23.3 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE..., EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN...

  7. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

    SciTech Connect

    Julie M. Stone

    2008-09-13

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan ismore » designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus

  8. ChIP-seq reveals broad roles of SARD1 and CBP60g in regulating plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tongjun; Zhang, Yaxi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Ding, Yuli; Zhang, Yuelin

    2015-12-18

    Recognition of pathogens by host plants leads to rapid transcriptional reprogramming and activation of defence responses. The expression of many defence regulators is induced in this process, but the mechanisms of how they are controlled transcriptionally are largely unknown. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing to show that the transcription factors SARD1 and CBP60g bind to the promoter regions of a large number of genes encoding key regulators of plant immunity. Among them are positive regulators of systemic immunity and signalling components for effector-triggered immunity and PAMP-triggered immunity, which is consistent with the critical roles of SARD1 and CBP60g in these processes. In addition, SARD1 and CBP60g target a number of genes encoding negative regulators of plant immunity, suggesting that they are also involved in negative feedback regulation of defence responses. Based on these findings we propose that SARD1 and CBP60g function as master regulators of plant immune responses.

  9. Regulation of phosphate starvation responses in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Juan; Finnegan, Patrick M

    2010-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting mineral nutrient for plant growth. Many soils worldwide are deficient in soluble inorganic phosphate (P(i)), the form of P most readily absorbed and utilized by plants. A network of elaborate developmental and biochemical adaptations has evolved in plants to enhance P(i) acquisition and avoid starvation. Controlling the deployment of adaptations used by plants to avoid P(i) starvation requires a sophisticated sensing and regulatory system that can integrate external and internal information regarding P(i) availability. In this review, the current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms that control P(i) starvation responses and the local and long-distance signals that may trigger P(i) starvation responses are discussed. Uncharacterized mutants that have P(i)-related phenotypes and their potential to give us additional insights into regulatory pathways and P(i) starvation-induced signalling are also highlighted and assessed. An impressive list of factors that regulate P(i) starvation responses is now available, as is a good deal of knowledge regarding the local and long-distance signals that allow a plant to sense and respond to P(i) availability. However, we are only beginning to understand how these factors and signals are integrated with one another in a regulatory web able to control the range of responses demonstrated by plants grown in low P(i) environments. Much more knowledge is needed in this agronomically important area before real gains can be made in improving P(i) acquisition in crop plants.

  10. MYC2 Orchestrates a Hierarchical Transcriptional Cascade That Regulates Jasmonate-Mediated Plant Immunity in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Du, Minmin; Zhao, Jiuhai; Tzeng, David T W; Liu, Yuanyuan; Deng, Lei; Yang, Tianxia; Zhai, Qingzhe; Wu, Fangming; Huang, Zhuo; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Qiaomei; Chen, Qian; Zhong, Silin; Li, Chang-Bao; Li, Chuanyou

    2017-08-01

    The hormone jasmonate (JA), which functions in plant immunity, regulates resistance to pathogen infection and insect attack through triggering genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming in plants. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (TF) MYC2 in tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) acts downstream of the JA receptor to orchestrate JA-mediated activation of both the wounding and pathogen responses. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) coupled with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) assays, we identified 655 MYC2-targeted JA-responsive genes. These genes are highly enriched in Gene Ontology categories related to TFs and the early response to JA, indicating that MYC2 functions at a high hierarchical level to regulate JA-mediated gene transcription. We also identified a group of MYC2-targeted TFs (MTFs) that may directly regulate the JA-induced transcription of late defense genes. Our findings suggest that MYC2 and its downstream MTFs form a hierarchical transcriptional cascade during JA-mediated plant immunity that initiates and amplifies transcriptional output. As proof of concept, we showed that during plant resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea , MYC2 and the MTF JA2-Like form a transcription module that preferentially regulates wounding-responsive genes, whereas MYC2 and the MTF ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR.C3 form a transcription module that preferentially regulates pathogen-responsive genes. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  11. Prioritizing plant defence over growth through WRKY regulation facilitates infestation by non-target herbivores.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Jin; Li, Jiancai; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Bian, Wenbo; Erb, Matthias; Lou, Yonggen

    2015-06-17

    Plants generally respond to herbivore attack by increasing resistance and decreasing growth. This prioritization is achieved through the regulation of phytohormonal signaling networks. However, it remains unknown how this prioritization affects resistance against non-target herbivores. In this study, we identify WRKY70 as a specific herbivore-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated rice transcription factor that physically interacts with W-box motives and prioritizes defence over growth by positively regulating jasmonic acid (JA) and negatively regulating gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis upon attack by the chewing herbivore Chilo suppressalis. WRKY70-dependent JA biosynthesis is required for proteinase inhibitor activation and resistance against C. suppressalis. In contrast, WRKY70 induction increases plant susceptibility against the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Experiments with GA-deficient rice lines identify WRKY70-dependent GA signaling as the causal factor in N. lugens susceptibility. Our study shows that prioritizing defence over growth leads to a significant resistance trade-off with important implications for the evolution and agricultural exploitation of plant immunity.

  12. Regulation of thermogenesis in plants: the interaction of alternative oxidase and plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Lu, Jianfei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Fu; Leng, Feifan; Li, Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    Thermogenesis is a process of heat production in living organisms. It is rare in plants, but it does occur in some species of angiosperm. The heat is generated via plant mitochondrial respiration. As possible involvement in thermogenesis of mitochondrial factors, alternative oxidases (AOXs) and plant uncoupling mitochondrial proteins (PUMPs) have been well studied. AOXs and PUMPs are ubiquitously present in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria. They serve as two major energy dissipation systems that balance mitochondrial respiration and uncoupled phosphorylation by dissipating the H+ redox energy and proton electrochemical gradient (ΔμH+) as heat, respectively. AOXs and PUMPs exert similar physiological functions during homeothermic heat production in thermogenic plants. AOXs have five isoforms, while PUMPs have six. Both AOXs and PUMPs are encoded by small nuclear multigene families. Multiple isoforms are expressed in different tissues or organs. Extensive studies have been done in the area of thermogenesis in higher plants. In this review, we focus on the involvement and regulation of AOXs and PUMPs in thermogenesis.

  13. Rho proteins of plants--functional cycle and regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Elena; Fricke, Inka; Schaefer, Antje; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2011-11-01

    Rho-related ROP proteins are molecular switches that essentially regulate a wide variety of processes. Of central interest is their influence on the plant cytoskeleton by which they affect vital processes like cell division, growth, morphogenesis, and pathogen defense. ROPs switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations by strictly regulated nucleotide exchange and GTP-hydrolysis, and only the active GTP-form interacts with downstream effectors to ultimately provoke a biological response. However, the mode of action of the engaged regulators and effectors as well as their upstream and downstream interaction partners have long been largely unknown. As opposed to analogous systems in animals and fungi, plants use specific GTPase activating proteins (RopGAPs) with a unique domain composition and novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RopGEFs) with a probable link to cell surface receptors. Moreover, plants comprise novel effector molecules and adapters connecting ROPs to mostly unknown downstream targets on the route to the cytoskeleton. This review aims to summarize recent knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and reaction cascades involved in ROP dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements, addressing the structure and function of the unusual RopGAPs, RopGEFs and effectors, and the upstream and downstream pathways linking ROPs to cell receptor-like kinases, actin filaments, and microtubules. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Abiotic stress responses in plants: roles of calmodulin-regulated proteins.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Amardeep S; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular changes in calcium ions (Ca(2+)) in response to different biotic and abiotic stimuli are detected by various sensor proteins in the plant cell. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most extensively studied Ca(2+)-sensing proteins and has been shown to be involved in transduction of Ca(2+) signals. After interacting with Ca(2+), CaM undergoes conformational change and influences the activities of a diverse range of CaM-binding proteins. A number of CaM-binding proteins have also been implicated in stress responses in plants, highlighting the central role played by CaM in adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Stress adaptation in plants is a highly complex and multigenic response. Identification and characterization of CaM-modulated proteins in relation to different abiotic stresses could, therefore, prove to be essential for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Various studies have revealed involvement of CaM in regulation of metal ions uptake, generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of transcription factors such as CAMTA3, GTL1, and WRKY39. Activities of several kinases and phosphatases have also been shown to be modulated by CaM, thus providing further versatility to stress-associated signal transduction pathways. The results obtained from contemporary studies are consistent with the proposed role of CaM as an integrator of different stress signaling pathways, which allows plants to maintain homeostasis between different cellular processes. In this review, we have attempted to present the current state of understanding of the role of CaM in modulating different stress-regulated proteins and its implications in augmenting abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

  15. Regulating the ethylene response of a plant by modulation of F-box proteins

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Hongwei [Beijing, CN; Ecker, Joseph R [Carlsbad, CA

    2014-01-07

    The relationship between F-box proteins and proteins invovled in the ethylene response in plants is described. In particular, F-box proteins may bind to proteins involved in the ethylene response and target them for degradation by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. The transcription factor EIN3 is a key transcription factor mediating ethylne-regulated gene expression and morphological responses. EIN3 is degraded through a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway mediated by F-box proteins EBF1 and EBF2. The link between F-box proteins and the ethylene response is a key step in modulating or regulating the response of a plant to ethylene. Described herein are transgenic plants having an altered sensitivity to ethylene, and methods for making transgenic plant haing an althered sensitivity to ethylene by modulating the level of activity of F-box proteins. Methods of altering the ethylene response in a plant by modulating the activity or expression of an F-box protein are described. Also described are methods of identifying compounds that modulate the ethylene response in plants by modulating the level of F-box protein expression or activity.

  16. The ERECTA gene regulates plant transpiration efficiency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Masle, Josette; Gilmore, Scott R; Farquhar, Graham D

    2005-08-11

    Assimilation of carbon by plants incurs water costs. In the many parts of the world where water is in short supply, plant transpiration efficiency, the ratio of carbon fixation to water loss, is critical to plant survival, crop yield and vegetation dynamics. When challenged by variations in their environment, plants often seem to coordinate photosynthesis and transpiration, but significant genetic variation in transpiration efficiency has been identified both between and within species. This has allowed plant breeders to develop effective selection programmes for the improved transpiration efficiency of crops, after it was demonstrated that carbon isotopic discrimination, Delta, of plant matter was a reliable and sensitive marker negatively related to variation in transpiration efficiency. However, little is known of the genetic controls of transpiration efficiency. Here we report the isolation of a gene that regulates transpiration efficiency, ERECTA. We show that ERECTA, a putative leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) known for its effects on inflorescence development, is a major contributor to a locus for Delta on Arabidopsis chromosome 2. Mechanisms include, but are not limited to, effects on stomatal density, epidermal cell expansion, mesophyll cell proliferation and cell-cell contact.

  17. Regulation of the NADPH Oxidase RBOHD During Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Shirasu, Ken; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    Pathogen recognition induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases in both plants and animals. ROS have direct antimicrobial properties, but also serve as signaling molecules to activate further immune outputs. However, ROS production has to be tightly controlled to avoid detrimental effects on host cells, but yet must be produced in the right amount, at the right place and at the right time upon pathogen perception. Plant NADPH oxidases belong to the respiratory burst oxidase homolog (RBOH) family, which contains 10 members in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leads to a rapid, specific and strong production of ROS, which is dependent on RBOHD. RBOHD is mainly controlled by Ca(2+) via direct binding to EF-hand motifs and phosphorylation by Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. Recent studies have, however, revealed a critical role for a Ca(2+)-independent regulation of RBOHD. The plasma membrane-associated cytoplasmic kinase BIK1 (BOTRYTIS-INDUCED KINASE1), which is a direct substrate of the PRR complex, directly interacts with and phosphorylates RBOHD upon PAMP perception. Impairment of these phosphorylation events completely abolishes the function of RBOHD in immunity. These results suggest that RBOHD activity is tightly controlled by multilayered regulations. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling RBOHD activation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles Reveal Insight into Chitosan-Mediated Regulation of Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Kecheng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Chen, Xiaolin; Yang, Haoyue; Li, Pengcheng

    2018-04-18

    Chitosan has been numerously studied as a plant growth regulator and stress tolerance inducer. To investigate the roles of chitosan as bioregulator on plant and unravel its possible metabolic responses mechanisms, we simultaneously investigated mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) expression profiles of wheat seedlings in response to chitosan heptamer. We found 400 chitosan-responsive differentially expressed genes, including 268 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated mRNAs, many of which were related to photosynthesis, primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism, defense responses, and transcription factors. Moreover, miRNAs also participate in chitosan-mediated regulation on plant growth. We identified 87 known and 21 novel miRNAs, among which 56 miRNAs were induced or repressed by chitosan heptamer, such as miRNA156, miRNA159a, miRNA164, miRNA171a, miRNA319, and miRNA1127. The integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in this case provides fundamental information for further investigation of regulation mechanisms of chitosan on plant growth and will facilitate its application in agriculture.

  19. 77 FR 25611 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Implementing Regulations for Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Implementing Regulations for Requirements To Publish Textual... regulations related to publishing textual descriptions of proposed and final critical habitat boundaries in... described in the Regulation Promulgation section of a rulemaking that is published in the Federal Register...

  20. Final Report for Regulation of Embryonic Development in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, John J.

    2013-10-22

    The overall goal of the project was to define the cellular processes that underlie embryo development in plants at a mechanistic level. Our studies focused on a critical transcriptional regulator, Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC1), that is necessary and sufficient to induce processes required for embryo development. Because LEC1 regulates lipid accumulation during the maturation phase of embryo development, information about LEC1 may be useful in designing approaches to enhance biofuel production in plants. During the tenure of this project, we determined the molecular mechanisms by which LEC1 acts as a transcription factor in embryos. We also identified genes directly regulatedmore » by LEC1 and showed that many of these genes are involved in maturation processes. This information has been useful in dissecting the gene regulatory networks controlling embryo development. Finally, LEC1 is a novel isoform of a transcription factor that is conserved among eukaryotes, and LEC1 is active primarily in seeds. Therefore, we determined that the LEC1-type transcription factors first appeared in lycophytes during land plant evolution. Together, this study provides basic information that has implications for biofuel production.« less

  1. Glycosylation Is a Major Regulator of Phenylpropanoid Availability and Biological Activity in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Le Roy, Julien; Huss, Brigitte; Creach, Anne; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2016-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants is responsible for the biosynthesis of a huge amount of secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Both flavonoids and lignins are synthesized at the end of this very diverse metabolic pathway, as well as many intermediate molecules whose precise biological functions remain largely unknown. The diversity of these molecules can be further increased under the action of UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) leading to the production of glycosylated hydroxycinnamates and related aldehydes, alcohols and esters. Glycosylation can change phenylpropanoid solubility, stability and toxic potential, as well as influencing compartmentalization and biological activity. (De)-glycosylation therefore represents an extremely important regulation point in phenylpropanoid homeostasis. In this article we review recent knowledge on the enzymes involved in regulating phenylpropanoid glycosylation status and availability in different subcellular compartments. We also examine the potential link between monolignol glycosylation and lignification by exploring co-expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and phenolic (de)glycosylation genes. Of the different biological roles linked with their particular chemical properties, phenylpropanoids are often correlated with the plant's stress management strategies that are also regulated by glycosylation. UGTs can for instance influence the resistance of plants during infection by microorganisms and be involved in the mechanisms related to environmental changes. The impact of flavonoid glycosylation on the color of flowers, leaves, seeds and fruits will also be discussed. Altogether this paper underlies the fact that glycosylation and deglycosylation are powerful mechanisms allowing plants to regulate phenylpropanoid localisation, availability and biological activity. PMID:27303427

  2. THE USE OF CHEMICALS AS PLANT REGULATORS. AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS TECHNOLOGY, NUMBER 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO ASSIST TEACHERS IN PREPARING POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS FOR AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONS, THIS MODULE IS SPECIFICALLY CONCERNED WITH CHEMICALS AS PLANT REGULATORS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A NATIONAL TASK FORCE ON THE BASIS OF DATA FROM STATE STUDIES. SECTIONS INCLUDE -- (1) CHEMICALS AS MODIFIERS OF PLANT GROWTH, (2)…

  3. Abiotic stress responses in plants: roles of calmodulin-regulated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Amardeep S.; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular changes in calcium ions (Ca2+) in response to different biotic and abiotic stimuli are detected by various sensor proteins in the plant cell. Calmodulin (CaM) is one of the most extensively studied Ca2+-sensing proteins and has been shown to be involved in transduction of Ca2+ signals. After interacting with Ca2+, CaM undergoes conformational change and influences the activities of a diverse range of CaM-binding proteins. A number of CaM-binding proteins have also been implicated in stress responses in plants, highlighting the central role played by CaM in adaptation to adverse environmental conditions. Stress adaptation in plants is a highly complex and multigenic response. Identification and characterization of CaM-modulated proteins in relation to different abiotic stresses could, therefore, prove to be essential for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Various studies have revealed involvement of CaM in regulation of metal ions uptake, generation of reactive oxygen species and modulation of transcription factors such as CAMTA3, GTL1, and WRKY39. Activities of several kinases and phosphatases have also been shown to be modulated by CaM, thus providing further versatility to stress-associated signal transduction pathways. The results obtained from contemporary studies are consistent with the proposed role of CaM as an integrator of different stress signaling pathways, which allows plants to maintain homeostasis between different cellular processes. In this review, we have attempted to present the current state of understanding of the role of CaM in modulating different stress-regulated proteins and its implications in augmenting abiotic stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26528296

  4. Prioritizing plant defence over growth through WRKY regulation facilitates infestation by non-target herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Jin; Li, Jiancai; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Bian, Wenbo; Erb, Matthias; Lou, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Plants generally respond to herbivore attack by increasing resistance and decreasing growth. This prioritization is achieved through the regulation of phytohormonal signaling networks. However, it remains unknown how this prioritization affects resistance against non-target herbivores. In this study, we identify WRKY70 as a specific herbivore-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated rice transcription factor that physically interacts with W-box motifs and prioritizes defence over growth by positively regulating jasmonic acid (JA) and negatively regulating gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis upon attack by the chewing herbivore Chilo suppressalis. WRKY70-dependent JA biosynthesis is required for proteinase inhibitor activation and resistance against C. suppressalis. In contrast, WRKY70 induction increases plant susceptibility against the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Experiments with GA-deficient rice lines identify WRKY70-dependent GA signaling as the causal factor in N. lugens susceptibility. Our study shows that prioritizing defence over growth leads to a significant resistance trade-off with important implications for the evolution and agricultural exploitation of plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04805.001 PMID:26083713

  5. Jasmonate Hormone: Regulating Synthesis of Reduced Carbon Compounds in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Browse, John

    Our original interest in understanding the role of jasmonate (JA) in regulating the final stages of stamen and pollen development led to our discovery of the JAZ repressors, and the molecular mechanism of JA action is now a second important focus of our research. The specific goals for this grant period are to: 1. Investigate the generation and clearance of the hormone with emphasis on the regulation of the OPR3 enzyme and the hydrolysis of JA-Ile. 2. Use dominant-negative and overexpression constructs to explore the role of the MYC5 transcription factor in initiating and regulating JA responses. 3. Investigate specificmore » JAZ protein interactions that will help us to recognize and understand the extended network of processes, such as sulfur nutrition, that interface with JA signaling. The COI1 F-Box protein is a JA-Ile coreceptor and coi1 mutant plants lack JA responses. We have tested the possibility that sites of JA action can be probed by using tissue-specific promoters to drive expression of a COI1-YFP fusion protein in coi1 mutant plants deficient in stamen and pollen function. When we expressed COI1 behind a filament-specific promoter (from the DAD1 gene), filament elongation was restored but not anther dehiscence or pollen function. Three tapetum specific promoters, all failed to restore any of these three functions but, unexpectedly, a promoter active in the stomium and epidermal cells, restored both pollen function and anther dehiscence. Most importantly, our results demonstrate the power of promoter::COI1-YFP constructs in revealing the primary sites of JA-regulated gene expression that control developmental and other responses in neighboring tissues. We now plan to use this new tool to test current hypotheses about JA action in other organs of the plant. The MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 proteins are the primary transcription factors initiating defense and root growth responses to JA signaling. However, transgenic plants overexpressing these proteins do not

  6. Life in the dark: Roots and how they regulate plant-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Chou, C.; Peruzzo, L.; Riley, W. J.; Hao, Z.; Petrov, P.; Newman, G. A.; Versteeg, R.; Blancaflor, E.; Ma, X.; Dafflon, B.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    Roots play a key role in regulating interactions between soil and plants, an important biosphere process critical for soil development and health, global food security, carbon sequestration, and the cycling of elements (water, carbon, nutrients, and environmental contaminants). However, their underground location has hindered studies of plant roots and the role they play in regulating plant-soil interactions. Technological limitations for root phenotyping and the lack of an integrated approach capable of linking root development, its environmental adaptation/modification with subsequent impact on plant health and productivity are major challenges faced by scientists as they seek to understand the plant's hidden half. To overcome these challenges, we combine novel experimental methods with numerical simulations, and conduct controlled studies to explore the dynamic growth of crop roots. We ask how roots adapt to and change the soil environment and their subsequent impacts on plant health and productivity. Specifically, our efforts are focused on (1) developing novel geophysical approaches for non-invasive plant root and rhizosphere characterization; (2) correlating root developments with key canopy traits indicative of plant health and productivity; (3) developing numerical algorithms for novel geophysical root signal processing; (4) establishing plant growth models to explore root-soil interactions and above and below ground traits co-variabilities; and (5) exploring how root development modifies rhizosphere physical, hydrological, and geochemical environments for adaptation and survival. Our preliminary results highlight the potential of using electro-geophysical methods to quantifying key rhizosphere traits, the capability of the ecosys model for mechanistic plant growth simulation and traits correlation exploration, and the combination of multi-physics and numerical approach for a systematic understanding of root growth dynamics, impacts on soil physicochemical

  7. Evolution of plant conducting cells: perspectives from key regulators of vascular cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Misato; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Takenaka, Yuto; Sano, Ryosuke; Demura, Taku

    2017-01-01

    One crucial problem that plants faced during their evolution, particularly during the transition to growth on land, was how to transport water, nutrients, metabolites, and small signaling molecules within a large, multicellular body. As a solution to this problem, land plants developed specific tissues for conducting molecules, called water-conducting cells (WCCs) and food-conducting cells (FCCs). The well-developed WCCs and FCCs in extant plants are the tracheary elements and sieve elements, respectively, which are found in vascular plants. Recent molecular genetic studies revealed that transcriptional networks regulate the differentiation of tracheary and sieve elements, and that the networks governing WCC differentiation are largely conserved among land plant species. In this review, we discuss the molecular evolution of plant conducting cells. By focusing on the evolution of the key transcription factors that regulate vascular cell differentiation, the NAC transcription factor VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN for WCCs and the MYB-coiled-coil (CC)-type transcription factor ALTERED PHLOEM DEVELOPMENT for sieve elements, we describe how land plants evolved molecular systems to produce the specialized cells that function as WCCs and FCCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. E3 ubiquitin ligases: key regulators of hormone signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Dior

    2018-03-07

    Ubiquitin-mediated control of protein stability is central to most aspects of plant hormone signaling. Attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins occurs via an enzymatic cascade with the final step being catalyzed by a family of enzymes known as E3 ubiquitin ligases, which have been classified based on their protein domains and structures. While E3 ubiquitin ligases are conserved among eukaryotes, in plants they are well-known to fulfill unique roles as central regulators of phytohormone signaling, including hormone perception and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. This review will highlight up-to-date findings that have refined well-known E3 ligase-substrate interactions and defined novel E3 ligase substrates that mediate numerous hormone signaling pathways. Additionally, examples of how particular E3 ligases may mediate hormone crosstalk will be discussed as an emerging theme. Looking forward, promising experimental approaches and methods that will provide deeper mechanistic insight into the roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases in plants will be considered. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Jasmonate response decay and defense metabolite accumulation contributes to age-regulated dynamics of plant insect resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ying-Bo; Liu, Yao-Qian; Chen, Dian-Yang; Chen, Fang-Yan; Fang, Xin; Hong, Gao-Jie; Wang, Ling-Jian; Wang, Jia-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2017-01-01

    Immunity deteriorates with age in animals but comparatively little is known about the temporal regulation of plant resistance to herbivores. The phytohormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of plant insect defense. Here, we show that the JA response decays progressively in Arabidopsis. We show that this decay is regulated by the miR156-targeted SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE9 (SPL9) group of proteins, which can interact with JA ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, including JAZ3. As SPL9 levels gradually increase, JAZ3 accumulates and the JA response is attenuated. We provide evidence that this pathway contributes to insect resistance in young plants. Interestingly however, despite the decay in JA response, older plants are still comparatively more resistant to both the lepidopteran generalist Helicoverpa armigera and the specialist Plutella xylostella, along with increased accumulation of glucosinolates. We propose a model whereby constitutive accumulation of defense compounds plays a role in compensating for age-related JA-response attenuation during plant maturation. PMID:28067238

  10. Diversity and regulation of plant Ca2+ pumps: insights from expression in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sze, H.; Liang, F.; Hwang, I.; Curran, A. C.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The spatial and temporal regulation of calcium concentration in plant cells depends on the coordinate activities of channels and active transporters located on different organelles and membranes. Several Ca2+ pumps have been identified and characterized by functional expression of plant genes in a yeast mutant (K616). This expression system has opened the way to a genetic and biochemical characterization of the regulatory and catalytic features of diverse Ca2+ pumps. Plant Ca(2+)-ATPases fall into two major types: AtECA1 represents one of four or more members of the type IIA (ER-type) Ca(2+)-ATPases in Arabidopsis, and AtACA2 is one of seven or more members of the type IIB (PM-type) Ca(2+)-ATPases that are regulated by a novel amino terminal domain. Type IIB pumps are widely distributed on membranes, including the PM (plasma membrane), vacuole, and ER (endoplasmic reticulum). The regulatory domain serves multiple functions, including autoinhibition, calmodulin binding, and sites for modification by phosphorylation. This domain, however, is considerably diverse among several type IIB ATPases, suggesting that the pumps are differentially regulated. Understanding of Ca2+ transporters at the molecular level is providing insights into their roles in signaling networks and in regulating fundamental processes of cell biology.

  11. 7 CFR 1131.76 - Payments by handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1131.76 Section 1131.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1131.76 Payments by handler operating...

  12. 7 CFR 1131.76 - Payments by handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1131.76 Section 1131.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1131.76 Payments by handler operating...

  13. 7 CFR 319.37-2a - Taxa of regulated plants for planting whose importation is not authorized pending pest risk...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... authorized pending pest risk analysis while the information presented by commenters is analyzed and... importation is not authorized pending pest risk analysis. 319.37-2a Section 319.37-2a Agriculture Regulations... plants for planting whose importation is not authorized pending pest risk analysis. (a) Determination by...

  14. YODA MAP3K kinase regulates plant immune responses conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Sopeña-Torres, Sara; Jordá, Lucía; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Miedes, Eva; Escudero, Viviana; Swami, Sanjay; López, Gemma; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Lassowskat, Ines; Lee, Justin; Gu, Yangnan; Haigis, Sabine; Alexander, Danny; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Muñoz-Barrios, Antonio; Bednarek, Pawel; Somerville, Shauna; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Hahn, Michael G; Scheel, Dierk; Molina, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascades play essential roles in plants by transducing developmental cues and environmental signals into cellular responses. Among the latter are microbe-associated molecular patterns perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which trigger immunity. We found that YODA (YDA) - a MAPK kinase kinase regulating several Arabidopsis developmental processes, like stomatal patterning - also modulates immune responses. Resistance to pathogens is compromised in yda alleles, whereas plants expressing the constitutively active YDA (CA-YDA) protein show broad-spectrum resistance to fungi, bacteria, and oomycetes with different colonization modes. YDA functions in the same pathway as ERECTA (ER) Receptor-Like Kinase, regulating both immunity and stomatal patterning. ER-YDA-mediated immune responses act in parallel to canonical disease resistance pathways regulated by phytohormones and PRRs. CA-YDA plants exhibit altered cell-wall integrity and constitutively express defense-associated genes, including some encoding putative small secreted peptides and PRRs whose impairment resulted in enhanced susceptibility phenotypes. CA-YDA plants show strong reprogramming of their phosphoproteome, which contains protein targets distinct from described MAPKs substrates. Our results suggest that, in addition to stomata development, the ER-YDA pathway regulates an immune surveillance system conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance that is distinct from the canonical pathways mediated by described PRRs and defense hormones. © 2018 Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Jian; Chen, Taiping; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. PMID:21321601

  16. New insights into the regulation of aquaporins by the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in maize plants under drought stress and possible implications for plant performance.

    PubMed

    Bárzana, Gloria; Aroca, Ricardo; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Chaumont, François; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between modulation by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) of aquaporin expression in the host plant and changes in root hydraulic conductance, plant water status, and performance under stressful conditions is not well known. This investigation aimed to elucidate how the AM symbiosis modulates the expression of the whole set of aquaporin genes in maize plants under different growing and drought stress conditions, as well as to characterize some of these aquaporins in order to shed further light on the molecules that may be involved in the mycorrhizal responses to drought. The AM symbiosis regulated a wide number of aquaporins in the host plant, comprising members of the different aquaporin subfamilies. The regulation of these genes depends on the watering conditions and the severity of the drought stress imposed. Some of these aquaporins can transport water and also other molecules which are of physiological importance for plant performance. AM plants grew and developed better than non-AM plants under the different conditions assayed. Thus, for the first time, this study relates the well-known better performance of AM plants under drought stress to not only the water movement in their tissues but also the mobilization of N compounds, glycerol, signaling molecules, or metalloids with a role in abiotic stress tolerance. Future studies should elucidate the specific function of each aquaporin isoform regulated by the AM symbiosis in order to shed further light on how the symbiosis alters the plant fitness under stressful conditions.

  17. Spatial Regulation of Root Growth: Placing the Plant TOR Pathway in a Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Barrada, Adam; Montané, Marie-Hélène; Robaglia, Christophe; Menand, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain specialized structures, such as a cell wall and a large vacuole, which play a major role in cell growth. Roots follow an organized pattern of development, making them the organs of choice for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of cell proliferation and growth in plants. During root growth, cells originate from the initials surrounding the quiescent center, proliferate in the division zone of the meristem, and then increase in length in the elongation zone, reaching their final size and differentiation stage in the mature zone. Phytohormones, especially auxins and cytokinins, control the dynamic balance between cell division and differentiation and therefore organ size. Plant growth is also regulated by metabolites and nutrients, such as the sugars produced by photosynthesis or nitrate assimilated from the soil. Recent literature has shown that the conserved eukaryotic TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase pathway plays an important role in orchestrating plant growth. We will summarize how the regulation of cell proliferation and cell expansion by phytohormones are at the heart of root growth and then discuss recent data indicating that the TOR pathway integrates hormonal and nutritive signals to orchestrate root growth. PMID:26295391

  18. Down-regulation of tissue N:P ratios in terrestrial plants by elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qi; Hui, Dafeng; Luo, Yiqi; Elser, James; Wang, Ying-ping; Loladze, Irakli; Zhang, Quanfa; Dennis, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations generally alter element stoichiometry in plants. However, a comprehensive evaluation of the elevated CO2 impact on plant nitrogen: phosphorus (N:P) ratios and the underlying mechanism has not been conducted. We synthesized the results from 112 previously published studies using meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of elevated CO2 on the N:P ratio of terrestrial plants and to explore the underlying mechanism based on plant growth and soil P dynamics. Our results show that terrestrial plants grown under elevated CO2 had lower N:P ratios in both above- and belowground biomass across different ecosystem types. The response ratio for plant N:P was negatively correlated with the response ratio for plant growth in croplands and grasslands, and showed a stronger relationship for P than for N. In addition, the CO2-induced down-regulation of plant N:P was accompanied by 19.3% and 4.2% increases in soil phosphatase activity and labile P, respectively, and a 10.1% decrease in total soil P. Our results show that down-regulation of plant N:P under elevated CO2 corresponds with accelerated soil P cycling. These findings should be useful for better understanding of terrestrial plant stoichiometry in response to elevated CO2 and of the underlying mechanisms affecting nutrient dynamics under climate change.

  19. Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth

    PubMed Central

    Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Jobbágy, Esteban G.; Jackson, Robert B.; Otero-Casal, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Plant rooting depth affects ecosystem resilience to environmental stress such as drought. Deep roots connect deep soil/groundwater to the atmosphere, thus influencing the hydrologic cycle and climate. Deep roots enhance bedrock weathering, thus regulating the long-term carbon cycle. However, we know little about how deep roots go and why. Here, we present a global synthesis of 2,200 root observations of >1,000 species along biotic (life form, genus) and abiotic (precipitation, soil, drainage) gradients. Results reveal strong sensitivities of rooting depth to local soil water profiles determined by precipitation infiltration depth from the top (reflecting climate and soil), and groundwater table depth from below (reflecting topography-driven land drainage). In well-drained uplands, rooting depth follows infiltration depth; in waterlogged lowlands, roots stay shallow, avoiding oxygen stress below the water table; in between, high productivity and drought can send roots many meters down to the groundwater capillary fringe. This framework explains the contrasting rooting depths observed under the same climate for the same species but at distinct topographic positions. We assess the global significance of these hydrologic mechanisms by estimating root water-uptake depths using an inverse model, based on observed productivity and atmosphere, at 30″ (∼1-km) global grids to capture the topography critical to soil hydrology. The resulting patterns of plant rooting depth bear a strong topographic and hydrologic signature at landscape to global scales. They underscore a fundamental plant–water feedback pathway that may be critical to understanding plant-mediated global change. PMID:28923923

  20. Regulation of leaf hydraulics: from molecular to whole plant levels.

    PubMed

    Prado, Karine; Maurel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The water status of plant leaves is dependent on both stomatal regulation and water supply from the vasculature to inner tissues. The present review addresses the multiple physiological and mechanistic facets of the latter process. Inner leaf tissues contribute to at least a third of the whole resistance to water flow within the plant. Physiological studies indicated that leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf) is highly dependent on the anatomy, development and age of the leaf and can vary rapidly in response to physiological or environmental factors such as leaf hydration, light, temperature, or nutrient supply. Differences in venation pattern provide a basis for variations in K leaf during development and between species. On a short time (hour) scale, the hydraulic resistance of the vessels can be influenced by transpiration-induced cavitations, wall collapses, and changes in xylem sap composition. The extravascular compartment includes all living tissues (xylem parenchyma, bundle sheath, and mesophyll) that transport water from xylem vessels to substomatal chambers. Pharmacological inhibition and reverse genetics studies have shown that this compartment involves water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs) that facilitate water transport across cell membranes. In many plant species, AQPs are present in all leaf tissues with a preferential expression in the vascular bundles. The various mechanisms that allow adjustment of K leaf to specific environmental conditions include transcriptional regulation of AQPs and changes in their abundance, trafficking, and intrinsic activity. Finally, the hydraulics of inner leaf tissues can have a strong impact on the dynamic responses of leaf water potential and stomata, and as a consequence on plant carbon economy and leaf expansion growth. The manipulation of these functions could help optimize the entire plant performance and its adaptation to extreme conditions over short and long time scales.

