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Sample records for tumours volume tumoral

  1. Measuring the volume of brain tumour and determining its location in T2-weighted MRI images using hidden Markov random field: expectation maximization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Jafri, Mohd. Zubir; Abdulbaqi, Hayder Saad; Mutter, Kussay N.; Mustapha, Iskandar Shahrim; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2017-06-01

    A brain tumour is an abnormal growth of tissue in the brain. Most tumour volume measurement processes are carried out manually by the radiographer and radiologist without relying on any auto program. This manual method is a timeconsuming task and may give inaccurate results. Treatment, diagnosis, signs and symptoms of the brain tumours mainly depend on the tumour volume and its location. In this paper, an approach is proposed to improve volume measurement of brain tumors as well as using a new method to determine the brain tumour location. The current study presents a hybrid method that includes two methods. One method is hidden Markov random field - expectation maximization (HMRFEM), which employs a positive initial classification of the image. The other method employs the threshold, which enables the final segmentation. In this method, the tumour volume is calculated using voxel dimension measurements. The brain tumour location was determined accurately in T2- weighted MRI image using a new algorithm. According to the results, this process was proven to be more useful compared to the manual method. Thus, it provides the possibility of calculating the volume and determining location of a brain tumour.

  2. Hierarchical probabilistic Gabor and MRF segmentation of brain tumours in MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Subbanna, Nagesh K; Precup, Doina; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated hierarchical probabilistic framework for segmenting brain tumours from multispectral human brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) using multiwindow Gabor filters and an adapted Markov Random Field (MRF) framework. In the first stage, a customised Gabor decomposition is developed, based on the combined-space characteristics of the two classes (tumour and non-tumour) in multispectral brain MRIs in order to optimally separate tumour (including edema) from healthy brain tissues. A Bayesian framework then provides a coarse probabilistic texture-based segmentation of tumours (including edema) whose boundaries are then refined at the voxel level through a modified MRF framework that carefully separates the edema from the main tumour. This customised MRF is not only built on the voxel intensities and class labels as in traditional MRFs, but also models the intensity differences between neighbouring voxels in the likelihood model, along with employing a prior based on local tissue class transition probabilities. The second inference stage is shown to resolve local inhomogeneities and impose a smoothing constraint, while also maintaining the appropriate boundaries as supported by the local intensity difference observations. The method was trained and tested on the publicly available MICCAI 2012 Brain Tumour Segmentation Challenge (BRATS) Database [1] on both synthetic and clinical volumes (low grade and high grade tumours). Our method performs well compared to state-of-the-art techniques, outperforming the results of the top methods in cases of clinical high grade and low grade tumour core segmentation by 40% and 45% respectively.

  3. 'Tumour volume' as a predictor of survival after resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, M. F.; Pendleton, N.; Faragher, E. B.; Dixon, G. R.; Myskow, M. W.; Horan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Many factors have been individually related to outcome in populations of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Factors responsible for the outcome of an individual after surgical resection are poorly understood. We have examined the importance of 'tumour volume' in determining prognosis of patients following resection of NSCLC in a multivariate model. Cox's proportional hazard analysis was used to determine the relative prognostic significance of stage, patient age, gender, tumour cell-type, nodal score and estimated 'tumour volume' in 669 cases with NSCLC treated with surgical resection, of which 280 had died. All factors (except tumour cell-type, P = 0.33) were individually related to survival (P < 0.05). When examined together, survival time was significantly and independently related to 'tumour volume' and stage (P < 0.001), and other factors ceased to be significant. In cases with stage I or II tumours, risk of death was found to increase significantly with increasing estimated 'tumour volume' (23.8% relative increase in hazard to death per doubling of 'tumour volume', 95% confidence interval 13.2-35.2%, P < 0.001 stage I; P < 0.006 stage II). In cases with stage IIIa tumours this factor alone was the significant prognostic variable. In conclusion, an estimate of 'tumour volume' significantly improves prediction of prognosis for individual NSCLC patients with UICC stage I or II tumours. PMID:8695364

  4. Detection of the index tumour and tumour volume in prostate cancer using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone.

    PubMed

    Rud, Erik; Klotz, Dagmar; Rennesund, Kristin; Baco, Eduard; Berge, Viktor; Lien, Diep; Svindland, Aud; Lundeby, Eskild; Berg, Rolf E; Eri, Lars M; Eggesbø, Heidi B

    2014-12-01

    To examine the performance of T2-weighted (T2W) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting the index tumour in patients with prostate cancer and to examine the agreement between MRI and histology when assessing tumour volume (TV) and overall tumour burden. The study included 199 consecutive patients with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer randomised to MRI before radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to July 2012. MRI-detected tumours (MRTs) were ranked from 1 to 3 according to decreasing volume and were compared with histologically detected tumours (HTs) ranked from 1 to 3, with HT 1 = index tumour. Whole-mount section histology was used as a reference standard. The TVs of true-positive MRTs (MRTVs 1-3) were compared with the TVs found by histology (HTVs 1-3). All tumours were registered on a 30-sector map and by classifying each sector as positive/negative, the rate of true-positive and -negative sectors was calculated. The detection rate for the HT 1 (index tumour) was 92%; HT 2, 45%; and HT 3, 37%. The MRTV 1-3 vs the HTV 1-3 were 2.8 mL vs 4.0 mL (index tumour, P < 0.001), 1.0 mL vs 0.9 mL (tumour 2, P = 0.413), and 0.6 mL vs 0.5 mL (tumour 3, P = 0.492). The rate of true-positive and -negative sectors was 50% and 88%, κ = 0.39. A combination of T2W and DW MRI detects the index tumour in 92% of cases, although MRI underestimates both TV and tumour burden compared with histology. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  5. 3D Pathology Volumetric Technique: A Method for Calculating Breast Tumour Volume from Whole-Mount Serial Section Images

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, G. M.; Murray, M.; Holloway, C. M. B.; Liu, K.; Zubovits, J. T.; Yaffe, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumour size, most commonly measured by maximum linear extent, remains a strong predictor of survival in breast cancer. Tumour volume, proportional to the number of tumour cells, may be a more accurate surrogate for size. We describe a novel “3D pathology volumetric technique” for lumpectomies and compare it with 2D measurements. Volume renderings and total tumour volume are computed from digitized whole-mount serial sections using custom software tools. Results are presented for two lumpectomy specimens selected for tumour features which may challenge accurate measurement of tumour burden with conventional, sampling-based pathology: (1) an infiltrative pattern admixed with normal breast elements; (2) a localized invasive mass separated from the in situ component by benign tissue. Spatial relationships between key features (tumour foci, close or involved margins) are clearly visualized in volume renderings. Invasive tumour burden can be underestimated using conventional pathology, compared to the volumetric technique (infiltrative pattern: 30% underestimation; localized mass: 3% underestimation for invasive tumour, 44% for in situ component). Tumour volume approximated from 2D measurements (i.e., maximum linear extent), assuming elliptical geometry, was seen to overestimate volume compared to the 3D volumetric calculation (by a factor of 7x for the infiltrative pattern; 1.5x for the localized invasive mass). PMID:23320179

  6. A novel concept for tumour targeting with radiation: Inverse dose-painting or targeting the "Low Drug Uptake Volume".

    PubMed

    Yaromina, Ala; Granzier, Marlies; Biemans, Rianne; Lieuwes, Natasja; van Elmpt, Wouter; Shakirin, Georgy; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We tested a novel treatment approach combining (1) targeting radioresistant hypoxic tumour cells with the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 and (2) inverse radiation dose-painting to boost selectively non-hypoxic tumour sub-volumes having no/low drug uptake. 18 F-HX4 hypoxia tracer uptake measured with a clinical PET/CT scanner was used as a surrogate of TH-302 activity in rhabdomyosarcomas growing in immunocompetent rats. Low or high drug uptake volume (LDUV/HDUV) was defined as 40% of the GTV with the lowest or highest 18 F-HX4 uptake, respectively. Two hours post TH-302/saline administration, animals received either single dose radiotherapy (RT) uniformly (15 or 18.5Gy) or a dose-painted non-uniform radiation (15Gy) with 50% higher dose to LDUV or HDUV (18.5Gy). Treatment plans were created using Eclipse treatment planning system and radiation was delivered using VMAT. Tumour response was quantified as time to reach 3 times starting tumour volume. Non-uniform RT boosting tumour sub-volume with low TH-302 uptake (LDUV) was superior to the same dose escalation to HDUV (p<0.0001) and uniform RT with the same mean dose 15Gy (p=0.0077). Noteworthy, dose escalation to LDUV required on average 3.5Gy lower dose to the GTV to achieve similar tumour response as uniform dose escalation. The results support targeted dose escalation to non-hypoxic tumour sub-volume with no/low activity of hypoxia-activated prodrugs. This strategy applies on average a lower radiation dose and is as effective as uniform dose escalation to the entire tumour. It could be applied to other type of drugs provided that their distribution can be imaged. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain tumor locating in 3D MR volume using symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Pavel; Bartusek, Karel

    2014-03-01

    This work deals with the automatic determination of a brain tumor location in 3D magnetic resonance volumes. The aim of this work is not the precise segmentation of the tumor and its parts but only the detection of its location. This work is the first step in the tumor segmentation process, an important topic in neuro-image processing. The algorithm expects 3D magnetic resonance volumes of brain containing a tumor. The detection is based on locating the area that breaks the left-right symmetry of the brain. This is done by multi-resolution comparing of corresponding regions in left and right hemisphere. The output of the computation is the probabilistic map of the tumor location. The created algorithm was tested on 80 volumes from publicly available BRATS databases containing 3D brain volumes afflicted by a brain tumor. These pathological structures had various sizes and shapes and were located in various parts of the brain. The locating performance of the algorithm was 85% for T1-weighted volumes, 91% for T1-weighted contrast enhanced volumes, 96% for FLAIR and T2-wieghted volumes and 95% for their combinations.

  8. Non-invasive 3D time-of-flight imaging technique for tumour volume assessment in subcutaneous models.

    PubMed

    Delgado San Martin, J A; Worthington, P; Yates, J W T

    2015-04-01

    Subcutaneous tumour xenograft volumes are generally measured using callipers. This method is susceptible to inter- and intra-observer variability and systematic inaccuracies. Non-invasive 3D measurement using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been considered, but require immobilization of the animal. An infrared-based 3D time-of-flight (3DToF) camera was used to acquire a depth map of tumour-bearing mice. A semi-automatic algorithm based on parametric surfaces was applied to estimate tumour volume. Four clay mouse models and 18 tumour-bearing mice were assessed using callipers (applying both prolate spheroid and ellipsoid models) and 3DToF methods, and validated using tumour weight. Inter-experimentalist variability could be up to 25% in the calliper method. Experimental results demonstrated good consistency and relatively low error rates for the 3DToF method, in contrast to biased overestimation using callipers. Accuracy is currently limited by camera performance; however, we anticipate the next generation 3DToF cameras will be able to support the development of a practical system. Here, we describe an initial proof of concept for a non-invasive, non-immobilized, morphology-independent, economical and potentially more precise tumour volume assessment technique. This affordable technique should maximize the datapoints per animal, by reducing the numbers required in experiments and reduce their distress. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Radiotherapy planning: PET/CT scanner performances in the definition of gross tumour volume and clinical target volume.

    PubMed

    Brianzoni, Ernesto; Rossi, Gloria; Ancidei, Sergio; Berbellini, Alfonso; Capoccetti, Francesca; Cidda, Carla; D'Avenia, Paola; Fattori, Sara; Montini, Gian Carlo; Valentini, Gianluca; Proietti, Alfredo; Algranati, Carlo

    2005-12-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most advanced scintigraphic imaging technology and can be employed in the planning of radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of fused images (anatomical CT and functional FDG-PET), acquired with a dedicated PET/CT scanner, in delineating gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in selected patients and thus in facilitating RT planning. Twenty-eight patients were examined, 24 with lung cancer (17 non-small cell and seven small cell) and four with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the head and neck region. All patients underwent a whole-body PET scan after a CT scan. The CT images provided morphological volumetric information, and in a second step, the corresponding PET images were overlaid to define the effective target volume. The images were exported off-line via an internal network to an RT simulator. Three patient were excluded from the study owing to change in the disease stage subsequent to the PET/CT study. Among the remaining 25 patients, PET significantly altered the GTV or CTV in 11 (44%) . In five of these 11 cases there was a reduction in GTV or CTV, while in six there was an increase in GTV or CTV. FDG-PET is a highly sensitive imaging modality that offers better visualisation of local and locoregional tumour extension. This study confirmed that co-registration of CT data and FDG-PET images may lead to significant modifications of RT planning and patient management.

  10. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  11. Suppressed rate of carcinogenesis and decreases in tumour volume and lung metastasis in CXCL14/BRAK transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hata, Ryu-Ichiro; Izukuri, Kazuhito; Kato, Yasumasa; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Akasaka, Tetsu; Yang, Xiaoyan; Nagashima, Yoji; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kiyono, Tohru; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2015-03-13

    Cancer progression involves carcinogenesis, an increase in tumour size, and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effect of overexpressed CXC chemokine ligand 14 (CXCL14) on these processes by using CXCL14/BRAK (CXCL14) transgenic (Tg) mice. The rate of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in these mice was significantly lower compared with that for isogenic wild type C57BL/6 (Wt) mice. When tumour cells were injected into these mice, the size of the tumours that developed and the number of metastatic nodules in the lungs of the animals were always significantly lower in the Tg mice than in the Wt ones. Injection of anti-asialo-GM1 antibodies to the mice before and after injection of tumour cells attenuated the suppressing effects of CXCL14 on the tumor growth and metastasis, suggesting that NK cell activity played an important role during CXCL14-mediated suppression of tumour growth and metastasis. The importance of NK cells on the metastasis was also supported when CXCL14 was expressed in B16 melanoma cells. Further, the survival rates after tumour cell injection were significantly increased for the Tg mice. As these Tg mice showed no obvious abnormality, we propose that CXCL14 to be a promising molecular target for cancer suppression/prevention.

  12. Diffusion and perfusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging for tumor volume definition in radiotherapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Wang, Gang; Feng, Yuanming; Yu, Tonggang; Guo, Yu; Bai, Xu; Ye, Zhaoxiang

    2016-09-21

    Accurate target volume delineation is crucial for the radiotherapy of tumors. Diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide functional information about brain tumors, and they are able to detect tumor volume and physiological changes beyond the lesions shown on conventional MRI. This review examines recent studies that utilized diffusion and perfusion MRI for tumor volume definition in radiotherapy of brain tumors, and it presents the opportunities and challenges in the integration of multimodal functional MRI into clinical practice. The results indicate that specialized and robust post-processing algorithms and tools are needed for the precise alignment of targets on the images, and comprehensive validations with more clinical data are important for the improvement of the correlation between histopathologic results and MRI parameter images.

  13. Metabolically active tumour volume segmentation from dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET studies in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, Lieke L; Frings, Virginie; Hoekstra, Otto S; Kenny, Laura M; Aboagye, Eric O; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT) can be used to assess tumour proliferation. A kinetic-filtering (KF) classification algorithm has been suggested for segmentation of tumours in dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET data. The aim of the present study was to evaluate KF segmentation and its test-retest performance in [(18)F]FLT PET in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Nine NSCLC patients underwent two 60-min dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET scans within 7 days prior to treatment. Dynamic scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) as well as with ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM). Twenty-eight lesions were identified by an experienced physician. Segmentation was performed using KF applied to the dynamic data set and a source-to-background corrected 50% threshold (A50%) was applied to the sum image of the last three frames (45- to 60-min p.i.). Furthermore, several adaptations of KF were tested. Both for KF and A50% test-retest (TRT) variability of metabolically active tumour volume and standard uptake value (SUV) were evaluated. KF performed better on OSEM- than on FBP-reconstructed PET images. The original KF implementation segmented 15 out of 28 lesions, whereas A50% segmented each lesion. Adapted KF versions, however, were able to segment 26 out of 28 lesions. In the best performing adapted versions, metabolically active tumour volume and SUV TRT variability was similar to those of A50%. KF misclassified certain tumour areas as vertebrae or liver tissue, which was shown to be related to heterogeneous [(18)F]FLT uptake areas within the tumour. For [(18)F]FLT PET studies in NSCLC patients, KF and A50% show comparable tumour volume segmentation performance. The KF method needs, however, a site-specific optimisation. The A50% is therefore a good alternative for tumour segmentation in NSCLC [(18)F]FLT PET studies in multicentre studies. Yet, it was observed that KF has the potential to subsegment

  14. Deep tissue volume imaging of birefringence through fibre-optic needle probes for the delineation of breast tumour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Quirk, Bryden C.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Bouma, Brett E.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-07-01

    Identifying tumour margins during breast-conserving surgeries is a persistent challenge. We have previously developed miniature needle probes that could enable intraoperative volume imaging with optical coherence tomography. In many situations, however, scattering contrast alone is insufficient to clearly identify and delineate malignant regions. Additional polarization-sensitive measurements provide the means to assess birefringence, which is elevated in oriented collagen fibres and may offer an intrinsic biomarker to differentiate tumour from benign tissue. Here, we performed polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography through miniature imaging needles and developed an algorithm to efficiently reconstruct images of the depth-resolved tissue birefringence free of artefacts. First ex vivo imaging of breast tumour samples revealed excellent contrast between lowly birefringent malignant regions, and stromal tissue, which is rich in oriented collagen and exhibits higher birefringence, as confirmed with co-located histology. The ability to clearly differentiate between tumour and uninvolved stroma based on intrinsic contrast could prove decisive for the intraoperative assessment of tumour margins.

  15. [Ovarian tumor in a koi carp (Cyprinus carpio): Diagnosis, surgery, postoperative care and tumour classification].

    PubMed

    Lewisch, E; Reifinger, M; Schmidt, P; El-Matbouli, M

    2014-01-01

    Although ovarian tumour in the koi (Cyprinus carpio) does not appear to be an uncommon condition, its occurrence and therapy has rarely been reported. In the present case, the decision for surgery was based on clinical and sonographic findings of an intracoelomic mass. We used tricaine methansulfonate for the anaesthesia. Laparotomy was performed by ventral access and an ovarian tumour of 12-cm diameter was removed. The wound was sutured in two layers using Vicryl®. In addition to the application of an analgesic, an antibiotic and vitamins, the postoperative conditions the patient was kept under were adapted to support wound healing. The fish recovered uneventfully and was clinically healthy during the 16-month observation period. Based on the histological findings, the tumour was diagnosed as a thecoma. Investigations using antibodies against vimentin, cytokeratin, S 100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) failed to provide reliable results.

  16. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for pancreatic carcinoma: evaluation of feasibility, reduction of tumour volume and pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Milka; Rauch, Maximilian; Mücke, Martin; Rolke, Roman; Gonzalez-Carmona, Maria A; Henseler, Jana; Cuhls, Henning; Radbruch, Lukas; Strassburg, Christian P; Zhang, Lian; Schild, Hans H; Strunk, Holger M

    2016-11-01

    Prognosis of patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma is extremely poor. They often suffer from cancer-related pain reducing their quality of life. This prospective observational study aimed to evaluate feasibility, local tumour response, and changes in quality of life and symptoms in Caucasian patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated by ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Thirteen patients underwent HIFU, five with stage III, eight with stage IV UICC disease. Ten patients received simultaneous palliative chemotherapy. Postinterventional clinical assessment included evaluation of quality of life and symptom changes using standardized questionnaires. CT and MRI follow-up evaluated the local tumour response. HIFU was successfully performed in all patients. Average tumour reduction was 34.2 % at 6 weeks and 63.9 % at 3 months. Complete or partial relief of cancer-related pain was achieved in 10 patients (77 %), five of whom required less analgesics for pain control. Quality of life was improved revealing increased global health status and alleviated symptoms. HIFU treatment was well tolerated. Eight patients experienced transient abdominal pain directly after HIFU. HIFU ablation of pancreatic carcinoma is a feasible, safe and effective treatment with a crucial benefit in terms of reduction of tumour volume and pain intensity. • US-guided HIFU is feasible and safe for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. • HIFU can considerably reduce tumour volume and cancer-related pain. • Patients treated with HIFU experienced significant and lasting reduction of pain intensity. • HIFU has a crucial clinical benefit for patients with pancreatic cancer.

  17. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, Spencer; Brophy, Mark; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Barron, John L; Beauchemin, Steven S; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart

    2015-02-21

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development.

  18. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Spencer; Brophy, Mark; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V.; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Barron, John L.; Beauchemin, Steven S.; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development.

  19. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Odontogenic and Maxillofacial Bone Tumors.

    PubMed

    Wright, John M; Vered, Marilena

    2017-03-01

    The 4th edition of the World Health Organization's Classification of Head and Neck Tumours was published in January of 2017. This article provides a summary of the changes to Chapter 4 Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue and Chapter 8 Odontogenic and maxillofacial bone tumours. Odontogenic cysts which were eliminated from the 3rd 2005 edition were included in the 4th edition as well as other unique allied conditons of the jaws. Many new tumors published since 2005 have been included in the 2017 classification.

  20. Risk factors for radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung tumours: clinical usefulness of the planning target volume to total lung volume ratio.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Tomoko; Arimura, Takeshi; Takumi, Koji; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Higashi, Ryutaro; Ito, Soichiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    To identify risk factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for lung tumours. We retrospectively evaluated 68 lung tumours in 63 patients treated with SRT between 2011 and 2015. RP was graded according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. SRT was delivered at 7.0-12.0 Gy per each fraction, once daily, to a total of 48-64 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to assess patient- and treatment-related factors, including age, sex, smoking index (SI), pulmonary function, tumour location, serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 value (KL-6), dose-volume metrics (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 and VS5), homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose, mean lung dose (MLD), contralateral MLD and V2, PTV volume, lung volume and the PTV/lung volume ratio (PTV/Lung). Performance of PTV/Lung in predicting symptomatic RP was also analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The median follow-up period was 21 months. 10 of 63 patients (15.9%) developed symptomatic RP after SRT. On univariate analysis, V10, V20, PTV volume and PTV/Lung were significantly associated with occurrence of RP  ≥Grade 2. ROC curves indicated that symptomatic RP could be predicted using PTV/Lung [area under curve (AUC): 0.88, confidence interval (CI: 0.78-0.95), cut-off value: 1.09, sensitivity: 90.0% and specificity: 72.4%]. PTV/Lung is a good predictor of symptomatic RP after SRT. Advances in knowledge: The cases with high PTV/Lung should be carefully monitored with caution for the occurrence of RP after SRT.

  1. Neuronal and mixed neuronal glial tumors associated to epilepsy. A heterogeneous and related group of tumours.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; de Felipe, J; García Sola, R; Navarro, A; Ramón y Cajal, S

    2001-04-01

    The group of brain tumors with mature components encompasses several pathological entities including: the ganglioneuroma; the gangliocytoma; the ganglioglioma; the desmoplastic ganglioglioma; the neurocitoma and a group of glioneuronal hamartomatous tumorous lesions, such as meningoangiomatosis. The dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor is characterized by the presence of multiple cortical nodules made up of small, oligo-like cells and a myxoid pattern rich in mucopolysaccharides. Mature neuronal cells are frequently detected throughout the tumor. Most of them are associated with microhamartias in the adjacent brain and pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The excellent prognosis of the majority of these tumors and the potential for malignant transformation of the glial component in the ganglioglioma are the two most remarkable findings. Histological signs of anaplasia and greater mitotic and proliferative activities are associated with local recurrences. Atypical neurocytomas occur only exceptionally. Treatment choices are surgical resectioning and, in those cases presenting greater proliferative activity and cytological atypia, postoperative radiotherapy may be recommended. This paper reviews this heterogeneous group of neoplasms and hamartomatous lesions, pointing out presumable transitions among the different types of mixed neuronal and glial brain tumors. A single term of "mixed neuronal-glial tumors" is defended, distinguishing different subgroups of tumors, depending on the predominant cellular component.

  2. Tumour volume response, initial cell kill and cellular repopulation in B16 melanoma treated with cyclophosphamide and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, T. C.; Peacock, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between tumour volume response and cell kill in B16 melanoma following treatment in vivo with cyclophosphamide (CY) and 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) was investigated. Tumour volume response, expressed as growth delay, was estimated from measurements of tumour dimensions. Depression of in vitro colony-forming ability of cells from treated tumours was used as the measure of tumour cell kill. The relationship between these parameters was clearly different for the two agents studied. CY produced more growth delay (7.5 days) per decade of tumour cell kill than CCNU (2 to 3.5 days). The possibility that this was due to a technical artefact was rejected in favour of an alternative explanation that different rates of cellular repopulation in tumours treated with CY and CCNU might be responsible. Cellular repopulation was measured directly, by performing cell-survival assays at various times after treatment with doses of CY and CCNU which produced about 3 decades of cell kill. The rate of repopulation by clonogenic cells was much slower after treatment with CY than with CCNU, and this appears to account for the longer duration of the growth delay obtained with CY. PMID:921888

  3. Residual tumour volumes and grey zones after external beam radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) in cervical cancer patients. A low-field MRI study.

    PubMed

    Schmid, M P; Mansmann, B; Federico, M; Dimopoulous, J C A; Georg, P; Fidarova, E; Dörr, W; Pötter, R

    2013-03-01

    Grey zones, which are defined as tissue with intermediate signal intensity in the area of primary hyperintense tumour extension, can be seen during radiation with or without chemotherapy on the T2-weighted MRI in patients with cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to systematically measure the tumour volume at the time of diagnosis and the residual tumour volume at the time of brachytherapy without and with consideration of the grey zones and to estimate tumour regression during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). T2-weighted MRI datasets of 175 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (FIGO stage IB-IVA), who underwent combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy were available for this study. The gross tumour volume at the time of diagnosis (GTV(init)) and at the time of first brachytherapy without (GTV(res)) and with (GTV(res)+ GZ) consideration of grey zones were measured for each patient. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed and tumour regression rates without (R) and with consideration of grey zones (R(GZ)) were calculated. Further, the role of prognostic factors on GTV(init), GTV(res), GTV(res)+ GZ and tumour regression rates was investigated. The median GTV(init), GTV(res), GTV(res)+ GZ in all patients were 44.4 cm(3), 8.2 cm(3), 20.3 cm(3), respectively. The median R was 78.5% and the median R(GZ) was 50.1%. The histology and FIGO staging showed a significant impact on GTV(init), GTV(res) and GTV(res)+ GZ. Grey zones represent a substantial proportion of the residual tumour volume at the time of brachytherapy. Differentiation of high signal intensity mass and surrounding intermediate signal intensity grey zones may be reasonable.

  4. Intra-tumour 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity decreases the reliability on target volume definition with positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinzhe; Wu, Peipei; Sun, Xiaorong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore whether the intra-tumour (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake heterogeneity affects the reliability of target volume definition with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell oesophageal cancer (SCEC). Patients with NSCLC (n = 50) or SCEC (n = 50) who received (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments were included in this retrospective study. Intra-tumour FDG uptake heterogeneity was assessed by visual scoring, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardised uptake value (SUV) and the image texture feature (entropy). Tumour volumes (gross tumour volume (GTV)) were delineated on the CT images (GTV(CT)), the fused PET/CT images (GTV(PET-CT)) and the PET images, using a threshold at 40% SUV(max) (GTV(PET40%)) or the SUV cut-off value of 2.5 (GTV(PET2.5)). The correlation between the FDG uptake heterogeneity parameters and the differences in tumour volumes among GTV(CT), GTV(PET-CT), GTV(PET40%) and GTV(PET2.5) was analysed. For both NSCLC and SCEC, obvious correlations were found between uptake heterogeneity, SUV or tumour volumes. Three types of heterogeneity parameters were consistent and closely related to each other. Substantial differences between the four methods of GTV definition were found. The differences between the GTV correlated significantly with PET heterogeneity defined with the visual score, the COV or the textural feature-entropy for NSCLC and SCEC. In tumours with a high FDG uptake heterogeneity, a larger GTV delineation difference was found. Advance image segmentation algorithms dealing with tracer uptake heterogeneity should be incorporated into the treatment planning system. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  5. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  6. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  7. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan; Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints weremore » disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.« less

  8. Evaluation of an Automatic Registration-Based Algorithm for Direct Measurement of Volume Change in Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Saradwata; Johnson, Timothy D.; Ma, Bing

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Assuming that early tumor volume change is a biomarker for response to therapy, accurate quantification of early volume changes could aid in adapting an individual patient's therapy and lead to shorter clinical trials. We investigated an image registration-based approach for tumor volume change quantification that may more reliably detect smaller changes that occur in shorter intervals than can be detected by existing algorithms. Methods and Materials: Variance and bias of the registration-based approach were evaluated using retrospective, in vivo, very-short-interval diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scans where true zero tumor volume change is unequivocally known and synthetic data, respectively. Themore » interval scans were nonlinearly registered using two similarity measures: mutual information (MI) and normalized cross-correlation (NCC). Results: The 95% confidence interval of the percentage volume change error was (-8.93% to 10.49%) for MI-based and (-7.69%, 8.83%) for NCC-based registrations. Linear mixed-effects models demonstrated that error in measuring volume change increased with increase in tumor volume and decreased with the increase in the tumor's normalized mutual information, even when NCC was the similarity measure being optimized during registration. The 95% confidence interval of the relative volume change error for the synthetic examinations with known changes over {+-}80% of reference tumor volume was (-3.02% to 3.86%). Statistically significant bias was not demonstrated. Conclusion: A low-noise, low-bias tumor volume change measurement algorithm using nonlinear registration is described. Errors in change measurement were a function of tumor volume and the normalized mutual information content of the tumor.« less

  9. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancermore » with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data

  10. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data.

