Science.gov

Sample records for tumble rates rendezvousing

  1. Optical Survey of the Tumble Rates of Retired GEO Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binz, C.; Davis, M.; Kelm, B.; Moore, C.

    2014-09-01

    The Naval Research Lab (NRL) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) have made significant progress toward robotic rendezvous and docking between spacecraft, however the long-term attitude motion evolution of uncontrolled resident space objects has never been well-characterized. This effort set out to identify the motion exhibited in retired satellites at or near geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Through analysis of the periodic structure of observed reflected light curves, estimated tumble rates were determined for several retired satellites, typically in a super-GEO disposal orbit. The NRL's 1-meter telescope at Midway Research Center was used to track and observe the objects while the sun-satellite-observer geometry was most favorable; typically over a one- to two-hour period, repeated multiple times over the course of weeks. By processing each image with calibration exposures, the relative apparent magnitude of the brightness of the object over time was determined. Several tools, including software developed internally, were used for frequency analysis of the brightness curves. Results show that observed satellites generally exhibit a tumble rate well below the notional bounding case of one degree per second. When harmonics are found to exist in the data, modeling and simulation of the optical characteristics of the satellite can help to resolve ambiguities. This process was validated on spacecraft for which an attitude history is known, and agreement was found.

  2. Study of effects of uncertainties of comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 2: Tumbling problem studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of determining the rotational motion of a tumbling celestial body of the asteroid type using spacecraft-acquired data is addressed. The rotational motion of the body is modeled by free-Eulerian motion of a triaxial, rigid body and its translational motion with respect, to a nonrotating, observing spacecraft, which is not thrusting, is assumed to be uniform during the time observations are made. The mathematical details which form the basis for a digital simulation of the motion and observations are presented. Two algorithms for determining the motion from observations for the special case of uniform rotational motion are given.

  3. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-28

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R{sub 1} of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R{sub 1} vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S–I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole {sup 14}N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of {sup 27}Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  4. Simple expressions of the nuclear relaxation rate enhancement due to quadrupole nuclei in slowly tumbling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.; Belorizky, Elie

    2015-07-01

    For slowly tumbling entities or quasi-rigid lattices, we derive very simple analytical expressions of the quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) of the longitudinal relaxation rate R1 of nuclear spins I due to their intramolecular magnetic dipolar coupling with quadrupole nuclei of arbitrary spins S ≥ 1. These expressions are obtained by using the adiabatic approximation for evaluating the time evolution operator of the quantum states of the quadrupole nuclei S. They are valid when the gyromagnetic ratio of the spin S is much smaller than that of the spin I. The theory predicts quadrupole resonant peaks in the dispersion curve of R1 vs magnetic field. The number, positions, relative intensities, Lorentzian shapes, and widths of these peaks are explained in terms of the following properties: the magnitude of the quadrupole Hamiltonian and the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) acting on the spin S, the S-I inter-spin orientation with respect to the EFG principal axes, the rotational correlation time of the entity carrying the S-I pair, and/or the proper relaxation time of the spin S. The theory is first applied to protein amide protons undergoing dipolar coupling with fast-relaxing quadrupole 14N nuclei and mediating the QRE to the observed bulk water protons. The theoretical QRE agrees well with its experimental counterpart for various systems such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and cartilages. The anomalous behaviour of the relaxation rate of protons in synthetic aluminium silicate imogolite nano-tubes due to the QRE of 27Al (S = 5/2) nuclei is also explained.

  5. Aerodynamic analysis of a tumbling American football

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Daniel Edmundson

    In this study, the aerodynamic effects on an American football are characterized, especially in a tumbling, or end-over-end, motion as seen in a typical kickoff or field goal attempt. The objective of this study is to establish aerodynamic coefficients for the dynamic motion of a tumbling American football. A subsonic wind tunnel was used to recreate a range of air velocities that, when coupled with rotation rates and differing laces orientations, would provide a test bed for aerodynamic drag, side, and lift coefficient analysis. Test results quantify effect of back-spin and top-spin on lift force. Results show that the presence of laces imposes a side force in the opposite direction of the laces orientation. A secondary system was installed to visualize air flow around the tumbling ball and record high-speed video of wake patterns, as a qualitative check of measured force directions.

  6. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  7. CTV rendezvous techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Anderson, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    The cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) requires the capability to perform automated rendezvous with Space Station Freedom (SSF) using onboard sensors and algorithms. The current approach to CTV rendezvous applies techniques developed during the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) program which have been mechanized for automatic, onboard execution. The initial catch up sequence can be described as a passive rendezvous without explicit time of arrival control. The ultimate requirement for this rendezvous technique is to place the CTV on the SSF V-bar axis at some specified downrange distance. The launch vehicle will use yaw steering during orbit injection to achieve the proper phantom plane for nodal biasing. This presentation describes the primary components of the CTV rendezvous scheme.

  8. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  9. Effective run-and-tumble dynamics of bacteria baths.

    PubMed

    Paoluzzi, M; Di Leonardo, R; Angelani, L

    2013-10-16

    E. coli bacteria swim in straight runs interrupted by sudden reorientation events called tumbles. The resulting random walks give rise to density fluctuations that can be derived analytically in the limit of non-interacting particles or equivalently of very low concentrations. However, in situations of practical interest, the concentration of bacteria is always large enough to make interactions an important factor. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we study the dynamic structure factor of a model bacterial bath for increasing values of densities. We show that it is possible to reproduce the dynamics of density fluctuations in the system using a free run-and-tumble model with effective fitting parameters. We discuss the dependence of these parameters, e.g., the tumbling rate, tumbling time and self-propulsion velocity, on the density of the bath.

  10. Usage and User Experience of Communication before and during Rendezvous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colbert, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a field evaluation of the mobile phone as a "package" of device and services. The evaluation compares 44 university students' usage and user experience of communication before and during rendezvous. During a rendezvous (en route), students rated many aspects of the experience of phone use less favourably than before a rendezvous…

  11. Rendezvous with Zarya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Backdropped against a blanket of heavy cloud cover, the Russian-built FGB, also called Zarya, nears the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the U.S.-built Node 1, also called Unity (foreground). Inside Endeavour's cabin, the STS-88 crew readies the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) for Zarya capture as they await the carefully choreographed dance of the rendezvous.

  12. Atmospheric rendezvous feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the feasibility of using atmospheric rendezvous to increase the efficiency of space transportation and to determine the most effective implementation. It is concluded that atmospheric rendezvous is feasible and can be utilized in a space transportation system to reduce size of the orbiter vehicle, provide a powered landing with go-around capability for every mission, and achieve lateral range performance that exceeds requirements. A significantly lighter booster and reduced launch fuel requirements are additional benefits that can be realized with a system that includes a large subsonic airplane for recovery of the orbiter. Additional reduction in booster size is possible if the airplane is designed for recovery of the booster by towing. An airplane about the size of the C-5A is required.

  13. Trajectory shaping rendezvous guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    The Space Station will bring a great increase in rendezvous traffic. Formerly, rendezvous has been expensive in terms of time and crew involvement. Multiple trajectory adjustments on separate orbits have been required to meet safety, lighting, and geometry requirements. This paper describes a new guidance technique in which the approach trajectory is shaped by a sequence of velocity increments in order to satisfy multiple constraints within a single orbit. The approach phase is planned before the mission, leaving a group of free parameters that are optimized by onboard guidance. Fuel penalties are typically a few percent, compared to unshaped Hohmann transfers, and total fuel costs can be less than those of more time-consuming ways of meeting the same requirements.

  14. Rendezvous BET Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Computes relative positions of two vehicles in concentric orbits. LRBET3 program best-estimate-of-trajectory (BET) calculation for postflight trajectory analysis of Shuttle orbital rendezvous maneuvers. LRBET3 produces estimated measurements for reconstructing relative positions of two vehicles. Kalman filter and smoothing filter applied to relative measurement input data to estimate state vector, reduce noise, and produce BET output. BET calculation minimizes variances of all trajectory estimation errors. LRBET3 written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  15. Spin State Estimation of Tumbling Small Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Corwin; Russell, Ryan P.; Bhaskaran, Shyam

    2016-06-01

    It is expected that a non-trivial percentage of small bodies that future missions may visit are in non-principal axis rotation (i.e. "tumbling"). The primary contribution of this paper is the application of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) method to estimate the small body spin state, mass, and moments of inertia; the spacecraft position and velocity; and the surface landmark locations. The method uses optical landmark measurements, and an example scenario based on the Rosetta mission is used. The SLAM method proves effective, with order of magnitude decreases in the spacecraft and small body spin state errors after less than a quarter of the comet characterization phase. The SLAM method converges nicely for initial small body angular velocity errors several times larger than the true rates (effectively having no a priori knowledge of the angular velocity). Surface landmark generation and identification are not treated in this work, but significant errors in the initial body-fixed landmark positions are effectively estimated. The algorithm remains effective for a range of different truth spin states, masses, and center of mass offsets that correspond to expected tumbling small bodies throughout the solar system.

  16. The tumbling spin state of (99942) Apophis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.; Scheirich, P.; Ďurech, J.; Pollock, J.; Kušnirák, P.; Hornoch, K.; Galád, A.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Harris, A. W.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Opitom, C.; Gillon, M.; Colas, F.; Oey, J.; Vraštil, J.; Reichart, D.; Ivarsen, K.; Haislip, J.; LaCluyze, A.

    2014-05-01

    Our photometric observations of Asteroid (99942) Apophis from December 2012 to April 2013 revealed it to be in a state of non-principal axis rotation (tumbling). We constructed its spin and shape model and found that it is in a moderately excited Short Axis Mode (SAM) state with a ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the basic spin state energy E/E0=1.024±0.013. (All quoted uncertainties correspond to 3σ.) The greatest and intermediate principal moments of inertia are nearly the same with I2/I3=0.965-0.015+0.009, but the smallest principal moment of inertia is substantially lower with I1/I3=0.61-0.08+0.11; the asteroid’s dynamically equivalent ellipsoid is close to a prolate ellipsoid. The precession and rotation periods are Pϕ=27.38±0.07 h and Pψ=263±6 h, respectively; the strongest observed lightcurve amplitude for the SAM case is in the 2nd harmonic of P1=P=30.56±0.01 h. The rotation is retrograde with the angular momentum vector’s ecliptic longitude and latitude of 250° and -75° (the uncertainty area is approximately an ellipse with the major and minor semiaxes of 27° and 14°, respectively). An implication of the retrograde rotation is a somewhat increased probability of the Apophis’ impact in 2068, but it is still very small with the risk level on the Palermo Scale remaining well below zero. Apophis is a member of the population of slowly tumbling asteroids. Applying the theory of asteroid nutational damping by Breiter et al. (Breiter, S., Rożek, A., Vokrouhlický, D. [2012]. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 427, 755-769), we found that slowly tumbling asteroids predominate in the spin rate-size range where their estimated damping times are greater than about 0.2 Gyr. The appearance that the PA/NPA rotators transition line seems to follow a line of constant damping time may be because there are two or more asteroid spin evolution mechanisms in play, or the factor of μQ (the elastic modulus times the quality factor) is not constant but it may

  17. Calculation of tumbling boundaries of a generic wing-only airliner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrabrov, A.; Sidoryuk, M.

    2015-06-01

    The aerodynamic model of a generic wing-only airliner configuration is developed for a whole range of angles of attack (-180°. . . +180°), based on experimental data obtained in wind tunnels using static, and forced oscillations. Two different approaches for the tumbling boundaries calculation are used. In the first approach, the steady pitch autorotation is calculated. In the second approach, for various angles of attack, the minimum pitch rate disturbance is considered which can result in tumbling. The tumbling boundaries are calculated via the use of a continuation technique. The dependence of these boundaries on such parameters as flight altitude, aircraft center of gravity position, and total velocity is analyzed.

  18. Maximising somersault rotation in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A Mark A; Yeadon, M R Maurice R

    2004-04-01

    Performing complex somersaulting skills during the flight phase of tumbling requires the generation of linear and angular momenta during the approach and takeoff phases. This paper investigates how approach characteristics and takeoff technique affect performance with a view to maximising somersault rotation in tumbling. A five-segment planar simulation model, customised to an elite gymnast, was used to produce a simulation which closely matched a recorded performance of a double layout somersault by the elite gymnast. Three optimisations were carried out to maximise somersault rotation with different sets of initial conditions. Using the same initial linear and angular momentum as the double layout somersault and varying the joint torque activation timings allowed a double straight somersault to be performed with 19% more rotation potential than the actual performance. Increasing the approach velocity to a realistic maximum of 7 ms(-1) resulted in a 42% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple layout somersault to be performed with an increase of 31% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. Increasing also the initial angular momentum to a realistic maximum resulted in a 4% reduction in rotation potential when the activation timings were unchanged but allowed a triple straight somersault to be performed with a further increase of 9% in rotation potential when activation timings were re-optimised. It is concluded that the limiting factor to maximising somersault rotation is the ability to generate high linear and angular velocities during the approach phase coupled with the ability to adopt consonant activation timings during the takeoff phase. PMID:14996558

  19. Multiple asteroid rendezvous missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, D. F.; Friedlander, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    Asteroid missions, centered on multiple asteroid rendezvous missions to main belt asteroids, are discussed and the required solar electric propulsion for these missions as well as the current performance estimates are examined. A brief statistical analysis involving asteroid availability transfer requirements and propulsion system capabilities is given, leading to a prediction that 5 to 8 asteroids can be encountered with a single launch. Measurement techniques include visual imaging, radio tracking, magnetometry, and in the case of landers, seismometry. The spacecraft will be propelled by a solar electric system with a power level of 25 kW to 40 kW and tour possibilities for 13 different asteroids have been developed. Preliminary estimates of asteroid triaxiality are made to calculate the effect of close orbits.

  20. STS-134: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 18, 2011, space shuttle Endeavour performed the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Mark Kelly at the helm, Endeavour rotated 360 degrees backward to enable Internationa...

  1. STS-135: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    On July 10, 2011, space shuttle Atlantis performed the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or “backflip.” With Commander Chris Ferguson at the helm, Atlantis rotated 360 degrees backward to ...

  2. STS-133: Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver

    NASA Video Gallery

    At 1:15 p.m. EST Saturday, space shuttle Discovery began the nine-minute Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver, or "backflip." With Commander Steve Lindsey at the helm, Discovery rotated 360 degrees backward t...

  3. Near Earth asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Spacecraft Design Course is the capstone design class for the M.S. in astronautics at the Naval Postgraduate School. The Fall 92 class designed a spacecraft for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Mission (NEAR). The NEAR mission uses a robotic spacecraft to conduct up-close reconnaissance of a near-earth asteroid. Such a mission will provide information on Solar System formation and possible space resources. The spacecraft is intended to complete a NEAR mission as a relatively low-budget program while striving to gather as much information about the target asteroid as possible. A complete mission analysis and detailed spacecraft design were completed. Mission analysis includes orbit comparison and selection, payload and telemetry requirements, spacecraft configuration, and launch vehicle selection. Spacecraft design includes all major subsystems: structure, electrical power, attitude control, propulsion, payload integration, and thermal control. The resulting spacecraft demonstrates the possibility to meet the NEAR mission requirements using existing technology, 'off-the-shelf' components, and a relatively low-cost launch vehicle.

  4. Rendezvous and docking with remote piloted vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The man-in-the-loop control system requirements for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are examined. Since many similarities exist between the Teleoperator Retrieval System (TRS) and the unfolding OMV concept, a review of the TRS control system baseline along with selected design trades which led to that baseline are discussed. TRS program issues relevant to the man-in-the-loop control system design include thruster size, communication delays and TV bandwidth compression, range/range rate radar, tumbling targets, shimmed docking interface, and control system definition. A TRS vs. OMV simulation comparative study is summarized, and the major issues currently facing the control system designer on OMV are discussed.

  5. History of Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This technical history is intended to provide a technical audience with an introduction to the rendezvous and proximity operations history of the Space Shuttle Program. It details the programmatic constraints and technical challenges encountered during shuttle development in the 1970s and over thirty years of shuttle missions. An overview of rendezvous and proximity operations on many shuttle missions is provided, as well as how some shuttle rendezvous and proximity operations systems and flight techniques evolved to meet new programmatic objectives. This revised edition provides additional information on Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo/Soyuz. Some chapters on the Space Shuttle have been updated and expanded. Four special focus chapters have been added to provide more detailed information on shuttle rendezvous. A chapter on the STS-39 mission of April/May 1991 describes the most complex deploy/retrieve mission flown by the shuttle. Another chapter focuses on the Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions. A third chapter gives the reader a detailed look at the February 2010 STS-130 mission to the International Space Station. The fourth chapter answers the question why rendezvous was not completely automated on the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle vehicles.

  6. A closer look at tumbling toast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, M. E.; Heald, George; James, Matt

    2001-01-01

    The study of the mechanics of tumbling toast provides an informative and entertaining project for undergraduates. The relatively recent introduction of software packages to facilitate the analysis of video recordings, and the numerical solution of complex differential equations, makes such a study an attractive candidate for inclusion in an experimental physics course at the undergraduate level. In the study reported here it is found that the experimentally determined free fall angular velocity of a board, tumbling off the edge of a table, can only be predicted at all accurately if slipping is taken into account. The size and shape of the board used in the calculations and in the experiments were roughly the same as that of a piece of toast. In addition, it is found that the board, tumbling from a standard table of height 76 cm, will land butter-side down (neglecting any bounce) for two ranges of overhang (δ0). δ0 is defined as the initial distance from the table edge to a vertical line drawn through the center of mass when the board is horizontal. For our board (length 10.2 cm) the approximate ranges of overhang are 0-0.8 and 2.7-5.1 cm. The importance of the 0-0.8 cm (only 2% of all possible overhangs for which tumbling is possible) favoring a butter-side down landing should not be underestimated when pondering the widely held belief that toast, tumbling from a table, usually falls butter-side down.

  7. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  8. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  9. 40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED TO TUMBLE CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO BREAK OFF RUNNERS AND SPRUES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Nutation damping in viscoelastic tumbling rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouard, Julien; Efroimsky, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Presently, 138 asteroids show signs of being in non-principal spin states (Warner et al. 2009, updated September 2015). Such spin is often called `tumble' or `wobble'. The instantaneous rotation axis of a wobbling body performs nutation about the direction of the (conserved) angular-momentum vector. Incited by collisions and YORP, wobble is mitigated by internal dissipation due to the nutation-caused alternating stresses inside the asteroid.The knowledge of the timescale related to the damping of the nutation angle is complementary to the knowledge of the timescales associated with collisions and YORP. Previous evaluations of the nutation relaxation rate were based on an inherently inconsistent approach that may be called "Q-model". First, the elastic energy in a periodically deforming rotator was calculated in assumption of the deformation being elastic. Therefrom, the energy dissipation rate was determined by introducing an ad hoc quality factor Q. This ignored the fact that friction (and the ensuing existence of Q) is due to deviation from elasticity.We use the viscoelastic Maxwell model which naturally implies dissipation (as any other viscoelastic model would). In this approach, we compute the power and damping time for an oblate ellipsoid and a prism. Now, the viscosity assumes the role of the product μQ in the empirical Q-model, with μ being the rigidity. Contrarily to the Q-model, our model naturally gives a null dissipation for a shape tending to a sphere. We also explore when the constant part of the stress can be ignored in the derivation of the damping time. The neglect of prestressing turns out to be legitimate for the mean viscosity exceeding a certain threshold value.

  11. Rendezvous lidar sensor system for terminal rendezvous, capture, and berthing to the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Andrew C. M.; Langley, Christopher; Mukherji, Raja; Taylor, Allen B.; Umasuthan, Manickam; Barfoot, Timothy D.

    2008-04-01

    The Rendezvous Lidar System (RLS), a high-performance scanning time-of-flight lidar jointly developed by MDA and Optech, was employed successfully during the XSS-11 spacecraft's 23-month mission. Ongoing development of the RLS mission software has resulted in an integrated pose functionality suited to safety-critical applications, specifically the terminal rendezvous of a visiting vehicle with the International Space Station (ISS). This integrated pose capability extends the contribution of the lidar from long-range acquisition and tracking for terminal rendezvous through to final alignment for docking or berthing. Innovative aspects of the technology that were developed include: 1) efficacious algorithms to detect, recognize, and compute the pose of a client spacecraft from a single scan using an intelligent search of candidate solutions, 2) automatic scene evaluation and feature selection algorithms and software that assist mission planners in specifying accurate and robust scan scheduling, and 3) optimal pose tracking functionality using knowledge of the relative spacecraft states. The development process incorporated the concept of sensor system bandwidth to address the sometimes unclear or misleading specifications of update rate and measurement delay often cited for rendezvous sensors. Because relative navigation sensors provide the measured feedback to the spacecraft GN&C, we propose a new method of specifying the performance of these sensors to better enable a full assessment of a given sensor in the closed-loop control for any given vehicle. This approach, and the tools and methods enabling it, permitted a rapid and rigorous development and verification of the pose tracking functionality. The complete system was then integrated and demonstrated in the MDA space vision facility using the flight-representative engineering model RLS lidar sensor.

  12. Hydra Rendezvous and Docking Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred; Carrington, Connie

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. technology to support a CEV AR&D activity is mature and was developed by NASA and supporting industry during an extensive research and development program conducted during the 1990's and early 2000 time frame at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous/docking sensor was identified early in the AR&D Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proxinity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous/docking sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS) was developed and successfully flown on STS 87 and again on STS 95, proving the concept of a video-based sensor. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development of a new generation of video based rendezvous/docking sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation. A Demonstration Automatic Rendezvous Technology (DART) flight experiment was flown in April 2005 using AVGS as the primary proximity operations sensor. Because of the absence of a docking mechanism on the target satellite, this mission did not demonstrate the ability of the sensor to coltrold ocking. Mission results indicate that the rendezvous sensor operated successfully in "spot mode" (2 km acquisition of the target, bearing data only) but was never commanded to "acquire and track" the docking target. Parts obsolescence issues prevent the construction of current design AVGS units to support the NASA Exploration initiative. This flight proven AR&D technology is being modularized and upgraded with additional capabilities through the Hydra project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Hydra brings a unique engineering approach and sensor architecture to the table, to solve the continuing issues of parts obsolescence and multiple sensor integration. This paper presents an approach to

  13. Automated rendezvous and docking with video imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Mike; Kennedy, Larry Z.

    1991-01-01

    For rendezvous and docking, assessing and tracking relative orientation is necessary within a minimum approach distance. Special target light patterns have previously been considered for use with video sensors for ease of determining relative orientation. A generalization of those approaches is addressed. At certain ranges, the entire structure of the target vehicle constitutes an acceptable target; at closer ranges, substructures will suffice. Acting on the same principle as the human intelligence, these structures can be compared with a memory model to assess the relative orientation and range. Models for comparison are constructed from a CAD facet model and current imagery. This approach requires fast image handling, projection, and comparison techniques which rely on rapidly developing parallel processing technology. Relative orientation and range assessment consists of successful comparison of the perceived target aspect with a known aspect. Generating a known projection from a model within required times, say subsecond times, is only now approaching feasibility. With this capability, rates of comparison used by the human brain can be approached and arbitrary known structures can be compared in reasonable times. Future space programs will have access to powerful computation devices which far exceed even this capability. For example, the possibility will exist to assess unknown structures and then control rendezvous and docking, all at very fast rates. The first step which has the current utility, namely applying this to known structures, is taken.

  14. Automated rendezvous and docking with video imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Mike; Kennedy, Larry Z.

    For rendezvous and docking, assessing and tracking relative orientation is necessary within a minimum approach distance. Special target light patterns have previously been considered for use with video sensors for ease of determining relative orientation. A generalization of those approaches is addressed. At certain ranges, the entire structure of the target vehicle constitutes an acceptable target; at closer ranges, substructures will suffice. Acting on the same principle as the human intelligence, these structures can be compared with a memory model to assess the relative orientation and range. Models for comparison are constructed from a CAD facet model and current imagery. This approach requires fast image handling, projection, and comparison techniques which rely on rapidly developing parallel processing technology. Relative orientation and range assessment consists of successful comparison of the perceived target aspect with a known aspect. Generating a known projection from a model within required times, say subsecond times, is only now approaching feasibility. With this capability, rates of comparison used by the human brain can be approached and arbitrary known structures can be compared in reasonable times. Future space programs will have access to powerful computation devices which far exceed even this capability. For example, the possibility will exist to assess unknown structures and then control rendezvous and docking, all at very fast rates. The first step which has the current utility, namely applying this to known structures, is taken.

  15. STS-134 Re-Rendezvous Design History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS), a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and will be tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the instruments on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the initial rendezvous and docking, the re-rendezvous profile would replicate the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the Shuttle Orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this re-rendezvous to make the flight test successful. And all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and Shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and re-rendezvous trajectory design that will prove not only the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also will serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  16. Orbital maneuvers and space rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-12-01

    Several possibilities of launching a space vehicle from the orbital station are considered and compared. Orbital maneuvers discussed in the paper can be useful in designing a trajectory for a specific space mission. The relative motion of orbiting bodies is investigated on examples of spacecraft rendezvous with the space station that stays in a circular orbit around the Earth. An elementary approach is illustrated by an accompanying simulation computer program and supported by a mathematical treatment based on fundamental laws of physics and conservation laws. Material is appropriate for engineers and other personnel involved in space exploration, undergraduate and graduate students studying classical physics and orbital mechanics.

  17. Boom Rendezvous Alternative Docking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    Space rendezvous and docking has always been attempted with primarily one philosophic methodology. The slow matching of one vehicle's orbit by a second vehicle and then a final closing sequence that ends in matching the orbits with perfect precision and with near zero relative velocities. The task is time consuming, propellant intensive, risk inherent (plume impingement, collisions, fuel depletion, etc.) and requires substantial hardware mass. The historical background and rationale as to why this approach is used is discussed in terms of the path-not-taken and in light of an alternate methodology. Rendezvous and docking by boom extension is suggested to have inherent advantages that today s technology can readily exploit. Extension from the primary spacecraft, beyond its inherent large inertia, allows low inertia connections to be made rapidly and safely. Plume contamination issues are eliminated as well as the extra propellant mass and risk required for the final thruster (docking) operations. Space vehicle connection hardware can be significantly lightened. Also, docking sensors and controls require less fidelity; allowing them to be more robust and less sensitive. It is the potential safety advantage and mission risk reduction that makes this approach attractive, besides the prospect of nominal time and mass savings.

  18. Onboard navigation rendezvous expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocen, Michelle

    The Onboard Navigation rendezvous expert system is designed to aid the ground flight controller in monitoring the shuttle onboard navigation system. The system is designed to keep track of the navigation sensors and relative state vectors. In addition, the system also keeps an event log and fills out forms usually handled by the flight controller. This expert system is one of the few rendezvous specific systems being developed for the Mission Control Center. The expert system has been in development for six years. Through these years the system has seen hardware, software, and personnel changes. Initial development was done by the Information Systems Directorate (ISD) and Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at Johnson Space Center. As of October 1, 1991 the system has been turned over to MOD. The system is completely developed except for some minor adjustments to the user interface. The rule base is in the verification stage with total certification of the system due to be completed by May 1992. Test cases for verification are obtained by saving data used for flight controller integrated simulations. The actual data comes from both the shuttle mission simulator and the Mission Control Center Computer. So far no actual flight data has been available. This paper covers all aspects of the system from the development history to the current hardware, software, and use of the system.

  19. NASA MSFC hardware in the loop simulations of automatic rendezvous and capture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Naumann, Charles B.; Sutton, William; Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    Two complementary hardware-in-the-loop simulation facilities for automatic rendezvous and capture systems at MSFC are described. One, the Flight Robotics Laboratory, uses an 8 DOF overhead manipulator with a work volume of 160 by 40 by 23 feet to evaluate automatic rendezvous algorithms and range/rate sensing systems. The other, the Space Station/Station Operations Mechanism Test Bed, uses a 6 DOF hydraulic table to perform docking and berthing dynamics simulations.

  20. Tumbling and spaceflight: the Gemini VIII experience.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E; McCormack, P D; Mohler, S R

    1990-01-01

    A malfunctioning orbital flight attitude thruster during the flight of Gemini VIII led to acceleration forces on astronauts Neil Armstrong (commander) and David Scott (pilot) that created the potential for derogation of oculo-vestibular and eye-hand coordination effects. The spacecraft attained an axial tumbling rotation of 50 rpm and would have exceeded this had not the commander accurately diagnosed the problem and taken immediate corrective action. By the time counter-measure controls were applied, both astronauts were experiencing vertigo and the physiological effects of the tumbling acceleration. Data from the recorders reveal that one astronaut experienced -Gy of 0.92 G-units, and the other +Gy of 0.92 for approximately 46 s. Both received a -Gz of 0.89 G-units from the waist up with a +Gz of 0.05 from the waist down. A substantial increase of time and/or an increase in rpm would ultimately have produced incapacitation of both astronauts. NASA corrected the Gemini thruster problem by changing the ignition system wiring. Future space-craft undertaking long-term missions could be equipped with unambiguous thruster fault displays and could have computer-controlled automatic cutoffs to control excessive thruster burns. PMID:2302130

  1. Tumbling and spaceflight: the Gemini VIII experience.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E; McCormack, P D; Mohler, S R

    1990-01-01

    A malfunctioning orbital flight attitude thruster during the flight of Gemini VIII led to acceleration forces on astronauts Neil Armstrong (commander) and David Scott (pilot) that created the potential for derogation of oculo-vestibular and eye-hand coordination effects. The spacecraft attained an axial tumbling rotation of 50 rpm and would have exceeded this had not the commander accurately diagnosed the problem and taken immediate corrective action. By the time counter-measure controls were applied, both astronauts were experiencing vertigo and the physiological effects of the tumbling acceleration. Data from the recorders reveal that one astronaut experienced -Gy of 0.92 G-units, and the other +Gy of 0.92 for approximately 46 s. Both received a -Gz of 0.89 G-units from the waist up with a +Gz of 0.05 from the waist down. A substantial increase of time and/or an increase in rpm would ultimately have produced incapacitation of both astronauts. NASA corrected the Gemini thruster problem by changing the ignition system wiring. Future space-craft undertaking long-term missions could be equipped with unambiguous thruster fault displays and could have computer-controlled automatic cutoffs to control excessive thruster burns.

  2. Terminal guidance and navigation for comet and asteroid rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A. G.; Pitts, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A terminal guidance and navigation scheme developed in earlier work was modified and evaluated for a solar electric propulsion rendezvous mission to comet Encke. The scheme is intended for autonomous, on-board use. The guidance algorithm is based on optimal control theory and minimizes the time integrated square of thrust acceleration. The navigation algorithm employs a modified Kalman filter set in measurement variables. Random sequences were generated to simulate measurement errors, and the evaluation was conducted with detailed numerical computations which include actual motions of spacecraft and comet. The evaluations showed that the scheme attains rendezvous and maintains station after rendezvous within less than 10 km for estimated best measurements and within less than 100 km for estimated worst measurements. The measurements required are angles, range, and range rate. Angles and range appear to be absolutely necessary; range rate is not as strong a measurement type, and further modifications of the filter will allow a scheme that does not require the rate measurements.

  3. 75 FR 44794 - Rendezvous International v.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Rendezvous International v. Chief Cargo Services, Inc., Kaiser Apparel, Inc., Edco Logistics, Inc., Oriental.... Karen V. Gregory, Secretary. BILLING CODE P...

  4. Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission 3A Rendezvous Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Connor, C.; Moy, E.; Smith, D.; Myslinski, M.; Markley, L.; Vernacchio, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) hardware complement includes six gas bearing, pulse rebalanced rate integrating gyros, any three of which are sufficient to conduct the science mission. After the loss of three gyros between April 1997 and April 1999 due to a known corrosion mechanism, NASA decided to split the third HST servicing mission into SM3A, accelerated to October 1999, and SM3B, scheduled for November 2001. SM3A was developed as a quick turnaround 'Launch on Need' mission to replace all six gyros. Loss of a fourth gyro in November 1999 caused HST to enter Zero Gyro Sunpoint (ZGSP) safemode, which uses sun sensors and magnetometers for attitude determination and momentum bias to maintain attitude stability during orbit night. Several instances of large attitude excursions during orbit night were observed, but ZGSP performance was adequate to provide power-positive sun pointing and to support low gain antenna communications. Body rates in ZGSP were estimated to exceed the nominal 0.1 deg/sec rendezvous limit, so rendezvous operations were restructured to utilize coarse, limited life, Retrieval Mode Gyros (RMGs) under Hardware Sunpoint (HWSP) safemode. Contingency procedures were developed to conduct the rendezvous in ZGSP in the event of RMGA or HWSP computer failure. Space Shuttle Mission STS-103 launched on December 19, 1999 after a series of weather and Shuttle-related delays. After successful rendezvous and grapple under HWSP/RMGA, the crew changed out all six gyros. Following deploy and systems checkout, HST returned to full science operations.

  5. Contactless prompt tumbling rebound of drops from a sublimating slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Carlo; Jung, Stefan; Wetzel, Andreas; Heer, Emmanuel; Schoch, Philippe; Moqaddam, Ali Mazloomi; Chikatamarla, Shyam S.; Karlin, Ilya; Marengo, Marco; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2016-05-01

    We have uncovered a drop rebound regime, characteristic of highly viscous liquids impacting tilted sublimating surfaces. Here the drops, rather than showing a slide, spread, recoil, and rebound behavior, exhibit a prompt tumbling rebound. As a result, glycerol surprisingly rebounds faster than three orders of magnitude less viscous water. When a viscous drop impacts a sublimating surface, part of its initial linear momentum is converted into angular momentum: Lattice Boltzmann simulations confirmed that tumbling owes its appearance to the rapid transition of the internal angular velocity prior to rebound to a constant value, as in a tumbling solid body.

  6. Tumbling and quasi-tumbling motions of E.coli over a solid surface under shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Flow shear is known to alter bacterial motility by inducing Jeffery Orbit, rheotaxis, and trapping cells in the high shear region. Over a solid surface flow shear Interferes with hydrodynamic interaction of cells with solid surface. Our previous study shows that in the quiescent condition the tumbles of wild E.coli are suppressed and tumbling reorientation of cells is restricted to the surface parallel direction. In the current study, we exposed bacteria to the well controlled shear flows inside a microchannel and applying Digital Holography Microscopy to track them over time. The results show that flow shear promotes tumbling of E.coli and preserve reorientation of the cells during tumbles. Our hydrodynamic model indicates that in the low shear levels the tumble enhancement is due to shear induced flagella unbundling, while in the high shear flow regime, Jeffery Orbit causes rapid cell re-orientation which causes quasi-tumbles with similar angular displacement one would expect during a tumbling. NIH, GoMRI.

  7. Stability and dynamics of anisotropically tumbling chemotactic swimmers.

    PubMed

    Lushi, Enkeleida

    2016-08-01

    Microswimmers such as bacteria perform random walks known as run-and-tumbles to move up chemoattractant gradients and as a result aggregate with others. It is also known that such micro-swimmers can self-organize into macroscopic patterns due to interactions with neighboring cells through the fluidic environment they live in. While the pattern formation resulting from chemotactic and hydrodynamic interactions separately and together have been previously investigated, the effect of the anisotropy in the tumbles of microswimmers has been unexplored. Here we show through linear analysis and full nonlinear simulations that the slight anisotropy in the individual swimmer tumbles can alter the collective pattern formation in nontrivial ways. We show that tumbling anisotropy diminishes the magnitude of the chemotactic aggregates but may result in more such aggregation peaks. PMID:27627341

  8. Failed Escape: Solid Surfaces Prevent Tumbling of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Barry, Michael; Stocker, Roman; Sheng, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to surfaces is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial dispersion, and pathogenic infections. We used digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>103) of three-dimensional Escherichia coli trajectories near and far from a surface. We found that within 20 μm from a surface tumbles are suppressed by 50% and reorientations are largely confined to surface-parallel directions, preventing escape of bacteria from the near-surface region. A hydrodynamic model indicates that the tumble suppression is likely due to a surface-induced reduction in the hydrodynamic force responsible for the flagellar unbundling that causes tumbling. These findings imply that tumbling does not provide an effective means to escape trapping near surfaces.

  9. Stability and dynamics of anisotropically tumbling chemotactic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushi, Enkeleida

    2016-08-01

    Microswimmers such as bacteria perform random walks known as run-and-tumbles to move up chemoattractant gradients and as a result aggregate with others. It is also known that such micro-swimmers can self-organize into macroscopic patterns due to interactions with neighboring cells through the fluidic environment they live in. While the pattern formation resulting from chemotactic and hydrodynamic interactions separately and together have been previously investigated, the effect of the anisotropy in the tumbles of microswimmers has been unexplored. Here we show through linear analysis and full nonlinear simulations that the slight anisotropy in the individual swimmer tumbles can alter the collective pattern formation in nontrivial ways. We show that tumbling anisotropy diminishes the magnitude of the chemotactic aggregates but may result in more such aggregation peaks.

  10. Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit PSR. This interior view shows the vacuum tumble dryer. The tumble dryer is lined with a water jacket to maintain temperature during the drying of ammonium perchlorate ("AP"); water enters and exits the dryer jacket through the pipe fittings along the horizontal center line of the dryer. The wall at the right is constructed to blow out in the event of an explosion - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Oxidizer Dryer Building, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Tumbling in Turbulence: How much does particle shape effect particle motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variano, E. A.; Andersson, H. I.; Zhao, L.; Byron, M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural particles suspended in surface water are often non-spherical. We explore the ways in which particle shape effects particle motion, focusing specifically on how particle rotation is divided into spinning and tumbling components. This, in turn, will effect particle collision, clustering, and settling rates. We focus on idealized axisymmetric particles shaped as rods, discs, and spheroids. They are chosen so as to explain the physics of aspherical-particle motion that will be relevant for natural particles such as plankton, sediment, or aggregates (e.g. oil-mineral aggregates, clay flocs, or bio-sediment aggregates held together by TEP). Our work begins with laboratory measurements of particle motion in a turbulence tank built to mimic the flow found in rivers, estuaries, and the ocean surface mixed layer. We then proceed to direct numerical simulation of particle-flow interactions in sheared turbulence similar to that which is found in the surface water of creeks and rivers. We find that shape has only a very weak effect on particle angular velocity, which is a quantity calculated with respect the global reference frame (i.e. east/north/up). If we analyze rotation in a particle's local frame (i.e. the particle's principle axes of rotation), then particle shape has a strong effect on rotation. In the local frame, rotation is described by two components: tumbling and spinning. We find that rod-shaped particles spin more than they tumble, and we find that disc-shaped particles tumble more than they spin. Such behavior is indicative of how particles respond the the directional influence of vortex tubes in turbulence, and such response has implications for particle motion other than rotation. Understanding particle alignment is relevant for predicting particle-particle collision rates, particle-wall collision rates, and the shear-driven breakup of aggregates. We discuss these briefly in the context of what can be concluded from the rotation data discussed above.

  12. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.; Ojakangas, G.; Mulrooney, M.

    2012-09-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies (R/Bs), to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) studies to help remediate the LEO environment. Tumble rates are needed to plan and develop proximity and docking operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-W Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on ascertaining how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48) SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard Russian government "gray" scheme and the second target is white/orange as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each observed in three independent rotation states: (a) spin-stabilized rotation (about the long axis), (b) end-over-end rotation, and (c) a 10 degree wobble about the center of mass. The first two cases represent simple spin about either primary axis. The third - what we call "wobble" - represents maximum principal axis rotation, with an inertia tensor that is offset from the symmetry axes. By comparing the resultant phase and orientation-dependent laboratory signatures with actual lightcurves derived from telescopic observations of orbiting R/Bs, we intend to assess the intrinsic R/B rotation states. In the simplest case, simulated R/B behavior coincides with principal axis spin states, while more complex R

  13. Flutter, Tumble and Vortex Induced Autorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Veeraraghavan; Mittal, Rajat; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2002-11-01

    The study of flow induced rotation goes back as far as Maxwell who first analyzed the behavior of a falling piece of paper. He noted that the strip exhibited either a "flutter" (side-to-side motion) or "tumble" (end-over-end rotation) as it fell under the influence of gravity. Since then a number of researchers have attempted to develop a better understanding of this behavior. We are using a newly developed Cartesian grid method to simulate and analyze the dynamical stability of an object in free fall in an incompressible fluid. The unique feature of this numerical method is that it allows us to simulate flow with complex moving body on stationary Cartesian grids.In order to simplify the flow configuration, we have initially focused on simulating and analyzing the phenomenon of autorotation of a flat plate in a free stream hinged at the center. This configuration may be considered as a model of the free falling plate with the reference frame attached to the centre of the plate. The primary objective of the current study is to understand the effect that the Reynolds number and plate thickness-ratio have on the flow-induced rotation of the plate and to subsequently apply this understanding to predict the behavior of plates in free fall. Results from this study will be presented.

  14. A bead-spring model for running and tumbling of flagellated swimmers: detailed predictions compared to experimental data for E. coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Miqiu; Wu, Yan; Li, Guangxian; Larson, Ronald G

    2015-02-28

    To study the swimming of the multi-flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli, we deploy a bead-spring hydrodynamic model (Watari and Larson 2010), whose body and flagellar geometry, motor torques, and motor reversals are adjusted to match the experimental observations of the Berg group (Turner et al. 2000; Darnton et al. 2007) during both running and tumbling of the bacterium. In this model, hydrodynamic interactions, which drive swimming, flagellar bundling, and unbundling during swimming and tumbling, are imposed by treating the beads as Stokeslets, imposing torques and counter-torques on the body and flagellum at the flexible joint connecting them to represent the action of motor, and using the Rotne-Prager tensor to model their hydrodynamic interactions with other beads. We explore the behavior of coarse-grained (60-bead) and refined (120-bead) versions of the model, and show that predictions of running speed, helical and body rotation rates, body wobble rates and angles, average tumbling angles, range of tumbling angles, and flagellar re-bundling times are in good agreement with experimental observations by Berg and coworkers. We find that variation in tumbling angle arises from variation in flagellar number and location on the bacterial body, variations in polymorphic transitions of the filaments, and especially from variations in the duration of the tumbling time, which is roughly linearly correlated with tumbling time up to tumbling angles of around 40-50° and more weakly thereafter. The accuracy of the model suggests its usefulness for future studies of swimming of other flagellated swimmers, for predictions of collective phenomena, and for tuning parameters of coarser-grained swimmer models to achieve greater realism.

  15. Development of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field-of-view limitations proved troublesome. Higher resolution was required. Side thrusters were too weak. The strategy logic was improved and the Kalman filter was augmented to estimate target attitude and tumble rate. Two separate filters were used. The new filter estimates target attitude and angular momentum. The Newton-Raphson iteration improves image interpretation.

  16. Electro-optical rendezvous and docking sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, David J.; Kesler, Lynn O.; Sirko, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors provide unique and critical functionality for space missions requiring rendezvous, docking, and berthing. McDonnell Douglas is developing a complete rendezvous and docking system for both manned and unmanned missions. This paper examines our sensor development and the systems and missions which benefit from rendezvous and docking sensors. Simulation results quantifying system performance improvements in key areas are given, with associated sensor performance requirements. A brief review of NASA-funded development activities and the current performance of electro-optical sensors for space applications is given. We will also describe current activities at McDonnell Douglas for a fully functional demonstration to address specific NASA mission needs.

  17. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith A.; Quaid, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) was designed at Motorola's Strategic Electronics Division in Chandler, Arizona, to be a key subsystem aboard NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The unmanned OMV, which was under development at TRW's Federal Systems Division in Redondo Beach, California, was designed to supplement the Shuttle's satellite delivery, retrieval, and maneuvering activities. The RRS was to be used to locate and then provide the OMV with vectoring information to the target satellite (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum fuel consumption approach and rendezvous. The OMV development program was halted by NASA in 1990 just as parts were being ordered for the RRS engineering model. The paper presented describes the RRS design and then discusses new technologies, either under development or planned for development at Motorola, that can be applied to radar or alternative sensor solutions for the Automated Rendezvous and Capture problem.

  18. Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator. Francis B. Smith, described the simmulator as follows: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.'

  19. Adaptive control and orbit determination for elliptical rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijia; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Tiantian

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the control and orbit determination problems for elliptical rendezvous. Autonomous rendezvous is achieved by the proposed adaptive control based on the measurements of relative position and velocity between the chaser and target spacecraft. Moreover, the target orbital elements can be estimated during the rendezvous process. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is illustrated by simulations.

  20. 14 CFR § 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Provisions Regarding Space Shuttle Flights of Payloads for Non-U.S. Government, Reimbursable Customers § 1214.111 Rendezvous services. (a) A rendezvous mission involves the rendezvous of the Space Shuttle orbiter... Space Shuttle flight. (2) Exchange of a spacecraft (or part thereof) delivered to orbit on a...

  1. Ion propulsion and Comet Halley rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    Cometary rendezvous missions using ion propulsion is considered. The characteristics of the ion engine are discussed including the fuel efficiency and acceleration, and the design of the ion engine is described. The operation of the ion drive engine and an overview of its applications are presented.

  2. Multiple NEO Rendezvous Using Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Fabisinski, Leo; Heaton, Andy; Miernik, Janie; Stough, Rob; Wright, Roosevelt; Young, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Mission concept is to assess the feasibility of using solar sail propulsion to enable a robotic precursor that would survey multiple Near Earth Objects (NEOs) for potential future human visits. Single spacecraft will rendezvous with and image 3 NEOs within 6 years of launch

  3. Multiple NEO Rendezvous Using Solar Sail Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Fabisinski, Leo; Heaton, Andy; Miernik, Janie; Stough, Rob; Wright, Roosevelt; Young, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office performed an assessment of the feasibility of using a near-term solar sail propulsion system to enable a single spacecraft to perform serial rendezvous operations at multiple Near Earth Objects (NEOs) within six years of launch on a small-to-moderate launch vehicle. The study baselined the use of the sail technology demonstrated in the mid-2000 s by the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Project and is scheduled to be demonstrated in space by 2014 as part of the NASA Technology Demonstration Mission Program. The study ground rules required that the solar sail be the only new technology on the flight; all other spacecraft systems and instruments must have had previous space test and qualification. The resulting mission concept uses an 80-m X 80-m 3-axis stabilized solar sail launched by an Athena-II rocket in 2017 to rendezvous with 1999 AO10, Apophis and 2001 QJ142. In each rendezvous, the spacecraft will perform proximity operations for approximately 30 days. The spacecraft science payload is simple and lightweight; it will consist of only the multispectral imager flown on the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission to 433 Eros and 253 Mathilde. Most non-sail spacecraft systems are based on the Messenger mission spacecraft. This paper will describe the objectives of the proposed mission, the solar sail technology to be employed, the spacecraft system and subsystems, as well as the overall mission profile.