  1. Regulation of leaf hydraulics: from molecular to whole plant levels

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Karine; Maurel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The water status of plant leaves is dependent on both stomatal regulation and water supply from the vasculature to inner tissues. The present review addresses the multiple physiological and mechanistic facets of the latter process. Inner leaf tissues contribute to at least a third of the whole resistance to water flow within the plant. Physiological studies indicated that leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) is highly dependent on the anatomy, development and age of the leaf and can vary rapidly in response to physiological or environmental factors such as leaf hydration, light, temperature, or nutrient supply. Differences in venation pattern provide a basis for variations in Kleaf during development and between species. On a short time (hour) scale, the hydraulic resistance of the vessels can be influenced by transpiration-induced cavitations, wall collapses, and changes in xylem sap composition. The extravascular compartment includes all living tissues (xylem parenchyma, bundle sheath, and mesophyll) that transport water from xylem vessels to substomatal chambers. Pharmacological inhibition and reverse genetics studies have shown that this compartment involves water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs) that facilitate water transport across cell membranes. In many plant species, AQPs are present in all leaf tissues with a preferential expression in the vascular bundles. The various mechanisms that allow adjustment of Kleaf to specific environmental conditions include transcriptional regulation of AQPs and changes in their abundance, trafficking, and intrinsic activity. Finally, the hydraulics of inner leaf tissues can have a strong impact on the dynamic responses of leaf water potential and stomata, and as a consequence on plant carbon economy and leaf expansion growth. The manipulation of these functions could help optimize the entire plant performance and its adaptation to extreme conditions over short and long time scales. PMID:23874349

  2. The Phaseolus vulgaris PvTRX1h gene regulates plant hormone biosynthesis in embryogenic callus from common bean.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Aarón; Cabrera-Ponce, José L; Gamboa-Becerra, Roberto; Luna-Martínez, Francisco; Winkler, Robert; Álvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Common bean is the most important grain legume in the human diet. Bean improvement efforts have been focused on classical breeding techniques because bean is recalcitrant to both somatic embryogenesis and in vitro regeneration. This study was undertaken to better understand the process of somatic embryogenesis in the common bean. We focused on the mechanisms by which somatic embryogenesis in plants is regulated and the interaction of these mechanisms with plant hormones. Specifically, we examined the role of the gene PvTRX1h, an ortholog of a major known histone lysine methyltransferase in plants, in somatic embryo generation. Given the problems with regeneration and transformation, we chose to develop and use regeneration-competent callus that could be successively transformed. Embryogenic calli of common bean were generated and transformed with the PvTRX1hRiA construction to down-regulate, by RNA interference, expression of the PvTRX1h gene. Plant hormone content was measured by mass spectrometry and gene expression was assessed by q-PCR. Detailed histological analysis was performed on selected transgenic embryogenic calli. It was determined that down-regulation of PvTRX1h gene was accompanied by altered concentrations of plant hormones in the calli. PvTRX1h regulated the expression of genes involved in auxin biosynthesis and embryogenic calli in which PvTRX1h was down-regulated were capable of differentiation into somatic embryos. Also, down-regulation of PvTRX1h showed increased transcript abundance of a gene coding for a second histone lysine methyltransferase, PvASHH2h. Accordingly, the PvTRX1h gene is involved in the synthesis of plant hormones in common bean callus. These results shed light on the crosstalk among histone methyltransferases and plant hormone signaling and on gene regulation during somatic embryo generation.

  3. Regulation of plant immunity through ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin-AtSR1/CAMTA3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Du, Liqun; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Poovaiah, B W

    2014-04-01

    Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are essential signals for activation of plant immunity. It has also been reported that Ca(2+) signals suppress salicylic acid-mediated plant defense through AtSR1/CAMTA3, a member of the Ca(2+) /calmodulin-regulated transcription factor family that is conserved in multicellular eukaryotes. How plants overcome this negative regulation to mount an effective defense response during a stage of intracellular Ca(2+) surge is unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of an important component of ubiquitin ligase, and the associated AtSR1 turnover. The AtSR1 interaction protein 1 (SR1IP1) was identified by CytoTrap two-hybrid screening. The loss-of-function mutant of SR1IP1 is more susceptible to bacterial pathogens, and over-expression of SR1IP1 confers enhanced resistance, indicating that SR1IP1 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. SR1IP1 and AtSR1 act in the same signaling pathway to regulate plant immunity. SR1IP1 contains the structural features of a substrate adaptor in cullin 3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, and was shown to serve as a substrate adaptor that recruits AtSR1 for ubiquitination and degradation when plants are challenged with pathogens. Hence, SR1IP1 positively regulates plant immunity by removing the defense suppressor AtSR1. These findings provide a mechanistic insight into how Ca(2+) -mediated actions are coordinated to achieve effective plant immunity. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    DOE PAGES

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightlymore » regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.« less

  5. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Loqué, Dominique; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightly regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. Beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes. PMID:26138488

  6. Tight regulation of plant immune responses by combining promoter and suicide exon elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Tania L.; Liang, Yan; Nguyen, Bao N.

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is activated when plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize the presence of pathogen effector proteins delivered into host cells. The ETI response generally encompasses a defensive ‘hypersensitive response’ (HR) that involves programmed cell death at the site of pathogen recognition. While many R protein and effector protein pairs are known to trigger HR, other components of the ETI signaling pathway remain elusive. Effector genes regulated by inducible promoters cause background HR due to leaky protein expression, preventing the generation of relevant transgenic plant lines. By employing the HyP5SM suicide exon, we have developed a strategy to tightlymore » regulate effector proteins such that HR is chemically inducible and non-leaky. This alternative splicing-based gene regulation system was shown to successfully control Bs2/AvrBs2-dependent and RPP1/ATR1Δ51-dependent HR in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana tabacum, respectively. It was also used to generate viable and healthy transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that inducibly initiate HR. In conclusion, beyond enabling studies on the ETI pathway, our regulatory strategy is generally applicable to reduce or eliminate undesired background expression of transgenes.« less

  7. 76 FR 28405 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Implementing Regulations for Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Implementing Regulations for Requirements To Publish... as the Services) propose to revise regulations related to publishing textual descriptions of proposed... published in the Federal Register will be the official delineation of the designation, and we will continue...

  8. Loose Plant Architecture1, an INDETERMINATE DOMAIN protein involved in shoot gravitropism, regulates plant architecture in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinru; Tang, Ding; Li, Ming; Wang, Kejian; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2013-01-01

    Tiller angle and leaf angle are two important components of rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture that play a crucial role in determining grain yield. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) gene in rice, the functional ortholog of the AtIDD15/SHOOT GRAVITROPISM5 (SGR5) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). LPA1 regulates tiller angle and leaf angle by controlling the adaxial growth of tiller node and lamina joint. LPA1 was also found to affect shoot gravitropism. Expression pattern analysis suggested that LPA1 influences plant architecture by affecting the gravitropism of leaf sheath pulvinus and lamina joint. However, LPA1 only influences gravity perception or signal transduction in coleoptile gravitropism by regulating the sedimentation rate of amyloplasts, distinct from the actions of LAZY1. LPA1 encodes a plant-specific INDETERMINATE DOMAIN protein and defines a novel subfamily of 28 INDETERMINATE DOMAIN proteins with several unique conserved features. LPA1 is localized in the nucleus and functions as an active transcriptional repressor, an activity mainly conferred by a conserved ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression-like motif. Further analysis suggests that LPA1 participates in a complicated transcriptional and protein interaction network and has evolved novel functions distinct from SGR5. This study not only facilitates the understanding of gravitropism mechanisms but also generates a useful genetic material for rice breeding.

  9. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  10. MYC2 Orchestrates a Hierarchical Transcriptional Cascade That Regulates Jasmonate-Mediated Plant Immunity in Tomato[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Deng, Lei; Wu, Fangming; Huang, Zhuo; Zhou, Ming; Chen, Qian; Zhong, Silin

    2017-01-01

    The hormone jasmonate (JA), which functions in plant immunity, regulates resistance to pathogen infection and insect attack through triggering genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming in plants. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (TF) MYC2 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) acts downstream of the JA receptor to orchestrate JA-mediated activation of both the wounding and pathogen responses. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) coupled with RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) assays, we identified 655 MYC2-targeted JA-responsive genes. These genes are highly enriched in Gene Ontology categories related to TFs and the early response to JA, indicating that MYC2 functions at a high hierarchical level to regulate JA-mediated gene transcription. We also identified a group of MYC2-targeted TFs (MTFs) that may directly regulate the JA-induced transcription of late defense genes. Our findings suggest that MYC2 and its downstream MTFs form a hierarchical transcriptional cascade during JA-mediated plant immunity that initiates and amplifies transcriptional output. As proof of concept, we showed that during plant resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, MYC2 and the MTF JA2-Like form a transcription module that preferentially regulates wounding-responsive genes, whereas MYC2 and the MTF ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR.C3 form a transcription module that preferentially regulates pathogen-responsive genes. PMID:28733419

  11. The effects of exogenous plant growth regulators in the phytoextraction of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Eliana; Pouget, Joël; Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Barbafieri, Meri

    2008-03-01

    The term "assisted phytoextraction" usually refers to the process of applying a chemical additive to contaminated soil in order to increase the metal uptake by crop plants. In this study three commercially available plant growth regulators (PGRs) based on cytokinins (CKs) were used to boost the assisted phytoextraction of Pb and Zn in contaminated soil collected from a former manufactured gas-plant site. The effects of EDTA treatment in soil and PGR treatment in leaves of Helianthus annuus were investigated in terms of dry weight biomass, Pb and Zn accumulation in the upper parts of the plants, Pb and Zn phytoextraction efficiency and transpiration rate. Metal solubility in soil and its subsequent accumulation in shoots were markedly enhanced by EDTA. The combined effects of EDTA and cytokine resulted in an increase in the Pb and Zn phytoextraction efficiency (up to 890% and 330%, respectively, compared to untreated plants) and up to a 50% increase in foliar transpiration. Our results indicate that exogenous PGRs based on CKs can positively assist the phytoextraction increasing the biomass production, the metal accumulation in shoots and the plant transpiration. The observed increase in biomass could be related to its action in stimulation of cell division and shoot initiation. On the other hand, the increase in metal accumulation in upper parts of plant could be related to both the role of PGRs in the enhancement of plant resistance to stress (as toxic metals) and the increase in transpiration rate, i.e. flux of water-soluble soil components and contaminants by the regulation of stomatal opening.

  12. SEUSS and PIF4 Coordinately Regulate Light and Temperature Signaling Pathways to Control Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Huai, Junling; Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Jialong; Ma, Tingting; Zha, Ping; Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2018-05-02

    Plants continuously monitor environmental conditions (such as light and temperature) and adjust their growth and development accordingly. The transcription factor PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) regulates both light and temperature signaling pathways. Here, we identified ENHANCED PHOTOMORPHOGENIC2 (EPP2) as a new repressor of photomorphogenesis in red, far-red, and blue light. Map-based cloning revealed that EPP2 encodes the SEUSS (SEU) transcription regulator. The C-terminus of SEU has transcriptional activation activity and SEU physically interacts with PIF4. Moreover, SEU promotes the expression of many genes, including auxin biosynthetic and responsive genes, and regulates IAA levels in plants. SEU associates with regulatory regions in INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID INDUCIBLE6 (IAA6) and IAA19 in a PIF4-independent manner, whereas the binding of PIF4 to these genes requires SEU. Furthermore, mutations in SEU affect H3K4me3 methylation at IAA6 and IAA19, and SEU positively regulates warm temperature-mediated hypocotyl growth together with PIF4. Therefore, our results reveal that SEU acts as a central regulator to integrate light and temperature signals to control plant growth by coordinating with PIF4. Copyright © 2018 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction in the ICE-CBF-COR Signaling Pathway during Cold Stress in Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Jin, Ya-Nan; Ding, Xi-Han; Wang, Wen-Jia; Zhai, Shan-Shan; Bai, Li-Ping; Guo, Zhi-Fu

    2017-10-01

    Low temperature is an abiotic stress that adversely affects the growth and production of plants. Resistance and adaptation of plants to cold stress is dependent upon the activation of molecular networks and pathways involved in signal transduction and the regulation of cold-stress related genes. Because it has numerous and complex genes, regulation factors, and pathways, research on the ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway is the most studied and detailed, which is thought to be rather important for cold resistance of plants. In this review, we focus on the function of each member, interrelation among members, and the influence of manipulators and repressors in the ICE-CBF-COR pathway. In addition, regulation and signal transduction concerning plant hormones, circadian clock, and light are discussed. The studies presented provide a detailed picture of the ICE-CBF-COR pathway.

  14. 7 CFR 1124.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1124.76 Section 1124.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1124.76 Payments by a...

  15. 7 CFR 1032.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1032.76 Section 1032.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE CENTRAL MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1032.76 Payments by a handler...

  16. 7 CFR 1005.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1005.76 Section 1005.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1005.76 Payments by a handler...

  17. 7 CFR 1001.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1001.76 Section 1001.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE NORTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1001.76 Payments by a handler...

  18. 7 CFR 1006.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1006.76 Section 1006.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1006.76 Payments by a handler...

  19. 7 CFR 1033.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1033.76 Section 1033.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE MIDEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1033.76 Payments by a handler...

  20. 7 CFR 1032.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1032.76 Section 1032.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE CENTRAL MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1032.76 Payments by a handler...

  1. 7 CFR 1126.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1126.76 Section 1126.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1126.76 Payments by a handler...

  2. 7 CFR 1126.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1126.76 Section 1126.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1126.76 Payments by a handler...

  3. 7 CFR 1005.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1005.76 Section 1005.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1005.76 Payments by a handler...

  4. 7 CFR 1001.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1001.76 Section 1001.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE NORTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1001.76 Payments by a handler...

  5. 7 CFR 1006.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1006.76 Section 1006.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1006.76 Payments by a handler...

  6. 7 CFR 1124.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1124.76 Section 1124.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1124.76 Payments by a...

  7. 7 CFR 1033.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1033.76 Section 1033.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE MIDEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1033.76 Payments by a handler...

  8. 7 CFR 1007.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1007.76 Section 1007.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1007.76 Payments by a handler...

  9. 7 CFR 1007.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1007.76 Section 1007.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1007.76 Payments by a handler...

  10. Iron-binding haemerythrin RING ubiquitin ligases regulate plant iron responses and accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Nagasaka, Seiji; Senoura, Takeshi; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms. Plants transcriptionally induce genes involved in iron acquisition under conditions of low iron availability, but the nature of the deficiency signal and its sensors are unknown. Here we report the identification of new iron regulators in rice, designated Oryza sativa Haemerythrin motif-containing Really Interesting New Gene (RING)- and Zinc-finger protein 1 (OsHRZ1) and OsHRZ2. OsHRZ1, OsHRZ2 and their Arabidopsis homologue BRUTUS bind iron and zinc, and possess ubiquitination activity. OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are susceptible to degradation in roots irrespective of iron conditions. OsHRZ-knockdown plants exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency, and accumulate more iron in their shoots and grains irrespective of soil iron conditions. The expression of iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron utilization is enhanced in OsHRZ-knockdown plants, mostly under iron-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are iron-binding sensors that negatively regulate iron acquisition under conditions of iron sufficiency. PMID:24253678

  11. Regulation of OsSPL14 by OsmiR156 defines ideal plant architecture in rice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yongqing; Wang, Yonghong; Xue, Dawei; Wang, Jing; Yan, Meixian; Liu, Guifu; Dong, Guojun; Zeng, Dali; Lu, Zefu; Zhu, Xudong; Qian, Qian; Li, Jiayang

    2010-06-01

    Increasing crop yield is a major challenge for modern agriculture. The development of new plant types, which is known as ideal plant architecture (IPA), has been proposed as a means to enhance rice yield potential over that of existing high-yield varieties. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a semidominant quantitative trait locus, IPA1 (Ideal Plant Architecture 1), which profoundly changes rice plant architecture and substantially enhances rice grain yield. The IPA1 quantitative trait locus encodes OsSPL14 (SOUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE 14) and is regulated by microRNA (miRNA) OsmiR156 in vivo. We demonstrate that a point mutation in OsSPL14 perturbs OsmiR156-directed regulation of OsSPL14, generating an 'ideal' rice plant with a reduced tiller number, increased lodging resistance and enhanced grain yield. Our study suggests that OsSPL14 may help improve rice grain yield by facilitating the breeding of new elite rice varieties.

  12. GDP-D-mannose epimerase regulates male gametophyte development, plant growth and leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tiancong; Liu, Zhipeng; Fan, Meng; Chen, Yan; Tian, Haixia; Wu, Dewei; Gao, Hua; Ren, Chunmei; Song, Susheng; Xie, Daoxin

    2017-09-04

    Plant GDP-D-mannose epimerase (GME) converts GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, a precursor of both L-ascorbate (vitamin C) and cell wall polysaccharides. However, the genetic functions of GME in Arabidopsis are unclear. In this study, we found that mutations in Arabidopsis GME affect pollen germination, pollen tube elongation, and transmission and development of the male gametophyte through analysis of the heterozygous GME/gme plants and the homozygous gme plants. Arabidopsis gme mutants also exhibit severe growth defects and early leaf senescence. Surprisingly, the defects in male gametophyte in the gme plants are not restored by L-ascorbate, boric acid or GDP-L-galactose, though boric acid rescues the growth defects of the mutants, indicating that GME may regulate male gametophyte development independent of L-ascorbate and GDP-L-galactose. These results reveal key roles for Arabidopsis GME in reproductive development, vegetative growth and leaf senescence, and suggest that GME regulates plant growth and controls male gametophyte development in different manners.

  13. 7 CFR 1030.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1030.76 Section 1030.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE UPPER MIDWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1030.76 Payments by a handler...

  14. 7 CFR 1030.76 - Payments by a handler operating a partially regulated distributing plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distributing plant. 1030.76 Section 1030.76 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE UPPER MIDWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Payments for Milk § 1030.76 Payments by a handler...

  15. Transport and transcriptional regulation of oil production in plants.

    PubMed

    Manan, Sehrish; Chen, Beibei; She, Guangbiao; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhao, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) serves as an energy reservoir and phospholipids as build blocks of biomembrane to support plant life. They also provide human with foods and nutrients. Multi-compartmentalized biosynthesis, trafficking or cross-membrane transport of lipid intermediates or precursors and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent progress has aided our understanding of how fatty acids (FAs) and phospholipids are transported between the chloroplast, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and how the ins and outs of lipids take place in the peroxisome and other organelles for lipid metabolism and function. In addition, information regarding the transcriptional regulation network associated with FA and TAG biosynthesis has been further enriched. Recent breakthroughs made in lipid transport and transcriptional regulation has provided significant insights into our comprehensive understanding of plant lipid biology. This review attempts to highlight the recent progress made on lipid synthesis, transport, degradation, and their regulatory mechanisms. Metabolic engineering, based on these knowledge-powered technologies for production of edible oils or biofuels, is reviewed. The biotechnological application of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and transporters, for oil production and composition improvement, are discussed in a broad context in order to provide a fresh scenario for researchers and to guide future research and applications.

  16. Control of Western Dwarf Mistletoe with the plant-growth regulator Ethephon.

    Treesearch

    Catherine A. Parks; James T. Hoffman

    1991-01-01

    Ethephon (Ethrel), an ethylene-releasing plant-growth regulator, was applied with a hydraulic sprayer to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) infected with dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium campylopodum Engelm. f. tsugense (Rosend.) Gill) in the Emmett Ranger District, Boise National Forest. Abscission rates of 60 to...

  17. The maize WRKY transcription factor ZmWRKY17 negatively regulates salt stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ronghao; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Congsheng; Wang, Yan; Wu, Min; Zhao, Yang; Ma, Qing; Xiang, Yan; Cheng, Beijiu

    2017-12-01

    We cloned and characterized the ZmWRKY17 gene from maize. Overexpression of ZmWRKY17 in Arabidopsis led to increased sensitivity to salt stress and decreased ABA sensitivity through regulating the expression of some ABA- and stress-responsive genes. The WRKY transcription factors have been reported to function as positive or negative regulators in many different biological processes including plant development, defense regulation and stress response. This study isolated a maize WRKY gene, ZmWRKY17, and characterized its role in tolerance to salt stress by generating transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression of the ZmWRKY17 was up-regulated by drought, salt and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. ZmWRKY17 was localized in the nucleus with no transcriptional activation in yeast. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that ZmWRKY17 can specifically bind to W-box, and it can activate W-box-dependent transcription in planta. Heterologous overexpression of ZmWRKY17 in Arabidopsis remarkably reduced plant tolerance to salt stress, as determined through physiological analyses of the cotyledons greening rate, root growth, relative electrical leakage and malondialdehyde content. Additionally, ZmWRKY17 transgenic plants showed decreased sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and early seedling growth. Transgenic plants accumulated higher content of ABA than wild-type (WT) plants under NaCl condition. Transcriptome and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that some stress-related genes in transgenic seedlings showed lower expression level than that in the WT when treated with NaCl. Taken together, these results suggest that ZmWRKY17 may act as a negative regulator involved in the salt stress responses through ABA signalling.

  18. Remodelling of lace plant leaves: antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Dauphinee, Adrian N; Fletcher, Jacob I; Denbigh, Georgia L; Lacroix, Christian R; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2017-07-01

    Antioxidants and reactive oxygen species are integral for programmed cell death signaling during perforation formation in the lace plant ( Aponogeton madagascariensis ). The lace plant is an excellent model system for studying developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). During early lace plant leaf development, PCD systematically deletes cells resulting in a perforated leaf morphology that is unique in planta. A distinct feature in young lace plant leaves is an abundance of anthocyanins, which have antioxidant properties. The first sign of PCD induction is the loss of anthocyanin pigmentation in cells that are targeted for destruction, which results in a visible gradient of cell death. The cellular dynamics and time course of lace plant PCD are well documented; however, the signals involved in the pathway remain elusive. This study investigates the roles of antioxidants and ROS in developmental PCD signaling during lace plant perforation formation. The involvement of antioxidants and ROS in the pathway was determined using a variety of techniques including pharmacological whole plant experimentation, long-term live cell imaging, the 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid anti-radical activity assay, and western blot analysis. Results indicate that antioxidants and ROS are key regulators of PCD during the remodelling of lace plant leaves.

  19. Structural Evolution of Differential Amino Acid Effector Regulation in Plant Chorismate Mutases*

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Corey S.; Xu, Ang; Jez, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Chorismate mutase converts chorismate into prephenate for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis. To understand the molecular basis of allosteric regulation in the plant chorismate mutases, we analyzed the three Arabidopsis thaliana chorismate mutase isoforms (AtCM1–3) and determined the x-ray crystal structures of AtCM1 in complex with phenylalanine and tyrosine. Functional analyses show a wider range of effector control in the Arabidopsis chorismate mutases than previously reported. AtCM1 is activated by tryptophan with phenylalanine and tyrosine acting as negative effectors; however, tryptophan, cysteine, and histidine activate AtCM3. AtCM2 is a nonallosteric form. The crystal structure of AtCM1 in complex with tyrosine and phenylalanine identifies differences in the effector sites of the allosterically regulated yeast enzyme and the other two Arabidopsis isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the effector site reveals key features leading to differential effector regulation in these enzymes. In AtCM1, mutations of Gly-213 abolish allosteric regulation, as observed in AtCM2. A second effector site position, Gly-149 in AtCM1 and Asp-132 in AtCM3, controls amino acid effector specificity in AtCM1 and AtCM3. Comparisons of chorismate mutases from multiple plants suggest that subtle differences in the effector site are conserved in different lineages and may lead to specialized regulation of this branch point enzyme. PMID:25160622

  20. Role and regulation of autophagy in heat stress responses of tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jian; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are constantly exposed to a wide spectrum of stress conditions such as high temperature, which causes protein misfolding. Misfolded proteins are highly toxic and must be efficiently removed to reduce cellular proteotoxic stress if restoration of native conformations is unsuccessful. Although selective autophagy is known to function in protein quality control by targeting degradation of misfolded and potentially toxic proteins, its role and regulation in heat stress responses have not been analyzed in crop plants. In the present study, we found that heat stress induced expression of autophagy-related (ATG) genes and accumulation of autophagosomes in tomato plants. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of tomato ATG5 and ATG7 genes resulted in increased sensitivity of tomato plants to heat stress based on both increased development of heat stress symptoms and compromised photosynthetic parameters of heat-stressed leaf tissues. Silencing of tomato homologs for the selective autophagy receptor NBR1, which targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates, also compromised tomato heat tolerance. To better understand the regulation of heat-induced autophagy, we found that silencing of tomato ATG5, ATG7, or NBR1 compromised heat-induced expression of not only the targeted genes but also other autophagy-related genes. Furthermore, we identified two tomato genes encoding proteins highly homologous to Arabidopsis WRKY33 transcription factor, which has been previously shown to interact physically with an autophagy protein. Silencing of tomato WRKY33 genes compromised tomato heat tolerance and reduced heat-induced ATG gene expression and autophagosome accumulation. Based on these results, we propose that heat-induced autophagy in tomato is subject to cooperative regulation by both WRKY33 and ATG proteins and plays a critical role in tomato heat tolerance, mostly likely through selective removal of heat-induced protein aggregates. PMID:24817875

  1. Oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and jasmonates: nontraditional regulators of plant growth, development, and gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1997-01-01

    Each of the nontraditional plant hormones reviewed in this article, oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and JA, can exert major effects on plant growth and development. However, in many cases, the mechanisms by which these compounds are involved in the endogenous regulation of morphogenesis remain to be established. Nevertheless, the use of mutant or transgenic plants with altered levels or perception of these hormones is leading to phenomenal increases in our understanding of the roles they play in the life cycle of plants. It is likely that in the future, novel modulators of plant growth and development will be identified; some will perhaps be related to the peptide encoded by ENOD40 (Van de Sande et al., 1996), which modifies the action of auxin. PMID:9254935

  2. Oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and jasmonates: nontraditional regulators of plant growth, development, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E

    1997-07-01

    Each of the nontraditional plant hormones reviewed in this article, oligosaccharins, brassinolides, and JA, can exert major effects on plant growth and development. However, in many cases, the mechanisms by which these compounds are involved in the endogenous regulation of morphogenesis remain to be established. Nevertheless, the use of mutant or transgenic plants with altered levels or perception of these hormones is leading to phenomenal increases in our understanding of the roles they play in the life cycle of plants. It is likely that in the future, novel modulators of plant growth and development will be identified; some will perhaps be related to the peptide encoded by ENOD40 (Van de Sande et al., 1996), which modifies the action of auxin.

  3. Effects of different plant growth regulators on blueberry fruit quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. C.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. N.; Luo, C.; Wang, X.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on blueberry fruit growth, various concentrations of Abscisic acid (ABA), Methyl jasmonate (MJ), Brassinolide (BR), Melatonin (MT) were sprayed on blueberry cv. ‘Brigita’ fruits. The results showed that all the PGRs put into effect on improving the quality of blueberry fruit. Comparing with the control plants no PGR spraying,300 mg/L of MT treatment promoted effectively accumulation of the soluble sugar. ABA 20mg/L treatment in-creased effectively accumulation of anthocyanin, and significantly decreased titratable acid content. The treatment of MJ 10mg/L improved significantly the soluble solid content. The effect of the four PGRs treatments on appearance did not show obvious difference.

  4. HPS4/SABRE regulates plant responses to phosphate starvation through antagonistic interaction with ethylene signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailan; Luo, Nan; Sun, Lichao; Liu, Dong

    2012-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays important roles in regulating plant responses to phosphate (Pi) starvation. To date, however, no molecular components have been identified that interact with ethylene signalling in regulating such responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis mutant, hps4, was characterized that exhibits enhanced responses to Pi starvation, including increased inhibition of primary root growth, enhanced expression of Pi starvation-induced genes, and overproduction of root-associated acid phosphatases. Molecular cloning indicated that hps4 is a new allele of SABRE, which was previously identified as an important regulator of cell expansion in Arabidopsis. HPS4/SABRE antagonistically interacts with ethylene signalling to regulate plant responses to Pi starvation. Furthermore, it is shown that Pi-starved hps4 mutants accumulate more auxin in their root tips than the wild type, which may explain the increased inhibition of their primary root growth when grown under Pi deficiency. PMID:22615140

  5. A survey of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms through genome resequencing in the Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thibaut; Murat, Claude; Gigant, Anaïs; Morin, Emmanuelle; De Mita, Stéphane; Martin, Francis

    2015-09-01

    The Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.), considered a gastronomic delicacy worldwide, is an ectomycorrhizal filamentous fungus that is ecologically important in Mediterranean French, Italian and Spanish woodlands. In this study, we developed a novel resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for T. melanosporum using Illumina high-throughput resequencing. The genome from six T. melanosporum geographical accessions was sequenced to a depth of approximately 20×. These geographical accessions were selected from different populations within the northern and southern regions of the geographical species distribution. Approximately 80% of the reads for each of the six resequenced geographical accessions mapped against the reference T. melanosporum genome assembly, estimating the core genome size of this organism to be approximately 110 Mbp. A total of 442 326 SNPs corresponding to 3540 SNPs/Mbps were identified as being included in all seven genomes. The SNPs occurred more frequently in repeated sequences (85%), although 4501 SNPs were also identified in the coding regions of 2587 genes. Using the ratio of nonsynonymous mutations per nonsynonymous site (pN) to synonymous mutations per synonymous site (pS) and Tajima's D index scanning the whole genome, we were able to identify genomic regions and genes potentially subjected to positive or purifying selection. The SNPs identified represent a valuable resource for future population genetics and genomics studies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fungus diversity in revegetated paddocks compared with remnant woodland in a south-eastern Australian agricultural landscape

    Treesearch

    Geoff Barrett; James M. Trappe; Alex Drew; Jacqui Stol; David Freudenberger

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of fungi for restoration, their presence in revegetated sites has received little attention. We compared the diversity and composition of macrofungi (i.e., those that form fleshy mushrooms and truffles) in 12 sites where 3- to 6-year-old native trees and shrubs had been planted (woodland restoration sites), with that in 6 woodland remnants. All...

  7. Predicting wetland plant community responses to proposed water-level-regulation plans for Lake Ontario: GIS-based modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, D.A.; Xie, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated, GIS-based, wetland predictive models were constructed to assist in predicting the responses of wetland plant communities to proposed new water-level regulation plans for Lake Ontario. The modeling exercise consisted of four major components: 1) building individual site wetland geometric models; 2) constructing generalized wetland geometric models representing specific types of wetlands (rectangle model for drowned river mouth wetlands, half ring model for open embayment wetlands, half ellipse model for protected embayment wetlands, and ellipse model for barrier beach wetlands); 3) assigning wetland plant profiles to the generalized wetland geometric models that identify associations between past flooding / dewatering events and the regulated water-level changes of a proposed water-level-regulation plan; and 4) predicting relevant proportions of wetland plant communities and the time durations during which they would be affected under proposed regulation plans. Based on this conceptual foundation, the predictive models were constructed using bathymetric and topographic wetland models and technical procedures operating on the platform of ArcGIS. An example of the model processes and outputs for the drowned river mouth wetland model using a test regulation plan illustrates the four components and, when compared against other test regulation plans, provided results that met ecological expectations. The model results were also compared to independent data collected by photointerpretation. Although data collections were not directly comparable, the predicted extent of meadow marsh in years in which photographs were taken was significantly correlated with extent of mapped meadow marsh in all but barrier beach wetlands. The predictive model for wetland plant communities provided valuable input into International Joint Commission deliberations on new regulation plans and was also incorporated into faunal predictive models used for that purpose.

  8. A novel plant ferredoxin-like protein and the regulator Hor are quorum-sensing targets in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Solveig; Harjunpää, Heidi; Brader, Günter; Palva, E Tapio

    2008-07-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a population-density-sensing mechanism, controls the production of the main virulence determinants, the plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) of the soft-rot phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. In this study, we used random transposon mutagenesis with a gusA reporter construct to identify two new QS-controlled genes encoding the regulator Hor and a plant ferredoxin-like protein, FerE. The QS control of the identified genes was executed by the QS regulators ExpR1 and ExpR2 and mediated by the global repressor RsmA. Hor was shown to contribute to bacterial virulence at least partly through its control of PCWDE production. Our results showed that FerE contributes to oxidative stress tolerance and in planta fitness of the bacteria and suggest that QS could be central to control of oxidative stress tolerance. The presence of the FerE protein appears to be rather unique in heterotrophic bacteria and suggests an acquisition of the corresponding gene from plant host by horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Silicon Regulates Antioxidant Activities of Crop Plants under Abiotic-Induced Oxidative Stress: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul L.; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil, where its availability to plants can exhilarate to 10% of total dry weight of the plant. Si accumulation/transport occurs in the upward direction, and has been identified in several crop plants. Si application has been known to ameliorate plant growth and development during normal and stressful conditions over past two-decades. During abiotic (salinity, drought, thermal, and heavy metal etc) stress, one of the immediate responses by plant is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen (1O2), superoxide (O2−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (OH), which cause severe damage to the cell structure, organelles, and functions. To alleviate and repair this damage, plants have developed a complex antioxidant system to maintain homeostasis through non-enzymatic (carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbate, and glutathione) and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)]. To this end, the exogenous application of Si has been found to induce stress tolerance by regulating the generation of ROS, reducing electrolytic leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and immobilizing and reducing the uptake of toxic ions like Na, under stressful conditions. However, the interaction of Si and plant antioxidant enzyme system remains poorly understood, and further in-depth analyses at the transcriptomic level are needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for the Si-mediated regulation of stress responses. PMID:28428797

  10. Silicon Regulates Antioxidant Activities of Crop Plants under Abiotic-Induced Oxidative Stress: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul L; Waqas, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is the second most abundant element in soil, where its availability to plants can exhilarate to 10% of total dry weight of the plant. Si accumulation/transport occurs in the upward direction, and has been identified in several crop plants. Si application has been known to ameliorate plant growth and development during normal and stressful conditions over past two-decades. During abiotic (salinity, drought, thermal, and heavy metal etc) stress, one of the immediate responses by plant is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ), superoxide ([Formula: see text]), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and hydroxyl radicals (OH), which cause severe damage to the cell structure, organelles, and functions. To alleviate and repair this damage, plants have developed a complex antioxidant system to maintain homeostasis through non-enzymatic (carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbate, and glutathione) and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)]. To this end, the exogenous application of Si has been found to induce stress tolerance by regulating the generation of ROS, reducing electrolytic leakage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and immobilizing and reducing the uptake of toxic ions like Na, under stressful conditions. However, the interaction of Si and plant antioxidant enzyme system remains poorly understood, and further in-depth analyses at the transcriptomic level are needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for the Si-mediated regulation of stress responses.

  11. Silencing of Stress-Regulated miRNAs in Plants by Short Tandem Target Mimic (STTM) Approach.

    PubMed

    Teotia, Sachin; Tang, Guiliang

    2017-01-01

    In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate more than hundred target genes comprising largely transcription factors that control growth and development as well as stress responses. However, the exact functions of miRNA families could not be deciphered because each miRNA family has multiple loci in the genome, thus are functionally redundant. Therefore, an ideal approach to study the function of a miRNA family is to silence the expression of all members simultaneously, which is a daunting task. However, this can be partly overcome by Target Mimic (TM) approach that can knockdown an entire miRNA family. STTM is a modification of TM approach and complements it. STTMs have been successfully used in monocots and dicots to block miRNA functions. miR159 has been shown to be differentially regulated by various abiotic stresses including ABA in various plant species. Here, we describe in detail the protocol for designing STTM construct to block miR159 functions in Arabidopsis, with the potential to apply this technique on a number of other stress-regulated miRNAs in plants.