    PubMed

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Yartsev, Slav; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Mayr, Nina

    2014-06-01

    In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S2 in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S2 and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T(1/2) have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S2 for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S2 reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. The data obtained in this work, when taken together with the data obtained

  11. Pairwise mixture model for unmixing partial volume effect in multi-voxel MR spectroscopy of brain tumour patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olliverre, Nathan; Asad, Muhammad; Yang, Guang; Howe, Franklyn; Slabaugh, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    Multi-Voxel Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MV-MRS) provides an important and insightful technique for the examination of the chemical composition of brain tissue, making it an attractive medical imaging modality for the examination of brain tumours. MRS, however, is affected by the issue of the Partial Volume Effect (PVE), where the signals of multiple tissue types can be found within a single voxel and provides an obstacle to the interpretation of the data. The PVE results from the low resolution achieved in MV-MRS images relating to the signal to noise ratio (SNR). To counteract PVE, this paper proposes a novel Pairwise Mixture Model (PMM), that extends a recently reported Signal Mixture Model (SMM) for representing the MV-MRS signal as normal, low or high grade tissue types. Inspired by Conditional Random Field (CRF) and its continuous variant the PMM incorporates the surrounding voxel neighbourhood into an optimisation problem, the solution of which provides an estimation to a set of coefficients. The values of the estimated coefficients represents the amount of each tissue type (normal, low or high) found within a voxel. These coefficients can then be visualised as a nosological rendering using a coloured grid representing the MV-MRS image overlaid on top of a structural image, such as a Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI). Experimental results show an accuracy of 92.69% in classifying patient tumours as either low or high grade compared against the histopathology for each patient. Compared to 91.96% achieved by the SMM, the proposed PMM method demonstrates the importance of incorporating spatial coherence into the estimation as well as its potential clinical usage.

  12. Concept of a selective tumour therapy and its evaluation by near-infrared fluorescence imaging and flat-panel volume computed tomography in mice.

    PubMed

    Alves, Frauke; Dullin, Christian; Napp, Joanna; Missbach-Guentner, Jeannine; Jannasch, Katharina; Mathejczyk, Julia; Pardo, Luis A; Stühmer, Walter; Tietze, Lutz-F

    2009-05-01

    Conventional chemotherapy of cancer has its limitations, especially in advanced and disseminated disease and suffers from lack of specificity. This results in a poor therapeutic index and considerable toxicity to normal organs. Therefore, many efforts are made to develop novel therapeutic tools against cancer with the aim of selectively targeting the drug to the tumour site. Drug delivery strategies fundamentally rely on the identification of good-quality biomarkers, allowing unequivocal discrimination between cancer and healthy tissue. At present, antibodies or antibody fragments have clearly proven their value as carrier molecules specific for a tumour-associated molecular marker. This present review draws attention to the use of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to investigate binding specificity and kinetics of carrier molecules such as monoclonal antibodies. In addition, flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) will be presented to monitor anatomical structures in tumour mouse models over time in a non-invasive manner. Each imaging device sheds light on a different aspect; functional imaging is applied to optimise the dose schedule and the concept of selective tumour therapies, whereas anatomical imaging assesses preclinically the efficacy of novel tumour therapies. Both imaging techniques in combination allow the visualisation of functional information obtained by NIRF imaging within an adequate anatomic framework.

  13. Correlation between tumour characteristics, SUV measurements, metabolic tumour volume, TLG and textural features assessed with 18F-FDG PET in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lemarignier, Charles; Martineau, Antoine; Teixeira, Luis; Vercellino, Laetitia; Espié, Marc; Merlet, Pascal; Groheux, David

    2017-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate 1) the relationship between PET image textural features (TFs) and SUVs, metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and tumour characteristics in a large prospective and homogenous cohort of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer (BC) patients, and 2) the capability of those parameters to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). 171 consecutive patients with large or locally advanced ER+ BC without distant metastases underwent an 18 F-FDG PET examination before NAC. The primary tumour was delineated with an adaptive threshold segmentation method. Parameters of volume, intensity and texture (entropy, homogeneity, contrast and energy) were measured and compared with tumour characteristics determined on pre-treatment breast biopsy (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). The correlation between PET-derived parameters was determined using Spearman's coefficient. The relationship between PET features and pathological findings was determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Spearman's coefficients between SUV max and TFs were 0.43, 0.24, -0.43 and -0.15 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast; they were higher between MTV and TFs: 0.99, 0.86, -0.99 and -0.87. All TFs showed a significant association with the histological type (IDC vs. ILC; 0.02 < P < 0.03) but didn't with immunohistochemical characteristics. SUV max and TLG predicted the pathological response (P = 0.0021 and P = 0.02 respectively); TFs didn't (P: 0.27, 0.19, 0.94, 0.19 respectively for entropy, homogeneity, energy and contrast). The correlation of TFs was poor with SUV parameters and high with MTV. TFs showed a significant association with the histological type. Finally, while SUV max and TLG were able to predict response to NAC, TFs failed.

  14. Grading of vestibular schwannomas and corresponding tumor volumes: ramifications for radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mindermann, T; Schlegel, I

    2013-01-01

    Patients with vestibular schwannomas (VS) are either assigned to watchful waiting, microsurgical resection, or radiosurgery. Decision making on how to proceed is based on parameters such as age, tumor growth, loss of hearing, and the tumor's Koos grading. In order to correlate Koos grading with tumor volume, patient records of 235 patients with VS who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) were retrospectively reviewed. From 1994 to 2009, 235 consecutive patients underwent GKRS for sporadic VS at the Zurich Gamma Knife Center. Median follow up was 62.8 ± 33.0 months. Of the 235 tumors, 32 (13.6 %) were graded Koos I with a volume of 0.25 ± 0.3 cc; 71 (30.2 %) were graded Koos II with a volume of 0.57 ± 0.54 cc; 70 (29.8 %) were graded Koos III with a volume of 1.82 ± 1.88 cc; and 62 (26.4 %) were graded Koos IV with a volume of 4.17 ± 2.75 cc. Tumor progression was defined as a volume increase > 20 % at 2 years or later following GKRS. Overall tumor progression occurred in 21/235 (8.9 %) patients at 3.4 ± 0.9 years. Tumor progression did not differ statistically significantly in the various Koos grades: 1/32 (3.1 %) patients with VS Koos Grade I, 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with VS Koos Grade II, 6/70 (8.6 %) patients with VS Koos Grade III, and 7/62 (11.3 %) patients with VS Koos Grade IV. To our knowledge, this is the first work correlating the various Koos grades of VS to their respective tumor volumes. In our patients, tumor volumes of VS Koos Grade IV were limited because all of our patients were eligible for radiosurgery. In our series, the outcome following GKRS for patients with VS Koos Grade IV tumors did not differ from patients with VS Koos Grades I-III. We therefore suggest to limit Koos Grade IV VS to tumor volumes < 6 cc that may be eligible for radiosurgery, and introduce an additional VS Grade V for large VS with tumor volumes of > 6 cc that may not be eligible for radiosurgery.

  15. Tumor Volume Estimation and Quasi-Continuous Administration for Most Effective Bevacizumab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sápi, Johanna; Kovács, Levente; Drexler, Dániel András; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Sápi, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab is an exogenous inhibitor which inhibits the biological activity of human VEGF. Several studies have investigated the effectiveness of bevacizumab therapy according to different cancer types but these days there is an intense debate on its utility. We have investigated different methods to find the best tumor volume estimation since it creates the possibility for precise and effective drug administration with a much lower dose than in the protocol. We have examined C38 mouse colon adenocarcinoma and HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, three groups were compared in the experiments. The first group did not receive therapy, the second group received one 200 μg bevacizumab dose for a treatment period (protocol-based therapy), and the third group received 1.1 μg bevacizumab every day (quasi-continuous therapy). Tumor volume measurement was performed by digital caliper and small animal MRI. The mathematical relationship between MRI-measured tumor volume and mass was investigated to estimate accurate tumor volume using caliper-measured data. A two-dimensional mathematical model was applied for tumor volume evaluation, and tumor- and therapy-specific constants were calculated for the three different groups. The effectiveness of bevacizumab administration was examined by statistical analysis. In the case of C38 adenocarcinoma, protocol-based treatment did not result in significantly smaller tumor volume compared to the no treatment group; however, there was a significant difference between untreated mice and mice who received quasi-continuous therapy (p = 0.002). In the case of HT-29 adenocarcinoma, the daily treatment with one-twelfth total dose resulted in significantly smaller tumors than the protocol-based treatment (p = 0.038). When the tumor has a symmetrical, solid closed shape (typically without treatment), volume can be evaluated accurately from caliper-measured data with the applied two-dimensional mathematical model. Our results

  16. Tumor Volume Is a Prognostic Factor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Brian M.; Othus, Megan; Caglar, Hale B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether primary tumor and nodal volumes defined on radiotherapy planning scans are correlated with outcome (survival and recurrence) after combined-modality treatment. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiation at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Tumor and nodal volume measurements, as computed by Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA), were used as independent variables, along with existing clinical factors, in univariate and multivariate analyses for association with outcomes. Results: For patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy, both nodal volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.09;more » p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.03; p < 0.01) were associated with overall survival on multivariate analysis. Both nodal volume (HR, 1.10; p < 0.01) and tumor volume (HR, 1.04; p < 0.01) were also associated with local control but not distant metastases. Conclusions: In addition to traditional surgical staging variables, disease burden, measured by primary tumor and nodal metastases volume, provides information that may be helpful in determining prognosis and identifying groups of patients for which more aggressive local therapy is warranted.« less

  17. Pseudo tumors of the lung after lung volume reduction surgery.

    PubMed

    Oey, Inger F; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Entwisle, James J; Waller, David A

    2004-03-01

    We describe 2 patients who underwent lung volume reduction surgery, who postoperatively had computed tomographic scans that showed symptomatic mass lesions suggestive of malignancy and an inhaled foreign body. Investigations excluded these conditions with the remaining likely diagnosis of pseudotumor secondary to buttressing material. These potential sequelae of lung volume reduction surgery should be recognized in follow-up investigations.

  18. Tumor volume in insignificant prostate cancer: increasing threshold gains increasing risk.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Jonas; Connan, Judith; Salomon, Georg; Boehm, Katharina; Beyer, Burkhard; Schlomm, Thorsten; Tennstedt, Pierre; Sauter, Guido; Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Graefen, Markus; Huland, Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    An increased tumor volume threshold (<2.5 ml) is suggested to define insignificant prostate cancer (iPCa). We hypothesize that an increasing tumor volume within iPCa patients increases the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). We relied on RP patients treated between 1992 and 2008. Multivariable Cox regression analyses predicting BCR within patients harboring favorable pathological characteristics (≤pT2, pN0/Nx, Gleason 3 + 3). Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed for BCR-free survival within iPCa patients (≤pT2, pN0/Nx, Gleason 3 + 3, tumor volume: <0.5 vs. 0.5-2.49 ml). From 1,829 patients, 141 (7.7%) and 310 (16.9%) harbored iPCa (tumor volume: <0.5 vs. 0.5-2.49 ml), respectively. Of those, 21 (14.9%) versus 31 (10.0%) had PSA >10 ng/ml. Tumor volume achieved independent predictor status for BCR. Specifically, iPCa patients with increasing tumor volume (0.5-2.49 ml) were at higher risk of BCR after RP than those with tumor volume <0.5 ml (HR: 8.8, 95% CI: 1.2-65.9, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier analysis recorded superior BCR-free survival in iPCa patients with lower tumor volume (<0.5 ml) (log-rank P = 0.009). The 10-year cancer-specific death rate was 0 versus 0.5%. Contemporary iPCa definition incorporates intermediate and high-risk patients (PSA: 10-20 and >20 ng/ml). Despite most favorable pathological characteristics, iPCa patients are not devoid of BCR after RP. Moreover, iPCa patients were at higher risk of BCR, when increasing tumor volume up to 2.49 ml was at play. Taken together the contemporary concept of iPCa is suboptimal. Especially, an increased tumor volume threshold for defining iPCa cannot be recommended according to our data. Clinicians might take these considerations into account during decision-making process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Current Methods to Define Metabolic Tumor Volume in Positron Emission Tomography: Which One is Better?

    PubMed

    Im, Hyung-Jun; Bradshaw, Tyler; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Cho, Steve Y

    2018-02-01

    Numerous methods to segment tumors using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) have been introduced. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) refers to the metabolically active volume of the tumor segmented using FDG PET, and has been shown to be useful in predicting patient outcome and in assessing treatment response. Also, tumor segmentation using FDG PET has useful applications in radiotherapy treatment planning. Despite extensive research on MTV showing promising results, MTV is not used in standard clinical practice yet, mainly because there is no consensus on the optimal method to segment tumors in FDG PET images. In this review, we discuss currently available methods to measure MTV using FDG PET, and assess the advantages and disadvantages of the methods.

  20. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L., E-mail: wayne.monsky@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Threemore » observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.« less

  1. Correlation of Tumor and Peritumoral Edema Volumes with Survival in Patients with Cerebral Metastases.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Bauer, Marlies; Popovscaia, Marina; Grams, Astrid E; Thomé, Claudius; Freyschlag, Christian F

    2017-02-01

    Surgical resection in combination with radiotherapy in selected cases remains the best option for patients with cerebral metastases. Postoperative relapse of brain metastases occurs frequently and can be reduced by postoperative whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Continuous spread of tumor cells from the primary lesions is debated as a cause of recurrence. It is well known that in gliomas, infiltration takes place within the surrounding edema. Obviously, most brain metastases are usually associated with peritumoral edema, which may act as an indicator of infiltration and more aggressive tumor biology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the correlation of tumor and edema volumes with overall survival in patients with cerebral metastases. A total of 143 patients diagnosed with brain metastasis (male:female=1.1:1) who underwent surgical resection were included retrospectively in this analysis. Clinical data were retrieved from electronic patient files. The volumes of tumor and edema calculated by manual delineation. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was calculated, leading to dichotomization of the patients. The median tumor volume was 20.1 cc (range=0.8-90.8 cc) and the median volume of edema 49.5 cc (range=0-179.9 cc). The volume of metastases did not significantly correlate with overall survival. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was also not a prognostic factor in terms of overall survival. Only surgical resection, preoperative recursive partitioning analysis class, and postoperative addition of WBRT, as well as female sex, demonstrated beneficial effects. The extent of edema surrounding cerebral metastases does not appear to influence overall survival in patients suffering from brain metastases, although it seems to be responsible for most of the patients' symptoms. The hypothesis that the extent of edema was disadvantageous concerning survival was supported by our data. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios

  2. Prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced breast cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; García García-Esquinas, M; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Rodríguez Rey, C; Román-Santamaría, J M; Moreno, F; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    To determine whether metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are able to predict recurrence risk in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients. Retrospective study of LABC patients who undertook neoadjuvant, local and adjuvant treatment and follow up. A 18 F-FDG PET/CT study for initial staging was performed analysing in this study different metabolic parameters (MTV, TLG, SUVmax and SUVmed) both in the primary tumour (T) as well as in axillary nodes (N) and whole-body (WB). Forty females were included between January 2010-2011; follow up until January 2015 was completed. The average follow-up was 46 months. Twenty percent presented recurrence: local disease (n=2) and distant metastasis (n=6); 3 patients died (38% of the patients which recurred and 7.5% from the total). SUVmax, MTV and TLG, in T, N and WB, were higher in those patients with recurrence. The MTV and TLG parameters in the tumour (T) were related to the recurrence rate (P=.020 and P=.028, respectively); whereas SUVmax in the lymph nodes (N) was significantly related (P=.008) to the recurrence rate. The best cut-off points to predict recurrence where: MTV T ≥19.3cm 3 , TLG T≥74.4g and SUVmax N≥13.8, being 10-12 times more likely to recidivate when these thresholds where exceeded. Tumour grade was the only clinical-pathological variable which was related to recurrence probability (p=.035). In this study of LABC patients the metabolic parameters which have a better relationship with recurrence rate are: MTV and TLG in the primary tumour, SUVmax in the regional lymph node disease and whole-body PET data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  3. Microenvironmental autophagy promotes tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Katheder, Nadja S; Khezri, Rojyar; O'Farrell, Fergal; Schultz, Sebastian W; Jain, Ashish; Rahman, Mohammed M; Schink, Kay O; Theodossiou, Theodossis A; Johansen, Terje; Juhász, Gábor; Bilder, David; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2017-01-19

    As malignant tumours develop, they interact intimately with their microenvironment and can activate autophagy, a catabolic process which provides nutrients during starvation. How tumours regulate autophagy in vivo and whether autophagy affects tumour growth is controversial. Here we demonstrate, using a well characterized Drosophila melanogaster malignant tumour model, that non-cell-autonomous autophagy is induced both in the tumour microenvironment and systemically in distant tissues. Tumour growth can be pharmacologically restrained using autophagy inhibitors, and early-stage tumour growth and invasion are genetically dependent on autophagy within the local tumour microenvironment. Induction of autophagy is mediated by Drosophila tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6-like signalling from metabolically stressed tumour cells, whereas tumour growth depends on active amino acid transport. We show that dormant growth-impaired tumours from autophagy-deficient animals reactivate tumorous growth when transplanted into autophagy-proficient hosts. We conclude that transformed cells engage surrounding normal cells as active and essential microenvironmental contributors to early tumour growth through nutrient-generating autophagy.

  4. Verification of the tumor volume delineation method using a fixed threshold of peak standardized uptake value.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuya; Mitsumoto, Takuya; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Tsuda, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Inoue, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Hatano, Kazuo; Kubota, Kazuo; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to determine the difference in tumor volume associated with the reconstruction model in positron-emission tomography (PET). To reduce the influence of the reconstruction model, we suggested a method to measure the tumor volume using the relative threshold method with a fixed threshold based on peak standardized uptake value (SUV peak ). The efficacy of our method was verified using 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/computed tomography images of 20 patients with lung cancer. The tumor volume was determined using the relative threshold method with a fixed threshold based on the SUV peak . The PET data were reconstructed using the ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) model, the OSEM + time-of-flight (TOF) model, and the OSEM + TOF + point-spread function (PSF) model. The volume differences associated with the reconstruction algorithm (%VD) were compared. For comparison, the tumor volume was measured using the relative threshold method based on the maximum SUV (SUV max ). For the OSEM and TOF models, the mean %VD values were -0.06 ± 8.07 and -2.04 ± 4.23% for the fixed 40% threshold according to the SUV max and the SUV peak, respectively. The effect of our method in this case seemed to be minor. For the OSEM and PSF models, the mean %VD values were -20.41 ± 14.47 and -13.87 ± 6.59% for the fixed 40% threshold according to the SUV max and SUV peak , respectively. Our new method enabled the measurement of tumor volume with a fixed threshold and reduced the influence of the changes in tumor volume associated with the reconstruction model.

  5. An automatic method of brain tumor segmentation from MRI volume based on the symmetry of brain and level set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobing; Qiu, Tianshuang; Lebonvallet, Stephane; Ruan, Su

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a brain tumor segmentation method which automatically segments tumors from human brain MRI image volume. The presented model is based on the symmetry of human brain and level set method. Firstly, the midsagittal plane of an MRI volume is searched, the slices with potential tumor of the volume are checked out according to their symmetries, and an initial boundary of the tumor in the slice, in which the tumor is in the largest size, is determined meanwhile by watershed and morphological algorithms; Secondly, the level set method is applied to the initial boundary to drive the curve evolving and stopping to the appropriate tumor boundary; Lastly, the tumor boundary is projected one by one to its adjacent slices as initial boundaries through the volume for the whole tumor. The experiment results are compared with hand tracking of the expert and show relatively good accordance between both.

  6. Tumor Volume Estimation and Quasi-Continuous Administration for Most Effective Bevacizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sápi, Johanna; Kovács, Levente; Drexler, Dániel András; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Sápi, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab is an exogenous inhibitor which inhibits the biological activity of human VEGF. Several studies have investigated the effectiveness of bevacizumab therapy according to different cancer types but these days there is an intense debate on its utility. We have investigated different methods to find the best tumor volume estimation since it creates the possibility for precise and effective drug administration with a much lower dose than in the protocol. Materials and Methods We have examined C38 mouse colon adenocarcinoma and HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In both cases, three groups were compared in the experiments. The first group did not receive therapy, the second group received one 200 μg bevacizumab dose for a treatment period (protocol-based therapy), and the third group received 1.1 μg bevacizumab every day (quasi-continuous therapy). Tumor volume measurement was performed by digital caliper and small animal MRI. The mathematical relationship between MRI-measured tumor volume and mass was investigated to estimate accurate tumor volume using caliper-measured data. A two-dimensional mathematical model was applied for tumor volume evaluation, and tumor- and therapy-specific constants were calculated for the three different groups. The effectiveness of bevacizumab administration was examined by statistical analysis. Results In the case of C38 adenocarcinoma, protocol-based treatment did not result in significantly smaller tumor volume compared to the no treatment group; however, there was a significant difference between untreated mice and mice who received quasi-continuous therapy (p = 0.002). In the case of HT-29 adenocarcinoma, the daily treatment with one-twelfth total dose resulted in significantly smaller tumors than the protocol-based treatment (p = 0.038). When the tumor has a symmetrical, solid closed shape (typically without treatment), volume can be evaluated accurately from caliper-measured data with the applied two

  7. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABRmore » and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent

  8. A novel magnetic resonance imaging segmentation technique for determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma tumor volume.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjodh; Zhou, Zhiping; Tisnado, Jamie; Haque, Sofia; Peck, Kyung K; Young, Robert J; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Thakur, Sunitha B; Souweidane, Mark M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurately determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumor volume is clinically important. The aims of the current study were to 1) measure DIPG volumes using methods that require different degrees of subjective judgment; and 2) evaluate interobserver agreement of measurements made using these methods. METHODS Eight patients from a Phase I clinical trial testing convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a therapeutic antibody were included in the study. Pre-CED, post-radiation therapy axial T2-weighted images were analyzed using 2 methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment (picture archiving and communication system [PACS] polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods) and 1 method requiring a low degree of subjective judgment (k-means clustering segmentation) to determine tumor volumes. Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated to assess interobserver agreement. RESULTS The CCCs of measurements made by 2 observers with the PACS polygon and the Volume Viewer auto-contour methods were 0.9465 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.8472) and 0.7514 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.3143), respectively. Both were considered poor agreement. The CCC of measurements made using k-means clustering segmentation was 0.9938 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.9772), which was considered substantial strength of agreement. CONCLUSIONS The poor interobserver agreement of PACS polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods highlighted the difficulty in consistently measuring DIPG tumor volumes using methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment. k-means clustering segmentation, which requires a low degree of subjective judgment, showed better interobserver agreement and produced tumor volumes with delineated borders.

  9. A novel magnetic resonance imaging segmentation technique for determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma tumor volume

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ranjodh; Zhou, Zhiping; Tisnado, Jamie; Haque, Sofia; Peck, Kyung K.; Young, Robert J.; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Thakur, Sunitha B.; Souweidane, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurately determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumor volume is clinically important. The aims of the current study were to 1) measure DIPG volumes using methods that require different degrees of subjective judgment; and 2) evaluate interobserver agreement of measurements made using these methods. METHODS Eight patients from a Phase I clinical trial testing convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a therapeutic antibody were included in the study. Pre-CED, post–radiation therapy axial T2-weighted images were analyzed using 2 methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment (picture archiving and communication system [PACS] polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods) and 1 method requiring a low degree of subjective judgment (k-means clustering segmentation) to determine tumor volumes. Lin’s concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated to assess interobserver agreement. RESULTS The CCCs of measurements made by 2 observers with the PACS polygon and the Volume Viewer auto-contour methods were 0.9465 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.8472) and 0.7514 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.3143), respectively. Both were considered poor agreement. The CCC of measurements made using k-means clustering segmentation was 0.9938 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.9772), which was considered substantial strength of agreement. CONCLUSIONS The poor interobserver agreement of PACS polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods high-lighted the difficulty in consistently measuring DIPG tumor volumes using methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment. k-means clustering segmentation, which requires a low degree of subjective judgment, showed better interob-server agreement and produced tumor volumes with delineated borders. PMID:27391980

  10. Quantification of gross tumour volume changes between simulation and first day of radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cui, Jing; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2014-10-01

    To quantify changes in gross tumour volume (GTV) between simulation and initiation of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck. Initial cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans from 12 patients with lung cancer and 12 with head/neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with image guidance were rigidly registered to the simulation CT scans. The GTV was demarcated on both scans. The relationship between percent GTV change and variables including time interval between simulation and start, tumour (T) stage, and absolute weight change was assessed. For lung cancer patients, the GTV increased a median of 35.06% (range, -16.63% to 229.97%) over a median interval of 13 days (range, 7-43), while for HNSCC patients, the median GTV increase was 16.04% (range, -8.03% to 47.41%) over 13 days (range, 7-40). These observed changes are statistically significant. The magnitude of this change was inversely associated with the size of the tumour on the simulation scan for lung cancer patients (P < 0.05). However, the observed changes in GTV did not correlate with the duration of the interval for either disease site. Similarly, T stage, absolute weight change and histologic type (the latter for lung cancer cases) did not correlate with degree of GTV change (P > 0.1). While the observed changes in GTV were moderate from the time of simulation to start of radiotherapy, these findings underscore the importance of image guidance for target localisation and verification, particularly for smaller tumours. Minimising the delay between simulation and treatment initiation may also be beneficial. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. [Primary perivascular epitheloid cell tumour (PEComa) of the liver - is a new entity of the liver tumors?].

    PubMed

    Panahova, S; Rempp, H; Sipos, B; Malek, N P; Boozari, B

    2015-05-01

    Perivascular epitheloid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare tumor, characterized by dual Expression of smooth muscle and melanocytic markers. Due to the development of diagnostic procedures, we now diagnose PEComa more often. We report about a case of PEComa of the liver as an accidental finding. We analyze the clinical and morphological characteristics of this tumor and compare it with the data of the literature. Management of patients with PEComa is not yet standardized; therefore biopsy with immunhistochemical staining is necessary for the diagnosis. In case of liver tumors which cannot be classified by their morphology on imaging modalities, it is important to think about this rare entity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  13. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-07

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  14. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  15. Short Communication: Conformal Therapy for Peri-Ventricular Brain Tumors: Is Target Volume Deformation an Issue?

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Glenn; Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav

    2008-04-01

    Physiologic variations in ventricular volumes could have important implications for treating patients with peri-ventricular brain tumors, yet no data exist in the literature addressing this issue. Daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) scans in a patient with neurocytoma receiving fractionated radiation revealed minimal changes, suggesting that margins accounting for ventricular deformation are not necessary.

  16. SU-E-J-12: A New Stereological Method for Tumor Volume Evaluation for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y; Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital; East Carolina University

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereological method used to obtain three dimensional quantitative information from two dimensional images is a widely used tool in the study of cells and pathology. But the feasibility of the method for quantitative evaluation of volumes with 3D image data sets for radiotherapy clinical application has not been explored. On the other hand, a quick, easy-to-use and reliable method is highly desired in image-guided-radiotherapy(IGRT) for tumor volume measurement for the assessment of response to treatment. To meet this need, a stereological method for evaluating tumor volumes for esophageal cancer is presented in this abstract. Methods: The stereology method wasmore » optimized by selecting the appropriate grid point distances and sample types. 7 patients with esophageal cancer were selected retrospectively for this study, each having pre and post treatment computed tomography (CT) scans. Stereological measurements were performed for evaluating the gross tumor volume (GTV) changes after radiotherapy and the results was compared with the ones by planimetric measurements. Two independent observers evaluated the reproducibility for volume measurement using the new stereological technique. Results: The intraobserver variation in the GTV volume estimation was 3.42±1.68cm3 (the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test Resultwas Z=−1.726,P=0.084>0.05); the interobserver variation in the GTV volume estimation was 22.40±7.23 cm3 (Z=−3.296,P=0.083>0.05), which showed the consistency in GTV volume calculation with the new method for the same and different users. The agreement level between the results from the two techniques was also evaluated. Difference between the measured GTVs was 20.10±5.35 cm3 (Z=−3.101,P=0.089>0.05). Variation of the measurement results using the two techniques was low and clinically acceptable. Conclusion: The good agreement between stereological and planimetric techniques proves the reliability of the stereological tumor volume estimations. The

  17. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models.

    PubMed

    Yock, Adam D; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Court, Laurence E

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: -11.6%-23.8%) and 14.6% (range: -7.3%-27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: -6.8%-40.3%) and 13.1% (range: -1.5%-52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: -11.1%-20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography images and facilitate improved treatment management.

  18. Superior Prognostic Value of Cumulative Intracranial Tumor Volume Relative to Largest Intracranial Tumor Volume for Stereotactic Radiosurgery-Treated Brain Metastasis Patients.

    PubMed

    Hirshman, Brian R; Wilson, Bayard; Ali, Mir Amaan; Proudfoot, James A; Koiso, Takao; Nagano, Osamu; Carter, Bob S; Serizawa, Toru; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Chen, Clark C

    2018-04-01

    Two intracranial tumor volume variables have been shown to prognosticate survival of stereotactic-radiosurgery-treated brain metastasis patients: the largest intracranial tumor volume (LITV) and the cumulative intracranial tumor volume (CITV). To determine whether the prognostic value of the Scored Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) model can be improved by replacing one of its components-LITV-with CITV. We compared LITV and CITV in terms of their survival prognostication using a series of multivariable models that included known components of the SIR: age, Karnofsky Performance Score, status of extracranial disease, and the number of brain metastases. Models were compared using established statistical measures, including the net reclassification improvement (NRI > 0) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). The analysis was performed in 2 independent cohorts, each consisting of ∼3000 patients. In both cohorts, CITV was shown to be independently predictive of patient survival. Replacement of LITV with CITV in the SIR model improved the model's ability to predict 1-yr survival. In the first cohort, the CITV model showed an NRI > 0 improvement of 0.2574 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1890-0.3257) and IDI of 0.0088 (95% CI 0.0057-0.0119) relative to the LITV model. In the second cohort, the CITV model showed a NRI > 0 of 0.2604 (95% CI 0.1796-0.3411) and IDI of 0.0051 (95% CI 0.0029-0.0073) relative to the LITV model. After accounting for covariates within the SIR model, CITV offers superior prognostic value relative to LITV for stereotactic radiosurgery-treated brain metastasis patients.