  4. Optimal cooperative power-limited rendezvous between neighboring circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coverstone-Carroll, Victoria; Prussing, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A minimum-fuel rendezvous of two power-limited spacecraft is investigated. Both vehicles are active and provide thrust to complete the rendezvous. Total propellant consumption is minimized. Analytical solutions are obtained for cooperative rendezvous in the linearized Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire gravity field. The optimal solutions depend in a complicated way on the power-to-mass ratios of the spacecraft, the initial orbits, and the specified transfer time. For comparison purposes, analytical solutions for active-passive rendezvous in the linearized gravity field are also determined. Cooperative rendezvous requires smaller total propellant consumption, resulting in greater payload capability.

  5. Optical Signature Analysis of Tumbling Rocket Bodies via Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has acquired telescopic lightcurve data on massive intact objects, specifically spent rocket bodies, in order to ascertain tumble rates in support of the Active Debris Removal (ADR) task to help remediate the LEO environment. Rotation rates are needed to plan and develop proximity operations for potential future ADR operations. To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC emulates illumination conditions in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC employs a 75-watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The light source is mounted on a rotary arm, allowing access any phase angle between 0 -- 360 degrees. The OMC does not attempt to replicate the rotation rates, but focuses on how an object is rotating as seen from multiple phase angles. The two targets studied are scaled (1:48), SL-8 Cosmos 3M second stages. The first target is painted in the standard government "gray" scheme and the second target is primary white, as used for commercial missions. This paper summarizes results of the two scaled rocket bodies, each rotated about two primary axes: (a) a spin-stabilized rotation and (b) an end-over-end rotation. The two rotation states are being investigated as a basis for possible spin states of rocket bodies, beginning with simple spin states about the two primary axes. The data will be used to create a database of potential spin states for future works to convolve with more complex spin states. The optical signatures will be presented for specific phase angles for each rocket body and shown in conjunction with acquired optical data from multiple telescope sources.

  6. The REAACT Multiple Asteroid Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Bell, J. F.

    1993-07-01

    The REAACT (Rendezvous with Earth Approaching Asteroids) mission was a proposal to last year's Discovery Program Workshop. This mission is designed to address the major question in asteroid science, the link between the spectral diversity of the asteroids and their geochemistry. Spectral diversity is perhaps the overriding feature of the asteroids. There are currently 17 different asteroid spectral types with at least 5 spectral types having no established meteoritical analogs and several more types having dubious or poorly defined analogs. The best way to link the large body of meteorite geochemical data with the groundbased remote sensing spectral data is asteroid rendezvous that yield imaging, IR-spectroscopy, and high-precision geochemical data. However, part of the scientific landscape are the severe programmatic and budgetary constraints that are imposed by limited NASA resources. The Discovery program was conceived as a way of maximizing those limited resources by emphasizing small, short missions with highly focused scientific objectives. Even with the lowcost Discovery-type missions, we cannot expect more than one or two asteroid rendezvous/sample return missions per decade. But missions that only target a single asteroids for rendezvous cannot provide a statistically meaningful sample of the wide diversity within the asteroids. It will take decades under the current budget constraints to build up an accurate picture of asteroidal geochemistry from single missions. The only way to address the diversity of the asteroids is with multiple rendezvous and REAACT proposes to do exactly that by buying at least four high-quality rendezvous spacecraft under a single Discovery cost cap. This is accomplished by adherence to four cost-saving principals: Maximum Use of Existing Commercial Equipment: REAACT uses the TRW Eagle-class lightsats for the spacecraft bus and a commercial space-qualified CCD camera for the imager. Scientific Instruments of Simple Design and

  7. Designing the STS-134 Re-Rendezvous: A Preparation for Future Crewed Rendezvous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuit, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    In preparation to provide the capability for the Orion spacecraft, also known as the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), to rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft, a new suite of relative navigation sensors are in development and were tested on one of the final Space Shuttle missions to ISS. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) commissioned a flight test of prototypes of the Orion relative navigation sensors on STS-134, in order to test their performance in the space environment during the nominal rendezvous and docking, as well as a re-rendezvous dedicated to testing the prototype sensors following the undocking of the Space Shuttle orbiter at the end of the mission. Unlike the rendezvous and docking at the beginning of the mission, the re-rendezvous profile replicates the newly designed Orion coelliptic approach trajectory, something never before attempted with the shuttle orbiter. Therefore, there were a number of new parameters that needed to be conceived of, designed, and tested for this rerendezvous to make the flight test successful. Additionally, all of this work had to be integrated with the normal operations of the ISS and shuttle and had to conform to the constraints of the mission and vehicles. The result of this work is a separation and rerendezvous trajectory design that would not only prove the design of the relative navigation sensors for the Orion vehicle, but also would serve as a proof of concept for the Orion rendezvous trajectory itself. This document presents the analysis and decision making process involved in attaining the final STS-134 re-rendezvous design.

  8. Tracking techniques for space shuttle rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle rendezvous radar has a requirement to track cooperative and non-cooperative targets. For this reason the Lunar Module (LM) Rendezvous Radar was modified to incorporate the capability of tracking a non-cooperative target. The modifications are discussed. All modifications except those relating to frequency diversity were completed, and system tests were performed to confirm proper performance in the non-cooperative mode. Frequency diversity was added to the radar and to the special test equipment, and then system tests were performed. This last set of tests included re-running the tests of the non-cooperative mode without frequency diversity, followed by tests with frequency diversity and tests of operation in the original cooperative mode.

  9. Laser space rendezvous and docking tradeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S.; Levinson, S.; Raber, P.; Weindling, F.

    1974-01-01

    A spaceborne laser radar (LADAR) was configured to meet the requirements for rendezvous and docking with a cooperative object in synchronous orbit. The LADAR, configurated using existing pulsed CO2 laser technology and a 1980 system technology baseline, is well suited for the envisioned space tug missions. The performance of a family of candidate LADARS was analyzed. Tradeoff studies as a function of size, weight, and power consumption were carried out for maximum ranges of 50, 100, 200, and 300 nautical miles. The investigation supports the original contention that a rendezvous and docking LADAR can be constructed to offer a cost effective and reliable solution to the envisioned space missions. In fact, the CO2 ladar system offers distinct advantages over other candidate systems.

  10. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions

    PubMed Central

    Patteson, A. E.; Gopinath, A.; Goulian, M.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-01-01

    Run-and-tumble motility is widely used by swimming microorganisms including numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here, we experimentally investigate the run-and-tumble dynamics of the bacterium E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that even small amounts of polymer in solution can drastically change E. coli dynamics: cells tumble less and their velocity increases, leading to an enhancement in cell translational diffusion and a sharp decline in rotational diffusion. We show that suppression of tumbling is due to fluid viscosity while the enhancement in swimming speed is mainly due to fluid elasticity. Visualization of single fluorescently labeled DNA polymers reveals that the flow generated by individual E. coli is sufficiently strong to stretch polymer molecules and induce elastic stresses in the fluid, which in turn can act on the cell in such a way to enhance its transport. Our results show that the transport and spread of chemotactic cells can be independently modified and controlled by the fluid material properties. PMID:26507950

  11. Running and tumbling with E. coli in polymeric solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patteson, A. E.; Gopinath, A.; Goulian, M.; Arratia, P. E.

    2015-10-01

    Run-and-tumble motility is widely used by swimming microorganisms including numerous prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here, we experimentally investigate the run-and-tumble dynamics of the bacterium E. coli in polymeric solutions. We find that even small amounts of polymer in solution can drastically change E. coli dynamics: cells tumble less and their velocity increases, leading to an enhancement in cell translational diffusion and a sharp decline in rotational diffusion. We show that suppression of tumbling is due to fluid viscosity while the enhancement in swimming speed is mainly due to fluid elasticity. Visualization of single fluorescently labeled DNA polymers reveals that the flow generated by individual E. coli is sufficiently strong to stretch polymer molecules and induce elastic stresses in the fluid, which in turn can act on the cell in such a way to enhance its transport. Our results show that the transport and spread of chemotactic cells can be independently modified and controlled by the fluid material properties.

  12. Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Multiple exposure of Rendezvous Docking Simulator. Francis B. Smith, described the simulator as follows: 'The rendezvous and docking operation of the Gemini spacecraft with the Agena and of the Apollo Command Module with the Lunar Excursion Module have been the subject of simulator studies for several years. [This figure] illustrates the Gemini-Agena rendezvous docking simulator at Langley. The Gemini spacecraft was supported in a gimbal system by an overhead crane and gantry arrangement which provided 6 degrees of freedom - roll, pitch, yaw, and translation in any direction - all controllable by the astronaut in the spacecraft. Here again the controls fed into a computer which in turn provided an input to the servos driving the spacecraft so that it responded to control motions in a manner which accurately simulated the Gemini spacecraft.' Published in Barton C. Hacker and James M. Grimwood, On the Shoulders of Titans: A History of Project Gemini, NASA SP-4203; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators for Manned Space Research,' Paper presented at the 1966 IEEE International convention, March 21-25, 1966.

  13. Lunar Ascent and Rendezvous Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald R.; Merriam, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The Lunar Lander Ascent Module (LLAM) will leave the lunar surface and actively rendezvous in lunar orbit with the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). For initial LLAM vehicle sizing efforts, a nominal trajectory, along with required delta-V and a few key sensitivities, is very useful. A nominal lunar ascent and rendezvous trajectory is shown, along with rationale and discussion of the trajectory shaping. Also included are ascent delta-V sensitivities to changes in target orbit and design thrust-to-weight of the vehicle. A sample launch window for a particular launch site has been completed and is included. The launch window shows that budgeting enough delta-V for two missed launch opportunities may be reasonable. A comparison between yaw steering and on-orbit plane change maneuvers is included. The comparison shows that for large plane changes, which are potentially necessary for an anytime return from mid-latitude locations, an on-orbit maneuver is much more efficient than ascent yaw steering. For a planned return, small amounts of yaw steering may be necessary during ascent and must be accounted for in the ascent delta-V budget. The delta-V cost of ascent yaw steering is shown, along with sensitivity to launch site latitude. Some discussion of off-nominal scenarios is also included. In particular, in the case of a failed Powered Descent Initiation burn, the requirements for subsequent rendezvous with the Orion vehicle are outlined.

  14. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A number of areas of research and laboratory experiments were identified which could lead to development of a cost efficient remote, disable satellite recovery system. Estimates were planned of disabled satellite motion. A concept is defined as a Tumbling Satellite Recovery kit which includes a modular system, composed of a number of subsystem mechanisms that can be readily integrated into varying combinations. This would enable the user to quickly configure a tailored remote, disabled satellite recovery kit to meet a broad spectrum of potential scenarios. The capability was determined of U.S. Earth based satellite tracking facilities to adequately determine the orientation and motion rates of disabled satellites.

  15. Orbit determination of the Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby mission - Post-rendezvous phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James K.; Wood, Lincoln J.; Weeks, Connie J.

    1989-01-01

    Orbit determination during the post-rendezvous phases of the Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby mission is described. The orbit determination process is discussed, with emphasis placed on optical imaging of landmarks and Doppler tracking. Rotational dynamics are introduced for the cometary nucleus. State estimation errors are given for spacecraft trajectory prediction and cometary nucleus attitude prediction. Estimation errors are also given for parameters that describe the cometary nucleus such as moments of inertia and gravity harmonics. The orbit determination performance in support of science observations while in orbit about the nucleus is described.

  16. Orion Handling Qualities During ISS Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Stephens, J. P.; Spehar, P.; Bilimoria, K.; Foster, C.; Gonzalex, R.; Sullivan, K.; Jackson, B.; Brazzel, J.; Hart, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft was designed to rendezvous with multiple vehicles in low earth orbit (LEO) and beyond. To perform the required rendezvous and docking task, Orion must provide enough control authority to perform coarse translational maneuvers while maintaining precision to perform the delicate docking corrections. While Orion has autonomous docking capabilities, it is expected that final approach and docking operations with the International Space Station (ISS) will initially be performed in a manual mode. A series of evaluations was conducted by NASA and Lockheed Martin at the Johnson Space Center to determine the handling qualities (HQ) of the Orion spacecraft during different docking and rendezvous conditions using the Cooper-Harper scale. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities methodology, vehicle configuration, scenarios flown, data collection tools, and subject ratings and comments. The initial Orion HQ assessment examined Orion docking to the ISS. This scenario demonstrates the Translational Hand Controller (THC) handling qualities of Orion. During this initial assessment, two different scenarios were evaluated. The first was a nominal docking approach to a stable ISS, with Orion initializing with relative position dispersions and a closing rate of approximately 0.1 ft/sec. The second docking scenario was identical to the first, except the attitude motion of the ISS was modeled to simulate a stress case ( 1 degree deadband per axis and 0.01 deg/sec rate deadband per axis). For both scenarios, subjects started each run on final approach at a docking port-to-port range of 20 ft. Subjects used the THC in pulse mode with cues from the docking camera image, window views, and range and range rate data displayed on the Orion display units. As in the actual design, the attitude of the Orion vehicle was held by the automated flight control system at 0.5 degree deadband per axis. Several error sources were modeled including Reaction

  17. Hyperbolic Rendezvous at Mars: Risk Assessments and Mitigation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Ricky; Landau, Damon; Whitley, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Given the current interest in the use of flyby trajectories for human Mars exploration, a key requirement is the capability to execute hyperbolic rendezvous. Hyperbolic rendezvous is used to transport crew from a Mars centered orbit, to a transiting Earth bound habitat that does a flyby. Representative cases are taken from future potential missions of this type, and a thorough sensitivity analysis of the hyperbolic rendezvous phase is performed. This includes early engine cutoff, missed burn times, and burn misalignment. A finite burn engine model is applied that assumes the hyperbolic rendezvous phase is done with at least two burns.

  18. KU-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The preparation of a real time computer simulation model of the KU band rendezvous radar to be integrated into the shuttle mission simulator (SMS), the shuttle engineering simulator (SES), and the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) simulator is described. To meet crew training requirements a radar tracking performance model, and a target modeling method were developed. The parent simulation/radar simulation interface requirements, and the method selected to model target scattering properties, including an application of this method to the SPAS spacecraft are described. The radar search and acquisition mode performance model and the radar track mode signal processor model are examined and analyzed. The angle, angle rate, range, and range rate tracking loops are also discussed.

  19. TRAC based sensing for autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.; Monford, Leo

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a TRAC (Targeting Reflective Alignment Concept) based sensing system for use in an autonomous rendezvous and docking experiment. The proposed experiment will utilize a COMET (COMmercial Experiment Transporter) based target satellite and a second chase vehicle. The sensor system consists of a target mounted on the target vehicle and a vision based sensor on the chase vehicle. The target has both active and passive components to enable the evaluation of both technologies. The chase vehicle will possess structured lighting and a single off the shelf camera.

  20. Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (ARD) will be a requirement for future space programs. Clear examples include satellite servicing, repair, recovery, and reboost in the near term, and the longer range lunar and planetary exploration programs. ARD will permit more aggressive unmanned space activities, while providing a valuable operational capability for manned missions. The purpose of the conference is to identify the technologies required for an on-orbit demonstration of ARD, assess the maturity of those technologies, and provide the necessary insight for a quality assessment of programmatic management, technical, schedule, and cost risks.

  1. Coping with perturbations to a layout somersault in tumbling.

    PubMed

    King, M A; Yeadon, M R

    2003-07-01

    Tumbling is a dynamic movement requiring control of the linear and angular momenta generated during the approach and takeoff phases. Both of these phases are subject to some variability even when the gymnast is trying to perform a given movement repeatedly. This paper used a simulation model of tumbling takeoff to establish how well gymnasts can cope with perturbations of the approach and takeoff phases. A five segment planar simulation model with torque generators at each joint was developed to simulate tumbling takeoffs. The model was customised to an elite gymnast by determining subject specific inertia and torque parameters and a simulation was produced which closely matched a performance of a layout somersault by the gymnast. The performance of a layout somersault was found to be sensitive to the approach characteristics and the activation timings but relatively insensitive to the elasticity of the track and maximum muscle strength. Appropriate variation of the activation timings used during the takeoff phase was capable of coping with moderate perturbations of the approach characteristics. A model of aerial movement established that variation of body configuration in the flight phase was capable of adjusting for takeoff perturbations that would lead to rotation errors of up to 8%. Providing the errors in perceiving approach characteristics are less than 5% or 5 degrees and the errors in timing activations are less than 7ms, perturbations in the approach can be accommodated using adjustments during takeoff and flight. PMID:12757800

  2. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  3. Development of Ku-band rendezvous radar tracking and acquisition simulation programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The fidelity of the Space Shuttle Radar tracking simulation model was improved. The data from the Shuttle Orbiter Radar Test and Evaluation (SORTE) program experiments performed at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) were reviewed and analyzed. The selected flight rendezvous radar data was evaluated. Problems with the Inertial Line-of-Sight (ILOS) angle rate tracker were evaluated using the improved fidelity angle rate tracker simulation model.

  4. The comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, David; Neugebauer, Marcia; Weissman, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission is designed to answer the many questions raised by the Halley missions by exploring a cometary nucleus in detail, following it around its orbit and studying its changing activity as it moves closer to and then away from the Sun. In addition, on its way to rendezvous with the comet, CRAF will fly by a large, primitive class main belt asteroid and will return valuable data for comparison with the comet results. The selected asteroid is 449 Hamburga with a diameter of 88 km and a surface composition of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The expected flyby date is January, 1998. The CRAF spacecraft will continue to make measurements in orbit around the cometary nucleus as they both move closer to the Sun, until the dust and gas hazard becomes unsafe. At that point the spacecraft will move in and out between 50 and 2,500 kilometers to study the inner coma and the cometary ionosphere, and to collect dust and gas samples for onboard analysis. Following perihelion, the spacecraft will make a 50,000 km excursion down the comet's tail, further investigating the solar wind interaction with the cometary atmosphere. The spacecraft will return to the vicinity of the nucleus about four months after perihelion to observe the changes that have taken place. If the spacecraft remains healthy and adequate fuel is still onboard, an extended mission to follow the comet nucleus out to aphelion is anticipated.

  5. Rendezvous radar for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, John W.; Olds, Keith; Parks, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Rendezvous Radar Set (RRS) for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RRS was to be used to locate, and then provide vectoring information to, target satellites (or Shuttle or Space Station) to aid the OMV in making a minimum-fuel-consumption approach and rendezvous. The RRS design is that of an X-Band, all solid-state, monopulse tracking, frequency hopping, pulse-Doppler radar system. The development of the radar was terminated when the OMV prime contract to TRW was terminated by NASA. At the time of the termination, the development was in the circuit design stage. The system design was virtually completed, the PDR had been held. The RRS design was based on Motorola's experiences, both in the design and production of radar systems for the US Army and in the design and production of hi-rel communications systems for NASA space programs. Experience in these fields was combined with the latest digital signal processor and micro-processor technology to design a light-weight, low-power, spaceborne radar. The antenna and antenna positioner (gimbals) technology developed for the RRS is now being used in the satellite-to-satellite communication link design for Motorola's Iridium telecommunications system.

  6. A Diffusion Approximation Based on Renewal Processes with Applications to Strongly Biased Run-Tumble Motion.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2016-03-01

    We consider organisms which use a renewal strategy such as run-tumble when moving in space, for example to perform chemotaxis in chemical gradients. We derive a diffusion approximation for the motion, applying a central limit theorem due to Anscombe for renewal-reward processes; this theorem has not previously been applied in this context. Our results extend previous work, which has established the mean drift but not the diffusivity. For a classical model of tumble rates applied to chemotaxis, we find that the resulting chemotactic drift saturates to the swimming velocity of the organism when the chemical gradients grow increasingly steep. The dispersal becomes anisotropic in steep gradients, with larger dispersal across the gradient than along the gradient. In contrast to one-dimensional settings, strong bias increases dispersal. We next include Brownian rotation in the model and find that, in limit of high chemotactic sensitivity, the chemotactic drift is 64% of the swimming velocity, independent of the magnitude of the Brownian rotation. We finally derive characteristic timescales of the motion that can be used to assess whether the diffusion limit is justified in a given situation. The proposed technique for obtaining diffusion approximations is conceptually and computationally simple, and applicable also when statistics of the motion is obtained empirically or through Monte Carlo simulation of the motion. PMID:27012850

  7. Open Field Phase Measurement Telemeter For Orbital Rendez-Vous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faup, Michel; Hullein, Francois

    1989-01-01

    For about four years, collaborating with its industrial and scientific partners, CNES has studied the different types of optical sensors that could help to fulfil an impactless rendez-vous and docking mission between two spatial vehicles moving on a low orbit around the Earth. As a part of that activities, a study realized by Sercel and CNES resulted in the definition of a phase measurement rangefinder able to measure distances from 2 to 500 meters with an accuracy varying from 20 millimeters to 40 millimeters at a rate of 1 Hz. The range and the field of view (+5°) of that instrument together with specific constraints due to spatial environment lead to choose high power (100 mW) current modulated continuous wave laser diode as lightning source for this application. As a matter of fact, the target satellite must keep passive during the mission. Furthermore, the sensor must work in open field to avoid the use of mechanical scanning systems and must be able to deliver a correct information even if the sun is in its field of view so that the rendez-vous scenario is not constrainted. Last, semi-conductor technologies have been preferred because their spatialisation seems to be simpler. Yet, a speckle phenomenon due to the multimode optical fibre onto which the laser diode is connected appears in the field of view. That phenomenon, associated to the dynamic behaviour of the component (spectral drift versus current intensity) prevents the sensor from delivering an homogeneous answer in different points of the field. The phenomenon has been analysed and a solution implying an adapted modulation for the laser diode is proposed. The global sensor principle is described.

  8. Concept definition study for recovery of tumbling satellites. Volume 1: Executive summary, study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, D. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Cathcart, J. A.; Keeley, M. G.; Madayev, L.; Nguyen, T. K.; Preese, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The first assessment is made of the design requirements and conceptual definition of a front end kit to be transported on the currently defined Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) and the Space Transportation System Shuttle Orbiter, to conduct remote, teleoperated recovery of disabled and noncontrollable, tumbling satellites. Previous studies did not quantify the dynamic characteristics of a tumbling satellite, nor did they appear to address the full spectrum of Tumbling Satellite Recovery systems requirements. Both of these aspects are investigated with useful results.

  9. Hohmann-Hohmann and Hohmann-Phasing Cooperative Rendezvous Maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Atri; Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of cooperative rendezvous between two satellites in circular orbits, given a fixed time for the rendezvous to be completed, and assuming a circular rendezvous orbit. We investigate two types of cooperative maneuvers for which analytical solutions can be obtained. One is the case of two Hohmann transfers, henceforth referred to as HHCM, while the other, henceforth referred to as HPCM, is the case of a Hohmann transfer and a phasing maneuver. For the latter case we derive conditions on the phasing angle that make a HPCM rendezvous cheaper than a cooperative rendezvous on an orbit that is different than either the original orbits of the two participating satellites. It is shown that minimizing the fuel expenditure is equivalent to minimizing a weighted sum of the Δ Vs of the two orbital transfers, the weights being determined by the mass and engine characteristics of the satellites. Our results show that, if the time of rendezvous allows for a Hohmann transfer between the orbits of the satellites, the optimal rendezvous is either a noncooperative Hohmann transfer or a Hohmann-phasing cooperative maneuver. In both of these cases, the maneuver costs are determined analytically. A numerical example verifies these observations. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of this study for Peer-to-Peer (P2P) refueling of satellites residing in two different circular orbits.

  10. Rendezvous missions with minimoons from L1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Patterson, G.

    2014-07-01

    We propose to present asteroid capture missions with the so-called minimoons. Minimoons are small asteroids that are temporarily captured objects on orbits in the Earth-Moon system. It has been suggested that, despite their small capture probability, at any time there are one or two meter diameter minimoons, and progressively greater numbers at smaller diameters. The minimoons orbits differ significantly from elliptical orbits which renders a rendezvous mission more challenging, however they offer many advantages for such missions that overcome this fact. First, they are already on geocentric orbits which results in short duration missions with low Delta-v, this translates in cost efficiency and low-risk targets. Second, beside their close proximity to Earth, an advantage is their small size since it provides us with the luxury to retrieve the entire asteroid and not only a sample of material. Accessing the interior structure of a near-Earth satellite in its morphological context is crucial to an in-depth analysis of the structure of the asteroid. Historically, 2006 RH120 is the only minimoon that has been detected but work is ongoing to determine which modifications to current observation facilities is necessary to provide detection algorithm capabilities. In the event that detection is successful, an efficient algorithm to produce a space mission to rendezvous with the detected minimoon is highly desirable to take advantage of this opportunity. This is the main focus of our work. For the design of the mission we propose the following. The spacecraft is first placed in hibernation on a Lissajoux orbit around the liberation point L1 of the Earth-Moon system. We focus on eight-shaped Lissajoux orbits to take advantage of the stability properties of their invariant manifolds for our transfers since the cost to minimize is the spacecraft fuel consumption. Once a minimoon has been detected we must choose a point on its orbit to rendezvous (in position and velocities

  11. Autonomous rendezvous and capture development infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of the technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking, key infrastructure capabilities must be used for effective and economical development. This need involves facility capabilities, both equipment and personnel, to devise, develop, qualify, and integrate ARD elements and subsystems into flight programs. One effective way of reducing technical risks in developing ARD technology is the use of the Low Earth Orbit test facility. Using a reusable free-flying testbed carried in the Shuttle, as a technology demonstration test flight, can be structured to include a variety of sensors, control schemes, and operational approaches. This testbed and flight demonstration concept will be used to illustrate how technologies and facilities at MSFC can be used to develop and prove an ARD system.

  12. Autonomous rendezvous and capture development infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.; Roe, Fred; Coker, Cindy; Nelson, Pam; Johnson, B.

    1991-01-01

    In the development of the technology for autonomous rendezvous and docking, key infrastructure capabilities must be used for effective and economical development. This involves facility capabilities, both equipment and personnel, to devise, develop, qualify, and integrate ARD elements and subsystems into flight programs. One effective way of reducing technical risks in developing ARD technology is the use of the ultimate test facility, using a Shuttle-based reusable free-flying testbed to perform a Technology Demonstration Test Flight which can be structured to include a variety of additional sensors, control schemes, and operational approaches. This conceptual testbed and flight demonstration will be used to illustrate how technologies and facilities at MSFC can be used to develop and prove an ARD system.

  13. Pathfinder autonomous rendezvous and docking project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen (Editor); Mccandless, Wayne (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Capabilities are being developed and demonstrated to support manned and unmanned vehicle operations in lunar and planetary orbits. In this initial phase, primary emphasis is placed on definition of the system requirements for candidate Pathfinder mission applications and correlation of these system-level requirements with specific requirements. The FY-89 activities detailed are best characterized as foundation building. The majority of the efforts were dedicated to assessing the current state of the art, identifying desired elaborations and expansions to this level of development and charting a course that will realize the desired objectives in the future. Efforts are detailed across all work packages in developing those requirements and tools needed to test, refine, and validate basic autonomous rendezvous and docking elements.

  14. Electric sail option for cometary rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarta, Alessandro A.; Mengali, Giovanni; Janhunen, Pekka

    2016-10-01

    The recent successes of the European Rosetta mission have shown the possibility of a close observation with one of the most evasive celestial bodies in the Solar System, the comets, and the practical feasibility of a comet rendezvous to obtain detailed information and in situ measurements. This paper discusses a preliminary study of the transfer trajectory toward the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (the same target used by Rosetta) for a spacecraft whose primary propulsion system is an electric solar wind sail. The use of a propellantless propulsion system with a continuous thrust is theoretically able to simplify the transfer trajectory by avoiding the need of intermediate flyby maneuvers. The problem is addressed in a parametric way, by looking for the possible optimal launch windows as a function of the propulsion system performance. The study is completed by a mass breakdown analysis of the spacecraft, for some mission scenarios of practical interest, based on the actual payload mass of the spacecraft Rosetta.

  15. Automated Rendezvous and Capture in Space: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to assess the technology of automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C) in space. The outline of the paper is as follows: First, the history of manual and automated rendezvous and capture and rendezvous and dock is presented. Next, the need for AR&C in space is reviewed. In light of these, AR&C systems are proposed that meet NASA's future needs, but can be developed in a reasonable amount of time with a reasonable amount of money. Technology plans for developing these systems are presented; cost and schedule are included.

  16. Expert system isssues in automated, autonomous space vehicle rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Mary Ann; Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1987-01-01

    The problems involved in automated autonomous rendezvous are briefly reviewed, and the Rendezvous Expert (RENEX) expert system is discussed with reference to its goals, approach used, and knowledge structure and contents. RENEX has been developed to support streamlining operations for the Space Shuttle and Space Station program and to aid definition of mission requirements for the autonomous portions of rendezvous for the Mars Surface Sample Return and Comet Nucleus Sample return unmanned missions. The experience with REMEX to date and recommendations for further development are presented.

  17. Mars Sample Return - Launch and Detection Strategies for Orbital Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, Ryan C.; Mattingly, Richard L.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Sturm, Erick J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sets forth conceptual mission design strategies for the ascent and rendezvous phase of the proposed NASA/ESA joint Mars Sample Return Campaign. The current notional mission architecture calls for the launch of an acquisition/cache rover in 2018, an orbiter with an Earth return vehicle in 2022, and a fetch rover and ascent vehicle in 2024. Strategies are presented to launch the sample into a coplanar orbit with the Orbiter which facilitate robust optical detection, orbit determination, and rendezvous. Repeating ground track orbits exist at 457 and 572 km which provide multiple launch opportunities with similar geometries for detection and rendezvous.

  18. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the "rendezvous technique") of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-14

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the "rendezvous technique". The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  19. Impact on thin steel plates by tumbling projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Goldsmith, W.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental, analytical, and numerical investigation into the effects of tumbling projectiles on the impact response of thin 4130 steel target plates was performed. Deformation patterns and failure phenomena as well as the final velocities and trajectories of the projectiles are correlated with initial conditions such as the initial velocity and impact angle (or yaw angle with a zero oblique angle) of the projectile and plate thickness. In the experiments, tumbling motion of the projectiles was induced by impact of a portion of the front face of the projectile with the edge of a massive block placed along the trajectory. Cylinders with a diameter of 12.7 mm, a length of 38.1 mm, and a hardness of R{sub c} 54 were fired at velocities from 400 m/s - 800 m/s. The forward speed of the projectile after tumbling production ranged from 300 m/s-700 m/s. Rotational speeds ranged from 0 rad/s - 3000 rad/s and concomitant impact angles varied from 0{degrees} to 60{degrees}. These parameters were determined from high speed photographic records. The targets were 1.6 mm and 3.2 mm thick. An analytical model developed for thin aluminum target plates was employed in the present study. The model divides the penetration process into three stages: (1) plugging; (2) hole enlargement; and (3) frontal petaling. The processes are quantified using energy dissipation descriptions of the various deformation mechanisms. Numerical simulations of the penetration processes were performed by employment of the program DYNA3D, a nonlinear, three-dimensional finite element code. The material of the target was modeled as elasto-plastic with failure, while the projectile was assumed to be undeformable. The failure criterion of the target is based on the ultimate tensile strain.

  20. Optimal search strategies of run-and-tumble walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, Jean-François; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    The run-and-tumble walk, consisting of randomly reoriented ballistic excursions, models phenomena ranging from gas kinetics to bacteria motility. We evaluate the mean time required for this walk to find a fixed target within a two- or three-dimensional spherical confinement. We find that the mean search time admits a minimum as a function of the mean run duration for various types of boundary conditions and run duration distributions (exponential, power-law, deterministic). Our result stands in sharp contrast to the pure ballistic motion, which is predicted to be the optimal search strategy in the case of Poisson-distributed targets.

  1. Optimal search strategies of run-and-tumble walks.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Jean-François; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    The run-and-tumble walk, consisting of randomly reoriented ballistic excursions, models phenomena ranging from gas kinetics to bacteria motility. We evaluate the mean time required for this walk to find a fixed target within a two- or three-dimensional spherical confinement. We find that the mean search time admits a minimum as a function of the mean run duration for various types of boundary conditions and run duration distributions (exponential, power-law, deterministic). Our result stands in sharp contrast to the pure ballistic motion, which is predicted to be the optimal search strategy in the case of Poisson-distributed targets. PMID:27575087

  2. Polishing and local planarization of plastic spherical capsules using tumble finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratwala, T. I.; Steele, W. A.; Feit, M. D.; Moreno, K.; Stadermann, M.; Fair, J.; Chen, K.; Nikroo, A.; Youngblood, K.; Wu, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new method (a variant of tumble finishing) for polishing and achieving local planarization on precision spherical, plastic capsules is described. Such capsules have niche applications, such as ablators used in high-peak-power laser targets for fusion energy research. The as-manufactured ablators contain many shallow domes (many 100's of nm high and a few 10's of μm wide) on the outer surface which are undesirable due to contributions to instabilities during implosion. These capsules were polished (i.e., tumble finished) by rotating a cylindrical vial containing the capsule, many borosilicate glass or zirconia media, and an aqueous-based colloidal silica polishing slurry. During tumble finishing, the relative media/capsule motions cause multiple, random sliding spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts, resulting in material removal, and possibly plastic deformation, on the capsule. As a result, the domes were observed to locally planarize (i.e., converge to lower heights). Utilizing the correct kinematics (i.e., the characteristics of the media/capsule motions), as controlled by the vial rotation rate and the fill fraction of media and slurry, the high velocity downward circumferential media motions were avoided, preventing fracturing of the fragile capsules. Also, the resulting post-polished surface roughness on the capsule was found to scale with the initial media surface roughness. Hence, pre-polishing the media greatly reduced the roughness of the media and thus the roughness of the polished capsule. A material removal model is described based on the Preston model and spherical-spherical Hertzian contacts which shows reasonable agreement with measured average removal rates of 35 ± 15 nm/day and which serves as a valuable tool to scale the polishing behavior with changes in process variables. Narrow domes were observed to planarize more rapidly than wider domes. A local planarization convergence model is also described, based on the concept of workpiece

  3. Flexible polymers suppress wobbling and tumbling of E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koser, Alison; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The run-and-tumble dynamics of swimming E. coli has been extensively studied. In this talk, we experimentally investigate the role of polymer concentration on the swimming dynamics of E. coli using tracking methods. We find that the addition of small amount of polymer to water drastically changes the run-and-tumble behavior of E. coli cells, enhancing translation while hindering rotational diffusion. Here, the cells are suspended in dilute solutions of carboxy-methyl cellulose (CMC) and imaged in a liquid film away from surfaces. The addition of polymer molecules to the fluid (water) leads to cell trajectories that are highly correlated in time; cells move in nearly straight lines and rotational diffusion is greatly reduced. By varying the polymer molecular weight, we show that trajectories are a result of two mechanisms: (1) suppression of cell wobbling due to elasticity and (2) enhancement of run times due to viscosity. Our experiments show that this combination of increased speed and suppressed reorientation dramatically changes overall cell dynamics in the presence of polymers.

  4. Low Earth Orbit Rendezvous Strategy for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cates, Grant R.; Cirillo, William M.; Stromgren, Chel

    2006-01-01

    On January 14, 2004 President George W. Bush announced a new Vision for Space Exploration calling for NASA to return humans to the moon. In 2005 NASA decided to use a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) rendezvous strategy for the lunar missions. A Discrete Event Simulation (DES) based model of this strategy was constructed. Results of the model were then used for subsequent analysis to explore the ramifications of the LEO rendezvous strategy.

  5. Automatic rendezvous and docking systems functional and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A generalized mission design scheme which utilizes a standard mission profile for all OMV rendezvous operations, recognizes typical operational constraints, and minimizes propellant penalties due to nodal regression effects was developed. This scheme has been used to demonstrate a unified guidance and navigation maneuver processor (the UMP), which supports all mission phases through station-keeping. The initial demonstration version of the Orbital Rendezvous Mission Planner (ORMP) was provided for evaluation purposes, and program operation was discussed.

  6. Shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting: Circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The strategy and logic used in a space shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting program are described. The program generates ascent targeting conditions for boost to insertion into an intermediate parking orbit, and generates on-orbit targeting and timeline bases for each maneuver to effect rendezvous with a space station. Time of launch is determined so as to eliminate any plane change, and all work was performed for a near-circular space station orbit.

  7. 75 FR 35751 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Tumbling Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879), and the Tumbling Creek Cavesnail Recovery Plan (published in the Federal Register on September 22, 2003 (68 FR 55060)), available on the Internet at http://ecos.fws.gov... solid rock bottom within sections of Tumbling Creek that have moderate current (U.S. Fish and...

  8. The "long tail" of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by (1)H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range.

    PubMed

    Roos, Matthias; Hofmann, Marius; Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen; Rössler, Ernst; Saalwächter, Kay; Krushelnitsky, Alexey

    2015-12-01

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component ("long tail") of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R1/R2 assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the "long tail" is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R1ρ and R2 measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the "long tail". In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field (15)N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the "long tail" in the analysis into account. PMID:26582718

  9. The "long tail" of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by (1)H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range.

    PubMed

    Roos, Matthias; Hofmann, Marius; Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen; Rössler, Ernst; Saalwächter, Kay; Krushelnitsky, Alexey

    2015-12-01

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component ("long tail") of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R1/R2 assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the "long tail" is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R1ρ and R2 measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the "long tail". In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field (15)N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the "long tail" in the analysis into account.

  10. TALON and CRADLE: Systems for the rescue of tumbling spacecraft and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idle, Dunning, V

    1991-01-01

    Advanced pressure suit and tool designs are beginning to allow extravehicular astronauts to repair space vehicles and so increase mission life and system reliability. A common spacecraft failure that is a severe challenge to the rescue mission planner is loss of attitude control resulting in tumbling motion. If an extravehicular astronaut flying the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) 'falls' into a tumble, the result could be loss of life. TALON (Tumble Arresting Large Oscillation Nullifier) is a device capable of capturing a target in an uncontrolled three-axis tumble. CRADLE (Concentric Rotating Astronaut Detumble Lifesaving Equipment) is a similar device sized to rescue a suited astronaut. The two rescue vehicles work on the same basic principle. They are structural shells with articulated limbs which can surround a tumbling target and thus align both the chaser and target centers of mass (CM).

  11. Advanced Multipurpose Rendezvous Tracking System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, R. J.; Sterzer, F.

    1982-01-01

    Rendezvous and docking (R&D) sensors needed to support Earth orbital operations of vehicles were investigated to determine the form they should take. An R&D sensor must enable an interceptor vehicle to determine both the relative position and the relative attitude of a target vehicle. Relative position determination is fairly straightforward and places few constraints on the sensor. Relative attitude determination, however, is more difficult. The attitude is calculated based on relative position measurements of several reflectors placed in a known arrangement on the target vehicle. The constraints imposed on the sensor by the attitude determination method are severe. Narrow beamwidth, wide field of view (fov), high range accuracy, and fast random scan capability are all required to determine attitude by this method. A consideration of these constraints as well as others imposed by expected operating conditions and the available technology led to the conclusion that the sensor should be a cw optical radar employing a semiconductor laser transmitter and an image dissector receiver.

  12. Imaging Flash Lidar for Safe Landing on Solar System Bodies and Spacecraft Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Roback, Vincent E.; Bulyshev, Alexander E.; Brewster, Paul F.; Carrion, William A; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Noe, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been pursuing flash lidar technology for autonomous, safe landing on solar system bodies and for automated rendezvous and docking. During the final stages of the landing from about 1 kilometer to 500 meters above the ground, the flash lidar can generate 3-Dimensional images of the terrain to identify hazardous features such as craters, rocks, and steep slopes. The onboard flight computer can then use the 3-D map of terrain to guide the vehicle to a safe location. As an automated rendezvous and docking sensor, the flash lidar can provide relative range, velocity, and bearing from an approaching spacecraft to another spacecraft or a space station. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flash lidar sensor system capable of generating 16,000 pixels range images with 7 centimeters precision, at 20 Hertz frame rate, from a maximum slant range of 1800 m from the target area. This paper describes the lidar instrument and presents the results of recent flight tests onboard a rocket-propelled free-flyer vehicle (Morpheus) built by NASA Johnson Space Center. The flights were conducted at a simulated lunar terrain site, consisting of realistic hazard features and designated landing areas, built at NASA Kennedy Space Center specifically for this demonstration test. This paper also provides an overview of the plan for continued advancement of the flash lidar technology aimed at enhancing its performance to meet both landing and automated rendezvous and docking applications.

  13. Production of mineral aggregates in quartz tumbling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Finster, Kai; Pall Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur; Knak Jensen, Svend; Merrison, Jonathan Peter

    2013-04-01

    Introduction Tumbling experiments with quartz sand with the purpose of tracing the effect of broken bonds in mineral surfaces resulted in an unexpected production of aggregates. These aggregates are a few microns in diameter, spherical and resembling tiny white "snowballs." Particle comminution by aeolian and other natural weathering processes are known in soil science and is often seen as an increase of fine particles towards the top of soil profiles (Nørnberg, P. 1987, 1988, 2002, J.S. Wright 2007). When mineral grains collide in aeolian processes they break up along weakness zones in the crystal lattice. This mechanism causes broken bonds between atoms in the crystal lattice and results in reactive groups in the mineral surface. This mechanism provides the background for experiments to investigate the oxidation processes of magnetite on the planet Mars. The primary magnetic iron oxide phase on Mars is to day known to be magnetite and the colour of the dust on Mars is most likely due to hematite. To investigate if the oxidation process could take place without going over dissolution and precipitation in water, experiments with tumbling of quartz grains in sealed glass containers along with magnetite were started. The idea was that activated bonds at the surface of quartz could oxidize magnetite and convert it to hematite over time. This proved to be the case (Merrison, J.P. et al. 2010). However, in these experiments we observed the formation of the white aggregates which has been the subject of the study that we present here. Results of tumbling experiments Commercially available quarts (Merck) was sieved to obtain the fraction between 125 and 1000 µm. This fraction was tumbled in glass containers for months and resulted in production of a significant amount of fine grained material (Merrison, J.P et al. 2010). A part of this fine fraction consists of the "snowball"-like aggregates which is a fragile element with relatively high specific surface. The physical

  14. Robot Acting on Moving Bodies (RAMBO): Interaction with tumbling objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Larry S.; Dementhon, Daniel; Bestul, Thor; Ziavras, Sotirios; Srinivasan, H. V.; Siddalingaiah, Madhu; Harwood, David

    1989-01-01

    Interaction with tumbling objects will become more common as human activities in space expand. Attempting to interact with a large complex object translating and rotating in space, a human operator using only his visual and mental capacities may not be able to estimate the object motion, plan actions or control those actions. A robot system (RAMBO) equipped with a camera, which, given a sequence of simple tasks, can perform these tasks on a tumbling object, is being developed. RAMBO is given a complete geometric model of the object. A low level vision module extracts and groups characteristic features in images of the object. The positions of the object are determined in a sequence of images, and a motion estimate of the object is obtained. This motion estimate is used to plan trajectories of the robot tool to relative locations rearby the object sufficient for achieving the tasks. More specifically, low level vision uses parallel algorithms for image enhancement by symmetric nearest neighbor filtering, edge detection by local gradient operators, and corner extraction by sector filtering. The object pose estimation is a Hough transform method accumulating position hypotheses obtained by matching triples of image features (corners) to triples of model features. To maximize computing speed, the estimate of the position in space of a triple of features is obtained by decomposing its perspective view into a product of rotations and a scaled orthographic projection. This allows use of 2-D lookup tables at each stage of the decomposition. The position hypotheses for each possible match of model feature triples and image feature triples are calculated in parallel. Trajectory planning combines heuristic and dynamic programming techniques. Then trajectories are created using dynamic interpolations between initial and goal trajectories. All the parallel algorithms run on a Connection Machine CM-2 with 16K processors.

  15. The ion drive program - Comet rendezvous issues for SEPS developers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary steps have been taken in a joint high-priority project between NASA and the European Space Agency, whereby a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS), using ion drive of a 25-30 kilowatt power level, will be utilized for the first time, as part of the Space Transportation System, in powering a probe to be deployed toward Halley's comet in 1985 and a separate spacecraft which will rendezvous with the Temple 2 comet in 1988 and study it for one year. Unlike ballistically-launched vehicles, an unprecedented long-term interaction between the SEPS, the primary source of power and attitude control, and the spacecraft, responsible for data handling (at a rate of 10-120 kilobits per second), and command and telecommunications to earth (requiring capabilities at both X- and S-band frequencies, for dual-frequency navigational tracking), is required, as mission phases alternate between powered flight and science data-taking. Different design sensitivities are presented graphically.

  16. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezvous missions present unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations, and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading, and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited reaction control system propellant in the Shuttle nose, drove a change from the legacy Gemini/Apollo coelliptic profile to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions, and crew exchange, assembly and replenishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes. These changes included new proximity operations, relative navigation sensors, and new computer generated piloting cues. However, the Shuttle's baseline rendezvous navigation system has not required modification to place the Shuttle at the proximity operations initiation point for all rendezvous missions flown.

  17. Rendezvous missions to temporarily captured near Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelsford, S.; Chyba, M.; Haberkorn, T.; Patterson, G.

    2016-04-01

    Missions to rendezvous with or capture an asteroid present significant interest both from a geophysical and safety point of view. They are key to the understanding of our solar system and are stepping stones for interplanetary human flight. In this paper, we focus on a rendezvous mission with 2006 RH120, an asteroid classified as a Temporarily Captured Orbiter (TCO). TCOs form a new population of near Earth objects presenting many advantages toward that goal. Prior to the mission, we consider the spacecraft hibernating on a Halo orbit around the Earth-Moon's L2 libration point. The objective is to design a transfer for the spacecraft from the parking orbit to rendezvous with 2006 RH120 while minimizing the fuel consumption. Our transfers use indirect methods, based on the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, combined with continuation techniques and a direct method to address the sensitivity of the initialization. We demonstrate that a rendezvous mission with 2006 RH120 can be accomplished with low delta-v. This exploratory work can be seen as a first step to identify good candidates for a rendezvous on a given TCO trajectory.