  12. The MADS-box gene SlMBP11 regulates plant architecture and affects reproductive development in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuhu; Chen, Guoping; Naeem, Muhammad; Yu, Xiaohu; Tang, Boyan; Li, Anzhou; Hu, Zongli

    2017-05-01

    MADS-domain proteins are important transcription factors that are involved in many biological processes of plants. In the present study, SlMBP11, a member of the AGL15 subfamily, was cloned in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicon M.). SlMBP11 is ubiquitously expressed in all of the tissues we examined, whereas the SlMBP11 transcription levels were significantly higher in reproductive tissues than in vegetative tissues. Plants exhibiting increased SlMBP11 levels displayed reduced plant height, leaf size, and internode length as well as a loss of dominance in young seedlings, highly branched growth from each leaf axil, and increased number of nodes and leaves. Moreover, overexpression lines also exhibited reproductive phenotypes, such as those having a shorter style and split ovary, leading to polycarpous fruits, while the wild type showed normal floral organization. In addition, delayed perianth senescence was observed in transgenic tomatoes. These phenotypes were further confirmed by analyzing the morphological, anatomical and molecular features of lines exhibiting overexpression. These results suggest that SlMBP11 plays an important role in regulating plant architecture and reproductive development in tomato plants. These findings add a new class of transcription factors to the group of genes controlling axillary bud growth and illuminate a previously uncharacterized function of MADS-box genes in tomato plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Novel Growth Regulators in Plant Populations Expressing Random Peptides1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhilong; Clancy, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of chemical genomics approaches allows the identification of small molecules that integrate into biological systems, thereby changing discrete processes that influence growth, development, or metabolism. Libraries of chemicals are applied to living systems, and changes in phenotype are observed, potentially leading to the identification of new growth regulators. This work describes an approach that is the nexus of chemical genomics and synthetic biology. Here, each plant in an extensive population synthesizes a unique small peptide arising from a transgene composed of a randomized nucleic acid sequence core flanked by translational start, stop, and cysteine-encoding (for disulfide cyclization) sequences. Ten and 16 amino acid sequences, bearing a core of six and 12 random amino acids, have been synthesized in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Populations were screened for phenotypes from the seedling stage through senescence. Dozens of phenotypes were observed in over 2,000 plants analyzed. Ten conspicuous phenotypes were verified through separate transformation and analysis of multiple independent lines. The results indicate that these populations contain sequences that often influence discrete aspects of plant biology. Novel peptides that affect photosynthesis, flowering, and red light response are described. The challenge now is to identify the mechanistic integrations of these peptides into biochemical processes. These populations serve as a new tool to identify small molecules that modulate discrete plant functions that could be produced later in transgenic plants or potentially applied exogenously to impart their effects. These findings could usher in a new generation of agricultural growth regulators, herbicides, or defense compounds. PMID:28807931

  14. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches' broom disease of cacao.

    PubMed

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-03-01

    Witches' broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant-fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Plant diversity in riparian forests in northwest Colorado: Effects of time and river regulation

    Treesearch

    Amanda L. Uowolo; Dan Binkley; E. Carol Adair

    2005-01-01

    During the 20th Century the flow of most rivers in the United States was regulated by diversions and dams, with major impacts on riparian forests. Few unregulated rivers remain to provide baseline information for assessing these impacts. We characterized patterns in riparian plant communities along chronosequences on the unregulated Yampa River and the regulated Green...

  16. Soil bacteria confer plant salt tolerance by tissue-specific regulation of the sodium transporter HKT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiming; Kim, Mi-Seong; Sun, Yan; Dowd, Scot E; Shi, Huazhong; Paré, Paul W

    2008-06-01

    Elevated sodium (Na(+)) decreases plant growth and, thereby, agricultural productivity. The ion transporter high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT)1 controls Na(+) import in roots, yet dysfunction or overexpression of HKT1 fails to increase salt tolerance, raising questions as to HKT1's role in regulating Na(+) homeostasis. Here, we report that tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 by the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis GB03 confers salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Under salt stress (100 mM NaCl), GB03 concurrently down- and upregulates HKT1 expression in roots and shoots, respectively, resulting in lower Na(+) accumulation throughout the plant compared with controls. Consistent with HKT1 participation in GB03-induced salt tolerance, GB03 fails to rescue salt-stressed athkt1 mutants from stunted foliar growth and elevated total Na(+) whereas salt-stressed Na(+) export mutants sos3 show GB03-induced salt tolerance with enhanced shoot and root growth as well as reduced total Na(+). These results demonstrate that tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 is critical for managing Na(+) homeostasis in salt-stressed plants, as well as underscore the breadth and sophistication of plant-microbe interactions.

  17. Group A PP2Cs evolved in land plants as key regulators of intrinsic desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenji; Suzuki, Norihiro; Kuwamura, Mayuri; Nishikawa, Yuri; Nakatani, Mao; Ohtawa, Hitomi; Takezawa, Daisuke; Seki, Motoaki; Tanaka, Maho; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Sakata, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative desiccation tolerance is common in bryophytes, although this character has been lost in most vascular plants. The moss Physcomitrella patens survives complete desiccation if treated with abscisic acid (ABA). Group A protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2C) are negative regulators of abscisic acid signalling. Here we show that the elimination of Group A PP2C is sufficient to ensure P. patens survival to full desiccation, without ABA treatment, although its growth is severely hindered. Microarray analysis shows that the Group A PP2C-regulated genes exclusively overlap with genes exhibiting a high level of ABA induction. Group A PP2C disruption weakly affects ABA-activated kinase activity, indicating Group A PP2C action downstream of these kinases in the moss. We propose that Group A PP2C emerged in land plants to repress desiccation tolerance mechanisms, possibly facilitating plants propagation on land, whereas ABA releases the intrinsic desiccation tolerance from Group A PP2C regulation. PMID:23900426

  18. Expression and regulation of ATL9, an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Mitchell; Scaglione, Steven; Antico, Christopher J.; Jing, Tao; Yang, Xin; Shan, Weixing

    2017-01-01

    Plants are continually exposed to a variety of pathogenic organisms, including bacteria, fungi and viruses. In response to these assaults, plants have developed various defense pathways to protect themselves from pathogen invasion. An understanding of the expression and regulation of genes involved in defense signaling is essential to controlling plant disease. ATL9, an Arabidopsis RING zinc finger protein, is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is induced by chitin and involved in basal resistance to the biotrophic fungal pathogen, Golovinomyces cichoracearum (G. cichoracearum). To better understand the expression and regulation of ATL9, we studied its expression pattern and the functions of its different protein domains. Using pATL9:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis lines we found that ATL9 is expressed in numerous tissues at various developmental stages and that GUS activity was induced rapidly upon wounding. Using a GFP control protein, we showed that ATL9 is a short-lived protein within plant cells and it is degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. ATL9 contains two transmembrane domains (TM), a RING zinc-finger domain, and a PEST domain. Using a series of deletion mutants, we found that the PEST domain and the RING domain have effects on ATL9 degradation. Further infection assays with G. cichoracearum showed that both the RING domain and the TM domains are important for ATL9’s resistance phenotype. Interestingly, the PEST domain was also shown to be significant for resistance to fungal pathogens. This study demonstrates that the PEST domain is directly coupled to plant defense regulation and the importance of protein degradation in plant immunity. PMID:29161311

  19. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multicellular behavior. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. RNA helicase-like protein as an early regulator of transcription factors for plant chilling and freezing tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhizhong; Lee, Hojoung; Xiong, Liming; Jagendorf, André; Stevenson, Becky; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Susceptibility to chilling injury prevents the cultivation of many important crops and limits the extended storage of horticultural commodities. Although freezing tolerance is acquired through cold-induced gene expression changes mediated in part by the CBF family of transcriptional activators, whether plant chilling resistance or sensitivity involves the CBF genes is not known. We report here that an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant impaired in the cold-regulated expression of CBF genes and their downstream target genes is sensitive to chilling stress. Expression of CBF3 under a strong constitutive promoter restores chilling resistance to the mutant plants. The mutated gene was cloned and found to encode a nuclear localized RNA helicase. Our results identify a regulator of CBF genes, and demonstrate the importance of gene regulation and the CBF transcriptional activators in plant chilling resistance. PMID:12165572

  1. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Precise plant breeding using new genome editing techniques: opportunities, safety and regulation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Frank; Schiemann, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Several new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs) have been developed during the last decade, and make it possible to precisely perform genome modifications in plants. The major problem, other than technical aspects, is the vagueness of regulation concerning these new techniques. Since the definition of eight NPBTs by a European expert group in 2007, there has been an ongoing debate on whether the resulting plants and their products are covered by GMO legislation. Obviously, cover by GMO legislation would severely hamper the use of NPBT, because genetically modified plants must pass a costly and time-consuming GMO approval procedure in the EU. In this review, we compare some of the NPBTs defined by the EU expert group with classical breeding techniques and conventional transgenic plants. The list of NPBTs may be shortened (or extended) during the international discussion process initiated by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. From the scientific point of view, it may be argued that plants developed by NPBTs are often indistinguishable from classically bred plants and are not expected to possess higher risks for health and the environment. In light of the debate on the future regulation of NPBTs and the accumulated evidence on the biosafety of genetically modified plants that have been commercialized and risk-assessed worldwide, it may be suggested that plants modified by crop genetic improvement technologies, including genetic modification, NPBTs or other future techniques, should be evaluated according to the new trait and the resulting end product rather than the technique used to create the new plant variety. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cyt toxin expression reveals an inverse regulation of insect and plant virulence factors of Dickeya dadantii.

    PubMed

    Costechareyre, Denis; Dridi, Bedis; Rahbé, Yvan; Condemine, Guy

    2010-12-01

    The plant pathogenic bacteria Dickeya dadantii is also a pathogen of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. The genome of the bacteria contains four cyt genes, encoding homologues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt toxins, which are involved in its pathogenicity to insects. We show here that these genes are transcribed as an operon, and we determined the conditions necessary for their expression. Their expression is induced at high temperature and at an osmolarity equivalent to that found in the plant phloem sap. The regulators of cyt genes have also been identified: their expression is repressed by H-NS and VfmE and activated by PecS. These genes are already known to regulate plant virulence factors, but in an opposite way. When tested in a virulence assay by ingestion, the pecS mutant was almost non-pathogenic while hns and vfmE mutants behaved in the same way as the wild-type strain. Mutants of other regulators of plant virulence, GacA, OmpR and PhoP, that do not control Cyt toxin production, also showed reduced pathogenicity. In an assay by injection of bacteria, the gacA strain was less pathogenic but, surprisingly, the pecS mutant was slightly more virulent. These results show that Cyt toxins are not the only virulence factors required to kill aphids, and that these factors act at different stages of the infection. Moreover, their production is controlled by general virulence regulators known for their role in plant virulence. This integration could indicate that virulence towards insects is a normal mode of life for D. dadantii. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Mercury emission trend influenced by stringent air pollutants regulation for coal-fired power plants in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasainee, Deepak; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2009-12-01

    Regulatory control of mercury emission from anthropogenic sources has become a global concern in the recent past. Coal-fired power plants are one of the largest sources of anthropogenic mercury emission into the atmosphere. This paper summarizes the current reducing trend of mercury emission as co-beneficial effect by more stringent regulation changes to control primary air pollutants with introducing test results from the commercial coal-fired facilities and suggesting a guideline for future regulatory development in Korea. On average, mercury emission concentrations ranged 16.3-2.7 μg Sm -3, 2.4-1.1 μg Sm -3, 3.1-0.7 μg Sm -3 from anthracite coal-fired power plants equipped with electrostatic precipitator (ESP), bituminous coal-fired power plants with ESP + flue gas desulphurization (FGD) and bituminous coal-fired power plants with selective catalytic reactor (SCR) + cold side (CS) - ESP + wet FGD, respectively. Among the existing air pollution control devices, the best configuration for mercury removal in coal-fired power plants was SCR + CS - ESP + wet FGD, which were installed due to the stringent regulation changes to control primary air pollutants emission such as SO 2, NOx and dust. It was estimated that uncontrolled and controlled mercury emission from coal-fired power plants as 10.3 ton yr -1 and 3.2 ton yr -1 respectively. After the installation of ESP, FGD and SCR system, following the enforcement of the stringent regulation, 7.1 ton yr -1 of mercury emission has been reduced (nearly 69%) from coal-fired power plants as a co-benefit control. Based on the overall study, a sample guideline including emission limits were suggested which will be applied to develop a countermeasure for controlling mercury emission from coal-fired power plants.

  5. Regulation of ion homeostasis in plants: current approaches and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Rouached, Hatem; Secco, David; Arpat, Bulak A

    2010-05-01

    The dependency of plants on essential macro- and micro-elements to complete their life cycle serves as a major entry point of these elements into the global food web. However, plants often face depletion of one or more essential elements limiting their growth. Thus, in modern agriculture, improving plant mineral nutrition has gained fundamental importance in order to address the issue of sustainable food resources for the growing world population. Heavy fertilization of soil was, for long time, chosen as a strategy to cope with the deficiency of these elements. Yet, this strategy is neither economically nor ecologically conceivable at long-term. As an alternative, genetic and breeding approaches that provide plants new characteristics enabling them to grow in nutrient-depleted soils, has become a major focal interest. The research emphasis so far has been on elucidating the molecular physiology of individual nutritive elements. However, in practice, application of such knowledge is hindered by complex cross-talks, which are emerging in the face of new data, between these elements. Developing integrative approaches, combining genetic, comparative genomics and 'omics' platforms, is crucial to untangle the interconnected signaling networks regulating ion homeostasis in plants.

  6. Loose Plant Architecture1, an INDETERMINATE DOMAIN Protein Involved in Shoot Gravitropism, Regulates Plant Architecture in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinru; Tang, Ding; Li, Ming; Wang, Kejian; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2013-01-01

    Tiller angle and leaf angle are two important components of rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture that play a crucial role in determining grain yield. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of the Loose Plant Architecture1 (LPA1) gene in rice, the functional ortholog of the AtIDD15/SHOOT GRAVITROPISM5 (SGR5) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). LPA1 regulates tiller angle and leaf angle by controlling the adaxial growth of tiller node and lamina joint. LPA1 was also found to affect shoot gravitropism. Expression pattern analysis suggested that LPA1 influences plant architecture by affecting the gravitropism of leaf sheath pulvinus and lamina joint. However, LPA1 only influences gravity perception or signal transduction in coleoptile gravitropism by regulating the sedimentation rate of amyloplasts, distinct from the actions of LAZY1. LPA1 encodes a plant-specific INDETERMINATE DOMAIN protein and defines a novel subfamily of 28 INDETERMINATE DOMAIN proteins with several unique conserved features. LPA1 is localized in the nucleus and functions as an active transcriptional repressor, an activity mainly conferred by a conserved ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression-like motif. Further analysis suggests that LPA1 participates in a complicated transcriptional and protein interaction network and has evolved novel functions distinct from SGR5. This study not only facilitates the understanding of gravitropism mechanisms but also generates a useful genetic material for rice breeding. PMID:23124325

  7. Redox regulation of plant S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity through post-translational modifications of cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Tichá, Tereza; Lochman, Jan; Činčalová, Lucie; Luhová, Lenka; Petřivalský, Marek

    2017-12-09

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered as a signalling molecule involved in a variety of important physiological and pathological processes in plant and animal systems. The major pathway of NO reactions in vivo represents S-nitrosation of thiols to form S-nitrosothiols. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is the key enzyme in the degradation pathway of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a low-molecular weight adduct of NO and glutathione. GSNOR indirectly regulates the level of protein S-nitrosothiol in the cells. This study was focused on the dynamic regulation of the activity of plant GSNORs through reversible S-nitrosation and/or oxidative modifications of target cysteine residues. Pre-incubation with NO/NO - donors or hydrogen peroxide resulted in a decreased reductase and dehydrogenase activity of all studied plant GSNORs. Incubation with thiol reducing agent completely reversed inhibitory effects of nitrosative modifications and partially also oxidative inhibition. In biotin-labelled samples, S-nitrosation of plant GSNORs was confirmed after immunodetection and using mass spectrometry S-nitrosation of conserved Cys271 was identified in tomato GSNOR. Negative regulation of constitutive GSNOR activity in vivo by nitrosative or oxidative modifications might present an important mechanism to control GSNO levels, a critical mediator of the downstream signalling effects of NO, as well as for formaldehyde detoxification in dehydrogenase reaction mode. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. [Epigenetics of plant vernalization regulated by non-coding RNAs].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Feng; Li, Xiao-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Bao; He, Yu-Ke

    2012-07-01

    Many higher plants must experience a period of winter cold to accomplish the transition from vegetative to reproductive growth. This biological process is called vernalization. Some crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) produce seeds as edible organs, and therefore special measures of rotation and cultivation are necessary for plants to go through an early vernalization for flower differentiation and development, whereas the other crops such as Chinese cabbage (B rapa ssp. pekinenesis) and cabbage (Brassica napus L.) produce leafy heads as edible organs, and additional practice should be taken to avoid vernalization for a prolonged and fully vegetative growth. Before vernalization, flowering is repressed by the action of a gene called Flowering Locus C (FLC). This paper reviewed the function of non-coding RNAs and some proteins including VRN1, VRN2, and VIN3 in epigenetic regulation of FLC during vernalization.

  9. Molecular and physiological mechanisms regulating tissue reunion in incised plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Asahina, Masashi; Satoh, Shinobu

    2015-05-01

    Interactions among the functionally specialized organs of higher plants ensure that the plant body develops and functions properly in response to changing environmental conditions. When an incision or grafting procedure interrupts the original organ or tissue connection, cell division is induced and tissue reunion occurs to restore physiological connections. Such activities have long been observed in grafting techniques, which are advantageous not only for agriculture and horticulture but also for basic research. To understand how this healing process is controlled and how this process is initiated and regulated at the molecular level, physiological and molecular analyses of tissue reunion have been performed using incised hypocotyls of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and incised flowering stems of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results suggest that leaf gibberellin and microelements from the roots are required for tissue reunion in the cortex of the cucumber and tomato incised hypocotyls. In addition, the wound-inducible hormones ethylene and jasmonic acid contribute to the regulation of the tissue reunion process in the upper and lower parts, respectively, of incised Arabidopsis stems. Ethylene and jasmonic acid modulate the expression of ANAC071 and RAP2.6L, respectively, and auxin signaling via ARF6/8 is essential for the expression of these transcription factors. In this report, we discuss recent findings regarding molecular and physiological mechanisms of the graft union and the tissue reunion process in wounded tissues of plants.

  10. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of plant receptor-like kinase/pelle genes.

    PubMed

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Zou, Cheng; Hanada, Kousuke; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2009-05-01

    Receptor-Like Kinase (RLK)/Pelle genes play roles ranging from growth regulation to defense response, and the dramatic expansion of this family has been postulated to be crucial for plant-specific adaptations. Despite this, little is known about the history of or the factors that contributed to the dramatic expansion of this gene family. In this study, we show that expansion coincided with the establishment of land plants and that RLK/Pelle subfamilies were established early in land plant evolution. The RLK/Pelle family expanded at a significantly higher rate than other kinases, due in large part to expansion of a few subfamilies by tandem duplication. Interestingly, these subfamilies tend to have members with known roles in defense response, suggesting that their rapid expansion was likely a consequence of adaptation to fast-evolving pathogens. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expression data support the importance of RLK/Pelles in biotic stress response. We found that hundreds of RLK/Pelles are up-regulated by biotic stress. Furthermore, stress responsiveness is correlated with the degree of tandem duplication in RLK/Pelle subfamilies. Our findings suggest a link between stress response and tandem duplication and provide an explanation for why a large proportion of the RLK/Pelle gene family is found in tandem repeats. In addition, our findings provide a useful framework for potentially predicting RLK/Pelle stress functions based on knowledge of expansion pattern and duplication mechanism. Finally, we propose that the detection of highly variable molecular patterns associated with specific pathogens/parasites is the main reason for the up-regulation of hundreds of RLK/Pelles under biotic stress.

  11. Short-term and continuing stresses differentially interplay with multiple hormones to regulate plant survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cangjing; Liu, Jingjing; Dong, Xinran; Cai, Zhenying; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Xuelu

    2014-05-01

    The stress phytohormone, abscisic acid (ABA), plays important roles in facilitating plants to survive and grow well under a wide range of stress conditions. Previous gene expression studies mainly focused on plant responses to short-term ABA treatment, but the effect of sustained ABA treatment and their difference are poorly studied. Here, we treated plants with ABA for 1 h or 9 d, and our genome-wide analysis indicated the differentially regulated genes under the two conditions were tremendously different. We analyzed other hormones' signaling changes by using their whole sets of known responsive genes as reporters and integrating feedback regulation of their biosynthesis. We found that, under short-term ABA treatment, signaling outputs of growth-promoting hormones, brassinosteroids and gibberellins, and a biotic stress-responsive hormone, jasmonic acid, were significantly inhibited, while auxin and ethylene signaling outputs were promoted. However, sustained ABA treatment repressed cytokinin and gibberellin signaling, but stimulated auxin signaling. Using several sets of hormone-related mutants, we found candidates in corresponding hormonal signaling pathways, including receptors or transcription regulators, are essential in responding to ABA. Our findings indicate interactions of ABA-dependent stress signals with hormones at different levels are involved in plants to survive under transient stress and to adapt to continuing stressful environments.

  12. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Negative Regulation of Multiple Plant Hormone Signaling Pathways Elicited by Overexpression of C-Repeat Binding Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Aixin; Zhou, Mingqi; Wei, Donghui; Chen, Hu; You, Chenjiang; Lin, Juan

    2017-01-01

    C-repeat binding factors (CBF) are a subfamily of AP2 transcription factors that play critical roles in the regulation of plant cold tolerance and growth in low temperature. In the present work, we sought to perform a detailed investigation into global transcriptional regulation of plant hormone signaling associated genes in transgenic plants engineered with CBF genes. RNA samples from Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing two CBF genes, CBF2 and CBF3 , were subjected to Illumina HiSeq 2000 RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our results showed that more than half of the hormone associated genes that were differentially expressed in CBF2 or CBF3 transgenic plants were related to auxin signal transduction and metabolism. Most of these alterations in gene expression could lead to repression of auxin signaling. Accordingly, the IAA content was significantly decreased in young tissues of plants overexpressing CBF2 and CBF3 compared with wild type. In addition, genes associated with the biosynthesis of Jasmonate (JA) and Salicylic acid (SA), as well as the signal sensing of Brassinolide (BR) and SA, were down-regulated, while genes associated with Gibberellin (GA) deactivation were up-regulated. In general, overexpression of CBF2 and CBF3 negatively affects multiple plant hormone signaling pathways in Arabidopsis . The transcriptome analysis using CBF2 and CBF3 transgenic plants provides novel and integrated insights into the interaction between CBFs and plant hormones, particularly the modulation of auxin signaling, which may contribute to the improvement of crop yields under abiotic stress via molecular engineering using CBF genes.

  13. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Negative Regulation of Multiple Plant Hormone Signaling Pathways Elicited by Overexpression of C-Repeat Binding Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aixin; Zhou, Mingqi; Wei, Donghui; Chen, Hu; You, Chenjiang; Lin, Juan

    2017-01-01

    C-repeat binding factors (CBF) are a subfamily of AP2 transcription factors that play critical roles in the regulation of plant cold tolerance and growth in low temperature. In the present work, we sought to perform a detailed investigation into global transcriptional regulation of plant hormone signaling associated genes in transgenic plants engineered with CBF genes. RNA samples from Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing two CBF genes, CBF2 and CBF3, were subjected to Illumina HiSeq 2000 RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Our results showed that more than half of the hormone associated genes that were differentially expressed in CBF2 or CBF3 transgenic plants were related to auxin signal transduction and metabolism. Most of these alterations in gene expression could lead to repression of auxin signaling. Accordingly, the IAA content was significantly decreased in young tissues of plants overexpressing CBF2 and CBF3 compared with wild type. In addition, genes associated with the biosynthesis of Jasmonate (JA) and Salicylic acid (SA), as well as the signal sensing of Brassinolide (BR) and SA, were down-regulated, while genes associated with Gibberellin (GA) deactivation were up-regulated. In general, overexpression of CBF2 and CBF3 negatively affects multiple plant hormone signaling pathways in Arabidopsis. The transcriptome analysis using CBF2 and CBF3 transgenic plants provides novel and integrated insights into the interaction between CBFs and plant hormones, particularly the modulation of auxin signaling, which may contribute to the improvement of crop yields under abiotic stress via molecular engineering using CBF genes. PMID:28983312

  14. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GAmore » down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.« less

  15. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    DOE PAGES

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    2015-01-06

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GAmore » down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.« less

  16. Ethylene Participates in the Regulation of Fe Deficiency Responses in Strategy I Plants and in Rice.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Carlos; Romera, Francisco J; García, María J; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is very abundant in most soils but its availability for plants is low, especially in calcareous soils. Plants have been divided into Strategy I and Strategy II species to acquire Fe from soils. Strategy I species apply a reduction-based uptake system which includes all higher plants except the Poaceae. Strategy II species apply a chelation-based uptake system which includes the Poaceae. To cope with Fe deficiency both type of species activate several Fe deficiency responses, mainly in their roots. These responses need to be tightly regulated to avoid Fe toxicity and to conserve energy. Their regulation is not totally understood but some hormones and signaling substances have been implicated. Several years ago it was suggested that ethylene could participate in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in Strategy I species. In Strategy II species, the role of hormones and signaling substances has been less studied. However, in rice, traditionally considered a Strategy II species but that possesses some characteristics of Strategy I species, it has been recently shown that ethylene can also play a role in the regulation of some of its Fe deficiency responses. Here, we will review and discuss the data supporting a role for ethylene in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in both Strategy I species and rice. In addition, we will review the data about ethylene and Fe responses related to Strategy II species. We will also discuss the results supporting the action of ethylene through different transduction pathways and its interaction with other signals, such as certain Fe-related repressive signals occurring in the phloem sap. Finally, the possible implication of ethylene in the interactions among Fe deficiency responses and the responses to other nutrient deficiencies in the plant will be addressed.

  17. Ethylene Participates in the Regulation of Fe Deficiency Responses in Strategy I Plants and in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Carlos; Romera, Francisco J.; García, María J.; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is very abundant in most soils but its availability for plants is low, especially in calcareous soils. Plants have been divided into Strategy I and Strategy II species to acquire Fe from soils. Strategy I species apply a reduction-based uptake system which includes all higher plants except the Poaceae. Strategy II species apply a chelation-based uptake system which includes the Poaceae. To cope with Fe deficiency both type of species activate several Fe deficiency responses, mainly in their roots. These responses need to be tightly regulated to avoid Fe toxicity and to conserve energy. Their regulation is not totally understood but some hormones and signaling substances have been implicated. Several years ago it was suggested that ethylene could participate in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in Strategy I species. In Strategy II species, the role of hormones and signaling substances has been less studied. However, in rice, traditionally considered a Strategy II species but that possesses some characteristics of Strategy I species, it has been recently shown that ethylene can also play a role in the regulation of some of its Fe deficiency responses. Here, we will review and discuss the data supporting a role for ethylene in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses in both Strategy I species and rice. In addition, we will review the data about ethylene and Fe responses related to Strategy II species. We will also discuss the results supporting the action of ethylene through different transduction pathways and its interaction with other signals, such as certain Fe-related repressive signals occurring in the phloem sap. Finally, the possible implication of ethylene in the interactions among Fe deficiency responses and the responses to other nutrient deficiencies in the plant will be addressed. PMID:26640474

  18. MicroRNA399 is a long-distance signal for the regulation of plant phosphate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Bikram Datt; Buhtz, Anja; Kehr, Julia; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    The presence of microRNA species in plant phloem sap suggests potential signaling roles by long-distance regulation of gene expression. Proof for such a role for a phloem-mobile microRNA is lacking. Here we show that phosphate (Pi) starvation-induced microRNA399 (miR399) is present in the phloem sap of two diverse plant species, rapeseed and pumpkin, and levels are strongly and specifically increased in phloem sap during Pi deprivation. By performing micro-grafting experiments using Arabidopsis, we further show that chimeric plants constitutively over-expressing miR399 in the shoot accumulate mature miR399 species to very high levels in their wild-type roots, while corresponding primary transcripts are virtually absent in roots, demonstrating shoot-to-root transport. The chimeric plants exhibit (i) down-regulation of the miR399 target transcript (PHO2), which encodes a critical component for maintenance of Pi homeostasis, in the wild-type root, and (ii) Pi accumulation in the shoot, which is the phenotype of pho2 mutants, miR399 over-expressers or chimeric plants with a genetic knock-out of PHO2 in the root. Hence the transported miR399 molecules retain biological activity. This is a demonstration of systemic control of a biological process, i.e. maintenance of plant Pi homeostasis, by a phloem-mobile microRNA. PMID:17988220

  19. Two cytoplasmic effectors of Phytophthora sojae regulate plant cell death via interactions with plant catalases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Li, Qi; Liu, Tingli; Liu, Li; Shen, Danyu; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Peihan; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora sojae, secrete an arsenal of host cytoplasmic effectors to promote infection. We have shown previously that P. sojae PsCRN63 (for crinkling- and necrosis-inducing proteins) induces programmed cell death (PCD) while PsCRN115 blocks PCD in planta; however, they are jointly required for full pathogenesis. Here, we find that PsCRN63 alone or PsCRN63 and PsCRN115 together might suppress the immune responses of Nicotiana benthamiana and demonstrate that these two cytoplasmic effectors interact with catalases from N. benthamiana and soybean (Glycine max). Transient expression of PsCRN63 increases hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation, whereas PsCRN115 suppresses this process. Transient overexpression of NbCAT1 (for N. benthamiana CATALASE1) or GmCAT1 specifically alleviates PsCRN63-induced PCD. Suppression of the PsCRN63-induced PCD by PsCRN115 is compromised when catalases are silenced in N. benthamiana. Interestingly, the NbCAT1 is recruited into the plant nucleus in the presence of PsCRN63 or PsCRN115; NbCAT1 and GmCAT1 are destabilized when PsCRN63 is coexpressed, and PsCRN115 inhibits the processes. Thus, PsCRN63/115 manipulates plant PCD through interfering with catalases and perturbing H(2)O(2) homeostasis. Furthermore, silencing of catalase genes enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora capsici, indicating that catalases are essential for plant resistance. Taken together, we suggest that P. sojae secretes these two effectors to regulate plant PCD and H(2)O(2) homeostasis through direct interaction with catalases and, therefore, overcome host immune responses. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Down-regulation of plant defence in a resident spider mite species and its effect upon con- and heterospecifics.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Diogo P; Janssen, Arne; Dias, Teresa; Cruz, Cristina; Magalhães, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Herbivorous spider mites occurring on tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cope with plant defences in various manners: the invasive Tetranychus evansi reduces defences below constitutive levels, whereas several strains of T. urticae induce such defences and others suppress them. In the Mediterranean region, these two species co-occur on tomato plants with T. ludeni, another closely related spider mite species. Unravelling how this third mite species affects plant defences is thus fundamental to understanding the outcome of herbivore interactions in this system. To test the effect of T. ludeni on tomato plant defences, we measured (1) the activity of proteinase inhibitors, indicating the induction of plant defences, in those plants, and (2) mite performance on plants previously infested with each mite species. We show that the performance of T. evansi and T. ludeni on plants previously infested with T. ludeni or T. evansi was better than on clean plants, indicating that these two mite species down-regulate plant defences. We also show that plants attacked by these mite species had lower activity of proteinase inhibitors than clean plants, whereas herbivory by T. urticae increased the activity of these proteins and resulted in reduced spider mite performance. This study thus shows that the property of down-regulation of plant defences below constitutive levels also occurs in T. ludeni.

  1. Apoplastic and intracellular plant sugars regulate developmental transitions in witches’ broom disease of cacao

    PubMed Central

    Barau, Joan; Grandis, Adriana; Carvalho, Vinicius Miessler de Andrade; Teixeira, Gleidson Silva; Zaparoli, Gustavo Henrique Alcalá; do Rio, Maria Carolina Scatolin; Rincones, Johana; Buckeridge, Marcos Silveira; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Witches’ broom disease (WBD) of cacao differs from other typical hemibiotrophic plant diseases by its unusually long biotrophic phase. Plant carbon sources have been proposed to regulate WBD developmental transitions; however, nothing is known about their availability at the plant–fungus interface, the apoplastic fluid of cacao. Data are provided supporting a role for the dynamics of soluble carbon in the apoplastic fluid in prompting the end of the biotrophic phase of infection. Carbon depletion and the consequent fungal sensing of starvation were identified as key signalling factors at the apoplast. MpNEP2, a fungal effector of host necrosis, was found to be up-regulated in an autophagic-like response to carbon starvation in vitro. In addition, the in vivo artificial manipulation of carbon availability in the apoplastic fluid considerably modulated both its expression and plant necrosis rate. Strikingly, infected cacao tissues accumulated intracellular hexoses, and showed stunted photosynthesis and the up-regulation of senescence markers immediately prior to the transition to the necrotrophic phase. These opposite findings of carbon depletion and accumulation in different host cell compartments are discussed within the frame of WBD development. A model is suggested to explain phase transition as a synergic outcome of fungal-related factors released upon sensing of extracellular carbon starvation, and an early senescence of infected tissues probably triggered by intracellular sugar accumulation. PMID:25540440

  2. The effect of cutting origin and organic plant growth regulator on the growth of Daun Ungu (Graptophyllum pictum) through stem cutting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratama, S. P.; Yunus, A.; Purwanto, E.; Widyastuti, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Graptophyllum pictum is one of medical plants which has important chemical content to treat diseases. Leaf, bark and flower can be used to facilitate menstruation, treat hemorrhoid, constipation, ulcers, ulcers, swelling, and earache. G. pictum is difficult to propagated by seedling due to the long duration of seed formation, thusvegetative propagation is done by stem cutting. The aims of this study are to obtain optimum combination of cutting origin and organic plant growth regulator in various consentration for the growth of Daun Ungu through stem cutting method. This research was conducted at Research center for Medicinal Plant and Traditional DrugTanjungsari, Tegal Gede, Karanganyar in June to August 2016. Origin of cuttings and organic plant growth regulator were used as treatments factor. A completely randomized design (RAL) is used and data were analyzed by F test (ANOVA) with a confidence level of 95%. Any significant differences among treatment followed with Duncan test at a = 5%. The research indicates that longest root was resulted from the treatment of 0,5 ml/l of organic plant growth regulator. The treatment of 1 ml/l is able to increase the fresh and dry weight of root, treatment of 1,5 ml/l of organic plant growth regulator was able to increase the percentage of growing shoots. Treatment of base part as origin of cuttings increases the length, fresh weight and and dry weight of shoot, increase the number of leaves. Interaction treatment between 1 ml/l consentration of organic plant growth regulator and central part origin of cuttings is capable of increasing the leaf area, whereas treatment without organic plant growth regulator and base part as planting material affects the smallest leaf area.

  3. Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yuki; Ito, Tasuku; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Saito, Masato; Tamaki, Takayuki; Shirasu, Ken; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-03-01

    During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

  4. Alternative splicing of anciently exonized 5S rRNA regulates plant transcription factor TFIIIA

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Bannach, Oliver; Chen, Hao; Teune, Jan-Hendrik; Schmitz, Axel; Steger, Gerhard; Xiong, Liming; Barbazuk, W. Brad

    2009-01-01

    Identifying conserved alternative splicing (AS) events among evolutionarily distant species can prioritize AS events for functional characterization and help uncover relevant cis- and trans-regulatory factors. A genome-wide search for conserved cassette exon AS events in higher plants revealed the exonization of 5S ribosomal RNA (5S rRNA) within the gene of its own transcription regulator, TFIIIA (transcription factor for polymerase III A). The 5S rRNA-derived exon in TFIIIA gene exists in all representative land plant species but not in green algae and nonplant species, suggesting it is specific to land plants. TFIIIA is essential for RNA polymerase III-based transcription of 5S rRNA in eukaryotes. Integrating comparative genomics and molecular biology revealed that the conserved cassette exon derived from 5S rRNA is coupled with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Utilizing multiple independent Arabidopsis overexpressing TFIIIA transgenic lines under osmotic and salt stress, strong accordance between phenotypic and molecular evidence reveals the biological relevance of AS of the exonized 5S rRNA in quantitative autoregulation of TFIIIA homeostasis. Most significantly, this study provides the first evidence of ancient exaptation of 5S rRNA in plants, suggesting a novel gene regulation model mediated by the AS of an anciently exonized noncoding element. PMID:19211543

  5. Jasmonate Regulates Plant Responses to Postsubmergence Reoxygenation through Transcriptional Activation of Antioxidant Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yang-Shuo; Xie, Li-Juan; Yu, Lu-Jun; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Yong-Xia; Yang, Yi-Cong; Xu, Le; Chen, Qin-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Submergence induces hypoxia in plants; exposure to oxygen following submergence, termed reoxygenation, produces a burst of reactive oxygen species. The mechanisms of hypoxia sensing and signaling in plants have been well studied, but how plants respond to reoxygenation remains unclear. Here, we show that reoxygenation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) involves rapid accumulation of jasmonates (JAs) and increased transcript levels of JA biosynthesis genes. Application of exogenous methyl jasmonate improved tolerance to reoxygenation in wild-type Arabidopsis; also, mutants deficient in JA biosynthesis and signaling were very sensitive to reoxygenation. Moreover, overexpression of the transcription factor gene MYC2 enhanced tolerance to posthypoxic stress, and myc2 knockout mutants showed increased sensitivity to reoxygenation, indicating that MYC2 functions as a key regulator in the JA-mediated reoxygenation response. MYC2 transcriptionally activates members of the VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE (VTC) and GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE (GSH) gene families, which encode rate-limiting enzymes in the ascorbate and glutathione synthesis pathways. Overexpression of VTC1 and GSH1 in the myc2-2 mutant suppressed the posthypoxic hypersensitive phenotype. The JA-inducible accumulation of antioxidants may alleviate oxidative damage caused by reoxygenation, improving plant survival after submergence. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that JA signaling interacts with the antioxidant pathway to regulate reoxygenation responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:28082717

  6. Flower synchrony, growth and yield enhancement of small type bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) through plant growth regulators and NPK fertilization.