  19. Anti-Tumor Action, Clinical Biochemistry Profile and Phytochemical Constituents of a Pharmacologically Active Fraction of S. crispus in NMU-Induced Rat Mammary Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Yankuzo, Hassan Muhammad; Devaraj, Sutha; Wong, Jimmy Ka Ming; Lai, Choon-Sheen

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients seek alternative remedies such as traditional medicinal plants for safe and effective treatment and help overcome the side effects of conventional therapy. Current knowledge indicates that extracts of Strobilanthes crispus of the Acanthaceae family exhibit potent anticancer properties in vitro and are non-toxic in vivo. S. crispus was also reported to be protective against chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously showed that a bioactive fraction of S. crispus leaves also synergized with tamoxifen to cause apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines without damaging non-malignant epithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor effect of S. crispus dichloromethane fraction (F3) using N-methyl-N-Nitrosourea (NMU)-induced rat mammary tumor model. Tumor regression was observed in 75% of the rats following 8-week oral administration of F3 with no secondary tumour formation and no signs of anemia or infection. However, no improvement in the liver and renal function profiles was observed. Major constituents of F3 were identified as lutein, 131-hydroxy-132-oxo-pheophytin a, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, pheophytin a and 132-hydroxy-pheophytin a. These compounds however, may not significantly contribute to the antitumor effect of F3. PMID:26000968

  20. Anti-Tumor Action, Clinical Biochemistry Profile and Phytochemical Constituents of a Pharmacologically Active Fraction of S. crispus in NMU-Induced Rat Mammary Tumour Model.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Yankuzo, Hassan Muhammad; Devaraj, Sutha; Wong, Jimmy Ka Ming; Lai, Choon-Sheen

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients seek alternative remedies such as traditional medicinal plants for safe and effective treatment and help overcome the side effects of conventional therapy. Current knowledge indicates that extracts of Strobilanthes crispus of the Acanthaceae family exhibit potent anticancer properties in vitro and are non-toxic in vivo. S. crispus was also reported to be protective against chemical hepatocarcinogenesis. We previously showed that a bioactive fraction of S. crispus leaves also synergized with tamoxifen to cause apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines without damaging non-malignant epithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the antitumor effect of S. crispus dichloromethane fraction (F3) using N-methyl-N-Nitrosourea (NMU)-induced rat mammary tumor model. Tumor regression was observed in 75% of the rats following 8-week oral administration of F3 with no secondary tumour formation and no signs of anemia or infection. However, no improvement in the liver and renal function profiles was observed. Major constituents of F3 were identified as lutein, 131-hydroxy-132-oxo-pheophytin a, campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol, pheophytin a and 132-hydroxy-pheophytin a. These compounds however, may not significantly contribute to the antitumor effect of F3.

  1. Comprehensive evaluation of an image segmentation technique for measuring tumor volume from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiang; Huang, Haibin; Zhu, Lei; Du, Guangwei; Xu, Xiaodong; Sun, Yiyong; Xu, Chenyang; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Chen, Jiuhong; Xiao, Jie; Merges, Reto; Suehling, Michael; Rinck, Daniel; Song, Lan; Jin, Zhengyu; Jiang, Zhaoxia; Wu, Bin; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Shuai; Peng, Weijun

    2008-03-01

    Comprehensive quantitative evaluation of tumor segmentation technique on large scale clinical data sets is crucial for routine clinical use of CT based tumor volumetry for cancer diagnosis and treatment response evaluation. In this paper, we present a systematic validation study of a semi-automatic image segmentation technique for measuring tumor volume from CT images. The segmentation algorithm was tested using clinical data of 200 tumors in 107 patients with liver, lung, lymphoma and other types of cancer. The performance was evaluated using both accuracy and reproducibility. The accuracy was assessed using 7 commonly used metrics that can provide complementary information regarding the quality of the segmentation results. The reproducibility was measured by the variation of the volume measurements from 10 independent segmentations. The effect of disease type, lesion size and slice thickness of image data on the accuracy measures were also analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the tumor segmentation algorithm showed good correlation with ground truth for all four lesion types (r = 0.97, 0.99, 0.97, 0.98, p < 0.0001 for liver, lung, lymphoma and other respectively). The segmentation algorithm can produce relatively reproducible volume measurements on all lesion types (coefficient of variation in the range of 10-20%). Our results show that the algorithm is insensitive to lesion size (coefficient of determination close to 0) and slice thickness of image data(p > 0.90). The validation framework used in this study has the potential to facilitate the development of new tumor segmentation algorithms and assist large scale evaluation of segmentation techniques for other clinical applications.

  2. Hypothalamic tumors impact gray and white matter volumes in fronto-limbic brain areas.

    PubMed

    Özyurt, Jale; Müller, Hermann L; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Thiel, Christiane M

    2017-04-01

    Patients with hypothalamic involvement of a sellar/parasellar tumor often suffer from cognitive and social-emotional deficits that a lesion in the hypothalamus cannot fully explain. It is conceivable that these deficits are partly due to distal changes in hypothalamic networks, evolving secondary to a focal lesion. Focusing on childhood-onset craniopharyngioma patients, we aimed at investigating the impact of hypothalamic lesions on gray and white matter areas densely connected to the hypothalamus, and to relate structural changes to neuropsychological deficits frequently observed in patients. We performed a voxel-based morphometric analysis based on data of 11 childhood-onset craniopharyngioma patients with hypothalamic tumor involvement, and 18 healthy controls (median age: 17.2 and 17.4 yrs.). Whole-brain analyses were used to test for volumetric differences between the groups (T-tests) and subsequent regression analyses were used to correlate neuropsychological performance with gray and white matter volumes within the patient group. Patients compared to controls had significantly reduced gray matter volumes in areas of the anterior and posterior limbic subsystems which are densely connected with the hypothalamus. In addition, a reduction in white matter volumes was observed in tracts connecting the hypothalamus to other limbic areas. Worse long-term memory retrieval was correlated with smaller gray matter volumes in the posterior cingulate cortex. Our data provide the first evidence that hypothalamic tumor involvement impacts gray and white matter volumes in limbic areas, outside the area of tumor growth. Notably, the functional range of the two limbic subsystems affected, strikingly parallels the two major domains of psychological complaints in patients i.e., deficits in episodic memory and in socio-emotional functioning. We suggest that focal hypothalamic lesions may trigger distal changes in connected brain areas, which then contribute to the impairments in

  3. Analysis of nodal coverage utilizing image guided radiation therapy for primary gynecologic tumor volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Faisal; Loma Linda University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda, CA; Sarkar, Vikren

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation dose delivered to pelvic lymph nodes, if daily Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) was implemented with treatment shifts based on the primary site (primary clinical target volume [CTV]). Our secondary goal was to compare dosimetric coverage with patient outcomes. Materials and methods: A total of 10 female patients with gynecologic malignancies were evaluated retrospectively after completion of definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to their pelvic lymph nodes and primary tumor site. IGRT consisted of daily kilovoltage computed tomography (CT)-on-rails imaging fused with initial planning scans for position verification. The initial plan was created using Varian's Eclipsemore » treatment planning software. Patients were treated with a median radiation dose of 45 Gy (range: 37.5 to 50 Gy) to the primary volume and 45 Gy (range: 45 to 64.8 Gy) to nodal structures. One IGRT scan per week was randomly selected from each patient's treatment course and re-planned on the Eclipse treatment planning station. CTVs were recreated by fusion on the IGRT image series, and the patient's treatment plan was applied to the new image set to calculate delivered dose. We evaluated the minimum, maximum, and 95% dose coverage for primary and nodal structures. Reconstructed primary tumor volumes were recreated within 4.7% of initial planning volume (0.9% to 8.6%), and reconstructed nodal volumes were recreated to within 2.9% of initial planning volume (0.01% to 5.5%). Results: Dosimetric parameters averaged less than 10% (range: 1% to 9%) of the original planned dose (45 Gy) for primary and nodal volumes on all patients (n = 10). For all patients, ≥99.3% of the primary tumor volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose (V95%) and the average minimum dose was 96.1% of the prescribed dose. In evaluating nodal CTV coverage, ≥ 99.8% of the volume received ≥ 95% the prescribed dose and the average minimum dose was 93%. In evaluating

  4. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volumemore » of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.« less

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced x-ray CT measurement of cerebral blood volume in a rabbit tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Lee, Ting-Yim; Craen, Rosemary A.; Gelb, Adrian W.

    1998-07-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a major determinant of intracranial pressure (ICP). Hyperventilation is commonly employed to reduce raised ICP (e.g. in brain tumour patients) presumably through its effect on CBV. With the advent of slip- ring CT scanners, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging allows for the measurement of CBV with high spatial resolution. Using a two-compartment model to characterize the distribution of X- ray contrast agent in the brain, we have developed a non- equilibrium CT method to measure CBV in normal and pathological regions. We used our method to investigate the effect of hyperventilation on CBV during propofol anaesthesia in rabbits with implanted brain tumours. Eight New Zealand White rabbits with implanted VX2 carcinoma brain tumours were studied. For each rabbit, regional CBV measurements were initially made at normocapnia (PaCO2 40 mmHg) and then at hyperventilation (PaCO2 25 mmHg) during propofol anaesthesia. The head was positioned such that a coronal image through the brain incorporated a significant cross-section of the brain tumour as well as a radial artery in a forelimb. Images at the rate of 1 per second were acquired for 2 minutes as Omnipaque 300 (1.5 ml/kg rabbit weight) was injected via a peripheral vein. In these CT images, regions of interest in the brain tissue (e.g. tumour, contra-lateral normal, and peri-tumoural) and the radial artery were drawn. For each region, the mean CT number in pre-contrast images was subtracted from the mean CT number in post-contrast images to produce either the tissue contrast concentration curve, or the arterial contrast concentration curve. Using our non- equilibrium analysis method based on a two-compartment model, regional CBV values were determined from the measured contrast concentration curves. From our study, the mean CBV values [+/- SD] in the tumour, peri-tumoural, and contra-lateral normal regions during normocapnia were: 5.47 plus or minus 1.97, 3.28 plus or minus 1.01, and 1

  6. Automatic delineation of tumor volumes by co-segmentation of combined PET/MR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibfarth, S.; Eckert, F.; Welz, S.; Siegel, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schwenzer, N.; Zips, D.; Thorwarth, D.

    2015-07-01

    Combined PET/MRI may be highly beneficial for radiotherapy treatment planning in terms of tumor delineation and characterization. To standardize tumor volume delineation, an automatic algorithm for the co-segmentation of head and neck (HN) tumors based on PET/MR data was developed. Ten HN patient datasets acquired in a combined PET/MR system were available for this study. The proposed algorithm uses both the anatomical T2-weighted MR and FDG-PET data. For both imaging modalities tumor probability maps were derived, assigning each voxel a probability of being cancerous based on its signal intensity. A combination of these maps was subsequently segmented using a threshold level set algorithm. To validate the method, tumor delineations from three radiation oncologists were available. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between the algorithm and each observer were quantified by means of the Dice similarity index and a distance measure. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between observers and algorithm were found to be comparable, suggesting that the proposed algorithm is adequate for PET/MR co-segmentation. Moreover, taking into account combined PET/MR data resulted in more consistent tumor delineations compared to MR information only.

  7. Radiotherapy treatment planning: benefits of CT-MR image registration and fusion in tumor volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Djan, Igor; Petrović, Borislava; Erak, Marko; Nikolić, Ivan; Lucić, Silvija

    2013-08-01

    Development of imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), made great impact on radiotherapy treatment planning by improving the localization of target volumes. Improved localization allows better local control of tumor volumes, but also minimizes geographical misses. Mutual information is obtained by registration and fusion of images achieved manually or automatically. The aim of this study was to validate the CT-MRI image fusion method and compare delineation obtained by CT versus CT-MRI image fusion. The image fusion software (XIO CMS 4.50.0) was applied to delineate 16 patients. The patients were scanned on CT and MRI in the treatment position within an immobilization device before the initial treatment. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated on CT alone and on CT+MRI images consecutively and image fusion was obtained. Image fusion showed that CTV delineated on a CT image study set is mainly inadequate for treatment planning, in comparison with CTV delineated on CT-MRI fused image study set. Fusion of different modalities enables the most accurate target volume delineation. This study shows that registration and image fusion allows precise target localization in terms of GTV and CTV and local disease control.

  8. Molecular weight (hydrodynamic volume) dictates the systemic pharmacokinetics and tumour disposition of PolyPEG star polymers.

    PubMed

    Khor, Song Yang; Hu, Jinming; McLeod, Victoria M; Quinn, John F; Williamson, Mark; Porter, Christopher J H; Whittaker, Michael R; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-11-01

    Herein we report for the first time the biological fate of poly[(oligoethylene glycol) acrylate] (POEGA) star polymers synthesised via a versatile arm-first reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerisation approach. The biopharmaceutical behaviour of three different molecular weight (49, 64 and 94kDa) POEGA stars was evaluated in rats and nude mice bearing human MDA MB-231 tumours after intravenous administration. The 94kDa star polymer exhibited a longer plasma exposure time than the 49kDa or 64kDa star polymer; an observation attributable to differences in the rates of both polymer biodegradation and urinary excretion. Tumour biodistribution also correlated with molecular weight and was greatest for the longest circulating 94kDa star. Different patterns of liver and spleen biodistribution were observed between mice and rats for the different sized polymers. The polymers were also well-tolerated in vivo and in vitro at therapeutic concentrations. Advances in nanotechnology has enabled scientists to produce nanoparticle as drug carriers in cancer therapeutics. In this article, the authors studied the biological fate of poly[(oligoethylene glycol) acrylate] (POEGA) star polymers of different size, after intravenous injections. This would allow the subsequent comparison to other drug delivery systems for better drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of Tumor Vascular Permeability and Blood Volume by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haojun; Tong, Xiao; Lang, Lixin; Jacobson, Orit; Yung, Bryant C.; Yang, Xiangyu; Bai, Ruiliang; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ma, Ying; Wu, Hua; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Evans Blue (EB) is an azo dye that binds quantitatively with serum albumin. With an albumin binding, NOTA conjugated truncated Evan's blue (NEB) dye derived PET tracer, we aimed to establish a strategy for evaluating vascular permeability in malignant tumors via non-invasive PET. Experimental design: Sixty-minute dynamic PET using [18F]FAl-NEB was performed in three xenograft tumor models including INS-1 rat insulinoma, UM-SCC-22B human head and neck carcinoma and U-87 MG human glioblastoma. Tumor vascular permeability was quantified by the difference of the slopes between tumor and blood time-activity curve (TACs, expressed as Ps). The method was further substantiated by EB extraction and colorimetric assay and correlates with that calculated from dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The changes in tumor vasculature at different time points were assessed with NEB PET in U-87 MG and UM-SCC-22B tumor models after treatment with bevacizumab or doxorubicin. Result: The Ps values calculated from tumor and blood TACs from multiple time-point static images are consistent with those from dynamic images. Moreover, the Ps showed a positive and significant correlation with extracted EB concentration and KPS-MRI generated from DCE-MRI, which further confirmed the soundness of this methodology. The antiangiogenic effect of bevacizumab could be revealed by NEB PET in U-87 MG tumors as early as 8 hrs after therapy, demonstrated by a substantial decrease of Ps. On the contrary, there was no significant change of Ps in bevacizumab treated UM-SCC-22B tumors, compared with control group. However, the significant changes of Pswere overestimated in doxorubicin treated UM-SCC-22B tumors. Conclusions: We successfully developed a relatively convenient and novel strategy to evaluate vascular permeability and blood volume using NEB PET. This method will be advantageous in evaluating vascular permeability, promoting drug delivery, and monitoring tumor

  10. Impact of removed tumor volume and location on patient outcome in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Awad, Al-Wala; Karsy, Michael; Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Yizhe; Mahan, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor with devastatingly poor prognosis. Multiple studies have shown the benefit of wider extent of resection (EOR) on patient overall survival (OS) and worsened survival with larger preoperative tumor volumes. However, the concomitant impact of postoperative tumor volume and eloquent location on OS has yet to be fully evaluated. We performed a retrospective chart review of adult patients treated for glioblastoma from January 2006 through December 2011. Adherence to standardized postoperative chemoradiation protocols was used as an inclusion criterion. Detailed volumetric and location analysis was performed on immediate preoperative and immediate postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cox proportional hazard modeling approach was employed to explore the modifying effects of EOR and eloquent location after adjusting for various confounders and associated characteristics, such as preoperative tumor volume and demographics. Of the 471 screened patients, 141 were excluded because they did not meet all inclusion criteria. The mean (±SD) age of the remaining 330 patients (60.6% male) was 58.9 ± 12.9 years; the mean preoperative and postoperative Karnofsky performance scores (KPSs) were 76.2 ± 10.3 and 80.0 ± 16.6, respectively. Preoperative tumor volume averaged 33.2 ± 29.0 ml, postoperative residual was 4.0 ± 8.1 ml, and average EOR was 88.6 ± 17.6%. The observed average follow-up was 17.6 ± 15.7 months, and mean OS was 16.7 ± 14.4 months. Survival analysis showed significantly shorter survival for patients with lesions in periventricular (16.8 ± 1.7 vs. 21.5 ± 1.4 mo, p = 0.03), deep nuclei/basal ganglia (11.6 ± 1.7 vs. 20.6 ± 1.2, p = 0.002), and multifocal (12.0 ± 1.4 vs. 21.3 ± 1.3 months, p = 0.0001) locations, but no significant influence on survival was seen for eloquent cortex sites (p = 0.14, range 0.07-0.9 for all individual

  11. Automatic estimation of extent of resection and residual tumor volume of patients with glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Meier, Raphael; Porz, Nicole; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Schucht, Philippe; Beck, Jürgen; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE In the treatment of glioblastoma, residual tumor burden is the only prognostic factor that can be actively influenced by therapy. Therefore, an accurate, reproducible, and objective measurement of residual tumor burden is necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a fully automatic segmentation method-brain tumor image analysis (BraTumIA)-for estimating the extent of resection (EOR) and residual tumor volume (RTV) of contrast-enhancing tumor after surgery. METHODS The imaging data of 19 patients who underwent primary resection of histologically confirmed supratentorial glioblastoma were retrospectively reviewed. Contrast-enhancing tumors apparent on structural preoperative and immediate postoperative MR imaging in this patient cohort were segmented by 4 different raters and the automatic segmentation BraTumIA software. The manual and automatic results were quantitatively compared. RESULTS First, the interrater variabilities in the estimates of EOR and RTV were assessed for all human raters. Interrater agreement in terms of the coefficient of concordance (W) was higher for RTV (W = 0.812; p < 0.001) than for EOR (W = 0.775; p < 0.001). Second, the volumetric estimates of BraTumIA for all 19 patients were compared with the estimates of the human raters, which showed that for both EOR (W = 0.713; p < 0.001) and RTV (W = 0.693; p < 0.001) the estimates of BraTumIA were generally located close to or between the estimates of the human raters. No statistically significant differences were detected between the manual and automatic estimates. BraTumIA showed a tendency to overestimate contrast-enhancing tumors, leading to moderate agreement with expert raters with respect to the literature-based, survival-relevant threshold values for EOR. CONCLUSIONS BraTumIA can generate volumetric estimates of EOR and RTV, in a fully automatic fashion, which are comparable to the estimates of human experts. However, automated analysis showed a tendency to overestimate

  12. Comparison of different width detector on the gross tumor volume delineation of the solitary pulmonary lesion.

    PubMed

    Shang, Dongping; Yue, Jinbo; Li, Jianbin; Duan, Jinghao; Yin, Yong; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    To explore the impact of different width detector on the volume and geometric position of gross tumor volume (GTV) of the solitary pulmonary lesion (SPL), as well as the impact on scanning time and radiation dose during the simulation. Twenty-three patients with SPL underwent three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation using different width detector, followed by four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. GTV16 and GTV4 derived from different width detectors were compared with internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) generated from 4DCT on the volume and geometric position. Fourteen patients with lesions located in the upper lobe were defined as Group A and nine patients in the middle or lower lobe were defined as Group B. The scanning time and radiation dose during the simulation with the different width detector were compared as well. The volumes of IGTV, GTV16, and GTV4 in Group A were 13.86 ± 14.42 cm3, 11.88 ± 11.93 cm3, and 11.64 ± 12.88 cm3, respectively, and the corresponding volumes in Group B were 12.84 ± 11.48 cm3, 6.90 ± 6.63 cm3, and 7.22 ± 7.15 cm3, respectively. No difference was found between GTV16 and GTV4 in Groups A and B (PA = 0.11, PB = 0.86). Either GTV16 or GTV4 was smaller than IGTV (P16 = 0.001, P4 = 0.000). The comparison of the centroidal positions in x, y, and z directions for GTV16, GTV4, and IGTV showed no significant difference both in Groups A and B (Group A: Px = 0.19, Py = 0.14, Pz = 0.47. Group B: Px = 0.09, Py = 0.90, Pz = 0.90). The scanning time was shorter and radiation dose patient received was lower using 16 × 1.5 mm detector combination than 4 × 1.5 mm detector (P = 0.000). Different width detector had no impact on the volume and geometric position of GTV of SPL during 3DCT simulation. Using wide detector would save time and decrease radiation dose compared with the narrow one. 3DCT simulation using either 16 × 1.5 mm detector or 4 × 1.5 mm detector could not cover all tumor motion information that 4

  13. Tumor-volume simulation during radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer using a four-level cell population model.

    PubMed

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Dong, Lei; Palta, Jantinder R; Amdur, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    To develop a fast computational radiobiologic model for quantitative analysis of tumor volume during fractionated radiotherapy. The tumor-volume model can be useful for optimizing image-guidance protocols and four-dimensional treatment simulations in proton therapy that is highly sensitive to physiologic changes. The analysis is performed using two approximations: (1) tumor volume is a linear function of total cell number and (2) tumor-cell population is separated into four subpopulations: oxygenated viable cells, oxygenated lethally damaged cells, hypoxic viable cells, and hypoxic lethally damaged cells. An exponential decay model is used for disintegration and removal of oxygenated lethally damaged cells from the tumor. We tested our model on daily volumetric imaging data available for 14 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with an integrated computed tomography/linear accelerator system. A simulation based on the averaged values of radiobiologic parameters was able to describe eight cases during the entire treatment and four cases partially (50% of treatment time) with a maximum 20% error. The largest discrepancies between the model and clinical data were obtained for small tumors, which may be explained by larger errors in the manual tumor volume delineation procedure. Our results indicate that the change in gross tumor volume for head-and-neck cancer can be adequately described by a relatively simple radiobiologic model. In future research, we propose to study the variation of model parameters by fitting to clinical data for a cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer and other tumors. The potential impact of other processes, like concurrent chemotherapy, on tumor volume should be evaluated.

  14. Neurocognitive status in patients with newly-diagnosed brain tumors in good neurological condition: The impact of tumor type, volume, and location.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Hans, Elisa; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Simgen, Andreas; Oertel, Joachim; Karbach, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Neurocognitive function is of great importance in patients with brain tumors. Even patients in good neurological condition may suffer from neurocognitive dysfunction that affects their daily living. The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors for neurocognitive dysfunction in patients suffering from common supratentorial brain tumors with minor neurological deficits. A prospective study evaluating neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with a newly-diagnosed brain tumor in good neurological condition was performed at a major German academic institution. Patients underwent extensive neurocognitive testing assessing perceptual speed, executive function, visual-spatial and verbal working memory, short- and long-term memory, verbal fluency, fluid intelligence, anxiety, and depression. For each patient, a healthy control was pair-matched based on age, sex, handedness, and profession. A total of 46 patients and 46 healthy controls underwent neurocognitive testing. Patients suffered from glioblastoma multiforme (10), cerebral metastasis (10), pituitary adenoma (13), or meningioma (13). There was neither any difference in age, educational level, fluid intelligence, neurological deficits, and anxiety nor in any depression scores between tumor subgroups. Overall, neurocognitive performance was significantly worse in patients compared to healthy controls. Larger tumor volume, frontal location, and left/dominant hemisphere were associated with worse executive functioning and verbal fluency. Additionally, larger tumors and left/dominant location correlated with impairments on perceptual speed tasks. Frontal tumor location was related to worse performance in visual-spatial and short- and long-term memory. Tumor type, clinical presentation, and patient self-awareness were not associated with specific neurocognitive impairments. Patients suffering from newly-diagnosed brain tumors presenting in good neurological condition display neurocognitive impairments in

  15. Impacts of lung and tumor volumes on lung dosimetry for nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weijie; Jia, Jing; Cao, Ruifen; Song, Jing; Hu, Liqin

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impacts of lung and tumor volumes on normal lung dosimetry in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ssIMRT), and single full-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancers (NSCLC). All plans were designed to deliver a total dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions to PTV for the 32 NSCLC patients with various total (bilateral) lung volumes, planning target volumes (PTVs), and PTV locations. The ratio of the lung volume (total lung volume excluding the PTV volume) to the PTV volume (LTR) was evaluated to represent the impacts in three steps. (a) The least squares method was used to fit mean lung doses (MLDs) to PTVs or LTRs with power-law function in the population cohort (N = 32). (b) The population cohort was divided into three groups by LTRs based on first step and then by PTVs, respectively. The MLDs were compared among the three techniques in each LTR group (LG) and each PTV group (PG). (c) The power-law correlation was tested by using the adaptive radiation therapy (ART) planning data of individual patients in the individual cohort (N = 4). Different curves of power-law function with high R 2 values were observed between averaged LTRs and averaged MLDs for 3DCRT, ssIMRT, and VMAT, respectively. In the individual cohort, high R 2 values of fitting curves were also observed in individual patients in ART, although the trend was highly patient-specific. There was a more obvious correlation between LTR and MLD than that between PTV and MLD. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Effect of Tumor Volume on Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lok, Benjamin H.; New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; Setton, Jeremy

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary gross tumor volume (pGTV) and nodal gross tumor volume (nGTV) on treatment outcomes in patients treated with definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and April 2009, a total of 442 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx were treated with IMRT with curative intent at our center. Thirty patients treated postoperatively and 2 additional patients who started treatment more than 6 months after diagnosis were excluded. A total of 340 patients with restorable treatment plans were included in this present study. The majoritymore » of the patients underwent concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The pGTV and nGTV were calculated using the original clinical treatment plans. Cox proportional hazards models and log-rank tests were used to evaluate the correlation between tumor volumes and overall survival (OS), and competing risks analysis tools were used to evaluate the correlation between local failure (LF), regional failure (RF), distant metastatic failure (DMF) vs. tumor volumes with death as a competing risk. Results: Median follow-up among surviving patients was 34 months (range, 5-67). The 2-year cumulative incidence of LF, RF and DF in this cohort of patients was 6.1%, 5.2%, and 12.2%, respectively. The 2-year OS rate was 88.6%. Univariate analysis determined pGTV and T-stage correlated with LF (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.004, respectively), whereas nGTV was not associated with RF. On multivariate analysis, pGTV and N-stage were independent risk factors for overall survival (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0073, respectively) and distant control (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions: In this cohort of patients with OPC treated with IMRT, pGTV was found to be associated with overall survival, local failure, and distant metastatic failure.« less

  17. Surgeon Annual and Cumulative Volumes Predict Early Postoperative Outcomes After Brain Tumor Resection.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Rohan; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Mao, Jialin; Sedrakyan, Art

    2018-06-01

    Surgeon volume has been previously shown to affect patient outcomes. However, data related to neuro-oncologic surgery are limited and do not include neurologic morbidities as an outcomes measure. In this study, we aimed to determine if 5-year surgeon cumulative and annual volumes predict early postoperative outcomes in patients after brain tumor surgery. A population-based cohort of patients (n = 10,258) undergoing brain tumor resection between 2005 and 2014 were included for study using the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperation System. Surgeons were categorized by their cumulative and annual surgical volume. Patients treated by high cumulative/high annual (HC/HA) volume surgeons had shorter length of stay (median, 5 days vs. 8 days vs. 8 days vs. 6 days, respectively; P < 0.01), lower charges (median, 70,025 vs. $77,043 vs. $93,715 vs. $77,018 respectively; P < 0.01) and less nonroutine discharge (41% vs. 48% vs. 50.9% vs. 43.9% respectively; P < 0.01) compared with patients treated by surgeons from the low cumulative/low annual (LC/LA), LC/HA, HC/LA groups. Similarly, HC/HA volume surgeons also had lower rate of hydrocephalus (9.9% vs. 10.4% vs. 13.7% respectively; P = 0.02), medical complications (6.9% vs. 11.2% vs. 11.5% respectively; P < 0.01), neurologic complications (44.1% vs. 46.8% vs. 48.1% respectively; P = 0.03), 30-day reoperation (5.1% vs. 6.9% vs. 7.1% respectively; P < 0.01) and 30-day death (3.3% vs. 5.4% vs. 5.2%; P < 0.01) compared with LC/LA and LC/HA volume surgeons. There is some evidence for improved postoperative outcomes when surgery is performed by HC and HA volume surgeons. This finding suggests that subspecialization in surgical neuro-oncology should be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic segmentation of tumor-laden lung volumes from the LIDC database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2012-03-01

    The segmentation of the lung parenchyma is often a critical pre-processing step prior to application of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. Segmentation of the lung volume can dramatically decrease computation time and reduce the number of false positive detections by excluding from consideration extra-pulmonary tissue. However, while many algorithms are capable of adequately segmenting the healthy lung, none have been demonstrated to work reliably well on tumor-laden lungs. Of particular challenge is to preserve tumorous masses attached to the chest wall, mediastinum or major vessels. In this role, lung volume segmentation comprises an important computational step that can adversely affect the performance of the overall CAD algorithm. An automated lung volume segmentation algorithm has been developed with the goals to maximally exclude extra-pulmonary tissue while retaining all true nodules. The algorithm comprises a series of tasks including intensity thresholding, 2-D and 3-D morphological operations, 2-D and 3-D floodfilling, and snake-based clipping of nodules attached to the chest wall. It features the ability to (1) exclude trachea and bowels, (2) snip large attached nodules using snakes, (3) snip small attached nodules using dilation, (4) preserve large masses fully internal to lung volume, (5) account for basal aspects of the lung where in a 2-D slice the lower sections appear to be disconnected from main lung, and (6) achieve separation of the right and left hemi-lungs. The algorithm was developed and trained to on the first 100 datasets of the LIDC image database.