  18. Shape and trajectory of a tumbling elastic sheet of paper II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Daniel; Robitaille, Michael; Kudrolli, Arshad; Bush, John

    2009-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical coupling between the tumbling motion and elastic deformation of a paper strip freely falling in air. Recent experiments suggest the existence of a critical length above which the strip bends as it tumbles. We demonstrate that this bending is caused by the centripetal force associated with its tumbling motion. A simple theory predicts that bending occurs above a critical length in much the same way that buckling occurs in a compressed beam. We further discuss the influence of bending on the trajectory of paper strips, as well as biological implications for the dispersal of seed pods.

  19. Rendezvous missions: From ISS to lunar space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, Rafail

    2014-08-01

    There was a lot of experience gained in the rendezvous of different vehicles in the LEO during the years of human space exploration. In the framework of the Apollo program when the astronauts landed on the surface of the Moon, the docking of the Lunar Module launched from the Moon's surface to the Apollo Command Module was successfully implemented in the near-Moon orbit. Presently many space agencies are considering a return to the Moon. It is necessary to solve the new task of docking the vehicle launched from the Earth to the long-term near-Moon orbital station taking into account specific constraints. Based on the ISS experience the author proposes a number of ballistic rendezvous strategies that provide for docking to the near-Moon orbital station with minimum propellant consumption. The trade-off analysis of the given rendezvous strategies is presented.

  20. SEPS comet rendezvous performance assessment. [Solar Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, C. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of delivered payload capability for a number of selected rendezvous missions to periodic comets with launch opportunities through the years 1986-1996. These missions are chosen using a selection criteria that considers both expected scientific interest and earth-based sighting considerations. Some 22 mission opportunities are found that satisfies the selection criteria. Spacecraft performance is presented for each mission opportunity based on use of a space shuttle, a twin stage inertial-upper-stage, and a conceptual solar-electric-propulsion-system with a nominal rendezvous 50 days before comet perihelion. Additional trajectory and propulsion enhancements are investigated for several comet rendezvous missions in order to improve spacecraft performance. An indirect transfer trajectory for an Encke mission is shown to offer substantial delivered payload. In addition the use of concentrator solar arrays is considered for several of the more interesting comet missions.

  1. Autonomous rendezvous and proximate motion of satellites - A covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackison, Donald L.; Morenthaler, George W.

    1992-08-01

    The construction of large (10 exp 6 kg) spacecraft in orbit will, in order to meet the requirements of interplanetary launch windows and restrictions of launch facilities require the launch of several 100,000-kg payloads using the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV), and their subsequent in-orbit assembly into a completed spacecraft. This assembly will require that the components rendezvous and dock within a reasonable time, taking into consideration launch window restrictions and the operating time limits on the component spacecraft. This will require that the rendezvous and docking operations be accomplished autonomously, without ground control. The trajectory and attitude control of a chase satellite to rendezvous with a target satellite are modeled using the Euler-Hill equations of relative orbital motion, and a linearized set of relative attitude parameters. The effect of uncertainties in the orbit dynamics and sensors, and the attitude dynamics and sensors are modeled using a linearized covariance analysis.

  2. Trajectory options for the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.; Bender, D. F.; Stetson, D. S.; Myers, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby mission is strongly supported by the scientific community. Two major events during the past year have forced a re-analysis of the mission options, with the goal of selecting a baseline mission for launch in 1993. Venus and earth gravity assists can be used to allow rendezvous with comet Tempel 2 in 1996; the scientific potential of the resulting mission is excellent. Although backup mission opportunities have been identified, the significantly longer flight times weaken the scientific appeal of these missions.

  3. A Study on Rendezvous Docking Control of the HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Yuji; Imado, Fumiaki; Murota, Akira

    A study on rendezvous docking control of the HOPE is presented. The HOPE is the Japanese version of unmanned space shuttle, which requires the automatic rendezvous docking guidance algorithm. In this paper, the thruster combination algorithm is implemented by using linear programming (LP) method for minimum fuel consumption. The automatic guidance algorithms for three approaching phases are developed. The numerical simulation by these algorithms showed good result. The thruster combination algorithm by LP, the determination algorithm of the thruster firing timing by C-W-Hill’s equation, and the technique for implementing the simulation are explained in detail.

  4. Robust H∞ Control for Spacecraft Rendezvous with a Noncooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shu-Nan; Zhou, Wen-Ya; Tan, Shu-Jun; Wu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The robust H∞ control for spacecraft rendezvous with a noncooperative target is addressed in this paper. The relative motion of chaser and noncooperative target is firstly modeled as the uncertain system, which contains uncertain orbit parameter and mass. Then the H∞ performance and finite time performance are proposed, and a robust H∞ controller is developed to drive the chaser to rendezvous with the non-cooperative target in the presence of control input saturation, measurement error, and thrust error. The linear matrix inequality technology is used to derive the sufficient condition of the proposed controller. An illustrative example is finally provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controller. PMID:24027446

  5. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card. PMID:23767634

  6. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamic forces and torques on falling parallelograms in coupled tumbling-helical motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Kapil; Chang, Song; Wang, Z. Jane

    2013-05-01

    Falling parallelograms exhibit coupled motion of autogyration and tumbling, similar to the motion of falling tulip seeds, unlike maple seeds which autogyrate but do not tumble, or rectangular cards which tumble but do not gyrate. This coupled tumbling and autogyrating motion are robust, when card parameters, such as aspect ratio, internal angle, and mass density, are varied. We measure the three-dimensional (3D) falling kinematics of the parallelograms and quantify their descending speed, azimuthal rotation, tumbling rotation, and cone angle in each falling. The cone angle is insensitive to the variation of the card parameters, and the card tumbling axis does not overlap with but is close to the diagonal axis. In addition to this connection to the dynamics of falling seeds, these trajectories provide an ideal set of data to analyze 3D aerodynamic force and torque at an intermediate range of Reynolds numbers, and the results will be useful for constructing 3D aerodynamic force and torque models. Tracking these free falling trajectories gives us a nonintrusive method for deducing instantaneous aerodynamic forces. We determine the 3D aerodynamic forces and torques based on Newton-Euler equations. The dynamical analysis reveals that, although the angle of attack changes dramatically during tumbling, the aerodynamic forces have a weak dependence on the angle of attack. The aerodynamic lift is dominated by the coupling of translational and rotational velocities. The aerodynamic torque has an unexpectedly large component perpendicular to the card. The analysis of the Euler equation suggests that this large torque is related to the deviation of the tumbling axis from the principle axis of the card.

  8. Dynamics and control of escape and rescue from a tumbling spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    The results of 18 months of investigations are reported. A movable mass control system to convert the tumbling motion of a spacecraft into simple spin was studied along with the optimization techniques for generating displacement profiles for a tumbling asymmetrical body. Equations of motion are discussed for two asymmetrical vehicles with flexible beams and one spacecraft with flexible solar arrays. The characteristics which allow reasonable safety and reliability in bailout are also discussed.

  9. Tumbling dynamics of isolated polymer chains in strong shear flows and the effects of chain resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Saha Dalal, Indranil; Albaugh, Alex; Hoda, Nazish

    2012-02-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, without hydrodynamic and excluded volume interactions, on polymer chain models encompassing a wide range of resolutions, we present a detailed investigation on the behavior of isolated chains in shear flow. We find a highly non-monotonic behavior for all models, with chain compression occurring at ultra-high shear rates that is consistent with the recent simulation studies. However, results obtained using highly refined models, with resolutions lower than a Kuhn step, reveal that this transition is an artifact of the level of chain discretization. Also, our results clearly indicate that, at high shear rates, the chain thickness in the shear-gradient direction is independent of the chain length, which differ from previously reported scaling law. We show that the chain thickness is fixed by the distance a sub-section of the chain can diffuse in the shear-gradient direction before convection stretches it out and suppresses further diffusion. Simple physical arguments are then used to derive the correct scaling laws for the coil width and the tumbling time at high shear rates. We believe that our findings presented here will provide the foundation for a better understanding of this basic problem in polymer dynamics.

  10. Shape and trajectory of a tumbling elastic sheet of paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Mike; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2009-03-01

    Inspired by wind dispersal of winged seeds and gliders, we study the flight of a tumbling piece of paper to explore the competing effect of inertia, lift, drag, and elasticity on its aerodynamics. Above a critical aspect ratio, a rigid rectangular sheet is well known to exhibit autorotation, leading to a lift force which causes it to drift away from the vertical as it falls through air. Less known is that the fact that the sheet buckles and bends along the axis of rotation when the rigidity of the sheet is reduced. We measure the deflection of the paper as a function of aspect ratio, and find its speed and angle of descent with high speed imaging. We find that the rotation speed is lower when the sheet is bent, than when it is unbent. The sheet deflection increases above a critical aspect ratio reaching a maximum before decreasing. The angle of descent is well described by a simple model balancing the gravitational, lift and drag forces acting on the sheet.

  11. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  12. Autonomous rendezvous and feature detection system using TV imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. B., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Algorithms and equations are used for conversion of standard television imaging system information into directly usable spatial and dimensional information. System allows utilization of spacecraft imagery system as sensor in application to operations such as deriving spacecraft steering signal, tracking, autonomous rendezvous and docking and ranging.

  13. Enchanted rendezvous: John C. Houbolt and the genesis of the lunar-orbit rendezvous concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth publication of the 'Monographs in Aerospace History' series, prepared by the NASA History Office. These publications are intended to be tightly focused in terms of subject, relatively short in length, and reproduced to allow timely and broad dissemination to researchers in aerospace history. This publication details the arguments of John C. Houbolt, an engineer at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, in his 1961-1962 campaign to support the lunar-orbit rendezvous (LOR). The LOR was eventually selected during Project Apollo as the method of flying to the Moon, landing on the surface, and returning to Earth. The LOR opted to send the entire lunar spacecraft up in one launch, enter into the lunar orbit, and dispatch a small lander to the lunar surface. It was the simplest of the various methods, both in terms of development and operational costs, but it was risky. There was no room for error or the crew could not get home; and the more difficult maneuvers had to be done when the spacecraft was committed to a circumlunar flight. Houbolt was one of the most vocal people supporting the LOR.

  14. Coarsening and clustering in run-and-tumble dynamics with short-range exclusion.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of clustering and coarsening in crowded ensembles of self-propelled agents is studied using a lattice model in one dimension. The persistent exclusion process, where particles move at directions that change randomly at a low tumble rate α, is extended allowing sites to be occupied by more than one particle, with a maximum n_{max} per site. Three phases are distinguished. For n_{max}=1 a gas of clusters form, with sizes distributed exponentially and no coarsening takes place. For n_{max}≥3 and small values of α, coarsening takes place and few large clusters appear, with a large fraction of the total number of particles in them. In the same range of n_{max} but for larger values of α, a gas phase where a negligible fraction of particles takes part of clusters. Finally, n_{max}=2 corresponds to a crossover phase. The character of the transitions between phases is studied extending the model to allow n_{max} to take real values and jumps to an occupied site are probabilistic. The transition from the gas of clusters to the coarsening phase is continuous and the mass of the large clusters grows continuously when varying the maximum occupancy, and the crossover found corresponds to values close to the transition. The second transition, from the coarsening to the gaseous phase, can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on the parameters, with a critical point separating both cases.

  15. Coarsening and clustering in run-and-tumble dynamics with short-range exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of clustering and coarsening in crowded ensembles of self-propelled agents is studied using a lattice model in one dimension. The persistent exclusion process, where particles move at directions that change randomly at a low tumble rate α , is extended allowing sites to be occupied by more than one particle, with a maximum nmax per site. Three phases are distinguished. For nmax=1 a gas of clusters form, with sizes distributed exponentially and no coarsening takes place. For nmax≥3 and small values of α , coarsening takes place and few large clusters appear, with a large fraction of the total number of particles in them. In the same range of nmax but for larger values of α , a gas phase where a negligible fraction of particles takes part of clusters. Finally, nmax=2 corresponds to a crossover phase. The character of the transitions between phases is studied extending the model to allow nmax to take real values and jumps to an occupied site are probabilistic. The transition from the gas of clusters to the coarsening phase is continuous and the mass of the large clusters grows continuously when varying the maximum occupancy, and the crossover found corresponds to values close to the transition. The second transition, from the coarsening to the gaseous phase, can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on the parameters, with a critical point separating both cases.

  16. Coarsening and clustering in run-and-tumble dynamics with short-range exclusion.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Néstor; Soto, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of clustering and coarsening in crowded ensembles of self-propelled agents is studied using a lattice model in one dimension. The persistent exclusion process, where particles move at directions that change randomly at a low tumble rate α, is extended allowing sites to be occupied by more than one particle, with a maximum n_{max} per site. Three phases are distinguished. For n_{max}=1 a gas of clusters form, with sizes distributed exponentially and no coarsening takes place. For n_{max}≥3 and small values of α, coarsening takes place and few large clusters appear, with a large fraction of the total number of particles in them. In the same range of n_{max} but for larger values of α, a gas phase where a negligible fraction of particles takes part of clusters. Finally, n_{max}=2 corresponds to a crossover phase. The character of the transitions between phases is studied extending the model to allow n_{max} to take real values and jumps to an occupied site are probabilistic. The transition from the gas of clusters to the coarsening phase is continuous and the mass of the large clusters grows continuously when varying the maximum occupancy, and the crossover found corresponds to values close to the transition. The second transition, from the coarsening to the gaseous phase, can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on the parameters, with a critical point separating both cases. PMID:27627356

  17. Design and development of PROBA-3 rendezvous experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastante, Juan C.; Vasconcelos, José; Hagenfeldt, Miguel; Peñín, Luis F.; Dinis, João; Rebordão, José

    2014-09-01

    PROBA-3 is a technology demonstration mission with the objective of, among others, raising the Formation Flying (FF) technology up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 8 or 9. The context of this mission has strong synergies with the knowledge areas considered in Rendezvous (RV), namely the fields of GNC, metrology, actuator systems, etc. This common ground between FF and RV allowed for a dedicated Rendezvous Experiment (RVX) to be performed in the scope of PROBA-3. The RVX is based only on camera measurements, and designed for highly elliptical orbits with strong constraints on relative position and attitude. This paper presents the design and development of the RVX experiment, with the goal to demonstrate the feasibility of vision-based RV and to increase the associated TRL.

  18. Optimal low-thrust rendezvous using equinoctial orbit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechichian, Jean Albert

    1996-01-01

    The problem of optimal low-thrust rendezvous using continuous constant acceleration is presented based on the use of the non-singular equinoctial orbit elements. State and adjoint equations are integrated numerically by applying the thrust vector along a direction that maximizes the variational Hamiltonian at each instant of time. The two-point-boundary-value problem is solved via a Newton-Raphson scheme after guessing the initial values of the Lagrange multipliers as well as the total flight time. The transversality condition for the Hamiltonian at the final time is also used to carry out the 7 × 7 search. Equinoctial elements have previously been used to carry out minimum-time orbit transfers by considering only the five slowly varying elements. The inclusion of the sixth element representing the fast variable has allowed us to extend the applicability of the non-singular formulation to problems of orbital rendezvous.

  19. Rendezvous and Proximity Operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2005-01-01

    Space Shuttle rendezous missions presented unique challenges that were not fully recognized when the Shuttle was designed. Rendezvous targets could be passive (i.e., no lights or transponders), and not designed to facilitate Shuttle rendezvous, proximity operations and retrieval. Shuttle reaction control system jet plume impingement on target spacecraft presented induced dynamics, structural loading and contamination concerns. These issues, along with limited forward reaction control system propellant, drove a change from the Gemimi/Apollo coelliptic profile heritage to a stable orbit profile, and the development of new proximity operations techniques. Multiple scientific and on-orbit servicing missions and crew exchange, assembly and replinishment flights to Mir and to the International Space Station drove further profile and piloting technique changes, including new relative navigation sensors and new computer generated piloting cues.

  20. Genetic algorithm based fuzzy control of spacecraft autonomous rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, C. L.; Freeman, L. M.; Meredith, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines is currently investigating ways to combine the control capabilities of fuzzy logic with the learning capabilities of genetic algorithms. Fuzzy logic allows for the uncertainty inherent in most control problems to be incorporated into conventional expert systems. Although fuzzy logic based expert systems have been used successfully for controlling a number of physical systems, the selection of acceptable fuzzy membership functions has generally been a subjective decision. High performance fuzzy membership functions for a fuzzy logic controller that manipulates a mathematical model simulating the autonomous rendezvous of spacecraft are learned using a genetic algorithm, a search technique based on the mechanics of natural genetics. The membership functions learned by the genetic algorithm provide for a more efficient fuzzy logic controller than membership functions selected by the authors for the rendezvous problem. Thus, genetic algorithms are potentially an effective and structured approach for learning fuzzy membership functions.

  1. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  2. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Treatments on the Quality Characteristics of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Ma, Ruixue; Song, Lei; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different tumbling marination treatments (control group, CG; conventional static marination, SM; vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) on the quality characteristics of prepared pork chops was investigated under simulated commercial conditions. The CT treatment increased (p<0.05) the pH value, b* value, product yield, tenderness, overall flavor, sensory juiciness and overall acceptability in comparison to other treatments for prepared boneless pork chops. The CT treatment decreased (p<0.05) cooking loss, shear force value, hardness, gumminess and chewiness compared with other treatments. In addition, CT treatment effectively improved springiness and sensory color more than other treatments. However, IT treatment achieved the numerically highest (p<0.05) L* and a* values. These results suggested that CT treatment obtained the best quality characteristics of prepared pork chops and should be adopted as the optimal commercial processing method for this prepared boneless pork chops. PMID:25557823

  3. Succeed escape: Flow shear promotes tumbling of Escherichia colinear a solid surface

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how bacteria move close to a surface under various stimuli is crucial for a broad range of microbial processes including biofilm formation, bacterial transport and migration. While prior studies focus on interactions between single stimulus and bacterial suspension, we emphasize on compounding effects of flow shear and solid surfaces on bacterial motility, especially reorientation and tumble. We have applied microfluidics and digital holographic microscopy to capture a large number (>105) of 3D Escherichia coli trajectories near a surface under various flow shear. We find that near-surface flow shear promotes cell reorientation and mitigates the tumble suppression and re-orientation confinement found in a quiescent flow, and consequently enhances surface normal bacterial dispersion. Conditional sampling suggests that two complimentary hydrodynamic mechanisms, Jeffrey Orbit and shear-induced flagella unbundling, are responsible for the enhancement in bacterial tumble motility. These findings imply that flow shear may mitigate cell trapping and prevent biofilm initiation. PMID:27752062

  4. Fast solar sail rendezvous mission to near Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangyuan; Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng

    2014-12-01

    The concept of fast solar sail rendezvous missions to near Earth asteroids is presented by considering the hyperbolic launch excess velocity as a design parameter. After introducing an initial constraint on the hyperbolic excess velocity, a time optimal control framework is derived and solved by using an indirect method. The coplanar circular orbit rendezvous scenario is investigated first to evaluate the variational trend of the transfer time with respect to different hyperbolic excess velocities and solar sail characteristic accelerations. The influence of the asteroid orbital inclination and eccentricity on the transfer time is studied in a parametric way. The optimal direction and magnitude of the hyperbolic excess velocity are identified via numerical simulations. The found results for coplanar circular scenarios are compared in terms of fuel consumption to the corresponding bi-impulsive transfer of the same flight time, but without using a solar sail. The fuel consumption tradeoff between the required hyperbolic excess velocity and the achievable flight time is discussed. The required total launch mass for a particular solar sail is derived in analytical form. A practical mission application is proposed to rendezvous with the asteroid 99942 Apophis by using a solar sail in combination with the provided hyperbolic excess velocity.

  5. Supervised autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1991-01-01

    Technology for manned space flight is mature and has an extensive history of the use of man-in-the-loop rendezvous and docking, but there is no history of automated rendezvous and docking. Sensors exist that can operate in the space environment. The Shuttle radar can be used for ranges down to 30 meters, Japan and France are developing laser rangers, and considerable work is going on in the U.S. However, there is a need to validate a flight qualified sensor for the range of 30 meters to contact. The number of targets and illumination patterns should be minimized to reduce operation constraints with one or more sensors integrated into a robust system for autonomous operation. To achieve system redundancy, it is worthwhile to follow a parallel development of qualifying and extending the range of the 0-12 meter MSFC sensor and to simultaneously qualify the 0-30(+) meter JPL laser ranging system as an additional sensor with overlapping capabilities. Such an approach offers a redundant sensor suite for autonomous rendezvous and docking. The development should include the optimization of integrated sensory systems, packaging, mission envelopes, and computer image processing to mimic brain perception and real-time response. The benefits of the Global Positioning System in providing real-time positioning data of high accuracy must be incorporated into the design. The use of GPS-derived attitude data should be investigated further and validated.

  6. Trajectory Control of Rendezvous with Maneuver Target Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhinqiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear trajectory control algorithm of rendezvous with maneuvering target spacecraft is presented. The disturbance forces on the chaser and target spacecraft and the thrust forces on the chaser spacecraft are considered in the analysis. The control algorithm developed in this paper uses the relative distance and relative velocity between the target and chaser spacecraft as the inputs. A general formula of reference relative trajectory of the chaser spacecraft to the target spacecraft is developed and applied to four different proximity maneuvers, which are in-track circling, cross-track circling, in-track spiral rendezvous and cross-track spiral rendezvous. The closed-loop differential equations of the proximity relative motion with the control algorithm are derived. It is proven in the paper that the tracking errors between the commanded relative trajectory and the actual relative trajectory are bounded within a constant region determined by the control gains. The prediction of the tracking errors is obtained. Design examples are provided to show the implementation of the control algorithm. The simulation results show that the actual relative trajectory tracks the commanded relative trajectory tightly. The predicted tracking errors match those calculated in the simulation results. The control algorithm developed in this paper can also be applied to interception of maneuver target spacecraft and relative trajectory control of spacecraft formation flying.

  7. Design and fabrication of an autonomous rendezvous and docking sensor using off-the-shelf hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Gary E.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed and tested an engineering model of an automated rendezvous and docking sensor system composed of a video camera ringed with laser diodes at two wavelengths and a standard remote manipulator system target that has been modified with retro-reflective tape and 830 and 780 mm optical filters. TRW has provided additional engineering analysis, design, and manufacturing support, resulting in a robust, low cost, automated rendezvous and docking sensor design. We have addressed the issue of space qualification using off-the-shelf hardware components. We have also addressed the performance problems of increased signal to noise ratio, increased range, increased frame rate, graceful degradation through component redundancy, and improved range calibration. Next year, we will build a breadboard of this sensor. The phenomenology of the background scene of a target vehicle as viewed against earth and space backgrounds under various lighting conditions will be simulated using the TRW Dynamic Scene Generator Facility (DSGF). Solar illumination angles of the target vehicle and candidate docking target ranging from eclipse to full sun will be explored. The sensor will be transportable for testing at the MSFC Flight Robotics Laboratory (EB24) using the Dynamic Overhead Telerobotic Simulator (DOTS).

  8. A new approach for teleoperation rendezvous and docking with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, JianYong; Jiang, ZiCheng; Tang, GuoJin

    2012-02-01

    Teleoperation rendezvous and docking can be used as a backup for autonomous rendezvous and docking (RVD) for an unmanned spacecraft or for guiding the chaser docking with an uncooperative target. The inherent teleoperation time delay is a rigorous problem, especially when the chaser is teleoperated on the ground. To eliminate the effect of time delay, a new approach for teleoperation RVD is studied. The characteristics of teleoperation RVD are analyzed by comparisons with the teleoperation robot and with manually controlled RVD; the relative motion of the chaser is predicted based on the C-W equation; and the processed measure information with time delay through the Kalman filter is utilized to correct the current prediction. Experimental results verify that the approach produces an 18% enhanced success rate of teleoperation RVD compared with direct visual feedback, and consumes less time and fuel. The developed approach also solves the time delay problem effectively. Teleoperation RVD using this method can be applied as a useful backup for autonomous RVD.

  9. Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-04-01

    Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. Our study suggests that nonlinear mechanics could be a significant contributing factor to how the trajectories of the microorganism are selected.

  10. [Role of contact with a support in the tumbling response of white rats during free fall].

    PubMed

    Aĭzikov, G S

    1980-12-01

    The tumbling and landing reactions of white rats were studied by cinematography during their free fall with eyes open. If the rats let the support go, they turned over and made a soft landing on their paws, no matter what their initial position was. However, when the animals fell down together with the support, the tumbling reaction was inhibited entirely and they landed as they were in the initial position, i.e. on the back, head, tail, etc. If during free fall the animals crumpled the support or if they touched a fixed object with their limbs or tail, they turned over and landed on their paws.

  11. Use of automated rendezvous trajectory planning to improve spacecraft operations efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Tom A.

    1991-01-01

    The current planning process for space shuttle rendezvous with a second Earth-orbiting vehicle is time consuming and costly. It is a labor-intensive, manual process performed pre-mission with the aid of specialized maneuver processing tools. Real-time execution of a rendezvous plan must closely follow a predicted trajectory, and targeted solutions leading up to the terminal phase are computed on the ground. Despite over 25 years of Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and shuttle vehicle-to-vehicle rendezvous missions flown to date, rendezvous in Earth orbit still requires careful monitoring and cannot be taken for granted. For example, a significant trajectory offset was experienced during terminal phase rendezvous of the STS-32 Long Duration Exposure Facility retrieval mission. Several improvements can be introduced to the present rendezvous planning process to reduce costs, produce more fuel-efficient profiles, and increase the probability of mission success.

  12. Mission options for rendezvous with the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid - 1989 ML

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadams, Jim V.

    1992-01-01

    The recent discovery of the Amor-class 1989 ML, the most accessible known asteroid for minimum-energy rendezvous missions, has expedited the search for frequent, low-cost Near-Earth Asteroid rendezvous and round-trip missions. This paper identifies trajectory characteristics and assesses mass performance for low Delta V ballistic rendezvous opportunities to 1989 ML during the period 1996-2010. This asteroid also offers occasional unique extended mission opportunities, such as the lowest known Delta V requirement for any asteroid sample return mission as well as pre-rendezvous asteroid flyby and post-rendezvous comet flyby opportunities requiring less than 5.25 km/sec total Delta V. This paper also briefly comments concerning mission opportunities for asteroid 1991 JW, which recently replaced other known asteroids as the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid for fast rendezvous and round-trip missions.

  13. Mission options for rendezvous with the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid - 1989 ML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Jim V.

    1992-08-01

    The recent discovery of the Amor-class 1989 ML, the most accessible known asteroid for minimum-energy rendezvous missions, has expedited the search for frequent, low-cost Near-Earth Asteroid rendezvous and round-trip missions. This paper identifies trajectory characteristics and assesses mass performance for low Delta V ballistic rendezvous opportunities to 1989 ML during the period 1996-2010. This asteroid also offers occasional unique extended mission opportunities, such as the lowest known Delta V requirement for any asteroid sample return mission as well as pre-rendezvous asteroid flyby and post-rendezvous comet flyby opportunities requiring less than 5.25 km/sec total Delta V. This paper also briefly comments concerning mission opportunities for asteroid 1991 JW, which recently replaced other known asteroids as the most accessible Near-Earth Asteroid for fast rendezvous and round-trip missions.

  14. Finding rendezvous: An approach to locating Rocky Mountain Rendezvous sites through use of historic documents, geophysical survey, and LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Rory J.

    The general locations of the Rocky Mountain Rendezvous have been known to historians through documentary evidence since the mid to late 1800s. While the approximate locations of the rendezvous sites provided through historic documents have sufficed for the placement of signs and markers commemorating these annual events, archaeologists seeking to learn more about the yearly gathering of mountain men and native peoples through excavations need a more precise area to begin their search on the landscape. The exact locations of the Rocky Mountain Rendezvous are yet unknown in the sense of an archaeologist visiting a rendezvous site, trowel in hand, and hoping to unearth a small portion of fur trade history. In this study, I present a method for moving from the approximate locations for the Rocky Mountain Rendezvous sites provided by historic documents to identifying specific rendezvous archaeological sites through use of historic documents, geophysical survey, and GIS modeling. The first paper in this dissertation examines the demographics of the rendezvous. By use of historic documents, I present a method for estimating the number of people who may have been present at the rendezvous and winter camps from 1825 through 1829. By using this method for estimating people at the rendezvous, it becomes clear more native people were in attendance at the rendezvous and winter camps than trappers and traders of European descent. Once armed with the knowledge a rendezvous site should more closely resemble the archaeological signature of a Protohistoric native camp than a historic Euroamerican archaeological site, the search for a Protohistoric native camp to be mapped with geophysical survey instruments can begin. During this study, such a search resulted in the successful mapping of a portion of the camp surrounding a fur trading post on the banks of Powder River in east-central Wyoming. The final section in the dissertation will address the issue of where and how to focus a

  15. Quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg as affected by tumbling after dry-salting and processing time.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Delgado, Luz H; Caro, Irma; Blanco, Carolina; Morán, Lara; Prieto, Nuria; Bodas, Raul; Giráldez, Francisco J; Mateo, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate selected quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg with different tumbling treatments after salting. The characteristics were measured at different processing times. Three batches of dry-cured lamb legs (nine legs per batch) were prepared with no-, short- and long-tumbling treatments, and microbial counts, NaCl, aw, proximate composition, pH, free fatty acids, water soluble nitrogen, volatile compounds, texture and colour were evaluated at days 1, 22 and 71 of processing. Furthermore, a descriptive sensory analysis (flavour and texture) was performed in the final product (day 71). Time-related changes were observed for most of the characteristics studied. The effect of tumbling was only observed for the sensory attribute pastiness that was higher in tumbled legs. Methyl-branched butanal was only detected in tumbled legs. PMID:24553493

  16. Quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg as affected by tumbling after dry-salting and processing time.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Delgado, Luz H; Caro, Irma; Blanco, Carolina; Morán, Lara; Prieto, Nuria; Bodas, Raul; Giráldez, Francisco J; Mateo, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate selected quality characteristics of a dry-cured lamb leg with different tumbling treatments after salting. The characteristics were measured at different processing times. Three batches of dry-cured lamb legs (nine legs per batch) were prepared with no-, short- and long-tumbling treatments, and microbial counts, NaCl, aw, proximate composition, pH, free fatty acids, water soluble nitrogen, volatile compounds, texture and colour were evaluated at days 1, 22 and 71 of processing. Furthermore, a descriptive sensory analysis (flavour and texture) was performed in the final product (day 71). Time-related changes were observed for most of the characteristics studied. The effect of tumbling was only observed for the sensory attribute pastiness that was higher in tumbled legs. Methyl-branched butanal was only detected in tumbled legs.

  17. Apollo experience report: Evolution of the rendezvous-maneuver plan for the lunar-landing missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. D.; Becker, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of the nominal rendezvous-maneuver plan for the lunar landing missions is presented along with a summary of the significant development for the lunar module abort and rescue plan. A general discussion of the rendezvous dispersion analysis that was conducted in support of both the nominal and contingency rendezvous planning is included. Emphasis is placed on the technical developments from the early 1960's through the Apollo 15 mission (July to August 1971), but pertinent organizational factors also are discussed briefly. Recommendations for rendezvous planning for future programs relative to Apollo experience also are included.

  18. Fiber laser-based scanning lidar for space rendezvous and docking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; He, Yan; Gao, Min; Zhou, Cuiyun; Zang, Huaguo; Lei, Linjun; Xie, Kedi; Yang, Yan; Shi, Wei; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-03-20

    Lidar systems have played an important role in space rendezvous and docking (RVD). A new type of scanning lidar is developed using a high-repetition-rate pulsed fiber laser and a position detector. It will be a candidate for autonomous space RVD between two spacecrafts. The lidar can search and track cooperative targets in a large region without artificial guidance. The lidar's operational range spans from 18 m to 20 km, and the relative angle between two aircrafts can be measured with high accuracy. A novel fiber laser with tunable pulse energy and repetition rate is developed to meet the wide dynamic detection range of the lidar. This paper presents the lidar system's composition, performance, and experimental results in detail.

  19. Fiber laser-based scanning lidar for space rendezvous and docking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuan; He, Yan; Gao, Min; Zhou, Cuiyun; Zang, Huaguo; Lei, Linjun; Xie, Kedi; Yang, Yan; Shi, Wei; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2015-03-20

    Lidar systems have played an important role in space rendezvous and docking (RVD). A new type of scanning lidar is developed using a high-repetition-rate pulsed fiber laser and a position detector. It will be a candidate for autonomous space RVD between two spacecrafts. The lidar can search and track cooperative targets in a large region without artificial guidance. The lidar's operational range spans from 18 m to 20 km, and the relative angle between two aircrafts can be measured with high accuracy. A novel fiber laser with tunable pulse energy and repetition rate is developed to meet the wide dynamic detection range of the lidar. This paper presents the lidar system's composition, performance, and experimental results in detail. PMID:25968536

  20. Practitioner Expertise: Creating Quality within the Daily Tumble of Events in Youth Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Reed W.; Rickman, Aimee N.; Gibbons, Colleen M.; Walker, Kathrin C.

    2009-01-01

    Practitioners in youth settings experience life on the ground as a tumble of events, shaped by a confluence of youth needs, institutional expectations, and other inputs. The quality of the setting is determined in part by practitioners' expertise in shaping and responding to these events. The situations that arise in practice, and how staff…

  1. Lightcurve Analysis of NEA (331471) 1984 QY1: A Tumbling Asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Brian D.; Benishek, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of CCD photometric observations of the near- Earth asteroid (331471) 1984 QY1 show that it is likely in non-principal axis rotation (NPAR), or tumbling. A single period analysis found a dominant period of 45.5 ± 0.5 h, but the true periods of rotation and precession could not be determined.

  2. Rough and Tumble Play Quality: Theoretical Foundations for a New Measure of Father-Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard; StGeorge, Jennifer; Freeman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Energetic, competitive, body-contact play (rough and tumble play (RTP)) is commonly observed among young children and is reported as an important feature of father-child relationships. Animal studies have demonstrated positive developmental effects of peer-peer play-wrestling, influencing cognitive and social outcomes. The purpose of this paper is…

  3. Is Father-Child Rough-and-Tumble Play Associated with Attachment or Activation Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Daniel; Dumont, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The activation relationship theory, primarily focused on parental stimulation of risk-taking along with parental control during exploration, predicts that boys will be activated more than girls by their fathers. This theory may explain why fathers engage in rough-and-tumble play (RTP) with children more frequently than mothers, especially with…

  4. Hydrodynamic model of bacterial tumbling near a non-slip surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jian; Molaei, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    To swim forward, wild type Escherichia coli bacteria rotate their helical flagella CCW to form a bundle; to tumble, one or more flagella rotate CW to initiate flagella unbundling and polymorphic transformation that leads to a significant change in cell orientation in comparison to original swimming direction. These random change of direction increases bacterial dispersion and also is long speculated to be a mechanism for perichtricous bacteria to escape from a surface. Our recent experimental results show that the tumbling frequency is substantially suppressed near a solid surface by 50%, and the bacterium tends to start a new run in the direction parallel to the surface. This suppression occurs at two cell length (including flagella) away from the surface whereby steric hindrance plays less significant role. Here we propose an analytical model based on hydrodynamic interaction between flagella and the solid surface. We utilize Slender Body Theory combined with the image system of the singularities for the Stoke-flow to quantify the flow around the bacterial flagella in the presence of a no-slip surface. The model includes two non-identical rigid helical flagella representing a bundle and single flagellum. We have showed that in the bulk, a repulsive force among flagella initiates the unbundling and consequently tumbling; however, in presence of a solid surface, the force is strongly mitigated that stabilize the bundle and suppress the tumbling. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  5. Hydrodynamic effects on the tumbling of flagellated bacteria near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Peritrichously flagellated bacteria use semi-rigid helical flagella to form a bundle during a run to swim forward and to trigger the unbundling during a tumble to change their swimming direction. It is accepted that the hydrodynamic interactions play a significant role in these processes. Recently, using digital holographic microscopy and microfluidics, we discovered that the tumbling events are substantially suppressed near a solid wall. In this paper, we present a two flagellum rigid model to elucidate the hydrodynamic wall interaction mechanism behind the phenomenon. Further implications on cell attachment and detachment during the biofilm formation will be discussed. We apply Slender Body Theory (SBT) to quantify the flow flagellum interaction. The no-slip boundary imposed by the wall is modeled using the image system of the SBT model for the stoke-flow singularity. We show that in the bulk, a repulsive force among flagella initiates the unbundling and consequently tumbling; however, in presence of the wall, the force is strongly mitigated that stabilize the bundle and suppress the tumbling. NIH and NSF.

  6. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions of Rough and Tumble Play vs. Aggression in Preschool-Aged Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Baumgartner, Jennifer; Ota, Carrie; Jenkins, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Rough and tumble play has been found to be positive for physical, social and cognitive development; it is often erroneously misinterpreted as aggression and generally stopped by preschool teachers. The current study sought to examine the relationship between teacher training and education and judgements about aggression in children. Ninety-four…

  7. 76 FR 37663 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Tumbling Creek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... cavesnail, refer to the final listing rule published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879... Federal Actions The Tumbling Creek cavesnail was emergency listed on December 27, 2001 (66 FR 66803) and subsequently listed as endangered on August 14, 2002 (67 FR 52879). At the time of listing, we determined...

  8. Virtual reality applications to automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph; Oneil, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly developing Human/Computer Interface (HCI) technology. The evolution of high-speed graphics processors and development of specialized anthropomorphic user interface devices, that more fully involve the human senses, have enabled VR technology. Recently, the maturity of this technology has reached a level where it can be used as a tool in a variety of applications. This paper provides an overview of: VR technology, VR activities at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), applications of VR to Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C), and identifies areas of VR technology that requires further development.

  9. Reference equations of motion for automatic rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis presented in this paper defines the reference coordinate frames, equations of motion, and control parameters necessary to model the relative motion and attitude of spacecraft in close proximity with another space system during the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture phase of an on-orbit operation. The relative docking port target position vector and the attitude control matrix are defined based upon an arbitrary spacecraft design. These translation and rotation control parameters could be used to drive the error signal input to the vehicle flight control system. Measurements for these control parameters would become the bases for an autopilot or feedback control system (FCS) design for a specific spacecraft.

  10. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Methods and Time on the Water Status and Protein Properties of Prepared Pork Chops

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tian; Li, Jiaolong; Zhang, Lin; Jiang, Yun; Yin, Maowen; Liu, Yang; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    The combined effect of tumbling marination methods (vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT) and effective tumbling time (4, 6, 8, and 10 h) on the water status and protein properties of prepared pork chops was investigated. Results showed that regardless of tumbling time, CT method significantly decreased the muscle fiber diameter (MD) and significantly increased the total moisture content, product yield, salt soluble proteins (SSP) solubility, immobilized water component (p<0.05) compared with IT method. With the effective tumbling time increased from 4 h to 10 h, the fat content and the MD were significantly decreased (p<0.05), whereas the SSP solubility of prepared pork chops increased firstly and then decreased. Besides, an interactive effect between CT method and effective tumbling time was also observed for the chemical composition and proportion of immobilized water (p<0.05). These results demonstrated that CT method of 8 h was the most beneficial for improving the muscle structure and water distribution status, increasing the water-binding capacity and accelerating the marinade efficiency of pork chops; and thus, it should be chosen as the most optimal treatment method for the processing production of prepared pork chops. PMID:26104408

  11. SEP ENCKE-87 and Halley rendezvous studies and improved S/C model implementation in HILTOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsewood, J. L.; Mann, F. I.

    1978-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the performance requirements for projected state-of-the-art SEP spacecrafts boosted by the Shuttle/IUS to perform a rendezvous with the comet Halley and a rendezvous with the comet Encke during its 1977 apparition. The spacecraft model of the standard HILTOP computer program was assumed. Numerical and graphical results summarizing the studies are presented.

  12. Constant propellant use rendezvous scenario across a launch window for refueling missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hametz, M. E.; Whittier, R.

    1990-12-01

    Active rendezvous of an unmanned spacecraft with the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle for refueling missions is investigated. The operational constraints facing both the maneuvering spacecraft and the Shuttle during a rendezvous sequence are presented. For example, the user spacecraft must arrive in the generic Shuttle control box at a specified time after Shuttle launch. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to initiate the transfer sequence from any point in its orbit. The standard four-burn rendezvous sequence, consisting of two Hohmann transfers and an intermediate phasing orbit, is presented as a low-energy solution for rendezvous and retrieval missions. However, for refueling missions, the Shuttle must completely refuel the spacecraft and return to Earth with no excess fuel. This additional constraint is not satisfied by the standard four-burn sequence. Therefore, a variation of the four-burn rendezvous, the constant delta-V scenario, was developed to satisfy the added requirement.

  13. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ruel Edwin

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 the Autonomous Rendezvous & Docking (AR&D) system was first demonstrated for members of NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware from the Cruise Missile and Advanced Centaur Avionics systems. The object was to show that all the accuracy, reliability and operational requirements established for a space craft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed system. The rapid prototyping capabilities of the Advanced Avionics Systems Development Laboratory were used to evaluate the proposed system in a real time, hardware in the loop simulation of the rendezvous and docking reference mission. The simulation permits manual, supervised automatic and fully autonomous operations to be evaluated. It is also being upgraded to be able to test an Autonomous Approach and Landing (AA&L) system. The AA&L and AR&D systems are very similar. Both use inertial guidance and control systems supplemented by GPS. Both use an Image Processing System (IPS), for target recognition and tracking. The IPS includes a general purpose multiprocessor computer and a selected suite of sensors that will provide the required relative position and orientation data. Graphic displays can also be generated by the computer, providing the astronaut / operator with real-time guidance and navigation data with enhanced video or sensor imagery.

  14. Optimal impulsive trajectories for orbital rendezvous between elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ching-Wei

    1992-01-01

    This study uses and extends primer vector theory to obtain a minimum-fuel two or multiple impulse solution for co-planar and non co-planar elliptic-to-elliptic, time-fixed rendezvous. Lawden's conditions for an optimal impulsive trajectory and three additional methods to improve the non-optimal multiple impulse are introduced. To extend a 3-Impulse differential cost function provided by Jezewski and Rozendaal, the general differential cost function for an N-Impulse trajectory is developed. This approach defines the gradient vector for any set of boundary conditions. To determine the number of impulses, times, and locations for multiple-impulse optimal trajectories automatically, a computer program is developed. This software has been thoroughly tested in a wide variety of rendezvous situations. The singularity for a transfer angle of 180 degrees and the singular case of sin I = 0 are also accounted for in the program. Part of this work was accomplished using the Generalized Reduced Gradient method using its associated GRG2 computer code. The effects of inclination between the vehicle and target orbits, the initial positions of the vehicle and target, and the direction of the major axes are considered. Numerical results for several different orbit configurations are produced and discussed. The results are compared with the Hohmann/Hohmann type transfer and/or the optimal, finite, three-impulse transfer.

  15. Global optimization of fuel consumption in rendezvous scenarios by the method of interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the optimal but large Δv of the fixed-short-time two impulse Lambert rendezvous between two spacecrafts along two coplanar circular orbits, the three-impulse Lambert rendezvous optimized via the optimization algorithm-interval analysis (IA) is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment of the fixed-short-time three-impulse Lambert rendezvous. The optimization algorithm IA is given for solving the rendezvous optimization problem with multiple uncertain variables, and strong nonlinearity and nonconvexity. Numerical examples of the time-open, coplanar-circular-orbit, multiple-revolution Lambert rendezvous with a parking time optimized via the optimization algorithm IA are firstly undertaken to validate the feasibility of the optimization algorithm IA by comparing the optimization results with those of the globally optimal Hohmann transfer. The results indicate that the globally optimal parameters of the time-open coplanar-circular-orbit multiple-revolution Lambert rendezvous can be obtained by the optimization algorithm IA, and the initial separation angle of two spacecrafts with different orbit radius can be adjusted to obtain the globally optimal and small Δv by distributing an optimal parking time. After that, for the fixed-short-time two-impulse Lambert rendezvous problem without sufficient time to adjust the separation angle by distributing a parking time like the open-time Lambert rendezvous problem, three-impulse Lambert rendezvous involving multiple optimization variables is given and the variables are optimized by the optimization algorithm IA to obtain an optimal and small Δv. Numerical simulation indicates that the optimal and small Δv of the fixed short time, three-impulse Lambert rendezvous can be obtained using the optimization algorithm IA.

  16. Determination of Eros Physical Parameters for Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Orbit Phase Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. K.; Antreasian, P. J.; Georgini, J.; Owen, W. M.; Williams, B. G.; Yeomans, D. K.