    PubMed

    Mia, Baset M A; Islam, Md Serajul; Miah, Md Yunus; Das, M R; Khan, H I

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of growth regulator and NPK fertilization effects are important tools for flower stimulation and yield improvement in cucurbits. This investigation demonstrates the comparative male-female flower induction and fruit yield of small sized bitter gourd treated with NPK fertilizers and plant growth regulators. Namely, two experiments having three replicates were conducted in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with NPK fertilization and plant growth regulators-GA3, NAA and Ethophon application on small sized bitter gourd-genotype BG5 at the research field of the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU). In experiment 1, different doses of NPK fertilizers comprised of 10 treatments and in that of experiment 2, different levels of plant growth regulators indicated 10 treatments. The results indicated that application of different doses of NPK fertilizer and plant growth regulators significantly (< or = 0.05) influenced over the flower initiation and fruit setting. The application of N90-P45-K60 fertilizer along with Ethophon spraying resulted in the better yield of small sized bitter gourd.

  7. [The mechanism of root hair development and molecular regulation in plants].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Ping; Li, Ying-Hui; Guan, Rong-Xia; Liu, Zhang-Xiong; Chen, Xiong-Ting; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2007-04-01

    The formation of the root epidermis in Arabidopsis thaliana provides a simple model to study mechanisms underlying patterning in plants. Root hair increases the root surface area and effectively increases the root diameter, so root hair is thought to aid plants in nutrient uptake, anchorage and microbe interactions. The determination of root hair development has two types, lateral inhibition with feedback and position-dependent pattern of cell differentiation. The initiation and development of root hair in Arabidopsis provide a simple and efficacious model for the study of cell fate determination in plants. Molecular genetic studies identify a suite of putative transcription factors which regulate the epidermal cell pattern. The homeodomain protein GLABRA2 (GL2), R2R3 MYB-type transcription factor WEREWOLF (WER) and WD-repeat protein TRANSPARENTT TESTA GLABRA (TTG) are required for specification of non-hair cell type. The CAPRICE (CPC) and TRYPTICHON (TRY) are involved in specifying the hair cell fate.

  8. Arabidopsis WRKY46, WRKY54, and WRKY70 Transcription Factors Are Involved in Brassinosteroid-Regulated Plant Growth and Drought Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiani; Nolan, Trevor M.; Zhang, Mingcai; Tong, Hongning; Xin, Peiyong; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Zhaohu

    2017-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play important roles in growth and development. BR signaling controls the activities of BRASSINOSTERIOD INSENSITIVE1-EMS-SUPPRESSOR1/BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BES1/BZR1) family transcription factors. Besides the role in promoting growth, BRs are also implicated in plant responses to drought stress. However, the molecular mechanisms by which BRs regulate drought response have just begun to be revealed. The functions of WRKY transcription factors in BR-regulated plant growth have not been established, although their roles in stress responses are well documented. Here, we found that three Arabidopsis thaliana group III WRKY transcription factors, WRKY46, WRKY54, and WRKY70, are involved in both BR-regulated plant growth and drought response as the wrky46 wrky54 wrky70 triple mutant has defects in BR-regulated growth and is more tolerant to drought stress. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed global roles of WRKY46, WRKY54, and WRKY70 in promoting BR-mediated gene expression and inhibiting drought responsive genes. WRKY54 directly interacts with BES1 to cooperatively regulate the expression of target genes. In addition, WRKY54 is phosphorylated and destabilized by GSK3-like kinase BR-INSENSITIVE2, a negative regulator in the BR pathway. Our results therefore establish WRKY46/54/70 as important signaling components that are positively involved in BR-regulated growth and negatively involved in drought responses. PMID:28576847

  9. Technology diffusion and environmental regulation: Evidence from electric power plants under the Clean Air Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Elaine F.

    Even though environmental policy can greatly affect the path of technology diffusion, the economics literature contains limited empirical evidence of this relationship. My research will contribute to the available evidence by providing insight into the technology adoption decisions of electric generating firms. Since policies are often evaluated based on the incentives they provide to promote adoption of new technologies, it is important that policy makers understand the relationship between technological diffusion and regulation structure to make informed decisions. Lessons learned from this study can be used to guide future policies such as those directed to mitigate climate change. I first explore the diffusion of scrubbers, a sulfur dioxide (SO 2) abatement technology, in response to federal market-based regulations and state command-and-control regulations. I develop a simple theoretical model to describe the adoption decisions of scrubbers and use a survival model to empirically test the theoretical model. I find that power plants with strict command-and-control regulations have a high probability of installing a scrubber. These findings suggest that although market-based regulations have encouraged diffusion, many scrubbers have been installed because of state regulatory pressure. Although tradable permit systems are thought to give firms more flexibility in choosing abatement technologies, I show that interactions between a permit system and pre-existing command-and-control regulations can limit that flexibility. In a separate analysis, I explore the diffusion of combined cycle (CC) generating units, which are natural gas-fired generating units that are cleaner and more efficient than alternative generating units. I model the decision to consider adoption of a CC generating unit and the extent to which the technology is adopted in response to environmental regulations imposed on new sources of pollutants. To accomplish this, I use a zero-inflated Poisson

  10. Chloride regulates leaf cell size and water relations in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Navarro, Juan D.; Brumós, Javier; Rosales, Miguel A.; Cubero-Font, Paloma; Talón, Manuel; Colmenero-Flores, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Chloride (Cl–) is a micronutrient that accumulates to macronutrient levels since it is normally available in nature and actively taken up by higher plants. Besides a role as an unspecific cell osmoticum, no clear biological roles have been explicitly associated with Cl– when accumulated to macronutrient concentrations. To address this question, the glycophyte tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Habana) has been treated with a basal nutrient solution supplemented with one of three salt combinations containing the same cationic balance: Cl–-based (CL), nitrate-based (N), and sulphate+phosphate-based (SP) treatments. Under non-saline conditions (up to 5mM Cl–) and no water limitation, Cl– specifically stimulated higher leaf cell size and led to a moderate increase of plant fresh and dry biomass mainly due to higher shoot expansion. When applied in the 1–5mM range, Cl– played specific roles in regulating leaf osmotic potential and turgor, allowing plants to improve leaf water balance parameters. In addition, Cl– also altered water relations at the whole-plant level through reduction of plant transpiration. This was a consequence of a lower stomatal conductance, which resulted in lower water loss and greater photosynthetic and integrated water-use efficiency. In contrast to Cl–, these effects were not observed for essential anionic macronutrients such as nitrate, sulphate, and phosphate. We propose that the abundant uptake and accumulation of Cl– responds to adaptive functions improving water homeostasis in higher plants. PMID:26602947

  11. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  12. Chapter 4: Hongos Hipogeos de Tamulipas, Mexico

    Treesearch

    Gonzalo Guevara-Guerrero; Efren Cazares-Gonzalez; Gregory Bonito; Rosanne A. Healy; Benjamin Stielow; Jesus Garcia; Fortunato Garza-Ocanas; Michael Castellano; James Trappe

    2014-01-01

    Twenty genera of hypogeous fungi or truffles are reported and illustrated from the State of Tamaulipas. The truffles belong to the following phyla: Glomeromycota (Glomus); Zygomycota (Endogone); hypogeous Ascomycota (Elaphomyces, Genabea, Genea, Hydnobolites, Pachyphloeus, Tuber); and Basidiomycota (...

  13. Experience in connecting the power generating units of thermal power plants to automatic secondary frequency regulation within the united power system of Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. V.; Komarov, A. N.; Safronov, A. N.

    The principles of central control of the power generating units of thermal power plants by automatic secondary frequency and active power overcurrent regulation systems, and the algorithms for interactions between automatic power control systems for the power production units in thermal power plants and centralized systems for automatic frequency and power regulation, are discussed. The order of switching the power generating units of thermal power plants over to control by a centralized system for automatic frequency and power regulation and by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation is presented. The results of full-scale system tests ofmore » the control of power generating units of the Kirishskaya, Stavropol, and Perm GRES (State Regional Electric Power Plants) by the Central Coordinating System for automatic frequency and power regulation at the United Power System of Russia on September 23-25, 2008, are reported.« less

  14. Exogenous application of plant growth regulators (PGRs) induces chilling tolerance in short-duration hybrid maize.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Imran; Akhter, Muhammad Javaid; Noor, Mehmood Ali; Ashraf, Umair

    2017-04-01

    Chilling stress hampers the optimal performance of maize under field conditions precipitously by inducing oxidative stress. To confer the damaging effects of chilling stress, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of some natural and synthetic plant growth regulators, i.e., salicylic acid (SA), thiourea (TU), sorghum water extract (SWE), and moringa leaf extract (MLE) on chilling stress tolerance in autumn maize hybrid. Foliar application of growth regulators at low concentrations was carried out at six leaf (V6) and tasseling stages. An increase in crop growth rate (CGR), leaf area index (LAI), leaf area duration (LAD), plant height (PH), grain yield (GY), and total dry matter accumulation (TDM) was observed in exogenously applied plants as compared to control. In addition, improved physio-biochemical, phenological, and grain nutritional quality attributes were noticed in foliar-treated maize plots as compared to non-treated ones. SA-treated plants reduced 20% electrolyte leakage in cell membrane against control. MLE and SA were proved best in improving total phenolic, relative water (19-23%), and chlorophyll contents among other applications. A similar trend was found for photosynthetic and transpiration rates, whereas MLE and SWE were found better in improving CGR, LAI, LAD, TDM, PH, GY, grains per cob, 1000 grain weight, and biological yield among all treatments including control. TU and MLE have significantly reduced the duration in phenological events of crop at the reproductive stage. MLE, TU, and SA also improved the grain protein, oil, and starch contents as compared to control. Enhanced crop water productivity was also observed in MLE-treated plants. Economic analysis suggested that MLE and SA applications were more economical in inducing chilling stress tolerance under field conditions. Although eliciting behavior of all growth regulators improved morpho-physiological attributes against suboptimal temperature stress conditions, MLE and SA

  15. A Jasmonate ZIM-Domain Protein NaJAZd Regulates Floral Jasmonic Acid Levels and Counteracts Flower Abscission in Nicotiana attenuata Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd) by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions played by jasmonates

  16. Characterization of the regulation of a plant polysaccharide utilization operon and its role in biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Cameron; Yu, Yiyang; Gozzi, Kevin; Ching, Carly; Shemesh, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is often found in association with plants in the rhizosphere. Previously, plant polysaccharides have been shown to stimulate formation of root-associated multicellular communities, or biofilms, in this bacterium, yet the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. A five-gene gan operon (ganSPQAB) in B. subtilis has recently been shown to be involved in utilization of the plant-derived polysaccharide galactan. Despite these findings, molecular details about the regulation of the operon and the role of the operon in biofilm formation remain elusive. In this study, we performed comprehensive genetic analyses on the regulation of the gan operon. We show that this operon is regulated both by a LacI-like transcription repressor (GanR), which directly binds to pairs of inverted DNA repeats in the promoter region of the operon, and by the catabolite control protein A (CcpA). Derepression can be triggered by the presence of the inducer β-1,4-galactobiose, a hydrolysis product of galactan, or in situ when B. subtilis cells are associated with plant roots. In addition to the transcriptional regulation, the encoded ß-galactosidase GanA (by ganA), which hydrolyzes ß-1,4-galactobiose into galactose, is inhibited at the enzymatic level by the catalytic product galactose. Thus, the galactan utilization pathway is under complex regulation involving both positive and negative feedback mechanisms in B. subtilis. We discuss about the biological significance of such complex regulation as well as a hypothesis of biofilm induction by galactan via multiple mechanisms. PMID:28617843

  17. Phylogenetic assessment of Pezizomycetes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pezizomycetes and Orbiliomycetes form the earliest diverging lineage within the Pezizomycotina. A shared derived character, the operculate ascus, supports Pezizomycetes monophyly, although functional opercula have been lost in certain taxa (mostly truffles and truffle-like forms). This class contain...

  18. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOEpatents

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  19. Enhancing crop yield with the use of N-based fertilizers co-applied with plant hormones or growth regulators.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mohammad; Kurepin, Leonid V; Catto, Warwick; Pharis, Richard P

    2015-07-01

    Crop yield, vegetative or reproductive, depends on access to an adequate supply of essential mineral nutrients. At the same time, a crop plant's growth and development, and thus yield, also depend on in situ production of plant hormones. Thus optimizing mineral nutrition and providing supplemental hormones are two mechanisms for gaining appreciable yield increases. Optimizing the mineral nutrient supply is a common and accepted agricultural practice, but the co-application of nitrogen-based fertilizers with plant hormones or plant growth regulators is relatively uncommon. Our review discusses possible uses of plant hormones (gibberellins, auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid and ethylene) and specific growth regulators (glycine betaine and polyamines) to enhance and optimize crop yield when co-applied with nitrogen-based fertilizers. We conclude that use of growth-active gibberellins, together with a nitrogen-based fertilizer, can result in appreciable and significant additive increases in shoot dry biomass of crops, including forage crops growing under low-temperature conditions. There may also be a potential for use of an auxin or cytokinin, together with a nitrogen-based fertilizer, for obtaining additive increases in dry shoot biomass and/or reproductive yield. Further research, though, is needed to determine the potential of co-application of nitrogen-based fertilizers with abscisic acid, ethylene and other growth regulators. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Central cell-derived peptides regulate early embryo patterning in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana M; Marshall, Eleanor; Tesfaye, Mesfin; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Mori, Masashi; Umetsu, Yoshitaka; Otterbach, Sophie L; Papareddy, Ranjith; Dickinson, Hugh G; Boutiller, Kim; VandenBosch, Kathryn A; Ohki, Shinya; Gutierrez-Marcos, José F

    2014-04-11

    Plant embryogenesis initiates with the establishment of an apical-basal axis; however, the molecular mechanisms accompanying this early event remain unclear. Here, we show that a small cysteine-rich peptide family is required for formation of the zygotic basal cell lineage and proembryo patterning in Arabidopsis. EMBRYO SURROUNDING FACTOR 1 (ESF1) peptides accumulate before fertilization in central cell gametes and thereafter in embryo-surrounding endosperm cells. Biochemical and structural analyses revealed cleavage of ESF1 propeptides to form biologically active mature peptides. Further, these peptides act in a non-cell-autonomous manner and synergistically with the receptor-like kinase SHORT SUSPENSOR to promote suspensor elongation through the YODA mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our findings demonstrate that the second female gamete and its sexually derived endosperm regulate early embryonic patterning in flowering plants.

  1. COP1, a negative regulator of photomorphogenesis, positively regulates plant disease resistance via double-stranded RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Gah-Hyun; Zhu, Shifeng; Clavel, Marion; Yu, Keshun; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Aardra; Deragon, Jean-Marc

    2018-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 (Constitutive Photomorphogenesis 1) is a well known component of the light-mediated plant development that acts as a repressor of photomorphogenesis. Here we show that COP1 positively regulates defense against turnip crinkle virus (TCV) and avrRPM1 bacteria by contributing to stability of resistance (R) protein HRT and RPM1, respectively. HRT and RPM1 levels and thereby pathogen resistance is significantly reduced in the cop1 mutant background. Notably, the levels of at least two double-stranded RNA binding (DRB) proteins DRB1 and DRB4 are reduced in the cop1 mutant background suggesting that COP1 affects HRT stability via its effect on the DRB proteins. Indeed, a mutation in either drb1 or drb4 resulted in degradation of HRT. In contrast to COP1, a multi-subunit E3 ligase encoded by anaphase-promoting complex (APC) 10 negatively regulates DRB4 and TCV resistance but had no effect on DRB1 levels. We propose that COP1-mediated positive regulation of HRT is dependent on a balance between COP1 and negative regulators that target DRB1 and DRB4. PMID:29513740

  2. Plasmodesmata localizing proteins regulate transport and signaling during systemic acquired immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants is mediated by the signaling molecules azelaic acid (AzA),glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), and salicylic acid (SA).Here, we show that AzA and G3P transport occurs via the symplastic route, which is regulated by channels known as plasmodesmata (PD). In contrast...

  3. Two Cytoplasmic Effectors of Phytophthora sojae Regulate Plant Cell Death via Interactions with Plant Catalases1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Li, Qi; Liu, Tingli; Liu, Li; Shen, Danyu; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Peihan; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora sojae, secrete an arsenal of host cytoplasmic effectors to promote infection. We have shown previously that P. sojae PsCRN63 (for crinkling- and necrosis-inducing proteins) induces programmed cell death (PCD) while PsCRN115 blocks PCD in planta; however, they are jointly required for full pathogenesis. Here, we find that PsCRN63 alone or PsCRN63 and PsCRN115 together might suppress the immune responses of Nicotiana benthamiana and demonstrate that these two cytoplasmic effectors interact with catalases from N. benthamiana and soybean (Glycine max). Transient expression of PsCRN63 increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, whereas PsCRN115 suppresses this process. Transient overexpression of NbCAT1 (for N. benthamiana CATALASE1) or GmCAT1 specifically alleviates PsCRN63-induced PCD. Suppression of the PsCRN63-induced PCD by PsCRN115 is compromised when catalases are silenced in N. benthamiana. Interestingly, the NbCAT1 is recruited into the plant nucleus in the presence of PsCRN63 or PsCRN115; NbCAT1 and GmCAT1 are destabilized when PsCRN63 is coexpressed, and PsCRN115 inhibits the processes. Thus, PsCRN63/115 manipulates plant PCD through interfering with catalases and perturbing H2O2 homeostasis. Furthermore, silencing of catalase genes enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora capsici, indicating that catalases are essential for plant resistance. Taken together, we suggest that P. sojae secretes these two effectors to regulate plant PCD and H2O2 homeostasis through direct interaction with catalases and, therefore, overcome host immune responses. PMID:25424308

  4. The influences of sugars and plant growth regulators on β-glucan synthesis of G. lucidum mycelium in submerged culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thao, Cao Phuong; Tien, Le Thi Thuy

    2017-09-01

    β - glucan is intracellular polysaccharide (IPS), extracted from Ganoderma lucidum mycelium that can enhance human immune respond. This study aimed to stimulate the production of β - glucan in G. lucidum mycelium through optimating the carbonhydrates and plant rowth regulators in submerged culture. The results showed that the stimulation or inhibition of IPS production as well as β - glucan biosynthesis could be adjusted depend on the type and concentration of carbonhydrates and plant growth regulators. The supplement of lactose 80 g/L and BA 1 mg/L in medium could cause the highest IPS production (644.478 mg/g DW) and β - glucan increased up to 0.15/DW, that raised twice as much as without plant growth regulators. Futhermore, the optimation of other environmental elements were figured out were completely dark and 150 rpm on rotary shaker. This result could be used as premise for production of β - glucan in pilot.

  5. Circulating plant miRNAs can regulate human gene expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pastrello, Chiara; Tsay, Mike; McQuaid, Rosanne; Abovsky, Mark; Pasini, Elisa; Shirdel, Elize; Angeli, Marc; Tokar, Tomas; Jamnik, Joseph; Kotlyar, Max; Jurisicova, Andrea; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    While Brassica oleracea vegetables have been linked to cancer prevention, the exact mechanism remains unknown. Regulation of gene expression by cross-species microRNAs has been previously reported; however, its link to cancer suppression remains unexplored. In this study we address both issues. We confirm plant microRNAs in human blood in a large nutrigenomics study cohort and in a randomized dose-controlled trial, finding a significant positive correlation between the daily amount of broccoli consumed and the amount of microRNA in the blood. We also demonstrate that Brassica microRNAs regulate expression of human genes and proteins in vitro, and that microRNAs cooperate with other Brassica-specific compounds in a possible cancer-preventive mechanism. Combined, we provide strong evidence and a possible multimodal mechanism for broccoli in cancer prevention. PMID:27604570

  6. Cell cycle-regulated PLEIADE/AtMAP65-3 links membrane and microtubule dynamics during plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexander; Rybak, Katarzyna; Altmann, Melina; McFarlane, Heather E; Klaeger, Susan; Nguyen, Ngoc; Facher, Eva; Ivakov, Alexander; Wanner, Gerhard; Kuster, Bernhard; Persson, Staffan; Braun, Pascal; Hauser, Marie-Theres; Assaad, Farhah F

    2016-11-01

    Cytokinesis, the partitioning of the cytoplasm following nuclear division, requires extensive coordination between cell cycle cues, membrane trafficking and microtubule dynamics. Plant cytokinesis occurs within a transient membrane compartment known as the cell plate, to which vesicles are delivered by a plant-specific microtubule array, the phragmoplast. While membrane proteins required for cytokinesis are known, how these are coordinated with microtubule dynamics and regulated by cell cycle cues remains unclear. Here, we document physical and genetic interactions between Transport Protein Particle II (TRAPPII) tethering factors and microtubule-associated proteins of the PLEIADE/AtMAP65 family. These interactions do not specifically affect the recruitment of either TRAPPII or MAP65 proteins to the cell plate or midzone. Rather, and based on single versus double mutant phenotypes, it appears that they are required to coordinate cytokinesis with the nuclear division cycle. As MAP65 family members are known to be targets of cell cycle-regulated kinases, our results provide a conceptual framework for how membrane and microtubule dynamics may be coordinated with each other and with the nuclear cycle during plant cytokinesis. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Isolation of Polysomal RNA for Analyzing Stress-Responsive Genes Regulated at the Translational Level in Plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Fang; Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2017-01-01

    Alteration of gene expression is an essential mechanism, which allows plants to respond and adapt to adverse environmental conditions. Transcriptome and proteome analyses in plants exposed to abiotic stresses revealed that protein levels are not correlated with the changes in corresponding mRNAs, indicating regulation at translational level is another major regulator for gene expression. Analysis of translatome, which refers to all mRNAs associated with ribosomes, thus has the potential to bridge the gap between transcriptome and proteome. Polysomal RNA profiling and recently developed ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq) are two main methods for translatome analysis at global level. Here, we describe the classical procedure for polysomal RNA isolation by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation followed by highthroughput RNA-seq to identify genes regulated at translational level. Polysomal RNA can be further used for a variety of downstream applications including Northern blot analysis, qRT-PCR, RNase protection assay, and microarray-based gene expression profiling.

  8. [Plant protection products and their residues : Aspects of consumer safety in context of the new EU regulations].

    PubMed

    Banasiak, U; Michalski, B; Pfeil, R; Solecki, R

    2010-06-01

    The law regulating plant protection products (PPP) in the European Union (EU) was fundamentally revised through the introduction of Regulation (EC) No. 1107/2009 which is due to enter into force on 14 June 2011. EU-wide harmonized maximum residue levels (MRLs) for the active substances of PPP in foods are laid down in Regulation (EC) No. 396/2005 and apply since entry into force of the regulation on 1 September 2008. The goal of both regulations is to strengthen the level of consumer protection. PPP are subject to a strict assessment of active substances, which is regulated at the EU level as well as an authorization procedure in the EU Member States. Prior to application for authorization of a PPP, the active substance(s) it contains must be included in a positive list. Tests regarding the toxicity and residue behavior of PPP must be conducted by the applicant, and the respective documents must be submitted to the authorities for evaluation. Following review of the required data, toxicological threshold values are derived, consumer exposure is assessed, and the risk to health is evaluated. The goal of this evaluation is to ensure that the use of PPP according to good plant protection practice does not have any harmful effects on human health.

  9. Plant-soil-microbe interactions regulating soil C storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmockel, K. S.; Bach, E.; Williams, R.

    2016-12-01

    Integration across disciplines is required to identify the emergent microbial scale properties that regulate the release or occlusion of plant inputs in soil organic matter. To investigate how micro-scale processes influence soil carbon cycling, we measured microbial community composition and activity within soil aggregates monthly over two growing seasons of a long-term bioenergy field experiment. Using a biologically sensitive sieving technique, soil aggregates were isolated and microbial community activity and composition were measured. This aggregate approach revealed biogeochemical processes regulating C cycling that are not detected using whole soil approaches. Soil aggregation influenced microbe-substrate interactions, where diversified perennial grassland systems supported greater aggregation and reduced severity of aggregate turnover compared to corn systems. Aggregate turnover and concurrent increases in activity resulted in greater microbial biomass and physical protection of soil organic matter in prairie systems, especially fertilized prairies. Fertilized prairie enhanced microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and soil aggregation despite greater root biomass in unfertilized prairie. Independent of ecosystem or sampling date, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase activity and Nitrospirae abundance was greatest in large macroaggregates (>2000 µm), which harbored the highest C:N; cellobiohydrolase activity and Acidobacteria abundance was greatest in microaggregates (<250 µm) which had the lowest C:N. Aggregate fractions differed in microbial community composition (bacteria, archaea, and fungi) and potential enzyme activity, independent of cropping system. Microaggregates harbored significantly greater microbial diversity and richness across all bioenergy cropping systems. Together these results suggest that by mediating access to substrates, soil structure (aggregates) can influence the microbial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity to regulate

  10. Identification of an Alternative rRNA Post-transcriptional Maturation of 26S rRNA in the Kingdom Fungi.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Ródenas, Alfonso; Carra, Andrea; Morte, Asunción

    2018-01-01

    Despite of the integrity of their RNA, some desert truffles present a non-canonical profile of rRNA where 3.3 kb is absent, 1.8 kb is clear and a band of 1.6 kb is observed. A similar rRNA profile was identified in organisms belonging to different life kingdoms, with the exception of the Kingdom Fungi, as a result of a split LSU rRNA called hidden gap . rRNA profiles of desert truffles were analyzed to verify the presence of the non-canonical profile. The RNA of desert truffles and yeast were blotted and hybridized with probes complementary to LSU extremes. RACE of LSU rRNA was carried out to determine the LSU rRNA breakage point. LSU rRNA of desert truffles presents a post-transcriptional cleavage of five nucleotides that generates a hidden gap located in domain D7. LSU splits into two molecules of 1.6 and 1.8 kb. Similar to other organisms, a UAAU tract, downstream of the breakage point, was identified. Phylogenetic comparison suggests that during fungi evolution mutations were introduced in the hypervariable D7 domain, resulting in a sequence that is specifically post-transcriptionally cleaved in some desert truffles.

  11. Role of transcriptional regulation in the evolution of plant phenotype: A dynamic systems approach.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mega, Emiliano; Piñeyro-Nelson, Alma; Gutierrez, Crisanto; García-Ponce, Berenice; Sánchez, María De La Paz; Zluhan-Martínez, Estephania; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena R; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana

    2015-03-02

    A growing body of evidence suggests that alterations in transcriptional regulation of genes involved in modulating development are an important part of phenotypic evolution, and this can be documented among species and within populations. While the effects of differential transcriptional regulation in organismal development have been preferentially studied in animal systems, this phenomenon has also been addressed in plants. In this review, we summarize evidence for cis-regulatory mutations, trans-regulatory changes and epigenetic modifications as molecular events underlying important phenotypic alterations, and thus shaping the evolution of plant development. We postulate that a mechanistic understanding of why such molecular alterations have a key role in development, morphology and evolution will have to rely on dynamic models of complex regulatory networks that consider the concerted action of genetic and nongenetic components, and that also incorporate the restrictions underlying the genotype to phenotype mapping process. Developmental Dynamics, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A CRISPR/Cas9 Toolbox for Multiplexed Plant Genome Editing and Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Levi G; Zhang, Dengwei; Baltes, Nicholas J; Paul, Joseph W; Tang, Xu; Zheng, Xuelian; Voytas, Daniel F; Hsieh, Tzung-Fu; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yiping

    2015-10-01

    The relative ease, speed, and biological scope of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated Protein9 (Cas9)-based reagents for genomic manipulations are revolutionizing virtually all areas of molecular biosciences, including functional genomics, genetics, applied biomedical research, and agricultural biotechnology. In plant systems, however, a number of hurdles currently exist that limit this technology from reaching its full potential. For example, significant plant molecular biology expertise and effort is still required to generate functional expression constructs that allow simultaneous editing, and especially transcriptional regulation, of multiple different genomic loci or multiplexing, which is a significant advantage of CRISPR/Cas9 versus other genome-editing systems. To streamline and facilitate rapid and wide-scale use of CRISPR/Cas9-based technologies for plant research, we developed and implemented a comprehensive molecular toolbox for multifaceted CRISPR/Cas9 applications in plants. This toolbox provides researchers with a protocol and reagents to quickly and efficiently assemble functional CRISPR/Cas9 transfer DNA constructs for monocots and dicots using Golden Gate and Gateway cloning methods. It comes with a full suite of capabilities, including multiplexed gene editing and transcriptional activation or repression of plant endogenous genes. We report the functionality and effectiveness of this toolbox in model plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and rice (Oryza sativa), demonstrating its utility for basic and applied plant research. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses.

    PubMed

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-06-12

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  14. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants. PMID:26075872

  15. Regulation of leaf-gas exchange strategies of woody plants under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmecheri, S.; Guerrieri, R.; Voelker, S.

    2016-12-01

    Estimates of vegetation water use efficiency (WUE) have increasingly been assessed using both eddy covariance and plant stable isotope techniques but these data have often lead to differing conclusions. Eddy covariance can provide forest ecosystem-level responses of coupled carbon and water exchanges to recent global change phenomena. These direct observations, however, are generally less than one or two decades, thus documenting ecosystem-level responses at elevated [CO2] concentrations (350-400 ppm). Therefore, eddy covariance data cannot directly address plant physiological mechanisms and adaptation to climate variability and anthropogenic factors, e.g., increasing atmospheric [CO2]. By contrast, tree based carbon isotope approaches can retrospectively assess intrinsic WUE over long periods and have documented physiological responses to ambient atmospheric [CO2] (ca), which have often been contextualized within generalized strategies for stomatal regulation of leaf gas-exchange. These include maintenance of a constant leaf internal [CO2] (ci), a constant drawdown in [CO2] (ca - ci), and a constant ci/ca . Tree carbon isotope studies, however, cannot account for changes in leaf area of individual trees or canopies, which makes scaling up a difficult task. The limitations of these different approaches to understanding how forest water use efficiency has been impacted by rising [CO2] has contributed to the uncertainty in global terrestrial carbon cycling and the "missing" terrestrial carbon sink. We examined stable C isotope ratios (d13C) from woody plants over a wide range of [CO2] (200-400 ppm) to test for patterns of ci-regulation in response to rising ca. The analyses are not consistent with any of the leaf gas-exchange regulation strategies noted above. The data suggest that ca - ci is still recently increasing in most species but that the rate of increase is less than expected from paleo trees which grew at much lower [CO2]. This evidence demonstrates that a

  16. SNF1-related protein kinases 2 are negatively regulated by a plant-specific calcium sensor.

    PubMed

    Bucholc, Maria; Ciesielski, Arkadiusz; Goch, Grażyna; Anielska-Mazur, Anna; Kulik, Anna; Krzywińska, Ewa; Dobrowolska, Grażyna

    2011-02-04

    SNF1-related protein kinases 2 (SnRK2s) are plant-specific enzymes involved in environmental stress signaling and abscisic acid-regulated plant development. Here, we report that SnRK2s interact with and are regulated by a plant-specific calcium-binding protein. We screened a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Matchmaker cDNA library for proteins interacting with Nicotiana tabacum osmotic stress-activated protein kinase (NtOSAK), a member of the SnRK2 family. A putative EF-hand calcium-binding protein was identified as a molecular partner of NtOSAK. To determine whether the identified protein interacts only with NtOSAK or with other SnRK2s as well, we studied the interaction of an Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of the calcium-binding protein with selected Arabidopsis SnRK2s using a two-hybrid system. All kinases studied interacted with the protein. The interactions were confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, indicating that the binding occurs in planta, exclusively in the cytoplasm. Calcium binding properties of the protein were analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy using Tb(3+) as a spectroscopic probe. The calcium binding constant, determined by the protein fluorescence titration, was 2.5 ± 0.9 × 10(5) M(-1). The CD spectrum indicated that the secondary structure of the protein changes significantly in the presence of calcium, suggesting its possible function as a calcium sensor in plant cells. In vitro studies revealed that the activity of SnRK2 kinases analyzed is inhibited in a calcium-dependent manner by the identified calcium sensor, which we named SCS (SnRK2-interacting calcium sensor). Our results suggest that SCS is involved in response to abscisic acid during seed germination most probably by negative regulation of SnRK2s activity.

  17. Natural production of Tuber aestivum in central Spain: Pinus spp. versus Quercus spp. brûlés

    Treesearch

    Luis G. Garcia-Montero; Domingo Moreno; Vicente J. Monleon; Fernando Arredondo-Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: Tuber aestivum is the most widespread edible truffle, with increasing commercial interest. This species can produce carpophores with conifer hosts, in contrast with the inability of Pinus spp. to induce fruiting in other truffle species such as Tuber melanosporum. Therefore the objective is to...

  18. The effect of plant growth regulators on apple graft union flexural strength and flexibility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apple rootstock ‘Geneva® 41’ (‘G.41’) forms weak graft unions with multiple scions. Exogenous plant growth regulators (PGR) can influence vascular differentiation and wood formation, and thus may improve graft union strength. A series of commercial and experimental PGR formulations were applied ...

  19. Regulations applicable to plant food supplements and related products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Silano, Vittorio; Coppens, Patrick; Larrañaga-Guetaria, Ainhoa; Minghetti, Paola; Roth-Ehrang, René

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with the current regulatory and legal settings of traditional plant food supplements and herbal medicinal products in the European Union (EU). Marketing of botanicals in foods and food supplements in the EU is subject to several provisions of food law, which cover aspects of safety, production, labelling and product composition, including the use of additives and maximum levels of contaminants and residues. However, due to limited harmonization at the EU level, specific national regulations adopted at a Member State level also apply and mutual recognition is the mechanism through which such products can be marketed in EU countries other than those of origin. Unlike food supplements, marketing of traditional herbal medicinal products is regulated by an ad hoc Directive (i.e. Directive 2004/24/EC) covering in detail all the relevant aspects of these products, including a facilitated registration procedure at national level. However, by distinguishing traditional herbal medicinal products from plant food supplements and establishing selective marketing modalities for these two product categories, the EU has been confronted with implementation difficulties for traditional herbal medicinal products and a lack of homogeneity in the regulatory approaches adopted in different EU Member States. In fact, currently the nature of the commercial botanical products made available to consumers as traditional medicinal products or food supplements, depends largely on the EU Member State under consideration as a consequence of how competent National Authorities and manufacturing companies interpret and apply current regulations rather than on the intrinsic properties of the botanical products and their constituents. When the EU approach is compared with approaches adopted in some non-European countries to regulate these product categories, major differences become evident.

  20. Regulating DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria de la Paz; Costas, Celina; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in plants has requirements and constraints similar to those in other eukaryotes. However, some aspects are plant-specific. Studies of DNA replication control in plants, which have unique developmental strategies, can offer unparalleled opportunities of comparing regulatory processes with yeast and, particularly, metazoa to identify common trends and basic rules. In addition to the comparative molecular and biochemical studies, genomic studies in plants that started with Arabidopsis thaliana in the year 2000 have now expanded to several dozens of species. This, together with the applicability of genomic approaches and the availability of a large collection of mutants, underscores the enormous potential to study DNA replication control in a whole developing organism. Recent advances in this field with particular focus on the DNA replication proteins, the nature of replication origins and their epigenetic landscape, and the control of endoreplication will be reviewed. PMID:23209151

  1. Fetal monitoring indications for delivery and 2-year outcome in 310 infants with fetal growth restriction delivered before 32 weeks' gestation in the TRUFFLE study.