  19. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  20. Phyllodes tumours

    PubMed Central

    Parker, S; Harries, S

    2001-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial lesions that account for less than 1% of all breast neoplasms. With the non-operative management of fibroadenomas widely adopted, the importance of phyllodes tumours today lies in the need to differentiate them from other benign breast lesions. All breast lumps should be triple assessed and the diagnosis of a phyllodes tumour considered in women, particularly over the age of 35 years, who present with a rapidly growing "benign" breast lump. Treatment can be by either wide excision or mastectomy provided histologically clear specimen margins are ensured. Nodal metastases are rare and routine axillary dissection is not recommended. Few reliable clinical and histological prognostic factors have been identified. Local recurrence occurs in approximately 15% of patients and is more common after incomplete excision. It can usually be controlled by further surgery. Repeated local recurrence has been reported without the development of distant metastases or reduced survival. Approximately 20% of patients with malignant phyllodes tumours develop distant metastases. Long term survival with distant metastases is rare. The role of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal manipulation in both the adjuvant and palliative settings remain to be defined.


Keywords: benign breast disease; fibroadenoma; phyllodes tumour PMID:11423590

  1. FDG-PET/CT imaging for tumor staging and definition of tumor volumes in radiation treatment planning in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanda; Sun, Xiaojiang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Lingnan; DI, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yaping

    2014-04-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has the potential to improve the staging and radiation treatment (RT) planning of various tumor sites. However, from a clinical standpoint, questions remain with regard to what extent PET/CT changes the target volume and whether PET/CT reduces interobserver variability in target volume delineation. The present study analyzed the use of FDG-PET/CT images for staging and evaluated the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who were candidates for radiotherapy. Intraobserver variation in delineating tumor volumes was also observed. In total, 23 patients with stage I-III NSCLC were enrolled and treated with fractionated RT-based therapy with or without chemotherapy. FDG-PET/CT scans were acquired within two weeks prior to RT. PET and CT data sets were sent to the treatment planning system, Pinnacle, through compact discs. The CT and PET images were subsequently fused by means of a dedicated RT planning system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured by four radiation oncologists on CT (GTV-CT) and PET/CT images (GTV-PET/CT). The resulting volumes were analyzed and compared. For the first phase, two radiation oncologists outlined the contours together, achieving a final consensus. Based on PET/CT, changes in tumor-node-metastasis categories occurred in 8/23 cases (35%). Radiation targeting with fused FDG-PET and CT images resulted in alterations in radiation therapy planning in 12/20 patients (60%) in comparison with CT targeting. The most prominent changes in GTV were observed in cases with atelectasis. For the second phase, the variation in delineating tumor volumes was assessed by four observers. The mean ratio of largest to smallest CT-based GTV was 2.31 (range, 1.01-5.96). The addition of the PET results reduced the mean ratio to 1.46 (range, 1.02-2.27). PET/CT fusion images may have a

  2. Diffusion-Weighted PROPELLER MRI for Quantitative Assessment of Liver Tumor Necrotic Fraction and Viable Tumor Volume in VX2 Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Virmani, Sumeet; Young, Joseph; Harris, Kathleen; Yang, Guang-Yu; Rademaker, Alfred; Woloschak, Gayle; Omary, Reed A.; Larson, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that diffusion-weighted (DW)-PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) MRI provides more accurate liver tumor necrotic fraction (NF) and viable tumor volume (VTV) measurements than conventional DW-SE-EPI (spin echo echo-planar imaging) methods. Materials and Methods Our institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approved all experiments. In six rabbits implanted with 10 VX2 liver tumors, DW-PROPELLER and DW-SE-EPI scans were performed at contiguous axial slice positions covering each tumor volume. Apparent diffusion coefficient maps of each tumor were used to generate spatially resolved tumor viability maps for NF and VTV measurements. We compared NF, whole tumor volume (WTV), and VTV measurements to corresponding reference standard histological measurements based on correlation and concordance coefficients and the Bland–Altman analysis. Results DW-PROPELLER generally improved image quality with less distortion compared to DW-SE-EPI. DW-PROPELLER NF, WTV, and VTV measurements were strongly correlated and satisfactorily concordant with histological measurements. DW-SE-EPI NF measurements were weakly correlated and poorly concordant with histological measurements. Bland–Altman analysis demonstrated that DWPROPELLER WTV and VTV measurements were less biased from histological measurements than the corresponding DW-SE-EPI measurements. Conclusion DW-PROPELLER MRI can provide spatially resolved liver tumor viability maps for accurate NF and VTV measurements, superior to DW-SE-EPI approaches. DWPROPELLER measurements may serve as a noninvasive surrogate for pathology, offering the potential for more accurate assessments of therapy response than conventional anatomic size measurements. PMID:18407540

  3. Evaluation of tomotherapy MVCT image enhancement program for tumor volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Spencer; Rodrigues, George; Chen, Quan; Pavamani, Simon; Read, Nancy; Ahmad, Belal; Hammond, J. Alex; Venkatesan, Varagur; Renaud, James

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the variability between physicians in delineation of head and neck tumors on original tomotherapy megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies and corresponding software enhanced MVCT images, and to establish an optimal approach for evaluation of image improvement. Five physicians contoured the gross tumor volume (GTV) for three head and neck cancer patients on 34 original and enhanced MVCT studies. Variation between original and enhanced MVCT studies was quantified by DICE coefficient and the coefficient of variance. Based on volume of agreement between physicians, higher correlation in terms of average DICE coefficients was observed in GTV delineation for enhanced MVCT for patients 1, 2, and 3 by 15%, 3%, and 7%, respectively, while delineation variance among physicians was reduced using enhanced MVCT for 12 of 17 weekly image studies. Enhanced MVCT provides advantages in reduction of variance among physicians in delineation of the GTV. Agreement on contouring by the same physician on both original and enhanced MVCT was equally high. PACS numbers: 87.57.N‐, 87.57.np, 87.57.nt

  4. Adaptive Radiotherapy Planning on Decreasing Gross Tumor Volumes as Seen on Megavoltage Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Dar, A. Rashid

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) changes for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer by using daily megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT) studies acquired before each treatment fraction on helical tomotherapy and to relate the potential benefit of adaptive image-guided radiotherapy to changes in GTV. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were prescribed 30 fractions of radiotherapy on helical tomotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer at London Regional Cancer Program from Dec 2005 to March 2007. The GTV was contoured on the daily MVCT studies of each patient. Adapted plans were created using merged MVCT-kilovoltage CT image sets to investigate the advantagesmore » of replanning for patients with differing GTV regression characteristics. Results: Average GTV change observed over 30 fractions was -38%, ranging from -12 to -87%. No significant correlation was observed between GTV change and patient's physical or tumor features. Patterns of GTV changes in the 17 patients could be divided broadly into three groups with distinctive potential for benefit from adaptive planning. Conclusions: Changes in GTV are difficult to predict quantitatively based on patient or tumor characteristics. If changes occur, there are points in time during the treatment course when it may be appropriate to adapt the plan to improve sparing of normal tissues. If GTV decreases by greater than 30% at any point in the first 20 fractions of treatment, adaptive planning is appropriate to further improve the therapeutic ratio.« less

  5. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Knybel, Lukas; VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava; Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, andmore » sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in

  6. Accurate tracking of tumor volume change during radiotherapy by CT-CBCT registration with intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Robinson, Adam; Quon, Harry; Kiess, Ana P.; Shen, Colette; Wong, John; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a CT-CBCT registration method to accurately predict the tumor volume change based on daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) during radiotherapy. CBCT is commonly used to reduce patient setup error during radiotherapy, but its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of anatomical changes. Although physician's contours drawn on the planning CT can be automatically propagated to daily CBCTs by deformable image registration (DIR), artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors. To improve the accuracy of the registration-based segmentation, we developed a DIR method that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities by local histogram matching. Three popular DIR algorithms (B-spline, demons, and optical flow) with the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation. We evaluated their performances on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. For each case, four trained scientists manually contoured the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial image registration software based on conventional mutual information (MI), VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average of the manual segmentations and automatic segmentations are 3.70+/-2.30 (B-spline), 1.25+/-1.78 (demons), 0.93+/-1.14 (optical flow), and 4.39+/-3.86 (VelocityAI). The proposed method significantly reduced the estimation error by 9% (B-spline), 38% (demons), and 51% (optical flow) over the results using VelocityAI. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply that the proposed method can produce improved segmentation of other critical structures over conventional methods.

  7. Influence of Residual Tumor Volume and Radiation Dose Coverage in Outcomes for Clival Chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com; Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana; Linton, Okechukwu R.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tumor control in clival chordomas. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 39 patients treated with surgery and proton therapy for clival chordomas between 2004 and 2014 was performed. The median prescribed dose was 77.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]); range was 70.2-79.2 Gy (RBE). Minimum and median doses to gross tumor volume (GTV), radiation dose received by 1 cm{sup 3} of GTV (D1cm{sup 3}), and the equivalent uniform dose were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics curves evaluated the predictive sensitivity and specificity for local failure of potential cutpoint values for GTVmore » and D1cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year estimate of local control (LC) was 69.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.0%-89.2%), and overall survival (OS) was 81.4% (95% CI: 65.3%-97.5%). Tumor histology, GTV at the time of radiation, and prescribed radiation dose were significantly associated with local control on multivariate analysis, whereas D1cm{sup 3} was associated with overall survival. Compared to those patients whose conditions remained controlled, patients experiencing tumor failure had statistically significant larger GTVs and lower D1cm{sup 3}, and prescribed and median doses to GTV. A subset of 21 patients with GTV of ≤20 cm{sup 3} and D1cm{sup 3} of >67 Gy (RBE) had a median follow-up of 47 months. The 5-year estimate of local control in this subset was 81.1% (95% CI: 61.7%-100%; P=.004, overall comparison by GTV ≤20 cm{sup 3} stratified by D1cm{sup 3}). A D1cm{sup 3} of 74.5 Gy (RBE) had 80% sensitivity for local control and 60% specificity, whereas a GTV of 9.3 cm{sup 3} had 80% sensitivity for local control and 66.7% specificity. Conclusions: Local control of clival chordomas was associated with both smaller size of residual tumor and more complete high-dose coverage of residual tumor. Multidisciplinary care

  8. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Reproducibility of lung tumor position and reduction of lung mass within the planning target volume using active breathing control (ABC).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Patrick C F; Sixel, Katharina E; Tirona, Romeo; Ung, Yee C

    2003-12-01

    The active breathing control (ABC) device allows for temporary immobilization of respiratory motion by implementing a breath hold at a predefined relative lung volume and air flow direction. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the ability of the ABC device to immobilize peripheral lung tumors at a reproducible position, increase total lung volume, and thereby reduce lung mass within the planning target volume (PTV). Ten patients with peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer tumors undergoing radiotherapy had CT scans of their thorax with and without ABC inspiration breath hold during the first 5 days of treatment. Total lung volumes were determined from the CT data sets. Each peripheral lung tumor was contoured by one physician on all CT scans to generate gross tumor volumes (GTVs). The lung density and mass contained within a 1.5-cm PTV margin around each peripheral tumor was calculated using CT numbers. Using the center of the GTV from the Day 1 ABC scan as the reference, the displacement of subsequent GTV centers on Days 2 to 5 for each patient with ABC applied was calculated in three dimensions. With the use of ABC inspiration breath hold, total lung volumes increased by an average of 42%. This resulted in an average decrease in lung mass of 18% within a standard 1.5-cm PTV margin around the GTV. The average (+/- standard deviation) displacement of GTV centers with ABC breath hold applied was 0.3 mm (+/- 1.8 mm), 1.2 mm (+/- 2.3 mm), and 1.1 mm (+/- 3.5 mm) in the lateral direction, anterior-posterior direction, and superior-inferior direction, respectively. Results from this study indicate that there remains some inter-breath hold variability in peripheral lung tumor position with the use of ABC inspiration breath hold, which prevents significant PTV margin reduction. However, lung volumes can significantly increase, thereby decreasing the mass of lung within a standard PTV.

  10. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquiredmore » for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC

  11. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  12. Avelumab for metastatic or locally advanced previously treated solid tumours (JAVELIN Solid Tumor): a phase 1a, multicohort, dose-escalation trial.

    PubMed

    Heery, Christopher R; O'Sullivan-Coyne, Geraldine; Madan, Ravi A; Cordes, Lisa; Rajan, Arun; Rauckhorst, Myrna; Lamping, Elizabeth; Oyelakin, Israel; Marté, Jennifer L; Lepone, Lauren M; Donahue, Renee N; Grenga, Italia; Cuillerot, Jean-Marie; Neuteboom, Berend; Heydebreck, Anja von; Chin, Kevin; Schlom, Jeffrey; Gulley, James L

    2017-05-01

    Avelumab (MSB0010718C) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds to PD-L1, inhibiting its binding to PD-1, which inactivates T cells. We aimed to establish the safety and pharmacokinetics of avelumab in patients with solid tumours while assessing biological correlatives for future development. This open-label, single-centre, phase 1a, dose-escalation trial (part of the JAVELIN Solid Tumor trial) assessed four doses of avelumab (1 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 20 mg/kg), with dose-level cohort expansions to provide additional safety, pharmacokinetics, and target occupancy data. This study used a standard 3 + 3 cohort design and assigned patients sequentially at trial entry according to the 3 + 3 dose-escalation algorithm and depending on the number of dose-limiting toxicities during the first 3-week assessment period (the primary endpoint). Patient eligibility criteria included age 18 years or older, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, metastatic or locally advanced previously treated solid tumours, and adequate end-organ function. Avelumab was given as a 1-h intravenous infusion every 2 weeks. Patients in the dose-limiting toxicity analysis set were assessed for the primary endpoint of dose-limiting toxicity, and all patients enrolled in the dose-escalation part were assessed for the secondary endpoints of safety (treatment-emergent and treatment-related adverse events according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0), pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles (immunological effects), best overall response by Response Evaluation Criteria, and antidrug antibody formation. The population for the pharmacokinetic analysis included a subset of patients with rich pharmacokinetic samples from two selected disease-specific expansion cohorts at the same study site who had serum samples obtained at multiple early timepoints. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT

  13. Residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemoradiation outside the radiation therapy target volume: a new prognostic factor for survival in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; van Dam, Go; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Results Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume <0.5 cm3. Variability across race/ethnicity was found in the univariable analysis for all PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Conclusions Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives’ ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer. PMID:28160549

  15. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: Addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-03-28

    To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume <0.5 cm3. Variability across race/ethnicity was found in the univariable analysis for all PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives' ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer.

  16. Whole-tumor histogram analysis of the cerebral blood volume map: tumor volume defined by 11C-methionine positron emission tomography image improves the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral glioma grading.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rongli; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Arisawa, Atsuko; Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Watabe, Tadashi; Isohashi, Kayako; Hatazawa, Jun; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the tumor volume definition using conventional magnetic resonance (MR) and 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET/PET) images in the differentiation of the pre-operative glioma grade by using whole-tumor histogram analysis of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) maps. Thirty-four patients with histopathologically proven primary brain low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and high-grade gliomas (n = 19) underwent pre-operative or pre-biopsy MET/PET, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted at 3.0 T. The histogram distribution derived from the nCBV maps was obtained by co-registering the whole tumor volume delineated on conventional MR or MET/PET images, and eight histogram parameters were assessed. The mean nCBV value had the highest AUC value (0.906) based on MET/PET images. Diagnostic accuracy significantly improved when the tumor volume was measured from MET/PET images compared with conventional MR images for the parameters of mean, 50th, and 75th percentile nCBV value (p = 0.0246, 0.0223, and 0.0150, respectively). Whole-tumor histogram analysis of CBV map provides more valuable histogram parameters and increases diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of pre-operative cerebral gliomas when the tumor volume is derived from MET/PET images.

  17. SU-E-T-429: Uncertainties of Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of cell surviving fraction reconstructed from tumor-volume variation curves during radiation therapy using sensitivity analysis based on linear perturbation theory. Methods: The time dependent tumor-volume functions V(t) have been calculated using a twolevel cell population model which is based on the separation of entire tumor cell population in two subpopulations: oxygenated viable and lethally damaged cells. The sensitivity function is defined as S(t)=[δV(t)/V(t)]/[δx/x] where δV(t)/V(t) is the time dependent relative variation of the volume V(t) and δx/x is the relative variation of the radiobiological parameter x. The sensitivity analysis was performed using direct perturbation method wheremore » the radiobiological parameter x was changed by a certain error and the tumor-volume was recalculated to evaluate the corresponding tumor-volume variation. Tumor volume variation curves and sensitivity functions have been computed for different values of cell surviving fractions from the practically important interval S{sub 2}=0.1-0.7 using the two-level cell population model. Results: The sensitivity functions of tumor-volume to cell surviving fractions achieved a relatively large value of 2.7 for S{sub 2}=0.7 and then approached zero as S{sub 2} is approaching zero Assuming a systematic error of 3-4% we obtain that the relative error in S{sub 2} is less that 20% in the range S2=0.4-0.7. This Resultis important because the large values of S{sub 2} are associated with poor treatment outcome should be measured with relatively small uncertainties. For the very small values of S2<0.3, the relative error can be larger than 20%; however, the absolute error does not increase significantly. Conclusion: Tumor-volume curves measured during radiotherapy can be used for evaluation of cell surviving fractions usually observed in radiation therapy with conventional fractionation.« less

  18. Surface-to-volume ratio mapping of tumor microstructure using oscillating gradient diffusion weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Olivier; Winters, Kerryanne Veronica; Hoang, Dung Minh; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Novikov, Dmitry S; Kim, Sungheon Gene

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To disentangle the free diffusivity (D0) and cellular membrane restrictions, via their surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), using the frequency-dependence of the diffusion coefficient D(ω), measured in brain tumors in the short diffusion-time regime using oscillating gradients (OGSE). Methods In vivo and ex vivo OGSE experiments were performed on mice bearing the GL261 murine glioma model (n=10) to identify the relevant time/frequency (t/ω) domain where D(ω) linearly decreases with ω−1/2. Parametric maps (S/V, D0) are compared to conventional DWI metrics. The impact of frequency range and temperature (20°C vs. 37°C) on S/V and D0 is investigated ex vivo. Results The validity of the short diffusion-time regime is demonstrated in vivo and ex vivo. Ex vivo measurements confirm that the purely geometric restrictions embodied in S/V are independent from temperature and frequency range, while the temperature dependence of the free diffusivity D0 is similar to that of pure water. Conclusion Our results suggest that D(ω) in the short diffusion-time regime can be used to uncouple the purely geometric restriction effect, such as S/V, from the intrinsic medium diffusivity properties, and provides a non-empirical and objective way to interpret frequency/time-dependent diffusion changes in tumors in terms of objective biophysical tissue parameters. PMID:26207354

  19. The prognostic impact of tumor volume on stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Hao-Jun; Liu, Qian-Wen; Mo, Yun-Xian; Long, Hao; Rong, Tie-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic impact of tumor volume (TV) on patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after complete resection. We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathological characteristics of 274 patients with stage I NSCLC who had received preoperative chest computed tomography (CT) scans and complete resection. TV was semi-automatically measured from chest CT scans by using an imaging software program. The optimal cutoff values of TV were determined by X-tile software. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS and OS. By using 3.046cm 3 and 8.078cm 3 as two optimal cutoff values of TV, the patients were separated into three groups. The 5-year DFS and OS for patients with TV≤3.046cm 3 , 3.046-8.078cm 3 , and>8.078cm 3 were 88.0%, 73.6%, and 62.1%, respectively (P<0.001), and 91.4%, 84.5%, and 73.3%, respectively (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and TV were independent factors associated with DFS. Sex, age, histology, visceral pleural invasion, and TV were independent factors associated with OS. Stage Ia patients might be separated into three groups on the basis of TV with significantly different DFS and OS. Patients with tumor diameter≤2cm and 2-3cm were also stratified into two groups with significantly different DFS and OS on the basis of TV, respectively. TV is an independent risk factor for DFS and OS for stage I NSCLC after complete resection. TV might provide additional prognostic information over tumor diameter in patients with stage I NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation.

  1. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  2. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com; McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device,more » a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.« less

  3. Cranial Tumor Surgical Outcomes at a High-Volume Academic Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Brown, Desmond A; Himes, Benjamin T; Major, Brittny T; Mundell, Benjamin F; Kumar, Ravi; Kall, Bruce; Meyer, Fredric B; Link, Michael J; Pollock, Bruce E; Atkinson, John D; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Marsh, W Richard; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Bydon, Mohamad; Parney, Ian F

    2018-01-01

    To determine adverse event rates for adult cranial neuro-oncologic surgeries performed at a high-volume quaternary academic center and assess the impact of resident participation on perioperative complication rates. All adult patients undergoing neurosurgical intervention for an intracranial neoplastic lesion between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013, were included. Cases were categorized as biopsy, extra-axial/skull base, intra-axial, or transsphenoidal. Complications were categorized as neurologic, medical, wound, mortality, or none and compared for patients managed by a chief resident vs a consultant neurosurgeon. A total of 6277 neurosurgical procedures for intracranial neoplasms were performed. After excluding radiosurgical procedures and pediatric patients, 4151 adult patients who underwent 4423 procedures were available for analysis. Complications were infrequent, with overall rates of 9.8% (435 of 4423 procedures), 1.7% (73 of 4423), and 1.4% (63 of 4423) for neurologic, medical, and wound complications, respectively. The rate of perioperative mortality was 0.3% (14 of 4423 procedures). Case performance and management by a chief resident did not negatively impact outcome. In our large-volume brain tumor practice, rates of complications were low, and management of cases by chief residents in a semiautonomous manner did not negatively impact surgical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bellini tumours].

    PubMed

    Teghom, Corine; Gachet, Julie; Scotté, Florian; Elaidi, Reza; Oudard, Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    In Europe, renal tumours are 7th in frequency of men cancers. They are rare tumours in 10 to 15% of cases. Collecting ducts carcinomas or Bellini tumours, described for the first time in 1949, are a distinct clinical and pathological entity. They represented 1% of epithelial cancers. Nephrectomy is the treatment of localised cancer. Because of lack of recommendations, usually in clinical practice, treatment is similar to urothelial carcinomas treatments (gemcitabine plus platinium). A 72% of response rate of urothelial carcinoma to association of bevacizumab with platinium and gemcitabine 1st line chemotherapy in metastatic setting was reported. More, cases of responses of metastatic Bellini cancers to antiangiogenic treatments associated to chemotherapy were reported these last years. Bellini cancers have a poor prognostic. Unless the fact that this cancer is aggressive, after nephrectomy, cancer specific survival seems not to be different to those of patients with clear cells renal carcinoma and could be related to latest stage of disease in patients. The evaluation of efficacy of association of bevacizumab to chemotherapy is still going on in this association.

  5. Partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised of partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment, or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discover LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner’s center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method’s correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom, and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of ±30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV

  6. [Volume changes to the neck lymph node metastases in head-neck tumors. The evaluation of radiotherapeutic treatment success].

    PubMed

    Liszka, G; Thalacker, U; Somogyi, A; Németh, G

    1997-08-01

    This work is engaged with the volume change of neck lymph node metastasis of malignant tumors in the head-neck region during radiotherapy. In 54 patients with head and neck tumors, the volume of neck lymph nodes before and after radiation was measured. The volumetry was done with CT planimetry. The total dose was 66 Gy (2 Gy/d) telecobalt from 2 lateral opponated fields. The time of volume change could be defined with measuring of the half-time and the doubling-time by the help of Schwartz formula. After 10 Gy the volume diminution was about 20% and half-time 24 to 26 days. Afterwards the time of volume diminution picked up speed and finally achieved 60 to 72%. Meanwhile the half-time decreased to the half value. The result was independent of the site of primary tumor, the patient's sex and age. In our opinion the effectivity of radiotherapy can best be judged with defining of the volume change of lymph nodes of the neck.

  7. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  8. Metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis, measured using preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT, predict the recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Shim, S-H; Kim, D-Y; Lee, D-Y; Lee, S-W; Park, J-Y; Lee, J J; Kim, J-H; Kim, Y-M; Kim, Y-T; Nam, J-H

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), measured by preoperative positron emission tomography and computerised tomography (PET/CT), in women with endometrial cancer. Retrospective cohort study. A tertiary referral centre. Women with endometrial cancer who underwent preoperative (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the period 2004-2009. Clinicopathological data for 84 women with endometrial cancer were reviewed from medical records. Cox proportional hazards modelling identified recurrence predictors. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the cut-off value for predicting recurrence. Disease-free survival (DFS). The number of patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages were: I (58); II (11); III (13); and IV (2). The median DFS was 48 (1-85) months. By univariate analysis, DFS was significantly associated with FIGO stage, histology, peritoneal cytology, myometrial invasion, nodal metastasis, serum CA-125, MTV, and TLG. Using multivariate analysis, the MTV (P = 0.010; hazard ratio, HR = 1.010; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.002-1.018) and TLG (P = 0.024; HR = 1.001; 95% CI = 1.000-1.002) were associated with DFS. The area under the ROC curve was 0.679 (95% CI = 0.505-0.836) after discriminating for recurrence using an MTV cut-off value of 17.15 ml. Regarding TLG, the cut-off value was 56.43 g and the area under the ROC plot was 0.661 (95% CI = 0.501-0.827). Kaplan-Meier survival graphs demonstrated a significant difference in DFS between groups categorised using the cut-off values for MTV and TLG (P < 0.022 for MTV and P < 0.047 for TLG, by log-rank test). Preoperative MTV and TLG could be independent prognostic factors predicting the recurrence of endometrial cancer. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  9. Characterizing Tumor Heterogeneity With Functional Imaging and Quantifying High-Risk Tumor Volume for Early Prediction of Treatment Outcome: Cervical Cancer as a Model

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: Nina.Mayr@osumc.edu; Huang Zhibin; Wang, Jian Z.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Treatment response in cancer has been monitored by measuring anatomic tumor volume (ATV) at various times without considering the inherent functional tumor heterogeneity known to critically influence ultimate treatment outcome: primary tumor control and survival. This study applied dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) functional MRI to characterize tumors' heterogeneous subregions with low DCE values, at risk for treatment failure, and to quantify the functional risk volume (FRV) for personalized early prediction of treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: DCE-MRI was performed in 102 stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer patients to assess tumor perfusion heterogeneity before and during radiation/chemotherapy. FRV represents the totalmore » volume of tumor voxels with critically low DCE signal intensity (<2.1 compared with precontrast image, determined by previous receiver operator characteristic analysis). FRVs were correlated with treatment outcome (follow-up: 0.2-9.4, mean 6.8 years) and compared with ATVs (Mann-Whitney, Kaplan-Meier, and multivariate analyses). Results: Before and during therapy at 2-2.5 and 4-5 weeks of RT, FRVs >20, >13, and >5 cm{sup 3}, respectively, significantly predicted unfavorable 6-year primary tumor control (p = 0.003, 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) and disease-specific survival (p = 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}, respectively). The FRVs were superior to the ATVs as early predictors of outcome, and the differentiating power of FRVs increased during treatment. Discussion: Our preliminary results suggest that functional tumor heterogeneity can be characterized by DCE-MRI to quantify FRV for predicting ultimate long-term treatment outcome. FRV is a novel functional imaging heterogeneity parameter, superior to ATV, and can be clinically translated for personalized early outcome prediction before or as early as 2

  10. Enrichment of circulating tumor cells from a large blood volume using leukapheresis and elutriation: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Robert L; Lind, Judith; Falkenhagen, Dieter; Weber, Viktoria; Fischer, Michael B; Zeillinger, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the applicability of a sequential process using leukapheresis, elutriation, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to enrich and isolate circulating tumor cells from a large blood volume to allow further molecular analysis. Mononuclear cells were collected from 10 L of blood by leukapheresis, to which carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester prelabeled CaOV-3 tumor cells were spiked at a ratio of 26 to 10⁶ leukocytes. Elutriation separated the spiked leukapheresates primarily by cell size into distinct fractions, and leukocytes and tumor cells, characterized as carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester positive, EpCAM positive and CD45 negative events, were quantified by flow cytometry. Tumor cells were isolated from the last fraction using FACS or anti-EpCAM coupled immunomagnetic beads, and their recovery and purity determined by fluorescent microscopy and real-time PCR. Leukapheresis collected 13.5 x 10⁹ mononuclear cells with 87% efficiency. In total, 53 to 78% of spiked tumor cells were pre-enriched in the last elutriation fraction among 1.6 x 10⁹ monocytes. Flow cytometry predicted a circulating tumor cell purity of ~90% giving an enrichment of 100,000-fold following leukapheresis, elutriation, and FACS, where CaOV-3 cells were identified as EpCAM positive and CD45 negative events. FACS confirmed this purity. Alternatively, immunomagnetic bead adsorption recovered 10% of tumor cells with a median purity of 3.5%. This proof of concept study demonstrated that elutriation and FACS following leukapheresis are able to enrich and isolate tumor cells from a large blood volume for molecular characterization. Copyright © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  11. Assessing response to treatment in non--small-cell lung cancer: role of tumor volume evaluated by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Knollmann, Friedrich D; Kumthekar, Rohan; Fetzer, David; Socinski, Mark A

    2014-03-01

    We set out to investigate whether volumetric tumor measurements allow for a prediction of treatment response, as measured by patient survival, in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with nonresectable NSCLC (stage III or IV, n = 100) who were repeatedly evaluated for treatment response by computed tomography (CT) were included in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study. Tumor response was measured by comparing tumor volumes over time. Patient survival was compared with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) using Kaplan-Meier survival statistics and Cox regression analysis. The median overall patient survival was 553 days (standard error, 146 days); for patients with stage III NSCLC, it was 822 days, and for patients with stage IV disease, 479 days. The survival differences were not statistically significant (P = .09). According to RECIST, 5 patients demonstrated complete response, 39 partial response, 44 stable disease, and 12 progressive disease. Patient survival was not significantly associated with RECIST class, the change of the sum of tumor diameters (P = .98), nor the change of the sum of volumetric tumor dimensions (P = .17). In a group of 100 patients with advanced-stage NSCLC, neither volumetric CT measurements of changes in tumor size nor RECIST class significantly predicted patient survival. This observation suggests that size response may not be a sufficiently precise surrogate marker of success to steer treatment decisions in individual patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Robotic Enucleation for Benign or Borderline Tumours of the Pancreas: A Retrospective Analysis and Comparison from a High-Volume Centre in Asia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jia-Bin; Qin, Kai; Li, Hua; Wu, Zhi-Chong; Zhan, Qian; Deng, Xia-Xing; Chen, Hao; Shen, Bai-Yong; Peng, Cheng-Hong; Li, Hong-Wei

    2016-12-01

    Enucleation is increasingly performed for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas because it is a parenchyma-sparing and less invasive procedure compared to conventional pancreatectomy, which reduces the risk of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. This study retrospectively evaluated and compared the pre-, intra-, and post-operative clinical characteristics after open and robotic approaches for pancreatic enucleation. Fifty-six cases of enucleation for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas treated from March 2010 to July 2015 were identified by a retrospective search. These included 25 patients who underwent an open approach and 31 patients who underwent a robotic approach. The clinical characteristics were extracted and compared. The two groups had a similar location and pathology of the tumour. The robotic group had a significantly shorter operation time and significantly less blood loss than the open group. The rates of clinical pancreatic fistula (PF) formation and major complications were similar. The robotic approach could be applied for a tumour on the right side of the pancreas without increasing the incidence of clinical PF or other major complications. The patients with clinical PF had a significantly shorter distance between the lesion and the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Robotic enucleation appears to be a feasible and safe approach for benign or borderline tumours of the pancreas and was associated with similarly favourable surgical outcomes as the open approach. Identifying and avoiding the MPD is an important step during enucleation.