    1995-01-01

    Navigation of the orbit phase of the Near Earth steroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission will re,quire determination of certain physical parameters describing the size, shape, gravity field, attitude and inertial properties of Eros. Prior to launch, little was known about Eros except for its orbit which could be determined with high precision from ground based telescope observations. Radar bounce and light curve data provided a rough estimate of Eros shape and a fairly good estimate of the pole, prime meridian and spin rate. However, the determination of the NEAR spacecraft orbit requires a high precision model of Eros's physical parameters and the ground based data provides only marginal a priori information. Eros is the principal source of perturbations of the spacecraft's trajectory and the principal source of data for determining the orbit. The initial orbit determination strategy is therefore concerned with developing a precise model of Eros. The original plan for Eros orbital operations was to execute a series of rendezvous burns beginning on December 20,1998 and insert into a close Eros orbit in January 1999. As a result of an unplanned termination of the rendezvous burn on December 20, 1998, the NEAR spacecraft continued on its high velocity approach trajectory and passed within 3900 km of Eros on December 23, 1998. The planned rendezvous burn was delayed until January 3, 1999 which resulted in the spacecraft being placed on a trajectory that slowly returns to Eros with a subsequent delay of close Eros orbital operations until February 2001. The flyby of Eros provided a brief glimpse and allowed for a crude estimate of the pole, prime meridian and mass of Eros. More importantly for navigation, orbit determination software was executed in the landmark tracking mode to determine the spacecraft orbit and a preliminary shape and landmark data base has been obtained. The flyby also provided an opportunity to test orbit determination operational procedures that will be

  17. Combined radiologic and endoscopic treatment (using the “rendezvous technique”) of a biliary fistula following left hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gracient, Aurélien; Rebibo, Lionel; Delcenserie, Richard; Yzet, Thierry; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ongoing decrease in the frequency of complications after hepatectomy, biliary fistulas still occur and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Here, we report on an unusual technique for managing biliary fistula following left hepatectomy in a patient in whom the right posterior segmental duct joined the left hepatic duct. The biliary fistula was treated with a combined radiologic and endoscopic procedure based on the “rendezvous technique”. The clinical outcome was good, and reoperation was not required. PMID:27570431

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, G. V.; Harrington, J. K.; Eastman, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    The purposes of this vanadyl spin probe study are threefold: (1) to establish when the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas occurs; (2) to analyze the experimental vanadyl EPR line shapes by the stochastic Lioville method as developed by Polnaszek et al. (1973) for slow tumbling in an anisotropic liquid; and (3) to compare the vanadyl probe study results with those of Polnaszek and Freed (1975). Spectral EPR line shapes are simulated for experimental spectra of vanadyl acetylacetonate (VOAA) in nematic liquid crystal butyl p-(p-ethoxyphenoxycarbonyl) phenyl carbonate (BEPC) and Phase V of EM laboratories. It is shown that the use of typical vanadyl complexes as spin probes for nematic liquid crystals simplifies the theoretical analysis and the subsequent interpretation. Guidelines for the breakdown of motionally narrowed formulas are established. Both the slow tumbling aspects and the effects of non-Brownian rotation should be resolved in order to extract quantitative information about molecular ordering and rotational mobility.

  19. ESR studies of the slow tumbling of vanadyl spin probes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, M. P.; Bruno, G. V.; Lawson, J. O.

    1977-01-01

    ESR line shapes that are appropriate for slowly tumbling vanadyl spin probes in viscous nematic liquid crystals were calculated by the stochastic Liouville method. Because of the symmetry possessed by vanadyl, the analysis and interpretation of these line shapes was simplified considerably. Spectral line shapes agreed well with experimental spectra of VOAcAc in the nematic liquid crystal Phase V and BEPC. Deviations from Brownian rotational diffusion were noted. A slowly fluctuating torque analysis yielded good agreement with the experimental spectra.

  20. Run-and-tumble particles, telegrapher’s equation and absorption problems with partially reflecting boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, Luca

    2015-12-01

    Absorption problems of run-and-tumble particles, described by the telegrapher's equation, are analyzed in one space dimension considering partially reflecting boundaries. Exact expressions for the probability distribution function in the Laplace domain and for the mean time to absorption are given, discussing some interesting limits (Brownian and wave limit, large volume limit) and different case studies (semi-infinite segment, equal and symmetric boundaries, totally/partially reflecting boundaries).

  1. Gossip-Based Solutions for Discrete Rendezvous in Populations of Communicating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Christopher D.; Wu, Annie S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the rendezvous problem is to construct a method that enables a population of agents to agree on a spatial (and possibly temporal) meeting location. We introduce the buffered gossip algorithm as a general solution to the rendezvous problem in a discrete domain with direct communication between decentralized agents. We compare the performance of the buffered gossip algorithm against the well known uniform gossip algorithm. We believe that a buffered solution is preferable to an unbuffered solution, such as the uniform gossip algorithm, because the use of a buffer allows an agent to use multiple information sources when determining its desired rendezvous point, and that access to multiple information sources may improve agent decision making by reinforcing or contradicting an initial choice. To show that the buffered gossip algorithm is an actual solution for the rendezvous problem, we construct a theoretical proof of convergence and derive the conditions under which the buffered gossip algorithm is guaranteed to produce a consensus on rendezvous location. We use these results to verify that the uniform gossip algorithm also solves the rendezvous problem. We then use a multi-agent simulation to conduct a series of simulation experiments to compare the performance between the buffered and uniform gossip algorithms. Our results suggest that the buffered gossip algorithm can solve the rendezvous problem faster than the uniform gossip algorithm; however, the relative performance between these two solutions depends on the specific constraints of the problem and the parameters of the buffered gossip algorithm. PMID:25397882

  2. Simulation of the flow field and tumbling dynamics of multiply flagellated bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Watari, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-01

    To study the hydrodynamics of swimming of multi-flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, we develop a simulation method using a bead-spring model to account for the hydrodynamic and the mechanical interactions between multiple flagella and the cell body, the reversal of the rotation of a flagellum in a tumble and associated polymorphic transformations of the flagellum. This simulation reproduces the experimentally observed behaviors of E. coli, namely, a three-dimensional random-walk trajectory in run-and-tumble motion and steady clockwise swimming near a wall. Here we show using a modeled cell that the polymorphic transformation of flagellum in a tumble facilitates the reorientation of the cell, and that the time-averaged flow field near a cell in a run has double-layered helical streamlines. Moreover, the instantaneous flow field, which is strongly time-dependent, is more than 10-fold larger in magnitude than the time-averaged flow, large enough to affect the migration behavior of surrounding chemoattractants, with the Peclet number for these molecules being larger than one near a swimming cell.

  3. A Study of the Inclination of Satellites of a Planet After Spin Axis Forced Tumbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrin, Luiz Augusto; Winter, O.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In order to analyze the theory of satellite loss resulting from a giant impact on Uranus, we decided to do few a study about this problem using forced tumbling of the spin axis of planet. We used two different kinds of forced tumbling to simulate the obliquity variation: linear variation and damped variation. To do this, we made numerical simulations of N-body problem with J2 oblateness coefficient of the central body. First, we studied the relation of the time tumbling of Uranus' spin axis and the semi-major axis of the hypothetical satellite with a specific final inclination. In both cases the results are a power law. Later we study the final inclination of the satellite in relation to the number of collisions (pseudo collision). And finally we studied the final inclination of several different initial conditions (orbital elements) of the satellites. We concluded that the initial inclination and initial longitude of ascending node are important to the final satellite inclination. For future studies we want implement a more realistic model using the attitude equations of the central body and study the origin of the obliquity of the others planets of the solar system. Aknowledments: FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  4. SIMONE: A fleet of Near-Earth Object rendezvous microsatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, S. F.; Wells, N. S.; Ball, A. J.; Bernelli-Zazzera, F.; Perozzi, E.; Townend, M.; Walker, R. G.; Zarnecki, J. C.

    2003-04-01

    The SIMONE (Spacecraft Intercept Missions to Objects Near Earth) concept has recently been developed as part of an ESA-funded study (Near Earth Objects Space Mission Preparation). The SIMONE study, led by QinetiQ, with scientific aspects led by the Open University's Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, is to help understand the diversity of the NEO population using a fleet of microsatellite-class (~120 kg) interplanetary spacecraft with solar electric propulsion. The low cost approach (<50 MEuro for the first and 30 MEuro for subsequent spacecraft) allows a fleet of spacecraft to be deployed for the budget of a typical interplanetary mission. Each spacecraft will rendezvous with a different Near-Earth Object to perform key physical, morphological and compositional measurements relevant to NEO risk assessment as well as scientific investigation. We present the main features of the spacecraft design, measurement objectives, payload, target NEOs and mission operations.

  5. Some impulsive rendezvous trajectories and their possible optimality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltier, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two- and three-impulse trajectories are investigated for fixed-time, fixed-angle rendezvous between vacant circular coplanar orbits, for trip angles less than, or equal to 2 pi in magnitude. For two-impulse trajectories, general features of the characteristic velocity function are outlined. Parameters of the intermediate orbit are reviewed. Attention is given to limiting cases. Computation of the adjoint system helps to define the domain of possible optimality foajectories: it is a closed domain in the trip time, trip angle plane. Waiting periods on terminal orbits are considered. The domain of possible optimality is defined using Lawden's primer vrtory. This domain extends to infinity if the radius ratio of terminal orbits is less than 15.6. Three-impulse trajectories are tried in cases where two-impulse trajectories, with or without cost, have been found nonoptimal. Improvements on the characteristic velocity are thus obtained.

  6. Orion Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Docking Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Hanak, F. Chad; Spehar, Pete; Clark, Fred D.; Jackson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Orion vehicle will be required to perform rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and the Earth Departure Stage (EDS)/Lunar Landing Vehicle (LLV) stack in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) as well as with the Lunar Landing Vehicle in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). The RPOD system, which consists of sensors, actuators, and software is being designed to be flexible and robust enough to perform RPOD with different vehicles in different environments. This paper will describe the design and the analysis which has been performed to date to allow the vehicle to perform its mission. Since the RPOD design touches on many areas such as sensors selection and placement, trajectory design, navigation performance, and effector performance, it is inherently a systems design problem. This paper will address each of these issues in order to demonstrate how the Orion RPOD has been designed to accommodate and meet all the requirements levied on the system.

  7. Mission opportunity maps for rendezvous with earth-crossing asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C.-W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Rendezvous missions for earth-crossing asteroids are of interest to NASA, for scientific purposes as well as for technological applications and ecological implications. To provide a comprehensive data base for planners of such missions, a mission opportunity map (MOM) has been created for eight relatively easy-to-access asteroids. A MOM presents such mission data as launch dates, flight times, and launch and postlaunch delta-V requirements for all useful mission opportunities. The merits of a MOM are: (1) searches for all useful mission opportunities are completed in the process of generating a MOM, and (2) a clear view of good and bad opportunities, the extent of performance variations, and the repeatability of the missions.

  8. Mission opportunity maps for rendezvous with earth-crossing asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Chen-Wan L.

    1989-01-01

    Rendezvous missions to earth-crossing asteroids are of interest to NASA, for scientific purposes as well as for technological applications and ecological implications. To provide a comprehensive data base for planners of such missions, a mission opportunity map (MOM) has been created for eight relatively easy-to-access asteroids. A MOM presents such mission data as launch dates, flight times, and launch and postlaunch delta V requirements for all useful mission opportunities. The merits of a MOM are: (1) searches for all useful mission oportunities are completed in the process of generating a MOM, and (2) a MOM provides a clear view of good and bad opportunities, the extent of performance variations, and the repeatability of the missions.

  9. Rendezvous, proximity operations and capture quality function deployment report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Capture (RPOC) is a missions operations area which is extremely important to present and future space initiatives and must be well planned and coordinated. To support this, a study team was formed to identify a specific plan of action using the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process. This team was composed of members from a wide spectrum of engineering and operations organizations which are involved in the RPOC technology area. The key to this study's success is an understanding of the needs of potential programmatic customers and the technology base available for system implementation. To this end, the study team conducted interviews with a variety of near term and future programmatic customers and technology development sponsors. The QFD activity led to a thorough understanding of the needs of these customers in the RPOC area, as well as the relative importance of these needs.

  10. Transparent Ada rendezvous in a fault tolerant distributed system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racine, Roger

    1986-01-01

    There are many problems associated with distributing an Ada program over a loosely coupled communication network. Some of these problems involve the various aspects of the distributed rendezvous. The problems addressed involve supporting the delay statement in a selective call and supporting the else clause in a selective call. Most of these difficulties are compounded by the need for an efficient communication system. The difficulties are compounded even more by considering the possibility of hardware faults occurring while the program is running. With a hardware fault tolerant computer system, it is possible to design a distribution scheme and communication software which is efficient and allows Ada semantics to be preserved. An Ada design for the communications software of one such system will be presented, including a description of the services provided in the seven layers of an International Standards Organization (ISO) Open System Interconnect (OSI) model communications system. The system capabilities (hardware and software) that allow this communication system will also be described.

  11. Rendezvous Integration Complexities of NASA Human Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack P.; Goodman, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Propellant-optimal trajectories, relative sensors and navigation, and docking/capture mechanisms are rendezvous disciplines that receive much attention in the technical literature. However, other areas must be considered. These include absolute navigation, maneuver targeting, attitude control, power generation, software development and verification, redundancy management, thermal control, avionics integration, robotics, communications, lighting, human factors, crew timeline, procedure development, orbital debris risk mitigation, structures, plume impingement, logistics, and in some cases extravehicular activity. While current and future spaceflight programs will introduce new technologies and operations concepts, the complexity of integrating multiple systems on multiple spacecraft will remain. The systems integration task may become more difficult as increasingly complex software is used to meet current and future automation, autonomy, and robotic operation requirements.

  12. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In support of the Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) Definition Studies in FY-92, the Advanced Program Development division of the Office of Space Flight at NASA Headquarters conducted an evaluation and review of the United States capabilities and state-of-the-art in Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C). This review was held in Williamsburg, Virginia on 19-21 Nov. 1991 and included over 120 attendees from U.S. government organizations, industries, and universities. One hundred abstracts were submitted to the organizing committee for consideration. Forty-two were selected for presentation. The review was structured to include five technical sessions. Forty-two papers addressed topics in the five categories below: (1) hardware systems and components; (2) software systems; (3) integrated systems; (4) operations; and (5) supporting infrastructure.

  13. STS 63 Flight Day 4 Highlights/MIR-Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS 63 Flight, day 4, the MIR-Shuttle rendezvous is highlighted in this video. The six-member team in the Shuttle are introduced and discuss their functions and tests for this day of the flight. There is actual footage of earth from space, of the MIR Space Station, a tour of the Shuttle cockpit, some footage from the MIR of the Space Shuttle, and footage from inside the MIR with the cosmonauts. Mission control communications with the Shuttle, communication between the Shuttle and MIR, and an historic communication between the Shuttle's astronauts and President Bill Clinton are included. President Clinton interviews each of the six-member team and discusses the upcoming space walk by Dr. Bernard Harris, the first black astronaut to walk in space. This video was recorded on February 6, 1995.

  14. STS 63 flight day 4 highlights/MIR-Shuttle rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-02-01

    STS 63 Flight, day 4, the MIR-Shuttle rendezvous is highlighted in this video. The six-member team in the Shuttle are introduced and discuss their functions and tests for this day of the flight. There is actual footage of earth from space, of the MIR Space Station, a tour of the Shuttle cockpit, some footage from the MIR of the Space Shuttle, and footage from inside the MIR with the cosmonauts. Mission control communications with the Shuttle, communication between the Shuttle and MIR, and an historic communication between the Shuttle's astronauts and President Bill Clinton are included. President Clinton interviews each of the six-member team and discusses the upcoming space walk by Dr. Bernard Harris, the first black astronaut to walk in space. This video was recorded on February 6, 1995.

  15. Autonomous rendezvous targeting techniques for national launch system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomas, James J.; Deaton, A. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The rendezvous targeting techniques that can be utilized to achieve autonomous guidance for delivering a cargo to Space Station Freedom (SSF) using the National Launch System's (NLS) Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) and the on-orbit Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) are described. This capability is made possible by advancements in autonomous navigation (Global Positioning System - GPS) on-board the CTV and SSF as well as the new generation flight computers. How the HLLV launch window can be decoupled from the CTV phasing window is described. The performance trades that have to be made to determine the length of the launch window and the phasing window between the CTV and SSF are identified and recommendations made that affect mission timelines.

  16. A Comparison Between Orion Automated and Space Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Jose O,; Hart, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft will replace the space shuttle and will be the first human spacecraft since the Apollo program to leave low earth orbit. This vehicle will serve as the cornerstone of a complete space transportation system with a myriad of mission requirements necessitating rendezvous to multiple vehicles in earth orbit, around the moon and eventually beyond . These goals will require a complex and robust vehicle that is, significantly different from both the space shuttle and the command module of the Apollo program. Historically, orbit operations have been accomplished with heavy reliance on ground support and manual crew reconfiguration and monitoring. One major difference with Orion is that automation will be incorporated as a key element of the man-vehicle system. The automated system will consist of software devoted to transitioning between events based on a master timeline. This effectively adds a layer of high level sequencing that moves control of the vehicle from one phase to the next. This type of automated control is not entirely new to spacecraft since the shuttle uses a version of this during ascent and entry operations. During shuttle orbit operations however many of the software modes and hardware switches must be manually configured through the use of printed procedures and instructions voiced from the ground. The goal of the automation scheme on Orion is to extend high level automation to all flight phases. The move towards automation represents a large shift from current space shuttle operations, and so these new systems will be adopted gradually via various safeguards. These include features such as authority-to-proceed, manual down modes, and functional inhibits. This paper describes the contrast between the manual and ground approach of the space shuttle and the proposed automation of the Orion vehicle. I will introduce typical orbit operations that are common to all rendezvous missions and go on to describe the current Orion automation

  17. Study of a comet rendezvous mission, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility, scientific objectives, modes of exploration and implementation alternatives of a rendezvous mission to Encke's comet in 1984 are considered. Principal emphasis is placed on developing the scientific rationale for such a mission, based on available knowledge and best estimates of this comet's physical characteristics, including current theories of its origin, evolution and composition. Studied are mission profile alternatives, performance tradeoffs, preferred exploration strategy, and a spacecraft design concept capable of performing this mission. The study showed that the major scientific objectives can be met by a Titan IIID/Centaur-launched 17.5 kw solar electric propulsion spacecraft which carries 60 kg of scientific instruments and is capable of extensive maneuvering within the comet envelope to explore the coma, tail and nucleus.

  18. Rendezvous, proximity operations and capture quality function deployment report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamkin, Stephen L.

    1991-12-01

    Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Capture (RPOC) is a missions operations area which is extremely important to present and future space initiatives and must be well planned and coordinated. To support this, a study team was formed to identify a specific plan of action using the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process. This team was composed of members from a wide spectrum of engineering and operations organizations which are involved in the RPOC technology area. The key to this study's success is an understanding of the needs of potential programmatic customers and the technology base available for system implementation. To this end, the study team conducted interviews with a variety of near term and future programmatic customers and technology development sponsors. The QFD activity led to a thorough understanding of the needs of these customers in the RPOC area, as well as the relative importance of these needs.

  19. Terminal spacecraft rendezvous and capture with LASSO model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Edward N.; Gallieri, Marco; Maciejowski, Jan M.

    2013-11-01

    The recently investigated ℓasso model predictive control (MPC) is applied to the terminal phase of a spacecraft rendezvous and capture mission. The interaction between the cost function and the treatment of minimum impulse bit is also investigated. The propellant consumption with ℓasso MPC for the considered scenario is noticeably less than with a conventional quadratic cost and control actions are sparser in time. Propellant consumption and sparsity are competitive with those achieved using a zone-based ℓ1 cost function, whilst requiring fewer decision variables in the optimisation problem than the latter. The ℓasso MPC is demonstrated to meet tighter specifications on control precision and also avoids the risk of undesirable behaviours often associated with pure ℓ1 stage costs.

  20. Deep Interior: Multiple-Rendezvous Prospecting of NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuda, R. Y.; Asphaug, E.; Belton, M. J. S.; Gulkis, S.; Huebner, W. F.

    2000-10-01

    This is an international multiple-rendezvous mission designed to prospect the deep interior and subsurface geophysical properties of diverse near-Earth objects, using reflection radar tomography, imaging, gravity, and explosions. What we learn will greatly influence future missions and guide strategies for the diversion, disruption, or utilization of potentially hazardous objects. Deep Interior. Low-frequency radar to determine internal variations of complex permittivity at resolutions approaching 20 m. Map inclusions or voids, fracture geometries, and compositional or structural boundaries. Subsurface. High-frequency radar to determine depth of regolith, existence and nature of cometary mantle, geology beneath and around craters, and subsurface expressions to surface geology. Topography and Geodesy. Stereogrammetric imaging with 1 m/pixel spatial resolution, supplemented by radar altimetry in shadowed regions, to determine detailed shape, volume, and spin state. Compare with radar sounding to learn how internal structure is manifested on the surface. Mass and Density. Total mass and lower moments of the internal mass distribution by mapping the exterior gravitational field. Look for mass concentrations. Surface microphysics and composition. Map color, albedo, and scattering properties of the surface over sunlit regions in six optical filters. Material properties. Deploy grenades to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of surface materials. Record 8 frame/sec, 20 cm/pixel videos of crater formation and ejecta dynamics, to enable simple and direct laboratory constraints on material density, cohesion and porosity. Dust. Look for dust lofted by surface waves propagating from the explosions, to constrain elastic properties and attenuation. Observe longer-term dynamics and optical properties of dust "atmosphere" generated by human activity. Cometary Activity. At comet 107P/Wilson-Harrington, look for expressions of past cometary activity, and for possible awakening

  1. The comet rendezvous asteroid flyby mission: A status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Neugebauer, Marcia

    1991-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission received a new start in fiscal year 1990. CRAF will match orbits with an active short-period comet and follow it around the Sun, making scientific measurements of the nucleus, coma, and tail. The Imaging system will map the nucleus surface at a resolution of 1 meter/line-pair or better, while Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and Thermal Infrared Radiometer Experiment (TIREX) will produce spectral and thermal maps of the surface. Onboard instruments will collect cometary dust, ice, and gases and perform elemental and molecular analysis. A suite of fields and particles instruments will observe the solar wind interaction with the cometary atmosphere and tail. Radio tracking of the spacecraft will provide an accurate measure of the nucleus mass and higher harmonics in the comet's gravity field. En route to the comet, the spacecraft will make a close flyby of a large asteroid, preferably a primitive type from the outer main belt. Observations at the asteroid include remote sensing mapping of the surface, detection of any solar wind interaction observable at the flyby distance, and measurement of the asteroid mass to better than 10 percent accuracy. Detailed design of the CRAF spacecraft is currently underway at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Recent mass growth has necessitated a switch to Venus-Earth gravity assist type trajectories, similar to that used by the Galileo spacecraft. These trajectories require longer flight times from launch to rendezvous with the target comet. The details of the current baseline mission, spacecraft design, and instrument payload will be reviewed.

  2. A Two-Impulse Plan for Performing Rendezvous on a Once-A-Day Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, John D.; Thomas, David F., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of a two-impulse plan for performing rendezvous on a once-a-day basis with a near-earth satellite station indicates that launch into rendezvous from slightly less than maximum satellite latitude is an unusually favorable circumstance in that no appreciable expense in mass ratio is incurred. In addition, it was found for the two-impulse maneuver employed in this study that the optimum angular travel of the ferry vehicle to rendezvous was considerably less than the 1800 transfer which is optimum for the two-impulse in-plane launch.

  3. Importance of chain tumbling and finite extension on the start-up and relaxation behavior of transient networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sing, Michelle; Wang, Zhen-Gang; McKinley, Gareth; Olsen, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    Associative polymer networks are ubiquitous in tissue and biomedical engineering. However, the particular molecular attributes that contribute to the macroscopic behavior like shear thinning, self-healing, and yield stress are less well known. Here we incorporate chemical kinetics in the the Smoluchowski Equation capable of modeling the full network chain end-to-end distance distribution while tracking the fraction of looped, bridged, and dangling chains in the gel. In steady shear, we see the development of non-monotonic flow instabilities when the rate of chain association and dissociation are slower than the rate of chain relaxation. These instabilities arise due to a combination of chain finite extensibility and tumbling. During start-up of steady shear, the combination of these two phenomena also results in stress overshoots followed by multiple damped oscillations toward steady-state. The timescale of chain relaxation after the cessation of shear is dominated by the chain kinetics of association and dissociation as a function of the fraction of dangling chains present at any time post-shear. Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Department of Defense National Defense Science and Engineering Fellowship Program.

  4. RendezVous sensor for automatic guidance of transfer vehicles to the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Karl-Hermann; Moebius, Bettina G.

    2000-10-01

    Based on a Predevelopment Program, initiated by the European Space Agency, an automatically operating RendezVous Sensor (RVS) is currently developed. This paper describes in more detail the RVS concept emphasizing the electro-optical elements of the sensor.

  5. Sodium chloride concentration affects yield, quality, and sensory acceptability of vacuum-tumbled marinated broiler breast fillets.

    PubMed

    Lopez, K; Schilling, M W; Armstrong, T W; Smith, B S; Corzo, A

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of sodium chloride concentration on yield, instrumental quality, and sensory acceptability of broiler breast meat that was vacuum tumbled with a 15% solution (over green weight) for 30 min. Different concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, and 1.50%) of NaCl (salt) and 0.35% sodium tripolyphosphate were included in the marinade solution. After marinating, breast fillets were evaluated for marination yields, pH, surface color, cooking loss, tenderness, expressible moisture, proximate composition, purge loss, sodium content, and sensory acceptability. As salt concentration increased, CIE L* decreased linearly, with a concentration of 0.75% having lower (P < 0.05) CIE L* values when compared with the control, 0, and 0.25% NaCl treatments. In addition, there was a linear and quadratic decrease (P < 0.05) in shear force as salt concentration increased, with no further decrease (P < 0.05) when greater than 0.75% NaCl was used. Cooking yield increased (P < 0.05) as the salt concentration increased to 1.0%. All marinated treatments were preferred (P < 0.05) over the control treatment, and all treatments marinated with at least 0.50% sodium chloride had an average rating of like moderately. Cluster analysis indicated that consumer groups varied in their preference of broiler breast meat treatments and that samples that were marinated with between 0.5 to 1.0% NaCl were acceptable to the majority of consumers. Marination with 0.75% NaCl was sufficient to maximize yields and decrease lightness (L*) in vacuum-tumbled, marinated broiler breast that is sold raw, but 1.0% NaCl could be used in a precooked product because it minimizes cook loss. In addition, use of 0.50% NaCl had minimal effects on yields, color, and sensory acceptability when compared with products that were marinated with greater concentrations of NaCl.

  6. On Torque and Tumbling in Swimming Escherichia coli▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Darnton, Nicholas C.; Turner, Linda; Rojevsky, Svetlana; Berg, Howard C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria swim by rotating long thin helical filaments, each driven at its base by a reversible rotary motor. When the motors of peritrichous cells turn counterclockwise (CCW), their filaments form bundles that drive the cells forward. We imaged fluorescently labeled cells of Escherichia coli with a high-speed charge-coupled-device camera (500 frames/s) and measured swimming speeds, rotation rates of cell bodies, and rotation rates of flagellar bundles. Using cells stuck to glass, we studied individual filaments, stopping their rotation by exposing the cells to high-intensity light. From these measurements we calculated approximate values for bundle torque and thrust and body torque and drag, and we estimated the filament stiffness. For both immobilized and swimming cells, the motor torque, as estimated using resistive force theory, was significantly lower than the motor torque reported previously. Also, a bundle of several flagella produced little more torque than a single flagellum produced. Motors driving individual filaments frequently changed directions of rotation. Usually, but not always, this led to a change in the handedness of the filament, which went through a sequence of polymorphic transformations, from normal to semicoiled to curly 1 and then, when the motor again spun CCW, back to normal. Motor reversals were necessary, although not always sufficient, to cause changes in filament chirality. Polymorphic transformations among helices having the same handedness occurred without changes in the sign of the applied torque. PMID:17189361

  7. Longitudinal Trim and Tumble Characteristics of a 0.057-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane, TED NO. NACA DE311

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert L.

    1948-01-01

    Based on results of longitudinal trim and tumble tests of a 0.057-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane, the following conclusions regarding the trim and tumble characteristics of the airplane have been drawn: 1. The airplane will not trim at any unusual or uncontrolled angles of attack. 2. The airplane will not tumble with the center of gravity located forward of 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. When the center of gravity is located at 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord and slats are extended and elevators are deflected full up, the airplane may tumble if given an external positive pitching moment. 3. The tumbling motion obtained will be readily terminated by deflecting the elevators full down so as to oppose the rotation. 4. The accelerations encountered during an established tumble may be dangerous to the pilot and, therefore, action should be taken to terminate a tumble immediately upon its inception. 5. Simultaneous opening of two wing-tip parachutes having diameters of 4 feet or larger and having drag coefficients of approximately 0.7 will effectively terminate the tumble. 6. Model results indicate that the pilot will not be struck by the airplane if it becomes necessary to leave the airplane during a tumble. The pilot may require aid from an ejection-seat arrangement.

  8. A feasibility study of unmanned rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit: Midterm review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The ascent, rendezvous, docking and sample transfer operations in a potential MSSR mission that uses the Mars orbital rendezvous mode are considered. In order that the design choices made for these operations remain compatible with the rest of the mission, the impact on the Earth launch, Mars landing and orbiting and Earth return phase are also being assessed. The selection and description of a preliminary baseline concept are presented.

  9. Solar electric propulsion for terminal flight to rendezvous with comets and asteroids. [using guidance algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A.

    1973-01-01

    A guidance algorithm that provides precise rendezvous in the deterministic case while requiring only relative state information is developed. A navigation scheme employing only onboard relative measurements is built around a Kalman filter set in measurement coordinates. The overall guidance and navigation procedure is evaluated in the face of measurement errors by a detailed numerical simulation. Results indicate that onboard guidance and navigation for the terminal phase of rendezvous is possible with reasonable limits on measurement errors.

  10. Multiple NEO Rendezvous, Reconnaissance and In Situ Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, K.; Elsperman, M. S.; Cook, T.; Smith, D.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a two spacecraft mission (Mother Ship and Small Body Lander) rendezvous with multiple Near Earth Objects (NEO). This two spacecraft mission mimics the likely architecture approach that human explorers will use: a “mother ship”(MS) designed to get from Earth to the NEO and a “Small Body Lander”(SBL) that performs in situ investigation on or close to the NEO’s surface. The MS carries the SBL to the target NEO. Once at the target NEO, the MS conducts an initial reconnaissance in order to produce a high resolution map of the surface. This map is used to identify coordinates of interest which are sent to the SBL. The SBL un-docks from the MS to rendezvous with the NEO and collect data. Landings are possible, though the challenges of anchoring to the NEO surface are significant. The SBL design is flexible and adaptable, enabling science data collection on or near the surface. After surface investigations are completed on the first NEO, the SBL will return and autonomously rendezvous and dock with the MS. The MS then goes to the next NEO target. During transit to the next NEO, the SBL could be refueled by the MS, a TRL8 capability demonstrated on the DARPA/NASA Orbital Express mission in 2007, or alternately sized to operate without requiring refueling depending on the mission profile. The mission goals are to identify surface hazards; quantify engineering boundary conditions for future human visits, and identify resources for future exploitation. The mission goals will be accomplished through the execution of key mission objectives: (1) high-resolution surface topography; (2) surface composition and mineralogy; (3) radiation environment near NEO; and (4) mechanical properties of the surface. Essential SBL instruments include: a) LIDAR (Obj. 1); b) 3D, high- resolution hyperspectral imaging cameras (Obj. 2); c) radiation sensor package (Obj. 3); and d) strain gauges (Obj. 4). Additional or alternative instruments could include: e) x-ray fluorescence

  11. Fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem subject to actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Meskin, N.; Sobhani-Tehrani, E.; Khorasani, K.; Rabbath, C. A.

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the problem of fault tolerant cooperative control for UAV rendezvous problem in which multiple UAVs are required to arrive at their designated target despite presence of a fault in the thruster of any UAV. An integrated hierarchical scheme is proposed and developed that consists of a cooperative rendezvous planning algorithm at the team level and a nonlinear fault detection and isolation (FDI) subsystem at individual UAV's actuator/sensor level. Furthermore, a rendezvous re-planning strategy is developed that interfaces the rendezvous planning algorithm with the low-level FDI. A nonlinear geometric approach is used for the FDI subsystem that can detect and isolate faults in various UAV actuators including thrusters and control surfaces. The developed scheme is implemented for a rendezvous scenario with three Aerosonde UAVs, a single target, and presence of a priori known threats. Simulation results reveal the effectiveness of our proposed scheme in fulfilling the rendezvous mission objective that is specified as a successful intercept of Aerosondes at their designated target, despite the presence of severe loss of effectiveness in Aerosondes engine thrusters.

  12. NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission

    SciTech Connect

    HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

    1999-11-03

    Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present

  13. Autonomous Mission Manager for Rendezvous, Inspection and Mating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimpfer, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    To meet cost and safety objectives, space missions that involve proximity operations between two vehicles require a high level of autonomy to successfully complete their missions. The need for autonomy is primarily driven by the need to conduct complex operations outside of communication windows, and the communication time delays inherent in space missions. Autonomy also supports the goals of both NASA and the DOD to make space operations more routine, and lower operational costs by reducing the requirement for ground personnel. NASA and the DoD have several programs underway that require a much higher level of autonomy for space vehicles. NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program has ambitious goals of reducing costs by a factor or 10 and improving safety by a factor of 100. DARPA has recently begun its Orbital Express to demonstrate key technologies to make satellite servicing routine. The Air Force's XSS-ll program is developing a protoflight demonstration of an autonomous satellite inspector. A common element in space operations for many NASA and DOD missions is the ability to rendezvous, inspect anclJor dock with another spacecraft. For DARPA, this is required to service or refuel military satellites. For the Air Force, this is required to inspect un-cooperative resident space objects. For NASA, this is needed to meet the primary SLI design reference mission of International Space Station re-supply. A common aspect for each of these programs is an Autonomous Mission Manager that provides highly autonomous planning, execution and monitoring of the rendezvous, inspection and docking operations. This paper provides an overview of the Autonomous Mission Manager (AMM) design being incorporated into many of these technology programs. This AMM provides a highly scalable level of autonomous operations, ranging from automatic execution of ground-derived plans to highly autonomous onboard planning to meet ground developed mission goals. The AMM provides the

  14. Pollinators' mating rendezvous and the evolution of floral advertisement.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Michael A; Hadany, Lilach

    2013-01-01

    Successful cross-fertilization in plant species that rely on animal pollinators depends not just on the number of pollinator visits, but also on these visits' duration. Furthermore, in non-deceptive pollination, a visit's duration depends on the magnitude of the reward provided to the pollinator. Accordingly, plants that rely on biotic pollination have to partition their investment in cross-fertilization assurance between attracting pollinator visits - advertisement, and rewarding visitors to assure that the visit is of productive duration. Here we analyze these processes by a combination of optimality methods and game theoretical modeling. Our results indicate that the optimality in such allocation of resources depends on the types of reward offered to the pollinators. More precisely, we show that plants that offer both food reward and mating rendezvous to pollinators will evolve to allocate a higher proportion of their cross-fertilization assurance budget to advertisement than plants that offer only food reward. That is, our results indicate that pollinators' mating habits may play a role in floral evolution. PMID:23023108

  15. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  16. Multi-sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2008-01-01

    During the past two years, many sensors have been tested in an open-loop fashion in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL) to both determine their suitability for use in Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) systems and to ensure the test facility is prepared for future multi-sensor testing. The primary focus of this work was in support of the CEV AR&D system, because the AR&D sensor technology area was identified as one of the top risks in the program. In 2006, four different sensors were tested individually or in a pair in the MSFC FRL. In 2007, four sensors, two each of two different types, were tested simultaneously. In each set of tests, the target was moved through a series of pre-planned trajectories while the sensor tracked it. In addition, a laser tracker "truth" sensor also measured the target motion. The tests demonstrated the functionality of testing four sensors simultaneously as well as the capabilities (both good and bad) of all of the different sensors tested. This paper outlines the test setup and conditions, briefly describes the facility, summarizes the earlier results of the individual sensor tests, and describes in some detail the results of the four-sensor testing. Post-test analysis includes data fusion by minimum variance estimation and sequential Kalman filtering. This Sensor Technology Project work was funded by NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program.

  17. Ku-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, H. G.; Goff, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    All work performed on the Ku-band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model program since the release of the preliminary final report is summarized. Developments on the program fall into three distinct categories: (1) modifications to the existing Ku-band radar tracking performance computer model; (2) the addition of a highly accurate, nonrealtime search and acquisition performance computer model to the total software package developed on this program; and (3) development of radar cross section (RCS) computation models for three additional satellites. All changes in the tracking model involved improvements in the automatic gain control (AGC) and the radar signal strength (RSS) computer models. Although the search and acquisition computer models were developed under the auspices of the Hughes Aircraft Company Ku-Band Integrated Radar and Communications Subsystem program office, they have been supplied to NASA as part of the Ku-band radar performance comuter model package. Their purpose is to predict Ku-band acquisition performance for specific satellite targets on specific missions. The RCS models were developed for three satellites: the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, and the Space Telescopes.

  18. Video-Guidance Design for the DART Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael; Tracy, Chisholm

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology (DART) mission will validate a number of different guidance technologies, including state-differenced GPS transfers and close-approach video guidance. The video guidance for DART will employ NASA/Marshall s Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). This paper focuses on the terminal phase of the DART mission that includes close-approach maneuvers under AVGS guidance. The closed-loop video guidance design for DART is driven by a number of competing requirements, including a need for maximizing tracking bandwidths while coping with measurement noise and the need to minimize RCS firings. A range of different strategies for attitude control and docking guidance have been considered for the DART mission, and design decisions are driven by a goal of minimizing both the design complexity and the effects of video guidance lags. The DART design employs an indirect docking approach, in which the guidance position targets are defined using relative attitude information. Flight simulation results have proven the effectiveness of the video guidance design.

  19. Run and tumble, run and reverse, or run reverse and flick - who wins the chemotaxis race?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Denisov, Sergey; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Run and tumble of E.coli bacteria is a well understood example of the stochastic cell motion that is alternated in the presence of signaling chemicals. By regulating the tumbling frequency bacteria are able to navigate toward the food sources. Another bacteria that use twitching to move on a surface, M. xanthus, utilize a different strategy - at the end of the run they completely reverse the direction of motion and continue moving in the opposite direction. The frequency of reversals was shown to be connected to the chemotactic response of the cell. Recently yet another pattern was discovered in marine bacteria V. alginolyticus which alternate sharp reversals with flicks -- making a turn to an angle with a broad distribution and centered around 90 degrees. In this work we are presenting a theoretical framework that describes all above motion patterns. As a highlight of the developed approach we find the exact analytical expressions for the mean squared displacement of moving cells for arbitrary distribution of run times. That allows us to quantitatively compare the performance of bacteria exploring the environment with and without signaling chemicals and, therefore, to find the winner of the chemotactic race.

  20. A stochastic model for bacterial dynamics toward point food sources with emergent run-and-tumble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jashnsaz, Hossein; Nguyen, Tyler; Petrache, Horia; Presse, Steve; StatPhysBio Team

    2015-03-01

    Despite stark differences in chemotactic signaling networks and flagellar physiology across bacterial species, all bacteria sense their environment through a series of stochastic detection events (``hits'') at their chemoreceptors and bias their random walk on the basis of this information. We present a general statistical model describing how bacteria locate point sources of food on the basis of stochastic event detection, rather than gradient information. We show how model parameters can be directly inferred using maximum likelihood methods from microscopy tracking data. We find that ``run-and-tumble'' dynamics naturally emerge from our statistical model and recapitulate known results from experiments when we consider bacterial dynamics in well-controlled chemoattractant gradients. However, our model goes beyond reproducing known run-and-tumble statistics. It also makes a number of predictions unique to bacteria tracking point sources. In our model, all parameters are directly inferred from tracking data thus there are no adjustable parameters; detection events by bacteria are assumed stochastic as they occur in nature; and our ``top-down'' modeling approach is broadly applicable across bacterial species. SP acknowledges the NSF (MCB-1412259), the Purdue Research Foundation and his IUPUI Start-up.

  1. Handling Neighbor Discovery and Rendezvous Consistency with Weighted Quorum-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Own, Chung-Ming; Meng, Zhaopeng; Liu, Kehan

    2015-01-01

    Neighbor discovery and the power of sensors play an important role in the formation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and mobile networks. Many asynchronous protocols based on wake-up time scheduling have been proposed to enable neighbor discovery among neighboring nodes for the energy saving, especially in the difficulty of clock synchronization. However, existing researches are divided two parts with the neighbor-discovery methods, one is the quorum-based protocols and the other is co-primality based protocols. Their distinction is on the arrangements of time slots, the former uses the quorums in the matrix, the latter adopts the numerical analysis. In our study, we propose the weighted heuristic quorum system (WQS), which is based on the quorum algorithm to eliminate redundant paths of active slots. We demonstrate the specification of our system: fewer active slots are required, the referring rate is balanced, and remaining power is considered particularly when a device maintains rendezvous with discovered neighbors. The evaluation results showed that our proposed method can effectively reschedule the active slots and save the computing time of the network system. PMID:26404297

  2. Space shuttle Ku-band integrated rendezvous radar/communications system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of work performed on the Space Shuttle Ku-Band Integrated Rendezvous Radar/Communications System Study. The recommendations and conclusions are included as well as the details explaining the results. The requirements upon which the study was based are presented along with the predicted performance of the recommended system configuration. In addition, shuttle orbiter vehicle constraints (e.g., size, weight, power, stowage space) are discussed. The tradeoffs considered and the operation of the recommended configuration are described for an optimized, integrated Ku-band radar/communications system. Basic system tradeoffs, communication design, radar design, antenna tradeoffs, antenna gimbal and drive design, antenna servo design, and deployed assembly packaging design are discussed. The communications and radar performance analyses necessary to support the system design effort are presented. Detailed derivations of the communications thermal noise error, the radar range, range rate, and angle tracking errors, and the communications transmitter distortion parameter effect on crosstalk between the unbalanced quadriphase signals are included.

  3. Integrated GPS/INS navigation system design for autonomous spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylor, David Edward

    2003-10-01

    The goal of the NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program is to advance the technologies for the next generation reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The SLI program has identified automated rendezvous and docking as an area requiring further research and development. Currently, the Space Shuttle uses a partially manual system for rendezvous, but a fully automated system could be safer and more reliable. Previous studies have shown that it is feasible to use the Global Positioning System (GPS) for spacecraft navigation during rendezvous with the International Space Station (ISS). However, these studies have not accounted for the effects of GPS signal blockage and multipath in the vicinity of the ISS, which make a GPS-only navigation system less accurate and reliable. One possible solution is to combine GPS with an inertial navigation system (INS). The integration of GPS and INS can be achieved using a Kalman filter. GPS/INS systems have been used in aircraft for many years and have also been used in launch vehicles. However, the performance of GPS/INS systems in orbit and during spacecraft rendezvous has not been characterized. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ability of an integrated GPS/INS to provide accurate navigation solutions during a rendezvous scenario where the effects of ISS signal blockage, multipath and delta-v maneuvers degrade GPS-only navigation. In order to accomplish this, GPS-only and GPS/INS Kalman filters have been developed for both absolute and relative navigation, as well as a new statistical multipath model for spacecraft operating near the ISS. Several factors that affect relative navigation performance were studied, including: filter tuning, GPS constellation geometry, rendezvous approach direction, and inertial sensor performance. The results showed that each of these factors has a large impact on relative navigation performance. Finally, it has been demonstrated that a GPS/INS system based on medium accuracy aircraft

  4. Manned maneuvering unit applications for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Donald L.; Cuseo, John A.; Lenda, Joseph A.; Ray, Lex; Whitsett, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) is an important technology to multiple National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs and centers. The recent Johnson Spacecraft Center (JSC) AR&C Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has listed on-orbit demonstration of related technologies as a near term priority. Martin Marietta has been evaluating use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for a low cost near term on-orbit demonstration of AR&C technologies such as control algorithms, sensors, and processors as well as system level performance. The MMU Program began in 1979 as the method of repairing the Space Shuttle (STS) Thermal Protection System (the tiles). The units were not needed for this task, but were successfully employed during three Shuttle flights in 1984: a test flight was flown in in February as proof of concept, in April the MMU participated in the Solar Max Repair Mission, and in November the MMU's returned to space to successfully rescue the two errant satellites, Westar and Palapa. In the intervening years, the MMU simulator and MMU Qualification Test Unit (QTU) have been used for Astronaut training and experimental evaluations. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) Retriever has used the QTU, in an unmanned form, as a free-flyer on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF). Currently, the MMU is undergoing recertification for flight. The two flight units were removed from storage in September, 1991 and evaluation tests were performed. The tests demonstrated that the units are in good shape with no discrepancies that would preclude further use. The Return to Flight effort is currently clearing up recertification issues and evaluating the design against the present Shuttle environments.

  5. Manned maneuvering unit applications for automated rendezvous and capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Donald L.; Cuseo, John A.; Lenda, Joseph A.; Ray, Lex; Whitsett, C. Edward

    Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) is an important technology to multiple National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs and centers. The recent Johnson Spacecraft Center (JSC) AR&C Quality Function Deployment (QFD) has listed on-orbit demonstration of related technologies as a near term priority. Martin Marietta has been evaluating use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) for a low cost near term on-orbit demonstration of AR&C technologies such as control algorithms, sensors, and processors as well as system level performance. The MMU Program began in 1979 as the method of repairing the Space Shuttle (STS) Thermal Protection System (the tiles). The units were not needed for this task, but were successfully employed during three Shuttle flights in 1984: a test flight was flown in in February as proof of concept, in April the MMU participated in the Solar Max Repair Mission, and in November the MMU's returned to space to successfully rescue the two errant satellites, Westar and Palapa. In the intervening years, the MMU simulator and MMU Qualification Test Unit (QTU) have been used for Astronaut training and experimental evaluations. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) Retriever has used the QTU, in an unmanned form, as a free-flyer on the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Precision Air Bearing Floor (PABF). Currently, the MMU is undergoing recertification for flight. The two flight units were removed from storage in September, 1991 and evaluation tests were performed. The tests demonstrated that the units are in good shape with no discrepancies that would preclude further use. The Return to Flight effort is currently clearing up recertification issues and evaluating the design against the present Shuttle environments.

  6. An Automatic Terminal Guidance System for Rendezvous with a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Terrance M.

    1961-01-01

    This study includes a consideration of the design philosophy for an automatic terminal guidance system, a derivation of guidance equations required, and an outline of the general type of instrumentation necessary to provide the essential information. A control system for a sample vehicle is analyzed. A representative case, rendezvous with a satellite in circular orbit at 400 nautical miles, was examined. Terminal-stage nominal burning times of 200 and 400 seconds were used. For the 200-second case, initial errors in circumferential displacement of +/- 25,000 feet, in radial displacement of 7,000 to -9,000 feet, and in lateral displacement of +/- 20,000 feet were within the capabilities of the system. Velocity errors of 300 to -400 ft/sec in the circumferential direction, 180 to -200 ft/sec in the radial direction, and velocity offsets of at least 20 (+/- 800 ft/sec) in the lateral direction could also be handled. The 400-second case was capable of correcting larger errors, but limits were not determined. The dependence of required characteristic velocity on initial errors was determined and it was found that increases over the nominal terminal-stage characteristic velocity of the order of 15 percent covered most of the previously mentioned in-plane errors. The requirements were more severe for cases with lateral velocity offsets. A simplified set of guidance equations was tested and produced only slight variations in performance. Overall velocity requirements and mass ratios were determined for terminal-stage burning times of 100, 200, 300, and 400 seconds and for a range of transfer angles by using exact calculations for the terminal stage and an impulsive launching velocity. These results indicated that the shortest burning time consistent with the launch guidance errors expected gave the best mass ratio.