    PubMed

    Visser, G H A; Bilardo, C M; Derks, J B; Ferrazzi, E; Fratelli, N; Frusca, T; Ganzevoort, W; Lees, C C; Napolitano, R; Todros, T; Wolf, H; Hecher, K

    2017-09-01

    In the TRUFFLE (Trial of Randomized Umbilical and Fetal Flow in Europe) study on the outcome of early fetal growth restriction, women were allocated to one of three groups of indication for delivery according to the following monitoring strategies: (1) reduced fetal heart rate (FHR) short-term variation (STV) on cardiotocography (CTG); (2) early changes in fetal ductus venosus (DV) waveform (DV-p95); and (3) late changes in fetal DV waveform (DV-no-A). However, many infants per monitoring protocol were delivered because of safety-net criteria, for maternal or other fetal indications, or after 32 weeks of gestation when the protocol was no longer applied. The objective of the present posthoc subanalysis was to investigate the indications for delivery in relation to 2-year outcome in infants delivered before 32 weeks to further refine management proposals. We included all 310 cases of the TRUFFLE study with known outcome at 2 years' corrected age and seven fetal deaths, excluding seven cases with inevitable perinatal death. Data were analyzed according to the allocated fetal monitoring strategy in combination with the indication for delivery. Overall, only 32% of liveborn infants were delivered according to the specified monitoring parameter for indication for delivery; 38% were delivered because of safety-net criteria, 15% for other fetal reasons and 15% for maternal reasons. In the CTG-STV group, 51% of infants were delivered because of reduced STV. In the DV-p95 group, 34% of infants were delivered because of abnormal DV and, in the DV-no-A group, only 10% of infants were delivered accordingly. The majority of infants in the DV groups were delivered for the safety-net criterion of spontaneous decelerations in FHR. Two-year intact survival was highest in the DV groups combined compared with the CTG-STV group (P = 0.05 for live births only, P = 0.21 including fetal death), with no difference between DV groups. A poorer outcome in the CTG-STV group was restricted to

  2. Gaps, inexperience, inconsistencies, and overlaps: crisis in the regulation of genetically modified plants and animals.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Gregory N

    2004-04-01

    The regulation of genetically modified products pursuant to statutes enacted decades prior to the advent of biotechnology has created a regulatory system that is passive rather than proactive about risks, has difficulty adapting to biotechnology advances, and is highly fractured and inefficient--transgenic plants and animals are governed by at least twelve different statutes and five different agencies or services. The deficiencies resulting from this piecemeal approach to regulation unnecessarily expose society and the environment to adverse risks of biotechnology and introduce numerous inefficiencies into the regulatory system. These risks and inefficiencies include gaps in regulation, duplicative and inconsistent regulation, unnecessary increases in the cost of and delay in the development and commercialization of new biotechnology products. These deficiencies also increase the risk of further unnecessary biotechnology scares, which may cause public overreaction against biotechnology products, preventing the maximization of social welfare. With science and society poised to soar from first-generation biotechnology (focused on crops modified for agricultural benefit), to next-generation developments (including transgenic fish, insects, and livestock, and pharmaceutical-producing and industrial compound-producing plants and animals), it is necessary to establish a comprehensive, efficient, and scientifically rigorous regulatory system. This Article details how to achieve such a result through fixing the deficiencies in, and risks created by, the current regulatory structure. Ignoring many details, the solutions can be summarized in two categories. First, statutory and regulatory gaps that are identified must be closed with new legislation and regulation. Second, regulation of genetically modified products must be shifted from a haphazard model based on statutes not intended to cover biotechnology to a system based upon agency expertise in handling particular types

  3. Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

    PubMed

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

  4. Regulation of the expression of plant resistance gene SNC1 by a protein with a conserved BAT2 domain.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzhong; Tessaro, Mark J; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-07-01

    Plant Resistance (R) genes encode immune receptors that recognize pathogens and activate defense responses. Because of fitness costs associated with maintaining R protein-mediated resistance, expression levels of R genes have to be tightly regulated. However, mechanisms on how R-gene expression is regulated are poorly understood. Here we show that MODIFIER OF snc1, 1 (MOS1) regulates the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF npr1-1, CONSTITUTIVE1 (SNC1), which encodes a Toll/interleukin receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat type of R protein in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the mos1 loss-of-function mutant plants, snc1 expression is repressed and constitutive resistance responses mediated by snc1 are lost. The repression of snc1 expression in mos1 is released by knocking out DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION1. In mos1 mutants, DNA methylation in a region upstream of SNC1 is altered. Furthermore, expression of snc1 transgenes using the native promoter does not require MOS1, indicating that regulation of SNC1 expression by MOS1 is at the chromatin level. Map-based cloning of MOS1 revealed that it encodes a novel protein with a HLA-B ASSOCIATED TRANSCRIPT2 (BAT2) domain that is conserved in plants and animals. Our study on MOS1 suggests that BAT2 domain-containing proteins may function in regulation of gene expression at chromatin level.

  5. Pipecolic acid, an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming, is a critical regulator of inducible plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Návarová, Hana; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Zeier, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    Metabolic signals orchestrate plant defenses against microbial pathogen invasion. Here, we report the identification of the non-protein amino acid pipecolic acid (Pip), a common Lys catabolite in plants and animals, as a critical regulator of inducible plant immunity. Following pathogen recognition, Pip accumulates in inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, in leaves distal from the site of inoculation, and, most specifically, in petiole exudates from inoculated leaves. Defects of mutants in AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (ALD1) in systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and in basal, specific, and β-aminobutyric acid-induced resistance to bacterial infection are associated with a lack of Pip production. Exogenous Pip complements these resistance defects and increases pathogen resistance of wild-type plants. We conclude that Pip accumulation is critical for SAR and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Our data indicate that biologically induced SAR conditions plants to more effectively synthesize the phytoalexin camalexin, Pip, and salicylic acid and primes plants for early defense gene expression. Biological priming is absent in the pipecolate-deficient ald1 mutants. Exogenous pipecolate induces SAR-related defense priming and partly restores priming responses in ald1. We conclude that Pip orchestrates defense amplification, positive regulation of salicylic acid biosynthesis, and priming to guarantee effective local resistance induction and the establishment of SAR.

  6. Translation regulation in plants: an interesting past, an exciting present and a promising future.

    PubMed

    Merchante, Catharina; Stepanova, Anna N; Alonso, Jose M

    2017-05-01

    Changes in gene expression are at the core of most biological processes, from cell differentiation to organ development, including the adaptation of the whole organism to the ever-changing environment. Although the central role of transcriptional regulation is solidly established and the general mechanisms involved in this type of regulation are relatively well understood, it is clear that regulation at a translational level also plays an essential role in modulating gene expression. Despite the large number of examples illustrating the critical role played by translational regulation in determining the expression levels of a gene, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind such types of regulation has been slow to emerge. With the recent development of high-throughput approaches to map and quantify different critical parameters affecting translation, such as RNA structure, protein-RNA interactions and ribosome occupancy at the genome level, a renewed enthusiasm toward studying translation regulation is warranted. The use of these new powerful technologies in well-established and uncharacterized translation-dependent processes holds the promise to decipher the likely complex and diverse, but also fascinating, mechanisms behind the regulation of translation. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Brassinosteroids play a critical role in the regulation of pesticide metabolism in crop plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Gaobo; Wang, Jitao; Wu, Jingxue; Wang, Mengmeng; Yang, Youxin; Shi, Kai; Yu, Yunlong; Chen, Zhixiang; Gan, Jay; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    Pesticide residues in agricultural produce pose a threat to human health worldwide. Although the detoxification mechanisms for xenobiotics have been extensively studied in mammalian cells, information about the regulation network in plants remains elusive. Here we show that brassinosteroids (BRs), a class of natural plant hormones, decreased residues of common organophosphorus, organochlorine and carbamate pesticides by 30–70% on tomato, rice, tea, broccoli, cucumber, strawberry, and other plants when treated externally. Genome-wide microarray analysis showed that fungicide chlorothalonil (CHT) and BR co-upregulated 301 genes, including a set of detoxifying genes encoding cytochrome P450, oxidoreductase, hydrolase and transferase in tomato plants. The level of BRs was closely related to the respiratory burst oxidase 1 (RBOH1)-encoded NADPH oxides-dependent H2O2 production, glutathione biosynthesis and the redox homeostasis, and the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST). Gene silencing treatments showed that BRs decreased pesticide residues in plants likely by promoting their metabolism through a signaling pathway involving BRs-induced H2O2 production and cellular redox change. Our study provided a novel approach for minimizing pesticide residues in crops by exploiting plants' own detoxification mechanisms. PMID:25761674

  8. Bioprocessing of plant-derived virus-like particles of Norwalk virus capsid protein under current Good Manufacture Practice regulations

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Huafang; Chen, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Despite the success in expressing a variety of subunit vaccine proteins in plants and the recent stride in improving vaccine accumulation levels by transient expression systems, there is still no plant-derived vaccine that has been licensed for human use. The lack of commercial success of plant-made vaccines lies in several technical and regulatory barriers that remain to be overcome. These challenges include the lack of scalable downstream processing procedures, the uncertainty of regulatory compliance of production processes, and the lack of demonstration of plant-derived products that meet the required standards of regulatory agencies in identity, purity, potency and safety. In this study, we addressed these remaining challenges and successfully demonstrate the ability of using plants to produce a pharmaceutical grade Norwalk virus (NV) vaccine under current Good Manufacture Practice (cGMP) guidelines at multiple gram scales. Our results demonstrate that an efficient and scalable extraction and purification scheme can established for processing virus-like particles (VLP) of NV capsid protein (NVCP). We successfully operated the upstream and downstream NVCP production processes under cGMP regulations. Furthermore, plant-derived NVCP VLP demonstrates the identity, purity, potency and safety that meet the preset release specifications. This material is being tested in a Phase I human clinical trial. This research provides the first report of producing a plant-derived vaccine at scale under cGMP regulations in an academic setting and an important step for plant-produced vaccines to become a commercial reality. PMID:22134876

  9. CEP genes regulate root and shoot development in response to environmental cues and are specific to seed plants.

    PubMed

    Delay, Christina; Imin, Nijat; Djordjevic, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    The manifestation of repetitive developmental programmes during plant growth can be adjusted in response to various environmental cues. During root development, this means being able to precisely control root growth and lateral root development. Small signalling peptides have been found to play roles in many aspects of root development. One member of the CEP (C-TERMINALLY ENCODED PEPTIDE) gene family has been shown to arrest root growth. Here we report that CEP genes are widespread among seed plants but are not present in land plants that lack true branching roots or root vasculature. We have identified 10 additional CEP genes in Arabidopsis. Expression analysis revealed that CEP genes are regulated by environmental cues such as nitrogen limitation, increased salt levels, increased osmotic strength, and increased CO2 levels in both roots and shoots. Analysis of synthetic CEP variants showed that both peptide sequence and modifications of key amino acids affect CEP biological activity. Analysis of several CEP over-expression lines revealed distinct roles for CEP genes in root and shoot development. A cep3 knockout mutant showed increased root and shoot growth under a range of abiotic stress, nutrient, and light conditions. We demonstrate that CEPs are negative regulators of root development, slowing primary root growth and reducing lateral root formation. We propose that CEPs are negative regulators that mediate environmental influences on plant development.

  10. Molecular tools for the identification of Tuber melanosporum in agroindustry.

    PubMed

    Séjalon-Delmas, N; Roux, C; Martins, M; Kulifaj, M; Bécard, G; Dargent, R

    2000-06-01

    Tuber melanosporum Vitt., Tuber magnatum Pico, and Tuber uncinatum Chat. can be differentiated by their morphological characters. Fraud problems have arisen recently with the importation to Europe of truffles from China. T. melanosporum is morphologically very close, but distinct from the Chinese species [Tuber indicum (Cooke and Massee) and T. himalayense BC (Zhang and Winter)]. We have optimized molecular tools to unequivocally identify T. melanosporum. DNA extraction from ascocarps of black truffles is not straightforward. Problems to obtain pure DNA are due to high contents of phenolic compounds, melanine, and various polymers (proteins, polysaccharides, etc). These compounds coprecipitate with the DNA during extraction and strongly inhibit the PCR reaction. We have developed an efficient and reliable protocol for DNA extraction from truffle ascocarps. It was used successfully for DNA extraction from mycorrhizal root tips as well as from canned preparations of T. melanosporum. Several approaches to identify T. melanosporum by PCR were developed. Two specific primers for T. melanosporum were designed after comparison of the ITS region of this species with those of three Chinese fungi. They proved to be efficient to specifically detect the presence of T. melanosporum by PCR. The mycorrhizal status of trees inoculated with T. melanosporum but unable to produce truffles was confirmed in a single-step PCR reaction. A multiplex PCR approach was also developed with three sets of primers (including a specific one for Chinese truffles) to detect, in one PCR reaction, the presence of any other Tuber species mixed with T. melanosporum ascocarps. This optimized protocol, in association with the specific primers we designed, is applicable to quality control in the truffle industry from the production stages to final commercial products.

  11. Effects of plant growth regulators on the growth and lipid accumulation of Nannochloropsis oculata (droop) Hibberd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Cam Tu; Tran, Thanh Huong; Bui, Trang Viet

    2017-09-01

    Nannochloropsis oculata cells were grown in f/2 modified medium of Chiu et al. (2009) supplemented with the plant growth regulators in different concentrations. Lipid accumulation of N. oculata cells was evaluated by using Nile Red dye and Fiji Image J with Analyze Particles. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) stimulated the increase of cell density in rapid growth phase (day 6) at high concentration (0.75 mg/L) and in slow growth phase (day 10) at lower concentration (0.50 mg/L). IAA, gibberellic acid (GA3) and zeatin increased content of chlorophyll a, in particular, in f/2 modified medium supplemented with 0.5 mg/L zeatin at the 10th day of culture. Roles of plant growth regulators in growth and lipid accumulation of N. oculata were discussed.

  12. Integral control of plant gravitropism through the interplay of hormone signaling and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Blázquez, Miguel A

    2011-08-17

    The interplay between hormone signaling and gene regulatory networks is instrumental in promoting the development of living organisms. In particular, plants have evolved mechanisms to sense gravity and orient themselves accordingly. Here, we present a mathematical model that reproduces plant gravitropic responses based on known molecular genetic interactions for auxin signaling coupled with a physical description of plant reorientation. The model allows one to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system, triggered by an auxin gradient that induces differential growth of the plant with respect to the gravity vector. Our model predicts two important features with strong biological implications: 1), robustness of the regulatory circuit as a consequence of integral control; and 2), a higher degree of plasticity generated by the molecular interplay between two classes of hormones. Our model also predicts the ability of gibberellins to modulate the tropic response and supports the integration of the hormonal role at the level of gene regulation. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Yeast nitrogen utilization in the phyllosphere during plant lifespan under regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Kosuke; Oku, Masahide; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Uchida, Daichi; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, microbe-plant interactions at the above-ground parts have attracted great attention. Here we describe nitrogen metabolism and regulation of autophagy in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii, proliferating and surviving on the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. After quantitative analyses of yeast growth on the leaves of A. thaliana with the wild-type and several mutant yeast strains, we showed that on young leaves, nitrate reductase (Ynr1) was necessary for yeast proliferation, and the yeast utilized nitrate as nitrogen source. On the other hand, a newly developed methylamine sensor revealed appearance of methylamine on older leaves, and methylamine metabolism was induced in C. boidinii, and Ynr1 was subjected to degradation. Biochemical and microscopic analysis of Ynr1 in vitro during a shift of nitrogen source from nitrate to methylamine revealed that Ynr1 was transported to the vacuole being the cargo for biosynthetic cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, and degraded. Our results reveal changes in the nitrogen source composition for phyllospheric yeasts during plant aging, and subsequent adaptation of the yeasts to this environmental change mediated by regulation of autophagy. PMID:25900611

  14. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses

    PubMed Central

    Andreasson, Erik; Jenkins, Thomas; Brodersen, Peter; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Zhu, Shijiang; Qiu, Jin-Long; Micheelsen, Pernille; Rocher, Anne; Petersen, Morten; Newman, Mari-Anne; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Hirt, Heribert; Somssich, Imre; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Analyses of transgenic plants and genome-wide transcript profiling indicated that MKS1 is required for full SA-dependent resistance in mpk4 mutants, and that overexpression of MKS1 in wild-type plants is sufficient to activate SA-dependent resistance, but does not interfere with induction of a defense gene by JA. Further yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that MKS1 interacts with the WRKY transcription factors WRKY25 and WRKY33. WRKY25 and WRKY33 were shown to be in vitro substrates of MPK4, and a wrky33 knockout mutant was found to exhibit increased expression of the SA-related defense gene PR1. MKS1 may therefore contribute to MPK4-regulated defense activation by coupling the kinase to specific WRKY transcription factors. PMID:15990873

  15. Interplay of HD-Zip II and III transcription factors in auxin-regulated plant development.

    PubMed

    Turchi, L; Baima, S; Morelli, G; Ruberti, I

    2015-08-01

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) class of transcription factors is unique to plants. HD-Zip proteins bind to DNA exclusively as dimers recognizing dyad symmetric sequences and act as positive or negative regulators of gene expression. On the basis of sequence homology in the HD-Zip DNA-binding domain, HD-Zip proteins have been grouped into four families (HD-Zip I-IV). Each HD-Zip family can be further divided into subfamilies containing paralogous genes that have arisen through genome duplication. Remarkably, all the members of the HD-Zip IIγ and -δ clades are regulated by light quality changes that induce in the majority of the angiosperms the shade-avoidance response, a process regulated at multiple levels by auxin. Intriguingly, it has recently emerged that, apart from their function in shade avoidance, the HD-Zip IIγ and -δ transcription factors control several auxin-regulated developmental processes, including apical embryo patterning, lateral organ polarity, and gynoecium development, in a white-light environment. This review presents recent advances in our understanding of HD-Zip II protein function in plant development, with particular emphasis on the impact of loss-of-function HD-Zip II mutations on auxin distribution and response. The review also describes evidence demonstrating that HD-Zip IIγ and -δ genes are directly and positively regulated by HD-Zip III transcription factors, primary determinants of apical shoot development, known to control the expression of several auxin biosynthesis, transport, and response genes. Finally, the interplay between HD-Zip II and III transcription factors in embryo apical patterning and organ polarity is discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The SAL-PAP Chloroplast Retrograde Pathway Contributes to Plant Immunity by Regulating Glucosinolate Pathway and Phytohormone Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Ishiga, Takako; Tohge, Takayuki; Matsuura, Takakazu; Ikeda, Yoko; Hoefgen, Rainer; Fernie, Alisdair R; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2017-10-01

    Chloroplasts have a crucial role in plant immunity against pathogens. Increasing evidence suggests that phytopathogens target chloroplast homeostasis as a pathogenicity mechanism. In order to regulate the performance of chloroplasts under stress conditions, chloroplasts produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression. Many signals for the chloroplast retrograde pathway have been identified, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species, and metabolic retrograde signals. Although there is a reasonably good understanding of chloroplast retrograde signaling in plant immunity, some signals are not well-understood. In order to understand the role of chloroplast retrograde signaling in plant immunity, we investigated Arabidopsis chloroplast retrograde signaling mutants in response to pathogen inoculation. sal1 mutants (fry1-2 and alx8) responsible for the SAL1-PAP retrograde signaling pathway showed enhanced disease symptoms not only to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 but, also, to the necrotrophic pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum EC1. Glucosinolate profiles demonstrated the reduced accumulation of aliphatic glucosinolates in the fry1-2 and alx8 mutants compared with the wild-type Col-0 in response to DC3000 infection. In addition, quantification of multiple phytohormones and analyses of their gene expression profiles revealed that both the salicylic acid (SA)- and jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathways were down-regulated in the fry1-2 and alx8 mutants. These results suggest that the SAL1-PAP chloroplast retrograde pathway is involved in plant immunity by regulating the SA- and JA-mediated signaling pathways.

  17. GsERF6, an ethylene-responsive factor from Glycine soja, mediates the regulation of plant bicarbonate tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Ailin; Duan, Xiangbo; Wang, Sunting; Sun, Xiaoli; Duanmu, Huizi; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Chao; Cao, Lei; Xiao, Jialei; Li, Qiang; Nisa, Zaib Un; Zhu, Yanming; Ding, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    This is an original study focus on ERF gene response to alkaline stress. GsERF6 functions as transcription factor and significantly enhanced plant tolerance to bicarbonate (HCO 3 (-) ) in transgenic Arabidopsis . Alkaline stress is one of the most harmful, but little studied environmental factors, which negatively affects plant growth, development and yield. The cause of alkaline stress is mainly due to the damaging consequence of high concentration of the bicarbonate ion, high-pH, and osmotic shock to plants. The AP2/ERF family genes encode plant-specific transcription factors involved in diverse environmental stresses. However, little is known about their physiological functions, especially in alkaline stress responses. In this study, we functionally characterized a novel ERF subfamily gene, GsERF6 from alkaline-tolerant wild soybean (Glycine soja). In wild soybean, GsERF6 was rapidly induced by NaHCO3 treatment, and its overexpression in Arabidopsis enhanced transgenic plant tolerance to NaHCO3 challenge. Interestingly, GsERF6 transgenic lines also displayed increased tolerance to KHCO3 treatment, but not to high pH stress, implicating that GsERF6 may participate specifically in bicarbonate stress responses. We also found that GsERF6 overexpression up-regulated the transcription levels of bicarbonate-stress-inducible genes such as NADP-ME, H (+)-Ppase and H (+)-ATPase, as well as downstream stress-tolerant genes such as RD29A, COR47 and KINI. GsERF6 overexpression and NaHCO3 stress also altered the expression patterns of plant hormone synthesis and hormone-responsive genes. Conjointly, our results suggested that GsERF6 is a positive regulator of plant alkaline stress by increasing bicarbonate ionic resistance specifically, providing a new insight into the regulation of gene expression under alkaline conditions.

  18. SPINDLY, a Negative Regulator of Gibberellic Acid Signaling, Is Involved in the Plant Abiotic Stress Response1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng; Kodaira, Ken-Suke; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mizoi, Junya; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Fujita, Yasunari; Morimoto, Kyoko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-01-01

    The SPINDLY (SPY) gene was first identified as a negative regulator of plant gibberellic acid (GA) signaling because mutation of this gene phenocopies plants treated with an overdose of bioactive GA and results in insensitivity to a GA inhibitor during seed germination. The SPY gene encodes an O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase that can modify the target protein and modulate the protein activity in cells. In this study, we describe the strong salt and drought tolerance phenotypes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) spy-1 and spy-3 mutants in addition to their GA-related phenotypes. SPY gene expression was found to be drought stress inducible and slightly responsive to salt stress. Transcriptome analysis of spy-3 revealed that many GA-responsive genes were up-regulated, which could explain the GA-overdosed phenotype of spy-3. Some stress-inducible genes were found to be up-regulated in spy-3, such as genes encoding late embryogenesis abundant proteins, Responsive to Dehydration20, and AREB1-like transcription factor, which may confer stress tolerance on spy-3. CKX3, a cytokinin (CK) catabolism gene, was up-regulated in spy-3; this up-regulation indicates that the mutant possesses reduced CK signaling, which is consistent with a positive role for SPY in CK signaling. Moreover, overexpression of SPY in transgenics (SPY overexpressing [SPY-OX]) impaired plant drought stress tolerance, opposite to the phenotype of spy. The expression levels of several genes, such as DREB1E/DDF1 and SNH1/WIN1, were decreased in SPY-OX but increased in spy-3. Taken together, these data indicate that SPY plays a negative role in plant abiotic stress tolerance, probably by integrating environmental stress signals via GA and CK cross talk. PMID:22013217

  19. Abandoned floodplain plant communities along a regulated dryland river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, L. V.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; House, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Rivers and their floodplains worldwide have changed dramatically over the last century because of regulation by dams, flow diversions and channel stabilization. Floodplains no longer inundated by river flows following dam-induced flood reduction comprise large areas of bottomland habitat, but the effects of abandonment on plant communities are not well understood. Using a hydraulic flow model, geomorphic mapping and field surveys, we addressed the following questions along the Bill Williams River, Arizona: (i) What per cent of the bottomland do abandoned floodplains comprise? and (ii) Are abandoned floodplains quantitatively different from adjacent xeric and riparian surfaces in terms of vegetation composition and surface sediment? We found that nearly 70% of active channel and floodplain area was abandoned following dam installation. Abandoned floodplains along the Bill Williams River tend to be similar to each other yet distinct from neighbouring habitats: they have been altered physically from their historic state, leading to distinct combinations of surface sediments, hydrology and plant communities. Abandoned floodplains may transition to xeric communities over time but are likely to retain some riparian qualities as long as there is access to relatively shallow ground water. With expected increases in water demand and drying climatic conditions in many regions, these surfaces and associated vegetation will continue to be extensive in riparian landscapes worldwide

  20. Epigenetic regulation of the expression of WRKY75 transcription factor in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in Solanaceae plants.

    PubMed

    López-Galiano, María José; González-Hernández, Ana I; Crespo-Salvador, Oscar; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores; Escamilla, Mónica; Camañes, Gemma; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Robles, Inmaculada

    2018-01-01

    SlyWRKY75: gene expression was induced in response to biotic stresses, especially in Botrytis cinerea-infected tomato plants, in which Sly-miR1127-3p is a putative SlyWRKY75 regulator and epigenetic marks were detected. WRKY75 transcription factor involved in Pi homeostasis was recently found also induced in defense against necrotrophic pathogens. In this study, we analyzed by RT-qPCR the expression of SlyWRKY75 gene in tomato plants in response to abiotic stresses (drought or heat) and biotic stresses (Colorado potato beetle larvae infestation, Pseudomonas syringae or Botrytis cinerea infection) being only differentially expressed following biotic stresses, especially upon B. cinerea infection (55-fold induction). JA and JA-Ile levels were significantly increased in tomato plants under biotic stresses compared with control plants, indicating that SlyWRKY75 might be a transcriptional regulator of the JA pathway. The contribution of miRNAs and epigenetic molecular mechanisms to the regulation of this gene in B. cinerea-infected tomato plants was explored. We identified a putative Sly-miR1127-3p miRNA predicted to bind the intronic region of the SlyWRKY75 genomic sequence. Sly-miR1127-3p miRNA was repressed in infected plants (0.4-fold) supporting that it might act as an epigenetic regulation factor of SlyWRKY75 gene expression rather than via the post-transcriptional mechanisms of canonical miRNAs. It has been proposed that certain miRNAs can mediate DNA methylation in the plant nucleus broadening miRNA functions with transcriptional gene silencing by targeting intron-containing pre-mRNAs. Histone modifications analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated the presence of the activator histone modification H3K4me3 on SlyWRKY75 transcription start site and gene body. The induction of this gene in response to B. cinerea correlates with the presence of an activator mark. Thus, miRNAs and chromatin modifications might cooperate as epigenetic factors to

  1. The AtRbx1 protein is part of plant SCF complexes, and its down-regulation causes severe growth and developmental defects.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Esther; Xie, Daoxin; Grava, Sandrine; Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Planchais, Severine; Murray, James A H; Parmentier, Yves; Mutterer, Jerome; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Shen, Wen-Hui; Genschik, Pascal

    2002-12-20

    Recently in yeast and animal cells, one particular class of ubiquitin ligase (E3), called the SCF, was demonstrated to regulate diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In plants SCF-dependent proteolysis is also involved in different developmental and hormonal regulations. To further investigate the function of SCF, we characterized at the molecular level the Arabidopsis RING-H2 finger protein AtRbx1. We demonstrated that the plant gene is able to functionally complement a yeast knockout mutant strain and showed that AtRbx1 protein interacts physically with at least two members of the Arabidopsis cullin family (AtCul1 and AtCul4). AtRbx1 also associates with AtCul1 and the Arabidopsis SKP1-related proteins in planta, indicating that it is part of plant SCF complexes. AtRbx1 mRNAs accumulate in various tissues of the plant, but at higher levels in tissues containing actively dividing cells. Finally to study the function of the gene in planta, we either overexpressed AtRbx1 or reduced its expression by a dsRNA strategy. Down-regulation of AtRbx1 impaired seedling growth and development, indicating that the gene is essential in plants. Furthermore, the AtRbx1-silenced plants showed a reduced level of AtCul1 protein, but accumulated higher level of cyclin D3.

  2. Regeneration of viable oil palm plants from protoplasts by optimizing media components, growth regulators and cultivation procedures.

    PubMed

    Masani, Mat Yunus Abdul; Noll, Gundula; Parveez, Ghulam Kadir Ahmad; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Prüfer, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Oil palm protoplasts are suitable as a starting material for the production of oil palm plants with new traits using approaches such as somatic hybridization, but attempts to regenerate viable plants from protoplasts have failed thus far. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the regeneration of viable plants from protoplasts isolated from cell suspension cultures. We achieved a protoplast yield of 1.14×10(6) per gram fresh weight with a viability of 82% by incubating the callus in a digestion solution comprising 2% cellulase, 1% pectinase, 0.5% cellulase onuzuka R10, 0.1% pectolyase Y23, 3% KCl, 0.5% CaCl2 and 3.6% mannitol. The regeneration of protoplasts into viable plants required media optimization, the inclusion of plant growth regulators and the correct culture technique. Microcalli derived from protoplasts were obtained by establishing agarose bead cultures using Y3A medium supplemented with 10μM naphthalene acetic acid, 2μM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2μM indole-3-butyric acid, 2μM gibberellic acid and 2μM 2-γ-dimethylallylaminopurine. Small plantlets were regenerated from microcalli by somatic embryogenesis after successive subculturing steps in medium with limiting amounts of growth regulators supplemented with 200mg/l ascorbic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Apple F-Box Protein MdMAX2 Regulates Plant Photomorphogenesis and Stress Response.

    PubMed

    An, Jian-Ping; Li, Rui; Qu, Feng-Jia; You, Chun-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    MAX2 (MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2) is involved in diverse physiological processes, including photomorphogenesis, the abiotic stress response, as well as karrikin and strigolactone signaling-mediated shoot branching. In this study, MdMAX2, an F-box protein that is a homolog of Arabidopsis MAX2, was identified and characterized. Overexpression of MdMAX2 in apple calli enhanced the accumulation of anthocyanin. Ectopic expression of MdMAX2 in Arabidopsis exhibited photomorphogenesis phenotypes, including increased anthocyanin content and decreased hypocotyl length. Further study indicated that MdMAX2 might promote plant photomorphogenesis by affecting the auxin signaling as well as other plant hormones. Transcripts of MdMAX2 were noticeably up-regulated in response to NaCl and Mannitol treatments. Moreover, compared with the wild-type, the MdMAX2 -overexpressing apple calli and Arabidopsis exhibited increased tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Taken together, these results suggest that MdMAX2 plays a positive regulatory role in plant photomorphogenesis and stress response.

  4. Constant change: dynamic regulation of membrane transport by calcium signalling networks keeps plants in tune with their environment.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Thomas J; Luan, Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Despite substantial variation and irregularities in their environment, plants must conform to spatiotemporal demands on the molecular composition of their cytosol. Cell membranes are the major interface between organisms and their environment and the basis for controlling the contents and intracellular organization of the cell. Membrane transport proteins (MTPs) govern the flow of molecules across membranes, and their activities are closely monitored and regulated by cell signalling networks. By continuously adjusting MTP activities, plants can mitigate the effects of environmental perturbations, but effective implementation of this strategy is reliant on precise coordination among transport systems that reside in distinct cell types and membranes. Here, we examine the role of calcium signalling in the coordination of membrane transport, with an emphasis on potassium transport. Potassium is an exceptionally abundant and mobile ion in plants, and plant potassium transport has been intensively studied for decades. Classic and recent studies have underscored the importance of calcium in plant environmental responses and membrane transport regulation. In reviewing recent advances in our understanding of the coding and decoding of calcium signals, we highlight established and emerging roles of calcium signalling in coordinating membrane transport among multiple subcellular locations and distinct transport systems in plants, drawing examples from the CBL-CIPK signalling network. By synthesizing classical studies and recent findings, we aim to provide timely insights on the role of calcium signalling networks in the modulation of membrane transport and its importance in plant environmental responses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Effect of Hydroelectric Power Plants (hpp) on Agro-Life at Rural Land Regulation in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onursal Denli, G.; Denli, H. H.; Seker, D. Z.; Bitik, E.; Cetin, S.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey is one of the self-sufficient in foodstuffs and globally ranks as 7th significant agricultural exporter in the world. Main trading partners are the European Union, the United States and the Middle East. As known, agricultural production is dependent on factors including efficient and effective use of all inputs ranging from those natural resources as in land and water to well-trained human resources as labour at the production. The socio-economic aspects of this sector take several forms ranging from the incomes of the primary producers. Rural land regulation is a necessity for rural areas and is regarded as a useful instrument for improving farmer's incomes and life standards. The irrigation system, established during the rural regulation/land consolidation period of large-scale farming, is insufficiently adjusted to the new land tenure structures. The government is especially in the process of water management with hydroelectric power plants. This process produces energy that is required but effects negatively the rivers and agricultural, environmental, climatic conditions. Rivers are vessels of the nature. Free flowing rivers give life to all nature. Most of the studies indicate that Hydroelectric Power Plants (HPP) affects the surface and ground-water management, natural life, agricultural productivity, socio-economic situation at agricultural regions and agro-life related with immigration. This study emphasizes the effect of Hydroelectric Power Plants which are used in transformation of water as a renewable natural resource into electricity power from the perspective of environmental policies and rural regulation.

  6. Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host

    PubMed Central

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947

  7. Influence of growth regulators on plant growth, yield, and skin color of specialty potatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    2,4-D has been used since the 1950’s to enhance color in red-skinned potatoes, but there is little research on the potential use of other plant growth regulators to improve tuber skin color in the wide range of specialty potatoes now available on the market. Field trials conducted at Parma, ID in 20...

  8. Differential Top10 promoter regulation by six tetracycline analogues in plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, John; Allen, George C.; Gatz, Christiane; Thompson, William F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of five tetracycline analogues, anhydrotetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline, on Top10 promoter activity in NT1 tobacco tissue culture cells have been analysed. The concentration that repressed Top10 promoter activity, the level of transgene repression and the kinetics of transgene de-repression were determined for each analogue, and could not be predicted from in vitro binding affinity to the tetracycline repressor or from comparison with animal cells. Doxycycline had the most potent effect on the Top10 promoter and completely inhibited transgene expression at 4 nmol l(-1). Tetracycline was the most versatile of the analogues tested; tetracycline inhibited the Top10 promoter at 10 nmol l(-1) and was easily washed out to restore Top10-driven expression in 12-24 h. A study was also made of the suitability for plant research of a novel tetracycline analogue, GR33076X. In animal cells, GR33076X de-repressed Top10 promoter activity in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of anhydrotetracycline. In NT1, it is shown that GR 33076X can antagonize repression of the Top10 promoter in the presence of tetracycline, but not of anhydrotetracycline or of doxycycline. Different tetracycline analogues can therefore be used to regulate the Top10 promoter in plant cells and this property may be exploited in planning an optimum course of transgene regulation.

  9. Differential Top10 promoter regulation by six tetracycline analogues in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Love, John; Allen, George C; Gatz, Christiane; Thompson, William F

    2002-09-01

    The effects of five tetracycline analogues, anhydrotetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, oxytetracycline, and tetracycline, on Top10 promoter activity in NT1 tobacco tissue culture cells have been analysed. The concentration that repressed Top10 promoter activity, the level of transgene repression and the kinetics of transgene de-repression were determined for each analogue, and could not be predicted from in vitro binding affinity to the tetracycline repressor or from comparison with animal cells. Doxycycline had the most potent effect on the Top10 promoter and completely inhibited transgene expression at 4 nmol l(-1). Tetracycline was the most versatile of the analogues tested; tetracycline inhibited the Top10 promoter at 10 nmol l(-1) and was easily washed out to restore Top10-driven expression in 12-24 h. A study was also made of the suitability for plant research of a novel tetracycline analogue, GR33076X. In animal cells, GR33076X de-repressed Top10 promoter activity in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of anhydrotetracycline. In NT1, it is shown that GR 33076X can antagonize repression of the Top10 promoter in the presence of tetracycline, but not of anhydrotetracycline or of doxycycline. Different tetracycline analogues can therefore be used to regulate the Top10 promoter in plant cells and this property may be exploited in planning an optimum course of transgene regulation.