  14. Comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC PSMA-PET/CT and multiparametric MRI for gross tumour volume detection in patients with primary prostate cancer based on slice by slice comparison with histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Drendel, Vanessa; Jilg, Cordula A.; Rischke, Hans C.; Beck, Teresa I.; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Krauss, Tobias; Mix, Michael; Schiller, Florian; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Werner, Martin; Langer, Mathias; Bock, Michael; Meyer, Philipp T.; Grosu, Anca L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The exact detection and delineation of the intraprostatic tumour burden is crucial for treatment planning in primary prostate cancer (PCa). We compared 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) for diagnosis and tumour delineation in patients with primary PCa based on slice by slice correlation with histopathological reference material. Methodology: Seven patients with histopathologically proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and MRI followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and prepared for histopathology. Invasive PCa was delineated on a HE stained histologic tissue slide and matched to ex-vivo CT to obtain gross tumor volume (GTV-)histo. Ex-vivo CT including GTV-histo and MRI data were matched to in-vivo CT(PET). Consensus contours based on MRI (GTV-MRI), PSMA PET (GTV-PET) or the combination of both (GTV-union/-intersection) were created. In each in-vivo CT slice the prostate was separated into 4 equal segments and sensitivity and specificity for PSMA PET and mpMRI were assessed by comparison with histological reference material. Furthermore, the spatial overlap between GTV-histo and GTV-PET/-MRI and the Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC) were calculated. In the case of multifocal PCa (4/7 patients), SUV values (PSMA PET) and ADC-values (diffusion weighted MRI) were obtained for each lesion. Results: PSMA PET and mpMRI detected PCa in all patients. GTV-histo was detected in 225 of 340 segments (66.2%). Sensitivity and specificity for GTV-PET, GTV-MRI, GTV-union and GTV-intersection were 75% and 87%, 70% and 82%, 82% and 67%, 55% and 99%, respectively. GTV-histo had on average the highest overlap with GTV-union (57±22%), which was significantly higher than overlap with GTV-MRI (p=0.016) and GTV-PET (p=0.016), respectively. The mean DSC for GTV-union, GTV-PET and GTV-MRI was 0.51 (±0.18), 0.45 (±0.17) and 0.48 (±0.19), respectively. In every patient with

  15. Vestibular schwannomas: Accuracy of tumor volume estimated by ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced MR images

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hsing-Hao; Li, Ya-Hui; Lee, Jih-Chin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Yu, Yi-Lin; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2018-01-01

    Purpose We estimated the volume of vestibular schwannomas by an ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced magnetic resonance images (MRI) and compared the estimation accuracy among different estimating formulas and between different models. Methods The study was approved by a local institutional review board. A total of 100 patients with vestibular schwannomas examined by MRI between January 2011 and November 2015 were enrolled retrospectively. Informed consent was waived. Volumes of vestibular schwannomas were estimated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulas based on a one-component model, and cuboidal, ellipsoidal, Linskey’s, and ice cream cone formulas based on a two-component model. The estimated volumes were compared to the volumes measured by planimetry. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver agreement was tested. Estimation error, including absolute percentage error (APE) and percentage error (PE), was calculated. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), linear regression analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-tests with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results Overall tumor size was 4.80 ± 6.8 mL (mean ±standard deviation). All ICCs were no less than 0.992, suggestive of high intraobserver reproducibility and high interobserver agreement. Cuboidal formulas significantly overestimated the tumor volume by a factor of 1.9 to 2.4 (P ≤ 0.001). The one-component ellipsoidal and spherical formulas overestimated the tumor volume with an APE of 20.3% and 29.2%, respectively. The two-component ice cream cone method, and ellipsoidal and Linskey’s formulas significantly reduced the APE to 11.0%, 10.1%, and 12.5%, respectively (all P < 0.001). Conclusion The ice cream cone method and other two-component formulas including the ellipsoidal and Linskey’s formulas allow for estimation of vestibular schwannoma volume more accurately than all one-component formulas. PMID:29438424

  16. Vestibular schwannomas: Accuracy of tumor volume estimated by ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced MR images.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsing-Hao; Li, Ya-Hui; Lee, Jih-Chin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Yu, Yi-Lin; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2018-01-01

    We estimated the volume of vestibular schwannomas by an ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced magnetic resonance images (MRI) and compared the estimation accuracy among different estimating formulas and between different models. The study was approved by a local institutional review board. A total of 100 patients with vestibular schwannomas examined by MRI between January 2011 and November 2015 were enrolled retrospectively. Informed consent was waived. Volumes of vestibular schwannomas were estimated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulas based on a one-component model, and cuboidal, ellipsoidal, Linskey's, and ice cream cone formulas based on a two-component model. The estimated volumes were compared to the volumes measured by planimetry. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver agreement was tested. Estimation error, including absolute percentage error (APE) and percentage error (PE), was calculated. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), linear regression analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-tests with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Overall tumor size was 4.80 ± 6.8 mL (mean ±standard deviation). All ICCs were no less than 0.992, suggestive of high intraobserver reproducibility and high interobserver agreement. Cuboidal formulas significantly overestimated the tumor volume by a factor of 1.9 to 2.4 (P ≤ 0.001). The one-component ellipsoidal and spherical formulas overestimated the tumor volume with an APE of 20.3% and 29.2%, respectively. The two-component ice cream cone method, and ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas significantly reduced the APE to 11.0%, 10.1%, and 12.5%, respectively (all P < 0.001). The ice cream cone method and other two-component formulas including the ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas allow for estimation of vestibular schwannoma volume more accurately than all one-component formulas.

  17. Prognostic significance of preoperative metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis measured by (18)F-FDG PET/CT in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Ryu, In Sun; Kim, Jae Seung; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Cho, Kyung-Ja; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) from (18)F-FDG PET/CT are emerging prognostic biomarkers in human solid cancers; yet few studies have investigated their clinical and prognostic significance in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The present retrospective study evaluated the utility of pretreatment MTV and TLG measured by (18)F-FDG PET/CT to predict survival and occult metastasis (OM) in OSCC. Of 162 patients with OSCC evaluated preoperatively by (18)F-FDG PET/CT, 105 who underwent definitive surgery with or without adjuvant therapy were eligible. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), MTV and TLG were measured. For calculation of MTV, 3-D regions of interest were drawn and a SUV threshold of 2.5 was used for defining regions. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified clinicopathological and imaging variables associated with OM, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The median (range) SUVmax, MTV and TLG were 7.3 (0.7-41.9), 4.5 ml (0.7-115.1 ml) and 18.3 g (2.4-224.1 g), respectively. Of 53 patients with clinically negative lymph nodes, OM was detected in 19 (36%). By univariate and multivariate analyses, MTV (P = 0.018) and TLG (P = 0.011) were both independent predictive factors for OM, although they were not independent of each other. The 4-year DFS and OS rates were 53.0% and 62.0%, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that MTV (P = 0.001) and TLG (P = 0.006), with different cut-off levels, were both independent predictive factors for DFS, although they were not independent of each other, and MTV (P = 0.001), TLG (P = 0.002) and the involved resection margin (P = 0.007) were independent predictive factors for OS. Pretreatment MTV and TLG may be useful in stratifying the likelihood of survival and predicting OM in OSCC.

  18. The Effect of Total Tumor Volume on the Biologically Effective Dose to Tumor and Kidneys for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA Peptides.

    PubMed

    Begum, Nusrat J; Thieme, Anne; Eberhardt, Nina; Tauber, Robert; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Beer, Ambros J; Glatting, Gerhard; Eiber, Matthias; Kletting, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work was to simulate the effect of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive total tumor volume (TTV) on the biologically effective doses (BEDs) to tumors and organs at risk in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer who are undergoing 177 Lu-PSMA radioligand therapy. Methods: A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the data of 13 patients treated with 177 Lu-PSMA I&T (a PSMA inhibitor for imaging and therapy). The tumor, kidney, and salivary gland BEDs were simulated for TTVs of 0.1-10 L. The activity and peptide amounts leading to an optimal tumor-to-kidneys BED ratio were also investigated. Results: When the TTV was increased from 0.3 to 3 L, the simulated BEDs to tumors, kidneys, parotid glands, and submandibular glands decreased from 22 ± 15 to 11.0 ± 6.0 Gy 1.49 , 6.5 ± 2.3 to 3.7 ± 1.4 Gy 2.5 , 11.0 ± 2.7 to 6.4 ± 1.9 Gy 4.5 , and 10.9 ± 2.7 to 6.3 ± 1.9 Gy 4.5 , respectively (where the subscripts denote that an α/β of 1.49, 2.5, or 4.5 Gy was used to calculate the BED). The BED to the red marrow increased from 0.17 ± 0.05 to 0.32 ± 0.11 Gy 15 For patients with a TTV of more than 0.3 L, the optimal amount of peptide was 273 ± 136 nmol and the optimal activity was 10.4 ± 4.4 GBq. Conclusion: This simulation study suggests that in patients with large PSMA-positive tumor volumes, higher activities and peptide amounts can be safely administered to maximize tumor BEDs without exceeding the tolerable BED to the organs at risk. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. Feasibility of large volume tumor ablation using multiple-mode strategy with fast scanning method: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Qiao, Shan; Chen, Yazhu

    2017-03-01

    Sonication with fast scanning method can generate homogeneous lesions without complex planning. But when the target region is large, switching focus too fast will reduce the heat accumulation, the margin of which may not ablated. Furthermore, high blood perfusion rate will reduce this maximum volume that can be ablated. Therefore, fast scanning method may not be applied to large volume tumor. To expand the therapy scope, this study combines the fast scan method with multiple mode strategy. Through simulation and experiment, the feasibility of this new strategy is evaluated and analyzed.

  20. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bichay, T; Mayville, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fractionmore » and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion: CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.« less

  1. Tumor Volume and Patient Weight as Predictors of Outcome in Children with Intermediate Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS): A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Rodeberg, David A.; Stoner, Julie A.; Garcia-Henriquez, Norbert; Randall, R. Lor; Spunt, Sheri L.; Arndt, Carola A.; Kao, Simon; Paidas, Charles N.; Million, Lynn; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2010-01-01

    Background To compare tumor volume and patient weight vs. traditional factors of tumor diameter and patient age, to determine which parameters best discriminates outcome among intermediate risk RMS patients. Methods Complete patient information for non-metastatic RMS patients enrolled in the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) intermediate risk study D9803 (1999–2005) was available for 370 patients. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival distributions. A recursive partitioning model was used to identify prognostic factors associated with event-free survival (EFS). Cox-proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the association between patient characteristics and the risk of failure or death. Results For all intermediate risk patients with RMS, a recursive partitioning algorithm for EFS suggests that prognostic groups should optimally be defined by tumor volume (transition point 20 cm3), weight (transition point 50 kg), and embryonal histology. Tumor volume and patient weight added significant outcome information to the standard prognostic factors including tumor diameter and age (p=0.02). The ability to resect the tumor completely was not significantly associated with the size of the patient, and patient weight did not significantly modify the association between tumor volume and EFS after adjustment for standard risk factors (p=0.2). Conclusion The factors most strongly associated with EFS were tumor volume, patient weight, and histology. Based on regression modeling, volume and weight are superior predictors of outcome compared to tumor diameter and patient age in children with intermediate risk RMS. Prognostic performance of tumor volume and patient weight should be assessed in an independent prospective study. PMID:24048802

  2. Automated and Semiautomated Segmentation of Rectal Tumor Volumes on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Can It Replace Manual Volumetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Heeswijk, Miriam M. van; Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht; Lambregts, Doenja M.J., E-mail: d.lambregts@nki.nl

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tumor volumetry is promising for rectal cancer response assessment, but an important drawback is that manual per-slice tumor delineation can be highly time consuming. This study investigated whether manual DWI-volumetry can be reproduced using a (semi)automated segmentation approach. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included DWI (highest b value [b1000 or b1100]) before and after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Tumor volumes were assessed on b1000 (or b1100) DWI before and after CRT by means of (1) automated segmentation (by 2 inexperienced readers), (2) semiautomated segmentation (manual adjustment of the volumes obtained bymore » method 1 by 2 radiologists), and (3) manual segmentation (by 2 radiologists); this last assessment served as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice similarity indices (DSI) were calculated to evaluate agreement between different methods and observers. Measurement times (from a radiologist's perspective) were recorded for each method. Results: Tumor volumes were not significantly different among the 3 methods, either before or after CRT (P=.08 to .92). ICCs compared to manual segmentation were 0.80 to 0.91 and 0.53 to 0.66 before and after CRT, respectively, for the automated segmentation and 0.91 to 0.97 and 0.61 to 0.75, respectively, for the semiautomated method. Interobserver agreement (ICC) pre and post CRT was 0.82 and 0.59 for automated segmentation, 0.91 and 0.73 for semiautomated segmentation, and 0.91 and 0.75 for manual segmentation, respectively. Mean DSI between the automated and semiautomated method were 0.83 and 0.58 pre-CRT and post-CRT, respectively; DSI between the automated and manual segmentation were 0.68 and 0.42 and 0.70 and 0.41 between the semiautomated and manual segmentation, respectively. Median measurement time for the radiologists was 0 seconds (pre- and post-CRT) for the

  3. Automated and Semiautomated Segmentation of Rectal Tumor Volumes on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Can It Replace Manual Volumetry?

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Miriam M; Lambregts, Doenja M J; van Griethuysen, Joost J M; Oei, Stanley; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; de Graaff, Carla A M; Vliegen, Roy F A; Beets, Geerard L; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2016-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tumor volumetry is promising for rectal cancer response assessment, but an important drawback is that manual per-slice tumor delineation can be highly time consuming. This study investigated whether manual DWI-volumetry can be reproduced using a (semi)automated segmentation approach. Seventy-nine patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included DWI (highest b value [b1000 or b1100]) before and after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Tumor volumes were assessed on b1000 (or b1100) DWI before and after CRT by means of (1) automated segmentation (by 2 inexperienced readers), (2) semiautomated segmentation (manual adjustment of the volumes obtained by method 1 by 2 radiologists), and (3) manual segmentation (by 2 radiologists); this last assessment served as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice similarity indices (DSI) were calculated to evaluate agreement between different methods and observers. Measurement times (from a radiologist's perspective) were recorded for each method. Tumor volumes were not significantly different among the 3 methods, either before or after CRT (P=.08 to .92). ICCs compared to manual segmentation were 0.80 to 0.91 and 0.53 to 0.66 before and after CRT, respectively, for the automated segmentation and 0.91 to 0.97 and 0.61 to 0.75, respectively, for the semiautomated method. Interobserver agreement (ICC) pre and post CRT was 0.82 and 0.59 for automated segmentation, 0.91 and 0.73 for semiautomated segmentation, and 0.91 and 0.75 for manual segmentation, respectively. Mean DSI between the automated and semiautomated method were 0.83 and 0.58 pre-CRT and post-CRT, respectively; DSI between the automated and manual segmentation were 0.68 and 0.42 and 0.70 and 0.41 between the semiautomated and manual segmentation, respectively. Median measurement time for the radiologists was 0 seconds (pre- and post-CRT) for the automated method, 41 to 69 seconds (pre-CRT) and

  4. Cell Death, Inflammation, Tumor Burden, and Proliferation Blood Biomarkers Predict Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Response and Correlate With Tumor Volume and Proliferation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mistry, Hitesh; Backen, Alison; Hodgson, Clare; Koh, Pek; Dean, Emma; Priest, Lynsey; Haslett, Kate; Trigonis, Ioannis; Jackson, Alan; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Dive, Caroline; Renehan, Andrew; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona

    2018-05-01

    There is an unmet need to develop noninvasive biomarkers to stratify patients in drug-radiotherapy trials. In this pilot study we investigated lung cancer radiotherapy response and toxicity blood biomarkers and correlated findings with tumor volume and proliferation imaging. Blood samples were collected before and during (day 21) radiotherapy. Twenty-six cell-death, hypoxia, angiogenesis, inflammation, proliferation, invasion, and tumor-burden biomarkers were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory data were collected. Univariate analysis was performed on small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whereas multivariate analysis focused on NSCLC. Blood samples from 78 patients were analyzed. Sixty-one (78.2%) harbored NSCLC, 48 (61.5%) received sequential chemoradiotherapy. Of tested baseline biomarkers, undetectable interleukin (IL)-1b (hazard ratio [HR], 4.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.04-7.93; P < .001) was the only significant survival covariate. Of routinely collected laboratory tests, high baseline neutrophil count was a significant survival covariate (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; P = .017). Baseline IL-1b and neutrophil count were prognostic for survival in a multivariate model. The addition of day-21 cytokeratin-19 antigen modestly improved this model's survival prediction (concordance probability, 0.75-0.78). Chemotherapy (P < .001) and baseline keratinocyte growth factor (P = .019) predicted acute esophagitis, but only chemotherapy remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Baseline angioprotein-1 and hepatocyte growth factor showed a direct correlation with tumor volume whereas changes in vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 showed significant correlations with 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET). Select biomarkers are prognostic after radiotherapy in this lung cancer series. The correlation between circulating biomarkers and 18F-FLT PET is shown, to our knowledge for the first time, highlighting their potential

  5. Optimal gross tumor volume definition in lung-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy for pleural mesothelioma: an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Botticella, Angela; Defraene, Gilles; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Deroose, Christophe M; Coolen, Johan; Nafteux, Philippe; Peeters, Stephanie; Ricardi, Umberto; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    The gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is ill-defined. We therefore investigated which imaging modality is optimal: computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IVC), positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen consecutive patients with untreated stage I-IV MPM were included. Patients with prior pleurodesis were excluded. CT with IVC, 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI (T2 and contrast-enhanced T1) were obtained. CT was rigidly co-registered with PET/CT and with MRI. Three sets of pleural GTVs were defined: GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI . Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the contoured GTVs were performed. Compared to CT-based GTV definition, PET/CT identified additional tumor sites (defined as either separate nodules or greater extent of a known tumor) in 12/16 patients. Compared to either CT or PET/CT, MRI identified additional tumor sites in 15/16 patients (p = .7). The mean GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI [±standard deviation (SD)] were 630.1 cm 3 (±302.81), 640.23 cm 3 (±302.83) and 660.8 cm 3 (±290.8), respectively. Differences in mean volumes were not significant. The mean Jaccard Index was significantly lower in MRI-based contours versus all the others. As MRI identified additional pleural disease sites in the majority of patients, it may play a role in optimal target volume definition.

  6. Dose-volume metrics and their relation to memory performance in pediatric brain tumor patients: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Raghubar, Kimberly P; Lamba, Michael; Cecil, Kim M; Yeates, Keith Owen; Mahone, E Mark; Limke, Christina; Grosshans, David; Beckwith, Travis J; Ris, M Douglas

    2018-06-01

    Advances in radiation treatment (RT), specifically volumetric planning with detailed dose and volumetric data for specific brain structures, have provided new opportunities to study neurobehavioral outcomes of RT in children treated for brain tumor. The present study examined the relationship between biophysical and physical dose metrics and neurocognitive ability, namely learning and memory, 2 years post-RT in pediatric brain tumor patients. The sample consisted of 26 pediatric patients with brain tumor, 14 of whom completed neuropsychological evaluations on average 24 months post-RT. Prescribed dose and dose-volume metrics for specific brain regions were calculated including physical metrics (i.e., mean dose and maximum dose) and biophysical metrics (i.e., integral biological effective dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose). We examined the associations between dose-volume metrics (whole brain, right and left hippocampus), and performance on measures of learning and memory (Children's Memory Scale). Biophysical dose metrics were highly correlated with the physical metric of mean dose but not with prescribed dose. Biophysical metrics and mean dose, but not prescribed dose, correlated with measures of learning and memory. These preliminary findings call into question the value of prescribed dose for characterizing treatment intensity; they also suggest that biophysical dose has only a limited advantage compared to physical dose when calculated for specific regions of the brain. We discuss the implications of the findings for evaluating and understanding the relation between RT and neurocognitive functioning. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Optimized breast MRI functional tumor volume as a biomarker of recurrence-free survival following neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Nazia F; Newitt, David C; Kornak, John; Esserman, Laura J; Joe, Bonnie N; Hylton, Nola M

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate optimal contrast kinetics thresholds for measuring functional tumor volume (FTV) by breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessment of recurrence-free survival (RFS). In this Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective study of 64 patients (ages 29-72, median age of 48.6) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for breast cancer, all patients underwent pre-MRI1 and postchemotherapy MRI4 of the breast. Tumor was defined as voxels meeting thresholds for early percent enhancement (PEthresh) and early-to-late signal enhancement ratio (SERthresh); and FTV (PEthresh, SERthresh) by summing all voxels meeting threshold criteria and minimum connectivity requirements. Ranges of PEthresh from 50% to 220% and SERthresh from 0.0 to 2.0 were evaluated. A Cox proportional hazard model determined associations between change in FTV over treatment and RFS at different PE and SER thresholds. The plot of hazard ratios for change in FTV from MRI1 to MRI4 showed a broad peak with the maximum hazard ratio and highest significance occurring at PE threshold of 70% and SER threshold of 1.0 (hazard ratio = 8.71, 95% confidence interval 2.86-25.5, P < 0.00015), indicating optimal model fit. Enhancement thresholds affect the ability of MRI tumor volume to predict RFS. The value is robust over a wide range of thresholds, supporting the use of FTV as a biomarker. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Daily Tracking of Glioblastoma Resection Cavity, Cerebral Edema, and Tumor Volume with MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shahil; Gajjar, Shefali R; Padgett, Kyle R; Asher, David; Stoyanova, Radka; Ford, John C; Mellon, Eric A

    2018-03-19

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays a critical role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Studies of brain imaging during RT for glioblastoma have demonstrated changes in the brain during RT. However, frequent or daily utilization of standalone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during RT have limited feasibility. The recent release of the tri-cobalt-60 MRI-guided RT (MR-IGRT) device (ViewRay MRIdian, Cleveland, OH) allows for daily brain MRI for the RT setup. Daily MRI of three postoperative patients undergoing RT and temozolomide for glioblastoma over a six-week course allowed for the identification of changes to the cavity, edema, and visible tumor on a daily basis. The volumes and dimensions of the resection cavities, edema, and T2-hyperintense tumor were measured. A general trend of daily decreases in cavity measurements was observed in all patients. For the one patient with edema, a trend of daily increases followed by a trend of daily decreases were observed. These results suggest that daily MRI could be used for onboard resimulation and adaptive RT for future fluctuations in the sizes of brain tumors, cavities, or cystic components. This could improve tumor targeting and reduce RT of healthy brain tissue.

  9. Daily Tracking of Glioblastoma Resection Cavity, Cerebral Edema, and Tumor Volume with MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shahil; Gajjar, Shefali R; Padgett, Kyle R; Asher, David; Stoyanova, Radka; Ford, John C

    2018-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) plays a critical role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Studies of brain imaging during RT for glioblastoma have demonstrated changes in the brain during RT. However, frequent or daily utilization of standalone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during RT have limited feasibility. The recent release of the tri-cobalt-60 MRI-guided RT (MR-IGRT) device (ViewRay MRIdian, Cleveland, OH) allows for daily brain MRI for the RT setup. Daily MRI of three postoperative patients undergoing RT and temozolomide for glioblastoma over a six-week course allowed for the identification of changes to the cavity, edema, and visible tumor on a daily basis. The volumes and dimensions of the resection cavities, edema, and T2-hyperintense tumor were measured. A general trend of daily decreases in cavity measurements was observed in all patients. For the one patient with edema, a trend of daily increases followed by a trend of daily decreases were observed. These results suggest that daily MRI could be used for onboard resimulation and adaptive RT for future fluctuations in the sizes of brain tumors, cavities, or cystic components. This could improve tumor targeting and reduce RT of healthy brain tissue. PMID:29796358

  10. MRI to delineate the gross tumor volume of nasopharyngeal cancers: which sequences and planes should be used?

    PubMed

    Popovtzer, Aron; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Tatro, Daniel; Feng, Felix Y; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be better than computed tomography for defining the extent of primary gross tumor volume (GTV) in advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. It is routinely applied for target delineation in planning radiotherapy. However, the specific MRI sequences/planes that should be used are unknown. Twelve patients with nasopharyngeal cancer underwent primary GTV evaluation with gadolinium-enhanced axial T1 weighted image (T1) and T2 weighted image (T2), coronal T1, and sagittal T1 sequences. Each sequence was registered with the planning computed tomography scans. Planning target volumes (PTVs) were derived by uniform expansions of the GTVs. The volumes encompassed by the various sequences/planes, and the volumes common to all sequences/planes, were compared quantitatively and anatomically to the volume delineated by the commonly used axial T1-based dataset. Addition of the axial T2 sequence increased the axial T1-based GTV by 12% on average (p = 0.004), and composite evaluations that included the coronal T1 and sagittal T1 planes increased the axial T1-based GTVs by 30% on average (p = 0.003). The axial T1-based PTVs were increased by 20% by the additional sequences (p = 0.04). Each sequence/plane added unique volume extensions. The GTVs common to all the T1 planes accounted for 38% of the total volumes of all the T1 planes. Anatomically, addition of the coronal and sagittal-based GTVs extended the axial T1-based GTV caudally and cranially, notably to the base of the skull. Adding MRI planes and sequences to the traditional axial T1 sequence yields significant quantitative and anatomically important extensions of the GTVs and PTVs. For accurate target delineation in nasopharyngeal cancer, we recommend that GTVs be outlined in all MRI sequences/planes and registered with the planning computed tomography scans.

  11. In vivo electrical conductivity of hepatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Staelin, S T; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Mahvi, D M; Webster, J G

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of electrical tissue conductivity is necessary to determine deposition of electromagnetic energy and can further be used to diagnostically differentiate between normal and neoplastic tissue. We measured 17 rats with a total of 24 tumours of the K12/TRb rat colon cancer cell line. In each animal we measured in vivo hepatic tumour and normal tissue conductivity at seven frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz, at different tumour stages between 6 and 12 weeks after induction. Conductivity of normal liver tissue was 1.26 +/- 0.15 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 4.61 +/- 0.42 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity of tumour was 2.69 +/- 0.91 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 5.23 +/- 0.82 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity was significantly different between normal and tumour tissue (p < 0.05). We determined the percentage of necrosis and fibrosis at the measurement site. We fitted the conductivity data to the Cole-Cole model. For the tumour data we determined Spearman's correlation coefficients between the Cole-Cole parameters and age, necrosis, fibrosis and tumour volume and found significant correlation between necrosis and the Cole-Cole parameters (p < 0.05). We conclude that necrosis within the tumour and the associated membrane breakdown is likely responsible for the observed change in conductivity.