  7. Flight data results of estimate fusion for spacecraft rendezvous navigation from shuttle mission STS-69

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bishop, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    A recently developed rendezvous navigation fusion filter that optimally exploits existing distributed filters for rendezvous and GPS navigation to achieve the relative and inertial state accuracies of both in a global solution is utilized here to process actual flight data. Space Shuttle Mission STS-69 was the first mission to date which gathered data from both the rendezvous and Global Positioning System filters allowing, for the first time, a test of the fusion algorithm with real flight data. Furthermore, a precise best estimate of trajectory is available for portions of STS-69, making possible a check on the performance of the fusion filter. In order to successfully carry out this experiment with flight data, two extensions to the existing scheme were necessary: a fusion edit test based on differences between the filter state vectors, and an underweighting scheme to accommodate the suboptimal perfect target assumption made by the Shuttle rendezvous filter. With these innovations, the flight data was successfully fused from playbacks of downlinked and/or recorded measurement data through ground analysis versions of the Shuttle rendezvous filter and a GPS filter developed for another experiment. The fusion results agree with the best estimate of trajectory at approximately the levels of uncertainty expected from the fusion filter's covariance matrix.

  8. Performance capabilities of a Phase One Automatic Rendezvous and Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, Peter M.; Polutchko, Robert J.; Matusky, Martin

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the existing 'Phase One' AR&C system developed at the C.S. Draper Laboratory for both the rendezvous and proximity operations mission phases. This material has been developed as a result of Draper Laboratory involvement through NASA's Johnson Space Center in the development of the flight proven IGN&C rendezvous systems for Apollo, Skylab, and Shuttle. The development of these systems using Draper computer simulations has required automation of all crew inputs to the IGN&C system and thus provided the unique opportunity to develop and test those system capabilities required for AR&C. This paper expands upon the material in the papers presented by the authors at the NASA Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Conference held at JSC on August 15-16, 1991.

  9. An Assessment of the Technology of Automated Rendezvous and Capture in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, M. E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to assess the technology of automated rendezvous and capture (AR&C) in space. The outline of the paper is as follows. First, the history of manual and automated rendezvous and capture and rendezvous and dock is presented. Next, the need for AR&C in space is established. Then, today's technology and ongoing technology efforts related to AR&C in space are reviewed. In light of these, AR&C systems are proposed that meet NASA's future needs, but can be developed in a reasonable amount of time with a reasonable amount of money. Technology plans for developing these systems are presented; cost and schedule are included.

  10. Time-fixed rendezvous by impulse factoring with an intermediate timing constraint. [for transfer orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Kibler, J. F.; Young, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is presented for factoring a two-impulse orbital transfer into a three- or four-impulse transfer which solves the rendezvous problem and satisfies an intermediate timing constraint. Both the time of rendezvous and the intermediate time of a alinement are formulated as any element of a finite sequence of times. These times are integer multiples of a constant plus an additive constant. The rendezvous condition is an equality constraint, whereas the intermediate alinement is an inequality constraint. The two timing constraints are satisfied by factoring the impulses into collinear parts that vectorially sum to the original impulse and by varying the resultant period differences and the number of revolutions in each orbit. Five different types of solutions arise by considering factoring either or both of the two impulses into two or three parts with a limit for four total impulses. The impulse-factoring technique may be applied to any two-impulse transfer which has distinct orbital periods.

  11. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions of Children's Rough-and-Tumble Play (R&T) in Indoor and Outdoor Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storli, Rune; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores teacher-reported prevalence of rough-and-tumble play (R&T) in preschool and investigates how their restriction to such play varies in different play environments (indoor and outdoor). An electronic questionnaire exploring preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding children's dramatic play themes was conducted by…

  12. Level of decontamination after washing textiles at 60°C or 70°C followed by tumble drying

    PubMed Central

    Tano, Eva; Melhus, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Background Several major outbreaks in healthcare facilities have occurred with the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria. A possible route for dissemination is the hospital textiles and inadequate laundering of them. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use method for simulating the laundering process of hospital textiles, and thereafter apply the method when evaluating the decontaminating efficacy of two different washing temperatures. Methods The laundering process, including tumble drying, took place at two professional laundries. Enterococcus faecium was used as bioindicator. Results The results showed that a lowering of the washing temperature from 70°C to 60°C did not affect the decontamination efficacy; the washing cycle alone reduced the number of bacteria with 3–5 log10 CFU, whereas the following tumble drying reduced the bacterial numbers with another 3–4 log10 CFU, yielding the same final result independent of washing temperature. Without tumble drying, there was an obvious risk of adding non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria to the fabric. These bacteria originated from the washing cycle. Conclusion A simple method to simulate hospital laundering was developed. To save energy, it is possible to use a washing temperature of 60°C, but the washing cycle should be followed by tumble drying, and the whole laundering process needs to be monitored to maintain sufficient textile hygiene. PMID:25413829

  13. Monsters, Magic and Mr Psycho: A Biocultural Approach to Rough and Tumble Play in the Early Years of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Pam

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the developmental role of rough and tumble (R&T) play with particular attention to the narratives that children use to underpin such activities. A review of the literature suggests that current early years research and practice pays scant attention to children's outdoor free play activities. A piece of original research is…

  14. Physical Activity Play and Preschool Children's Peer Acceptance: Distinctions between Rough-and-Tumble and Exercise Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Eric W.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Two forms of exercise play (toy mediated and non-mediated) and 2 forms of rough-and-tumble (R&T) play (chase and fighting) were examined in relation to preschoolers' peer competence. A total of 148 preschoolers (78 boys, 89 Euro-Americans) were observed during free play at their university-sponsored child care center.…

  15. Methodology for Developing a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model of Spacecraft Rendezvous and Dockings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnham, Steven J., II; Garza, Joel, Jr.; Castillo, Theresa M.; Lutomski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 NASA was preparing to send two new visiting vehicles carrying logistics and propellant to the International Space Station (ISS). These new vehicles were the European Space Agency s (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Jules Verne, and the Japanese Aerospace and Explorations Agency s (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The ISS Program wanted to quantify the increased risk to the ISS from these visiting vehicles. At the time, only the Shuttle, the Soyuz, and the Progress vehicles rendezvoused and docked to the ISS. The increased risk to the ISS was from an increase in vehicle traffic, thereby, increasing the potential catastrophic collision during the rendezvous and the docking or berthing of the spacecraft to the ISS. A universal method of evaluating the risk of rendezvous and docking or berthing was created by the ISS s Risk Team to accommodate the increasing number of rendezvous and docking or berthing operations due to the increasing number of different spacecraft, as well as the future arrival of commercial spacecraft. Before the first docking attempt of ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV to the ISS, a probabilistic risk model was developed to quantitatively calculate the risk of collision of each spacecraft with the ISS. The 5 rendezvous and docking risk models (Soyuz, Progress, Shuttle, ATV, and HTV) have been used to build and refine the modeling methodology for rendezvous and docking of spacecrafts. This risk modeling methodology will be NASA s basis for evaluating the addition of future ISS visiting spacecrafts hazards, including SpaceX s Dragon, Orbital Science s Cygnus, and NASA s own Orion spacecraft. This paper will describe the methodology used for developing a visiting vehicle risk model.

  16. Result of Rendezvous Docking Experiment of ETS.35zw .5zw .25mmVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Isao; Mokuno, Masaaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi; Kunugi, Makoto

    ETS VII is a test satellite to perform in-orbit demonstration of autonomous rendezvous docking (RVD) technology, which will be necessary for advanced space activities in the early 21st century. ETS VII performed three RVD experiment flights, and verified all technical items. ETS VII demonstrated first autonomous RVD between unmanned vehicles, and remote piloted rendezvous flight position accuracy at docking was about 1cm, and acceleration was less than 1.5mG (low impact docking). In the second RVD experiment flight, ETS VII detected attitude anomaly and executed disable abort for safety insurance. We present the results and evaluation of three RVD experiment flights in this paper.

  17. Scheme of rendezvous mission to lunar orbital station by spacecraft launched from Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, great experience has been accumulated in manned flight astronautics for rendezvous in near-Earth orbit. During flights of Apollo spacecraft with crews that landed on the surface of the Moon, the problem of docking a landing module launched from the Moon's surface with the Apollo spacecraft's command module in a circumlunar orbit was successfully solved. A return to the Moon declared by leading space agencies requires a scheme for rendezvous of a spacecraft launched from an earth-based cosmodromee with a lunar orbital station. This paper considers some ballistic schemes making it possible to solve this problem with minimum fuel expenditures.

  18. Halley comet rendezvous with a SEPS vehicle. [Solar Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the performance of a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS) vehicle rendezvousing with Halley's comet just prior to its Frebruary 1986 perihelion is described. A calculus of variations mathematical formulation is used to maximize Halley arrival mass while giving effect to the influence of solar array size, launch date, arrival date, and insertion hyperbolic excess velocity. Numerical sensitivity relief, thrust system modeling, trajectory characteristics and ion engine operating conditions are discussed and illustrated. Results indicate a rendezvous is feasible with a minimal advance in solar cell and ion engine technology.

  19. NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking convened on May 24 and 25, 1994. Based on the meetings, the Task Force made the following recommendations: at a minimum, the mission commander and payload commander for all subsequent Shuttle-Mir missions should be named at least 18 months in advance of the scheduled launch date; in order to derive early operational experience in advance of the first Mir docking mission, the primary objective of STS-63 should be Mir rendezvous and proximity operations; and if at all possible, the launch date for STS-63 should be moved forward.

  20. Characterization of the relative motion of rendezvous between vehicles in proximate, highly elliptic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Carrie Dumas

    This dissertation deals with the subject of rendezvous between two vehicles in highly elliptic orbits. The specific range of orbital eccentricities addressed is 0.6 to 0.9. This research focuses on what is commonly referred to as final rendezvous, the process by which an active (chaser) vehicle is brought from some position in a neighboring orbit to a prescribed stationary position relative to a passive (target) vehicle. Due to the varying orbital speeds of the two vehicles as they travel in their respective orbits, their motion relative to each other is highly initial condition-dependent and varies significantly from the relative motion seen in common, circular orbits. This research sheds light on this non-intuitive motion, exposing the challenges and promise of such rendezvous techniques. Motivation for the study of highly elliptic rendezvous is given and a summary of relevant, previous rendezvous research is presented. The paper details the development of relative motion targeting and propagation routines, valid for high eccentricities, which output relative coordinates in a suitable curvilinear coordinate system. Parametric studies that utilize the routines developed are presented as an initial characterization of the solution space. This solution space is constrained for this and all subsequent investigations by the definition of two types of co-apsidial target/chaser vehicle relationships. The software used in the early studies is subsequently married with a genetic algorithm optimization routine and a large number of runs are made to globally characterize and evaluate candidate final rendezvous scenarios. Results of genetic algorithm runs, with and without operational constraints, are presented and summarized and a fuel-optimal family of solutions is identified. A further parametric study is done within the optimal space to explore the rich diversity of final rendezvous geometries still present after the optimization process. Dispersions in magnitude and

  1. Chlamydomonas swims with two "gears" in a eukaryotic version of run-and-tumble locomotion.

    PubMed

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Gollub, J P; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-07-24

    The coordination of eukaryotic flagella is essential for many of the most basic processes of life (motility, sensing, and development), yet its emergence and regulation and its connection to locomotion are poorly understood. Previous studies show that the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas, widely regarded as an ideal system in which to study flagellar biology, swims forward by the synchronous action of its two flagella. Using high-speed imaging over long intervals, we found a richer behavior: A cell swimming in the dark stochastically switches between synchronous and asynchronous flagellar beating. Three-dimensional tracking shows that these regimes lead, respectively, to nearly straight swimming and to abrupt large reorientations, which yield a eukaryotic version of the "run-and-tumble" motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  2. Recent developments in electropolishing and tumbling R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.; Brandt, J.; Cooley, L.; Ge, M.; Harms, E.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Boffo, C.; /Babcock Noell, Wuerzburg

    2009-10-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Lab (Fermilab) is continuing to improve its infrastructure for research and development on the processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities. A single cell 3.9 GHz electropolishing tool built at Fermilab and operated at an industrial partner was recently commissioned. The EP tool was used to produce a single cell 3.9 GHz cavity that reached an accelerating gradient of 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 5 x 10{sup 9}. A single cell 1.3 GHz cavity was also electropolished at the same industrial vendor using the vendor's vertical full-immersion technique. On their first and only attempt the vendor produced a single cell 1.3 GHz cavity that reached 30 MV/m with a quality factor of 1 x 10{sup 10}. These results will be detailed along with preliminary tumbling results.

  3. Jamming and Attraction of Interacting Run-and-Tumble Random Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowman, A. B.; Evans, M. R.; Blythe, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study a model of bacterial dynamics where two interacting random walkers perform run-and-tumble motion on a one-dimensional lattice under mutual exclusion and find an exact expression for the probability distribution in the steady state. This stationary distribution has a rich structure comprising three components: a jammed component, where the particles are adjacent and block each other; an attractive component, where the probability distribution for the distance between particles decays exponentially; and an extended component in which the distance between particles is uniformly distributed. The attraction between the particles is sufficiently strong that even in the limit where continuous space is recovered for a finite system, the two walkers spend a finite fraction of time in a jammed configuration. Our results potentially provide a route to understanding the motility-induced phase separation characteristic of active matter from a microscopic perspective.

  4. Jamming and Attraction of Interacting Run-and-Tumble Random Walkers.

    PubMed

    Slowman, A B; Evans, M R; Blythe, R A

    2016-05-27

    We study a model of bacterial dynamics where two interacting random walkers perform run-and-tumble motion on a one-dimensional lattice under mutual exclusion and find an exact expression for the probability distribution in the steady state. This stationary distribution has a rich structure comprising three components: a jammed component, where the particles are adjacent and block each other; an attractive component, where the probability distribution for the distance between particles decays exponentially; and an extended component in which the distance between particles is uniformly distributed. The attraction between the particles is sufficiently strong that even in the limit where continuous space is recovered for a finite system, the two walkers spend a finite fraction of time in a jammed configuration. Our results potentially provide a route to understanding the motility-induced phase separation characteristic of active matter from a microscopic perspective. PMID:27284675

  5. Methodology for Prototyping Increased Levels of Automation for Spacecraft Rendezvous Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Jeremy J.; Valasek, John

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle necessitates higher levels of automation than previous NASA vehicles, due to program requirements for automation, including Automated Rendezvous and Docking. Studies of spacecraft development often point to the locus of decision-making authority between humans and computers (i.e. automation) as a prime driver for cost, safety, and mission success. Therefore, a critical component in the Crew Exploration Vehicle development is the determination of the correct level of automation. To identify the appropriate levels of automation and autonomy to design into a human space flight vehicle, NASA has created the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool. This paper develops a methodology for prototyping increased levels of automation for spacecraft rendezvous functions. This methodology is used to evaluate the accuracy of the Function-specific Level of Autonomy and Automation Tool specified levels of automation, via prototyping. Spacecraft rendezvous planning tasks are selected and then prototyped in Matlab using Fuzzy Logic techniques and existing Space Shuttle rendezvous trajectory algorithms.

  6. Rendezvous terminal phase automatic braking sequencing and targeting. [for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the rendezvous terminal phase braking program is to provide the means of automatically bringing the primary orbiter within desired station keeping boundaries relative to the target satellite. A detailed discussion is presented on the braking program and its navigation, targeting, and guidance functions.

  7. Rendezvous and Docking Strategy for Crewed Segment of the Asteroid Redirect Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather D.; Cryan, Scott P.; D'Souza, Christopher; Dannemiller, David P.; Brazzel, Jack P.; Condon, Gerald L.; Othon, William L.; Williams, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This paper will describe the overall rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) strategy in support of the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission (ARCM), as part of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). The focus of the paper is on the crewed mission phase of ARM, starting with the establishment of Orion in the Distant Retrograde Orbit (DRO) and ending with docking to the Asteroid Redirect Vechicle (ARV). The paper will detail the sequence of maneuvers required to execute the rendezvous and proximity operations mission phases along with the on-board navigation strategies, including the final approach phase. The trajectories to be considered will include target vehicles in a DRO. The paper will also discuss the sensor requirements for rendezvous and docking and the various trade studies associated with the final sensor selection. Building on the sensor requirements and trade studies, the paper will include a candidate sensor concept of operations, which will drive the selection of the sensor suite; concurrently, it will be driven by higher level requirements on the system, such as crew timeline constraints and vehicle consummables. This paper will address how many of the seemingly competing requirements will have to be addressed to create a complete system and system design. The objective is to determine a sensor suite and trajectories that enable Orion to successfully rendezvous and dock with a target vehicle in trans lunar space. Finally, the paper will report on the status of a NASA action to look for synergy within RPOD, across the crewed and robotic asteroid missions.

  8. Sensory fusion for planetary surface robotic navigation, rendezvous, and manipulation operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, T.; Cheng, Y.; Baumgartner, E. T.; Robinson, M.; Schenker, P. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports some of the ongoing work at JPL in the areas of autonomous sensory fusion of both raw and derived inputs for better localization during long traverses, precision rendezvous operations with both labeled and unlabeled targets, and precision manipulation of targets.

  9. Effect of freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil on house dust mites in soft toys.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Fu; Wu, Francis Fu-Sheng; Chen, Chi-Ying; Crane, Julian; Siebers, Rob

    2011-09-01

    Soft toys are a major source of house dust mites (HDM) and HDM allergens, and sleeping with soft toys is a significant risk factor for HDM sensitization. We studied three techniques to eliminate HDM from soft toys, namely freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil. Thirty-six toys (12 in each treatment group) were enumerated for live HDM by the heat escape method before and after freezing overnight, hot tumble drying for 1 h and washing in 0.2% to 0.4% eucalyptus oil. Freezing, hot tumble drying and washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in significant reductions in live HDM, an average reduction of 95.1%, 89.1% and 95.1%, respectively. Additionally, washing with eucalyptus oil resulted in a significant reduction in HDM allergens as well from a geometric mean of 9.12 μg/g to 0.37 μg/g (p = 0.033). These three HDM elimination techniques give parents of infants effective and acceptable methods of limiting HDM exposure.

  10. Encapsulated guest-host dynamics: guest rotational barriers and tumbling as a probe of host interior cavity space.

    PubMed

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Szigethy, Géza; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2010-11-17

    The supramolecular host assembly [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) encapsulates cationic guest molecules within its hydrophobic cavity and catalyzes a variety of chemical transformations within its confined interior space. Despite the well-defined structure, the host ligand framework and interior cavity are very flexible and 1 can accommodate a wide range of guest shapes and sizes. These observations raise questions about the steric effects of confinement within 1 and how encapsulation fundamentally changes the motions of guest molecules. Here we examine the motional dynamics (guest bond rotation and tumbling) of encapsulated guest molecules to probe the steric consequences of encapsulation within host 1. Encapsulation is found to increase the Ph-CH(2) bond rotational barrier for ortho-substituted benzyl phosphonium guest molecules by 3 to 6 kcal/mol, and the barrier is found to depend on both guest size and shape. The tumbling dynamics of guests encapsulated in 1 were also investigated, and here it was found that longer, more prolate-shaped guest molecules tumble more slowly in the host cavity than larger but more spherical guest molecules. The prolate guests reduce the host symmetry from T to C(1) in solution at low temperatures, and the distortion of the host framework that is in part responsible for this symmetry reduction is observed directly in the solid state. Analysis of guest motional dynamics is a powerful method for interrogating host structure and fundamental host-guest interactions.

  11. Tools and Techniques for a Systematic Approach to Safe Rendezvous and Proximity Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Rob; Rishikof, Brian

    2010-09-01

    Among the most demanding operations facing manned spaceflight is the ability to successfully and safely complete Rendezvous Proximity Operations & Capture(RPOC) operations with a target vehicle. While perhaps made to look routine from a safety perspective for some vehicles and developers regularly docking to the International Space Station(namely the Space Shuttle, and Russian Progress and Soyuz vehicles), international partners and commercial vehicle developers are finding it among the most difficult engineering challenges. Whether docking with the International Space Station in low earth orbit, or rendezvousing with a returning spacecraft in low lunar orbit, successfully and systematically accounting for all the combinations of risks and failures which lead to failed rendezvous or collisions can be daunting. Systems such as propulsion, avionics, software, and command and data handling(C&DH) must all work as a single integrated system; and the guidance, navigation, and control(GN&C) systems arguably forms the heart of that unit. In response to this challenge, Odyssey Space Research(Odyssey) utilizes their core GN&C engineering competencies, systems engineering capabilities and associated simulation tools to address the safety of RPOC. These simulations provide for high-level mission scenario analysis, systems design, mission planning, monitoring, and implementation, covering all flight phases of rendezvous from orbit insertion, phasing and transfer orbits, far-range rendezvous operations, proximity operations, and capture. Combined with a systems engineering approach, it allows our team to analyze functional system capabilities, propose design modifications and then perform the safety engineering aspect of evaluating that vehicle’s safety compliance. The simulation, modeling and analysis tools(such as domain specific RPOC models, and visualization and virtual reality) allow for detailed design and development and/or help provide the independent assessment

  12. Rough-and-tumble play as a window on animal communication.

    PubMed

    Palagi, Elisabetta; Burghardt, Gordon M; Smuts, Barbara; Cordoni, Giada; Dall'Olio, Stefania; Fouts, Hillary N; Řeháková-Petrů, Milada; Siviy, Stephen M; Pellis, Sergio M

    2016-05-01

    Rough-and-tumble play (RT) is a widespread phenomenon in mammals. Since it involves competition, whereby one animal attempts to gain advantage over another, RT runs the risk of escalation to serious fighting. Competition is typically curtailed by some degree of cooperation and different signals help negotiate potential mishaps during RT. This review provides a framework for such signals, showing that they range along two dimensions: one from signals borrowed from other functional contexts to those that are unique to play, and the other from purely emotional expressions to highly cognitive (intentional) constructions. Some animal taxa have exaggerated the emotional and cognitive interplay aspects of play signals, yielding admixtures of communication that have led to complex forms of RT. This complexity has been further exaggerated in some lineages by the development of specific novel gestures that can be used to negotiate playful mood and entice reluctant partners. Play-derived gestures may provide new mechanisms by which more sophisticated communication forms can evolve. Therefore, RT and playful communication provide a window into the study of social cognition, emotional regulation and the evolution of communication systems. PMID:25619897

  13. Active brownian particles and run-and-tumble particles: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solon, A. P.; Cates, M. E.; Tailleur, J.

    2015-07-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs) and Run-and-Tumble particles (RTPs) both self-propel at fixed speed v along a body-axis u that reorients either through slow angular diffusion (ABPs) or sudden complete randomisation (RTPs). We compare the physics of these two model systems both at microscopic and macroscopic scales. Using exact results for their steady-state distribution in the presence of external potentials, we show that they both admit the same effective equilibrium regime perturbatively that breaks down for stronger external potentials, in a model-dependent way. In the presence of collisional repulsions such particles slow down at high density: their propulsive effort is unchanged, but their average speed along u becomes v(ρ) < v. A fruitful avenue is then to construct a mean-field description in which particles are ghost-like and have no collisions, but swim at a variable speed v that is an explicit function or functional of the density ρ. We give numerical evidence that the recently shown equivalence of the fluctuating hydrodynamics of ABPs and RTPs in this case, which we detail here, extends to microscopic models of ABPs and RTPs interacting with repulsive forces.

  14. Evaluation of GPS position and attitude determination for automated rendezvous and docking missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diprinzio, Marc D.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1994-07-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System for position and attitude determination is evaluated for an automated rendezvous and docking mission. The typical mission scenario involves the chaser docking with the target for resupply or repair purposes, and is divided into three sections. During the homing phase, the chaser utilizes coarse acquisition pseudorange data to approach the target; guidance laws for this stage are investigated. In the second phase, differential carrier phase positioning is utilized. The chaser must maintain a quasiconstant distance from the target, in order to resolve the initial integer ambiguities. Once the ambiguities are determined, the terminal phase is entered, and the rendezvous is completed with continuous carrier phase tracking. Attitude knowledge is maintained in all phases through the use of the carrier phase observable. A Kalman filter is utilized to estimate all states from the noisy measurement data. The effects of selective availability and cycle slips are also investigated.

  15. SIMONE: near-Earth asteroid rendezvous microsatellites with solar-electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Andrew J.; Green, Simon F.; Wells, Nigel S.

    2002-11-01

    The SIMONE mission proposal is led by QinetiQ, with scientific aspects led by the Open University's Planetary and Space Science Research Institute. Currently the focus of an ESA-funded study, the concept is to help understand the diversity of the NEO population using a fleet of microsatellite-class (~120 kg) interplanetary spacecraft. These will individually rendezvous with specific Near-Earth Objects of interest (together representing a number of important spectral and photometric types) to perform 'up close' measurements of key physical, morphological and compositional features. The ΔV capability of the solar-electric-propelled spacecraft should make a wide range of objects accessible for rendezvous, or at least a sequence of resonant flybys. The wide-ranging dataset produced will be important for risk assessment and studies of possible mitigation approaches, as well as for science.

  16. The asteroid rendezvous spacecraft. An adaptation study of TIROS/DMSP technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using the TIROS/DMSP Earth orbiting meteorological satellite in application to a near Earth asteroid rendezvous mission. System and subsystems analysis was carried out to develop a configuration of the spacecraft suitable for this mission. Mission analysis studies were also done and maneuver/rendezvous scenarios developed for baseline missions to both Anteros and Eros. The fact that the Asteroid mission is the most complex of the Pioneer class missions currently under consideration notwithstanding, the basic conclusion very strongly supports the suitability of the basic TIROS bus for this mission in all systems and subsystems areas, including science accommodation. Further, the modifications which are required due to the unique mission are very low risk and can be accomplished readily. The key issue is that in virtually every key subsystem, the demands of the Asteroid mission are a subset of the basic meteorological satellite mission. This allows a relatively simple reconfiguration to be accomplished without a major system redesign.

  17. Failed common bile duct cannulation during pregnancy: Rescue with endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous procedure.

    PubMed

    Singla, Vikas; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Kumar, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) stones can lead to serious complications and require intervention with either endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or laparoscopic techniques for urgent relief. On an average 10%-20% of the patients with gall bladder stones can have associated CBD stones. CBD stones during pregnancy can be associated with hazardous complications for both the mother and the fetus. Failed cannulation while performing ERCP during pregnancy is a technically demanding situation, which requires immediate rescue with special techniques. Conventional rescue techniques may not be feasible and can be associated with hazardous consequences. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided rendezvous technique has now emerged as a safe alternative, and in one of our patients, this technique was successfully attempted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature on EUS-guided rendezvous procedure during pregnancy. PMID:27386479

  18. Low-Cost Innovation in Spaceflight: The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, Howard E.

    2005-01-01

    On a spring day in 1996, at their research center in the Maryland countryside, representatives from the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) presented Administrator Daniel S. Goldin of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with a check for $3.6 million. 1 Two and a half years earlier, APL officials had agreed to develop a spacecraft capable of conducting an asteroid rendezvous and to do so for slightly more than $122 million. This was a remarkably low sum for a spacecraft due to conduct a planetaryclass mission. By contrast, the Mars Observer spacecraft launched in 1992 for an orbital rendezvous with the red planet had cost $479 million to develop, while the upcoming Cassini mission to Saturn required a spacecraft whose total cost was approaching $1.4 billion. In an Agency accustomed to cost overruns on major missions, the promise to build a planetary-class spacecraft for about $100 million seemed excessively optimistic.

  19. Mission options for the first SEPS application. [rendezvous with near earth asteroids and comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C.-W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Missions to comets and asteroids are primary candidates for Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS) applications. NASA estimates that the first SEPS mission might be launched as early as 1988. This paper presents mission opportunities available for launches between 1988 and early 1991 and discusses the performance capabilities of the current SEPS. Use of a Shuttle Two-Stage IUS and/or a Shuttle Wide Tank Centaur launch vehicle is assumed in the performance assessment. The list of possible first SEPS missions consists of nine missions to comets of primary interest and examples of multiple asteroid rendezvous missions. Both an earth crossing asteroid and a main belt asteroid are considered as first possible targets in the multiple asteroid rendezvous examples. Mission opportunity and performance maps for Eros and Anteros are presented which provide exact performance data and optimal launch and arrival dates for any launch year.

  20. Systematic low-thrust trajectory optimization for a multi-rendezvous mission using adjoint scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fanghua; Tang, Gao

    2016-04-01

    A deep-space exploration mission with low-thrust propulsion to rendezvous with multiple asteroids is investigated. Indirect methods, based on the optimal control theory, are implemented to optimize the fuel consumption. The application of indirect methods for optimizing low-thrust trajectories between two asteroids is briefly given. An effective method is proposed to provide initial guesses for transfers between close near-circular near-coplanar orbits. The conditions for optimality of a multi-asteroid rendezvous mission are determined. The intuitive method of splitting the trajectories into several legs that are solved sequentially is applied first. Then the results are patched together by a scaling method to provide a tentative guess for optimizing the whole trajectory. Numerical examples of optimizing three probe exploration sequences that contain a dozen asteroids each demonstrate the validity and efficiency of these methods.

  1. Guidance and Navigation for Rendezvous and Proximity Operations with a Non-Cooperative Spacecraft at Geosynchronous Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent William; Carpenter, J. Russell; Heatwole, Scott; Markley, F. Landis; Moreau, Michael; Naasz, Bo J.; VanEepoel, John

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility and benefits of various spacecraft servicing concepts are currently being assessed, and all require that the servicer spacecraft perform rendezvous, proximity, and capture operations with the target spacecraft to be serviced. Many high-value spacecraft, which would be logical targets for servicing from an economic point of view, are located in geosynchronous orbit, a regime in which autonomous rendezvous and capture operations are not commonplace. Furthermore, existing GEO spacecraft were not designed to be serviced. Most do not have cooperative relative navigation sensors or docking features, and some servicing applications, such as de-orbiting of a non-functional spacecraft, entail rendezvous and capture with a spacecraft that may be non-functional or un-controlled. Several of these challenges have been explored via the design of a notional mission in which a nonfunctional satellite in geosynchronous orbit is captured by a servicer spacecraft and boosted into super-synchronous orbit for safe disposal. A strategy for autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture is developed, and the Orbit Determination Toolbox (ODTBX) is used to perform a relative navigation simulation to assess the feasibility of performing the rendezvous using a combination of angles-only and range measurements. Additionally, a method for designing efficient orbital rendezvous sequences for multiple target spacecraft is utilized to examine the capabilities of a servicer spacecraft to service multiple targets during the course of a single mission.

  2. Short range and proximity sensor for autonomous rendez-vous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamenbaum, S.; Bomer, T.; Jamet, J.; Turon, P.; Krebs, J. P.

    1986-10-01

    Rendezvous and docking (RVD) sensors have currently been the subject of investigation on the part of MATRA and SODERN. The paper presents the 'future flight sensor' together with estimates of accuracy, mass, power, and reliability. The imager sensor for the short range and proximity phases of RVD appears to be the most suitable and promising in terms of performance capability. Moreover, this concept conforms to the present-day Columbus and Hermes specifications.

  3. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  4. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectory for asteroid deflection missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Yongsheng; Wang, Yukai

    2014-02-01

    Asteroid deflection techniques are essential in order to protect the Earth from catastrophic impacts by hazardous asteroids. Rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories is considered as one of the key technologies to successfully deflect potentially hazardous asteroids. In this paper, we address a general framework for the rapid design and optimization of low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories for future asteroid deflection missions. The design and optimization process includes three closely associated steps. Firstly, shape-based approaches and genetic algorithm (GA) are adopted to perform preliminary design, which provides a reasonable initial guess for subsequent accurate optimization. Secondly, Radau pseudospectral method is utilized to transcribe the low-thrust trajectory optimization problem into a discrete nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. Finally, sequential quadratic programming (SQP) is used to efficiently solve the nonlinear programming problem and obtain the optimal low-thrust rendezvous/interception trajectories. The rapid design and optimization algorithms developed in this paper are validated by three simulation cases with different performance indexes and boundary constraints.

  5. A feasibility study of unmanned rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit. Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technical feasibility of achieving automatic rendezvous and docking in Mars orbit as a part of a surface sample return mission was investigated based on using as much existing Viking '75 Orbiter and Lander hardware as possible. Both 1981 and 1983/84 mission opportunities were considered. The principle result of the study was the definition of a three stage 289 kg Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) capable of accepting a 1 kg sample, injecting itself into a 2200 km circular orbit, and rendezvousing with an orbiting spacecraft carrying an earth return vehicle. Conclusions are that with state of the art systems plus limited application of new developments in areas where feasibility has already been demonstrated, e.g., solid rocket motor sterilization, it is possible to land a small ascent vehicle capable of automatically ascending and rendezvousing with a modified Viking '75 orbiter spacecraft. The mission can be flown in 1981 or 1983/84, but a dual launch or a larger launch vehicle than the Viking Titan 3 Centaur, or the use of space storable propellants for Mars orbit injection, would be required in the 1983/84 opportunity.

  6. The Data Transfer Kit: A geometric rendezvous-based tool for multiphysics data transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Pawlowski, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    The Data Transfer Kit (DTK) is a software library designed to provide parallel data transfer services for arbitrary physics components based on the concept of geometric rendezvous. The rendezvous algorithm provides a means to geometrically correlate two geometric domains that may be arbitrarily decomposed in a parallel simulation. By repartitioning both domains such that they have the same geometric domain on each parallel process, efficient and load balanced search operations and data transfer can be performed at a desirable algorithmic time complexity with low communication overhead relative to other types of mapping algorithms. With the increased development efforts in multiphysics simulation and other multiple mesh and geometry problems, generating parallel topology maps for transferring fields and other data between geometric domains is a common operation. The algorithms used to generate parallel topology maps based on the concept of geometric rendezvous as implemented in DTK are described with an example using a conjugate heat transfer calculation and thermal coupling with a neutronics code. In addition, we provide the results of initial scaling studies performed on the Jaguar Cray XK6 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for a worse-case-scenario problem in terms of algorithmic complexity that shows good scaling on 0(1 x 104) cores for topology map generation and excellent scaling on 0(1 x 105) cores for the data transfer operation with meshes of O(1 x 109) elements. (authors)

  7. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Williamson, Marlin L.; Johnston, Albert S.; Brewster, Linda L.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.; Strack, David; Key, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, (AR&D).) The crewed versions of the spacecraft may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  8. Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Williamson, M.; Brewster, L.; Strack, D.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as Automated Rendezvous and Docking, AR&D). The crewed versions may also perform AR&D, possibly with a different level of automation and/or autonomy, and must also provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the CEV requirements. The relatively low technology readiness of relative navigation sensors for AR&D has been carried as one of the CEV Projects top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce this risk by increasing technology maturation of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through testing and simulation, and to allow the CEV Project to assess the relative navigation sensors.

  9. A Ground Testbed to Advance US Capability in Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This project will advance the Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) GNC system by testing it on hardware, particularly in a flight processor, with a goal of testing it in IPAS with the Waypoint L2 AR&D scenario. The entire Agency supports development of a Commodity for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (CARD) as outlined in the Agency-wide Community of Practice whitepaper entitled: "A Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond". The whitepaper establishes that 1) the US is in a continual state of AR&D point-designs and therefore there is no US "off-the-shelf" AR&D capability in existence today, 2) the US has fallen behind our foreign counterparts particularly in the autonomy of AR&D systems, 3) development of an AR&D commodity is a national need that would benefit NASA, our commercial partners, and DoD, and 4) an initial estimate indicates that the development of a standardized AR&D capability could save the US approximately $60M for each AR&D project and cut each project's AR&D flight system implementation time in half.

  10. Diffusion, sedimentation equilibrium, and harmonic trapping of run-and-tumble nanoswimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjia; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-05-14

    The diffusion of self-propelling nanoswimmers is explored by dissipative particle dynamics in which a nanoswimmer swims by forming an instantaneous force dipole with one of its nearest neighboring solvent beads. Our simulations mimic run-and-tumble behavior by letting the swimmer run for a time τ, then it randomly changes its direction for the next run period. Our simulations show that the swimming speed (ν(a)) of a nanoswimmer is proportional to the propulsion force and the mobility of a pusher is the same as that of a puller. The effective diffusivity is determined by three methods: mean squared displacement, velocity autocorrelation function, and sedimentation equilibrium. The active colloid undergoes directed propulsion at short time scales but changes to random motion at long time scales. The velocity autocorrelation function decreases with time and becomes zero beyond the run time. Under gravity, the concentration profile of active colloids follows Boltzmann distribution with a sedimentation length consistent with that acquired from the drift-diffusion equation. In our simulation, all three methods yield the same result, the effective diffusivity of an active colloid is the sum of the diffusivity of a passive colloid and ν(a)²τ/6. When the active colloids are confined by a harmonic well, they are trapped within a confinement length defined by the balance between the swimmer active force and restoring force of the well. When the confinement length is large compared to the run length, the stationary density profile follows the Boltzmann distribution. However, when the run length exceeds the confinement length, the density distribution is no longer described by Boltzmann distribution, instead we found a bimodal distribution.

  11. Membrane interactions in small fast-tumbling bicelles as studied by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Andrea; Kövér, Katalin E; Mäler, Lena

    2015-03-01

    Small fast-tumbling bicelles are ideal for studies of membrane interactions at molecular level; they allow analysis of lipid properties using solution-state NMR. In the present study we used 31P NMR relaxation to obtain detailed information on lipid head-group dynamics. We explored the effect of two topologically different membrane-interacting peptides on bicelles containing either dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC), or a mixture of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphoglycerol (DMPG), and dihexanoylphosphocholine (DHPC). KALP21 is a model transmembrane peptide, designed to span a DMPC bilayer and dynorphin B is a membrane surface active neuropeptide. KALP21 causes significant increase in bicelle size, as evidenced by both dynamic light scattering and 31P T2 relaxation measurements. The effect of dynorphin B on bicelle size is more modest, although significant effects on T2 relaxation are observed at higher temperatures. A comparison of 31P T1 values for the lipids with and without the peptides showed that dynorphin B has a greater effect on lipid head-group dynamics than KALP21, especially at elevated temperatures. From the field-dependence of T1 relaxation data, a correlation time describing the overall lipid motion was derived. Results indicate that the positively charged dynorphin B decreases the mobility of the lipid molecules--in particular for the negatively charged DMPG--while KALP21 has a more modest influence. Our results demonstrate that while a transmembrane peptide has severe effects on overall bilayer properties, the surface bound peptide has a more dramatic effect in reducing lipid head-group mobility. These observations may be of general importance for understanding peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:25497765

  12. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages. PMID:22060988

  13. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages.

  14. Poisson equations of rotational motion for a rigid triaxial body with application to a tumbling artificial satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J. J. F.; Fitzpatrick, P. M.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for studying the effects of gravity gradient torque on the attitude stability of a tumbling triaxial rigid satellite. Poisson equations are used to investigate the rotation of the satellite (which is in elliptical orbit about an attracting point mass) about its center of mass. An averaging method is employed to obtain an intermediate set of differential equations for the nonresonant, secular behavior of the osculating elements which describe the rotational motions of the satellite, and the averaged equations are then integrated to obtain long-term secular solutions for the osculating elements.

  15. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Milenkovich, Zoran; Wilson, Zachary; Huich, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) at the Lockheed Martin (LM) Waterton Campus in Littleton, Colorado is a dynamic test environment focused on Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) development testing and risk reduction activities. The SOSC supports multiple program pursuits and accommodates testing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms for relative navigation, hardware testing and characterization, as well as software and test process development. The SOSC consists of a high bay (60 meters long by 15.2 meters wide by 15.2 meters tall) with dual six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion simulators and a single fixed base 6DOF robot. The large testing area (maximum sensor-to-target effective range of 60 meters) allows for large-scale, flight-like simulations of proximity maneuvers and docking events. The facility also has two apertures for access to external extended-range outdoor target test operations. In addition, the facility contains four Mission Operations Centers (MOCs) with connectivity to dual high bay control rooms and a data/video interface room. The high bay is rated at Class 300,000 (. 0.5 m maximum particles/m3) cleanliness and includes orbital lighting simulation capabilities.

  16. Theoretical reason for the lack of influence of 1H-14N cross-relaxation on the water proton T 1 NMRD profile in slow tumbling proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westlund, P.-O.

    2012-09-01

    For immobilized protein the water proton T 1-NMRD profile displays three enhanced relaxation peaks (QP). For slow tumbling proteins these relaxation peaks are not experimentally observed. However, the theoretically determined QP effect on the amide proton T 1-NMRD profile displays a distorted Lorentzian dispersion profile. The question arises as to whether there is also a distortion of the water-proton T 1-NMRD profile due to QP. The model of Sunde and Halle [J. Magn. Reson. 203, 257 (2010)] predicts a decreasing QP relaxation contribution and, with the aid of a model for tumbling proteins [P.-O. Westlund, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 12, 3136 (2010)], it is shown that the QP effect is absent in water-proton T 1-NMRD profiles for slow tumbling proteins with τR < 1 µs, τI.

  17. Effect of field size, head motion, and rotational velocity on roll vection and illusory self-tilt in a tumbling room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, R. S.; Howard, I. P.; Zacher, J. E.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of field size, velocity, and visual fixation upon the perception of self-body rotation and tilt was examined in a rotating furnished room. Subjects sat in a stationary chair in the furnished room which could be rotated about the body roll axis. For full-field conditions, complete 360 degrees body rotation (tumbling) was the most common sensation (felt by 80% of subjects). Constant tilt or partial tumbling (less than 360 degrees rotation) occurred more frequently with a small field of view (20 deg). The number of subjects who experienced complete tumbling increased with increases in field of view and room velocity (for velocities between 15 and 30 degrees s-1). The speed of perceived self-rotation relative to room rotation also increased with increasing field of view.

  18. SPARTAN: A High-Fidelity Simulation for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turbe, Michael A.; McDuffie, James H.; DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; Carrington, Connie K.

    2007-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed the Simulation Package for Autonomous Rendezvous Test and ANalysis (SPARTAN), a high-fidelity on-orbit simulation featuring multiple six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) vehicles. SPARTAN has been developed in a modular fashion in Matlab/Simulink to test next-generation automated rendezvous and docking guidance, navigation,and control algorithms for NASA's new Vision for Space Exploration. SPARTAN includes autonomous state-based mission manager algorithms responsible for sequencing the vehicle through various flight phases based on on-board sensor inputs and closed-loop guidance algorithms, including Lambert transfers, Clohessy-Wiltshire maneuvers, and glideslope approaches The guidance commands are implemented using an integrated translation and attitude control system to provide 6DOF control of each vehicle in the simulation. SPARTAN also includes high-fidelity representations of a variety of absolute and relative navigation sensors that maybe used for NASA missions, including radio frequency, lidar, and video-based rendezvous sensors. Proprietary navigation sensor fusion algorithms have been developed that allow the integration of these sensor measurements through an extended Kalman filter framework to create a single optimal estimate of the relative state of the vehicles. SPARTAN provides capability for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis, allowing for rigorous evaluation of the performance of the complete proposed AR&D system, including software, sensors, and mechanisms. SPARTAN also supports hardware-in-the-loop testing through conversion of the algorithms to C code using Real-Time Workshop in order to be hosted in a mission computer engineering development unit running an embedded real-time operating system. SPARTAN also contains both runtime TCP/IP socket interface and post-processing compatibility with bdStudio, a visualization tool developed by bd Systems, allowing for intuitive evaluation of simulation results. A

  19. Third Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In May 1994, the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions was established by the NASA Advisory Council. Its purpose is to review Phase 1 (Shuttle-Mir) planning, training, operations, rendezvous and docking, and management and to provide interim reports containing specific recommendations to the Advisory Council. Phase 1 represents the building block to create the experience and technical expertise for an International Space Station. The Phase 1 program brings together the United States and Russia in a major cooperative and contractual program that takes advantage of both countries' capabilities. The content of the Phase 1 program consists of the following elements as defined by the Phase 1 Program Management Plan, dated October 6, 1994: Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions; astronaut long duration presence on Mir Requirements for Mir support of Phase 1 when astronauts are not on board; outfitting Spektr and Priroda modules with NASA science, research, and risk mitigation equipment Related ground support requirements of NASA and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) to support Phase 1 Integrated NASA and RSA launch schedules and manifests The first meeting of the Task Force was held at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) on May 24 and 25, 1994 with a preliminary report submitted to the NASA Advisory Council on June 6, 1994. The second meeting of the Task Force was held at JSC on July 12 and 13, 1994 and a detailed report containing a series of specific recommendations was submitted on July 29, 1994. This report reflects the results of the third Task Force meeting which was held at JSC on 11 and 12 October, 1994. The briefings presented at that meeting reviewed NASA's response to the Task Force recommendations made to date and provided background data and current status on several critical areas which the Task Force had not addressed in its previous reports.

  20. Coma and tail trajectory design for the CRAF mission. [Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionasescu, Rodica

    1989-01-01

    The design of the trajectory for the proposed Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission to study comet coma and tail development is examined. A two part trajectory is planned for the CRAF mission to study comet Kopff. It is proposed that, during the 213 day perihelion phase of the trajectory, CRAF should perform multiple petallike flybys at 50-5000 km from the comet's nucleus. Nine days after the perihelion, the spacecraft would transition into the comet tail in the antisun direction to a maximum distance of 50,000 km. The objectives of these two phases of exploration are discussed.