  10. Harzianolide, a novel plant growth regulator and systemic resistance elicitor from Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Feng; Yu, Guanghui; Wang, Ping; Wei, Zhong; Fu, Lin; Shen, Qirong; Chen, Wei

    2013-12-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of natural products on plant growth and protection will underpin new product development for plant production. The isolation and characterization of a known secondary metabolite named harzianolide from Trichoderma harzianum strain SQR-T037 were described, and the bioactivity of the purified compound as well as the crude metabolite extract in plant growth promotion and systemic resistance induction was investigated in this study. The results showed that harzianolide significantly promoted tomato seedling growth by up to 2.5-fold (dry weight) at a concentration of 0.1 ppm compared with the control. The result of root scan suggested that Trichoderma secondary metabolites may influence the early stages of plant growth through better root development for the enhancement of root length and tips. Both of the purified harzianolide and crude metabolite extract increased the activity of some defense-related enzymes to response to oxidative stress. Examination of six defense-related gene expression by real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that harzianolide induces the expression of genes involved in the salicylic acid (PR1 and GLU) and jasmonate/ethylene (JERF3) signaling pathways while crude metabolite extract inhibited some gene expression (CHI-II and PGIP) related to basal defense in tomato plants. Further experiment showed that a subsequent challenge of harzianolide-pretreated plants with the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum resulted in higher systemic resistance by the reduction of lesion size. These results indicate that secondary metabolites of Trichoderma spp., like harzianolide, may play a novel role in both plant growth regulation and plant defense responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Trafficking of plant plasma membrane aquaporins: multiple regulation levels and complex sorting signals.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Adrien S; Chaumont, François

    2015-05-01

    Aquaporins are small channel proteins which facilitate the diffusion of water and small neutral molecules across biological membranes. Compared with animals, plant genomes encode numerous aquaporins, which display a large variety of subcellular localization patterns. More specifically, plant aquaporins of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily were first described as plasma membrane (PM)-resident proteins, but recent research has demonstrated that the trafficking and subcellular localization of these proteins are complex and highly regulated. In the past few years, PIPs emerged as new model proteins to study subcellular sorting and membrane dynamics in plant cells. At least two distinct sorting motifs (one cytosolic, the other buried in the membrane) are required to direct PIPs to the PM. Hetero-oligomerization and interaction with SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein attachment protein receptors) also influence the subcellular trafficking of PIPs. In addition to these constitutive processes, both the progression of PIPs through the secretory pathway and their dynamics at the PM are responsive to changing environmental conditions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Process for producing vegetative and tuber growth regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorio, Neil C. (Inventor); Stutte, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process of making a vegetative and tuber growth regulator. The vegetative and tuber growth regulator is made by growing potato plants in a recirculating hydroponic system for a sufficient time to produce the growth regulator. Also, the use of the vegetative and growth regulator on solanaceous plants, tuber forming plants and ornamental seedlings by contacting the roots or shoots of the plant with a sufficient amount of the growth regulator to regulate the growth of the plant and one more of canopy size, plant height, stem length, internode number and presence of tubers in fresh mass. Finally, a method for regulating the growth of potato plants using a recirculating hydroponic system is described.

  13. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Morphological and functional diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi on Roan Mountain (NC/TN)

    Treesearch

    Claire Bird; Coleman McCleneghan

    2005-01-01

    A comparison of ectomycorrhizal morphotypes and hypogeous fungi (truffles and false-truffles) in northern hardwood and spruce-fir forests on Roan Mountain (NC/TN) was performed to increase our knowledge of the fungal communities in the Southern Appalachian high elevation forests. These forests are home to an endangered subspecies and mycophagist, the Carolina northern...

  15. Thermo-Regulation of Genes Mediating Motility and Plant Interactions in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Hockett, Kevin L.; Burch, Adrien Y.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30°C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin) and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis) were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30°C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30°C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated. PMID:23527276

  16. [The genetic determination and function of RR-proteins--the regulators of photoperiodic reaction and circadian rhythms in plants].

    PubMed

    Tots'kyĭ, V M; D'iachenko, L F; Muterko, O F; Balashova, I A; Toptikov, V A

    2012-01-01

    The present review devoted to the analysis of recent literature on genetic determination and the domain organization of the newly discovered two-component signaling systems in pro- and eukaryotes. These structures are involved in the regulation of numerous morphological and physiological processes in plants. RR-proteins, it the key elements of signaling systems, they launch a cascade of phosphotransferase reactions and directly or indirectly regulate the transcription and activity other proteins, including enzymes, in response to hormones or environmental factors. Modern views on the molecular and genetic mechanisms of photoperiodic response, circadian rhythms and anti-stress responses in plants are set out in these positions. The relationship between gene expression and photoreceptor sensitivity of plants to photoperiod traced. We present our own data obtained on the isogenic lines of wheat, where been showed dependence expression of structural genes of enzymes on the allelic composition of individual PRR-loci and the duration action of low temperature.

  17. Regulation of Hydrolytic Enzyme Activity in Aquatic Microbial Communities Hosted by Carnivorous Pitcher Plants.

    PubMed

    Young, Erica B; Sielicki, Jessica; Grothjan, Jacob J

    2018-04-20

    Carnivorous pitcher plants Sarracenia purpurea host diverse eukaryotic and bacterial communities which aid in insect prey digestion, but little is known about the functional processes mediated by the microbial communities. This study aimed to connect pitcher community diversity with functional nutrient transformation processes, identifying bacterial taxa, and measuring regulation of hydrolytic enzyme activity in response to prey and alternative nutrient sources. Genetic analysis identified diverse bacterial taxa known to produce hydrolytic enzyme activities. Chitinase, protease, and phosphatase activities were measured using fluorometric assays. Enzyme activity in field pitchers was positively correlated with bacterial abundance, and activity was suppressed by antibiotics suggesting predominantly bacterial sources of chitinase and protease activity. Fungi, algae, and rotifers observed could also contribute enzyme activity, but fresh insect prey released minimal chitinase activity. Activity of chitinase and proteases was upregulated in response to insect additions, and phosphatase activity was suppressed by phosphate additions. Particulate organic P in prey was broken down, appearing as increasing dissolved organic and inorganic P pools within 14 days. Chitinase and protease were not significantly suppressed by availability of dissolved organic substrates, though organic C and N stimulated bacterial growth, resulting in elevated enzyme activity. This comprehensive field and experimental study show that pitcher plant microbial communities dynamically regulate hydrolytic enzyme activity, to digest prey nutrients to simpler forms, mediating biogeochemical nutrient transformations and release of nutrients for microbial and host plant uptake.

  18. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells. PMID:26826387

  19. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-02-19

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of plant growth regulators in pears by microwave-assisted extraction and liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuejin; Tang, Lijuan; Tan, Ting; Wan, Yiqun

    2014-06-01

    A new method for the determination of six plant growth regulators, 3-indolylacetic acid, 3-indolepropionic acid, 2-naphthoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dicholrophenoxyacetic acid, 1-naphthlcetic acid, and methyl naphthalene-1-acetate, in pears was established by liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In this study, a microwave-assisted extraction technique was first applied for the determination of plant growth regulators in fruit and three cleanup techniques were, respectively, investigated for the purification of pear samples. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Diamonsil C18 column by using 0.01 mol/L formic acid/ammonium formate buffer solution (pH 3.5)/methanol (35:65, v/v) as the mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min in 1:1 split mode. The LODs ranged from 0.3 to 1.9 μg/kg. Under optimized conditions, the average recoveries (five replicates) for six plant growth regulators (spiked at 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5 mg/kg) ranged from 78.9 to 118.0%, and the RSDs were 1.4-10.3%. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Plant architecture and grain yield are regulated by the novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Lin, Jian Zhong; Peng, Dan; Yang, Yuan Zhu; Guo, Ming; Tang, Dong Ying; Tan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xuan Ming

    2017-01-01

    In many plants, architecture and grain yield are affected by both the environment and genetics. In rice, the tiller is a vital factor impacting plant architecture and regulated by many genes. In this study, we cloned a novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene Os02g0819100 and its alternative splice variant OsDHHC1 from the cDNA of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which regulate plant architecture by altering the tiller in rice. The tillers increased by about 40% when this type of DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene was over-expressed in Zhong Hua 11 (ZH11) rice plants. Moreover, the grain yield of transgenic rice increased approximately by 10% compared with wild-type ZH11. These findings provide an important genetic engineering approach for increasing rice yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Diversity and productivity of hypogeous fungal sporocarps in a variably thinned Douglas-fir forest.

    Treesearch

    W.C. III Colgan; A.B. Carey; J.M. Trappe; R. Molina; D. Thysell

    1999-01-01

    Although ecosystem management techniques are designed to enhance species diversity in managed forests, no comprehensive study has been conducted to evaluate effects of such techniques on diversity and productivity of hypogeous fungi (truffles). During this study, truffles were collected in a 55- to 65-year-old Douglas-fir forest from March 1993 through December 1995 at...

  3. Regulation of epinasty induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in pea and Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Pazmiño, D M; Rodríguez-Serrano, M; Sanz, M; Romero-Puertas, M C; Sandalio, L M

    2014-07-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) causes uncontrolled cell division and malformed growth in plants, giving rise to leaf epinasty and stem curvature. In this study, mechanisms involved in the regulation of leaf epinasty induced by 2,4-D were studied using different chemicals involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation (diphenyleniodonium, butylated hydroxyanisole, EDTA, allopurinol), calcium channels (LaCl3), protein phosphorylation (cantharidin, wortmannin) and ethylene emission/perception (aminoethoxyvinyl glycine, AgNO3). The effect of these compounds on the epinasty induced by 2,4-D was analysed in shoots and leaf strips from pea plants. For further insight into the effect of 2,4-D, studies were also made in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in ROS production (rbohD, rbohF, xdh), ethylene (ein 3-1, ctr 1-1, etr 1-1), abscisic acid (aba 3.1), and jasmonic acid (coi 1.1, jar 1.1, opr 3) pathways. The results suggest that ROS production, mainly ·OH, is essential in the development of epinasty triggered by 2,4-D. Epinasty was also found to be regulated by Ca2+, protein phosphorylation and ethylene, although all these factors act downstream of ROS production. The use of Arabidopsis mutants appears to indicate that abscisic and jasmonic acid are not involved in regulating epinasty, although they could be involved in other symptoms induced by 2,4-D. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Development of a qPCR Strategy to Select Bean Genes Involved in Plant Defense Response and Regulated by the Trichoderma velutinum - Rhizoctonia solani Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara; Cominelli, Eleonora; Sparvoli, Francesca; González-López, Oscar; Rodríguez-González, Alvaro; Gutiérrez, Santiago; Casquero, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    Bean production is affected by a wide diversity of fungal pathogens, among them Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important. A strategy to control bean infectious diseases, mainly those caused by fungi, is based on the use of biocontrol agents (BCAs) that can reduce the negative effects of plant pathogens and also can promote positive responses in the plant. Trichoderma is a fungal genus that is able to induce the expression of genes involved in plant defense response and also to promote plant growth, root development and nutrient uptake. In this article, a strategy that combines in silico analysis and real time PCR to detect additional bean defense-related genes, regulated by the presence of Trichoderma velutinum and/or R. solani has been applied. Based in this strategy, from the 48 bean genes initially analyzed, 14 were selected, and only WRKY33, CH5b and hGS showed an up-regulatory response in the presence of T. velutinum. The other genes were or not affected (OSM34) or down-regulated by the presence of this fungus. R. solani infection resulted in a down-regulation of most of the genes analyzed, except PR1, OSM34 and CNGC2 that were not affected, and the presence of both, T. velutinum and R. solani, up-regulates hGS and down-regulates all the other genes analyzed, except CH5b which was not significantly affected. As conclusion, the strategy described in the present work has been shown to be effective to detect genes involved in plant defense, which respond to the presence of a BCA or to a pathogen and also to the presence of both. The selected genes show significant homology with previously described plant defense genes and they are expressed in bean leaves of plants treated with T. velutinum and/or infected with R. solani.

  5. A Plant Gene Up-Regulated at Rust Infection Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ayliffe, Michael A.; Roberts, James K.; Mitchell, Heidi J.; Zhang, Ren; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Pryor, Tony J.

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the fis1 gene from flax (Linum usitatissimum) is induced by a compatible rust (Melampsora lini) infection. Infection of transgenic plants containing a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under the control of the fis1 promoter showed that induction is highly localized to those leaf mesophyll cells within and immediately surrounding rust infection sites. The level of induction reflects the extent of fungal growth. In a strong resistance reaction, such as the hypersensitive fleck mediated by the L6 resistance gene, there is very little fungal growth and a microscopic level of GUS expression. Partially resistant flax leaves show levels of GUS expression that were intermediate to the level observed in the fully susceptible infection. Sequence and deletion analysis using both transient Agrobacterium tumefaciens expression and stable transformation assays have shown that the rust-inducible fis1 promoter is contained within a 580-bp fragment. Homologs of fis1 were identified in expressed sequence tag databases of a range of plant species including dicots, monocots, and a gymnosperm. Homologous genes isolated from maize (Zea mays; mis1), barley (Hordeum vulgare; bis1), wheat (Triticum aestivum; wis1), and Arabidopsis encode proteins that are highly similar (76%–82%) to the FIS1 protein. The Arabidopsis homologue has been reported to encode a Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase that is involved in the catabolism of proline to glutamate. RNA-blot analysis showed that mis1 in maize and the bis1 homolog in barley are both up-regulated by a compatible infection with the corresponding species-specific rust. The rust-induced genes homologous to fis1 are present in many plants. The promoters of these genes have potential roles for the engineering of synthetic rust resistance genes by targeting transgene expression to the sites of rust infection. PMID:12011348

  6. Post-translational regulation of plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Withers, John; Dong, Xinnian

    2017-08-01

    Plants have evolved multi-layered molecular defense strategies to protect against pathogens. Plant immune signaling largely relies on post-translational modifications (PTMs) to induce rapid alterations of signaling pathways to achieve a response that is appropriate to the type of pathogen and infection pressure. In host cells, dynamic PTMs have emerged as powerful regulatory mechanisms that cells use to adjust their immune response. PTM is also a virulence strategy used by pathogens to subvert host immunity through the activities of effector proteins secreted into the host cell. Recent studies focusing on deciphering post-translational mechanisms underlying plant immunity have offered an in-depth view of how PTMs facilitate efficient immune responses and have provided a more dynamic and holistic view of plant immunity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioassay of Plant Growth Regulator Activity on Aquatic Plants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    natural plant hormonal processes. Certain substi- tuted pyrimidine and triazole compounds have been found to inhibit the syn- thesis of gibberellin in...drove down the pH to levels that were injurious to the plants. For this reason, the bicarbonate buffer was added to both stock and experimental media...digital pH meter (Orion Model 701A/Digital, Orion Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA) equipped with a dis- solved oxygen (DO) electrode (Orion Model 97-08

  8. Modelling (18)O2 and (16)O2 unidirectional fluxes in plants. IV: role of conductance and laws of its regulation in C3 plants.

    PubMed

    André, Marcel J

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies focus on the measurement of conductances for CO2 transfer in plants and especially on their regulatory effects on photosynthesis. Measurement accuracy is strongly dependent on the model used and on the knowledge of the flow of photochemical energy generated by light in chloroplasts. The only accurate and precise method to quantify the linear electron flux (responsible for the production of reductive energy) is the direct measurement of O2 evolution, by (18)O2 labelling and mass spectrometry. The sharing of this energy between the carboxylation (P) and the oxygenation of photorespiration (PR) depends on the plant specificity factor (Sp) and on the corresponding atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and O2 (André, 2013). The concept of plant specificity factor simplifies the equations of the model. It gives a new expression of the effect of the conductance (g) between atmosphere and chloroplasts. Its quantitative effect on photosynthesis is easy to understand because it intervenes in the ratio of the plant specificity factor (Sp) to the specificity of Rubisco (Sr). Using this 'simple' model with the data of (18)O2 experiments, the calculation of conductance variations in response to CO2 and light was carried out. The good fitting of experimental data of O2 and CO2 exchanges confirms the validity of the simple model. The calculation of conductance variation during the increase of external CO2 concentration reveals a linear law of regulation between external and internal CO2 concentrations. During CO2 variations, the effects of g regulation tend to maintain a higher level of oxygenation (PR) in expense of a better carboxylation (P). Contrary to CO2, the variation of O2 creates a negative feedback effect compatible with a stabilization of atmospheric O2. The regulation of g amplifies this result. The effect of light in combination with CO2 is more complex. Below 800μmolquantam(-2)s(-1) the ratio PR/P is maintained unchangeable in expense of carboxylation

  9. A Conserved Cytochrome P450 Evolved in Seed Plants Regulates Flower Maturation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenhua; Boachon, Benoît; Lugan, Raphaël; Tavares, Raquel; Erhardt, Mathieu; Mutterer, Jérôme; Demais, Valérie; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Brunaud, Véronique; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Pencik, Ales; Achard, Patrick; Gong, Fan; Hedden, Peter; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Renault, Hugues

    2015-12-07

    Global inspection of plant genomes identifies genes maintained in low copies across taxa and under strong purifying selection, which are likely to have essential functions. Based on this rationale, we investigated the function of the low-duplicated CYP715 cytochrome P450 gene family that appeared early in seed plants and evolved under strong negative selection. Arabidopsis CYP715A1 showed a restricted tissue-specific expression in the tapetum of flower buds and in the anther filaments upon anthesis. cyp715a1 insertion lines showed a strong defect in petal development, and transient alteration of pollen intine deposition. Comparative expression analysis revealed the downregulated expression of genes involved in pollen development, cell wall biogenesis, hormone homeostasis, and floral sesquiterpene biosynthesis, especially TPS21 and several key genes regulating floral development such as MYB21, MYB24, and MYC2. Accordingly, floral sesquiterpene emission was suppressed in the cyp715a1 mutants. Flower hormone profiling, in addition, indicated a modification of gibberellin homeostasis and a strong disturbance of the turnover of jasmonic acid derivatives. Petal growth was partially restored by the active gibberellin GA3 or the functional analog of jasmonoyl-isoleucine, coronatine. CYP715 appears to function as a key regulator of flower maturation, synchronizing petal expansion and volatile emission. It is thus expected to be an important determinant of flower-insect interaction. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pipecolic Acid, an Endogenous Mediator of Defense Amplification and Priming, Is a Critical Regulator of Inducible Plant Immunity[W

    PubMed Central

    Návarová, Hana; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Döring, Anne-Christin; Zeier, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals orchestrate plant defenses against microbial pathogen invasion. Here, we report the identification of the non-protein amino acid pipecolic acid (Pip), a common Lys catabolite in plants and animals, as a critical regulator of inducible plant immunity. Following pathogen recognition, Pip accumulates in inoculated Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, in leaves distal from the site of inoculation, and, most specifically, in petiole exudates from inoculated leaves. Defects of mutants in AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN1 (ALD1) in systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and in basal, specific, and β-aminobutyric acid–induced resistance to bacterial infection are associated with a lack of Pip production. Exogenous Pip complements these resistance defects and increases pathogen resistance of wild-type plants. We conclude that Pip accumulation is critical for SAR and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Our data indicate that biologically induced SAR conditions plants to more effectively synthesize the phytoalexin camalexin, Pip, and salicylic acid and primes plants for early defense gene expression. Biological priming is absent in the pipecolate-deficient ald1 mutants. Exogenous pipecolate induces SAR-related defense priming and partly restores priming responses in ald1. We conclude that Pip orchestrates defense amplification, positive regulation of salicylic acid biosynthesis, and priming to guarantee effective local resistance induction and the establishment of SAR. PMID:23221596

  11. Valine-glutamine (VQ) motif coding genes are ancient and non-plant-specific with comprehensive expression regulation by various biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2018-05-09

    Valine-glutamine (VQ) motif containing proteins play important roles in abiotic and biotic stress responses in plants. However, little is known about the origin and evolution as well as comprehensive expression regulation of the VQ gene family. In this study, we systematically surveyed this gene family in 50 plant genomes from algae, moss, gymnosperm and angiosperm and explored their presence in other species from animals, bacteria, fungi and viruses. No VQs were detected in all tested algae genomes and all genomes from moss, gymnosperm and angiosperm encode varying numbers of VQs. Interestingly, some of fungi, lower animals and bacteria also encode single to a few VQs. Thus, they are not plant-specific and should be regarded as an ancient family. Their family expansion was mainly due to segmental duplication followed by tandem duplication and mobile elements. Limited contribution of gene conversion was detected to the family evolution. Generally, VQs were very much conserved in their motif coding region and were under purifying selection. However, positive selection was also observed during species divergence. Many VQs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic / biotic stresses and phytohormones in rice and Arabidopsis. They were also co-expressed with some of other stress-related genes. All of the expression data suggest a comprehensive expression regulation of the VQ gene family. We provide new insights into gene expansion, divergence, evolution and their expression regulation of this VQ family. VQs were detectable not only in plants but also in some of fungi, lower animals and bacteria, suggesting the evolutionary conservation and the ancient origin. Overall, VQs are non-plant-specific and play roles in abiotic / biotic responses or other biological processes through comprehensive expression regulation.

  12. The Phytochrome-Interacting VASCULAR PLANT ONE–ZINC FINGER1 and VOZ2 Redundantly Regulate Flowering in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Yukiko; Mukougawa, Keiko; Uemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yokofuji, Akira; Suzuri, Ryota; Nishitani, Aiko; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The timing of the transition to flowering in plants is regulated by various environmental factors, including daylength and light quality. Although the red/far-red photoreceptor phytochrome B (phyB) represses flowering by indirectly regulating the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), the mechanism of phyB signaling for flowering is largely unknown. Here, we identified two Arabidopsis thaliana genes, VASCULAR PLANT ONE–ZINC FINGER1 (VOZ1) and VOZ2, which are highly conserved throughout land plant evolution, as phyB-interacting factors. voz1 voz2 double mutants, but neither single mutant, showed a late-flowering phenotype under long-day conditions, which indicated that VOZ1 and VOZ2 redundantly promote flowering. voz1 voz2 mutations suppressed the early-flowering phenotype of the phyB mutant, and FT expression was repressed in the voz1 voz2 mutant. Green fluorescent protein–VOZ2 signal was observed in the cytoplasm, and interaction of VOZ proteins with phyB was indicated to occur in the cytoplasm under far-red light. However, VOZ2 protein modified to localize constitutively in the nucleus promoted flowering. In addition, the stability of VOZ2 proteins in the nucleus was modulated by light quality in a phytochrome-dependent manner. We propose that partial translocation of VOZ proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus mediates the initial step of the phyB signal transduction pathway that regulates flowering. PMID:22904146

  13. 76 FR 31171 - Importation of Plants for Planting; Establishing a Category of Plants for Planting Not Authorized...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ...We are amending the regulations to establish a new category of regulated articles in the regulations governing the importation of nursery stock, also known as plants for planting. This category will list taxa of plants for planting whose importation is not authorized pending pest risk analysis. If scientific evidence indicates that a taxon of plants for planting is a quarantine pest or a host of a quarantine pest, we will publish a notice that will announce our determination that the taxon is a quarantine pest or a host of a quarantine pest, cite the scientific evidence we considered in making this determination, and give the public an opportunity to comment on our determination. If we receive no comments that change our determination, the taxon will subsequently be added to the new category. We will allow any person to petition for a pest risk analysis to be conducted to consider whether to remove a taxon that has been added to the new category. After the pest risk analysis is completed, we will remove the taxon from the category and allow its importation subject to general requirements, allow its importation subject to specific restrictions, or prohibit its importation. We will consider applications for permits to import small quantities of germplasm from taxa whose importation is not authorized pending pest risk analysis, for experimental or scientific purposes under controlled conditions. This new category will allow us to take prompt action on evidence that the importation of a taxon of plants for planting poses a risk while continuing to allow for public participation in the process.

  14. Reassessing apoptosis in plants.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Martin; Williams, Brett; Li, Yurong; de Figueiredo, Paul; Wolpert, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Cell death can be driven by a genetically programmed signalling pathway known as programmed cell death (PCD). In plants, PCD occurs during development as well as in response to environmental and biotic stimuli. Our understanding of PCD regulation in plants has advanced significantly over the past two decades; however, the molecular machinery responsible for driving the system remains elusive. Thus, whether conserved PCD regulatory mechanisms include plant apoptosis remains enigmatic. Animal apoptotic regulators, including Bcl-2 family members, have not been identified in plants but expression of such regulators can trigger or suppress plant PCD. Moreover, plants exhibit nearly all of the biochemical and morphological features of apoptosis. One difference between plant and animal PCD is the absence of phagocytosis in plants. Evidence is emerging that the vacuole may be key to removal of unwanted plant cells, and may carry out functions that are analogous to animal phagocytosis. Here, we provide context for the argument that apoptotic-like cell death occurs in plants.

  15. Food plant toxicants and safety Risk assessment and regulation of inherent toxicants in plant foods.

    PubMed

    Essers, A J; Alink, G M; Speijers, G J; Alexander, J; Bouwmeister, P J; van den Brandt, P A; Ciere, S; Gry, J; Herrman, J; Kuiper, H A; Mortby, E; Renwick, A G; Shrimpton, D H; Vainio, H; Vittozzi, L; Koeman, J H

    1998-05-01

    The ADI as a tool for risk management and regulation of food additives and pesticide residues is not readily applicable to inherent food plant toxicants: The margin between actual intake and potentially toxic levels is often small; application of the default uncertainty factors used to derive ADI values, particularly when extrapolating from animal data, would prohibit the utilisation of the food, which may have an overall beneficial health effect. Levels of inherent toxicants are difficult to control; their complete removal is not always wanted, due to their function for the plant or for human health. The health impact of the inherent toxicant is often modified by factors in the food, e.g. the bioavailability from the matrix and interaction with other inherent constituents. Risk-benefit analysis should be made for different consumption scenarios, without the use of uncertainty factors. Crucial in this approach is analysis of the toxicity of the whole foodstuff. The relationship between the whole foodstuff and the pure toxicant is expressed in the `product correction factor' (PCF). Investigations in humans are essential so that biomarkers of exposure and for effect can be used to analyse the difference between animals and humans and between the food and the pure toxicant. A grid of the variables characterising toxicity is proposed, showing their inter-relationships. A flow diagram for risk estimate is provided, using both toxicological and epidemiological studies.

  16. Modules of co-regulated metabolites in turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizome suggest the existence of biosynthetic modules in plant specialized metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Gang, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Turmeric is an excellent example of a plant that produces large numbers of metabolites from diverse metabolic pathways or networks. It is hypothesized that these metabolic pathways or networks contain biosynthetic modules, which lead to the formation of metabolite modules—groups of metabolites whose production is co-regulated and biosynthetically linked. To test whether such co-regulated metabolite modules do exist in this plant, metabolic profiling analysis was performed on turmeric rhizome samples that were collected from 16 different growth and development treatments, which had significant impacts on the levels of 249 volatile and non-volatile metabolites that were detected. Importantly, one of the many co-regulated metabolite modules that were indeed readily detected in this analysis contained the three major curcuminoids, whereas many other structurally related diarylheptanoids belonged to separate metabolite modules, as did groups of terpenoids. The existence of these co-regulated metabolite modules supported the hypothesis that the 3-methoxyl groups on the aromatic rings of the curcuminoids are formed before the formation of the heptanoid backbone during the biosynthesis of curcumin and also suggested the involvement of multiple polyketide synthases with different substrate selectivities in the formation of the array of diarylheptanoids detected in turmeric. Similar conclusions about terpenoid biosynthesis could also be made. Thus, discovery and analysis of metabolite modules can be a powerful predictive tool in efforts to understand metabolism in plants. PMID:19073964

  17. Importance of Mediator complex in the regulation and integration of diverse signaling pathways in plants.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Subhasis; Thakur, Jitendra K

    2015-01-01

    Basic transcriptional machinery in eukaryotes is assisted by a number of cofactors, which either increase or decrease the rate of transcription. Mediator complex is one such cofactor, and recently has drawn a lot of interest because of its integrative power to converge different signaling pathways before channeling the transcription instructions to the RNA polymerase II machinery. Like yeast and metazoans, plants do possess the Mediator complex across the kingdom, and its isolation and subunit analyses have been reported from the model plant, Arabidopsis. Genetic, and molecular analyses have unraveled important regulatory roles of Mediator subunits at every stage of plant life cycle starting from flowering to embryo and organ development, to even size determination. It also contributes immensely to the survival of plants against different environmental vagaries by the timely activation of its resistance mechanisms. Here, we have provided an overview of plant Mediator complex starting from its discovery to regulation of stoichiometry of its subunits. We have also reviewed involvement of different Mediator subunits in different processes and pathways including defense response pathways evoked by diverse biotic cues. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to provide mechanistic insight of Mediator's involvement in these processes.

  18. Importance of Mediator complex in the regulation and integration of diverse signaling pathways in plants

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Subhasis; Thakur, Jitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Basic transcriptional machinery in eukaryotes is assisted by a number of cofactors, which either increase or decrease the rate of transcription. Mediator complex is one such cofactor, and recently has drawn a lot of interest because of its integrative power to converge different signaling pathways before channeling the transcription instructions to the RNA polymerase II machinery. Like yeast and metazoans, plants do possess the Mediator complex across the kingdom, and its isolation and subunit analyses have been reported from the model plant, Arabidopsis. Genetic, and molecular analyses have unraveled important regulatory roles of Mediator subunits at every stage of plant life cycle starting from flowering to embryo and organ development, to even size determination. It also contributes immensely to the survival of plants against different environmental vagaries by the timely activation of its resistance mechanisms. Here, we have provided an overview of plant Mediator complex starting from its discovery to regulation of stoichiometry of its subunits. We have also reviewed involvement of different Mediator subunits in different processes and pathways including defense response pathways evoked by diverse biotic cues. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to provide mechanistic insight of Mediator's involvement in these processes. PMID:26442070

  19. Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The United States Supreme Court, with PG&E and Silkwood, and in the eight years since, has expanded the acceptable extent of state regulation of commercial nuclear power plants. In PG&E, the Court established the acceptability of state regulation that purports to be concerned with the non-radiological aspects of nuclear plant operations but that, as a practical matter, is concerned with their radiological hazards. In Silkwood, the Court established the acceptability of state regulation of radiological hazards when its impact on federal regulation of radiological hazards is indirect and incidental. Finally, in Goodyear and English, the Court confirmed and elaborated onmore » such state regulation. Subject to political demands either for additional involvement in commercial nuclear power plant regulation or from political interests opposed altogether to nuclear power, some states, in the 1980s, sought to expand even further the involvement of state and local governments in nuclear plant regulation. Indeed, some states sought and in some instances acquired, through innovative and extraordinary means, a degree of involvement in the regulation of radiological hazards that seriously erodes and undermines the role of the federal government in such regulation. In particular, the State of New York concluded with the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO), in February 1989, an agreement for the purchase of New York of the Shoreham nuclear power plant on Long Island. A response to failed efforts by New York to prevent the issuance by the NRC of a license to LILCO to operate the plant, the agreement was concluded to allow New York to close the plant either altogether or to convert it to a fossil fuel facility. The opposition to the sale of Shoreham is discussed.« less

  20. High throughput selection of novel plant growth regulators: Assessing the translatability of small bioactive molecules from Arabidopsis to crops.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Miranda, Giovanna; Reggiardo, Martín; Hicks, Glenn R; Norambuena, Lorena

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth regulators (PGRs) have become an integral part of agricultural and horticultural practices. Accordingly, there is an increased demand for new and cost-effective products. Nevertheless, the market is limited by insufficient innovation. In this context chemical genomics has gained increasing attention as a powerful approach addressing specific traits. Here is described the successful implementation of a highly specific, sensitive and efficient high throughput screening approach using Arabidopsis as a model. Using a combination of techniques, 10,000 diverse compounds were screened and evaluated for several important plant growth traits including root and leaf growth. The phenotype-based selection allowed the compilation of a collection of putative Arabidopsis growth regulators with a broad range of activities and specificities. A subset was selected for evaluating their bioactivity in agronomically valuable plants. Their validation as growth regulators in commercial species such as tomato, lettuce, carrot, maize and turfgrasses reinforced the success of the screening in Arabidopsis and indicated that small molecules activity can be efficiently translated to commercial species. Therefore, the chemical genomics approach in Arabidopsis is a promising field that can be incorporated in PGR discovery programs and has a great potential to develop new products that can be efficiently used in crops. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. The transcriptional regulator BZR1 mediates trade-off between plant innate immunity and growth.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Segonzac, Cécile; Somssich, Imre E; Zipfel, Cyril

    2013-12-31

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the trade-off between plant innate immunity and steroid-mediated growth are controversial. Here, we report that activation of the transcription factor BZR1 is required and sufficient for suppression of immune signaling by brassinosteroids (BR). BZR1 induces the expression of several WRKY transcription factors that negatively control early immune responses. In addition, BZR1 associates with WRKY40 to mediate the antagonism between BR and immune signaling. We reveal that BZR1-mediated inhibition of immunity is particularly relevant when plant fast growth is required, such as during etiolation. Thus, BZR1 acts as an important regulator mediating the trade-off between growth and immunity upon integration of environmental cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00983.001.

  2. MicroRNAs as master regulators of the plant NB-LRR defense gene family via the production of phased, trans-acting siRNAs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Legumes and many nonleguminous plants enter symbiotic interactions with microbes, and it is poorly understood how host plants respond to promote beneficial, symbiotic microbial interactions while suppressing those that are deleterious or pathogenic. Trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) negatively regulate...

  3. Regulation Involved in Colonization of Intercellular Spaces of Host Plants in Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Yasufumi; Mori, Yuka; Ishikawa, Shiho; Hayashi, Kazusa; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kiba, Akinori; Kai, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum invading plant roots first colonizes the intercellular spaces of the root, and eventually enters xylem vessels, where it replicates at high levels leading to wilting symptoms. After invasion into intercellular spaces, R. solanacearum strain OE1-1 attaches to host cells and expression of the hrp genes encoding components of the type III secretion system (T3SS). OE1-1 then constructs T3SS and secrets effectors into host cells, inducing expression of the host gene encoding phosphatidic acid phosphatase. This leads to suppressing plant innate immunity. Then, OE1-1 grows on host cells, inducing quorum sensing (QS). The QS contributes to regulation of OE1-1 colonization of intercellular spaces including mushroom-type biofilm formation on host cells, leading to its virulence. R. solanacearum strains AW1 and K60 produce methyl 3-hydroxypalmitate (3-OH PAME) as a QS signal. The methyltransferase PhcB synthesizes 3-OH PAME. When 3-OH PAME reaches a threshold level, it increases the ability of the histidine kinase PhcS to phosphorylate the response regulator PhcR. This results in elevated levels of functional PhcA, the global virulence regulator. On the other hand, strains OE1-1 and GMI1000 produce methyl 3-hydroxymyristate (3-OH MAME) as a QS signal. Among R. solanacearum strains, the deduced PhcB and PhcS amino acid sequences are related to the production of QS signals. R. solanacearum produces aryl-furanone secondary metabolites, ralfuranones, which are extracellularly secreted and required for its virulence, dependent on the QS. Interestingly, ralfuranones affect the QS feedback loop. Taken together, integrated signaling via ralfuranones influences the QS, contributing to pathogen virulence. PMID:28642776

  4. A pair of light signaling factors FHY3 and FAR1 regulates plant immunity by modulating chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanqing; Tang, Weijiang; Ma, Tingting; Niu, De; Jin, Jing Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Light and chloroplast function is known to affect the plant immune response; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously demonstrated that two light signaling factors, FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 3 (FHY3) and FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE 1 (FAR1), regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis and seedling growth via controlling HEMB1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we reveal that FHY3 and FAR1 are involved in modulating plant immunity. We showed that the fhy3 far1 double null mutant displayed high levels of reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid (SA) and increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pathogen infection. Microarray analysis revealed that a large proportion of pathogen-related genes, particularly genes encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain resistant proteins, are highly induced in fhy3 far1. Genetic studies indicated that the defects of fhy3 far1 can be largely rescued by reducing SA signaling or blocking SA accumulation, and by overexpression of HEMB1, which encodes a 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we found that transgenic plants with reduced expression of HEMB1 exhibit a phenotype similar to fhy3 far1. Taken together, this study demonstrates an important role of FHY3 and FAR1 in regulating plant immunity, through integrating chlorophyll biosynthesis and the SA signaling pathway. © The Authors. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Regulation of Water in Plant Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowles, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    Cell water relationships are important topics to be included in cell biology courses. Differences exist in the control of water relationships in plant cells relative to control in animal cells. One important reason for these differences is that turgor pressure is a consideration in plant cells. Diffusion and osmosis are the underlying factors…

  6. Ambient temperature regulates the expression of a small set of sRNAs influencing plant development through NF-YA2 and YUC2.