  12. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404.

    PubMed

    Besemer, Abigail E; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J; Weichert, Jamey P; Kuo, John S; Robins, H Ian; Hall, Lance T; Bednarz, Bryan P

    2017-07-06

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124 I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131 I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124 I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131 I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq -1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq -1 ). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for

  13. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  14. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  15. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs andmore » dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV{sub NAA}) and Cho (MTV{sub Cho}) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV{sub NAA}, MTV{sub Cho} and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV{sub NAA} while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV{sub Cho}. MTV{sub NAA} was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV{sub Cho} remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach

  16. Prognostic factors of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a cohort study based on high-volume centers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuechao; Qiu, Haibo; Zhang, Peng; Feng, Xingyu; Chen, Tao; Li, Yong; Tao, Kaixiong; Li, Guoxin; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhou, Zhiwei

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the clinicopathologic characteristics, immunohistochemical expression and prognostic factors of patients with primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Data from 2,570 consecutive GIST patients from four medical centers in China (January 2001-December 2015) were reviewed. Survival curves were constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression models were used to identify independent prognostic factors. Of the included patients, 1,375 (53.5%) were male, and the patient age range was 18 to 95 (median, 58) years. The tumors were mostly found in the stomach (64.5%), small intestine (25.1%) and colorectal region (5.1%). At the time of diagnosis, the median tumor size was 4.0 (range: 0.1-55.0) cm, and the median mitotic index per 50 high power fields (HPFs) was 3 (range: 0-254). Of the 2,168 resected patients, 2,009 (92.7%) received curative resection. According to the modified National Institutes of Health (NIH) classification, 21.9%, 28.9%, 14.1% and 35.1% were very low-, low-, intermediate- and high-risk tumors, respectively. The rate of positivity was 96.4% for c-Kit, 87.1% for CD34, 96.9% for delay of germination 1 (DOG-1), 8.0% for S-100, 31.0% for smooth muscle actin (SMA) and 5.1% for desmin. However, the prognostic value of each was limited. Multivariate analysis showed that age, tumor size, mitotic index, tumor site, occurrence of curative resection and postoperative imatinib were independent prognostic factors. Furthermore, we found that high-risk patients benefited significantly from postoperative imatinib (P<0.001), whereas intermediate-risk patients did not (P=0.954). Age, tumor size, mitotic index, tumor site, occurrence of curative resection and postoperative imatinib were independent prognostic factors in patients with GISTs. Moreover, determining whether intermediate-risk patients can benefit from adjuvant imatinib would be of considerable interest in future studies.

  17. Hippocampal volume and auditory attention on a verbal memory task with adult survivors of pediatric brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Jayakar, Reema; King, Tricia Z; Morris, Robin; Na, Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    We examined the nature of verbal memory deficits and the possible hippocampal underpinnings in long-term adult survivors of childhood brain tumor. 35 survivors (M = 24.10 ± 4.93 years at testing; 54% female), on average 15 years post-diagnosis, and 59 typically developing adults (M = 22.40 ± 4.35 years, 54% female) participated. Automated FMRIB Software Library (FSL) tools were used to measure hippocampal, putamen, and whole brain volumes. The California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) was used to assess verbal memory. Hippocampal, F(1, 91) = 4.06, ηp² = .04; putamen, F(1, 91) = 11.18, ηp² = .11; and whole brain, F(1, 92) = 18.51, ηp² = .17, volumes were significantly lower for survivors than controls (p < .05). Hippocampus and putamen volumes were significantly correlated (r = .62, p < .001) with each other, but not with total brain volume (r = .09; r = .08), for survivors and controls. Verbal memory indices of auditory attention list span (Trial 1: F(1, 92) = 12.70, η² = .12) and final list learning (Trial 5: F(1, 92) = 6.01, η² = .06) were significantly lower for survivors (p < .05). Total hippocampal volume in survivors was significantly correlated (r = .43, p = .01) with auditory attention, but none of the other CVLT-II indices. Secondary analyses for the effect of treatment factors are presented. Volumetric differences between survivors and controls exist for the whole brain and for subcortical structures on average 15 years post-diagnosis. Treatment factors seem to have a unique effect on subcortical structures. Memory differences between survivors and controls are largely contingent upon auditory attention list span. Only hippocampal volume is associated with the auditory attention list span component of verbal memory. These findings are particularly robust for survivors treated with radiation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Potential dosimetric benefits of adaptive tumor tracking over the internal target volume concept for stereotactic body radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Karava, Konstantina; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Riesterer, Oliver; Roesch, Johannes; Glatz, Stefan; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-11-09

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer has two major challenges: (I) the tumor is adjacent to several critical organs and, (II) the mobility of both, the tumor and its surrounding organs at risk (OARs). A treatment planning study simulating stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic tumors with both the internal target volume (ITV) concept and the tumor tracking approach was performed. The two respiratory motion-management techniques were compared in terms of doses to the target volume and organs at risk. Two volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans (5 × 5 Gy) were created for each of the 12 previously treated pancreatic cancer patients, one using the ITV concept and one the tumor tracking approach. To better evaluate the overall dose delivered to the moving tumor volume, 4D dose calculations were performed on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) size for each technique was analyzed. Target and OAR dose parameters were reported and analyzed for both 3D and 4D dose calculation. Tumor motion ranged from 1.3 to 11.2 mm. Tracking led to a reduction of PTV size (max. 39.2%) accompanied with significant better tumor coverage (p<0.05, paired Wilcoxon signed rank test) both in 3D and 4D dose calculations and improved organ at risk sparing. Especially for duodenum, stomach and liver, the mean dose was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tracking for 3D and 4D dose calculations. By using an adaptive tumor tracking approach for respiratory-induced pancreatic motion management, a significant reduction in PTV size can be achieved, which subsequently facilitates treatment planning, and improves organ dose sparing. The dosimetric benefit of tumor tracking is organ and patient-specific.

  19. RNAi screening of subtracted transcriptomes reveals tumor suppression by taurine-activated GABAA receptors involved in volume regulation

    PubMed Central

    van Nierop, Pim; Vormer, Tinke L.; Foijer, Floris; Verheij, Joanne; Lodder, Johannes C.; Andersen, Jesper B.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; te Riele, Hein

    2018-01-01

    To identify coding and non-coding suppressor genes of anchorage-independent proliferation by efficient loss-of-function screening, we have developed a method for enzymatic production of low complexity shRNA libraries from subtracted transcriptomes. We produced and screened two LEGO (Low-complexity by Enrichment for Genes shut Off) shRNA libraries that were enriched for shRNA vectors targeting coding and non-coding polyadenylated transcripts that were reduced in transformed Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs). The LEGO shRNA libraries included ~25 shRNA vectors per transcript which limited off-target artifacts. Our method identified 79 coding and non-coding suppressor transcripts. We found that taurine-responsive GABAA receptor subunits, including GABRA5 and GABRB3, were induced during the arrest of non-transformed anchor-deprived MEFs and prevented anchorless proliferation. We show that taurine activates chloride currents through GABAA receptors on MEFs, causing seclusion of cell volume in large membrane protrusions. Volume seclusion from cells by taurine correlated with reduced proliferation and, conversely, suppression of this pathway allowed anchorage-independent proliferation. In human cholangiocarcinomas, we found that several proteins involved in taurine signaling via GABAA receptors were repressed. Low GABRA5 expression typified hyperproliferative tumors, and loss of taurine signaling correlated with reduced patient survival, suggesting this tumor suppressive mechanism operates in vivo. PMID:29787571

  20. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Head and Neck Tumours: Tumors of the Salivary Gland.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Raja R; Stenman, Göran

    2017-03-01

    The salivary gland section in the 4th edition of the World Health Organization classification of head and neck tumors features the description and inclusion of several entities, the most significant of which is represented by (mammary analogue) secretory carcinoma. This entity was extracted mainly from acinic cell carcinoma based on recapitulation of breast secretory carcinoma and a shared ETV6-NTRK3 gene fusion. Also new is the subsection of "Other epithelial lesions," for which key entities include sclerosing polycystic adenosis and intercalated duct hyperplasia. Many entities have been compressed into their broader categories given clinical and morphologic similarities, or transitioned to a different grouping as was the case with low-grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma reclassified as intraductal carcinoma (with the applied qualifier of low-grade). Specific grade has been removed from the names of the salivary gland entities such as polymorphous adenocarcinoma, providing pathologists flexibility in assigning grade and allowing for recognition of a broader spectrum within an entity. Cribriform adenocarcinoma of (minor) salivary gland origin continues to be divisive in terms of whether it should be recognized as a distinct category. This chapter also features new key concepts such as high-grade transformation. The new paradigm of translocations and gene fusions being common in salivary gland tumors is featured heavily in this chapter.

  1. Defining Hepatoblastoma Responsiveness to Induction Therapy as Measured by Tumor Volume and Serum α-fetoprotein Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lovvorn, Harold N.; Ayers, Dan; Zhao, Zhiguo; Hilmes, Melissa; Prasad, Pinki; Shinall, Myrick C.; Berch, Barry; Neblett, Wallace W.; O'Neill, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Hepatoblastoma is commonly unresectable at presentation, necessitating induction chemotherapy before definitive resection. To refine the paradigm for timing of resection, we questioned whether a plateau in hepatoblastoma responsiveness to neoadjuvant therapy could be detected by calculating tumor volume (TV) and serum α-fetoprotein (sAFP) kinetics. Methods To calculate TV and sAFP as measures of treatment responsiveness over time, infants having initially unresectable epithelial-type hepatoblastomas were identified at a single institution (1996-2008). Effects of therapy type, therapy duration, and lobe of liver involvement on TV, sAFP, margin status, and toxicity were analyzed. Results Of 24 infants treated for epithelial-type hepatoblastoma during this interval, 5 were resected primarily, and 15 had complete digital films for kinetics analysis. Both TV and sAFP decreased dramatically over time (p<0.0001). No statistically significant difference in mean TV or sAFP was detected after chemotherapy cycle 2. Left lobe tumors had greater presenting levels of and significantly slower decay in sAFP compared to right lobe tumors (p=0.005), although no statistically significant differences in TV existed between liver lobes. Resection margins did not change with therapy duration. Conclusions Measuring TV and sAFP kinetics accurately reflects hepatoblastoma responsiveness to induction therapy. Treatment toxicities may be reduced by earlier resection and tailoring of chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:20105591

  2. Canine perineal tumours.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, A; Vos, J H; van den Ingh, T S; Molenbeek, R F; van Sluijs, F J

    1989-12-01

    One hundred and thirty nine canine perineal tumours were histologically evaluated. The vast majority (134 tumours = 96.4%) appeared to originate from the characteristic glandular structures of this region. They were classified as well differentiated perianal gland tumours (58.3%), as moderately or poorly differentiated perianal gland tumours (21.6%) and as carcinomas without perianal gland differentiation (16.5%). Only 5 tumours (3.6%) appeared to originate from non-characteristic perineal structures. A prominent male predominance was found with respect to the perianal gland tumours, whereas the carcinomas showed a distinct female predisposition. Tumours showing perianal gland differentiation almost invariably will have a benign behaviour. The carcinomas lacking any perianal gland differentiation often show a distinct malignant behaviour with metastases to regional lymph nodes and internal organs. These malignant neoplasms showed morphological and clinical features comparable to canine anal sac gland adenocarcinomas and carcinoids in man and animals.

  3. Computed tomography predictors of hepatocellular carcinoma tumour necrosis after chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Mary K; Dorn, David P; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J Kevin; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen H; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiographical features associated with a favourable response to trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) are poorly defined for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From 2008 to 2012, all first TACE interventions for HCC performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients with a pre-TACE and a post-TACE computed tomography (CT) scan were included in the analyses (n = 115). HCC tumour response to TACE was quantified via the the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) criteria. Univariate and multivariable analyses were constructed. Results The index HCC tumours experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis in 59/115 (51%) of patients after the first TACE intervention. On univariate analysis, smaller tumour size, peripheral tumour location and arterial enhancement were associated with a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis, whereas, only smaller tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 0.81] and peripheral location (OR 6.91; 95% CI 1.75, 27.29) were significant on multivariable analysis. There was a trend towards improved survival in the patients that experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis (P = 0.08). Conclusions Peripherally located smaller HCC tumours are most likely to experience a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis after TACE. Surprisingly, arterial-phase enhancement and portal venous-phase washout were not significantly predictive of TACE-induced tumour necrosis. The TACE response was not statistically associated with improved survival. PMID:23980917

  4. Repeatability of quantitative FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in recurrent ovarian carcinoma: test-retest measurements for tumor FDG uptake, diameter, and volume.

    PubMed

    Rockall, Andrea G; Avril, Norbert; Lam, Raymond; Iannone, Robert; Mozley, P David; Parkinson, Christine; Bergstrom, Donald; Sala, Evis; Sarker, Shah-Jalal; McNeish, Iain A; Brenton, James D

    2014-05-15

    Repeatability of baseline FDG-PET/CT measurements has not been tested in ovarian cancer. This dual-center, prospective study assessed variation in tumor 2[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake, tumor diameter, and tumor volume from sequential FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Patients underwent two pretreatment baseline FDG-PET/CT (n = 21) and CECT (n = 20) at two clinical sites with different PET/CT instruments. Patients were included if they had at least one target lesion in the abdomen with a standardized uptake value (SUV) maximum (SUVmax) of ≥ 2.5 and a long axis diameter of ≥ 15 mm. Two independent reading methods were used to evaluate repeatability of tumor diameter and SUV uptake: on site and at an imaging clinical research organization (CRO). Tumor volume reads were only performed by CRO. In each reading set, target lesions were independently measured on sequential imaging. Median time between FDG-PET/CT was two days (range 1-7). For site reads, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) for SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor diameter were 0.95, 0.94, and 0.99, respectively. Repeatability coefficients were 16.3%, 17.3%, and 8.8% for SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor diameter, respectively. Similar results were observed for CRO reads. Tumor volume CCC was 0.99 with a repeatability coefficient of 28.1%. There was excellent test-retest repeatability for FDG-PET/CT quantitative measurements across two sites and two independent reading methods. Cutoff values for determining change in SUVmean, SUVmax, and tumor volume establish limits to determine metabolic and/or volumetric response to treatment in platinum-sensitive relapsed ovarian cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal atmore » the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.« less

  6. Fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT volume-based indices in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: prediction of residual viable tumor after induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Michael; Cyrta, Joanna; Pouliquen, Christelle; Chouahnia, Kader; Orlhac, Fanny; Martinod, Emmanuel; Eder, Véronique; Morère, Jean-François; Buvat, Irène

    2014-09-01

    To study whether volume-based indices of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic (PET)/computed tomographic (CT) imaging is an accurate tool to predict the amount of residual viable tumor after induction chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study was approved by institutional review board with waivers of informed consent. Twenty-two patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent surgery after induction chemotherapy. All had pre- and posttreatment FDG PET/CT scans. CT largest diameter, CT volume, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean SUV (SUVmean), metabolic tumor volume (TV), and total lesion glycolysis of primary tumor were calculated. Changes in tumor measurements were determined by dividing follow-up by baseline measurement (ratio index). Amounts of residual viable tumor, necrosis, fibrous tissue, inflammatory infiltrate, and Ki-67 proliferative index were estimated on resected tumor. Correlations between imaging indices and histologic parameters were estimated by using Spearman correlation coefficients or Mann-Whitney tests. No baseline or posttreatment indices correlated with percentage of residual viable tumor. TV ratio was the only index that correlated with percentage of residual viable tumor (r = 0.61 [95% confidence interval: 0.24, 0.81]; P = .003). Conversely, SUVmax and SUVmean ratios were only indices correlated with Ki-67 (r = 0.62 [95% confidence interval: 0.24, 0.82]; P = .003; and r = 0.60 [95% confidence interval: 0.21, 0.81]; P = .004, respectively). Total lesion glycolysis ratio was moderately correlated with residual viable tumor (r = 0.53 [95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.78]; P = .01) and with Ki-67 (r = 0.57 [95% confidence interval: 0.18, 0.80]; P = .006). No ratios were correlated with presence of inflammatory infiltrate or foamy macrophages. TV and total lesion glycolysis ratios were the only indices correlated with residual viable tumor after induction

  7. Increasing the Accuracy of Volume and ADC Delineation for Heterogeneous Tumor on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Correlation with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Nan-Jie; Wong, Chun-Sing, E-mail: drcswong@gmail.com; Chu, Yiu-Ching

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a method based on thresholding both the b0 images and the ADC maps. Methods and Materials: In 21 heterogeneous lesions from patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), gross lesion were manually contoured, and corresponding volumes and ADCs were denoted as gross tumor volume (GTV) and gross ADC (ADC{sub g}), respectively. Using a k-means clustering algorithm, the probable high-cellularity tumor tissues were selected based on b0 images and ADC maps. ADC and volume of the tissues selected using themore » proposed method were denoted as thresholded ADC (ADC{sub thr}) and high-cellularity tumor volume (HCTV), respectively. The metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) was measured using 40% maximum standard uptake value (SUV{sub max}) as the lower threshold, and corresponding mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) was also measured. Results: HCTV had excellent concordance with MTV according to Pearson's correlation (r=0.984, P<.001) and linear regression (slope = 1.085, intercept = −4.731). In contrast, GTV overestimated the volume and differed significantly from MTV (P=.005). ADC{sub thr} correlated significantly and strongly with SUV{sub mean} (r=−0.807, P<.001) and SUV{sub max} (r=−0.843, P<.001); both were stronger than those of ADC{sub g}. Conclusions: The proposed lesion-adaptive semiautomatic method can help segment high-cellularity tissues that match hypermetabolic tissues in PET/CT and enables more accurate volume and ADC delineation on diffusion-weighted MR images of GIST.« less

  8. Site-specific volumetric analysis of lung tumour motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George A.; Langer, Mark; Shirato, Hiroki

    2010-06-01

    The treatment of lung cancer with radiation therapy is hindered by respiratory motion. Real-time adjustments to compensate for this motion are hampered by mechanical system latencies and imaging-rate restrictions. To better understand tumour motion behaviour for adaptive image-guided radiation therapy of lung cancer, the volume of a tumour's motion space was investigated. Motion data were collected by tracking an implanted fiducial using fluoroscopy at 30 Hz during treatment sessions. A total of 637 treatment fractions from 31 tumours were used in this study. For each fraction, data points collected from three consecutive breathing cycles were used to identify instantaneous tumour location. A convex hull was created over these data points, defining the tumour motion envelope. The study sought a correlation between the tumour location in the lung and the convex hull's volume and shape. It was found that tumours located in the upper apex had smaller motion envelopes (<50 mm3), whereas tumours located near the chest wall or diaphragm had larger envelopes (>70 mm3). Tumours attached to fixed anatomical structures had small motion spaces. Three general shapes described the tumour motion envelopes: 50% of motion envelopes enclosed largely 1D oscillation, 38% enclosed an ellipsoid path, 6% enclosed an arced path and 6% were of hybrid shape. This location-space correlation suggests it may be useful in developing a predictive model, but more work needs to be done to verify it.

  9. Effect of androgen deprivation therapy on intraprostatic tumour volume identified on 18F choline PET/CT for prostate dose painting radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joachim; Carver, Antony; Brunt, John N H; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Syndikus, Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Prostate dose painting radiotherapy requires the accurate identification of dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) to be used as boost volumes; these can be identified on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) or choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Planning scans are usually performed after 2-3 months of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). We examine the effect of ADT on choline tracer uptake and boost volumes identified on choline PET/CT. Fluoroethylcholine ( 18 F choline) PET/CT was performed for dose painting radiotherapy planning in patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Initially, they were performed at planning. Owing to low visual tracer uptake, PET/CT for subsequent patients was performed at staging. We compared these two approaches on intraprostatic lesions obtained on PET using both visual and automatic threshold methods [prostate maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) 60%] when compared with mpMRI. PET/CT was performed during ADT in 11 patients (median duration of 85 days) and before ADT in 29 patients. ADT significantly reduced overall prostate volume by 17%. During ADT, prostate SUV max was lower although it did not reach statistical significance (4.2 vs 6.6, p = 0.06); three patients had no visually identifiable PET DIL; and visually defined PET DILs were significantly smaller than corresponding mpMRI DILs (p = 0.03). However, all patients scanned before ADT had at least one visually identifiable PET DIL, with no significant size difference between MRI and visually defined PET DILs. In both groups, threshold PET produced larger DILs than visual PET. Both PET methods have moderate sensitivity (0.50-0.68) and high specificity (0.85-0.98) for identifying MRI-defined disease. For visual contouring of boost volumes in prostate dose painting radiotherapy, 18 F choline PET/CT should be performed before ADT. For threshold contouring of boost volumes using our PET/CT scanning protocol, threshold levels of above 60% prostate SUV

  10. SU-G-BRA-11: Tumor Tracking in An Iterative Volume of Interest Based 4D CBCT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R; Pan, T; Ahmad, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 4D CBCT can allow evaluation of tumor motion immediately prior to radiation therapy, but suffers from heavy artifacts that limit its ability to track tumors. Various iterative and compressed sensing reconstructions have been proposed to reduce these artifacts, but are costly time-wise and can degrade the image quality of bony anatomy for alignment with regularization. We have previously proposed an iterative volume of interest (I4D VOI) method which minimizes reconstruction time and maintains image quality of bony anatomy by focusing a 4D reconstruction within a VOI. The purpose of this study is to test the tumor tracking accuracy ofmore » this method compared to existing methods. Methods: Long scan (8–10 mins) CBCT data with corresponding RPM data was collected for 12 lung cancer patients. The full data set was sorted into 8 phases and reconstructed using FDK cone beam reconstruction to serve as a gold standard. The data was reduced in way that maintains a normal breathing pattern and used to reconstruct 4D images using FDK, low and high regularization TV minimization (λ=2,10), and the proposed I4D VOI method with PTVs used for the VOI. Tumor trajectories were found using rigid registration within the VOI for each reconstruction and compared to the gold standard. Results: The root mean square error (RMSE) values were 2.70mm for FDK, 2.50mm for low regularization TV, 1.48mm for high regularization TV, and 2.34mm for I4D VOI. Streak artifacts in I4D VOI were reduced compared to FDK and images were less blurred than TV reconstructed images. Conclusion: I4D VOI performed at least as well as existing methods in tumor tracking, with the exception of high regularization TV minimization. These results along with the reconstruction time and outside VOI image quality advantages suggest I4D VOI to be an improvement over existing methods. Funding support provided by CPRIT grant RP110562-P2-01.« less

  11. Oxidative stress specifically downregulates survivin to promote breast tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Pervin, S; Tran, L; Urman, R; Braga, M; Parveen, M; Li, S A; Chaudhuri, G; Singh, R

    2013-03-05

    Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease has been broadly classified into oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) or oestrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumour types. Each of these tumours is dependent on specific signalling pathways for their progression. While high levels of survivin, an anti-apoptotic protein, increases aggressive behaviour in ER- breast tumours, oxidative stress (OS) promotes the progression of ER+ breast tumours. Mechanisms and molecular targets by which OS promotes tumourigenesis remain poorly understood. DETA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor induces OS in breast cancer cell lines by early re-localisation and downregulation of cellular survivin. Using in vivo models of HMLE(HRAS) xenografts and E2-induced breast tumours in ACI rats, we demonstrate that high OS downregulates survivin during initiation of tumourigenesis. Overexpression of survivin in HMLE(HRAS) cells led to a significant delay in tumour initiation and tumour volume in nude mice. This inverse relationship between survivin and OS was also observed in ER+ human breast tumours. We also demonstrate an upregulation of NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1) and its activating protein p67, which are novel markers of OS in E2-induced tumours in ACI rats and as well as in ER+ human breast tumours. Our data, therefore, suggest that downregulation of survivin could be an important early event by which OS initiates breast tumour formation.

  12. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in eachmore » patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor

  13. Dose-volume histogram analysis of brainstem necrosis in head and neck tumors treated using carbon-ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Fukata, Kyohei; Adachi, Akiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Musha, Atsushi; Abe, Takanori; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Shigeta, Yuka; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between brainstem necrosis and dose-volume histograms in patients with head and neck tumors after carbon-ion radiotherapy. We evaluated 85 patients with head and neck tumors who underwent carbon-ion radiotherapy and were followed-up for ≥12months. Brainstem necrosis was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.0). The median follow-up was 24months, and four patients developed grade 1 brainstem necrosis, with 2-year and 3-year cumulative rates of 2.8% and 6.5%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the following significant cut-off values: a maximum brainstem dose of 48Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), D1cm 3 of 27Gy (RBE), V40Gy (RBE) of 0.1cm 3 , V30Gy (RBE) of 0.7cm 3 , and V20Gy (RBE) of 1.4cm 3 . Multivariate analysis revealed that V30Gy (RBE) was most significantly associated with brainstem necrosis. The 2-year cumulative rates were 33% and 0% for V30Gy (RBE) of ≥0.7cm 3 and <0.7cm 3 , respectively (p<0.001). The present study indicated that the dose constraints might help minimize brainstem necrosis after carbon-ion radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prognostic value of FDG PET/CT-based metabolic tumor volumes in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Brett; Espinet-Col, Carina; Ulaner, Gary A; McArthur, Heather L; Gonen, Mithat; Jochelson, Maxine; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2016-01-01

    FDG PET/CT-based measures of tumor burden show promise to predict survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer, but the patient populations studied so far are heterogeneous. The reports may have been confounded by the markedly different prognosis of the various subtypes of breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the correlation between tumor burden on FDG PET/CT and overall survival (OS) in patients within a defined population: metastatic triple negative breast cancer (MTNBC). FDG PET/CT scans of 47 consecutive MTNBC patients (54±12 years-old) with no other known malignancies were analyzed. A total 393 lesions were identified, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), mean SUV, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion number (TLN) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), were measured and correlated with patient survival by Mantel-Cox tests and Cox regression analysis. At a median follow-up time of 12.4 months, 41 patients died with a median OS of 12.1 months. Patients with MTV less than 51.5 ml lived nearly three times longer (22 vs 7.1 months) than those with a higher MTV (χ2=21.3, P<0.0001). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis only TLN and MTV were significantly correlated with survival. Those with an MTV burden in the 75th percentile versus the 25th percentile had a hazard ratio of 6.94 (p=0.001). In patients with MTNBC, MTV appears to be a strong prognostic factor. If validated in prospective studies, MTV may be a valuable tool for risk stratification of MTNBC patients in clinical trials and to guide patient management. PMID:27186439

  15. Constitutive secretion of soluble interleukin-2 receptor by human T cell lymphoma xenografted into SCID mice. Correlation of tumor volume with concentration of tumor-derived soluble interleukin-2 receptor in body fluids of the host mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, M. A.; Sioutos, N.; Tuttle, M.; Butmarc, J. R.; Kaplan, W. D.; Kadin, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Increased serum concentration of soluble alpha-chain receptor for interleukin-2 (sIL-2R) has been noted in patients with a variety of inflammatory conditions and lymphoid malignancies including T cell leukemia and lymphoma. Elevated sIL-2R serum levels seen in lymphoid malignancies appear to correlate with the clinical stage of disease. However, because sIL-2R is produced by normal activated lymphocytes, it has been uncertain whether serum sIL-2R in such conditions is derived from tumor cells or normal immune cells responding to the tumor. To address this question, we used a model of human (CD30+) anaplastic, large T cell lymphoma transplanted into immunodeficient SCID mice. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tumor RNA showed that the tumor, designated mJB6, contains mRNA for alpha-chain of human IL-2R. Furthermore, 15 to 25% of tumor cells stained with anti-human IL-2R alpha-chain mAb. Solid phase ELISA analysis of serum samples from mice bearing mJB6 lymphoma showed high concentrations of human sIL-2R. None of the control mice without lymphoma or with human nonlymphoid tumors (prostatic carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and glioblastoma multiforme) showed detectable human sIL-2R. The sIL-2R serum titers of mJB6-bearing mice correlated strongly with tumor volume (P < 0.0001). Tumors as small as 0.4 to 0.8 mm3 could be detected by this method. The sensitivity of sIL-2R ELISA exceeded at least 150 times the sensitivity of conventional radioisotopic tumor detection. Total resection of mJB6 tumors resulted in complete clearance of sIL-2R from the murine serum within 48 hours with a half-life of 6 hours. Accordingly, partial resection led to a significant decrease in sIL-2R followed by gradual increase with tumor regrowth. sIL-2R was also detected in the urine of mJB6-transplanted mice. As in serum, urine concentrations of sIL-2R were proportional to tumor mass (P < 0.02). Based on these findings we postulate that malignant cells are a major source of serum

  16. Genetics Home Reference: gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours (Review of NICE Technology Appraisal Guidance 196) (National Institute for Health and ... Society: Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Cancer.Net: Gastrointestinal ...