  1. Orbit Modification of Earth-Crossing Asteroids/Comets Using Rendezvous Spacecraft and Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang-Young; Mazanek, Daniel D.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the approach and results of an end-to-end simulation to deflect a long-period comet (LPC) by using a rapid rendezvous spacecraft and laser ablation system. The laser energy required for providing sufficient deflection DELTA V and an analysis of possible intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories are studied in this analysis. These problems minimize a weighted sum of the flight time and required propellant by using an advanced propulsion system. The optimal thrust-vector history and propellant mass to use are found in order to transfer a spacecraft from the Earth to a targeted celestial object. One goal of this analysis is to formulate an optimization problem for intercept/rendezvous spacecraft trajectories. One approach to alter the trajectory of the object in a highly controlled manner is to use pulsed laser ablative propulsion. A sufficiently intense laser pulse ablates the surface of a near-Earth object (NEO) by causing plasma blowoff. The momentum change from a single laser pulse is very small. However, the cumulative effect is very effective because the laser can interact with the object over long periods of time. The laser ablation technique can overcome the mass penalties associated with other nondisruptive approaches because no propellant is required to generate the DELTA V (the material of the celestial object is the propellant source). Additionally, laser ablation is effective against a wide range of surface materials and does not require any landing or physical attachment to the object. For diverting distant asteroids and comets, the power and optical requirements of a laser ablation system on or near the Earth may be too extreme to contemplate in the next few decades. A hybrid solution would be for a spacecraft to carry a laser as a payload to a particular celestial body. The spacecraft would require an advanced propulsion system capable of rapid rendezvous with the object and an extremely powerful electrical generator, which is

  2. NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review. A compilation of the abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of abstracts of papers solicited for presentation at the NASA Automated Rendezvous and Capture Review held in Williamsburg, VA on November 19-21, 1991. Due to limitations on time and other considerations, not all abstracts could be presented during the review. The organizing committee determined however, that all abstracts merited availability to all participants and represented data and information reflecting state-of-the-art of this technology which should be captured in one document for future use and reference. The organizing committee appreciates the interest shown in the review and the response by the authors in submitting these abstracts.

  3. Manned Mars lander launch-to-rendezvous analysis for a 1981 Venus-swingby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, N. L.; Murtagh, T. B.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the return of a manned Mars lander by a launch from the surface of Mars to some intermediate orbit, with subsequent maneuvers to rendezvous with a primary spacecraft (called the orbiter) in a Mars parking orbit. The type of Mars mission used to demonstrate the analytical technique includes a Venus swingby on the Mars-to-Earth portion of the trajectory in order to reduce the total mission velocity requirement. The total velocity requirement for the mission considered (if inplane launches are assumed) is approximately 17,500 ft/sec.

  4. Results to be expected from light scattering dust analyzer during a rendezvous mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zerull, R. H.; Giese, R. H.; Kneissel, B.

    1981-01-01

    The light scattering principle for particle detection is customary for the measurement of aerosols. Light scattering techniques can be applied to mixtures of particles (nephelometers) and to single particles as well. Measuring particle mixtures simplify detection because of the higher intensity level, however, information concerning the individual particle is lost. To provide well defined conditions over the whole rendezvous period, i.e., constant illumination beam and unchangeable scattering angle, the use of an artificial light source (instead of the sun) and a scattering volume located within the S/C is desirable. Considering this and the relatively low particle densities to be expected, the measurement of particle mixtures must be excluded.

  5. Embedded Relative Navigation Sensor Fusion Algorithms for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon K.; Betts, Kevin M.; McDuffie, James H.; Dreas, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    bd Systems (a subsidiary of SAIC) has developed a suite of embedded relative navigation sensor fusion algorithms to enable NASA autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) missions. Translational and rotational Extended Kalman Filters (EKFs) were developed for integrating measurements based on the vehicles' orbital mechanics and high-fidelity sensor error models and provide a solution with increased accuracy and robustness relative to any single relative navigation sensor. The filters were tested tinough stand-alone covariance analysis, closed-loop testing with a high-fidelity multi-body orbital simulation, and hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL).

  6. Application of neural networks to autonomous rendezvous and docking of space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has investigated the feasibility of numerous autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) candidate techniques. Neural networks have been studied as a viable basis for such systems' implementation, due to their intrinsic representation of such nonlinear functions as those for which analytical solutions are either difficult or nonexistent. Neural networks are also able to recognize and adapt to changes in their dynamic environment, thereby enhancing redundancy and fault tolerance. Outstanding performance has been obtained from ARD azimuth, elevation, and roll networks of this type.

  7. Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) Rendezvous Proximity Operations Design and Trade Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Westphal, J. J.; Roscoe, C.; Hawes, D. R.; Carrico, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The Proximity Operations Nano-Satellite Flight Demonstration (PONSFD) program is to demonstrate rendezvous proximity operations (RPO), formation flying, and docking with a pair of 3U CubeSats. The program is sponsored by NASA Ames via the Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) in support of its Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP). The goal of the mission is to demonstrate complex RPO and docking operations with a pair of low-cost 3U CubeSat satellites using passive navigation sensors. The program encompasses the entire system evolution including system design, acquisition, satellite construction, launch, mission operations, and final disposal. The satellite is scheduled for launch in Fall 2015 with a 1-year mission lifetime. This paper provides a brief mission overview but will then focus on the current design and driving trade study results for the RPO mission specific processor and relevant ground software. The current design involves multiple on-board processors, each specifically tasked with providing mission critical capabilities. These capabilities range from attitude determination and control to image processing. The RPO system processor is responsible for absolute and relative navigation, maneuver planning, attitude commanding, and abort monitoring for mission safety. A low power processor running a Linux operating system has been selected for implementation. Navigation is one of the RPO processor's key tasks. This entails processing data obtained from the on-board GPS unit as well as the on-board imaging sensors. To do this, Kalman filters will be hosted on the processor to ingest and process measurements for maintenance of position and velocity estimates with associated uncertainties. While each satellite carries a GPS unit, it will be used sparsely to conserve power. As such, absolute navigation will mainly consist of propagating past known states, and relative navigation will be considered to be of greater importance. For relative observations

  8. COMPASS Final Report: Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team completed a design for a multi-asteroid (Nereus and 1996 FG3) sample return capable spacecraft for the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office. The objective of the study was to support technology development and assess the relative benefits of different electric propulsion systems on asteroid sample return design. The design uses a single, heritage Orion solar array (SA) (approx.6.5 kW at 1 AU) to power a single NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster ((NEXT) a spare NEXT is carried) to propel a lander to two near Earth asteroids. After landing and gathering science samples, the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) vehicle spirals back to Earth where it drops off the first sample s return capsule and performs an Earth flyby to assist the craft in rendezvousing with a second asteroid, which is then sampled. The second sample is returned in a similar fashion. The vehicle, dubbed Near Earth Asteroids Rendezvous and Sample Earth Returns (NEARER), easily fits in an Atlas 401 launcher and its cost estimates put the mission in the New Frontier s (NF's) class mission.

  9. A Comparison of Trajectory Optimization Methods for the Impulsive Minimum Fuel Rendezvous Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steven P.; Mailhe, Laurie M.; Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present, a comparison of trajectory optimization approaches for the minimum fuel rendezvous problem. Both indirect and direct methods are compared for a variety of test cases. The indirect approach is based on primer vector theory. The direct approaches are implemented numerically and include Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). Quasi- Newton and Nelder-Meade Simplex. Several cost function parameterizations are considered for the direct approach. We choose one direct approach that appears to be the most flexible. Both the direct and indirect methods are applied to a variety of test cases which are chosen to demonstrate the performance of each method in different flight regimes. The first test case is a simple circular-to-circular coplanar rendezvous. The second test case is an elliptic-to-elliptic line of apsides rotation. The final test case is an orbit phasing maneuver sequence in a highly elliptic orbit. For each test case we present a comparison of the performance of all methods we consider in this paper.

  10. Hardware-in-the-Loop Rendezvous Tests of a Novel Actuators Command Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes dos Santos, Willer; Marconi Rocco, Evandro; Boge, Toralf; Benninghoff, Heike; Rems, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Integration, test and validation results, in a real-time environment, of a novel concept for spacecraft control are presented in this paper. The proposed method commands simultaneously a group of actuators optimizing a given set of objective functions based on a multiobjective optimization technique. Since close proximity maneuvers play an important role in orbital servicing missions, the entire GNC system has been integrated and tested at a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) rendezvous and docking simulator known as European Proximity Operations Simulator (EPOS). During the test campaign at EPOS facility, a visual camera has been used to provide the necessary measurements for calculating the relative position with respect to the target satellite during closed-loop simulations. In addition, two different configurations of spacecraft control have been considered in this paper: a thruster reaction control system and a mixed actuators mode which includes thrusters, reaction wheels, and magnetic torqrods. At EPOS, results of HIL closed-loop tests have demonstrated that a safe and stable rendezvous approach can be achieved with the proposed GNC loop.

  11. Optimization of maneuvers and resources for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Jacques; Canu, Richard; Joulot, Antoine

    Addressing the generation of flight scenarios for the rendezvous of a servicing vehicle to a space station, solutions in terms of sequences of maneuvers shall be found that meet a generally complex set of mission constraints while optimizing the needed resources. For the optimization of maneuvers and resources during rendezvous, this paper describes a methodology based on the parametric optimization of a sequence of genetic non-impulsional thrust maneuvers which are defined by the user from a standard catalog, allowing to cope with both translations and rotations. The method uses a reduced gradient algorithm to find an optimal trajectory that meet every mission constraint. Most attention has been paid to the standard of realism in the modeling of the chaser and target dynamics, and in the formalization of the constraints on the approach trajectories; these last ones are defined as the terminal position, the attitude and kinematic capture conditions for berthing or docking, the maximal duration allocated to the approach, path constraints, the propulsive capacities of the chaser and a `safety' constraint, which in other words means that any failure on the chaser during the approach shall result in collision avoiding trajectories or in a mechanical contract to the station within safe limits. The criterion for scenarios optimization can be minimization of propellant consumption or phase duration, or a weighed combination of both. For illustration purpose, example results are given for the final approach of a servicing vehicle to an Earth-pointed space station.

  12. Space Shuttle Program: Automatic rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture (category 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William L.; Lee, Roscoe; Eick, Richard E.; Hallstrom, J. V.; Hiers, Harry K.; Mcmanamen, John P.; Olszewski, Oscar W.; Prather, Joseph L.; Rue, D. L.; Zimmer, Karl J.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center is actively pursuing the development and demonstration of capabilities for automatic rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture (AR&C) using the Space Shuttle as the active vehicle. This activity combines the technologies, expertise, tools, and facilities of the JSC Tracking and Communications Division (EE), Navigation, Control and Aeronautics Division (EG), Automation and Robotics Division (ER), and Structures and Mechanics Division (ES) of the Engineering Directorate and the Flight Design and Dynamics Division (DM) of the Mission Operations Directorate. Potential benefits of AR&C include more efficient and repeatable rendezvous, proximity operations, and capture operations; reduced impacts on the target vehicles (e.g., Orbiter RCS plume loads); reduced flight crew work loads; reduced ground support requirements; and reduced operational constraints. This paper documents the current JSC capabilities/tools/facilities for AR&C and describes a proposed plan for a progression of ground demonstrations and flight tests and demonstrations of AR&C capabilities. This plan involves the maturing of existing technologies in tracking and communications; guidance, navigation and control; mechanisms; manipulators; and systems management and integrating them into several evolutionary demonstration stages.

  13. An integrated autonomous rendezvous and docking system architecture using Centaur modern avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The avionics system for the Centaur upper stage is in the process of being modernized with the current state-of-the-art in strapdown inertial guidance equipment. This equipment includes an integrated flight control processor with a ring laser gyro based inertial guidance system. This inertial navigation unit (INU) uses two MIL-STD-1750A processors and communicates over the MIL-STD-1553B data bus. Commands are translated into load activation through a Remote Control Unit (RCU) which incorporates the use of solid state relays. Also, a programmable data acquisition system replaces separate multiplexer and signal conditioning units. This modern avionics suite is currently being enhanced through independent research and development programs to provide autonomous rendezvous and docking capability using advanced cruise missile image processing technology and integrated GPS navigational aids. A system concept was developed to combine these technologies in order to achieve a fully autonomous rendezvous, docking, and autoland capability. The current system architecture and the evolution of this architecture using advanced modular avionics concepts being pursued for the National Launch System are discussed.

  14. Space Shuttle Guidance, Navigation, and Rendezvous Knowledge Capture Reports. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    This document is a catalog and readers guide to lessons learned, experience, and technical history reports, as well as compilation volumes prepared by United Space Alliance personnel for the NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) Flight Dynamics Division.1 It is intended to make it easier for future generations of engineers to locate knowledge capture documentation from the Shuttle Program. The first chapter covers observations on documentation quality and research challenges encountered during the Space Shuttle and Orion programs. The second chapter covers the knowledge capture approach used to create many of the reports covered in this document. These chapters are intended to provide future flight programs with insight that could be used to formulate knowledge capture and management strategies. The following chapters contain descriptions of each knowledge capture report. The majority of the reports concern the Space Shuttle. Three are included that were written in support of the Orion Program. Most of the reports were written from the years 2001 to 2011. Lessons learned reports concern primarily the shuttle Global Positioning System (GPS) upgrade and the knowledge capture process. Experience reports on navigation and rendezvous provide examples of how challenges were overcome and how best practices were identified and applied. Some reports are of a more technical history nature covering navigation and rendezvous. They provide an overview of mission activities and the evolution of operations concepts and trajectory design. The lessons learned, experience, and history reports would be considered secondary sources by historians and archivists.

  15. Progress in navigation filter estimate fusion and its application to spacecraft rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell

    1994-01-01

    A new derivation of an algorithm which fuses the outputs of two Kalman filters is presented within the context of previous research in this field. Unlike other works, this derivation clearly shows the combination of estimates to be optimal, minimizing the trace of the fused covariance matrix. The algorithm assumes that the filters use identical models, and are stable and operating optimally with respect to their own local measurements. Evidence is presented which indicates that the error ellipsoid derived from the covariance of the optimally fused estimate is contained within the intersections of the error ellipsoids of the two filters being fused. Modifications which reduce the algorithm's data transmission requirements are also presented, including a scalar gain approximation, a cross-covariance update formula which employs only the two contributing filters' autocovariances, and a form of the algorithm which can be used to reinitialize the two Kalman filters. A sufficient condition for using the optimally fused estimates to periodically reinitialize the Kalman filters in this fashion is presented and proved as a theorem. When these results are applied to an optimal spacecraft rendezvous problem, simulated performance results indicate that the use of optimally fused data leads to significantly improved robustness to initial target vehicle state errors. The following applications of estimate fusion methods to spacecraft rendezvous are also described: state vector differencing, and redundancy management.

  16. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015 PMID:27652305

  17. A comparison between endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous and percutaneous biliary drainage after failed ERCP for malignant distal biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Jason G.; Darcy, Michael; Fujii-Lau, Larissa L.; Mullady, Daniel K.; Gaddam, Srinivas; Murad, Faris M.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Kushnir, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study Aims: Selective biliary cannulation is unsuccessful in 5 % to 10 % of patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for malignant distal biliary obstruction (MDBO). Percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) has been the gold standard, but endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUSr) have been increasingly used for biliary decompression in this patient population. Our aim was to compare the initial success rate, long-term efficacy, and safety of PBD and EUSr in relieving MDBO after failed ERC Patients and methods: A retrospective study involving 50 consecutive patients who had an initial failed ERCP for MDBO. Twenty-five patients undergoing EUSr between 2008 – 2014 were compared to 25 patients who underwent PBD immediately prior to the introduction of EUSr at our center (2002 – 2008). Comparisons were made between the two groups with regard to technical success, duration of hospital stay and adverse event rates after biliary decompression. Results: The mean age at presentation was 66.5 (± 12.6 years), 28 patients (54.9 %) were female. The etiology of MDBO was pancreaticobiliary malignancy in 44 (88 %) and metastatic disease in 6 (12 %) cases. Biliary drainage was technically successful by EUSr in 19 (76 %) cases and by PBD in 25 (100 %) (P = 0.002). Median length of hospital stay after initial drainage was 1 day in the EUSr group vs 5 days in PBD group (P = 0.02). Repeat biliary intervention was required for 4 patients in the EUSr group and 15 in the PBD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Initial technical success with EUSr was significantly lower than with PBD, however when EUSr was successful, patients had a significantly shorter post-procedure hospital stay and required fewer follow-up biliary interventions. Meeting presentations: Annual Digestive Diseases Week 2015

  18. An EPR line shape study of anisotropic rotational reorientation and slow tumbling in liquid and frozen jojoba oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Al-Rashid, W. A.

    Spin probe investigation of jojoba oil was carried out by electron paramagnetic rresonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The spin probe used was 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone- N-oxide. The EPR line shape studies were carried out in the lower temperature range of 192 to 275 K to test the applicability of the stochastic Liouville theory in the simulation of EPR line shapes where earlier relaxation theories do not apply. In an earlier study, this system was analysed by employing rotational diffusion at the fast-motional region. The results show that PD-Tempone exhibits asymmetric rotational diffusion with N = 3.3 at an axis z'= Y in the plane of the molecule and perpendicular to the NO bond direction. In this investigation we have extended the temperature range to lower temperatures and observed slow tumbling EPR spectra. It is shown that the stochastic Liouville method can be used to simulate all but two of the experimentally observed EPR spectra in the slow-motional region and details of the slow-motional line shape are sensitive to the anisotropy of rotation and showed good agreement for a moderate jump model. From the computer simulation of EPR line shapes it is found that the information obtained on τ R, and N in the motional-narrowing region can be extrapolated into the slow-tumbling region. It is also found that ln (τ R) is linear in 1/ T in the temperature range studied and the resulting activation energy for rotation is 51 kJ/mol. The two EPR spectra at 240 and 231 K were found to exhibit the effects of anisotropic viscosity observed by B IRELL for nitroxides oriented in tubular cavities in inclusion crystals in which the molecule is free to rotate about the long axis but with its rotation hindered about the other two axes because of the cavity geometry. These results proved that the slow-tumbling spectra were very sensitive to the effects of anisotropy in the viscosity.

  19. The Successful Development of an Automated Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) System for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture/docking (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. Development and demonstration of a rendezvous sensor was identified early in the AR&C Program as the critical enabling technology that allows automated proximity operations and docking. A first generation rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor (VGS), was developed and successfully flown on STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. A ground demonstration of the entire system and software was successfully tested. Advances in both video and signal processing technologies and the lessons learned from the two successful flight experiments provided a baseline for the development, by the MSFC, of a new generation of video based rendezvous sensor. The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AGS) has greatly increased performance and additional capability for longer-range operation with a new target designed as a direct replacement for existing ISS hemispherical reflectors.

  20. Usefulness of the 'Rendezvous' Technique in Living Related Right Liver Donors with Postoperative Biliary Leakage from Bile Duct Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, R.; Traina, M.; Maruzzelli, L.; Caruso, S.; Di Pisa, M.; Gruttadauria, S.; Luca, A.; Gridelli, B.

    2008-09-15

    This is a report on two cases of large bile leak following right hepatectomy performed for living related liver transplantation, originating from the stump of the ligated right bile duct, and treated with the placement of large percutaneous biliary catheters through a combined percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic approach (rendezvous technique).

  1. Q-Learning and p-persistent CSMA based rendezvous protocol for cognitive radio networks operating with shared spectrum activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Clifton L.; Biswas, Subir

    2014-06-01

    With an increasing demand for spectrum, dynamic spectrum access (DSA) has been proposed as viable means for providing the flexibility and greater access to spectrum necessary to meet this demand. Within the DSA concept, unlicensed secondary users temporarily "borrow" or access licensed spectrum, while respecting the licensed primary user's rights to that spectrum. As key enablers for DSA, cognitive radios (CRs) are based on software-defined radios which allow them to sense, learn, and adapt to the spectrum environment. These radios can operate independently and rapidly switch channels. Thus, the initial setup and maintenance of cognitive radio networks are dependent upon the ability of CR nodes to find each other, in a process known as rendezvous, and create a link on a common channel for the exchange of data and control information. In this paper, we propose a novel rendezvous protocol, known as QLP, which is based on Q-learning and the p-persistent CSMA protocol. With the QLP protocol, CR nodes learn which channels are best for rendezvous and thus adapt their behavior to visit those channels more frequently. We demonstrate through simulation that the QLP protocol provides a rendevous capability for DSA environments with different dynamics of PU activity, while attempting to achieve the following performance goals: (1) minimize the average time-to-rendezvous, (2) maximize system throughput, (3) minimize primary user interference, and (4) minimize collisions among CR nodes.

  2. Autonomous rendezvous and docking operations of unmanned expendable cargo transfer vehicles (e.g. Centaur) with Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmet, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the feasibility study using Centaur or other CTV's to deliver payloads to the Space Station Freedom (SSF). During this study was examined the requirements upon unmanned cargo transfer stages (including Centaur) for phasing, rendezvous, proximity operations and docking/berthing (capture).

  3. Active rendezvous between a low-earth orbit user spacecraft and the Space Transportation System (STS) shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, H. L.; Herrnstein, J. R.

    1989-10-01

    Active rendezvous of an unmanned spacecraft with the Space Transportation System (STS) Shuttle is considered. The various operational constraints facing both the maneuvering spacecraft and the Shuttle during such a rendezvous sequence are discussed. Specifically, the actively rendezvousing user spacecraft must arrive in the generic Shuttle control box at a specified time after Shuttle launch. In so doing it must at no point violate Shuttle separation requirements. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to initiate the transfer sequence from any point in its orbit. The four-burn rendezvous sequence incorporating two Hohmann transfers and an intermediate phasing orbit as a low-energy solution satisfying the above requirements are discussed. The general characteristics of the four-burn sequence are discussed, with emphasis placed on phase orbit altitude and delta-velocity requirements. The planning and execution of such a sequence in the operational environment are then considered. Factor crucial in maintaining the safety of both spacecraft, such as spacecraft separation and contingency analysis, are considered in detail.

  4. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Linda L.; Howard, Richard T.; Johnston, A. S.; Carrington, Connie; Mitchell, Jennifer D.; Cryan, Scott P.

    2008-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success ofthe Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor-proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-Ioop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of "pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  5. Multi-Sensor Testing for Automated Rendezvous and Docking Sensor Testing at the Flight Robotics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, L.; Johnston, A.; Howard, R.; Mitchell, J.; Cryan, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Architecture defines missions that require rendezvous, proximity operations, and docking (RPOD) of two spacecraft both in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and in Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Uncrewed spacecraft must perform automated and/or autonomous rendezvous, proximity operations and docking operations (commonly known as AR&D). The crewed missions may also perform rendezvous and docking operations and may require different levels of automation and/or autonomy, and must provide the crew with relative navigation information for manual piloting. The capabilities of the RPOD sensors are critical to the success of the Exploration Program. NASA has the responsibility to determine whether the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) contractor proposed relative navigation sensor suite will meet the requirements. The relatively low technology readiness level of AR&D relative navigation sensors has been carried as one of the CEV Project's top risks. The AR&D Sensor Technology Project seeks to reduce the risk by the testing and analysis of selected relative navigation sensor technologies through hardware-in-the-loop testing and simulation. These activities will provide the CEV Project information to assess the relative navigation sensors maturity as well as demonstrate test methods and capabilities. The first year of this project focused on a series of"pathfinder" testing tasks to develop the test plans, test facility requirements, trajectories, math model architecture, simulation platform, and processes that will be used to evaluate the Contractor-proposed sensors. Four candidate sensors were used in the first phase of the testing. The second phase of testing used four sensors simultaneously: two Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Video Guidance Sensors (AVGS), a laser-based video sensor that uses retroreflectors attached to the target vehicle, and two commercial laser range finders. The multi-sensor testing was conducted at MSFC's Flight Robotics Laboratory (FRL

  6. Analysis of a Linear System for Variable-Thrust Control in the Terminal Phase of Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, Richard A.; Durling, Barbara J.

    1961-01-01

    A linear system for applying thrust to a ferry vehicle in the 3 terminal phase of rendezvous with a satellite is analyzed. This system requires that the ferry thrust vector per unit mass be variable and equal to a suitable linear combination of the measured position and velocity vectors of the ferry relative to the satellite. The variations of the ferry position, speed, acceleration, and mass ratio are examined for several combinations of the initial conditions and two basic control parameters analogous to the undamped natural frequency and the fraction of critical damping. Upon making a desirable selection of one control parameter and requiring minimum fuel expenditure for given terminal-phase initial conditions, a simplified analysis in one dimension practically fixes the choice of the remaining control parameter. The system can be implemented by an automatic controller or by a pilot.

  7. Autonomous rendezvous and docking: A commercial approach to on-orbit technology validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Whitten, Raymond P.

    1991-11-01

    SpARC, in conjunction with its corporate affiliates, is planning an on-orbit validation of autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) technology. The emphasis in this program is to utilize existing technology and commercially available components wherever possible. The primary subsystems to be validated by this demonstration include GPS receivers for navigation, a video-based sensor for proximity operations, a fluid connector mechanism to demonstrate fluid resupply capability, and a compliant, single-point docking mechanism. The focus for this initial experiment will be ELV based and will make use of two residual Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) service modules. The first COMET spacecraft will be launched in late 1992 and will serve as the target vehicle. After the second COMET spacecraft has been launched in late 1994, the ARD demonstration will take place. The service module from the second COMET will serve as the chase vehicle.

  8. Rendezvous strategy impacts on CTV avionics design, system reliability requirements, and available collision avoidance maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, William J.; Davis, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Rockwell International is conducting an ongoing program to develop avionics architectures that provide high intrinsic value while meeting all mission objectives. Studies are being conducted to determine alternative configurations that have low life-cycle cost and minimum development risk, and that minimize launch delays while providing the reliability level to assure a successful mission. This effort is based on four decades of providing ballistic missile avionics to the United States Air Force and has focused on the requirements of the NASA Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) program in 1991. During the development of architectural concepts it became apparent that rendezvous strategy issues have an impact on the architecture of the avionics system. This is in addition to the expected impact on propulsion and electrical power duration, flight profiles, and trajectory during approach.

  9. Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In October 1992, Russia and the U.S. agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. This original 'Shuttle-Mir' project encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz, and Mir spacecraft. At that time, the project was limited to: the STS-60 Shuttle mission, which was completed in February 1994 and carried the first Russian cosmonaut; the planned March 1995 Soyuz 18 launch which will carry a U.S. astronaut to the Mir space station for a three month mission; and the STS-71 Shuttle mission which is scheduled to rendezvous and dock with the Mir space station in June 1995. The Task Force's specific recommendations are given.

  10. Rendezvous strategy impacts on CTV avionics design, system reliability requirements, and available collision avoidance maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, William J.; Davis, John E.

    Rockwell International is conducting an ongoing program to develop avionics architectures that provide high intrinsic value while meeting all mission objectives. Studies are being conducted to determine alternative configurations that have low life-cycle cost and minimum development risk, and that minimize launch delays while providing the reliability level to assure a successful mission. This effort is based on four decades of providing ballistic missile avionics to the United States Air Force and has focused on the requirements of the NASA Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) program in 1991. During the development of architectural concepts it became apparent that rendezvous strategy issues have an impact on the architecture of the avionics system. This is in addition to the expected impact on propulsion and electrical power duration, flight profiles, and trajectory during approach.

  11. Robust adaptive backstepping neural networks control for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with input saturation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kewei; Huo, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a robust adaptive neural networks control strategy for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with the coupled position and attitude dynamics under input saturation. Backstepping technique is applied to design a relative attitude controller and a relative position controller, respectively. The dynamics uncertainties are approximated by radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs). A novel switching controller consists of an adaptive neural networks controller dominating in its active region combined with an extra robust controller to avoid invalidation of the RBFNNs destroying stability of the system outside the neural active region. An auxiliary signal is introduced to compensate the input saturation with anti-windup technique, and a command filter is employed to approximate derivative of the virtual control in the backstepping procedure. Globally uniformly ultimately bounded of the relative states is proved via Lyapunov theory. Simulation example demonstrates effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  12. Optimal multiple-impulse time-fixed rendezvous between circular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, J. E.; Chiu, J.-H.

    1984-08-01

    Minimum-fuel, multiple-impulse, time-fixed solutions are obtained for circle-to-circle rendezvous. The coplanar case and a restricted class of noncoplanar cases are analyzed. For several initial phase angles of the target relative to the vehicle, optimal solutions are obtained for a range of fixed transfer times. Primer vector theory is used to obtain the optimal number of impulses, their times and positions, and the presence of initial or final coasting arcs. For a sufficiently large transfer time the optimal solution becomes the time-open (Hohmann) solution. The results obtained can be used to perform a time vs. fuel trade-off for missions which have operational time constraints, such as space rescue operations and avoidance maneuvers.

  13. Orbit determination for the Mariner Mark II Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby mission - The orbiting phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission is the first of the Mariner Mark II mission set, designed to explore the outer solar system. Major objectives of orbit determination will be determine the positions and masses of the comet and asteroid and the relative position of the spacecraft, which is important to accurate pointing of the scan platform on which the narrow angle camera and scientific instruments are positioned. Position prediction is also important, since continuous commuication with the spacecraft will not be possible. The small gravitational attractions and poorly known ephemerides of the comet and asteroid, and the small, slow spacecraft orbit about the comet, pose significant new problems for orbit determination. Results of simulations studying the effectiveness of key data types, the accuracies of estimates, and prediction capabilities, are presented.

  14. Development of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Richardson, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    The critical elements of an autonomous video rendezvous and docking system were built and used successfully in a physical laboratory simulation. The laboratory system demonstrated that a small, inexpensive electronic package and a flight computer of modest size can analyze television images to derive guidance information for spacecraft. In the ultimate application, the system would use a docking aid consisting of three flashing lights mounted on a passive target spacecraft. Television imagery of the docking aid would be processed aboard an active chase vehicle to derive relative positions and attitudes of the two spacecraft. The demonstration system used scale models of the target spacecraft with working docking aids. A television camera mounted on a 6 degree of freedom (DOF) simulator provided imagery of the target to simulate observations from the chase vehicle. A hardware video processor extracted statistics from the imagery, from which a computer quickly computed position and attitude. Computer software known as a Kalman filter derived velocity information from position measurements.

  15. Robust adaptive backstepping neural networks control for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with input saturation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Kewei; Huo, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a robust adaptive neural networks control strategy for spacecraft rendezvous and docking with the coupled position and attitude dynamics under input saturation. Backstepping technique is applied to design a relative attitude controller and a relative position controller, respectively. The dynamics uncertainties are approximated by radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs). A novel switching controller consists of an adaptive neural networks controller dominating in its active region combined with an extra robust controller to avoid invalidation of the RBFNNs destroying stability of the system outside the neural active region. An auxiliary signal is introduced to compensate the input saturation with anti-windup technique, and a command filter is employed to approximate derivative of the virtual control in the backstepping procedure. Globally uniformly ultimately bounded of the relative states is proved via Lyapunov theory. Simulation example demonstrates effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26892402

  16. Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Revised Eros Orbit Phase Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfrich, J; Miller, J. K.; Antreasian, P. G.; Carranza, E.; Williams, B. G.; Dunham, D. W.; Farquhar, R. W.; McAdams, J. V.

    1999-01-01

    Trajectory design of the orbit phase of the NEAR mission involves a new process that departs significantly from those procedures used in previous missions. In most cases, a precise spacecraft ephemeris is designed well in advance of arrival at the target body. For NEAR, the uncertainty in the dynamic environment around Eros does not allow the luxury of a precise spacecraft trajectory to be defined in advance. The principal cause of this uncertainty is the limited knowledge oi' the gravity field a,-id rotational state of Eros. As a result, the concept for the NEAR trajectory design is to define a number of rules for satisfying spacecraft, mission, and science constraints, and then apply these rules to various assumptions for the model of Eros. Nominal, high, and low Eros mass models are used for testing the trajectory design strategy and to bracket the ranges of parameter variations that are expected upon arrival at the asteroid. The final design is completed after arrival at Eros and determination of the actual gravity field and rotational state. As a result of the unplanned termination of the deep space rendezvous maneuver on December 20, 1998, the NEAR spacecraft passed within 3830 km of Eros on December 23, 1998. This flyby provided a brief glimpse of Eros, and allowed for a more accurate model of the rotational parameters and gravity field uncertainty. Furthermore, after the termination of the deep space rendezvous burn, contact with the spacecraft was lost and the NEAR spacecraft lost attitude control. During the subsequent gyrations of the spacecraft, hydrazine thruster firings were used to regain attitude control. This unplanned thruster activity used Much of the fuel margin allocated for the orbit phase. Consequently, minimizing fuel consumption is now even more important.

  17. A Summary of the Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, Docking, and Undocking (RPODU) Lessons Learned from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) Demonstration System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Carpenter, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) sponsored Dr. J. Russell Carpenter, a Navigation and Rendezvous Subject Matter Expert (SME) from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), to provide support to the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Orbital Express (OE) rendezvous and docking flight test that was conducted in 2007. When that DARPA OE mission was completed, Mr. Neil Dennehy, NASA Technical Fellow for GN&C, requested Dr. Carpenter document his findings (lessons learned) and recommendations for future rendezvous missions resulting from his OE support experience. This report captures lessons specifically from anomalies that occurred during one of OE's unmated operations.

  18. Evaluation of GPS position and attitude determination for automated rendezvous and docking missions. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diprinzio, Marc D.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of the Global Positioning System for position and attitude determination is evaluated for an automated rendezvous and docking mission. The typical mission scenario involves the chaser docking with the target for resupply or repair purposes, and is divided into three sections. During the homing phase, the chaser utilizes coarse acquisition pseudorange data to approach the target; guidance laws for this stage are investigated. In the second phase, differential carrier phase positioning is utilized. The chaser must maintain a quasiconstant distance from the target, in order to resolve the initial integer ambiguities. Once the ambiguities are determined, the terminal phase is entered, and the rendezvous is completed with continuous carrier phase tracking. Attitude knowledge is maintained in all phases through the use of the carrier phase observable. A Kalman filter is utilized to estimate all states from the noisy measurement data. The effects of selective availability and cycle slips are also investigated.

  19. EURECA: EUropean REtrievable CArrier Mission Analysis - The nominal orbit with its degradations and the rendez-vous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvaux, I.

    1982-09-01

    Orbital configurations and transfer operations necessary for rendezvous between the EUropean REtrievable CArrier (EURECA) free-flying platform for space materials processing and the Orbiter are analyzed. EURECA is intended as an autonomous experimental materials processing spacecraft which will be launched by the Shuttle. It will carry its own propulsion system for transfer to a higher orbit, where satisfactory microgravity conditions will be located, then return to a lower orbit for retrieval by the Orbiter after 4-6 mos of functioning. The two-body problem is solved for a Hohmann transfer ellipse for placing the EURECA platform into a sufficiently high circular orbit starting from the 28.5 deg inclination, 296 km orbit of the Shuttle. A numerical calculation is made for optimizing the total propellant mass, and consideration is given to air-drag and earth oblateness. A maximum rendezvous time of 45 hr is determined for the return to the Shuttle, allowing for a 1 deg inclination correction.

  20. Analysis of Tumble and Its Effects on EGR Tolerance for a Gasoline Engine Running at High Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easter, Jordan; Puzinauskas, Paulius; Pyles, Timothy

    2012-11-01

    The series hybrid electric vehicle allows for the design of an engine that can run solely at its most efficient point, wide open throttle (WOT). However, at WOT there is an increase in emissions not typically handled in the conventional gasoline engine. Exhaust gas recirculation can be used to reduce emissions if the tolerance of the engine for the exhaust gas is increased. It is hypothesized that tolerance at WOT will increase when there is an increase in in-cylinder turbulence. In this research, aluminum flow guide vanes were inserted in the intake to induce tumble. The flow was examined through the use of PIV techniques and the increase in EGR tolerance was verified with engine testing. PIV images of the flow structure were taken between the intake valves of a modified cylinder designed to mimic bottom dead center. The lift to valve diameters as well as the vane configurations were altered. Engine testing was performed with varying vane configurations, while the EGR percentage was increased until it became difficult to control combustion. It was been found through the engine testing that the flow guide vanes do significantly increase the EGR tolerance as well as combustion stability. Funding received by the NSF REU Grant 1062611.

  1. A Multidimensional 1H NMR Investigation of the Conformation of Methionine-Enkephalin in Fast-Tumbling Bicelles

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Isabelle; Separovic, Frances; Auger, Michèle; Gagné, Stéphane M.

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalins are pentapeptides found in the central nervous system. It is believed that these neuropeptides interact with the nerve cell membrane to adopt a conformation suitable for their binding to an opiate receptor. In this work, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of methionine-enkephalin (Menk) in fast-tumbling bicelles using multidimensional 1H NMR. Bicelles were selected as model membranes because both their bilayer organization and composition resemble those of natural biomembranes. The effect of the membrane composition on the peptide conformation was explored using both zwitterionic (PC bicelles) and negatively charged bicelles (Bic/PG). Pulsed field gradient experiments allowed the determination of the proportion of Menk bound to the model membranes. Approximately 60% of the water-soluble enkephalin was found to associate to the bicellar systems. Structure calculations from torsion angle and NOE-based distance constraints suggest the presence of both μ- and δ-selective conformers of Menk in each system and slightly different conformers in PC bicelles and Bic/PG. As opposed to previous studies of enkephalins in membrane mimetic systems, our results show that these opiate peptides could adopt several conformations in a membrane environment, which is consistent with the flexibility and poor selectivity of enkephalins. PMID:14990485

  2. Opportunity options for rendezvous, flyby and sample return mission to different spectral-type asteroids for the 2015-2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qiao; Pingyuan, Cui; Yamin, Wang

    2012-03-01

    The feasible rendezvous, flyby and sample return mission scenario to different spectral-type asteroids for the 2015-2025 are investigated. The emphasis is put on the potential target selection and the design of preliminary interplanetary transfer trajectory in this paper. First, according to different scientific motivations, some potential targets with different spectral-type and physical property are selected. Then, some optimal rendezvous and sample return opportunities for different spectral-type asteroids are presented by using pork-chop plots method and Sequential Quadratic-Programming (SQP) algorithm. In order to reduce the launch energy and total velocity increments for sample return mission, the Earth swingby strategy is used. In addition, the feasible trajectory profiles of flyby and rendezvous with two different spectral-type asteroids in one mission are discussed. A hybrid optimization method combing the Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm and SQP algorithm is introduced as a trajectory design method for the mission. Finally, some important parameters of transfer trajectory are analyzed, which would have a direct impact on the design of spacecraft subsystem, such as communication, power and thermal control subsystem.

  3. The Ion Propulsion System on NASA's Space Technology 4/Champollion Comet Rendezvous Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles E.; Weiss, Jeffery M.

    1999-01-01

    The ST4/Champollion mission is designed to rendezvous with and land on the comet Tempel 1 and return data from the first-ever sampling of a comet surface. Ion propulsion is an enabling technology for this mission. The ion propulsion system on ST4 consists of three ion engines each essentially identical to the single engine that flew on the DS1 spacecraft. The ST4 propulsion system will operate at a maximum input power of 7.5 kW (3.4 times greater than that demonstrated on DS1), will produce a maximum thrust of 276 mN, and will provide a total (Delta)V of 11.4 km/s. To accomplish this the propulsion system will carry 385 kg of xenon. All three engines will be operated simultaneously for the first 168 days of the mission. The nominal mission requires that each engine be capable of processing 118 kg. If one engine fails after 168 days, the remaining two engines can perform the mission, but must be capable of processing 160 kg of xenon, or twice the original thruster design requirement. Detailed analyses of the thruster wear-out failure modes coupled with experience from long-duration engine tests indicate that the thrusters have a high probability of meeting the 160-kg throughput requirement.

  4. Radio science results during the NEAR-shoemaker spacecraft rendezvous with eros

    PubMed

    Yeomans; Antreasian; Barriot; Chesley; Dunham; Farquhar; Giorgini; Helfrich; Konopliv; McAdams; Miller; Owen; Scheeres; Thomas; Veverka; Williams

    2000-09-22

    We determined the mass of asteroid 433 Eros, its lower order gravitational harmonics, and rotation state, using ground-based Doppler and range tracking of the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)-Shoemaker spacecraft and images of the asteroid's surface landmarks. The mass of Eros is (6.687 +/- 0.003) x 10(18) grams, which, coupled with our volume estimate, implies a bulk density of 2. 67 +/- 0.03 grams per cubic centimeter. The asteroid appears to have a uniform density distribution. The right ascension and declination of the rotation pole are 11.37 +/- 0.05 and 17.22 +/- 0.05 degrees, respectively, and at least over the short term, the rotation state of Eros is stable with no measurable free precession of the spin pole. Escape velocities on the surface vary from 3.1 to 17.2 meters per second. The dynamical environment of Eros suggests that it is covered with regolith and that one might expect material transport toward the deepest potential wells in the saddle and 5.5-kilometer crater regions. PMID:11000104

  5. An overview of autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology development at General Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuenzel, Fred

    1991-01-01

    The Centaur avionics suite is undergoing a dramatic modernization for the commercial, DoD Atlas and Titan programs. The system has been upgraded to the current state-of-the-art in ring laser gyro inertial sensors and Mil-Std-1750A processor technology. The Cruise Missile avionic system has similarly been evolving for many years. Integration of GPS into both systems has been underway for over five years with a follow-on cruise missile system currently in flight test. Rendezvous and Docking related studies have been conducted for over five years in support of OMV, CTV, and Advanced Upper Stages, as well as several other internal IR&D's. The avionics system and AR&D simulator demonstrated to the SATWG in November 1990 has been upgraded considerably under two IR&D programs in 1991. The Centaur modern avionics system is being flown in block upgrades which started in July of 1990. The Inertial Navigation Unit will fly in November of 1991. The Cruise Missile avionics systems have been fully tested and operationally validated in combat. The integrated AR&D system for space vehicle applications has been under development and testing since 1990. A Joint NASA / GD ARD&L System Test Program is currently being planned to validate several aspects of system performance in three different NASA test facilities in 1992.

  6. Endoscopic dilation of complete oesophageal obstructions with a combined antegrade-retrograde rendezvous technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolini, Reto; Meyenberger, Christa; Putora, Paul Martin; Albrecht, Franziska; Broglie, Martina Anja; Stoeckli, Sandro J; Sulz, Michael Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic rendezvous technique for complete oesophageal obstruction and the swallowing outcome. METHODS: This single-centre case series includes consecutive patients who were unable to swallow due to complete oesophageal obstruction and underwent combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation (CARD) within the last 10 years. The patients’ demographic characteristics, clinical parameters, endoscopic therapy, adverse events, and outcomes were obtained retrospectively. Technical success was defined as effective restoration of oesophageal patency. Swallowing success was defined as either percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG)-tube independency and/or relevant improvement of oral food intake, as assessed by the functional oral intake scale (FOIS) (≥ level 3). RESULTS: The cohort consisted of six patients [five males; mean age 71 years (range, 54-74)]. All but one patient had undergone radiotherapy for head and neck or oesophageal cancer. Technical success was achieved in five out of six patients. After discharge, repeated dilations were performed in all five patients. During follow-up (median 27 mo, range, 2-115), three patients remained PEG-tube dependent. Three of four patients achieved relevant improvement of swallowing (two patients: FOIS 6, one patient: FOIS 7). One patient developed mediastinal emphysema following CARD, without a need for surgery. CONCLUSION: The CARD technique is safe and a viable alternative to high-risk blind antegrade dilation in patients with complete proximal oesophageal obstruction. Although only half of the patients remained PEG-tube independent, the majority improved their ability to swallow. PMID:26900299

  7. A new terminal guidance sensor system for asteroid intercept or rendezvous missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyzhoft, Joshua; Basart, John; Wie, Bong

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the initial conceptual study results of a new terminal guidance sensor system for asteroid intercept or rendezvous missions, which explores the use of visual, infrared, and radar devices. As was demonstrated by NASA's Deep Impact mission, visual cameras can be effectively utilized for hypervelocity intercept terminal guidance for a 5 kilometer target. Other systems such as Raytheon's EKV (Exoatmospheric Kill Vehicle) employ a different scheme that utilizes infrared target information to intercept ballistic missiles. Another example that uses infrared information is the NEOWISE telescope, which is used for asteroid detection and tracking. This paper describes the signal-to-noise ratio estimation problem for infrared sensors, minimum and maximum range of detection, and computational validation using GPU accelerated simulations. Small targets (50-100 m in diameter) are considered, and scaled polyhedron models of known objects, such as the Rosetta mission's Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, 101,955 Bennu, target of the OSIRIS-REx mission, and asteroid 433 Eros, are utilized. A parallelized ray tracing algorithm to simulate realistic surface-to-surface shadowing of a given celestial body is developed. By using the simulated models and parameters given from the formulation of the different sensors, impact mission scenarios are used to verify the feasibility for intercepting a small target.

  8. Autonomous rendezvous and docking: A commercial approach to on-orbit technology validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Dobbs, Michael E.; Conrad, David J.; Apley, Dale J.; Whitten, Raymond P.

    The Space Automation and Robotics Center (SpARC), a NASA-sponsored Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), in conjunction with its corporate affiliates, is planning an on-orbit validation of autonomous rendezvous and docking (ARD) technology. The emphasis in this program is to utilize existing technology and commercially available components whenever possible. The primary subsystems that will be validated by this demonstration include GPS receivers for navigation, a video-based sensor for proximity operations, a fluid connector mechanism to demonstrate fluid resupply capability, and a compliant, single-point docking mechanism. The focus for this initial experiment will be expendable launch vehicle (ELV) based and will make use of two residual Commercial Experiment Transporter (COMET) service modules. The first COMET spacecraft will be launched in late 1992 and will serve as the target vehicle. The ARD demonstration will take place in late 1994, after the second COMET spacecraft has been launched. The service module from the second COMET will serve as the chase vehicle.

  9. The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yijing; Tian, Yu; Huang, Weifen; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed. PMID:26236252

  10. Mating rendezvous in monogenean gill parasites of the humbug Dascyllus aruanus (Pisces: Pomacentridae).

    PubMed

    Lo, C M

    1999-12-01

    The gills of the humbug, Dascyllus aruanus (Pomacentridae), were infected by a monogenean genus Haliotrema at a high prevalence (83%) but with a low mean intensity (5.6 worms/fish). All the gill arches of 365 fish, caught on the fringing reef of Moorea Island (French Polynesia), were examined for parasites. Each hemibranch was divided into 12 subequal sections. Monogeneans showing microhabitat overlap were defined as couples. Hosts with low intensity of infection (fewer than 5 monogeneans per gill) were selected and couples were recorded. Among the 37 hosts harboring 2 worms on their gills, 18 fish were infected with these 2 monogeneans on the same gill side of the body; 50% (n = 9) of these harbored monogeneans within the same gill arch and 55% (n = 5) of these last fish showed individual parasites within the same section of the gill. In the case of hosts with few monogeneans (3 and 4 individuals; n = 37) on the same arch, more than 40% (n = 16) harbored worms in couples. There may be some chemical communication that allowed these monogeneans to migrate toward each other and thus enhance mating success. Mating rendezvous appears to be a more important factor than site location for these gill monogeneans.