    PubMed

    Gyula, Péter; Baksa, Ivett; Tóth, Tamás; Mohorianu, Irina; Dalmay, Tamás; Szittya, György

    2018-06-01

    Plants substantially alter their developmental program upon changes in the ambient temperature. The 21-24 nt small RNAs (sRNAs) are important gene expression regulators, which play a major role in development and adaptation. However, little is known about how the different sRNA classes respond to changes in the ambient temperature. We profiled the sRNA populations in four different tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown at 15, 21 and 27 °C. We found that only a small fraction (0.6%) of the sRNA loci are ambient temperature-controlled. We identified thermoresponsive miRNAs and identified their target genes using degradome libraries. We verified that the target of the thermoregulated miR169, NF-YA2, is also ambient temperature-regulated. NF-YA2, as the component of the conserved transcriptional regulator NF-Y complex, binds the promoter of the flowering time regulator FT and the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC2. Other differentially expressed loci include thermoresponsive phased siRNA loci that target various auxin pathway genes and tRNA fragments. Furthermore, a temperature dependent 24-nt heterochromatic siRNA locus in the promoter of YUC2 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of auxin homeostasis. This holistic approach facilitated a better understanding of the role of different sRNA classes in ambient temperature adaptation of plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Dan; Zheng, Chengchao; Liu, Pei; Huang, Jinguang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT) plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3) plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms.

  8. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Dan; Zheng, Chengchao; Liu, Pei; Huang, Jinguang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT) plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3) plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms. PMID:26076137

  9. Cell Number Regulator1 Affects Plant and Organ Size in Maize: Implications for Crop Yield Enhancement and Heterosis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A.; Dieter, Jo Ann; Zou, Jijun; Spielbauer, Daniel; Duncan, Keith E.; Howard, Richard J.; Hou, Zhenglin; Simmons, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes involved in cell number regulation may affect plant growth and organ size and, ultimately, crop yield. The tomato (genus Solanum) fruit weight gene fw2.2, for instance, governs a quantitative trait locus that accounts for 30% of fruit size variation, with increased fruit size chiefly due to increased carpel ovary cell number. To expand investigation of how related genes may impact other crop plant or organ sizes, we identified the maize (Zea mays) gene family of putative fw2.2 orthologs, naming them Cell Number Regulator (CNR) genes. This family represents an ancient eukaryotic family of Cys-rich proteins containing the PLAC8 or DUF614 conserved motif. We focused on native expression and transgene analysis of the two maize members closest to Le-fw2.2, namely, CNR1 and CNR2. We show that CNR1 reduced overall plant size when ectopically overexpressed and that plant and organ size increased when its expression was cosuppressed or silenced. Leaf epidermal cell counts showed that the increased or decreased transgenic plant and organ size was due to changes in cell number, not cell size. CNR2 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tissue growth activity and hybrid seedling vigor. The effects of CNR1 on plant size and cell number are reminiscent of heterosis, which also increases plant size primarily through increased cell number. Regardless of whether CNRs and other cell number–influencing genes directly contribute to, or merely mimic, heterosis, they may aid generation of more vigorous and productive crop plants. PMID:20400678

  10. Plant terpenes: defense responses, phylogenetic analysis, regulation and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bharat; Sharma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    The terpenoids constitute the largest class of natural products and many interesting products are extensively applied in the industrial sector as flavors, fragrances, spices and are also used in perfumery and cosmetics. Many terpenoids have biological activities and also used for medical purposes. In higher plants, the conventional acetate-mevalonic acid pathway operates mainly in the cytosol and mitochondria and synthesizes sterols, sesquiterpenes and ubiquinones mainly. In the plastid, the non-mevalonic acid pathway takes place and synthesizes hemi-, mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes along with carotenoids and phytol tail of chlorophyll. In this review paper, recent developments in the biosynthesis of terpenoids, indepth description of terpene synthases and their phylogenetic analysis, regulation of terpene biosynthesis as well as updates of terpenes which have entered in the clinical studies are reviewed thoroughly.

  11. HnRNP-like proteins as post-transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Wan-Chin; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2014-10-01

    Plant cells contain a diverse repertoire of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that coordinate a network of post-transcriptional regulation. RBPs govern diverse developmental processes by modulating the gene expression of specific transcripts. Recent gene annotation and RNA sequencing clearly showed that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-like proteins which form a family of RBPs, are also expressed in higher plants and serve specific plant functions. In addition to their involvement in post-transcriptional regulation from mRNA capping to translation, they are also involved in telomere regulation, gene silencing and regulation in chloroplast. Here, we review the involvement of plant hnRNP-like proteins in post-transcription regulation of RNA processes and their functional roles in control of plant developmental processes especially plant-specific functions including flowering, chloroplastic-specific mRNA regulation, long-distance phloem transportation and plant responses to environmental stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic expression of different cytokinin-regulated transcription factor genes of Arabidopsis thaliana alters plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Köllmer, Ireen; Werner, Tomáš; Schmülling, Thomas

    2011-08-15

    The plant hormone cytokinin rapidly alters the steady state transcript levels of a number of transcription factor genes suggesting that these might have a function in mediating cytokinin effects. Here we report the analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an altered expression level of four different cytokinin-regulated transcription factor genes. These include GATA22 (also known as CGA1/GNL), two genes coding for members of the homeodomain zip (HD zip) class II transcription factor family (HAT4, HAT22), and bHLH64. Ectopic expression of the GATA22 gene induced the development of chloroplasts in root tissue where it is normally suppressed and led to the formation of shorter and less branched roots. Overexpression of HAT22 lowered the seedlings chlorophyll content and caused an earlier onset of leaf senescence. Enhanced expression of the HAT4 gene led to severe defects in inflorescence stem development and to a decrease in root growth and branching, while hat4 insertional mutants developed a larger root system. 35S:bHLH64 transgenic plants showed a pleiotropic phenotype, consisting of larger rosettes, reduced chlorophyll content and an elongated and thickened hypocotyl. Flower development was strongly disturbed leading to sterile plants. The results are consistent with specific functions of these transcription factor genes in regulating part of the cytokinin activities and suggest their action as convergence point with other signalling pathways, particularly those of gibberellin and light. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. NaJAZh Regulates a Subset of Defense Responses against Herbivores and Spontaneous Leaf Necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata Plants[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:22496510

  14. The tonoplast-localized sucrose transporter in Populus (PtaSUT4) regulates whole-plant water relations, responses to water stress, and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Frost, Christopher J; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Harding, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    The Populus sucrose (Suc) transporter 4 (PtaSUT4), like its orthologs in other plant taxa, is tonoplast localized and thought to mediate Suc export from the vacuole into the cytosol. In source leaves of Populus, SUT4 is the predominantly expressed gene family member, with transcript levels several times higher than those of plasma membrane SUTs. A hypothesis is advanced that SUT4-mediated tonoplast sucrose fluxes contribute to the regulation of osmotic gradients between cellular compartments, with the potential to mediate both sink provisioning and drought tolerance in Populus. Here, we describe the effects of PtaSUT4-RNA interference (RNAi) on sucrose levels and raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) induction, photosynthesis, and water uptake, retention and loss during acute and chronic drought stresses. Under normal water-replete growing conditions, SUT4-RNAi plants had generally higher shoot water contents than wild-type plants. In response to soil drying during a short-term, acute drought, RNAi plants exhibited reduced rates of water uptake and delayed wilting relative to wild-type plants. SUT4-RNAi plants had larger leaf areas and lower photosynthesis rates than wild-type plants under well-watered, but not under chronic water-limiting conditions. Moreover, the magnitude of shoot water content, height growth, and photosynthesis responses to contrasting soil moisture regimes was greater in RNAi than wild-type plants. The concentrations of stress-responsive RFOs increased in wild-type plants but were unaffected in SUT4-RNAi plants under chronically dry conditions. We discuss a model in which the subcellular compartmentalization of sucrose mediated by PtaSUT4 is regulated in response to both sink demand and plant water status in Populus.

  15. The roles of community biomass and species pools in the regulation of plant diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grace, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable debate has developed over the importance of community biomass and species pools in the regulation of community diversity. Attempts to explain patterns of plant diversity as a function of community biomass or productivity have been only partially successful and in general, have explained only a fraction of the observed variation in diversity. At the same time studies that have focused on the importance of species pools have led some to conclude that diversity is primarily regulated in the short term by the size of the species pool rather than by biotic interactions. In this paper, I explore how community biomass and species pools may work in combination to regulate diversity in herbaceous plant communities. To address this problem, I employ a simple model in which the dynamics of species richness are a function of aboveground community biomass and environmentally controlled gradients in species pools. Model results lead to two main predictions about the role of biomass regulation: (1) Seasonal dynamics of richness will tend to follow a regular oscillation, with richness rising to peak values during the early to middle portion of the growing season and then declining during the latter part of the season. (2.) Seasonal dieback of aboveground tissues facilitates the long-term maintenance of high levels of richness in the community. The persistence of aboveground tissues and accumulation of litter are especially important in limiting the number of species through the suppression of recruitment. Model results also lead to two main predictions about the role of species pools: (1) The height and position of peak richness relative to community biomass will be influenced by the rate at which the species pool increases as available soil resources increase. (2) Variations in nonresource environmental factors (e.g. soil pH or soil salinity) have the potential to regulate species pools in a way that is uncorrelated with aboveground biomass. Under extreme conditions

  16. 7 CFR 302.2 - Movement of plants and plant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Movement of plants and plant products. 302.2 Section 302.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS...

  17. 7 CFR 302.2 - Movement of plants and plant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of plants and plant products. 302.2 Section 302.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS...

  18. 7 CFR 302.2 - Movement of plants and plant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Movement of plants and plant products. 302.2 Section 302.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS...

  19. 7 CFR 302.2 - Movement of plants and plant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of plants and plant products. 302.2 Section 302.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS...

  20. 7 CFR 302.2 - Movement of plants and plant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Movement of plants and plant products. 302.2 Section 302.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; MOVEMENT OF PLANTS AND PLANT PRODUCTS...

  1. Regulation of non-relevant metabolites of plant protection products in drinking and groundwater in the EU: Current status and way forward.

    PubMed

    Laabs, V; Leake, C; Botham, P; Melching-Kollmuß, S

    2015-10-01

    Non-relevant metabolites are defined in the EU regulation for plant protection product authorization and a detailed definition of non-relevant metabolites is given in an EU Commission DG Sanco (now DG SANTE - Health and Food Safety) guidance document. However, in water legislation at EU and member state level non-relevant metabolites of pesticides are either not specifically regulated or diverse threshold values are applied. Based on their inherent properties, non-relevant metabolites should be regulated based on substance-specific and toxicity-based limit values in drinking and groundwater like other anthropogenic chemicals. Yet, if a general limit value for non-relevant metabolites in drinking and groundwater is favored, an application of a Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept for Cramer class III compounds leads to a threshold value of 4.5 μg L(-1). This general value is exemplarily shown to be protective for non-relevant metabolites, based on individual drinking water limit values derived for a set of 56 non-relevant metabolites. A consistent definition of non-relevant metabolites of plant protection products, as well as their uniform regulation in drinking and groundwater in the EU, is important to achieve legal clarity for all stakeholders and to establish planning security for development of plant protection products for the European market. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein Kinases in Shaping Plant Architecture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Wang, Bo; Xin, Xiaoyun; Ren, Dongtao

    2018-02-13

    Plant architecture, the three-dimensional organization of the plant body, includes the branching pattern and the size, shape, and position of organs. Plant architecture is genetically controlled and is influenced by environmental conditions. The regulations occur at most of the stages from the first division of the fertilized eggs to the final establishment of plant architecture. Among the various endogenous regulators, protein kinases and their associated signaling pathways have been shown to play important roles in regulating the process of plant architecture establishment. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms by which plant architecture formation is regulated by protein kinases, especially mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Plant defense genes are regulated by ethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, J.R.; Davis, R.W.

    One of the earliest detectable events during plant-pathogen interaction is a rapid increase in ethylene biosynthesis. This gaseous plant stress hormone may be a signal for plants to activate defense mechanisms against invading pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses. The effect of ethylene on four plant genes involved in three separate plant defense response pathways was examined; these included (i and ii) genes that encode L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4-coumarate:CoA ligase (AMP-forming), EC 6.2.1.12), enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, (iii) the gene encoding chalcone synthase, an enzyme of the flavonoid glycoside pathway, and (iv) the genesmore » encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, a major protein component(s) of plant cell walls. Blot hybridization analysis of mRNA from ethylene-treated carrot roots reveals marked increases in the levels of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase mRNA, 4-coumarate CoA ligase mRNA, chalcone synthase mRNA, and certain hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein transcripts. The effect of ethylene on hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNA accumulation was different from that of wounding. Ethylene induces two hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein mRNAs (1.8 and 4.0 kilobases), whereas wounding of carrot root leads to accumulation of an additional hydroxyproline-rich mRNA (1.5 kilobases). These results indicate that at least two distinct signals, ethylene and a wound signal, can affect the expression of plant defense-response genes.« less

  4. Salicylic acid and nitric oxide alleviate high temperature induced oxidative damage in Lablab purpureus L plants by regulating bio-physical processes and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Rai, Krishna Kumar; Rai, Nagendra; Rai, Shashi Pandey

    2018-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor) modulates plant growth and development processes and recent findings have also revealed their involvement in the regulation of epigenetic factors under stress condition. In the present study, some of these factors were comparatively studied in hyacinth bean plants subjected to high temperature (HT) environment (40-42 °C) with and without exogenous application of SA and SNP under field condition. Exogenous application of SA and SNP substantially modulated the growth and biophysical process of hyacinth bean plants under HT environment. Exogenous application of SA and SNP also remarkably regulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes, modulated mRNA level of certain enzymes, improves plant water relation, enhance photosynthesis and thereby increasing plant defence under HT. Coupled restriction enzyme digestion-random amplification (CRED-RA) technique revealed that many methylation changes were "dose dependent" and HT significantly increased DNA damages as evidenced by both increase and decrease in bands profiles, methylation and de-methylation pattern. Thus, the result of the present study clearly shows that exogenous SA and SNP regulates DNA methylation pattern, modulates stress-responsive genes and can impart transient HT tolerance by synchronizing growth and physiological acclimatization of plants, thus narrowing the gaps between physio-biochemical and molecular events in addressing HT tolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Feedback regulation of an Agrobacterium catalase gene katA involved in Agrobacterium-plant interaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Q; Li, L P; Pan, S Q

    2001-11-01

    Catalases are known to detoxify H2O2, a major component of oxidative stress imposed on a cell. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens catalase encoded by a chromosomal gene katA has been implicated as an important virulence factor as it is involved in detoxification of H2O2 released during Agrobacterium-plant interaction. In this paper, we report a feedback regulation pathway that controls the expression of katA in A. tumefaciens cells. We observed that katA could be induced by plant tissue sections and by acidic pH on a minimal medium, which resembles the plant environment that the bacteria encounter during the course of infection. This represents a new regulatory factor for catalase induction in bacteria. More importantly, a feedback regulation was observed when the katA-gfp expression was studied in different genetic backgrounds. We found that introduction of a wild-type katA gene encoding a functional catalase into A. tumefaciens cells could repress the katA-gfp expression over 60-fold. The katA gene could be induced by H2O2 and the encoded catalase could detoxify H2O2. In addition, the katA-gfp expression of one bacterial cell could be repressed by other surrounding catalase-proficient bacterial cells. Furthermore, mutation at katA caused a 10-fold increase of the intracellular H2O2 concentration in the bacteria grown on an acidic pH medium. These results suggest that the endogenous H2O2 generated during A. tumefaciens cell growth could serve as the intracellular and intercellular inducer for the katA gene expression and that the acidic pH could pose an oxidative stress on the bacteria. Surprisingly, one mutated KatA protein, exhibiting no significant catalase activity as a result of the alteration of two important residues at the putative active site, could partially repress the katA-gfp expression. The feedback regulation of the katA gene by both catalase activity and KatA protein could presumably maintain an appropriated level of catalase activity and H2O2 inside A

  6. Whole-plant versus leaf-level regulation of photosynthetic responses after partial defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus saplings.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Davies, Noel W; Corkrey, Ross; Churchill, Keith; O'Grady, Anthony P; Sands, Peter; Mohammed, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Increases in photosynthetic capacity (A1500) after defoliation have been attributed to changes in leaf-level biochemistry, water, and/or nutrient status. The hypothesis that transient photosynthetic responses to partial defoliation are regulated by whole-plant (e.g. source-sink relationships or changes in hydraulic conductance) rather than leaf-level mechanisms is tested here. Temporal variation in leaf-level gas exchange, chemistry, whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (KP), and aboveground biomass partitioning were determined to evaluate mechanisms responsible for increases in A1500 of Eucalyptus globulus L. potted saplings. A1500 increased in response to debudding (B), partial defoliation (D), and combined B&D treatments by up to 36% at 5 weeks after treatment. Changes in leaf-level factors partly explained increases in A1500 of B and B&D treatments but not for D treatment. By week 5, saplings in B, B&D, and D treatments had similar leaf-specific KP to control trees by maintaining lower midday water potentials and higher transpiration rate per leaf area. Whole-plant source:sink ratios correlated strongly with A1500. Further, unlike KP, temporal changes in source:sink ratios tracked well with those observed for A1500. The results indicate that increases in A1500 after partial defoliation treatments were largely driven by an increased demand for assimilate by developing sinks rather than improvements in whole-plant water relations and changes in leaf-level factors. Three carbohydrates, galactional, stachyose, and, to a lesser extent, raffinose, correlated strongly with photosynthetic capacity, indicating that these sugars may function as signalling molecules in the regulation of longer term defoliation-induced gas exchange responses.

  7. Whole-plant versus leaf-level regulation of photosynthetic responses after partial defoliation in Eucalyptus globulus saplings

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Alieta

    2013-01-01

    Increases in photosynthetic capacity (A1500) after defoliation have been attributed to changes in leaf-level biochemistry, water, and/or nutrient status. The hypothesis that transient photosynthetic responses to partial defoliation are regulated by whole-plant (e.g. source–sink relationships or changes in hydraulic conductance) rather than leaf-level mechanisms is tested here. Temporal variation in leaf-level gas exchange, chemistry, whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (KP), and aboveground biomass partitioning were determined to evaluate mechanisms responsible for increases in A1500 of Eucalyptus globulus L. potted saplings. A1500 increased in response to debudding (B), partial defoliation (D), and combined B&D treatments by up to 36% at 5 weeks after treatment. Changes in leaf-level factors partly explained increases in A1500 of B and B&D treatments but not for D treatment. By week 5, saplings in B, B&D, and D treatments had similar leaf-specific KP to control trees by maintaining lower midday water potentials and higher transpiration rate per leaf area. Whole-plant source:sink ratios correlated strongly with A1500. Further, unlike KP, temporal changes in source:sink ratios tracked well with those observed for A1500. The results indicate that increases in A1500 after partial defoliation treatments were largely driven by an increased demand for assimilate by developing sinks rather than improvements in whole-plant water relations and changes in leaf-level factors. Three carbohydrates, galactional, stachyose, and, to a lesser extent, raffinose, correlated strongly with photosynthetic capacity, indicating that these sugars may function as signalling molecules in the regulation of longer term defoliation-induced gas exchange responses. PMID:23382548

  8. Mapping ‘hydroscapes’ along the iso- to anisohydric continuum of stomatal regulation of plant water status

    Treesearch

    Frederick C. Meinzer; David R. Woodruff; Danielle E. Marias; Duncan D. Smith; Katherine A. McCulloh; Ava R. Howard; Alicia L. Magedman; Josep Penuelas

    2016-01-01

    The concept of iso- vs. anisohydry has been used to describe the stringency of stomatal regulation of plant water potential (ψ). However, metrics that accurately and consistently quantify species’ operating ranges along a continuum of iso- to anisohydry have been elusive. Additionally, most approaches to quantifying iso/anisohydry require labour-intensive measurements...

  9. New Era of Studying RNA Secondary Structure and Its Influence on Gene Regulation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofei; Yang, Minglei; Deng, Hongjing; Ding, Yiliang

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic structure of RNA plays a central role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression such as RNA maturation, degradation, and translation. With the rise of next-generation sequencing, the study of RNA structure has been transformed from in vitro low-throughput RNA structure probing methods to in vivo high-throughput RNA structure profiling. The development of these methods enables incremental studies on the function of RNA structure to be performed, revealing new insights of novel regulatory mechanisms of RNA structure in plants. Genome-wide scale RNA structure profiling allows us to investigate general RNA structural features over 10s of 1000s of mRNAs and to compare RNA structuromes between plant species. Here, we provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of: (i) RNA structure probing methods; (ii) the biological functions of RNA structure; (iii) genome-wide RNA structural features corresponding to their regulatory mechanisms; and (iv) RNA structurome evolution in plants.

  10. Polarization of IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) to the plant-soil interface plays crucial role in metal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Marie; Dubeaux, Guillaume; Kolb, Cornelia; Isono, Erika; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2014-06-03

    In plants, the controlled absorption of soil nutrients by root epidermal cells is critical for growth and development. IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the main root transporter taking up iron from the soil and is also the main entry route in plants for potentially toxic metals such as manganese, zinc, cobalt, and cadmium. Previous work demonstrated that the IRT1 protein localizes to early endosomes/trans-Golgi network (EE/TGN) and is constitutively endocytosed through a monoubiquitin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Here, we show that the availability of secondary non-iron metal substrates of IRT1 (Zn, Mn, and Co) controls the localization of IRT1 between the outer polar domain of the plasma membrane and EE/TGN in root epidermal cells. We also identify FYVE1, a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding protein recruited to late endosomes, as an important regulator of IRT1-dependent metal transport and metal homeostasis in plants. FYVE1 controls IRT1 recycling to the plasma membrane and impacts the polar delivery of this transporter to the outer plasma membrane domain. This work establishes a functional link between the dynamics and the lateral polarity of IRT1 and the transport of its substrates, and identifies a molecular mechanism driving polar localization of a cell surface protein in plants.

  11. Overexpression of OsGATA12 regulates chlorophyll content, delays plant senescence and improves rice yield under high density planting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangwen; Casaretto, José A; Ying, Shan; Mahmood, Kashif; Liu, Fang; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2017-05-01

    Agronomic traits controlling the formation, architecture and physiology of source and sink organs are main determinants of rice productivity. Semi-dwarf rice varieties with low tiller formation but high seed production per panicle and dark green and thick leaves with prolonged source activity are among the desirable traits to further increase the yield potential of rice. Here, we report the functional characterization of a zinc finger transcription factor, OsGATA12, whose overexpression causes increased leaf greenness, reduction of leaf and tiller number, and affects yield parameters. Reduced tillering allowed testing the transgenic plants under high density which resulted in significantly increased yield per area and higher harvest index compared to wild-type. We show that delayed senescence of transgenic plants and the corresponding longer stay-green phenotype is mainly due to increased chlorophyll and chloroplast number. Further, our work postulates that the increased greenness observed in the transgenic plants is due to more chlorophyll synthesis but most significantly to decreased chlorophyll degradation, which is supported by the reduced expression of genes involved in the chlorophyll degradation pathway. In particular we show evidence for the down-regulation of the STAY GREEN RICE gene and in vivo repression of its promoter by OsGATA12, which suggests a transcriptional repression function for a GATA transcription factor for prolonging the onset of senescence in cereals.

  12. Spatial and temporal regulation of the forisome gene for1 in the phloem during plant development.

    PubMed

    Noll, Gundula A; Fontanellaz, Maria E; Rüping, Boris; Ashoub, Ahmed; van Bel, Aart J E; Fischer, Rainer; Knoblauch, Michael; Prüfer, Dirk

    2007-10-01

    Forisomes are protein aggregates found uniquely in the sieve elements of Fabaceaen plants. Upon wounding they undergo a reversible, calcium-dependent conformational switch which enables them to act as cellular stopcocks. Forisomes begin to form in young sieve elements at an early stage of metaphloem differentiation. Genes encoding forisome components could therefore be useful as markers of early sieve element development. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the developmental expression profile of for1, which encodes such a forisome component. The for1 gene is highly conserved among Fabaceaen species and appears to be unique to this phylogenetic lineage since no orthologous genes have been found in other plants, including Arabidopsis and rice. Even so, transgenic tobacco plants expressing reporter genes under the control of the for1 promoter display reporter activity exclusively in immature sieve elements. This suggests that the regulation of sieve element development is highly conserved even in plants where mature forisomes have not been detected. The promoter system could therefore provide a powerful tool for the detailed analysis of differentiation in metaphloem sieve elements in an unexpectedly broad range of plant species.

  13. Changes in cellular distribution regulate SKD1 ATPase activity in response to a sudden increase in environmental salinity in halophyte ice plant

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Yingtzy; Chiang, Chih-Pin; Yen, Hungchen Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. (ice plant) rapidly responds to sudden increases in salinity in its environment by activating specific salt-tolerant mechanisms. One major strategy is to regulate a series of ion transporters and proton pumps to maintain cellular Na+/K+ homeostasis. Plant SKD1 (suppressor of K+ transport growth defect 1) proteins accumulate in cells actively engaged in the secretory processes, and play a critical role in intracellular protein trafficking. Ice plant SKD1 redistributes from the cytosol to the plasma membrane hours after salt stressed. In combination with present knowledge of this protein, we suggest that stress facilitates SKD1 movement to the plasma membrane where ADP/ATP exchange occurs, and functions in the regulation of membrane components such as ion transporters to avoid ion toxicity. PMID:24390077

  14. LeMYC2 acts as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenic growth, and promotes the growth of adult tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis ZBF1/MYC2bHLH transcription factor is a repressor of photomorphogenesis, and acts as a point of cross talk in light, abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. MYC2 also functions as a positive regulator of lateral root development and flowering time under long day conditions. However, the function of MYC2 in growth and development remains unknown in crop plants. Results Here, we report the functional analyses of LeMYC2 in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The amino acid sequence of LeMYC2 showed extensive homology with Arabidopsis MYC2, containing the conserved bHLH domain. To study the function of LeMYC2 in tomato, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) LeMYC2 tomato transgenic plants were generated. Examination of seedling morphology, physiological responses and light regulated gene expression has revealed that LeMYC2 works as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenesis. Furthermore, LeMYC2 specifically binds to the G-box of LeRBCS-3A promoter. Overexpression of LeMYC2 has led to increased root length with more number of lateral roots. The tomato plants overexpressing LeMYC2 have reduced internode distance with more branches, and display the opposite morphology to RNAi transgenic lines. Furthermore, this study shows that LeMYC2 promotes ABA and JA responsiveness. Conclusions Collectively, this study highlights that working in light, ABA and JA signaling pathways LeMYC2 works as an important regulator for growth and development in tomato plants. PMID:24483714

  15. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants: regulation and biosafety concern.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Narendra; Verma, Shiv; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Raveendar, Sebastian; Reddy, I N Bheema Lingeshwara

    2012-03-01

    During the efficient genetic transformation of plants with the gene of interest, some selectable marker genes are also used in order to identify the transgenic plant cells or tissues. Usually, antibiotic- or herbicide-selective agents and their corresponding resistance genes are used to introduce economically valuable genes into crop plants. From the biosafety authority and consumer viewpoints, the presence of selectable marker genes in released transgenic crops may be transferred to weeds or pathogenic microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract or soil, making them resistant to treatment with herbicides or antibiotics, respectively. Sexual crossing also raises the problem of transgene expression because redundancy of transgenes in the genome may trigger homology-dependent gene silencing. The future potential of transgenic technologies for crop improvement depends greatly on our abilities to engineer stable expression of multiple transgenic traits in a predictable fashion and to prevent the transfer of undesirable transgenic material to non-transgenic crops and related species. Therefore, it is now essential to develop an efficient marker-free transgenic system. These considerations underline the development of various approaches designed to facilitate timely elimination of transgenes when their function is no longer needed. Due to the limiting number of available selectable marker genes, in future the stacking of transgenes will be increasingly desirable. The production of marker-free transgenic plants is now a critical requisite for their commercial deployment and also for engineering multiple and complex trait. Here we describe the current technologies to eliminate the selectable marker genes (SMG) in order to develop marker-free transgenic plants and also discuss the regulation and biosafety concern of genetically modified (GM) crops.

  16. The Membrane Mucin Msb2 Regulates Invasive Growth and Plant Infection in Fusarium oxysporum[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Nadales, Elena; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Fungal pathogenicity in plants requires a conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade homologous to the yeast filamentous growth pathway. How this signaling cascade is activated during infection remains poorly understood. In the soil-borne vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum, the orthologous MAPK Fmk1 (Fusarium MAPK1) is essential for root penetration and pathogenicity in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Here, we show that Msb2, a highly glycosylated transmembrane protein, is required for surface-induced phosphorylation of Fmk1 and contributes to a subset of Fmk1-regulated functions related to invasive growth and virulence. Mutants lacking Msb2 share characteristic phenotypes with the Δfmk1 mutant, including defects in cellophane invasion, penetration of the root surface, and induction of vascular wilt symptoms in tomato plants. In contrast with Δfmk1, Δmsb2 mutants were hypersensitive to cell wall targeting compounds, a phenotype that was exacerbated in a Δmsb2 Δfmk1 double mutant. These results suggest that the membrane mucin Msb2 promotes invasive growth and plant infection upstream of Fmk1 while contributing to cell integrity through a distinct pathway. PMID:21441438

  17. Electronic plants

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Gabrielsson, Roger; Gomez, Eliot; Crispin, Xavier; Nilsson, Ove; Simon, Daniel T.; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directly merged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization. PMID:26702448

  18. Redox proteomics for the assessment of redox-related posttranslational regulation in plants.

    PubMed

    Mock, Hans-Peter; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-08-01

    The methodological developments of in vivo and in vitro protein labeling and subsequent detection enable sensitive and specific detection of redox modifications. Such methods are presently applied to diverse cells and tissues, subproteomes and developmental as well as environmental conditions. The chloroplast proteome is particularly suitable for such kind of studies, because redox regulation of chloroplast proteins is well established, many plastid proteins are abundant, redox network components have been inventoried in great depth, and functional consequences explored. Thus the repertoire of redox-related posttranslational modifications on the one hand side and their abundance on the other pose a challenge for the near future to understand their contribution to physiological regulation. The various posttranslational redox modifications are introduced, followed by a description of the available proteomics methods. The significance of the redox-related posttranslational modification is exemplarily worked out using established examples from photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. 7 CFR 330.400 - Regulation of certain garbage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Regulation of certain garbage. 330.400 Section 330.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  20. 7 CFR 330.102 - Basis for certain regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Basis for certain regulations. 330.102 Section 330.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  1. 7 CFR 330.400 - Regulation of certain garbage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulation of certain garbage. 330.400 Section 330.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  2. 7 CFR 330.102 - Basis for certain regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Basis for certain regulations. 330.102 Section 330.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  3. 7 CFR 330.400 - Regulation of certain garbage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulation of certain garbage. 330.400 Section 330.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  4. 7 CFR 330.400 - Regulation of certain garbage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Regulation of certain garbage. 330.400 Section 330.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  5. 7 CFR 330.102 - Basis for certain regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Basis for certain regulations. 330.102 Section 330.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  6. 7 CFR 330.102 - Basis for certain regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basis for certain regulations. 330.102 Section 330.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  7. 7 CFR 330.102 - Basis for certain regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Basis for certain regulations. 330.102 Section 330.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  8. 7 CFR 330.400 - Regulation of certain garbage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulation of certain garbage. 330.400 Section 330.400 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FEDERAL PLANT PEST REGULATIONS; GENERAL; PLANT PESTS; SOIL, STONE, AND...

  9. Redox signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Our aim is to deliver an authoritative and challenging perspective of current concepts in plant redox signaling, focusing particularly on the complex interface between the redox and hormone-signaling pathways that allow precise control of plant growth and defense in response to metabolic triggers and environmental constraints and cues. Plants produce significant amounts of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of photosynthetic electron transport and metabolism. Such pathways contribute to the compartment-specific redox-regulated signaling systems in plant cells that convey information to the nucleus to regulate gene expression. Like the chloroplasts and mitochondria, the apoplast-cell wall compartment makes a significant contribution to the redox signaling network, but unlike these organelles, the apoplast has a low antioxidant-buffering capacity. The respective roles of ROS, low-molecular antioxidants, redox-active proteins, and antioxidant enzymes are considered in relation to the functions of plant hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, in the composite control of plant growth and defense. Regulation of redox gradients between key compartments in plant cells such as those across the plasma membrane facilitates flexible and multiple faceted opportunities for redox signaling that spans the intracellular and extracellular environments. In conclusion, plants are recognized as masters of the art of redox regulation that use oxidants and antioxidants as flexible integrators of signals from metabolism and the environment.

  10. Evolutionary conservation and regulation of particular alternative splicing events in plant SR proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy; Voronin, Viktor; Barta, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for fine tuning of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. SR proteins govern splice site selection and spliceosome assembly. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 19 SR proteins, several of which have no orthologues in metazoan. Three of the plant specific subfamilies are characterized by the presence of a relatively long alternatively spliced intron located in their first RNA recognition motif, which potentially results in an extremely truncated protein. In atRSZ33, a member of the RS2Z subfamily, this alternative splicing event was shown to be autoregulated. Here we show that atRSp31, a member of the RS subfamily, does not autoregulate alternative splicing of its similarily positioned intron. Interestingly, this alternative splicing event is regulated by atRSZ33. We demonstrate that the positions of these long introns and their capability for alternative splicing are conserved from green algae to flowering plants. Moreover, in particular alternative splicing events the splicing signals are embedded into highly conserved sequences. In different taxa, these conserved sequences occur in at least one gene within a subfamily. The evolutionary preservation of alternative splice forms together with highly conserved intron features argues for additional functions hidden in the genes of these plant-specific SR proteins. PMID:16936312

  11. Gain-of-Function Mutants of the Cytokinin Receptors AHK2 and AHK3 Regulate Plant Organ Size, Flowering Time and Plant Longevity1

    PubMed Central

    Bartrina, Isabel; Novák, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin is a regulator of numerous processes in plants. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the cytokinin signal is perceived by three membrane-located receptors named ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE2 (AHK2), AHK3, and AHK4/CRE1. How the signal is transmitted across the membrane is an entirely unknown process. The three receptors have been shown to operate mostly in a redundant fashion, and very few specific roles have been attributed to single receptors. Using a forward genetic approach, we isolated constitutively active gain-of-function variants of the AHK2 and AHK3 genes, named repressor of cytokinin deficiency2 (rock2) and rock3, respectively. It is hypothesized that the structural changes caused by these mutations in the sensory and adjacent transmembrane domains emulate the structural changes caused by cytokinin binding, resulting in domain motion propagating the signal across the membrane. Detailed analysis of lines carrying rock2 and rock3 alleles revealed how plants respond to locally enhanced cytokinin signaling. Early flowering time, a prolonged reproductive growth phase, and, thereby, increased seed yield suggest that cytokinin regulates various aspects of reproductive growth. In particular, it counteracts the global proliferative arrest, a correlative inhibition of maternal growth by seeds, an as yet unknown activity of the hormone. PMID:28096190

  12. Hormone Profiling in Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2017-01-01

    Plant hormones are for a long time known to act as chemical messengers in the regulation of physiological processes during a plant's life cycle, from germination to senescence. Furthermore, plant hormones simultaneously coordinate physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. To study the hormonal regulation of physiological processes, three main approaches have been used (1) exogenous application of hormones, (2) correlative studies through measurements of endogenous hormone levels, and (3) use of transgenic and/or mutant plants altered in hormone metabolism or signaling. A plant hormone profiling method is useful to unravel cross talk between hormones and help unravel the hormonal regulation of physiological processes in studies using any of the aforementioned approaches. However, hormone profiling is still particularly challenging due to their very low abundance in plant tissues. In this chapter, a sensitive, rapid, and accurate method to quantify all the five "classic" classes of plant hormones plus other plant growth regulators, such as jasmonates, salicylic acid, melatonin, and brassinosteroids is described. The method includes a fast and simple extraction procedure without time consuming steps as purification or derivatization, followed by optimized ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis. This protocol facilitates the high-throughput analysis of hormone profiling and is applicable to different plant tissues.