  17. Gliomas: Application of Cumulative Histogram Analysis of Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume on 3 T MRI to Tumor Grading

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Yeom, Jeong A.; Shin, Hwaseon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma grading assumes significant importance in that low- and high-grade gliomas display different prognoses and are treated with dissimilar therapeutic strategies. The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess the usefulness of a cumulative normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histogram for glioma grading based on 3 T MRI. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 63 patients with astrocytic tumors underwent 3 T MRI with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging. Regions of interest containing the entire tumor volume were drawn on every section of the co-registered relative CBV (rCBV) maps and T2-weighted images. The percentile values from the cumulative nCBV histograms and the other histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grades. Cochran’s Q test and the McNemar test were used to compare the diagnostic accuracies of the histogram parameters after the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using the parameter offering the highest diagnostic accuracy, a validation process was performed with an independent test set of nine patients. Results The 99th percentile of the cumulative nCBV histogram (nCBV C99), mean and peak height differed significantly between low- and high-grade gliomas (P = <0.001, 0.014 and <0.001, respectively) and between grade III and IV gliomas (P = <0.001, 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). The diagnostic accuracy of nCBV C99 was significantly higher than that of the mean nCBV (P = 0.016) in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and was comparable to that of the peak height (P = 1.000). Validation using the two cutoff values of nCBV C99 achieved a diagnostic accuracy of 66.7% (6/9) for the separation of all three glioma grades. Conclusion Cumulative histogram analysis of nCBV using 3 T MRI can be a useful method for preoperative glioma grading. The nCBV C99 value is helpful in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and grade IV from III gliomas. PMID:23704910

  18. Pretherapeutic FDG-PET total metabolic tumor volume predicts response to induction therapy in pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rogasch, Julian M M; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Hofheinz, Frank; Wedel, Florian; Schatka, Imke; Amthauer, Holger; Furth, Christian

    2018-05-03

    Standardized treatment in pediatric patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) follows risk stratification by tumor stage, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and tumor bulk. We aimed to identify quantitative parameters from pretherapeutic FDG-PET to assist prediction of response to induction chemotherapy. Retrospective analysis in 50 children with HL (f:18; m:32; median age, 14.8 [4-18] a) consecutively treated according to EuroNet-PHL-C1 (n = 42) or -C2 treatment protocol (n = 8). Total metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in pretherapeutic FDG-PET was defined using a semi-automated, background-adapted threshold. Metabolic (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, total lesion glycolysis [MTV*SUVmean]) and heterogeneity parameters (asphericity [ASP], entropy, contrast, local homogeneity, energy, and cumulative SUV-volume histograms) were derived. Early response assessment (ERA) was performed after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy according to treatment protocol and verified by reference rating. Prediction of inadequate response (IR) in ERA was based on ROC analysis separated by stage I/II (1 and 26 patients) and stage III/IV disease (7 and 16 patients) or treatment group/level (TG/TL) 1 to 3. IR was seen in 28/50 patients (TG/TL 1, 6/12 patients; TG/TL 2, 10/17; TG/TL 3, 12/21). Among all PET parameters, MTV best predicted IR; ASP was the best heterogeneity parameter. AUC of MTV was 0.84 (95%-confidence interval, 0.69-0.99) in stage I/II and 0.86 (0.7-1.0) in stage III/IV. In patients of TG/TL 1, AUC of MTV was 0.92 (0.74-1.0); in TG/TL 2 0.71 (0.44-0.99), and in TG/TL 3 0.85 (0.69-1.0). Patients with high vs. low MTV had IR in 86 vs. 0% in TG/TL 1, 80 vs. 29% in TG/TL 2, and 90 vs. 27% in TG/TL 3 (cut-off, > 80 ml, > 160 ml, > 410 ml). In this explorative study, high total MTV best predicted inadequate response to induction therapy in pediatric HL of all pretherapeutic FDG-PET parameters - in both low and high stages as well as the 3 different TG/TL. Ethics committee number

  19. Measuring treatment response to systemic therapy and predicting outcome in biliary tract cancer: comparing tumor size, volume, density, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Dushyant V; Hayano, Koichi; Galluzzo, Anna; Zhu, Andrew X

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the response of biliary tract cancer treated with multidrug chemotherapy using FDG PET in comparison with morphologic and density changes. In this phase II clinical trial, 28 patients with unresectable or metastatic biliary tract cancers treated with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin combined with bevacizumab (GEMOX-B) underwent FDG PET and contrast-enhanced CT at baseline and after the second cycle of the therapy (8 weeks). A single reviewer recorded tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) along with size, volume (3D-sphere), and density. The percentage changes of the parameters were compared with progression-free survival at 7 months. Overall survival was compared with the percentage change of SUVmax. After 8 weeks, measurable reductions (±SD) in size (7.05±4.19 to 5.52±3.28 cm, -21.70%), volume (411.38±540.08 to 212.41±293.45 cm3, -48.36%), and density (60.76±20.65 to 50.68±16.89 HU, -15.59%) were noted along with a substantial drop in SUVmax (5.95±1.95 to 3.36±1.28, -43.52%). The SUVmax change showed positive correlations with tumor size change (R2=0.39, p=0.0004) and volumetric change (R2=0.34, p=0.001). Patients who showed a larger drop in SUVmax at 8 weeks correlated with favorable progression-free survival (p=0.02). ROC analysis showed that a 45% reduction in SUVmax was the best cutoff value to detect favorable progression-free survival patients. When we used this cutoff value, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with tumors showing greater reduction in SUVmax had favorable progression-free survival and overall survival (p=0.0009, p=0.03). In biliary tract cancers treated with GEMOX-B, the reduction of SUVmax after therapy is a better predictor for survival than morphologic and density changes.

  20. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  1. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-07

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  2. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru; Zhu, Dongyun; Cai, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT) and its multiplanar reformation (MPR), volume rendering (VR) and virtual bronchoscopy (VB) postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors. Methods Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology. Results Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6), tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16), extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm—56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1), longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm—68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1), morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1) and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19), distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10), and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n

  3. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru; Zhu, Dongyun; Cai, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT) and its multiplanar reformation (MPR), volume rendering (VR) and virtual bronchoscopy (VB) postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors. Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology. Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6), tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16), extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1), longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1), morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1) and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19), distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10), and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density without

  4. Pancreatic tumours produce neurotensin.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, A M; Bryant, M G; Adrian, T E; Bloom, S R

    1981-04-01

    Tumour tissue may secrete substances which are not normally secreted by the original tissue. We have found that 6 out of 21 pancreatic tumours producing vasoactive intestinal peptide also produce neurotensin-like peptides. These are sometimes secreted and very high plasma levels of neurotensin-like immunoreactivity may be found in the circulation.

  5. Bilateral multifocal Warthin tumours.

    PubMed

    Deveer, Mehmet; Sahan, Murat; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Celik, Ozgür Ilhan

    2013-05-22

    Warthin tumour, also known as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum, is the second most frequent benign tumour of the parotid gland after pleomorphic adenoma. A 57-year-old man was referred to our hospital with bilateral buccal masses without pain. He presented with a 1-year history of the condition and stated that growth of the mass has accelerated during the last 6 months. Ultrasonography examination showed two heterogeneous solid masses. Axial contrast-enhanced CT image revealed bilateral heterogeneous solid masses. The masses showed enhancement after contrast administration (95 HU). Fine needle aspiration cytology was recommended for further analysis and typical benign features of Warthin tumour was obtained. Right parotid gland including the masses was resected completely. 5 weeks later superficial parotidectomy was performed to the left parotid gland. Histological examination revealed cystic tumour in the parenchyma of parotid gland, composed of prominent lymphoid stroma and large epithelial cells with oncocytic features covering it consistent with Warthin tumour.

  6. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC) on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170). These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT) and B16F10 melanoma. Methods Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO) by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained the cells from inside

  7. Tumor dose-volume response in image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Mazeron, Renaud; Castelnau-Marchand, Pauline; Escande, Alexandre; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Maroun, Pierre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chargari, Cyrus; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided adaptive brachytherapy is a high precision technique that allows dose escalation and adaptation to tumor response. Two monocentric studies reported continuous dose-volume response relationships, however, burdened by large confidence intervals. The aim was to refine these estimations by performing a meta-regression analysis based on published series. Eligibility was limited to series reporting dosimetric parameters according to the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European SocieTy for Radiation Oncology recommendations. The local control rates reported at 2-3 years were confronted to the mean D90 clinical target volume (CTV) in 2-Gy equivalent using the probit model. The impact of each series on the relationships was pondered according to the number of patients reported. An exhaustive literature search retrieved 13 series reporting on 1299 patients. D90 high-risk CTV ranged from 70.9 to 93.1 Gy. The probit model showed a significant correlation between the D90 and the probability of achieving local control (p < 0.0001). The D90 associated to a 90% probability of achieving local control was 81.4 Gy (78.3-83.8 Gy). The planning aim of 90 Gy corresponded to a 95.0% probability (92.8-96.3%). For the intermediate-risk CTV, less data were available, with 873 patients from eight institutions. Reported mean D90 intermediate-risk CTV ranged from 61.7 to 69.1 Gy. A significant dose-volume effect was observed (p = 0.009). The D90 of 60 Gy was associated to a 79.4% (60.2-86.0%) local control probability. Based on published data from a high number of patients, significant dose-volume effect relationships were confirmed and refined between the D90 of both CTV and the probability of achieving local control. Further studies based on individual data are required to develop nomograms including nondosimetric prognostic criteria. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epigenetic silencing of MLH1 in endometrial cancers is associated with larger tumor volume, increased rate of lymph node positivity and reduced recurrence-free survival.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Casey M; Cohn, David E; Hampel, Heather; Frankel, Wendy L; Jones, Dan; McElroy, Joseph P; Suarez, Adrian A; Zhao, Weiqiang; Chen, Wei; Salani, Ritu; Copeland, Larry J; O'Malley, David M; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Chassen, Alexis S; Pearlman, Rachel; Goodfellow, Paul J; Backes, Floor J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the relationship between mismatch repair (MMR) classification and clinicopathologic features including tumor volume, and explore outcomes by MMR class in a contemporary cohort. Single institution cohort evaluating MMR classification for endometrial cancers (EC). MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC)±microsatellite instability (MSI) testing and reflex MLH1 methylation testing was performed. Tumors with MMR abnormalities by IHC or MSI and MLH1 methylation were classified as epigenetic MMR deficiency while those without MLH1 methylation were classified as probable MMR mutations. Clinicopathologic characteristics were analyzed. 466 endometrial cancers were classified; 75% as MMR proficient, 20% epigenetic MMR defects, and 5% as probable MMR mutations. Epigenetic MMR defects were associated with advanced stage, higher grade, presence of lymphovascular space invasion, and older age. MMR class was significantly associated with tumor volume, an association not previously reported. The epigenetic MMR defect tumors median volume was 10,220mm 3 compared to 3321mm 3 and 2,846mm 3 , for MMR proficient and probable MMR mutations respectively (P<0.0001). Higher tumor volume was associated with lymph node involvement. Endometrioid EC cases with epigenetic MMR defects had significantly reduced recurrence-free survival (RFS). Among advanced stage (III/IV) endometrioid EC the epigenetic MMR defect group was more likely to recur compared to the MMR proficient group (47.7% vs 3.4%) despite receiving similar adjuvant therapy. In contrast, there was no difference in the number of early stage recurrences for the different MMR classes. MMR testing that includes MLH1 methylation analysis defines a subset of tumors that have worse prognostic features and reduced RFS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developing and validating a novel metabolic tumor volume risk stratification system for supplementing non-small cell lung cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yonglin; Zhang, James X; Liu, Haiyan; Appelbaum, Daniel; Meng, Jianfeng; Penney, Bill C

    2018-06-07

    We hypothesized that whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTVwb) could be used to supplement non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) staging due to its independent prognostic value. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a novel MTVwb risk stratification system to supplement NSCLC staging. We performed an IRB-approved retrospective review of 935 patients with NSCLC and FDG-avid tumor divided into modeling and validation cohorts based on the type of PET/CT scanner used for imaging. In addition, sensitivity analysis was conducted by dividing the patient population into two randomized cohorts. Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed to determine the prognostic value of the MTVwb risk stratification system. The cut-off values (10.0, 53.4 and 155.0 mL) between the MTVwb quartiles of the modeling cohort were applied to both the modeling and validation cohorts to determine each patient's MTVwb risk stratum. The survival analyses showed that a lower MTVwb risk stratum was associated with better overall survival (all p < 0.01), independent of TNM stage together with other clinical prognostic factors, and the discriminatory power of the MTVwb risk stratification system, as measured by Gönen and Heller's concordance index, was not significantly different from that of TNM stage in both cohorts. Also, the prognostic value of the MTVwb risk stratum was robust in the two randomized cohorts. The discordance rate between the MTVwb risk stratum and TNM stage or substage was 45.1% in the modeling cohort and 50.3% in the validation cohort. This study developed and validated a novel MTVwb risk stratification system, which has prognostic value independent of the TNM stage and other clinical prognostic factors in NSCLC, suggesting that it could be used for further NSCLC pretreatment assessment and for refining treatment decisions in individual patients.

  10. Chronic baseline prostate inflammation is associated with lower tumor volume in men with prostate cancer on repeat biopsy: Results from the REDUCE study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel M; Nickel, J Curtis; Andriole, Gerald L; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate whether baseline acute and chronic prostate inflammation among men with initial negative biopsy for prostate cancer (PC) is associated with PC volume at the 2-year repeat prostate biopsy in a clinical trial with systematic biopsies. Retrospective analysis of 886 men with negative baseline prostate biopsy and positive 2-year repeat biopsy in the Reduction by Dutasteride of PC Events (REDUCE) study. Acute and chronic inflammation and tumor volume were determined by central pathology. The association of baseline inflammation with 2-year repeat biopsy cancer volume was evaluated with linear and Poisson regressions controlling for demographics and laboratory variables. Chronic, acute inflammation, and both were detected in 531 (60%), 12 (1%), and 84 (9%) baseline biopsies, respectively. Acute and chronic inflammation were significantly associated with each other (P < 0.001). Chronic inflammation was associated with larger prostate (P < 0.001) and lower pre-repeat biopsy PSA (P = 0.01). At 2-year biopsy, baseline chronic inflammation was associated with lower mean tumor volume (2.07 µl vs. 3.15 µl; P = 0.001), number of biopsy cores involved (1.78 vs. 2.19; P < 0.001), percent of cores involved (17.8% vs. 22.8%; P < 0.001), core involvement (0.21 µl vs. 0.31 µl; P < 0.001), and overall percent tumor involvement (1.40% vs. 2.01%; P < 0.001). Results were unchanged in multivariable analysis. Baseline acute inflammation was not associated with any tumor volume measurement. In a cohort of men with 2-year repeat prostate biopsy positive for PC after a negative baseline biopsy, baseline chronic inflammation was associated with lower PC volume. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Testicular tumours in prepubertal children: About eight cases.

    PubMed

    Khemakhem, Rachid; Ahmed, Yosra Ben; Jlidi, Said; Nouira, Faouzi; Fdhila, Faten; Charieg, Awatef; Ghorbel, Sofiene; Barsaoui, Sihem; Chaouachi, Béji

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the spectrum of testicular tumors in prepubertal children and the therapeutic resultants in an unselected population. Our hospital database was analyzed for testicular tumors from January 1995 to December 2010 concerning clinical presentation, treatment and therapeutic results. Eight patients were operated on because of testicular tumors. In six cases (75%) the tumor was benign: benign teratoma (four cases), epidermoid cyst (one case) and immature teratoma (one case). Two patients (25%) had a malignant tumour: yolk-sac tumour (two cases). All this children underwent surgery. Radical inguinal orchidectomy was performed in six cases and conservative surgery was performed in two cases. One patient has received adjuvant chemotherapy. Follow-up was uneventfully three years after primary surgery. In prepubertal children, most testicular tumours are benign. If tumour markers were negative testis-preserving surgery can be proposed, complete excision of the tumour should be ascertained. In the case of testicular teratoma, the possibility of contralateral tumour should be considered in the follow-up.

  12. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  13. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance inmore » the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.« less

  14. Long-term Benefit of Tumor Volume-Directed Involved Field Radiation Therapy in the Management of Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Patel, Mona; Liotta, Margaret; Harkenrider, Matthew; Guo, Rong; Small, William; Ronald, Potkul

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to report on long-term effectiveness of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) in the salvage of localized recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). A retrospective analysis of 27 patients with a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer who received tumor volume-directed IFRT for localized extraperitoneal recurrences (either as consolidation after cytoreductive surgery (CRS) or as attempted salvage if unresectable) forms the basis of this report. All patients were heavily pretreated with multiple chemotherapy regimens. Involved field radiation therapy was primarily with external beam (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was defined as freedom from in-field recurrences and was considered as a measure of effectiveness of radiotherapy. Statistical analyses evaluated association between disease-free survival, overall survival, LRFS, and various prognostic factors. Comparison was also made with a similar but unmatched cohort with localized recurrences salvaged by additional chemotherapy instead of local therapies (NIFRT group). Of 27 patients, 17 had optimal CRS before RT. The actuarial survival at 5 and 10 years (in parenthesis) from date of radiation were LRFS (70% and 60%), overall survival (30% and 19%), and disease-free survival (33% and 20%). None of the NIFRT patients survived beyond 5 years from initiation of salvage chemotherapy. Long-term follow-up in this selected series confirmed the benefit of IFRT (±CRS) in localized ROC. Chemotherapy salvage in a similar NIFRT group was not equivalent, suggesting a role for locoregional therapies in selected patients with ROC.

  15. Diffusion profiling of tumor volumes using a histogram approach can predict proliferation and further microarchitectural features in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schob, Stefan; Beeskow, Anne; Dieckow, Julia; Meyer, Hans-Jonas; Krause, Matthias; Frydrychowicz, Clara; Hirsch, Franz-Wolfgang; Surov, Alexey

    2018-05-31

    Medulloblastomas are the most common central nervous system tumors in childhood. Treatment and prognosis strongly depend on histology and transcriptomic profiling. However, the proliferative potential also has prognostical value. Our study aimed to investigate correlations between histogram profiling of diffusion-weighted images and further microarchitectural features. Seven patients (age median 14.6 years, minimum 2 years, maximum 20 years; 5 male, 2 female) were included in this retrospective study. Using a Matlab-based analysis tool, histogram analysis of whole apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) volumes was performed. ADC entropy revealed a strong inverse correlation with the expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 (r = - 0.962, p = 0.009) and with total nuclear area (r = - 0.888, p = 0.044). Furthermore, ADC percentiles, most of all ADCp90, showed significant correlations with Ki67 expression (r = 0.902, p = 0.036). Diffusion histogram profiling of medulloblastomas provides valuable in vivo information which potentially can be used for risk stratification and prognostication. First of all, entropy revealed to be the most promising imaging biomarker. However, further studies are warranted.

  16. Dose escalation to high-risk sub-volumes based on non-invasive imaging of hypoxia and glycolytic activity in canine solid tumors: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Glycolytic activity and hypoxia are associated with poor prognosis and radiation resistance. Including both the tumor uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N4)-methylsemithio-carbazone (Cu-ATSM) in targeted therapy planning may therefore lead to improved tumor control. In this study we analyzed the overlap between sub-volumes of FDG and hypoxia assessed by the uptake of 64Cu-ATSM in canine solid tumors, and evaluated the possibilities for dose redistribution within the gross tumor volume (GTV). Materials and methods Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans of five spontaneous canine solid tumors were included. FDG-PET/CT was obtained at day 1, 64Cu-ATSM at day 2 and 3 (3 and 24 h pi.). GTV was delineated and CT images were co-registered. Sub-volumes for 3 h and 24 h 64Cu-ATSM (Cu3 and Cu24) were defined by a threshold based method. FDG sub-volumes were delineated at 40% (FDG40) and 50% (FDG50) of SUVmax. The size of sub-volumes, intersection and biological target volume (BTV) were measured in a treatment planning software. By varying the average dose prescription to the tumor from 66 to 85 Gy, the possible dose boost (D B ) was calculated for the three scenarios that the optimal target for the boost was one, the union or the intersection of the FDG and 64Cu-ATSM sub-volumes. Results The potential boost volumes represented a fairly large fraction of the total GTV: Cu3 49.8% (26.8-72.5%), Cu24 28.1% (2.4-54.3%), FDG40 45.2% (10.1-75.2%), and FDG50 32.5% (2.6-68.1%). A BTV including the union (∪) of Cu3 and FDG would involve boosting to a larger fraction of the GTV, in the case of Cu3∪FDG40 63.5% (51.8-83.8) and Cu3∪FDG50 48.1% (43.7-80.8). The union allowed only a very limited D B whereas the intersection allowed a substantial dose escalation. Conclusions FDG and 64Cu-ATSM sub-volumes were only partly overlapping, suggesting that the tracers offer

  17. Update on testis tumours.

    PubMed

    Berney, Daniel M

    2012-08-01

    The range of testicular tumours is so large that many pathologists may encounter the rarer variants only a few times, if at all, in their career. This rarity and complexity results in immense challenges for pathologists. For clinicians, due to their rarity and the high cure rate, the difficulty in conducting randomised trials in this area, even in the more common germ cell tumours, means that progress is slow and it is difficult to accumulate evidence for the relevance of the various histopathological risk factors for recurrence. A number of recent trials and retrospective analyses have suggested that some histopathological features suggestive of recurrence are more important than others. This has implications both in how testicular tumours are examined macroscopically and microscopically. New clinically important entities will also be described, as well as some pitfalls in the diagnosis of testicular tumours and how to avoid them.

  18. Clinical Implications of the Tumor Volume Reduction Rate in Head-and-Neck Cancer During Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Organ Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shih-Neng; Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Liao, Chih-Ying

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the volume reduction rate (VRR) in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) and another 76 with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) were enrolled in volumetric analysis. All patients received allocated radiotherapy courses. Adaptive computed tomography was done 4 to 5 weeks after the start of IMRT. Primary tumor volume measurement was derived using separate images for the pretreatment gross tumor volume (pGTV) and the interval gross tumor volume. Results: In the OPC group, the pGTV ranged from 6.6 to 242.6 mL (mean, 49.9more » mL), whereas the value of the VRR ranged from 0.014 to 0.74 (mean, 0.43). In HPC patients, the pGTV ranged from 4.1 to 152.4 mL (mean, 35.6 mL), whereas the VRR ranged from -1.15 to 0.79 (mean, 0.33). Multivariate analysis of the primary tumor relapse-free survival for OPC revealed three prognostic factors: T4 tumor (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 7.38), pGTV {>=}20 mL (p = 0.01, hazard ratio 10.61), and VRR <0.5 (p = 0.001, hazard ratio 6.49). Multivariate analysis of the primary tumor relapse-free survival for HPC showed two prognostic factors: pGTV {>=}30 mL (p = 0.001, hazard ratio 2.87) and VRR <0.5 (p = 0.03, hazard ratio 2.25). Conclusion: The VRR is an outcome predictor for local control in OPC and HPC patients treated with IMRT. Those with large tumor volumes or a VRR <0.5 should be considered for a salvage operation or a dose-escalation scheme.« less

  19. Delineation of the primary tumour Clinical Target Volumes (CTV-P) in laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: AIRO, CACA, DAHANCA, EORTC, GEORCC, GORTEC, HKNPCSG, HNCIG, IAG-KHT, LPRHHT, NCIC CTG, NCRI, NRG Oncology, PHNS, SBRT, SOMERA, SRO, SSHNO, TROG consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Vincent; Evans, Mererid; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bourhis, Jean; Budach, Volker; Chen, Amy; Eisbruch, Abraham; Feng, Mei; Giralt, Jordi; Gupta, Tejpal; Hamoir, Marc; Helito, Juliana K; Hu, Chaosu; Hunter, Keith; Johansen, Jorgen; Kaanders, Johannes; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Lee, Anne; Maingon, Philippe; Mäkitie, Antti; Micciche', Francesco; Nicolai, Piero; O'Sullivan, Brian; Poitevin, Adela; Porceddu, Sandro; Składowski, Krzysztof; Tribius, Silke; Waldron, John; Wee, Joseph; Yao, Min; Yom, Sue S; Zimmermann, Frank; Grau, Cai

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have reported large inter-observer variations in target volume selection and delineation in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Consensus guidelines have been published for the neck nodes (see Grégoire et al., 2003, 2014), but such recommendations are lacking for primary tumour delineation. For the latter, two main schools of thoughts are prevailing, one based on geometric expansion of the Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) as promoted by DAHANCA, and the other one based on anatomical expansion of the GTV using compartmentalization of head and neck anatomy. For each anatomic location within the larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx and oral cavity, and for each T-stage, the DAHANCA proposal has been comprehensively reviewed and edited to include anatomic knowledge into the geometric Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation concept. A first proposal was put forward by the leading authors of this publication (VG and CG) and discussed with opinion leaders in head and neck radiation oncology from Europe, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, North America and South America to reach a worldwide consensus. This consensus proposes two CTVs for the primary tumour, the so called CTV-P1 and CVT-P2, corresponding to a high and lower tumour burden, and which should be associated with a high and a lower dose prescription, respectively. Implementation of these guidelines in the daily practice of radiation oncology should contribute to reduce treatment variations from clinicians to clinicians, facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials, and contribute to improved care of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy. Methods: The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freelymore » downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose. Results: For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies. Conclusion: The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.« less

  1. Validation of post-operative residual contrast enhancing tumor volume as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Abrey, Lauren E; Nelson, Sarah J; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Garcia, Josep; Chinot, Olivier; Saran, Frank; Nishikawa, Ryo; Henriksson, Roger; Mason, Warren P; Wick, Wolfgang; Butowski, Nicholas; Ligon, Keith L; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Colman, Howard; de Groot, John; Chang, Susan; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Young, Robert J; Alexander, Brian M; Colen, Rivka; Taylor, Jennie W; Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel; Mehta, Arnav; Huang, Raymond Y; Pope, Whitney B; Reardon, David; Batchelor, Tracy; Prados, Michael; Galanis, Evanthia; Wen, Patrick Y; Cloughesy, Timothy F

    2018-04-05

    In the current study, we pooled imaging data in newly diagnosed GBM patients from international multicenter clinical trials, single institution databases, and multicenter clinical trial consortiums to identify the relationship between post-operative residual enhancing tumor volume and overall survival (OS). Data from 1,511 newly diagnosed GBM patients from 5 data sources were included in the current study: 1) a single institution database from UCLA (N=398; Discovery); 2) patients from the Ben and Cathy Ivy Foundation for Early Phase Clinical Trials Network Radiogenomics Database (N=262 from 8 centers; Confirmation); 3) the chemoradiation placebo arm from an international phase III trial (AVAglio; N=394 from 120 locations in 23 countries; Validation); 4) the experimental arm from AVAglio examining chemoradiation plus bevacizumab (N=404 from 120 locations in 23 countries; Exploratory Set 1); and 5) an Alliance (N0874) Phase I/II trial of vorinostat plus chemoradiation (N=53; Exploratory Set 2). Post-surgical, residual enhancing disease was quantified using T1 subtraction maps. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to determine influence of clinical variables, MGMT status, and residual tumor volume on OS. A log-linear relationship was observed between post-operative, residual enhancing tumor volume and OS in newly diagnosed GBM treated with standard chemoradiation. Post-operative tumor volume is a prognostic factor for OS (P<0.01), regardless of therapy, age, and MGMT promoter methylation status. Post-surgical, residual contrast-enhancing disease significantly negatively influences survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with chemoradiation with or without concomitant experimental therapy.

  2. Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis in Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy: Which Threshold Is the Best Predictor of Local Control?

    PubMed

    Castelli, Joël; Depeursinge, Adrien; de Bari, Berardino; Devillers, Anne; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Bourhis, Jean; Prior, John O

    2017-06-01

    In the context of oropharyngeal cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy, the aim of this retrospective study was to identify the best threshold value to compute metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and/or total lesion glycolysis to predict local-regional control (LRC) and disease-free survival. One hundred twenty patients with a locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer from 2 different institutions treated with definitive radiotherapy underwent FDG PET/CT before treatment. Various MTVs and total lesion glycolysis were defined based on 2 segmentation methods: (i) an absolute threshold of SUV (0-20 g/mL) or (ii) a relative threshold for SUVmax (0%-100%). The parameters' predictive capabilities for disease-free survival and LRC were assessed using the Harrell C-index and Cox regression model. Relative thresholds between 40% and 68% and absolute threshold between 5.5 and 7 had a similar predictive value for LRC (C-index = 0.65 and 0.64, respectively). Metabolic tumor volume had a higher predictive value than gross tumor volume (C-index = 0.61) and SUVmax (C-index = 0.54). Metabolic tumor volume computed with a relative threshold of 51% of SUVmax was the best predictor of disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.23 [per 10 mL], P = 0.009) and LRC (hazard ratio: 1.22 [per 10 mL], P = 0.02). The use of different thresholds within a reasonable range (between 5.5 and 7 for an absolute threshold and between 40% and 68% for a relative threshold) seems to have no major impact on the predictive value of MTV. This parameter may be used to identify patient with a high risk of recurrence and who may benefit from treatment intensification.

  3. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for tumor staging and definition of tumor volumes on radiation treatment planning in nonsmall cell lung cancer: A prospective radiographic cohort study of single center clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dan; Hu, Qiaoqiao; Qi, Liping; Wang, Juan; Wu, Hao; Zhu, Guangying; Yu, Huiming

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the impact of magnetic resonance (MR) on the staging and radiotherapy planning for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).A total of 24 patients with NSCLC underwent MRI, which was fused with radiotherapy planning CT using rigid registration. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated not only according to CT image alone (GTVCT), but also based on both CT and MR image (GTVCT/MR). For each patient, 2 conformal treatment plans were made according to GTVCT and GTVCT/MR, respectively. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) for lesion and normal organs were generated using both GTVCT and GTVCT/MR treatment plans. All patients were irradiated according to GTVCT/MR plan.Median volume of the GTVCT/MR and GTVCT were 105.42 cm and 124.45 cm, respectively, and the mean value of GTVCT/MR was significantly smaller than that of GTVCT (145.71 ± 145.04 vs 174.30 ± 150.34, P < 0.01). Clinical stage was modified in 9 patients (37.5%). The objective response rate (ORR) was 83.3% and the l-year overall survival (OS) was 87.5%.MR is a useful tool in radiotherapy treatment planning for NSCLC, which improves the definition of tumor volume, reduces organs at risk dose and does not increase the local recurrence rate.