  11. Inverse simulation system for manual-controlled rendezvous and docking based on artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wanmeng; Wang, Hua; Tang, Guojin; Guo, Shuai

    2016-09-01

    The time-consuming experimental method for handling qualities assessment cannot meet the increasing fast design requirements for the manned space flight. As a tool for the aircraft handling qualities research, the model-predictive-control structured inverse simulation (MPC-IS) has potential applications in the aerospace field to guide the astronauts' operations and evaluate the handling qualities more effectively. Therefore, this paper establishes MPC-IS for the manual-controlled rendezvous and docking (RVD) and proposes a novel artificial neural network inverse simulation system (ANN-IS) to further decrease the computational cost. The novel system was obtained by replacing the inverse model of MPC-IS with the artificial neural network. The optimal neural network was trained by the genetic Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, and finally determined by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. In order to validate MPC-IS and ANN-IS, the manual-controlled RVD experiments on the simulator were carried out. The comparisons between simulation results and experimental data demonstrated the validity of two systems and the high computational efficiency of ANN-IS.

  12. Real-time 3D vision solution for on-orbit autonomous rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruel, S.; English, C.; Anctil, M.; Daly, J.; Smith, C.; Zhu, S.

    2006-05-01

    Neptec has developed a vision system for the capture of non-cooperative objects on orbit. This system uses an active TriDAR sensor and a model based tracking algorithm to provide 6 degree of freedom pose information in real-time from mid range to docking. This system was selected for the Hubble Robotic Vehicle De-orbit Module (HRVDM) mission and for a Detailed Test Objective (DTO) mission to fly on the Space Shuttle. TriDAR (triangulation + LIDAR) technology makes use of a novel approach to 3D sensing by combining triangulation and Time-of-Flight (ToF) active ranging techniques in the same optical path. This approach exploits the complementary nature of these sensing technologies. Real-time tracking of target objects is accomplished using 3D model based tracking algorithms developed at Neptec in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The system provides 6 degrees of freedom pose estimation and incorporates search capabilities to initiate and recover tracking. Pose estimation is performed using an innovative approach that is faster than traditional techniques. This performance allows the algorithms to operate in real-time on the TriDAR's flight certified embedded processor. This paper presents results from simulation and lab testing demonstrating that the system's performance meets the requirements of a complete tracking system for on-orbit autonomous rendezvous and docking.

  13. Coherent Doppler lidar for automated space vehicle rendezvous, stationkeeping and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The inherent spatial resolution of laser radar makes ladar or lidar an attractive candidate for Automated Rendezvous and Capture application. Previous applications were based on incoherent lidar techniques, requiring retro-reflectors on the target vehicle. Technology improvements (reduced size, no cryogenic cooling requirement) have greatly enhanced the construction of coherent lidar systems. Coherent lidar permits the acquisition of non-cooperative targets at ranges that are limited by the detection capability rather than by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requirements. The sensor can provide translational state information (range, velocity, and angle) by direct measurement and, when used with any array detector, also can provide attitude information by Doppler imaging techniques. Identification of the target is accomplished by scanning with a high pulse repetition frequency (dependent on the SNR). The system performance is independent of range and should not be constrained by sun angle. An initial effort to characterize a multi-element detection system has resulted in a system that is expected to work to a minimum range of 1 meter. The system size, weight and power requirements are dependent on the operating range; 10 km range requires a diameter of 3 centimeters with overall size at 3 x 3 x 15 to 30 cm, while 100 km range requires a 30 cm diameter.

  14. The influence of spatial ability and experience on performance during spaceship rendezvous and docking

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yijing; Tian, Yu; Huang, Weifen; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    Manual rendezvous and docking (manual RVD) is a challenging space task for astronauts. Previous research showed a correlation between spatial ability and manual RVD skills among participants at early stages of training, but paid less attention to experts. Therefore, this study tried to explore the role of spatial ability in manual RVD skills in two groups of trainees, one relatively inexperienced and the other experienced operators. Additionally, mental rotation has been proven essential in RVD and was tested in this study among 27 male participants, 15 novices, and 12 experts. The participants performed manual RVD tasks in a high fidelity simulator. Results showed that experience moderated the relation between mental rotation ability and manual RVD performance. On one hand, novices with high mental rotation ability tended to perform that RVD task more successfully; on the other hand, experts with high mental rotation ability showed not only no performance advantage in the final stage of the RVD task, but had certain disadvantages in their earlier processes. Both theoretical and practical implications were discussed. PMID:26236252

  15. Fourth Report of the Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On December 6, 1994, the NASA Administrator, Mr. Daniel Goldin, requested that Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Stafford, in his role as the Chairman of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions, lead a team composed of several Task Force members and technical advisors' to Russia with the goal of reviewing preparations and readiness for the upcoming international Space Station Phase 1 missions. In his directions to Gen. Stafford, Mr. Goldin requested that the review team focus its initial efforts on safety of flight issues for the following Phase 1A missions: the Soyuz TM-21 mission which will carry U.S. astronaut Dr. Norman Thagard and cosmonauts Lt. Col. Vladimir Dezhurov and Mr. Gennady Strekalov aboard a Soyuz spacecraft to the Mir Station; the Mir 18 Main Expedition during which Thagard and his fellow cosmonauts, Dezhurov and Strokalov, will spend approximately three months aboard the Mir Station; the STS-71 Space Shuttle mission which will perform the first Shuttle-Mir docking, carry cosmonauts Col. Anatoly SoloViev and Mr. Nikolai Budarin to the Mir Station, and return Thagard, Dezhurov, and Strekalov to Earth.

  16. Fuzzy logic techniques for rendezvous and docking of two geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    1995-01-01

    Large assemblings in space require the ability to manage rendezvous and docking operations. In future these techniques will be required for the gradual build up of big telecommunication platforms in the geostationary orbit. The paper discusses the use of fuzzy logic to model and implement a control system for the docking/berthing of two satellites in geostationary orbit. The system mounted in a chaser vehicle determines the actual state of both satellites and generates torques to execute maneuvers to establish the structural latching. The paper describes the proximity operations to collocate the two satellites in the same orbital window, the fuzzy guidance and navigation of the chaser approaching the target and the final Fuzzy berthing. The fuzzy logic system represents a knowledge based controller that realizes the close loop operations autonomously replacing the conventional control algorithms. The goal is to produce smooth control actions in the proximity of the target and during the docking to avoid disturbance torques in the final assembly orbit. The knowledge of the fuzzy controller consists of a data base of rules and the definitions of the fuzzy sets. The knowledge of an experienced spacecraft controller is captured into a set of rules forming the Rules Data Base.

  17. Basic targeting strategies for rendezvous and flyby missions to the near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, Ettore; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2001-01-01

    Missions to asteroids and comets are becoming increasingly feasible both from a technical and a financial point of view. In particular, those directed towards the Near-Earth Asteroids have proven suitable for a low-cost approach, thus attracting the major space agencies as well as private companies. The choice of a suitable target involves both scientific relevance and mission design considerations, being often a difficult task to accomplish due to the limited energy budget at disposal. The aim of this paper is to provide an approach to basic trajectory design which allows to account for both aspects of the problem, taking into account scientific and technical information. A global characterization of the Near-Earth Asteroids population carried out on the basis of their dynamics, physical properties and flight dynamics considerations, allows to identify a group of candidates which satisfy both, the scientific and engineering requirements. The feasibility of rendezvous and flyby missions towards them is then discussed and the possibility of repeated encounters with the same object is investigated, as an intermediate scenario. Within this framework, the capability of present and near future launch and propulsion systems for interplanetary missions is also addressed.

  18. The applications of laser tracking and ranging technology in space rendezvous and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Wenji; Gao, Limin; Zhou, Liang; Li, Dawei; Wang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    With the development of space technology, more and more Rendezvous and Docking (RVD) mission require more precise measurement of relative position and attitude between tracking spacecraft and target spacecraft. In the procedure of docking between near spacecraft , the optical retroreflector on the target Spacecraft were tracked by the laser tracking and ranging device on the tracking spacecraft , the distance data were provided by laser ranging system, and the azimuth data were provided by tracking gimbal, Synthesized the distance data and azimuth data, the relative position information between two spacecraft were provided to the target spacecraft. Furthermore, through tracking more than three point on the target spacecraft ,the complete information of relative position and attitude between two spacecraft were calculated rapidly by the measurement system,which were presented to the control system during the whole RVD operating stage. The laser tracking technology guaranteed continuous measurement and supplied accurate azimuth information, and the laser ranging technology ensured high accuracy of distance information. In addition, the untouched measure mode give no disturbance to the docking operation, moreover, the monochromaticity of laser make the tracking and ranging procedure avoiding to be disturbed by parasitic light of space, thus there will be a effective measurement accompanying the whole docking operating procedure and affording valid data to the control system of docking.

  19. Ground guided CX-OLEV rendez-vous with uncooperative geostationary satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabini, Lorenzo; Gil, Jesús; Gandia, Fernando; Molina, Miguel Ángel; Del Cura, Juan Manuel; Ortega, Guillermo

    2007-06-01

    CX-OLEV is a commercial mission aimed to extend the operational life of geostationary telecommunications satellites by supplying them propulsion, navigation and guidance services. Under SENER's contract and ESA's supervision, GMV designed the CX-OLEV ground guided rendez-vous (RV) approach. The starting point of the RV phase between CX-OLEV and the client is at 35 km distance with an uncertainty of 2 km. Dedicated ground tracking is performed to reduce the position uncertainty to 200 m and therefore to command the closing to 1 km distance. Fly around and final approach maneuvers complete the CX-OLEV RV approach along the client's zenith direction up to a relative distance of 7 m. Two redundant optical cameras working in the 5 m-2 km range are selected as RV sensors. The RV camera images are sent to ground and processed to determine the relative position of the spacecraft. The flight dynamics system calculates, validates and transmits in near real time the RV maneuvers commands. The relative spiral motion of CX-OLEV around the telecommunication satellite is synchronized with the Sun-client-CXOLEV angle to guarantee a good illumination of the client but without shadowing the client satellite's solar panels. The complete RV is simulated in a dedicated environment to assess its feasibility.

  20. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of β-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string. PMID

  1. String method for calculation of minimum free-energy paths in Cartesian space in freely-tumbling systems.

    PubMed

    Branduardi, Davide; Faraldo-Gómez, José D

    2013-09-10

    The string method is a molecular-simulation technique that aims to calculate the minimum free-energy path of a chemical reaction or conformational transition, in the space of a pre-defined set of reaction coordinates that is typically highly dimensional. Any descriptor may be used as a reaction coordinate, but arguably the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms involved are the most unprejudiced and intuitive choice. Cartesian coordinates, however, present a non-trivial problem, in that they are not invariant to rigid-body molecular rotations and translations, which ideally ought to be unrestricted in the simulations. To overcome this difficulty, we reformulate the framework of the string method to integrate an on-the-fly structural-alignment algorithm. This approach, referred to as SOMA (String method with Optimal Molecular Alignment), enables the use of Cartesian reaction coordinates in freely tumbling molecular systems. In addition, this scheme permits the dissection of the free-energy change along the most probable path into individual atomic contributions, thus revealing the dominant mechanism of the simulated process. This detailed analysis also provides a physically-meaningful criterion to coarse-grain the representation of the path. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method we analyze the isomerization of the alanine dipeptide in vacuum and the chair-to-inverted-chair transition of β-D mannose in explicit water. Notwithstanding the simplicity of these systems, the SOMA approach reveals novel insights into the atomic mechanism of these isomerizations. In both cases, we find that the dynamics and the energetics of these processes are controlled by interactions involving only a handful of atoms in each molecule. Consistent with this result, we show that a coarse-grained SOMA calculation defined in terms of these subsets of atoms yields nearidentical minimum free-energy paths and committor distributions to those obtained via a highly-dimensional string.

  2. A Prediction Method of TV Camera Image for Space Manual-control Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Huang; Qing, Yang; Wenrui, Wu

    Space manual-control rendezvous and docking (RVD) is a key technology for accomplishing the RVD mission in manned space engineering, especially when automatic control system is out of work. The pilot on chase spacecraft manipulates the hand-stick by the image of target spacecraft captured by TV camera. From the TV image, the relative position and attitude of chase and target spacecrafts can be shown. Therefore, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of the target on TV camera are key to guarantee the success of manual-control RVD. A method of predicting the on-orbit TV camera image at different relative positions and light conditions during the process of RVD is discussed. Firstly, the basic principle of capturing the image of cross drone on target spacecraft by TV camera is analyzed theoretically, based which the strategy of manual-control RVD is discussed in detail. Secondly, the relationship between the displayed size or position and the real relative distance of chase and target spacecrafts is presented, the brightness and reflection by the target spacecraft at different light conditions are decribed, the shadow on cross drone caused by the chase or target spacecraft is analyzed. Thirdly, a prediction method of on-orbit TV camera images at certain orbit and light condition is provided, and the characteristics of TV camera image during the RVD is analyzed. Finally, the size, the position, the brightness and the shadow of target spacecraft on TV camera image at typical orbit is simulated. The result, by comparing the simulated images with the real images captured by the TV camera on Shenzhou manned spaceship , shows that the prediction method is reasonable

  3. Proximity Operations for Space Situational Awareness Spacecraft Rendezvous and Maneuvering using Numerical Simulations and Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, T.; Langster, T.; Carrico, J.; Alfano, S.; Loucks, M.; Vallado, D.

    The authors present several spacecraft rendezvous and close proximity maneuvering techniques modeled with a high-precision numerical integrator using full force models and closed loop control with a Fuzzy Logic intelligent controller to command the engines. The authors document and compare the maneuvers, fuel use, and other parameters. This paper presents an innovative application of an existing capability to design, simulate and analyze proximity maneuvers; already in use for operational satellites performing other maneuvers. The system has been extended to demonstrate the capability to develop closed loop control laws to maneuver spacecraft in close proximity to another, including stand-off, docking, lunar landing and other operations applicable to space situational awareness, space based surveillance, and operational satellite modeling. The fully integrated end-to-end trajectory ephemerides are available from the authors in electronic ASCII text by request. The benefits of this system include: A realistic physics-based simulation for the development and validation of control laws A collaborative engineering environment for the design, development and tuning of spacecraft law parameters, sizing actuators (i.e., rocket engines), and sensor suite selection. An accurate simulation and visualization to communicate the complexity, criticality, and risk of spacecraft operations. A precise mathematical environment for research and development of future spacecraft maneuvering engineering tasks, operational planning and forensic analysis. A closed loop, knowledge-based control example for proximity operations. This proximity operations modeling and simulation environment will provide a valuable adjunct to programs in military space control, space situational awareness and civil space exploration engineering and decision making processes.

  4. Concluding Report of Free-Spinning, Tumbling, and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/18-Scale Model of the Ryan X-13 Airplane, Coord. No. AF-199

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    An investigation has been completed in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/18-scale model of the Ryan X-13 airplane to determine its spin, recovery, and tumbling characteristics, and to determine the minimum altitude from which a belly landing could be made in case of power failure in hovering flight. Model spin tests were conducted with and without simulated engine rotation. Tests without simulated engine rotation indicated two types of spins: one, a slightly oscillatory flat spin; and the other, a violently oscillatory spin. Tests with simulated engine rotation indicated that spins to the left were fast rotating and steep and those to the right were slow rotating and flat. The optimum technique for recovery is reversal of the rudder to against the spin and simultaneous movement of the ailerons to full with the spin followed by movement of the elevators to neutral after the spin rotation ceases. Tumbling tests made on the model indicated that although the Ryan X-13 airplane will not tumble in the ordinary sense (end-over-end pitching motion), it may instead tend to enter a wild gyrating'motion. Tests made to simulate power failure in hovering flight by dropping the model indicated that the model entered what appeared to be a right spin. An attempt should be made to stop this motion immediately by moving the rudder to oppose the rotation (left pedal), moving the ailerons to with the spin (stick right), and moving the stick forward after the spin rotation ceases to obtain flying speed for pullout. The minimum altitude required for a belly landing in case of power failure in hovering flight was indicated to be about 4,200 feet.

  5. Mission analysis and guidance, navigation, and control design for rendezvous and docking phase of advanced reentry vehicle mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strippoli, L.; Colmenarejo, P.; Strauch, H.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced Reentry Vehicle (ARV) belongs to the family of vehicles designed to perform rendezvous and docking (RvD) with the International space station (ISS) [1]. Differently from its predecessor ATV (Automated Transfer Vehicle), the ARV will transport a reentry capsule, equipped with a heatshield and able to bring back cargo, experiments, or, as a possible future development, even crew, being this latter scenario very attracting in view of the Space Shuttle retirement. GMV, as subcontractor of EADS-Astrium Germany, is in charge of the RvD and departure mission analysis and GNC (Guidance, Navigation, and Control) design of ARV mission. This paper will present the main outcomes of the study.

  6. Application of solar electric propulsion to comet and asteroid rendezvous and docking /CARD/ missions with sample return.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, P. R.; Cikanek, H. A.; Allen, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    Summary of a feasibility study of CARD mission/system concepts for comet Encke and asteroid Eros missions in the late 1970s. A common planetary vehicle employing a modular SEP (solar electric propulsion) system and a direct rendezvous/docking mode with a staged science/sampling module appears feasible based on 1973 technology. The SEP system utilizes 3.5-kW, 3500-sec Isp mercury ion thrusters and rollout solar arrays sized at 36 (Encke) and 13 (Eros) kW based on the Titan III family launch vehicles. Science payloads, sampling concepts, and supporting spacecraft subsystems are defined. Problem areas are identified, and programmatic considerations are discussed.

  7. Fifth Report of the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Advisory Council Task Force on the Shuttle-Mir rendezvous and docking missions examine a number of specific issues related to the Shuttle-Mir program. Three teams composed of Task Force members and technical advisors were formed to address the follow issues: preliminary results from STS-71 and the status of preparations for STS-74; NASA's presence in Russia; and NASA's automated data processing and telecommunications (ADP/T) infrastructure in Russia. The three review team reports have been included in the fifth report of the Task Force.

  8. NASA's Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensor Development and Its Applicability to the GER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; DSouza, Christopher; Strube, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This paper will address how a common Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensor suite can support Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) missions, and discuss how the model of common capability development to support multiple missions can enable system capability level partnerships and further GER objectives. NASA has initiated efforts to develop AR&D/C sensors, that are directly applicable to GER. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. NASA's AR&D/C sensor development path could benefit the International Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) and support the GER mission scenario by providing a common sensor suite upon which GER objectives could be achieved while

  9. Guidance Algorithms for Non-Drifting Trajectory Generation and Control in RendezVous Missions into Elliptical Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiSotto, Emanuele; Bastante, Juan Carlos; Drai, Remi

    2007-01-01

    Safety requirement represents one of the most critical aspect when defining the operational profile for a RendezVous mission. This requirement specially affects the design of the guidance algorithms that need to be tailored to guarantee what is normally referred to as Passive Trajectory Protection . The basic idea of passive trajectory protection is to design all the trajectory elements in an approach sequence such that if, at any point of the trajectory, thrust control ceases, the resulting free drift motion will remain collision free during a certain amount of time. This paper deals with the design and performances assessment of specific guidance algorithm addressing this issue. Firstly the problem is addressed for circular orbit using the Traveling Ellipse formulation for the relative motion. Secondly a solution for the RendezVous into a generic elliptical orbit is presented. This is based on a reduced transition matrix obtained through a description of the relative motion based on the first order variation of the orbital elements.

  10. Laser rangefinder for the near-earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Timothy D.; Boies, Mark T.; El-Dinary, Ashruf S.; Reiter, R. Alan; Rodriguez, Daniel E.; Heins, Robert J.; Le, Binh Q.; Moore, Robert C.; Grote, Michael G.; Culpepper, Charles; Stillman, Lee

    1995-12-01

    The near-earth asteroid rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the first of the NASA discovery programs. Discovery-class programs emphasize small, low-cost, quick turnaround space missions that provide significant science returns. The NEAR spacecraft and ground control system are currently being developed and tested at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL). The NEAR spacecraft will orbit, 433 Eros, possibly the most studied of the near-Earth asteroids. Subsequent to a 3-year cruise, the NEAR spacecraft is inserted into a 50-km-altitude orbit about Eros for 1 year to permit data collection in the infrared, visible, x-ray and gamma-ray regions. One instrument, the NEAR laser rangefinder (NLR), will provide altimetry data useful in characterizing the geophysical nature of Eros. In addition, ranging data from the NLR will support navigation functions associated with spacecraft station-keeping and orbit maintenance. The NLR instrument uniquely applies several technologies for use in space. Our configuration uses a direct-detection, bistatic design employing a gallium arsenide (GaAs) diode-pumped Cr:Nd:YAG laser for the 1.064-micrometer transmitter and an enhanced-silicon avalanche-photodiode (APD) detector for the receiver. Transmitter pulse energy provides the required signal-to-noise power ratio, SNRp, for reliable operation at 50 km. The selected APD exhibited low noise, setting the level achievable for noise equivalent power, NEP, by the receiver. The lithium-niobate (LiNbO3) Q-switched transmitter emits 12-ns pulses at 15.3 mJ/pulse, permitting reliable NLR operation beyond the required 50-km altitude. Cavity aperturing and a 9.3X Galilean telescope reduce beam divergence for high spatial sampling of Eros's surface. Our receiver design is an f/3.4 Dall-Kirkham Cassegrain with a 7.62-cm clear aperture -- we emphasized receiver aperture area, Arx, over transmitter power, Pt, in our design based on the range advantage attainable according to the simplified range equation, Rmax

  11. An Investigation of Multipath Effects on the GPS System During Auto-Rendezvous and Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richie, James E.; Forest, Francis W.

    1995-01-01

    The proposed use of a Cargo Transport Vehicle (CTV) to carry hardware to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) during the construction phase of the SSF project requires remote maneuvering of the CTV. The CTV is not a manned vehicle. Obtaining the relative positions of the CTV and SSF for remote auto-rendezvous and capture (AR&C) scenarios will rely heavily on the Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS system is expected to guide the CTV up to a distance of 100 to 300 meters from the SSF. At some point within this range, an optical docking system will take over the remote guidance for capture. During any remote guidance by GPS it is possible that significant multipath signals may be caused by large objects in the vicinity of the module being remotely guided. This could alter the position obtained by the GPS system from the actual position. Due to the nature of the GPS signals, it has been estimated that if the difference in distance between the Line of Sight (LOS) path and the multipath is greater than 300 meters, the GPS system is capable of discriminating between the direct signal and the reflected (or multipath) signal. However, if the path difference is less than 300 meters, one must be concerned. This report details the work accomplished by the Electromagnetic Simulations Laboratory at Marquette University over the period December 1993 to May 1995. This work is an investigation of the strength and phase of a multipath signal arriving at the CTV relative to the direct or line of sight (LOS) signal. The signal originates at a GPS satellite in half geo-stationary orbit and takes two paths to the CTV: (1) the direct or LOS path from the GPS satellite to the CTV; and (2) a scattered path from the GPS satellite to the SSF module and then to the CTV. The scattering from a cylinder has been computed using the physical optics approximation for the current. No other approximations or assumptions have been made including no assumptions regarding the far field or Fresnel field

  12. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  13. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  14. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  15. Multi-objective and reliable control for trajectory-tracking of rendezvous via parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lichao; Meng, Xiuyun; Liu, Zaozhen; Du, Lifu

    2012-12-01

    A reliable, multi-objective and state-feedback controller design algorithm is presented for trajectory-tracking of circular-orbit rendezvous, in which H∞ performance, H2 performance and regional pole placement are taken into account. Given actuator failures and exogenous disturbances, the dynamical model is described as a polytopic system. By applying parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions and introducing slack matrices, the condition for the existence of multi-objective controller is described as a non-convex optimization subject to nonlinear matrix inequality constraints. Then, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to obtain the desired controller. Numerical simulations are given to show that the proposed method can (a) handle actuator failures and exogenous disturbances effectively, and (b) provide better disturbance-attenuation performances than conventional methods.

  16. State dependent model predictive control for orbital rendezvous using pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhu, Zheng H.; Meguid, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation based trajectory planning for orbital rendezvous and proximity maneuvering near a non-cooperative spacecraft in an elliptical orbit. The problem is formulated by converting the continuous control input, output from the state dependent model predictive control, into a sequence of pulses of constant magnitude by controlling firing frequency and duration of constant-magnitude thrusters. The state dependent model predictive control is derived by minimizing the control error of states and control roughness of control input for a safe, smooth and fuel efficient approaching trajectory. The resulting nonlinear programming problem is converted into a series of quadratic programming problem and solved by numerical iteration using the receding horizon strategy. The numerical results show that the proposed state dependent model predictive control with the pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation is able to effectively generate optimized trajectories using equivalent control pulses for the proximity maneuvering with less energy consumption.

  17. Study of effects of uncertainties on comet and asteroid encounter and contact guidance requirements. Part 1: Guidance and navigation studies. [development of navigation and guidance techniques for space rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A guidance algorithm that provides precise rendezvous in the deterministic case while requiring only relative state information is developed. A navigation scheme employing only onboard relative measurements is built around a Kalman filter set in measurement coordinates. The overall guidance and navigation procedure is evaluated in the face of measurement errors by a detailed numerical simulation. Results indicate that onboard guidance and navigation for the terminal phase of rendezvous is possible with reasonable limits on measurement errors.

  18. RendezVous sensor for automatic guidance of transfer vehicles to ISS concept of the operational modes depending on actual optical and geometrical-dynamical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Bettina G.; Kolk, Karl-Hermann

    2000-10-01

    Based on an ATV RendezVous Predevelopment Program initiated by ESTEC, an automatically operating Rendez Vous Sensor has been developed. The sensor--a Scanning Tele-Goniometer--shall guide docking and retreat of the European Automatic Transfer Vehicle as well as berthing and retreat of the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle. The sensor performance will be strongly connected with the properties of cooperative targets, consisting of an arrangement of retro reflectors mounted on ISS each.

  19. The application of the seam beam VLBI technique for the orbit determination of CE-5 in the rendezvous and docking phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    CE-5 will be launched in 2017-2018, and it is a lunar sample return mission. It is the first time for China to carry out the rendezvous and docking in the Moon. How to achieve rendezvous and docking successfully in the Moon is very important for CE-5 project. When the ascender is about 70 km farer away from the orbiter, the ground based tracking technique including range, Doppler and VLBI will be used to track the orbiter and the ascender. Later the ascender will approach the orbiter automatically. Here the application of the same beam VLBI for the orbit determination of the orbiter and the ascender in the long range of the rendezvous and docking phase is discussed. The same beam VLBI technique can be used to track the orbiter and the ascender simultaneously when they are in the same beam. Delta delay of the two probes can be derived, and the measurement accuracy is much higher than the traditional VLBI data because of the cancelation of common errors. Theoretically it can result in more accurate relative orbit between the two probes. The simulation results show that the relative position accuracy of the orbiter and ascender can reach about 1 m in CE-5 project with delta delay data of 10 ps.

  20. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-Loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milenkovic, Zoran; DSouza, Christopher; Huish, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The exploration goals of Orion / MPCV Project will require a mature Rendezvous, Proximity Operations and Docking (RPOD) capability. Ground testing autonomous docking with a next-generation sensor such as the Vision Navigation Sensor (VNS) is a critical step along the path of ensuring successful execution of autonomous RPOD for Orion. This paper will discuss the testing rationale, the test configuration, the test limitations and the results obtained from tests that have been performed at the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) to evaluate and mature the Orion RPOD system. We will show that these tests have greatly increased the confidence in the maturity of the Orion RPOD design, reduced some of the latent risks and in doing so validated the design philosophy of the Orion RPOD system. This paper is organized as follows: first, the objectives of the test are given. Descriptions of the SOSC facility, and the Orion RPOD system and associated components follow. The details of the test configuration of the components in question are presented prior to discussing preliminary results of the tests. The paper concludes with closing comments.

  1. Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, Jack D.

    1992-01-01

    The Coordinated Radio, Electron, and Waves Experiment (CREWE) was designed to determine density, bulk velocity and temperature of the electrons for the NASA Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby Spacecraft, to define the MHD-SW IMF flow configuration; to clarify the role of impact ionization processes, to comment on the importance of anomalous ionization phenomena (via wave particle processes), to quantify the importance of wave turbulence in the cometary interaction, to establish the importance of photoionization via the presence of characteristic lines in a structured energy spectrum, to infer the presence and grain size of significant ambient dust column density, to search for the theoretically suggested 'impenetrable' contact surface, and to quantify the flow of heat (in the likelihood that no surface exists) that will penetrate very deep into the atmosphere supplying a good deal of heat via impact and charge exchange ionization. This final report provides an instrument description, instrument test plans, list of deliverables/schedule, flight and support equipment and software schedule, CREWE accommodation issues, resource requirements, status of major contracts, an explanation of the non-NASA funded efforts, status of EIP and IM plan, descope options, and Brinton questions.

  2. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion spacecraft. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a three-dimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build-time instead of at design-time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal non-recurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  3. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Strube, Matthew; Zipay, John J.; Cryan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR and D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR and D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR and D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR and D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe

  4. Technology Development of Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture Sensors and Docking Mechanism for the Asteroid Redirect Crewed Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkel, Heather; Cryan, Scott; Zipay, John; Strube, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe the technology development efforts NASA has underway for Automated Rendezvous and Docking/Capture (AR&D/C) sensors and a docking mechanism and the challenges involved. The paper will additionally address how these technologies will be extended to other missions requiring AR&D/C whether robotic or manned. NASA needs AR&D/C sensors for both the robotic and crewed segments of the Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM). NASA recently conducted a commonality assessment of the concept of operations for the robotic Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV) and the crewed mission segment using the Orion crew vehicle. The commonality assessment also considered several future exploration and science missions requiring an AR&D/C capability. Missions considered were asteroid sample return, satellite servicing, and planetary entry, descent, and landing. This assessment determined that a common sensor suite consisting of one or more visible wavelength cameras, a threedimensional LIDAR along with long-wavelength infrared cameras for robustness and situational awareness could be used on each mission to eliminate the cost of multiple sensor developments and qualifications. By choosing sensor parameters at build time instead of at design time and, without having to requalify flight hardware, a specific mission can design overlapping bearing, range, relative attitude, and position measurement availability to suit their mission requirements with minimal nonrecurring engineering costs. The resulting common sensor specification provides the union of all performance requirements for each mission and represents an improvement over the current systems used for AR&D/C today. These sensor specifications are tightly coupled to the docking system capabilities and requirements for final docking conditions. The paper will describe NASA's efforts to develop a standard docking system for use across NASA human spaceflight missions to multiple destinations. It will describe the current

  5. Cosmic Ray Induced Degradation in X-Ray Detectors On Board the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, S. R.; Trombka, J. I.; Goldsten, J. O.; Fiore, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission is the first in NASA's new Discovery Program to explore the solar system. Launched in February 1996, the NEAR spacecraft will take a long cruise flight arriving at the asteroid 433 Eros in January 1999 for a one year orbiting survey operation. This long exposure to the space environment has already proven to be an additional complication for the x-ray spectrometer. The asteroid pointing detectors for the x-ray spectrometer are three gas-filled proportional counters with resolving power in the range of 1 keV. Therefore, to resolve the important but closely spaced magnesium, aluminum and silicon k alpha lines( 1.255, 1.487, 1.739 keV respectively), magnesium and aluminum balanced filters are used on two of the detectors. The x-ray florescence from the surface of Eros is stimulated by solar x-rays. A proportional counter and a silicon PIN detector are used to monitor the solar incident x-ray flux. The proportional counters are single wire gas filled beryllium lined steel tubes operating at about 1100 volt. The 25 cm(exp 2) optical window is one mil. thick beryllium. To define the detector's active region, two boron nitride disks were incorporated in the tube just outside window area. It appears from the space flight data that the space environment is creating a charge on these boron nitride disks which ultimately distorts the tube gain and resolution. This broadening of the photo peak makes it more difficult to identify weak peaks and so degrades the statistical accuracy for some very important elements such as sulfur, calcium and iron (2.307, 3.690, 6.403 keV respectively). If the broadening is severe enough in the low energy region, counts will be lost as the photo peak spreads below the lower level discriminator (0.7 keV).

  6. The impact of trauma on the psyche of the individual using the film Belleville Rendez-vous as an illustrative vehicle.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Sharn

    2008-09-01

    Using the film Belleville Rendez-vous as a vehicle for discussion, this paper argues that whilst a traumatic complex may bring about dissociation of the psyche, this is not the only possibility, nor is dissociation necessarily to be seen solely as a difficulty to be overcome. If trauma is experienced within the context of support and validation, the experience of trauma may generate integration not only of the trauma but also of the growth potential that the trauma has previously inhibited. PMID:18844736

  7. Spontaneous Rupture of Superficial Femoral Artery Repaired with Endovascular Stent-Grafting with use of Rendez-Vous Technique, Followed by Delayed Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio Cannavale, Alessandro; Gazzetti, Marianna; Fantozzi, Cristiano; Taurino, Maurizio; Speziale, Francesco

    2013-02-15

    This is the case of a 72-year-old man with lower limb ischemia due to spontaneous rupture of nonaneurysmal superficial femoral artery that developed into thigh hematoma. After failure of a Fogarty revascularization, an emergency endovascular procedure was performed to restore the arterial continuity. A rendezvous procedure was performed with a double femoral and popliteal approach and two covered stent-grafts were deployed. Patient's clinical conditions immediately improved, but 4 months later the stent-grafts were surgically removed for infection and exteriorization. A femoropopliteal bypass was performed. After 1 year follow-up, the patient is in good clinical condition.

  8. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Explore the Origin and Evolution of the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J. F., III; Olkin, C.; Castillo, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The orbital properties, compositions, and physical properties of the diverse populations of small outer solar system bodies provide a forensic map of how our solar system formed and evolved. Perhaps the most potentially diagnostic, but least explored, of those populations are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. More than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are presently known, but these are predicted to be only a small fraction of the 500,000 to 1 million Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that were scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in the 1:1 Jupiter mean motion resonance, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a much more quiescent early solar system, and then trapped at L4 and L5. The 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey identified important questions about the origin and evolution of the solar system that can be addressed by studying of the Trojan asteroids, including: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft? The Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) is a New Frontiers-class mission designed to answer these questions, and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of a large number of these objects,, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the first-time exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology

  9. Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR): A New Frontiers Mission to Conduct the First Detailed Reconnaissance of the Jupiter Trojan Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James F.; Olkin, Cathy; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Among the most potentially diagnostic but least explored populations of small bodies are the Jupiter Trojan asteroids, which orbit at ~5 AU in the L4 and L5 Lagrange points of Jupiter. The Trojans provide a unique perspective on solar system history, because their locations and physical, compositional, and mineralogic properties preserve evidence for important gravitational interactions among the giant planets. The locations and orbital properties of more than 6200 Jupiter Trojans are now known, but that is likely only a small fraction of a population of up to ~1e6 Trojans >1 km in size. The Trojans are hypothesized to be either former KBOs scattered into the inner solar system by early giant planet migration and then trapped in L4 and L5, or bodies formed near 5 AU in a more quiescent early solar system.Important Planetary Decadal Survey questions that can be addressed by studying the Trojans include: (a) How did the giant planets and their satellite systems accrete, and is there evidence that they migrated to new orbital positions? (b) What is the relationship between large and small KBOs? Is the small population derived by impact disruption of the large one? (c) What kinds of surface evolution, radiation chemistry, and surface-atmosphere interactions occur on distant icy primitive bodies? And (d) What are the sources of asteroid groups (Trojans and Centaurs) that remain to be explored by spacecraft?Here we describe the Trojan Tour and Rendezvous (TTR) New Frontiers mission concept, which is designed to answer these Decadal questions and to test hypotheses for early giant planet migration and solar system evolution. Via close flybys of many of these objects, and orbital characterization of at least one large Trojan, TTR will enable the initial up-close exploration of this population. Our primary mission goals are to characterize the overall surface geology, geochemistry and mineralogy of these worlds; to characterize their internal structure and dynamical

  10. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  11. DARe: Dark Asteroid Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. S.; McFadden, L. A.; Rhoden, A. R.; Lim, L. F.; Boynton, W. V.; Carter, L. M.; Collins, G.; Englander, J. A.; Goossens, S. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Li, J.-Y.; Mottola, S.; Oberst, J.; Orosei, R.; Parsons, A. M.; Preusker, F.; Reuter, D. C.; Simon, A. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Walsh, K.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Small bodies record the chemical, physical, and dynamical processes that gave birth to and shaped the solar system. The great variety of small bodies reflects the diversity of both their genesis and their histories. The DARe mission conducts a critical test of how small body populations reflect a history of planetary migration and planetesimal scattering. This understanding is crucial for planning future NASA missions and placing current and past missions into context.

  12. Tumbling motions of NH2(CH3)2 ions in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 studied using 1H MAS NMR and 13C CP/MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Choi, Jae Hun; Lim, Ae Ran

    2014-12-01

    The structure and the phase transition temperatures of [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 were determined using X-ray diffraction and DSC, respectively. The temperature dependence of chemical shifts and the spin-lattice relaxation time T1ρ in the rotating frame were measured for the 1H and 13C nuclei in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4. From these results, it was observed that the structural change by chemical shifts does not occur with temperature. However, T1ρ for 1H and 13C in [NH2(CH3)2]2ZnCl4 showed a minimum, and it is apparent that both T1ρ values are governed by the same tumbling motions. The activation energies of tumbling motions for 1H and 13C are nearly the same owing to the connection between CH3 and NH2 ions in the [NH2(CH3)2]+ group.

  13. In-Flight Operation of the Dawn Ion Propulsion System: Status at One Year from the Vesta Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Rayman, Marc D.

    2010-01-01

    , 2007 and was successfully concluded as planned on October 31, 2008. During this time period the Dawn IPS was operated mostly at full power for approximately 6500 hours, consumed 71.7 kg of xenon and delivered approximately 1.8 km/s of delta V to the spacecraft. The thrusting to Mars was followed by a coasting period of approximately 3.5 months that included a Mars flyby in February of 2009. The Mars flyby provided a gravity assist (MGA) for a plane change and approximately 1 km/s of heliocentric energy increase and is the only part of the mission following launch in which a needed velocity change is not accomplished by the IPS. During the coast period IPS was operated for a trajectory correction maneuver and for engineering tests but was not operated for primary propulsion. Closest approach to Mars occurred as planned on February 17, 2009 and was followed by another coasting period of just under 4 months in duration. During this last coasting phase IPS was operated only for routine maintenance activities and for system engineering tests. Deterministic thrusting for heliocentric transfer to Vesta resumed on June 8, 2009. Since resumption of cruise to Vesta IPS has been operated at throttled power levels, most of the time at full power, and with a duty cycle of approximately 93%, leading to an arrival at Vesta in July of 2011 and arrival at Ceres in February 2015. This paper provides an overview of Dawn's mission objectives and the results of Dawn IPS mission operations through one year from the spacecraft's rendezvous with Vesta.

  14. Investigation of Spinning and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 Airplane in the Free-Spinning Tunnel, TED No. NACA DE 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Henry A.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XFY-1 airplane with a windmilling propeller simulated to determine the effects of control setting and movements upon the erect spin and recovery characteristics for a range of airplane-loading conditions. The effects on the model's spin-recovery characteristics of removing the lower vertical tail, removing the gun pods, and fixing the rudders at neutral were also investigated briefly. The investigation included determination of the size parachute required for emergency recovery from demonstration spins. The tumbling tendencies of the model were also investigated. Brief static force tests were made to determine the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch at high angles of attack. The investigation indicated that the spin and recovery characteristics of the airplane with propeller windmilling will be satisfactory for all loading conditions if recovery is attempted by full rudder reversal accompanied by simultaneous movement of the stick laterally to full with the spin (stick right in a right spin) and longitudinally to neutral. Inverted spins should be satisfactorily terminated by fully reversing the rudder followed immediately by moving the stick laterally towards the forward rudder pedal and longitudinally to neutral. Removal of the gun pods or fixing the rudders at neutral will not adversely affect the airplane's spin-recovery characteristics, but removal of the lower vertical tail will result in unsatisfactory spin-recovery characteristics. The model-test results showed that a 13.3-foot wing-tip conventional parachute (drag coefficient approximately 0.7) should be effective as an emergency spin-recovery device during demonstration spins of the airplane. It was indicated that the airplane should not tumble and that no unusual longitudinal-trim characteristics should be obtained for the center-of-gravity positions investigated.

  15. Are the Walls of Injustice Tumbling Down?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rochelle R.; Davila, Erica R.

    2011-01-01

    The discussion of multicultural education in teacher preparation dates back several decades. "The historical roots of multicultural education lie in the civil rights movements of various historically oppressed groups" (Gorski, 1999, p.1). As communities of color resisted institutional racism, schools became one of the sites of struggle. Thus, the…

  16. Tumbling: From Rally Cars to Toast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The article by Rod Cross describing the translational and rotational motion of the "Launch of a Vehicle from a Ramp" motivated us to create two computer models showing this type of dynamical behavior.

  17. Coal - prices tumble as the glut continues

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.M.

    1987-03-01

    The oil price collapse was the major event affecting coal markets around the world in 1986. The 8% expansion in international coal trade in 1985 was halted, and prices fell considerably. World coking coal trade declined and import and export prices fell due to a decrease in steel production and the use of oil, rather than pulverized coal, in blast furnaces. However steam coal trade increased by about 5 million mt because of various institutional constraints to utilities switching from coal burning to oil burning. The article covers coal trade and production in the following countries: Australia; Canada; China; Colombia; Western Europe; Japan; Poland; South Africa; and the USSR.

  18. A Proposed Strategy for the U.S. to Develop and Maintain a Mainstream Capability Suite ("Warehouse") for Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking in Low Earth Orbit and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S.; Stillwater, Ryan A.; Babula, Maria; Moreau, Michael C.; Riedel, J. Ed; Mrozinski, Richard B.; Bradley, Arthur; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of space assets to rendezvous and dock/capture/berth is a fundamental enabler for numerous classes of NASA fs missions, and is therefore an essential capability for the future of NASA. Mission classes include: ISS crew rotation, crewed exploration beyond low-Earth-orbit (LEO), on-orbit assembly, ISS cargo supply, crewed satellite servicing, robotic satellite servicing / debris mitigation, robotic sample return, and robotic small body (e.g. near-Earth object, NEO) proximity operations. For a variety of reasons to be described, NASA programs requiring Automated/Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking/Capture/Berthing (AR&D) capabilities are currently spending an order-of-magnitude more than necessary and taking twice as long as necessary to achieve their AR&D capability, "reinventing the wheel" for each program, and have fallen behind all of our foreign counterparts in AR&D technology (especially autonomy) in the process. To ensure future missions' reliability and crew safety (when applicable), to achieve the noted cost and schedule savings by eliminate costs of continually "reinventing the wheel ", the NASA AR&D Community of Practice (CoP) recommends NASA develop an AR&D Warehouse, detailed herein, which does not exist today. The term "warehouse" is used herein to refer to a toolbox or capability suite that has pre-integrated selectable supply-chain hardware and reusable software components that are considered ready-to-fly, low-risk, reliable, versatile, scalable, cost-effective, architecture and destination independent, that can be confidently utilized operationally on human spaceflight and robotic vehicles over a variety of mission classes and design reference missions, especially beyond LEO. The CoP also believes that it is imperative that NASA coordinate and integrate all current and proposed technology development activities into a cohesive cross-Agency strategy to produce and utilize this AR&D warehouse. An initial estimate indicates that if NASA

  19. Supplementary Investigation to Determine the Effects of Center-of-Gravity Position on the Spin, Longitudinal-Trim, and Tumbling Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee 7002 Airplane (Flying Mock-up of XF-92)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Jones, Ira P., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    A supplementary wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of rearward positions of the center of gravity on the spin, longitudinal-trim, and tumbling characteristics of the 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee 7002 airplane equipped with the single vertical tail. A few tests were also made with dual vertical tails added to the model. The model was ballasted to represent, the airplane in its approximate design gross weight for two center-of-gravity positions, 3O and 35 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord. The original tests previously reported were for a center-of-gravity position of 24 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord.

  20. The First Joint Report of the General Thomas P. Stafford Task Force and the Academician Vladimir F. Utkin Advisory Expert Council on the Shuttle-Mir Rendezvous and Docking Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency (RSA) formally agreed to conduct a fundamentally new program of human cooperation in space. The 'Shuttle-Mir Program' encompassed combined astronaut-cosmonaut activities on the Shuttle, Soyuz Test Module(TM), and Mir station spacecraft. At that time, NASA and RSA limited the project to: the STS-60 mission carrying the first Russian cosmonaut to fly on the U.S. Space Shuttle; the launch of the first U.S. astronaut on the Soyuz vehicle for a multi-month mission as a member of a Mir crew; and the change-out of the U.S.-Russian Mir crews with a Russian crew during a Shuttle rendezvous and docking mission with the Mir Station. The objectives of the Phase 1 Program are to provide the basis for the resolution of engineering and technical problems related to the implementation of the ISS and future U.S.-Russian cooperation in space. This, combined with test data generated during the course of the Shuttle flights to the Mir station and extended joint activities between U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts aboard Mir, is expected to reduce the technical risks associated with the construction and operation of the ISS. Phase 1 will further enhance the ISS by combining space operations and joint space technology demonstrations. Phase 1 also provides early opportunities for extended U.S. scientific and research activities, prior to utilization of the ISS.

  1. Spin Rate Diversity Amongst Ten-meter Class Near Earth Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, William; Ryan, Eileen V.