  13. 76 FR 39804 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Regulation That Excludes U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ...-0056; 96300-1671-0000-R4] RIN 1018-AX29 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Regulation That Excludes U.S. Captive-Bred Scimitar-Horned Oryx, Addax, and Dama Gazelle From Certain... (Act). This action would eliminate the exclusion of U.S. captive-bred live wildlife and sport-hunted...

  14. Dynamic Plant-Plant-Herbivore Interactions Govern Plant Growth-Defence Integration.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jorad; Evers, Jochem B; Poelman, Erik H

    2017-04-01

    Plants downregulate their defences against insect herbivores upon impending competition for light. This has long been considered a resource trade-off, but recent advances in plant physiology and ecology suggest this mechanism is more complex. Here we propose that to understand why plants regulate and balance growth and defence, the complex dynamics in plant-plant competition and plant-herbivore interactions needs to be considered. Induced growth-defence responses affect plant competition and herbivore colonisation in space and time, which has consequences for the adaptive value of these responses. Assessing these complex interactions strongly benefits from advanced modelling tools that can model multitrophic interactions in space and time. Such an exercise will allow a critical re-evaluation why and how plants integrate defence and competition for light. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. MicroRNA-mediated gene regulation: potential applications for plant genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Luo, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Food security is one of the most important issues challenging the world today. Any strategies to solve this problem must include increasing crop yields and quality. MicroRNA-based genetic modification technology (miRNA-based GM tech) can be one of the most promising solutions that contribute to agricultural productivity directly by developing superior crop cultivars with enhanced biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and increased biomass yields. Indirectly, the technology may increase usage of marginal soils and decrease pesticide use, among other benefits. This review highlights the most recent progress of transgenic studies utilizing various miRNAs and their targets for plant trait modifications, and analyzes the potential of miRNA-mediated gene regulation for use in crop improvement. Strategies for manipulating miRNAs and their targets in transgenic plants including constitutive, stress-induced, or tissue-specific expression of miRNAs or their targets, RNA interference, expressing miRNA-resistant target genes, artificial target mimic and artificial miRNAs were discussed. We also discussed potential risks of utilizing miRNA-based GM tech. In general, miRNAs and their targets not only provide an invaluable source of novel transgenes, but also inspire the development of several new GM strategies, allowing advances in breeding novel crop cultivars with agronomically useful characteristics.

  16. Heat shock transcription factor 3 regulates plant immune response through modulation of salicylic acid accumulation and signaling in cassava.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Guoyin; Chang, Yanli; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2018-04-16

    As the terminal components of signal transduction, heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs) mediate the activation of multiple genes responsive to various stresses. However, the information and functional analysis are very limited in non-model plants, especially in cassava (Manihot esculenta), one of the most important crops in the tropical area. In this study, 32 MeHsfs were identified from cassava genome, the evolutionary tree, gene structures and motifs were also analyzed. Gene expression analysis found that MeHsfs were commonly regulated by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv manihotis (Xam). Among these MeHsfs, MeHsf3 was specifically located in the cell nucleus and had transcriptional activated activity on HSEs. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in cassava, we identified the essential role of MeHsf3 in plant disease resistance, by regulating the transcripts of Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1 (EDS1) and pathogen-related gene 4 (PR4). Notably, as regulators of defense susceptibility, MeEDS1 and MePR4 were identified as direct targets of MeHsf3. Moreover, the disease sensitivity of MeHsf3- and MeEDS1-silenced plants could be restored by exogenous salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Taken together, this study highlights the involvement of MeHsf3 in defense resistance through the transcription activation on MeEDS1 and MePR4. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Tracing a key player in the regulation of plant architecture: the columnar growth habit of apple trees (Malus × domestica).

    PubMed

    Petersen, Romina; Krost, Clemens

    2013-07-01

    Plant architecture is regulated by a complex interplay of some key players (often transcription factors), phytohormones and other signaling molecules such as microRNAs. The columnar growth habit of apple trees is a unique form of plant architecture characterized by thick and upright stems showing a compaction of internodes and carrying short fruit spurs instead of lateral branches. The molecular basis for columnar growth is a single dominant allele of the gene Columnar, whose identity, function and gene product are unknown. As a result of marker analyses, this gene has recently been fine-mapped to chromosome 10 at 18.51-19.09 Mb [according to the annotation of the apple genome by Velasco (2010)], a region containing a cluster of quantitative trait loci associated with plant architecture, but no homologs to the well-known key regulators of plant architecture. Columnar apple trees have a higher auxin/cytokinin ratio and lower levels of gibberellins and abscisic acid than normal apple trees. Transcriptome analyses corroborate these results and additionally show differences in cell membrane and cell wall function. It can be expected that within the next year or two, an integration of these different research methodologies will reveal the identity of the Columnar gene. Besides enabling breeders to efficiently create new apple (and maybe related pear, peach, cherry, etc.) cultivars which combine desirable characteristics of commercial cultivars with the advantageous columnar growth habit using gene technology, this will also provide new insights into an elevated level of plant growth regulation.

  18. Glutathione and fungal elicitor regulation of a plant defense gene promoter in electroporated protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Dron, Michel; Clouse, Steven D.; Dixon, Richard A.; Lawton, Michael A.; Lamb, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying activation of plant defenses against microbial attack we have studied elicitor regulation of a chimeric gene comprising the 5′ flanking region of a defense gene encoding the phytoalexin biosynthetic enzyme chalcone synthase fused to a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Glutathione or fungal elicitor caused a rapid, marked but transient expression of the chimeric gene electroporated into soybean protoplasts. The response closely resembled that of endogenous chalcone synthase genes in suspension cultured cells. Functional analysis of 5′ deletions suggests that promoter activity is determined by an elicitor-regulated activator located between the “TATA box” and nucleotide position -173 and an upstream silencer between -173 and -326. These cis-acting elements function in the transduction of the elicitation signal to initiate elaboration of an inducible defense response. Images PMID:16593981

  19. Gibberellins regulate the stem elongation rate without affecting the mature plant height of a quick development mutant of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Xie, Yong-Dun; Guo, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Lin-Shu; Xiong, Hong-Chun; Gu, Jia-Yu; Li, Jun-Hui; Kong, Fu-Quan; Sui, Li; Zhao, Zi-Wei; Zhao, Shi-Rong; Liu, Lu-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Gibberellin (GA) is essential for determining plant height. Alteration of GA content or GA signaling results in a dwarf or slender phenotype. Here, we characterized a novel wheat mutant, quick development (qd), in which GA regulates stem elongation but does not affect mature plant height. qd and wild-type plants did not exhibit phenotypic differences at the seedling stage. From jointing to heading stage, qd plants were taller than wild-type plants due to elongated cells. However, wild-type and qd plants were the same height at heading. Unlike wild-type plants, qd plants were sensitive to exogenous GA due to mutation of Rht-B1. With continuous GA stimulation, qd seedlings and adult plants were taller than wild-type. Thus, the GA content of qd plants might differ from that of wild-type during the growth process. Analysis of GA biosynthetic gene expression verified this hypothesis and showed that TaKAO, which is involved in catalyzing the early steps of GA biosynthesis, was differentially expressed in qd plants compared with wild-type. The bioactive GA associated gene TaGA20ox was downregulated in qd plants during the late growth stages. Measurements of endogenous GA content were consistent with the gene-expression analysis results. Consistent with the GA content variation, the first three basal internodes were longer and the last two internodes were shorter in qd than in wild-type plants. The qd mutant might be useful in dissecting the mechanism by which GA regulates stem-growing process, and it may be serve as a GA responsive semi-dwarf germplasm in breeding programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular regulation and physiological functions of a novel FaHsfA2c cloned from tall fescue conferring plant tolerance to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuyun; Huang, Wanlu; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2017-02-01

    Heat stress transcription factors (HSFs) compose a large gene family, and different members play differential roles in regulating plant responses to abiotic stress. The objectives of this study were to identify and characterize an A2-type HSF, FaHsfA2c, in a cool-season perennial grass tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) for its association with heat tolerance and to determine the underlying physiological functions and regulatory mechanisms of FaHsfA2c imparting plant tolerance to heat stress. FaHsfA2c was localized in nucleus and exhibited a rapid transcriptional increase in leaves and roots during early phase of heat stress. Ectopic expression of FaHsfA2c improved basal and acquired thermotolerance in wild-type Arabidopsis and also restored heat-sensitive deficiency of hsfa2 mutant. Overexpression of FaHsfA2c in tall fescue enhanced plant tolerance to heat by triggering transcriptional regulation of heat-protective gene expression, improving photosynthetic capacity and maintaining plant growth under heat stress. Our results indicated that FaHsfA2c acted as a positive regulator conferring thermotolerance improvement in Arabidopsis and tall fescue, and it could be potentially used as a candidate gene for genetic modification and molecular breeding to develop heat-tolerant cool-season grass species. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Rice OsMYB5P improves plant phosphate acquisition by regulation of phosphate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Kwang Sik; Hong, So Yeon; Bae, Ki Deuk; Chung, Young Soo; Kwon, Yong Sham; Kim, Du Hyun; Jung, Ki Hong

    2018-01-01

    Myeloblastosis (MYB) transcription factors play central roles in plant developmental processes and in responses to nutrient deficiency. In this study, OsMYB5P, an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, was isolated and identified from rice (Oryza sativa L. ‘Dongjin’) under inorganic phosphate (Pi)-deficient conditions. OsMYB5P protein is localized to the nucleus and functions as a transcription activator in plant development. Overexpression of OsMYB5P in rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0) increases tolerance to phosphate starvation, whereas OsMYB5P knock-out through RNA interference increases sensitivity to Pi depletion in rice. Furthermore, shoots and roots of transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsMYB5P were longer than those of wild plants under both normal and Pi-deficient conditions. These results indicate that OsMYB5P is associated with the regulation of shoot development and root- system architecture. Overexpression of OsMYB5P led to increased Pi accumulation in shoots and roots. Interestingly, OsMYB5P directly bound to MBS (MYB binding site) motifs on the OsPT5 promoter and induced transcription of OsPT5 in rice. In addition, overexpression of OsMYB5P in Arabidopsis triggered increased expression of AtPht1;3, an Arabidopsis Pi transporter, in shoots and roots under normal and Pi-deficient conditions. Together, these results demonstrate that overexpression of OsMYB5P increases tolerance to Pi deficiency in plants by modulating Pi transporters at the transcriptional level in monocots and dicots. PMID:29566032

  2. The Role and Regulation of ABI5 (ABA-Insensitive 5) in Plant Development, Abiotic Stress Responses and Phytohormone Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Skubacz, Anna; Daszkowska-Golec, Agata; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    ABA Insensitive 5 (ABI5) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a key role in the regulation of seed germination and early seedling growth in the presence of ABA and abiotic stresses. ABI5 functions in the core ABA signaling, which is composed of PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, PP2C phosphatases and SnRK2 kinases, through the regulation of the expression of genes that contain the ABSCISIC ACID RESPONSE ELEMENT (ABRE) motif within their promoter region. The regulated targets include stress adaptation genes, e.g., LEA proteins. However, the expression and activation of ABI5 is not only dependent on the core ABA signaling. Many transcription factors such as ABI3, ABI4, MYB7 and WRKYs play either a positive or a negative role in the regulation of ABI5 expression. Additionally, the stability and activity of ABI5 are also regulated by other proteins through post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and S-nitrosylation. Moreover, ABI5 also acts as an ABA and other phytohormone signaling integrator. Components of auxin, cytokinin, gibberellic acid, jasmonate and brassinosteroid signaling and metabolism pathways were shown to take part in ABI5 regulation and/or to be regulated by ABI5. Monocot orthologs of AtABI5 have been identified. Although their roles in the molecular and physiological adaptations during abiotic stress have been elucidated, knowledge about their detailed action still remains elusive. Here, we describe the recent advances in understanding the action of ABI5 in early developmental processes and the adaptation of plants to unfavorable environmental conditions. We also focus on ABI5 relation to other phytohormones in the abiotic stress response of plants. PMID:28018412

  3. Transcriptome analysis of the Populus trichocarpa-Rhizophagus irregularis Mycorrhizal Symbiosis: Regulation of Plant and Fungal Transportomes under Nitrogen Starvation.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Silvia; Kohler, Annegret; Niehl, Annette; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Boller, Thomas; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Nutrient transfer is a key feature of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. Valuable mineral nutrients are transferred from the AM fungus to the plant, increasing its fitness and productivity, and, in exchange, the AM fungus receives carbohydrates as an energy source from the plant. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of the Populus trichocarpa-Rhizophagus irregularis symbiosis using RNA-sequencing of non-mycorrhizal or mycorrhizal fine roots, with a focus on the effect of nitrogen (N) starvation. In R. irregularis, we identified 1,015 differentially expressed genes, whereby N starvation led to a general induction of gene expression. Genes of the functional classes of cell growth, membrane biogenesis and cell structural components were highly abundant. Interestingly, N starvation also led to a general induction of fungal transporters, indicating increased nutrient demand upon N starvation. In non-mycorrhizal P. trichocarpa roots, 1,341 genes were differentially expressed under N starvation. Among the 953 down-regulated genes in N starvation, most were involved in metabolic processes including amino acids, carbohydrate and inorganic ion transport, while the 342 up-regulated genes included many defense-related genes. Mycorrhization led to the up-regulation of 549 genes mainly involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis and transport; only 24 genes were down-regulated. Mycorrhization specifically induced expression of three ammonium transporters and one phosphate transporter, independently of the N conditions, corroborating the hypothesis that these transporters are important for symbiotic nutrient exchange. In conclusion, our data establish a framework of gene expression in the two symbiotic partners under high-N and low-N conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Plant responses to environmental stress: regulation and functions of the Arabidopsis TCH genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braam, J.; Sistrunk, M. L.; Polisensky, D. H.; Xu, W.; Purugganan, M. M.; Antosiewicz, D. M.; Campbell, P.; Johnson, K. A.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the Arabidopsis TCH genes is markedly upregulated in response to a variety of environmental stimuli including the seemingly innocuous stimulus of touch. Understanding the mechanism(s) and factors that control TCH gene regulation will shed light on the signaling pathways that enable plants to respond to environmental conditions. The TCH proteins include calmodulin, calmodulin-related proteins and a xyloglucan endotransglycosylase. Expression analyses and localization of protein accumulation indicates that the potential sites of TCH protein function include expanding cells and tissues under mechanical strain. We hypothesize that at least a subset of the TCH proteins may collaborate in cell wall biogenesis.

  5. Overexpression of NtPR-Q Up-Regulates Multiple Defense-Related Genes in Nicotiana tabacum and Enhances Plant Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanman; Liu, Qiuping; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Linli; Ding, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Various classes of plant pathogenesis-related proteins have been identified in the past several decades. PR-Q, a member of the PR3 family encoding chitinases, has played an important role in regulating plant resistance and preventing pathogen infection. In this paper, we functionally characterized NtPR-Q in tobacco plants and found that the overexpression of NtPR-Q in tobacco Yunyan87 resulted in higher resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum inoculation. Surprisingly, overexpression of NtPR-Q led to the activation of many defense-related genes, such as salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes NtPR1a/c , NtPR2 and NtCHN50 , JA-responsive gene NtPR1b and ET production-associated genes NtACC Oxidase and NtEFE26 . Consistent with the role of NtPR-Q in multiple stress responses, NtPR-Q transcripts were induced by the exogenous hormones SA, ethylene and methyl jasmonate, which could enhance the resistance of tobacco to R. solanacearum . Collectively, our results suggested that NtPR-Q overexpression led to the up-regulation of defense-related genes and enhanced plant resistance to R. solanacearum infection.

  6. Genetic and Genomic Evidence That Sucrose Is a Global Regulator of Plant Responses to Phosphate Starvation in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Mingguang; Liu, Yidan; Zhang, Baocai; Zhao, Yingtao; Wang, Xiujie; Zhou, Yihua; Raghothama, Kashchandra G.; Liu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond to phosphate (Pi) starvation by exhibiting a suite of developmental, biochemical, and physiological changes to cope with this nutritional stress. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying these responses, we isolated an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, hypersensitive to phosphate starvation1 (hps1), which has enhanced sensitivity in almost all aspects of plant responses to Pi starvation. Molecular and genetic analyses indicated that the mutant phenotype is caused by overexpression of the SUCROSE TRANSPORTER2 (SUC2) gene. As a consequence, hps1 has a high level of sucrose (Suc) in both its shoot and root tissues. Overexpression of SUC2 or its closely related family members SUC1 and SUC5 in wild-type plants recapitulates the phenotype of hps1. In contrast, the disruption of SUC2 functions greatly inhibits plant responses to Pi starvation. Microarray analysis further indicated that 73% of the genes that are induced by Pi starvation in wild-type plants can be induced by elevated levels of Suc in hps1 mutants, even when they are grown under Pi-sufficient conditions. These genes include several important Pi signaling components and those that are directly involved in Pi transport, mobilization, and distribution between shoot and root. Interestingly, Suc and low-Pi signals appear to interact with each other both synergistically and antagonistically in regulating gene expression. Our genetic and genomic studies provide compelling evidence that Suc is a global regulator of plant responses to Pi starvation. This finding will help to further elucidate the signaling mechanism that controls plant responses to this particular nutritional stress. PMID:21346170

  7. Differential Regulation of Two-Tiered Plant Immunity and Sexual Reproduction by ANXUR Receptor-Like Kinases.

    PubMed

    Mang, Hyunggon; Feng, Baomin; Hu, Zhangjian; Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Franck, Christina M; Meng, Xiangzong; Huang, Yanyan; Zhou, Jinggeng; Xu, Guangyuan; Wang, Taotao; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Plants have evolved two tiers of immune receptors to detect infections: cell surface-resident pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense microbial signatures and intracellular nucleotide binding domain leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins that recognize pathogen effectors. How PRRs and NLRs interconnect and activate the specific and overlapping plant immune responses remains elusive. A genetic screen for components controlling plant immunity identified ANXUR1 (ANX1), a malectin-like domain-containing receptor-like kinase, together with its homolog ANX2, as important negative regulators of both PRR- and NLR-mediated immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana ANX1 constitutively associates with the bacterial flagellin receptor FLAGELLIN-SENSING2 (FLS2) and its coreceptor BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE1 (BAK1). Perception of flagellin by FLS2 promotes ANX1 association with BAK1, thereby interfering with FLS2-BAK1 complex formation to attenuate PRR signaling. In addition, ANX1 complexes with the NLR proteins RESISTANT TO PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE2 (RPS2) and RESISTANCE TO P. SYRINGAE PV MACULICOLA1. ANX1 promotes RPS2 degradation and attenuates RPS2-mediated cell death. Surprisingly, a mutation that affects ANX1 function in plant immunity does not disrupt its function in controlling pollen tube growth during fertilization. Our study thus reveals a molecular link between PRR and NLR protein complexes that both associate with cell surface-resident ANX1 and uncovers uncoupled functions of ANX1 and ANX2 during plant immunity and sexual reproduction. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  9. Comparative analysis of the response and gene regulation in cold resistant and susceptible tea plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cheng; Wang, Yiwei; Kong, Lei; Jiang, Huiguang; Xu, Yiqun; Wang, Wenzhi; Pan, Yuting; Li, Yeyun; Jiang, Changjun

    2017-01-01

    Cold environment is the main constraint for tea plants (Camellia sinensis) distribution and tea farming. We identified two tea cultivars, called var. sinensis cv. Shuchazao (SCZ) with a high cold-tolerance and var. assamica cv. Yinghong9 (YH9) with low cold-tolerance. To better understand the response mechanism of tea plants under cold stress for improving breeding, we compared physiological and biochemical responses, and associated genes expression in response to 7-day and 14-day cold acclimation, followed by 7-day de-acclimation in these two tea cultivars. We found that the low EL50, low Fv/Fm, and high sucrose and raffinose accumulation are responsible for higher cold tolerance in SCZ comparing with YH9. We then measured the expression of 14 key homologous genes, known as involved in these responses in other plants, for each stages of treatment in both cultivars using RT-qPCR. Our results suggested that the increased expression of CsCBF1 and CsDHNs coupling with the accumulation of sucrose play key roles in conferring higher cold resistance in SCZ. Our findings have revealed key genes regulation responsible for cold resistance, which help to understand the cold-resistant mechanisms and guide breeding in tea plants. PMID:29211766

  10. Comparative analysis of the response and gene regulation in cold resistant and susceptible tea plants.

    PubMed

    Ban, Qiuyan; Wang, Xuewen; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Yiwei; Kong, Lei; Jiang, Huiguang; Xu, Yiqun; Wang, Wenzhi; Pan, Yuting; Li, Yeyun; Jiang, Changjun

    2017-01-01

    Cold environment is the main constraint for tea plants (Camellia sinensis) distribution and tea farming. We identified two tea cultivars, called var. sinensis cv. Shuchazao (SCZ) with a high cold-tolerance and var. assamica cv. Yinghong9 (YH9) with low cold-tolerance. To better understand the response mechanism of tea plants under cold stress for improving breeding, we compared physiological and biochemical responses, and associated genes expression in response to 7-day and 14-day cold acclimation, followed by 7-day de-acclimation in these two tea cultivars. We found that the low EL50, low Fv/Fm, and high sucrose and raffinose accumulation are responsible for higher cold tolerance in SCZ comparing with YH9. We then measured the expression of 14 key homologous genes, known as involved in these responses in other plants, for each stages of treatment in both cultivars using RT-qPCR. Our results suggested that the increased expression of CsCBF1 and CsDHNs coupling with the accumulation of sucrose play key roles in conferring higher cold resistance in SCZ. Our findings have revealed key genes regulation responsible for cold resistance, which help to understand the cold-resistant mechanisms and guide breeding in tea plants.

  11. Dataset on the regulation of banana weevil abundance and corm damage associated with plant richness and the ground-dwelling arthropods' food web.

    PubMed

    Poeydebat, Charlotte; Tixier, Philippe; De Bellaire, Luc De Lapeyre; Carval, Dominique

    2017-12-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Plant richness enhances banana weevil regulation in a tropical agroecosystem by affecting a multitrophic food web " [1]. It provides information about plant species richness, weevil corm damage and the abundance of different arthropod groups, including the banana weevil and its potential natural enemies and alternative preys.

  12. Enhanced Drought Stress Tolerance by the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in a Drought-Sensitive Maize Cultivar Is Related to a Broader and Differential Regulation of Host Plant Aquaporins than in a Drought-Tolerant Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Gabriela; Erice, Gorka; Aroca, Ricardo; Chaumont, François; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been shown to improve maize tolerance to different drought stress scenarios by regulating a wide range of host plants aquaporins. The objective of this study was to highlight the differences in aquaporin regulation by comparing the effects of the AM symbiosis on root aquaporin gene expression and plant physiology in two maize cultivars with contrasting drought sensitivity. This information would help to identify key aquaporin genes involved in the enhanced drought tolerance by the AM symbiosis. Results showed that when plants were subjected to drought stress the AM symbiosis induced a higher improvement of physiological parameters in drought-sensitive plants than in drought-tolerant plants. These include efficiency of photosystem II, membrane stability, accumulation of soluble sugars and plant biomass production. Thus, drought-sensitive plants obtained higher physiological benefit from the AM symbiosis. In addition, the genes ZmPIP1;1, ZmPIP1;3, ZmPIP1;4, ZmPIP1;6, ZmPIP2;2, ZmPIP2;4, ZmTIP1;1, and ZmTIP2;3 were down-regulated by the AM symbiosis in the drought-sensitive cultivar and only ZmTIP4;1 was up-regulated. In contrast, in the drought-tolerant cultivar only three of the studied aquaporin genes (ZmPIP1;6, ZmPIP2;2, and ZmTIP4;1) were regulated by the AM symbiosis, resulting induced. Results in the drought-sensitive cultivar are in line with the hypothesis that down-regulation of aquaporins under water deprivation could be a way to minimize water loss, and the AM symbiosis could be helping the plant in this regulation. Indeed, during drought stress episodes, water conservation is critical for plant survival and productivity, and is achieved by an efficient uptake and stringently regulated water loss, in which aquaporins participate. Moreover, the broader and contrasting regulation of these aquaporins by the AM symbiosis in the drought-sensitive than the drought-tolerant cultivar suggests a role of these aquaporins

  13. Lace plant ethylene receptors, AmERS1a and AmERS1c, regulate ethylene-induced programmed cell death during leaf morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rantong, Gaolathe; Evans, Rodger; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2015-10-01

    The lace plant, Aponogeton madagascariensis, is an aquatic monocot that forms perforations in its leaves as part of normal leaf development. Perforation formation occurs through developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). The molecular basis of PCD regulation in the lace plant is unknown, however ethylene has been shown to play a significant role. In this study, we examined the role of ethylene receptors during perforation formation. We isolated three lace plant ethylene receptors AmERS1a, AmERS1b and AmERS1c. Using quantitative PCR, we examined their transcript levels at seven stages of leaf development. Through laser-capture microscopy, transcript levels were also determined in cells undergoing PCD and cells not undergoing PCD (NPCD cells). AmERS1a transcript levels were significantly lower in window stage leaves (in which perforation formation and PCD are occurring) as compared to all other leaf developmental stages. AmERS1a and AmERS1c (the most abundant among the three receptors) had the highest transcript levels in mature stage leaves, where PCD is not occurring. Their transcript levels decreased significantly during senescence-associated PCD. AmERS1c had significantly higher transcript levels in NPCD compared to PCD cells. Despite being significantly low in window stage leaves, AmERS1a transcripts were not differentially expressed between PCD and NPCD cells. The results suggested that ethylene receptors negatively regulate ethylene-controlled PCD in the lace plant. A combination of ethylene and receptor levels determines cell fate during perforation formation and leaf senescence. A new model for ethylene emission and receptor expression during lace plant perforation formation and senescence is proposed.

  14. Plants regulate the effects of experimental warming on the soil microbial community in an alpine scrub ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiliang; Zhao, Wenqiang; Zhao, Chunzhang; Wang, Dong; Liu, Mei; Li, Dandan; Liu, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Information on how soil microbial communities respond to warming is still scarce for alpine scrub ecosystems. We conducted a field experiment with two plant treatments (plant removal or undisturbed) subjected to warmed or unwarmed conditions to examine the effects of warming and plant removal on soil microbial community structures during the growing season in a Sibiraea angustata scrubland of the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The results indicate that experimental warming significantly influenced soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), but the warming effects were dependent on the plant treatments and sampling seasons. In the plant-removal plots, warming did not affect most of the microbial variables, while in the undisturbed plots, warming significantly increased the abundances of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterial groups during the mid-growing season (July), but it did not affect the fungi groups. Plant removal significantly reduced fungal abundance throughout the growing season and significantly altered the soil microbial community structure in July. The interaction between warming and plant removal significantly influenced the soil MBC and MBN and the abundances of total microbes, bacteria and actinomycete throughout the growing season. Experimental warming significantly reduced the abundance of rare taxa, while the interaction between warming and plant removal tended to have strong effects on the abundant taxa. These findings suggest that the responses of soil microbial communities to warming are regulated by plant communities. These results provide new insights into how soil microbial community structure responds to climatic warming in alpine scrub ecosystems.

  15. Plants regulate the effects of experimental warming on the soil microbial community in an alpine scrub ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiliang; Zhao, Wenqiang; Zhao, Chunzhang; Wang, Dong; Liu, Mei; Li, Dandan

    2018-01-01

    Information on how soil microbial communities respond to warming is still scarce for alpine scrub ecosystems. We conducted a field experiment with two plant treatments (plant removal or undisturbed) subjected to warmed or unwarmed conditions to examine the effects of warming and plant removal on soil microbial community structures during the growing season in a Sibiraea angustata scrubland of the eastern Qinghai–Tibetan Plateau. The results indicate that experimental warming significantly influenced soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN), but the warming effects were dependent on the plant treatments and sampling seasons. In the plant-removal plots, warming did not affect most of the microbial variables, while in the undisturbed plots, warming significantly increased the abundances of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterial groups during the mid-growing season (July), but it did not affect the fungi groups. Plant removal significantly reduced fungal abundance throughout the growing season and significantly altered the soil microbial community structure in July. The interaction between warming and plant removal significantly influenced the soil MBC and MBN and the abundances of total microbes, bacteria and actinomycete throughout the growing season. Experimental warming significantly reduced the abundance of rare taxa, while the interaction between warming and plant removal tended to have strong effects on the abundant taxa. These findings suggest that the responses of soil microbial communities to warming are regulated by plant communities. These results provide new insights into how soil microbial community structure responds to climatic warming in alpine scrub ecosystems. PMID:29668711

  16. Literature Review on Mental Models and Linear Separability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    of the following assertions is true, and possibly both: 1. You have the marshmallows . 2. You have the truffles or the jelly beans, and possibly both...Also, suppose you have the marshmallows . What, if anything, follows? Is it possible that you also have either the truffles or jelly beans? Could...have both? The correct answer to Problem 6 is that, if you have the marshmallows (Assertion 1 is true), it is logically possible that also have

  17. 48 CFR 31.205-31 - Plant reconversion costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plant reconversion costs. 31.205-31 Section 31.205-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Organizations 31.205-31 Plant reconversion costs. Plant reconversion costs are those incurred in restoring or...

  18. 48 CFR 31.205-31 - Plant reconversion costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plant reconversion costs. 31.205-31 Section 31.205-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Organizations 31.205-31 Plant reconversion costs. Plant reconversion costs are those incurred in restoring or...

  19. Hormonal interactions and gene regulation can link monoecy and environmental plasticity to the evolution of dioecy in plants.

    PubMed

    Golenberg, Edward M; West, Nicholas W

    2013-06-01

    Most models for dioecy in flowering plants assume that dioecy arises directly from hermaphroditism through a series of independent feminizing and masculinizing mutations that become chromosomally linked. However, dioecy appears to evolve most frequently through monoecious grades. The major genetic models do not explain the evolution of unisexual flowers in monoecious and submonoecious populations, nor do they account for environmentally induced sexual plasticity. In this review, we explore the roles of environmental stress and hormones on sex determination, and propose a model that can explain the evolution of dioecy through monoecy, and the mechanisms of environmental sex determination. Environmental stresses elicit hormones that allow plants to mediate the negative effects of the stresses. Many of these same hormones are involved in the regulation of floral developmental genes. Recent studies have elucidated the mechanisms whereby these hormones interact and can act as switchpoints in regulatory pathways. Consequently, differential concentrations of plant hormones can regulate whole developmental pathways, providing a mechanism for differential development within isogenic individuals such as seen in monoecious plants. Sex-determining genes in such systems will evolve to generate clusters of coexpressed suites. Coexpression rather than coinheritance of gender-specific genes will define the sexual developmental fate. Therefore, selection for gender type will drive evolution of the regulatory sequences of such genes rather than their synteny. Subsequent mutations to hyper- or hyposensitive alleles within the hormone response pathway can result in segregating dioecious populations. Simultaneously, such developmental systems will remain sensitive to external stimuli that modify hormone responses.

  20. Incidence of Listeria spp. in Ready-to-Eat Food Processing Plant Environments Regulated by the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Robert G; Kalinowski, Robin M; Bodnaruk, Peter W; Eifert, Joseph D; Boyer, Renee R; Duncan, Susan E; Bailey, R Hartford

    2018-06-07

    A multiyear survey of 31 ready-to-eat (RTE) food processing plants in the United States was conducted to determine the incidence of Listeria spp. in various RTE production environments. Samples were collected from 22 RTE plants regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and from 9 RTE food plants regulated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Only nonfood contact surfaces in the RTE manufacturing areas with exposed RTE product were sampled. Each sample was individually analyzed for the presence of Listeria spp. by using a PCR-based rapid assay. In total, 4,829 samples were collected from various locations, including freezers, equipment framework, floors, walls, wall-floor junctures, drains, floor mats, doors, and cleaning tools. Nine (29%) of the facilities had zero samples positive for Listeria spp. in the production environment, whereas 22 (71%) had one or more samples positive for Listeria spp. The total incidence of Listeria spp. in all RTE food plants was 4.5%. The positive rate in plants regulated by the FSIS ranged from 0 to 9.7%, whereas the positive rate in plants regulated by the FDA ranged from 1.2 to 36%.

  1. What you can do to help improve regulation of the plants for planting pathway

    Treesearch

    2008-01-01

    The current rules for plants for planting are being revised. The United States Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) has already provided several opportunities for public input into the new rules, and more opportunities will be coming soon. Considering the importance most plant health scientists attach to this issue, it is...

  2. Melatonin: A Multifunctional Factor in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jibiao; Zhang, Zaichao; Chen, Liang

    2018-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine) is a universal molecule that is present in animals and plants. It has been detected in different kinds of plants and organs in different levels. Melatonin in plants shares the same initial biosynthesis compound with auxin, and therefore functions as indole-3-acetic acid like hormones. Moreover, melatonin is involved in regulating plant growth and development, protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, such as salt, drought, cold, heat and heavy metal stresses. Melatonin improves the stress tolerance of plants via a direct pathway, which scavenges reactive oxygen species directly, and indirect pathways, such as increasing antioxidate enzymes activity, photosynthetic efficiency and metabolites content. In addition, melatonin plays a role in regulating gene expression, and hence affects performance of plants. In this review, the biosynthesis pathway, growth and development regulation, and the environment stress response of melatonin in plants are summarized and future research directions and priorities of melatonin in plants are speculated. PMID:29883400

  3. Melatonin: A Multifunctional Factor in Plants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jibiao; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Zaichao; Chen, Liang

    2018-05-21

    Melatonin ( N -acetyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine) is a universal molecule that is present in animals and plants. It has been detected in different kinds of plants and organs in different levels. Melatonin in plants shares the same initial biosynthesis compound with auxin, and therefore functions as indole-3-acetic acid like hormones. Moreover, melatonin is involved in regulating plant growth and development, protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, such as salt, drought, cold, heat and heavy metal stresses. Melatonin improves the stress tolerance of plants via a direct pathway, which scavenges reactive oxygen species directly, and indirect pathways, such as increasing antioxidate enzymes activity, photosynthetic efficiency and metabolites content. In addition, melatonin plays a role in regulating gene expression, and hence affects performance of plants. In this review, the biosynthesis pathway, growth and development regulation, and the environment stress response of melatonin in plants are summarized and future research directions and priorities of melatonin in plants are speculated.

  4. No time for candy: passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) plants down-regulate damage-induced extra floral nectar production in response to light signals of competition.

    PubMed

    Izaguirre, Miriam M; Mazza, Carlos A; Astigueta, María S; Ciarla, Ana M; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2013-09-01

    Plant fitness is often defined by the combined effects of herbivory a