    2016-10-01

    The spin rates of small asteroids can provide insight into their mechanical structure, origin, and subsequent evolution. This is of more than just scientific interest since these are also the objects that will hit the Earth most frequently. Early statistics [Pravec and Harris, 2000] for Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) with diameters of ~100 meters or less had resulted in the conclusion that many are rotating more rapidly than feasible for a gravitationally bound system of constituent components (i.e, 'rubble piles'). However, more recent studies [Holsapple, 2007; Scheeres et al. 2010] have focused on how non-gravitational cohesion mechanisms do not necessarily rule out a rubble pile structure for fast spin rate bodies. To further study this issue, we will report on the recent spin rate results for the smallest asteroids observed as part of our ongoing NEA target-of-opportunity characterization research [Ryan and Ryan, 2016] conducted using the Magdalena Ridge Observatory's 2.4-meter telescope.Spin rates determined by this program plus results from the current lightcurve database [Warner et al. 2016] indicate that the very smallest NEAs with H>29 rotate with periods of minutes or less. This implies that these objects possess significant strength, hinting that they are likely examples of truly monolithic fragments. However, our observations also show a great diversity in rotation periods for asteroids that are only slightly larger. In particular, the H~28.6 asteroids 2016 CC136 and 2016 CG18 were observed to rotate with periods approaching or exceeding ~2 hours, with the latter showing a tumbling behavior. In a subset of our database that includes 22 asteroids with H~27.5 (~10 meters) or greater, a full range of periods from less than a minute to greater than 2 hours (close to the minimal period of a self-gravitating system), have been identified. Moreover, at least three of these are in a tumbling state with multiple periods clearly identified, implying constraints on

  2. The Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Mission, the Mars Surveyor 2001 (MS01) Mission, and the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The NEAR Mission was launched on February 17, 1996 for a three year cruise to the asteroid 433 Eros. During October, November, and December 1998 cruise measurements with the gamma-ray spectrometer were made at three different escape-window-width settings. These were done in order to understand how the count rate and peak width change as the window width settings change. Analysis of these spectra was completed using the latest version of the spectral analysis program, RobWin. Results as a function of energy were combined with the results from the Schlumberger-Doll Research experiments (described below). Laboratory measurements were needed to confirm efficiency calculations above 6 MeV and to understand the relationship between the full energy peak areas and the areas of the first and second escape peaks as a function of the escape peak widths. A week of measurements was made at Schlumberger-Doll Research using their 14-MeV pulsed neutron generator and large soil samples. Data were collected after adding iron and nickel to the sample to increase the emission of high-energy lines. Approximately 24 hours of data were accumulated at each of three escape peak window widths. These data were analyzed with RobWin. Combining results from the cruise measurements and the laboratory measurements indicated that both data sets had similar energy dependence and that this energy dependence was different from that obtained using standard Monte Carlo calculations. Alternate methods of simulating the response of the detector to changes in the escape window widths are being investigated.

  3. Coding gains and error rates from the Big Viterbi Decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onyszchuk, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype hardware Big Viterbi Decoder (BVD) was completed for an experiment with the Galileo Spacecraft. Searches for new convolutional codes, studies of Viterbi decoder hardware designs and architectures, mathematical formulations, and decompositions of the deBruijn graph into identical and hierarchical subgraphs, and very large scale integration (VLSI) chip design are just a few examples of tasks completed for this project. The BVD bit error rates (BER), measured from hardware and software simulations, are plotted as a function of bit signal to noise ratio E sub b/N sub 0 on the additive white Gaussian noise channel. Using the constraint length 15, rate 1/4, experimental convolutional code for the Galileo mission, the BVD gains 1.5 dB over the NASA standard (7,1/2) Maximum Likelihood Convolution Decoder (MCD) at a BER of 0.005. At this BER, the same gain results when the (255,233) NASA standard Reed-Solomon decoder is used, which yields a word error rate of 2.1 x 10(exp -8) and a BER of 1.4 x 10(exp -9). The (15, 1/6) code to be used by the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF)/Cassini Missions yields 1.7 dB of coding gain. These gains are measured with respect to symbols input to the BVD and increase with decreasing BER. Also, 8-bit input symbol quantization makes the BVD resistant to demodulated signal-level variations which may cause higher bandwidth than the NASA (7,1/2) code, these gains are offset by about 0.1 dB of expected additional receiver losses. Coding gains of several decibels are possible by compressing all spacecraft data.

  4. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR, and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.

  5. Automated Rendezvous and Docking: 1994-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This custom bibliography from the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program lists a sampling of records found in the NASA Aeronautics and Space Database. The scope of this topic includes technologies for human exploration and robotic sample return missions. This area of focus is one of the enabling technologies as defined by NASA s Report of the President s Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy, published in June 2004.

  6. Telerobotic rendezvous and docking vision system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gravely, Ben; Myers, Donald; Moody, David

    1992-01-01

    This research program has successfully demonstrated a new target label architecture that allows a microcomputer to determine the position, orientation, and identity of an object. It contains a CAD-like database with specific geometric information about the object for approach, grasping, and docking maneuvers. Successful demonstrations were performed selecting and docking an ORU box with either of two ORU receptacles. Small, but significant differences were seen in the two camera types used in the program, and camera sensitive program elements have been identified. The software has been formatted into a new co-autonomy system which provides various levels of operator interaction and promises to allow effective application of telerobotic systems while code improvements are continuing.

  7. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Earth of the orbiting spacecraft (or part thereof), including a spacecraft deployed earlier on the same... orbiting spacecraft to Earth. (3) Revisit of an orbiting spacecraft for purposes such as resupply,...

  8. 14 CFR 1214.111 - Rendezvous services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Earth of the orbiting spacecraft (or part thereof), including a spacecraft deployed earlier on the same... orbiting spacecraft to Earth. (3) Revisit of an orbiting spacecraft for purposes such as resupply,...

  9. Discovery: Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The work carried out under this grant consisted of two parallel studies aimed at defining candidate missions for the initiation of the Discovery Program being considered by NASA's Solar System Exploration Division. The main study considered a Discover-class mission to a Near Earth Asteroid (NEA); the companion study considered a small telescope in Earth-orbit dedicated to ultra violet studies of solar system bodies. The results of these studies are summarized in two reports which are attached (Appendix 1 and Appendix 2).

  10. Mars Researchers Rendezvous on Remote Arctic Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Devon Island is situated in an isolated part of Canada's Nunavut Territory, and is usually considered to be the largest uninhabited island in the world. However, each summer since 1999, researchers from NASA's Haughton-Mars Project and the Mars Society reside at this 'polar desert' location to study the geologic and environmental characteristics of a site which is considered to be an excellent 'Mars analog': a terrestrial location wherein specific conditions approximate environmental features reported on Mars. Base camps established amidst the rocks and rubble surrounding the Haughton impact crater enable researchers to conduct surveys designed to test the habitat, equipment and technology that may be deployed during a human mission to Mars. One of the many objectives of the project scientists is to understand the ice formations around the Haughton area, in the hopes that this might ultimately assist with the recognition of areas where ice can be found at shallow depth on Mars.

    These images of Devon Island from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument provide contrasting views of the spectral and angular reflectance 'signatures' of different surfaces within the region. The top panel is a natural color view created with data from the red, green and blue-bands of MISR's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera. The bottom panel is a false-color multiangular composite of the same area, utilizing red band data from MISR's 60-degree backward, nadir, and 60-degree forward-viewing cameras, displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. In this representation, colors highlight textural properties of elements within the scene, with blue tones indicating smooth surfaces (which preferentially forward scatter sunlight) and red hues indicating rougher surfaces (which preferentially backscatter). The angular reflectance 'signature' of low clouds causes them to appear purple, and this visualization provides a unique way of distinguishing clouds from snow and ice.

    The data were captured on June 28, 2001, during the early part of the arctic summer, when sea ice becomes thinner and begins to move depending upon localized currents and winds. In winter the entire region is locked with several meters of nearly motionless sea ice, which acts as a thermodynamic barrier to the loss of heat from the comparatively warm ocean to the colder atmosphere. Summer melting of sea ice can be observed at the two large, dark regions of open water; one is present in the Jones Sound (near the top to the left of center), and another appears in the Wellington Channel (left-hand edge). A large crack caused by tidal heaving has broken the ice cover over the Parry Channel (lower right-hand corner). A substantial ice cap permanently occupies the easternmost third of the island (upper right). Surface features such as dendritic meltwater channels incised into the island's surface are apparent. The Haughton-Mars project site is located slightly to the left and above image center, in an area which appears with relatively little surface ice, near the island's inner 'elbow.'

    The images were acquired during Terra orbit 8132 and cover an area of about 334 kilometers x 229 kilometers. They utilize data from blocks 27 to 31 within World Reference System-2 path 42.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. STORRM To Test Future Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Video Gallery

    A state-of-the-art relative navigation system will be demonstrated on the STS-134 mission to the International Space Station called the Sensor Test for Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation or ...

  12. Long range targeting for space based rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, Louis J.; Redfield, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    The work performed under this grant supported the Dexterous Flight Experiment one STS-62 The project required developing hardware and software for automating a TRAC sensor on orbit. The hardware developed by for the flight has been documented through standard NASA channels since it has to pass safety, environmental, and other issues. The software has not been documented previously, therefore, this report provides a software manual for the TRAC code developed for the grant.

  13. The gas production rate of periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Festou, Michel C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ahearn, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/d'Arrest is a potential target for a rendezvous mission to a short period comet. Its light curve is rather peculiar, the comet being active only after perihelion passage. One apparition out of two is easy to observe from the ground. The 1995 apparition of the comet will offer a unique opportunity to characterize the outgassing properties of its nucleus.

  14. A Miniature, High-Resolution Laser Radar Operating at Video Rates

    SciTech Connect

    SMITHPETER,COLIN L.; NELLUMS,ROBERT O.; LEBIEN,STEVEN M.; STUDOR,GEORGE

    2000-06-26

    The authors are developing a laser radar to meet the needs of NASA for a 5-lb, 150 in{sup 3} image sensor with a pixel range accuracy of 0.1-inch. NASA applications include structural dynamics measurements, navigation guidance in rendezvous and proximity operations, and space vehicle inspection. The sensor is based on the scannerless range imager architecture developed at Sandia. This architecture modulates laser floodlight illumination and a focal plane receiver to phase encode the laser time of flight (TOF) for each pixel. They believe this approach has significant advantages over architectures directly measuring TOF including high data rate, reduced detector bandwidth, and conventional FPA detection. A limitation of the phase detection technique is its periodic nature, which provides relative range information over a finite ambiguity interval. To extend the operating interval while maintaining a given range resolution, a LADAR sensor using dual modulation frequencies has been developed. This sensor also extends the relative range information to absolute range by calibrating a gating function on the receiver to the TOF. The modulation frequency values can be scaled to meet the resolution and range interval requirements of different applications. Results from the miniature NASA sensor illustrate the advantages of the dual-frequency operation and the ability to provide the range images of 640 by 480 pixels at 30 frames per second.

  15. Examination of Granular Tumbling by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Lachlan; Metcalfe, Guy

    1998-11-01

    The focus for the present work has been to investigate the granular flow in a rotating tumbler. Tumblers are used industrially in areas such as calcining kilns and have issues such as product throughput and recycling. A model tumbler was made from acrylic tube supported at each end to allow the working section to coincide with the MRI magnet imaging region. A removable hatch allowed the tumbler to be filled with particles. The particles used were polystyrene beads and yellow mustard seeds. The aspect ratio of the tumbler could be varied by moving the end plates and the surface roughness was also varied by gluing various grades of abrasive paper to the internal surfaces. The abrasive paper had discernable effect on the quality of the MRI signals. The tumbler was rotated slowly to simulate operation in the avalanche regime. Images were taken up to 128 revolutions. Results showed that the mustard seeds and polystyrene beads segregated with the seeds moving to the wall of the tumbler except for an unmixed core region. This core region formed in the first few revolutions and persisted for the full 128 revolutions investigated. The size of the unmixed core appeared to asymptote by 128 revolutions. Measurements of the final core size relative to the initial size showed that the final core size decreased with increasing aspect ratio.

  16. Take a Tumble: Weathering and Erosion Using a Rock Tumbler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Patrick; Mattox, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Weathering--the physical and chemical breakdown of geologic materials--and erosion--the transport of materials by wind, water, or ice--can be subtle, yet powerful forces. For example, shale, a rock made of mud-sized particles, is by far the most common sedimentary rock, a testament to the ability of weathering and erosion to take a rock and reduce…

  17. Reentry survival analysis of tumbling metallic hollow cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Hyung-seok; Kim, Kyu-hong

    2011-09-01

    The survival of orbital debris reentering the Earth's atmosphere is considered. The numerical approach of NASA's Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) is reviewed, and a new equation accounting for reradiation heat loss of hollow cylindrical objects is presented. Based on these, a code called Survivability Analysis Program for Atmospheric Reentry (SAPAR) has been developed, and the new equation for reradiation heat loss is validated. Using this equation in conjunction with the formulation used in ORSAT, a comparative case study on the Delta-II second stage cylindrical tank is given, demonstrating that the analysis using the proposed equation is in good agreement with the actual recovered object when a practical value for thermal emissivity is used. A detailed explanation of the revised formulation is given, and additional simulation results are presented. Finally, discussions are made to address the applicability of the proposed equation to be incorporated in future survival analyses of orbital debris.

  18. Raters & Rating Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Winifred A.; Stone, Mark H.

    1998-01-01

    The first article in this section, "Rating Scales and Shared Meaning," by Winifred A. Lopez, discusses the analysis of rating scale data. The second article, "Rating Scale Categories: Dichotomy, Double Dichotomy, and the Number Two," by Mark H. Stone, argues that dichotomies in rating scales are more useful than multiple ratings. (SLD)

  19. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data. PMID:20802818

  20. Rating Movies and Rating the Raters Who Rate Them.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    The movie distribution company Netflix has generated considerable buzz in the statistics community by offering a million dollar prize for improvements to its movie rating system. Among the statisticians and computer scientists who have disclosed their techniques, the emphasis has been on machine learning approaches. This article has the modest goal of discussing a simple model for movie rating and other forms of democratic rating. Because the model involves a large number of parameters, it is nontrivial to carry out maximum likelihood estimation. Here we derive a straightforward EM algorithm from the perspective of the more general MM algorithm. The algorithm is capable of finding the global maximum on a likelihood landscape littered with inferior modes. We apply two variants of the model to a dataset from the MovieLens archive and compare their results. Our model identifies quirky raters, redefines the raw rankings, and permits imputation of missing ratings. The model is intended to stimulate discussion and development of better theory rather than to win the prize. It has the added benefit of introducing readers to some of the issues connected with analyzing high-dimensional data.

  1. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  2. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  3. Rate theories for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Some of the rate theories that are most useful for modeling biological processes are reviewed. By delving into some of the details and subtleties in the development of the theories, the review will hopefully help the reader gain a more than superficial perspective. Examples are presented to illustrate how rate theories can be used to generate insight at the microscopic level into biomolecular behaviors. Attempt is made to clear up a number of misconceptions in the literature regarding popular rate theories, including the appearance of Planck’s constant in the transition-state theory and the Smoluchowski result as an upper limit for protein-protein and protein-DNA association rate constants. Future work in combining the implementation of rate theories through computer simulations with experimental probes of rate processes, and in modeling effects of intracellular environments so theories can be used for generating rate constants for systems biology studies is particularly exciting. PMID:20691138

  4. Vibrato rate adjustment.

    PubMed

    Dromey, Christopher; Carter, Neisha; Hopkin, Arden

    2003-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to document the acoustic changes that occur as singers attempt to increase or decrease their vibrato rate to match target stimuli. Eight advanced singing students produced vowels with vibrato in three registers, both naturally and while attempting to match faster or slower rate stimuli. Slower rates were associated with lower intensity and less steady vibrato. Faster rates involved increased vibrato extent in the chest register and increased intensity in the head register. Singers whose spontaneous vibrato rates were naturally either slower or faster tended to also be relatively slower or faster when matching target rates. This ability to modify rate may have beneficial effects on the artistic quality of the voice for performance. PMID:12825649

  5. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  6. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  7. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  8. Tests of Rating Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masin, Sergio Cesare; Busetto, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The study reports empirical tests of Anderson's, Haubensak's, Helson's, and Parducci's rating models when two end anchors are used for rating. The results show that these models cannot predict the judgment effect called here the Dai Pra effect. It is shown that an extension of Anderson's model is consistent with this effect. The results confirm…

  9. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  10. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  11. The Infant Rating Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the usefulness of the Infant Rating Scale (IRS) in the early identification of learning difficulties. Thirteen hundred five-year-olds were rated by their teachers after one term in school. The structure of the IRS, its reliability, and predictive validity are examined. (Author/SJL)

  12. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  13. Growth rates made easy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Barry G; Acar, Hande; Nandipati, Anna; Barlow, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    In the 1960s-1980s, determination of bacterial growth rates was an important tool in microbial genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and microbial physiology. The exciting technical developments of the 1990s and the 2000s eclipsed that tool; as a result, many investigators today lack experience with growth rate measurements. Recently, investigators in a number of areas have started to use measurements of bacterial growth rates for a variety of purposes. Those measurements have been greatly facilitated by the availability of microwell plate readers that permit the simultaneous measurements on up to 384 different cultures. Only the exponential (logarithmic) portions of the resulting growth curves are useful for determining growth rates, and manual determination of that portion and calculation of growth rates can be tedious for high-throughput purposes. Here, we introduce the program GrowthRates that uses plate reader output files to automatically determine the exponential portion of the curve and to automatically calculate the growth rate, the maximum culture density, and the duration of the growth lag phase. GrowthRates is freely available for Macintosh, Windows, and Linux. We discuss the effects of culture volume, the classical bacterial growth curve, and the differences between determinations in rich media and minimal (mineral salts) media. This protocol covers calibration of the plate reader, growth of culture inocula for both rich and minimal media, and experimental setup. As a guide to reliability, we report typical day-to-day variation in growth rates and variation within experiments with respect to position of wells within the plates.

  14. Twinning rates in Tamilnadu.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P S; Inbaraj, S G; Muthurathnam, S

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study of human reproduction was conducted in Tamilnadu State, South India, from 1969 to 1975. This paper reports twinning rates and relates these to maternal age, parity, and consanguinity. Birth weights and other dimensions at birth and infant mortality are also studied. The overall twinning rate was 1 in 115 births. Dizygotic twinning rates increased significantly with maternal age and parity. The measurements at birth for like-sexed twin pairs were lower than that of unlike-sexed, but the mortalities did not differ significantly. Twins, in general, had a several fold increase in mortality as compared with singletons. PMID:6886580

  15. Burning Rate Emulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Burning Rate Emulator is a gas fuel investigation attempting to emulate the burning of solids to improve our understanding of materials''flammability over a wide range of conditions. The approa...

  16. Rating the Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explains how people arrive at personal hazard assessments. Explores why people overestimate some hazards and underestimate others. Examines risk ratings for activities and technologies such as nuclear power, motor vehicles, pesticides, and vaccinations. (MA)

  17. National ART Success Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... ART and Birth Defects ART and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology National Summary Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... live-birth rate? [PDF - 1.37MB] Section 2: ART Cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos What ...

  18. The ratings game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braben, Donald W.

    2009-04-01

    How sad to read a supposedly serious debate among distinguished physicists (February p19) about which combinations of the latest Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ratings represent a university physics department's true strengths.

  19. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  20. High population increase rates.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems. PMID:12284289

  1. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years. PMID:17782901

  2. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  3. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  4. Modelling heart rate kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual's cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women).

  5. Modelling Heart Rate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Zakynthinaki, Maria S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate a simple and at the same time effective mathematical model of heart rate kinetics in response to movement (exercise). Based on an existing model, a system of two coupled differential equations which give the rate of change of heart rate and the rate of change of exercise intensity is used. The modifications introduced to the existing model are justified and discussed in detail, while models of blood lactate accumulation in respect to time and exercise intensity are also presented. The main modification is that the proposed model has now only one parameter which reflects the overall cardiovascular condition of the individual. The time elapsed after the beginning of the exercise, the intensity of the exercise, as well as blood lactate are also taken into account. Application of the model provides information regarding the individual’s cardiovascular condition and is able to detect possible changes in it, across the data recording periods. To demonstrate examples of successful numerical fit of the model, constant intensity experimental heart rate data sets of two individuals have been selected and numerical optimization was implemented. In addition, numerical simulations provided predictions for various exercise intensities and various cardiovascular condition levels. The proposed model can serve as a powerful tool for a complete means of heart rate analysis, not only in exercise physiology (for efficiently designing training sessions for healthy subjects) but also in the areas of cardiovascular health and rehabilitation (including application in population groups for which direct heart rate recordings at intense exercises are not possible or not allowed, such as elderly or pregnant women). PMID:25876164

  6. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  7. Sulfur rate control system

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.A.; Mullendore, M.G.; Kleinfeldt, T.E.; Walker, H.G. Jr.

    1993-07-20

    A sulfur rate control system is described for substantially optimizing particulate removal performance of an electrostatic precipitator in fluid communication with a flue carrying combustion products of a fossil fuel, comprising: an electrostatic precipitator having an inlet for receiving a flue gas: means for injecting sulfur trioxide into a flue for mixing with said flue gas at a location preceding entry of said flue gas into said electrostatic precipitator, said injection of sulfur trioxide being varied responsive to a proportional control signal; and, control means coupled to both said flue and said sulfur trioxide injection means for generating said proportional control signal, said control means including (1) means for measuring a sulfur dioxide concentration quantity in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, (2) means for measuring a flow rate of particulates in said flue gas at a location preceding said sulfur trioxide injection means, and (3) a controller for calculating a ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio calculating controller having a first input coupled to said sulfur dioxide measuring means and a second input coupled to said particulate flow rate measuring means for generating said proportional control signal in proportion to a difference between a predetermined value and said ratio between said sulfur dioxide concentration quantity and said flow rate of particulates, said ratio controller having an output coupled to said sulfur trioxide injection means for maximizing particulate removal efficiency of said electrostatic precipitator.

  8. Interest rates factor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangwook; Kim, Min Jae; Kim, Soo Yong

    2011-07-01

    Interdependence of the interest rates of the US, the UK, and Japan is analyzed in this work by means of spectral analysis and network methods. A predominant effective factor in the interest rate market is which country floats a bond issue, and a minor effective factor is time to maturity of bonds. Power-law cross-correlation among different countries is analyzed by the detrended cross-correlation analysis method. Long-range cross-correlation is found between the first factors of interest rate, while there is no cross-correlation between some of the second factors. The tail dependency is indicated by tail indices from Archimedean copulas, including an empirical copula. In contrast to other pairs, the US-UK first factor pair has tail dependencies in both the upper-tail and lower-tail. Dynamic properties of interest rate are modeled by a stochastic volatility model. The properties of mean reverting and volatility clustering are observed and reflected in this model. The proposed simulation method combines the dependence structures and the factor dynamics model; it simultaneously describes the interest rates of different countries.

  9. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death. PMID:24215748

  10. Knee arthroplasty rating.

    PubMed

    Binazzi, R; Soudry, M; Mestriner, L A; Insall, J N

    1992-06-01

    A number of rating systems used to evaluate the results of total knee arthroplasty exist. Many of these systems are based on different concepts, and might be expected to give divergent results. To see if this was so, the authors examined a consecutive series of 235 posterior stabilized knee arthroplasties recording the results according to five rating systems: HSS (The Hospital for Special Surgery), Brigham, Freeman, BOA (British Orthopaedic Association), and the VENN diagram. In spite of their apparent differences, all point systems and the BOA gave almost identical results, while the VENN diagram proved to be the most stringent. The authors suggest that any of the current point systems may be used to "score" arthroplasties, but the results should also be rated with the VENN diagram in order to see the quality of the arthroplasty and a comparison between the different series.

  11. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-12-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  12. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  13. Variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer cost savings to a producer; however, the full potential of the benefits and savings cannot be realized if water ...

  14. Paradoxes in Film Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The author selected a simple random sample of 100 movies from the "Movie and Video Guide" (1996), by Leonard Maltin. The author's intent was to obtain some basic information on the population of roughly 19,000 movies through a small sample. The "Movie and Video Guide" by Leonard Maltin is an annual ratings guide to movies. While not all films ever…

  15. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  16. Variable Rate Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems are available to producers with the ability to make variable-rate applications of defoliants, fertilizer, lime, pesticides, plant growth regulators, and seed. These systems could potentially offer a producer great cost savings; however, the full potential of these benefits and savings cannot...

  17. Controlling Your Utility Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucht, Ray; Dembowski, Frederick L.

    1985-01-01

    A cost-effective alternative to high utility bills for middle-sized and smaller utility users is the service of utility rate consultants. The consultants analyze utility invoices for the previous 12 months to locate available refunds or credits. (MLF)

  18. Understanding Rates of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Aurelia; Russell, Larry

    This paper presents three activities on how to analyze rates of change in real-life situations using TI-83 calculators and computer-based laboratories. Activities include 24 hour temperature data, the temperature of a light bulb, and an M&M toss. Each section contains descriptions of equipment/materials, data collection, and data analysis. The…

  19. Toy Stories: Modeling Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Elementary school mathematics is increasingly recognized for its crucial role in developing the foundational skills and understandings for algebra. In this article, the author uses a lesson to introduce the concept of "rates"--comparing two different types and units of measure--and how to graph them. Described is the lesson and shared…

  20. Relative Navigation Determination in the Capture of Non-Cooperative Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Harvey; Boge, Toralf

    2013-08-01

    The active removal of space debris has great interest nowadays because of recent events of space collisions in LEO and unexpected object re-entry. There have been some test flights, e.g. ETS-VII [1] and Orbital Express [2], for on-orbit satellite servicing and autonomous rendezvous and docking, with the advantage of being cooperative targets, which gives aid for attitude and position determination by the chaser. In case of space debris, no cooperative information is given and the chaser satellite must extract accurate information about the behaviour of the tumbling debris. For this, specific sensors will be used during each phase of the rendezvous approach in order to ensure a secure and safe mission during the complete process. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of possible sensors for autonomous rendezvous to space debris, i.e. non-cooperative targets.

  1. Calculating California Seismicity Rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, Karen R.

    2008-01-01

    Empirically the rate of earthquakes = magnitude M is well fit by the Gutenberg-Richter relationship, logN=a-bM (1) where N is the number of earthquakes = M over a given time period, a is the number of M = 0 earthquakes over the same period, and b is a parameter that determines the ratio of larger to smaller earthquakes (Ishimoto and Iida 1939; Gutenberg and Richter 1944). Thus to characterize the seismicity rate, N, and risk in a given region we need to solve for the values of a and b. Here we are concerned with solving for the long term average values of these parameters for the state of California. My primary data source is a catalog of 1850-2006 M = 4.0 seismicity compiled with Tianqing Cao (Appendix H). Because earthquakes outside of the state can influence California I consider both earthquakes within the state and within 100 km of the state border (Figure 1).

  2. [High dose rate brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Aisen, S; Carvalho, H A; Chavantes, M C; Esteves, S C; Haddad, C M; Permonian, A C; Taier, M do C; Marinheiro, R C; Feriancic, C V

    1992-01-01

    The high dose rate brachytherapy uses a single source os 192Ir with 10Ci of nominal activity in a remote afterloading machine. This technique allows an outpatient treatment, without the inconveniences of the conventional low dose rate brachytherapy such as use of general anesthesia, rhachianesthesia, prolonged immobilization, and personal exposition to radiation. The radiotherapy department is now studying 5 basic treatment schemes concerning carcinomas of the uterine cervix, endometrium, lung, esophagus and central nervous system tumors. With the Micro Selectron HDR, 257 treatment sessions were done in 90 patients. Mostly were treated with weekly fractions, receiving a total of three to four treatments each. No complications were observed neither during nor after the procedure. Doses, fraction and ideal associations still have to be studied, so that a higher therapeutic ratio can be reached.

  3. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8)more » with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.« less

  4. Rotational rate sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  5. Composite rating scales.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2010-02-15

    Rating scales are instruments that are very frequently used by clinicians to perform patient assessments. Typically, rating scales grade the attribute on an ordinal level of measurement, i.e., a rank ordering, meaning that the numbers assigned to the different ranks (item scores) do not represent 'real numbers' or 'physical magnitudes'. Single-item scales have some advantages, such as simplicity and low respondent burden, but they may also suffer from disadvantages, such as ambiguous score meanings and low responsiveness. Multi-item scales, in contrast, seem more adequate for assessment of complex constructs, allowing for detailed evaluation. Total scores representing the value of the construct may be quite precise and thus the responsiveness of the scale may be high. The most common strategy for obtaining the total score is the sum of the item scores, a strategy that constitutes one of the most important problems with these types of scales. A summative score of ordinal figures is not a 'real magnitude' and may have little sense. This paper is a review of the theoretical frameworks of the main theories used to develop rating scales (Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory). Bearing in mind that no alternative is perfect, additional research in this field and judicious decisions are called for.

  6. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  7. Constituents of response rates

    PubMed Central

    Pear, Joseph J.; Rector, Brian L.

    1979-01-01

    Response rate and the proportion of time pigeons allocated to a key-pecking activity were measured on several basic types of reinforcement schedules. Reinforcement frequency was varied within each type of basic schedule, and the effects on two constituents of response rate were noted. Propensity, the proportion of time the birds spent on a platform in front of the key, showed very consistent effects as reinforcement frequency varied: in general, it decreased when reinforcement frequency markedly decreased and it increased when reinforcement frequency increased. Speed, key pecks per unit of time spent on the platform, showed inconsistent effects when reinforcement frequency varied. Consequently, response rate showed less consistent effects than did propensity. Cumulative response records demonstrated the existence of several different types of transitions or boundary states between the key-pecking activity and other activities. The types of transitions that occurred between activities depended on both the type of reinforcement schedule and the frequency of reinforcement. The propensity data support the position that general laws of behavior can be based on temporal measures of behavior. The speed data suggest that, if a complete assessment of the dynamic properties of behavior is to be achieved, measures of behavior must incorporate the structural variations in the operant unit. PMID:16812155

  8. Emission rate measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  9. Interest rates hierarchical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, T.; Aste, T.; Hyde, S. T.; Ramsden, S.

    2005-09-01

    We propose a general method to study the hierarchical organization of financial data by embedding the structure of their correlations in metric graphs in multi-dimensional spaces. An application to two different sets of interest rates is discussed by constructing triangular embeddings on the sphere. Three-dimensional representations of these embeddings with the correct metric geometry are constructed and visualized. The resulting graphs contain the minimum spanning tree as a sub-graph and they preserve its hierarchical structure. This produces a clear cluster differentiation and allows us to compute new local and global topological quantities.

  10. PULSE RATE DIVIDER

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, H.C. Jr.

    1962-12-18

    A compact pulse-rate divider circuit affording low impedance output and high input pulse repetition rates is described. The circuit features a single secondary emission tube having a capacitor interposed between its dynode and its control grid. An output pulse is produced at the anode of the tube each time an incoming pulse at the control grid drives the tube above cutoff and the duration of each output pulse corresponds to the charging time of the capacitor. Pulses incoming during the time the grid bias established by the discharging capacitor is sufficiently negative that the pulses are unable to drive the tube above cutoff do not produce output pulses at the anode; these pulses are lost and a dividing action is thus produced by the circuit. The time constant of the discharge path may be vanied to vary in turn the division ratio of the circuit; the time constant of the charging circuit may be varied to vary the width of the output pulses. (AEC)

  11. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  12. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  13. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing, and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  14. Method and associated apparatus for capturing, servicing and de-orbiting earth satellites using robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepollina, Frank J. (Inventor); Burns, Richard D. (Inventor); Holz, Jill M. (Inventor); Corbo, James E. (Inventor); Jedhrich, Nicholas M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    This invention is a method and supporting apparatus for autonomously capturing, servicing and de-orbiting a free-flying spacecraft, such as a satellite, using robotics. The capture of the spacecraft includes the steps of optically seeking and ranging the satellite using LIDAR; and matching tumble rates, rendezvousing and berthing with the satellite. Servicing of the spacecraft may be done using supervised autonomy, which is allowing a robot to execute a sequence of instructions without intervention from a remote human-occupied location. These instructions may be packaged at the remote station in a script and uplinked to the robot for execution upon remote command giving authority to proceed. Alternately, the instructions may be generated by Artificial Intelligence (AI) logic onboard the robot. In either case, the remote operator maintains the ability to abort an instruction or script at any time, as well as the ability to intervene using manual override to teleoperate the robot.In one embodiment, a vehicle used for carrying out the method of this invention comprises an ejection module, which includes the robot, and a de-orbit module. Once servicing is completed by the robot, the ejection module separates from the de-orbit module, leaving the de-orbit module attached to the satellite for de-orbiting the same at a future time. Upon separation, the ejection module can either de-orbit itself or rendezvous with another satellite for servicing. The ability to de-orbit a spacecraft further allows the opportunity to direct the landing of the spent satellite in a safe location away from population centers, such as the ocean.

  15. Heart-Rate and Breath-Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Circuit requiring only four integrated circuits (IC's) measures both heart rate and breath rate. Phase-locked loops lock on heart-rate and respiration-rate input signals. Each loop IC contains two phase comparators. Positive-edge-triggered circuit used in making monitors insensitive to dutycycle variations.

  16. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  17. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  18. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  19. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  20. 29 CFR 778.112 - Day rates and job rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Day rates and job rates. 778.112 Section 778.112 Labor... Requirements Principles for Computing Overtime Pay Based on the âregular Rateâ § 778.112 Day rates and job rates. If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day's work or for doing a particular job, without...

  1. Technology of H-II Transfer Vehicle Rendezvous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Toru; Ueda, Satoshi; Uematsu, Hirohiko

    The H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), which is a Japanese unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft, will deliver supplies to the International Space Station (ISS). The first HTV will be launched in 2009 from the Tanegashima Space Center aboard an H-IIB launch vehicle with up to 6,000kg of supplies. HTV approaches to the ISS and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), known as Canadarm2, will grapple the HTV and berth it to the ISS. After the supplies, the HTV will then be loaded with waste materials and then separated from the ISS by SSRMS. HTV conducts departure sequence from ISS after release from SSRMS and reentry to the atmosphere. In this paper, technology of HTV automated Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system is presented.

  2. A study of rendez-vous docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Shujiro; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Ishii, Nobuaki; Nakatani, Ichiro; Matsuo, Hiroki

    Ground simulation facilities for docking missions, a docking mechanism, and a relative position/attitude sensor for proximity phase are treated. In the development of a docking mechanism, a ground simulation facility that demonstrates relative motion of two spacecraft (s/c) is a mighty and important tool. Such a simulator shall (1) reproduce relative motion rigorously and, (2) be able to cope with various simulation conditions easily. For docking mechanisms, existing simulator ideas were surveyed. As a result, it was revealed that conventional simulators are not sufficient when it comes to soft-docking with flexible structures. To overcome this difficulty, a new type hardware simulator designated as 'servo-free type' was proposed. As for the docking mechanism itself, a new soft-docking mechanism was proposed. Its target module has four perches placed in a circle, while the chaser module has four corresponding mating mechanisms; diagonally, two of them are ordinary latches that grasp the perches of the target s/c, and the others are just grooves in which the perches fit. In spite of its reduced redundancy, this mechanism works well and is found simpler and lighter than conventional ones. Hardware tests proved the feasibility of a latch controller based on a neural network scheme. A visual sensor was selected as a proximity relative position/attitude sensor. In hardware tests of the sensor, marks were identified easily by using color data, although images were sometimes contaminated.

  3. When X-inactivation meets pluripotency: an intimate rendezvous.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pablo; Avner, Philip

    2009-06-01

    The integration of X-inactivation with development is a crucial aspect of this classical paradigm of epigenetic regulation. During early female mouse development, X-inactivation reprogramming occurs in pluripotent cells of the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and in pluripotent primordial germ cells. Here we discuss the developmental strategies which ensure the coupling of the regulation of X-inactivation to the acquisition of pluripotency through the regulation of the master of X-inactivation, the non-coding Xist gene, by the key factors which support pluripotency Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2.

  4. Gemini - John W. Young in Rendezvous Docking Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut John Young (above) was one of 14 astronauts, 8 NASA test pilots, and 2 McDonnell test pilots who took part in simulator studies. Young piloted the simulator on November 12, 1963 Arthur Vogeley wrote: 'Many of the astronauts have flown this simulator in support of the Gemini studies and they, without exception, appreciated the realism of the visual scene. The simulator has also been used in the development of pilot techniques to handle certain jet malfunctions in order that aborts could be avoided. In these situations large attitude changes are sometimes necessary and the false motion cues that were generated due to earth gravity were somewhat objectionable; however, the pilots were readily able to overlook these false motion cues in favor of the visual realism.' Roy F. Brissenden wrote:'The basic Gemini control studies developed the necessary techniques and demonstrated the ability of human pilots to perform final space docking with the specified Gemini-Agena systems using only visual references. ... Results... showed that trained astronauts can effect the docking with direct acceleration control and even with jet malfunctions as long as good visual conditions exist.... Probably more important than data results was the early confidence that the astronauts themselves gained in their ability to perform the maneuver in the ultimate flight mission.'

  5. An autonomous rendezvous and docking system using cruise missile technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, ED; Nicholson, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    In November 1990 General Dynamics demonstrated an AR&D system for members of the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group. This simulation utilized prototype hardware derived from the Cruise Missile and Centaur avionics systems. The object of this proof of concept demonstration was to show that all the accuracy, reliability, and operational requirements established for a spacecraft to dock with Space Station Freedom could be met by the proposed AR&D system.

  6. Consideration of radar target glint from ST during OMV rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, M. W.; Malone, L. B.; Gleason, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of radar target glint and the factors upon which it depends when using the Hubble Space Telescope as a radar target is discussed. An analysis of the glint problem using a 35 MHz or 94 MHz radar on the orbital maneuvering vehicle is explored. A strategy for overcoming glint is suggested.

  7. Proximal tibiofibular joint: Rendezvous with a forgotten articulation

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Amitav; Borgohain, Bhaskar; Saikia, Bishwajeet

    2015-01-01

    The proximal tibiofibular joint (PTFJ) is a plane type synovial joint. The primary function of the PTFJ is dissipation of torsional stresses applied at the ankle and the lateral tibial bending moments besides a very significant tensile, rather than compressive weight bearing. Though rare, early diagnosis and treatment of the PTFJ dislocation are essential to prevent chronic joint instability and extensive surgical intervention to restore normal PTFJ biomechanics, ankle and knee function, especially in athletes prone to such injuries. PTFJ dislocations often remain undiagnosed in polytrauma scenario with ipsilateral tibial fracture due to the absence of specific signs and symptoms of PTFJ injury. Standard orthopedic textbooks generally describe no specific tests or radiological signs for assessment of the integrity of this joint. The aim of this paper was to review the relevant clinical anatomy, biomechanics and traumatic pathology of PTFJ with its effect on the knee emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis through a high index of suspicion. Dislocation of the joint may have serious implications for the knee joint stability since fibular collateral ligament and posterolateral ligament complex is attached to the upper end of the fibula. Any high energy knee injury with peroneal nerve palsy should immediately raise the suspicion of PTFJ dislocation especially if the mechanism of injury involved knee twisting in flexion beyond 80° and in such cases a comparative radiograph of the contralateral side should be performed. Wider clinical awareness can avoid both embarrassingly extensive surgeries due to diagnostic delays or unnecessary overtreatment due to misinformation on the part of the treating surgeon. PMID:26538753

  8. Orbital Express AVGS Validation and Calibration for Automated Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Howard, Richard T.; Pinson, Robin M.

    2008-01-01

    From March to July of 2007, the DARPA Orbital Express mission achieved a number of firsts in autonomous spacecraft operations. The NASA Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) was the primary docking sensor during the first two dockings and was used in a blended mode three other automated captures. The AVGS performance exceeded its specification by approximately an order of magnitude. One reason that the AVGS functioned so well during the mission was that the validation and calibration of the sensor prior to the mission advanced the state-of-the-art for proximity sensors. Some factors in this success were improvements in ground test equipment and truth data, the capability for ILOAD corrections for optical and other effects, and the development of a bias correction procedure. Several valuable lessons learned have applications to future proximity sensors.

  9. Rendezvous with the World: Missouri Southern State University's Themed Semesters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Although most universities emphasize study abroad as the primary vehicle to internationalize the campus, in reality only a small percentage of students actually participate in this endeavor. The internationally themed semesters at Missouri Southern State University (MSSU) reach virtually every student, and provide a global perspective and cultural…

  10. Rates of Earth degassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onions, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    The degassing of the Earth during accretion is constrained by Pu-U-I-Xe systematics. Degassing was much more efficient during the first 100-200 Ma than subsequently, and it was more complete for Xe than for the lighter gases. More than 90 percent of the degassed Xe escaped from the atmosphere during this period. The combination of fractional degassing of melts and rare gas escape from the atmosphere is able to explain the deficit of terrestrial Xe as a simple consequence of this early degassing history. By the time Xe was quantitatively retained in the atmosphere, the abundances of Kr and the lighter gases in the Earth's interior were similar to or higher than the present-day atmospheric abundances. Subsequent transfer of these lighter rare gases into the atmosphere requires a high rate of post-accretion degassing and melt production. Considerations of Pu-U-Xe systematics suggest that relatively rapid post-accretion degassing was continued to ca. 4.1-4.2 Ga. The present-day degassing history of the Earth is investigated through consideration of rare gas isotope abundances. Although the Earth is a highly degassed body, depleted in rare gases by many orders of magnitude relative to their solar abundances, it is at the present-day losing primordial rare gases which were trapped at the time of accretion.

  11. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  12. 78 FR 18664 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  13. 78 FR 39434 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  14. 76 FR 38717 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  15. 78 FR 62932 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  16. 75 FR 17453 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  17. 75 FR 37872 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  18. 77 FR 39560 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  19. 77 FR 20476 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  20. 77 FR 76586 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  1. 75 FR 81326 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  2. 76 FR 77581 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  3. 76 FR 18821 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  4. 75 FR 60152 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  5. 77 FR 59447 - Interest Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Interest Rates The Small Business Administration publishes an interest rate called the optional ``peg'' rate (13 CFR 120.214) on a quarterly basis. This rate is a weighted average cost of money to...

  6. 78 FR 14821 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION... Commission has adopted its 2013 preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier... preliminary fee rate on Class II revenues shall be one-half of the annual fee rate, which is 0.037%...

  7. 77 FR 5267 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2012. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2012 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  8. 76 FR 38207 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2011. These rates... Commission. If a tribe has a certificate of self-regulation under 25 CFR part 518, the final fee rate...

  9. 76 FR 7879 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2011. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2011 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  10. 75 FR 5342 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... preliminary annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.060% (.00060) for tier 2 for calendar year 2010. These... fee rate on class II revenues for calendar year 2010 shall be one-half of the annual fee rate,...

  11. 77 FR 41202 - Fee Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... COMMISSION Fee Rate AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby... annual fee rates of 0.00% for tier 1 and 0.074% (.00074) for tier 2 for calendar year 2012. These rates... Commission. If a Tribe has a certificate of self-regulation under 25 CFR part 518, the final fee rate...

  12. Beta-decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzov, I. N.

    2006-10-01

    Major astrophysical applications involve a huge number of exotic nuclei. Their beta-decay properties play a crucial role in stellar explosive events. An important effort has been developed in last decades to measure the masses and β-decay properties of very neutron-rich nuclei at radioactive nuclear beam facilities. However, most of them cannot be synthesized in terrestrial laboratories and only theoretical predictions can fill the gap. We will concentrate mainly on the β-decay rates needed for stellar r-process modeling and for performing the RNB experiments. An overview of the microscopic approaches to the β-decay strength function is given. The continuum QRPA approach based on the self-consistent ground state description in the framework of the density functional theory is outlined. For the first time, a systematic study of the total β-decay half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities takes into account the Gamow Teller and first-forbidden transitions. Due to the shell configuration effects, the first-forbidden decays have a strong impact on the β-decay characteristics of the r-process relevant nuclei at Z≈28, N>50; Z⩾50, N>82 and Z=60 70, N≈126. Suppression of the delayed neutron emission probability is found in nuclei with the neutron excess bigger than one major shell. The effect originates from the high-energy first-forbidden transitions to the states outside the (Q-B)-window in the daughter nuclei. The performance of existing global models for the nuclides near the r-process paths is critically analyzed and confronted with the recent RIB experiments in the regions of 78Ni, 132Sn and “east” of 208Pb.

  13. High accuracy optical rate sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J.

    1990-01-01

    Optical rate sensors, in particular CCD arrays, will be used on Space Station Freedom to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. An algorithm to provide attitude rate information by directly manipulating the sensor pixel intensity output is presented. The star image produced by a sensor in the laboratory is modeled. Simulated, moving star images are generated, and the algorithm is applied to this data for a star moving at a constant rate. The algorithm produces accurate derived rate of the above data. A step rate change requires two frames for the output of the algorithm to accurately reflect the new rate. When zero mean Gaussian noise with a standard deviation of 5 is added to the simulated data of a star image moving at a constant rate, the algorithm derives the rate with an error of 1.9 percent at a rate of 1.28 pixels per frame.

  14. Centrifugal destabilization and restabilization of plane shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, A.J.

    1997-08-01

    The flow of an incompressible viscous fluid between parallel plates becomes unstable when the plates are tumbled. As the tumbling rate increases, the flow restabilizes. This phenomenon is elucidated by path-following techniques. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is approximated by spectral techniques. The linear stability of these solutions is studied.

  15. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  16. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  17. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  18. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More All About Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Apr 19,2016 ... Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure 4 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 5 How to Eat ...

  19. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  20. Advancing Lidar Sensors Technologies for Next Generation Landing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Hines, Glenn D.; Roback, Vincent E.; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Brewster, Paul F.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Bulyshev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Missions to solar systems bodies must meet increasingly ambitious objectives requiring highly reliable "precision landing", and "hazard avoidance" capabilities. Robotic missions to the Moon and Mars demand landing at pre-designated sites of high scientific value near hazardous terrain features, such as escarpments, craters, slopes, and rocks. Missions aimed at paving the path for colonization of the Moon and human landing on Mars need to execute onboard hazard detection and precision maneuvering to ensure safe landing near previously deployed assets. Asteroid missions require precision rendezvous, identification of the landing or sampling site location, and navigation to the highly dynamic object that may be tumbling at a fast rate. To meet these needs, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a set of advanced lidar sensors under the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. These lidar sensors can provide precision measurement of vehicle relative proximity, velocity, and orientation, and high resolution elevation maps of the surface during the descent to the targeted body. Recent flights onboard Morpheus free-flyer vehicle have demonstrated the viability of ALHAT lidar sensors for future landing missions to solar system bodies.