  4. An optimized small animal tumour model for experimentation with low energy protons.

    PubMed

    Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Krause, Mechthild; Schmidt, Margret; Szabo, Rita; Pawelke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The long-term aim of developing laser based particle acceleration towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short and ultra-intensive particle beam pulses. After comprehensive cell studies a mouse ear tumour model was established allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~20 MeV) currently available at laser driven accelerators. The model was successfully applied for a first tumour growth delay study with laser driven electrons, whereby the need of improvements crop out. To optimise the mouse ear tumour model with respect to a stable, high take rate and a lower number of secondary tumours, Matrigel was introduced for tumour cell injection. Different concentrations of two human tumour cell lines (FaDu, LN229) and Matrigel were evaluated for stable tumour growth and fulfilling the allocation criteria for irradiation experiments. The originally applied cell injection with PBS was performed for comparison and to assess the long-term stability of the model. Finally, the optimum suspension of cells and Matrigel was applied to determine applicable dose ranges for tumour growth delay studies by 200 kV X-ray irradiation. Both human tumour models showed a high take rate and exponential tumour growth starting at a volume of ~10 mm3. As disclosed by immunofluorescence analysis these small tumours already interact with the surrounding tissue and activate endothelial cells to form vessels. The formation of delimited, solid tumours at irradiation size was shown by standard H&E staining and a realistic dose range for inducing tumour growth delay without permanent tumour control was obtained for both tumour entities. The already established mouse ear tumour model was successfully upgraded now providing stable tumour growth with high take rate for two tumour entities (HNSCC, glioblastoma) that are of interest for future irradiation experiments at experimental

  5. Bilateral multifocal Warthin tumours

    PubMed Central

    Deveer, Mehmet; Sahan, Murat; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; İlhan Celik, Özgür

    2013-01-01

    Warthin tumour, also known as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum, is the second most frequent benign tumour of the parotid gland after pleomorphic adenoma. A 57-year-old man was referred to our hospital with bilateral buccal masses without pain. He presented with a 1-year history of the condition and stated that growth of the mass has accelerated during the last 6 months. Ultrasonography examination showed two heterogeneous solid masses. Axial contrast-enhanced CT image revealed bilateral heterogeneous solid masses. The masses showed enhancement after contrast administration (95 HU). Fine needle aspiration cytology was recommended for further analysis and typical benign features of Warthin tumour was obtained. Right parotid gland including the masses was resected completely. 5 weeks later superficial parotidectomy was performed to the left parotid gland. Histological examination revealed cystic tumour in the parenchyma of parotid gland, composed of prominent lymphoid stroma and large epithelial cells with oncocytic features covering it consistent with Warthin tumour. PMID:23704438

  6. A prospective study of cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and neuropsychological performance in children with primary brain tumors treated with cranial radiation.

    PubMed

    Agbahiwe, Harold; Rashid, Arif; Horska, Alena; Mahone, E Mark; Lin, Doris; McNutt, Todd; Cohen, Kenneth; Redmond, Kristin; Wharam, Moody; Terezakis, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (RT) is an important component in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. However, it can result in long-term effects on the developing brain. This prospective study assessed the effects of cranial RT on cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and their correlation with higher cognitive functioning. Ten pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated with cranial RT and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy children serving as controls were evaluated. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessments (language, memory, auditory and visual processing, and vocabulary) were performed at the baseline and 6, 15, and 27 months after RT. The effects of age, the time since RT, and the cerebral RT dose on brain volumes and neuropsychological performance were analyzed with linear mixed effects model analyses. Cerebral volume increased significantly with age in both groups (P = .01); this increase in volume was more pronounced in younger children. Vocabulary performance was found to be significantly associated with a greater cerebral volume (P = .05) and a lower RT dose (P = .003). No relation was observed between the RT dose and the cerebral volume. There was no difference in the corresponding neuropsychological tests between the 2 groups. This prospective study found significant relations among the RT dose, cerebral volumes, and rate of vocabulary development among children receiving RT. The results of this study provide further support for clinical trials aimed at reducing cranial RT doses in the pediatric population. Cancer 2017;161-168. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  7. Antisecretory Factor-mediated Inhibition of Cell Volume Dynamics Produces Anti-tumor Activity in Glioblastoma. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) presents a barrier to drug uptake in solid tumors, including the aggressive primary brain tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). It remains unclear how fluid dynamics impacts tumor progression and can be targeted therapeutically. To address this issue, a novel telemetry-based approach was developed to measure changes in IFP during progression of GBM xenografts. Antisecretory factor (AF) is an endogenous protein that displays anti-secretory effects in animals and patients.

  8. Estimation of error in maximal intensity projection-based internal target volume of lung tumors: a simulation and comparison study using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Read, Paul W; Baisden, Joseph M; Larner, James M; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA) from RedCAM (epsilon), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability (nu). Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies (epsilon = -21.64% +/- 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies (epsilon = -20.31% +/- 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly (epsilon = -5.13nu - 6.71, r(2) = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.

  9. Estimation of Error in Maximal Intensity Projection-Based Internal Target Volume of Lung Tumors: A Simulation and Comparison Study Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Jing; Read, Paul W.; Baisden, Joseph M.

    Purpose: To evaluate the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)-based lung tumor internal target volume determination using a simulation method based on dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). Methods and Materials: Eight healthy volunteers and six lung tumor patients underwent a 5-min MRI scan in the sagittal plane to acquire dynamic images of lung motion. A MATLAB program was written to generate re-sorted dMRI using 4D-CT acquisition methods (RedCAM) by segmenting and rebinning the MRI scans. The maximal intensity projection images were generated from RedCAM and dMRI, and the errors in the MIP-based internal target area (ITA)more » from RedCAM ({epsilon}), compared with those from dMRI, were determined and correlated with the subjects' respiratory variability ({nu}). Results: Maximal intensity projection-based ITAs from RedCAM were comparatively smaller than those from dMRI in both phantom studies ({epsilon} = -21.64% {+-} 8.23%) and lung tumor patient studies ({epsilon} = -20.31% {+-} 11.36%). The errors in MIP-based ITA from RedCAM correlated linearly ({epsilon} = -5.13{nu} - 6.71, r{sup 2} = 0.76) with the subjects' respiratory variability. Conclusions: Because of the low temporal resolution and retrospective re-sorting, 4D-CT might not accurately depict the excursion of a moving tumor. Using a 4D-CT MIP image to define the internal target volume might therefore cause underdosing and an increased risk of subsequent treatment failure. Patient-specific respiratory variability might also be a useful predictor of the 4D-CT-induced error in MIP-based internal target volume determination.« less

  10. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted basedmore » on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.« less

  11. Correlation between molecular tumor volume evaluated with 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and prostatic specific antigen levels.

    PubMed

    Medina-Ornelas Sevastián, S; García-Pérez Francisco, O; Hernández-Pedro Norma, Y; Arellano-Zarate Angélica, E; Abúndiz-López Blanca, L

    2018-02-14

    To investigate the association between prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels and molecular tumor volume (MTV) measured in the 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT, both done in a short period of time, in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. Eighty-four patients who underwent 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT and measurement of PSA levels in the same week (trigger-PSA) were studied in this retrospective analysis. MTV was calculated from the sum of the metastatic lesions. To determine the association between trigger-PSA level and PET/CT findings, Spearman rank correlation was used. The median MTV of metastatic bone disease (mBD) was significantly higher than in metastatic lymph-nodes (mLN) (139.5 versus 17.7; P<.05). Disease was limited to the prostate in 8 patients (9.5%), mLN in 21 patients (25%), mBD in 32 patients (38.1%) and the 3 sites (prostate, mLN, and mBD) in 17 patients (20.2%). In 6 patients (6.14%), 68 Ga-PSMA-PET/CT was not capable of detecting disease. The median trigger-PSA levels of patients with disease limited to the prostate (2.8ng/mL), mLN (6.8ng/mL), and for mBD (16.8ng/mL) was statically significant (P<.05). Positive patients had a mean trigger-PSA of 4.3ng/mL vs 1.5ng/mL in negative patients (P<.05). We established 3 threshold-points for trigger-PSA level detection rate:≤1ng/mL (47.3%), 1-4ng/mL (68.4%) and≥4ng/mL (96.7%). When trigger-PSA exceeded 4ng/mL, the MTV was higher (P<.001). The correlation of MTV with trigger-PSA is demonstrated, which may have an impact on management. However, trigger-PSA levels were not capable of distinguishing between localized or distant disease. An accurate detection of disease can lead to a better therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  12. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  13. Putting tumours in context.

    PubMed

    Bissell, M J; Radisky, D

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumour growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets.

  14. Metastasising pilar tumour of scalp.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Evans, H J

    1986-01-01

    A case of pilar tumour of the scalp, treated by local excision and radiotherapy, later metastasised to the neck. The variable histological growth patterns of the primary tumour and its metastases are described. It is concluded that the pilar tumour is a genuine neoplasm of the hair follicle that is occasionally capable of malignant behaviour. Images PMID:3734112

  15. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images weremore » binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing.« less

  16. Gastric tumours in FAP.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Frayling, Ian M; Clark, Susan K; Latchford, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Gastric cancer is not a recognised extra-colonic manifestation of FAP, except in countries with a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Data regarding gastric adenomas in FAP are sparse. The aim of this study was to review the clinical characteristics of gastric tumours occurring within an FAP population from the largest European polyposis registry. All patients that developed a gastric adenoma or carcinoma were identified from a prospectively maintained registry database. The primary outcome measure was the occurrence of gastric adenoma or adenocarcinoma. Secondary outcomes included APC mutation, tumour stage, management and survival. Eight patients developed gastric cancer and 21 an adenoma (median age 52 and 44 years, respectively). Regular oesophagogastroduodenoscopy surveillance was performed in 6/8 patients who developed cancer. Half were advanced T3/4 tumours and 6/8 had nodal or metastatic spread at diagnosis. All cancer cases died within a median of 13.5 months from diagnosis. Gastric adenomas were evenly distributed: 11/21 (52%) in the distal and 10/21 (48%) proximal stomach, whereas 5/8 (63%) cancers were located proximally. An association between gastric tumour and desmoid development was observed; 7/8 (88%) cancer and 11/21 (52%) adenoma cases had a personal or family history of desmoid. It would appear from this small, retrospective study that gastric cancer is not a prominent extra-colonic feature of FAP in the Western world. It seems to present at an advanced stage with a poor prognosis. There may be an association between gastric tumour and desmoid occurrence but a large multicentre cohort is necessary to investigate this further.

  17. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu; Harris, Jonathan; Yao, Min

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baselinemore » SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.« less

  18. Mixed malignant germ cell tumour of third ventricle with hydrocephalus: a rare case with recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Manjari; Monappa, Vidya; Rao, Lakshmi; Kudva, Ranjini

    2014-11-01

    Malignant Germ Cell Tumours (GCTs) are rare, accounting for 3% of intracranial tumours and just like their extracranial counterparts represent a wide array of disease. Combination of Germinoma with Teratoma is very rare. Here in, we describe a case of Mixed Malignant Germ cell tumor of third ventricle with recurrence with emphasis on histopathological and radiological findings.

  19. Retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) high risk gross tumor volume boost (HR GTV boost) contour delineation agreement among NRG sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Elizabeth H; Bosch, Walter; Kane, John M; Abrams, Ross A; Salerno, Kilian E; Deville, Curtiland; Raut, Chandrajit P; Petersen, Ivy A; Chen, Yen-Lin; Mullen, John T; Millikan, Keith W; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kendrick, Michael L; DeLaney, Thomas F; Wang, Dian

    2015-09-01

    Curative intent management of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) requires gross total resection. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) often is used as an adjuvant to surgery, but recurrence rates remain high. To enhance RT efficacy with acceptable tolerance, there is interest in delivering "boost doses" of RT to high-risk areas of gross tumor volume (HR GTV) judged to be at risk for positive resection margins. We sought to evaluate variability in HR GTV boost target volume delineation among collaborating sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams. Radiation planning CT scans for three cases of RPS were distributed to seven paired radiation and surgical oncologist teams at six institutions. Teams contoured HR GTV boost volumes for each case. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. HRGTV boost volume contour agreement between the seven teams was "substantial" or "moderate" for all cases. Agreement was best on the torso wall posteriorly (abutting posterior chest abdominal wall) and medially (abutting ipsilateral para-vertebral space and great vessels). Contours varied more significantly abutting visceral organs due to differing surgical opinions regarding planned partial organ resection. Agreement of RPS HRGTV boost volumes between sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams was substantial to moderate. Differences were most striking in regions abutting visceral organs, highlighting the importance of collaboration between the radiation and surgical oncologist for "individualized" target delineation on the basis of areas deemed at risk and planned resection.

  20. Coupled modelling of tumour angiogenesis, tumour growth and blood perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Xu, Shixiong; Wu, Jie; Long, Quan

    2011-06-21

    We propose a mathematical modelling system to investigate the dynamic process of tumour cell proliferation, death and tumour angiogenesis by fully coupling the vessel growth, tumour growth and blood perfusion. Tumour growth and angiogenesis are coupled by the chemical microenvironment and the cell-matrix interaction. The haemodynamic calculation is carried out on the updated vasculature. The domains of intravascular, transcapillary and interstitial fluid flow were coupled in the model to provide a comprehensive solution of blood perfusion variables. An estimation of vessel collapse is made according to the wall shear stress criterion to provide feedback on vasculature remodelling. The simulation can show the process of tumour angiogenesis and the spatial distribution of tumour cells for periods of up to 24 days. It can show the major features of tumour and tumour microvasculature during the period such as the formation of a large necrotic core in the tumour centre with few functional vessels passing through, and a well circulated tumour periphery regions in which the microvascular density is high and associated with more aggressive proliferating cells of the growing tumour which are all consistent with physiological observations. The study also demonstrated that the simulation results are not dependent on the initial tumour and networks, which further confirms the application of the coupled model feedback mechanisms. The model enables us to examine the interactions between angiogenesis and tumour growth, and to study the dynamic response of a solid tumour to the changes in the microenvironment. This simulation framework can be a foundation for further applications such as drug delivery and anti-angiogenic therapies. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interobserver delineation variation in lung tumour stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Persson, G F; Nygaard, D E; Hollensen, C; Munck af Rosenschöld, P; Mouritsen, L S; Due, A K; Berthelsen, A K; Nyman, J; Markova, E; Roed, A P; Roed, H; Korreman, S; Specht, L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In radiotherapy, delineation uncertainties are important as they contribute to systematic errors and can lead to geographical miss of the target. For margin computation, standard deviations (SDs) of all uncertainties must be included as SDs. The aim of this study was to quantify the interobserver delineation variation for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung tumours using a cross-sectional study design. Methods 22 consecutive patients with 26 tumours were included. Positron emission tomography/CT scans were acquired for planning of SBRT. Three oncologists and three radiologists independently delineated the gross tumour volume. The interobserver variation was calculated as a mean of multiple SDs of distances to a reference contour, and calculated for the transversal plane (SDtrans) and craniocaudal (CC) direction (SDcc) separately. Concordance indexes and volume deviations were also calculated. Results Median tumour volume was 13.0 cm3, ranging from 0.3 to 60.4 cm3. The mean SDtrans was 0.15 cm (SD 0.08 cm) and the overall mean SDcc was 0.26 cm (SD 0.15 cm). Tumours with pleural contact had a significantly larger SDtrans than tumours surrounded by lung tissue. Conclusions The interobserver delineation variation was very small in this systematic cross-sectional analysis, although significantly larger in the CC direction than in the transversal plane, stressing that anisotropic margins should be applied. This study is the first to make a systematic cross-sectional analysis of delineation variation for peripheral lung tumours referred for SBRT, establishing the evidence that interobserver variation is very small for these tumours. PMID:22919015

  2. Planning the breast tumor bed boost: Changes in the excision cavity volume and surgical scar location after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Kevin S.; Kong, F.-M.; Griffith, Kent A.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the changes in breast and excision cavity volumes after whole-breast irradiation and the adequacy of using the surgical scar to guide boost planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 30 women consecutively treated for 31 breast cancers were included in this study. Simulation CT scans were performed before and after whole-breast irradiation. CT breast volumes were delineated using clinically defined borders. Excision cavity volumes were contoured based on surgical clips, the presence of a hematoma, and/or other surgical changes. Hypothetical electron boost plans were generated using the surgical scar with amore » 3-cm margin and analyzed for coverage. Results: The mean CT breast volumes were 774 and 761 cc (p = 0.22), and the excision cavity volumes were 32.1 and 25.1 cc (p < 0.0001), before and after 40 Gy (39-42 Gy) of whole-breast irradiation, respectively. The volume reduction in the excision cavity was inversely correlated with time elapsed since surgery (R = 0.46, p < 0.01) and body weight (R = 0.50, p < 0.01). The scar-guided hypothetical plans failed to cover the excision cavity adequately in 62% and 53.8% of cases using the pretreatment and postradiation CTs, respectively. Per the hypothetical plans, the minimum dose to the excision cavity was significantly lower for tumors located in the inner vs. outer quadrants (p = 0.02) and for cavities >20 cc vs. <20 cc (p = 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrates a significant reduction in the volume of the excision cavity during whole-breast irradiation. Scar-guided boost plans provide inadequate coverage of the excision cavity in the majority of cases.« less

  3. PET imaging in adaptive radiotherapy of gastrointestinal tumours.

    PubMed

    Bulens, Philippe; Thomas, Melissa; Deroose, Christophe M; Haustermans, Karin

    2018-06-04

    Radiotherapy is the standard of care in the multimodality treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) tumours, such as oesophageal cancer, gastric cancer, rectal cancer and anal cancer. Additionally, radiotherapy has served as an alternative for surgery in patients with liver cancer, cancer of the biliary tract and pancreatic cancer. Positron-emission tomography (PET), generally in combination with computed tomography (CT), has an established role in the diagnosis, response assessment and (re-)staging of several GI tumours. However, the additional value of PET in adaptive radiotherapy, i.e. during the radiation treatment course and in the delineation process, is still unclear. When performed during radiotherapy, PET aims at assessing treatment-induced variations in functional tumour volumes to reduce the radiation target volume. Moreover, in the radiation treatment planning, tumour delineation could be more accurate by incorporating PET to identify the metabolic tumour volume. This review focuses on the additional value of PET for adaptive radiotherapy protocols as well as for the target volume adaptation for individualised treatment strategies in oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, liver, biliary tract, rectal and anal neoplasms.

  4. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p < 0.001) and red cell distribution width (16.11 ± 3.04 vs. 13.41 ± 0.95%, p < 0.001) were significantly higher in autoimmune gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  5. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: kmishra@radonc.ucsf.edu; Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volumemore » histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P<.0001), greater height (P<.0001), higher T stage (P<.0001), and closer proximity to the disc (P=.002). Dose–volume histogram analysis revealed that if >30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P<.0001 for both). Furthermore, if 100% of the disc or macula received ≥28 GyE, the NVG rate was higher (P<.0001 and P=.03, respectively). If both anterior and posterior doses were above specified cut points, NVG risk was highest (P<.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed significant independent risk factors to include tumor height (P<.0001), age (P<.0001), %disc treated to ≥50% Dose (<100% vs 100%) (P=.0007), larger tumor diameter (P=.01), %lens treated to ≥90% Dose (0 vs >0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height

  6. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    PubMed

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. TU-G-BRA-05: Predicting Volume Change of the Tumor and Critical Structures Throughout Radiation Therapy by CT-CBCT Registration with Local Intensity Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S; Robinson, A; Kiess, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an accurate and effective technique to predict and monitor volume changes of the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) from daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Methods: While CBCT is typically used to minimize the patient setup error, its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of daily anatomical changes in radiotherapy. Reconstruction artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors in registration-based contour propagation from the planning CT, a conventional way to estimate anatomical changes. To improve the registration and segmentation accuracy, we developed a new deformable image registration (DIR) that iteratively corrects CBCTmore » intensities using slice-based histogram matching during the registration process. Three popular DIR algorithms (hierarchical B-spline, demons, optical flow) augmented by the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation, and their performances were evaluated on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Four trained scientists manually contoured nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs for each case, to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial software, VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). Results: Manual contouring showed significant variations, [-76, +141]% from the mean of all four sets of contours. The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average manual segmentation and four automatic segmentations are 3.70±2.30(B-spline), 1.25±1.78(demons), 0.93±1.14(optical flow), and 4.39±3.86 (VelocityAI). In comparison to the average volume of the manual segmentations, the proposed approach significantly reduced the estimation error by 9%(B-spline), 38%(demons), and 51%(optical flow) over the conventional mutual information based method (VelocityAI). Conclusion: The proposed CT-CBCT registration with local CBCT intensity

  8. Impact of 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT imaging on target volume delineation in SBRT patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Multi-reader comparative study.

    PubMed

    Chirindel, Alin; Adebahr, Sonja; Schuster, Daniel; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Schanne, Daniel H; Nemer, Ursula; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Brunner, Thomas; Nestle, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of the effect of co-registered 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT for SBRT target delineation in patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Analysis of internal target volume (ITV) delineation of central and peripheral lung lesions in 21 SBRT-patients. Manual delineation was performed by 4 observers in 2 contouring phases: on respiratory gated 4DCT with diagnostic 3DPET available aside (CT-ITV) and on co-registered 4DPET/CT (PET/CT-ITV). Comparative analysis of volumes and inter-reader agreement. 11 cases of peripheral and 10 central lesions were evaluated. In peripheral lesions, average CT-ITV was 6.2 cm(3) and PET/CT-ITV 8.6 cm(3), resembling a mean change in hypothetical radius of 2 mm. For both CT-ITVs and PET/CT-ITVs inter reader agreement was good and unchanged (0.733 and 0.716; p=0.58). All PET/CT-ITVs stayed within the PTVs derived from CT-ITVs. In central lesions, average CT-ITVs were 42.1 cm(3), PET/CT-ITVs 44.2 cm(3), without significant overall volume changes. Inter-reader agreement improved significantly (0.665 and 0.750; p<0.05). 2/10 PET/CT-ITVs exceeded the PTVs derived from CT-ITVs by >1 ml in average for all observers. The addition of co-registered 4DPET data to 4DCT based target volume delineation for SBRT of centrally located lung tumors increases the inter-observer agreement and may help to avoid geographic misses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the fluctuations of the tumour/host interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, Edoardo; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Stella, Sabrina; Dogo, Federico; Chignola, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    In a recent analysis of metabolic scaling in solid tumours we found a scaling law that interpolates between the power laws μ ∝ V and μ ∝V 2 / 3, where μ is the metabolic rate expressed as the glucose absorption rate and V is the tumour volume. The scaling law fits quite well both in vitro and in vivo data, however we also observed marked fluctuations that are associated with the specific biological properties of individual tumours. Here we analyse these fluctuations, in an attempt to find the population-wide distribution of an important parameter (A) which expresses the total extent of the interface between the solid tumour and the non-cancerous environment. Heuristic considerations suggest that the values of the A parameter follow a lognormal distribution, and, allowing for the large uncertainties of the experimental data, our statistical analysis confirms this.

  10. [Feasibility study of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging qualitative diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumors].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zuo, P L; Cheng, K B; Yu, A H; Cheng, X G

    2016-04-18

    To investigate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters in differentiating musculoskeletal tumors with different behaviours of pathological findings before therapy. A total of 34 subjects of musculoskeletal tumors were involved in this retrospective analysis. DCE-MRI was performed using a fat-saturated 3D VIBE (volumetric interpolated breath-hold exam) imaging sequence with following parameters: FA, 10 degree; TR/TE, 5.6/2.4 ms; slice thickness, 4.0 mm with no intersection gap; field of view, 310 mm×213 mm; matrix, 256×178; voxel size, 1.2 mm×1.2 mm×4.0 mm; parallel imaging acceleration factor. The actuation time for the DCE-MRI sequence was 255 s with a temporal resolution of 5 s and 40 image volumes. Using pathological results as a gold standard, tumors were divided into benign, borderline and malignant tumors. Toft's model was used for calculation of K(trans) (volume transfer constant), Ve (extravascular extracellular space distribute volume per unit tissue volume) and Kep (microvascular permeability reflux constant). Those parameters were compared between the lesions and the control tissues using paired t tests. The one-way analysis of variance was used to assess the difference among benign, borderline and malignant tumors. P values <0.05 difference was statistically significant. Based on the WHO Classification of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone(2012) criteria, 34 patients were divided into three groups: 11 for benign tumors, 12 for borderline tumors, and 11 for malignancies. Compared with control tissues, K(trans) and Kep showed no difference, but Ve was increased in benign tumors, Kep showed no difference, but K(trans) and Ve were increased in borderline tumors,K(trans), Kep and Ve were increased in malignant tumors. K(trans) (P<0.001) and Kep (P<0.01) were significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign and borderline tumors, but did not show any difference between benign tumors and borderline

  11. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Julia A.; Park, Lara K.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Tai, Albert K.; Koh, Gar Yee; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Parnell, Laurence D.; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua; Byun, Alexander J.; Crott, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well. Objective In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content. Methods Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation) were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL), mildly deficient (DEF), or supplemental (SUPP) quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden. Results No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring. Conclusions In this animal model, modulation of

  12. Sarcopenia Impairs Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: The Role of Liver Functional Reserve and Tumor-Related Factors in Loss of Skeletal Muscle Volume.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kenji; Takai, Koji; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hanai, Tatsunori; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Shiraki, Makoto; Shimizu, Masahito

    2017-09-22

    Sarcopenia impairs survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to clarify the factors that contribute to decreased skeletal muscle volume in patients with HCC. The third lumbar vertebra skeletal muscle index (L3 SMI) in 351 consecutive patients with HCC was calculated to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined as an L3 SMI value ≤ 29.0 cm²/m² for women and ≤ 36.0 cm²/m² for men. The factors affecting L3 SMI were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis and tree-based models. Of the 351 HCC patients, 33 were diagnosed as having sarcopenia and showed poor prognosis compared with non-sarcopenia patients ( p = 0.007). However, this significant difference disappeared after the adjustments for age, sex, Child-Pugh score, maximum tumor size, tumor number, and the degree of portal vein invasion by propensity score matching analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age ( p = 0.015) and sex ( p < 0.0001) were significantly correlated with a decrease in L3 SMI. Tree-based models revealed that sex (female) is the most significant factor that affects L3 SMI. In male patients, L3 SMI was decreased by aging, increased Child-Pugh score (≥56 years), and enlarged tumor size (<56 years). Maintaining liver functional reserve and early diagnosis and therapy for HCC are vital to prevent skeletal muscle depletion and improve the prognosis of patients with HCC.

  13. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima; Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generatedmore » from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.« less

  14. Thermometry system development for thermoradiotherapy of deep-seated tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, A. M.; Ivanov, S. M.; Perelstein, E. A.; Polozov, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic hyperthermia (including RF hyperthermia) in combination with radiotherapy (called thermoradiotherapy) is one of widely used contemporary cancer treatment methods. The independent electron linac and RF system or their combinations are necessary for effective therapy. Whole-body hyperthermia is used for treatment of metastatic cancer that was spread throughout the body, regional one is used for treatment of part of the body (for instance leg or abdominal cavity). Local hyperthermia with characteristic size of heating volume of 20-100 mm permits to heat tumour without overheating of healthy tissues. The thermometry of deep suited tissues during the hyperthermia process is an important and complex task. Invasive methods as thermistors, optical sensors or thermo-couples can not be widely used because all of them are able to transport tumor cells to the healthy region of the patient body. Distant methods of the temperature measurement such, as radiothermometry and acoustic thermometry can not be used for tissues seated deeper than 5-7 cm. One of possible ways to solve the problem of temperature measurement of the deep suited tissues is discussed in this article: it was proposed to use the same electrodes for RF hyperthermia and thermometry. As known electrodynamics characteristics of tissues are sufficiently depends on temperature. It was proposed to use this effect for active radiothermometry in local hyperthermia. Two opposite RF dipoles can be used as generator and receiver of pick-up signal.

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Sekac, J; Labas, P; Skultety, J; Prochotsky, A; Durdik, J; Hrbaty, B

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 years 9 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) underwent surgery at our department. All cases were with very atypical process. From these patients 3 interesting cases are described in more details. A 75-years-old woman with gastroscopically verified endoluminal tumour in the proximal third of stomach, 6x7 cm, 76-years-old man with a large endoluminal tumour in D2-D3 part of the duodenum, 4x4 cm, and 62-years-old man with verified extraluminal tumour by CT examination in the middle part of stomach. In all cases, gastrointestinal stromal tumour was histologically confirmed. Work is well photo-documented pre-surgically with endoscopic and CT-findings and during surgery: individual steps during the removal of these tumours. In assessment of the size and number of mitoses, tumours belonged to a group with highly malignant potential. Patients are regularly checked in 3-months intervals and also examination by positron emission tomography was performed--it seems to have the best demonstrability of possible relapse. All three patients live and are subjectively and objectively without significant problems (Tab. 5, Fig. 5, Ref. 7). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  16. Differentiating between Glioblastoma and Primary CNS Lymphoma Using Combined Whole-tumor Histogram Analysis of the Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume and the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shixing; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Arisawa, Atsuko; Matsuo, Chisato; Wu, Rongli; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2018-05-31

    This study aimed to determine whether whole-tumor histogram analysis of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for contrast-enhancing lesions can be used to differentiate between glioblastoma (GBM) and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). From 20 patients, 9 with PCNSL and 11 with GBM without any hemorrhagic lesions, underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging before surgery. Histogram analysis of nCBV and ADC from whole-tumor voxels in contrast-enhancing lesions was performed. An unpaired t-test was used to compare the mean values for each type of tumor. A multivariate logistic regression model (LRM) was performed to classify GBM and PCNSL using the best parameters of ADC and nCBV. All nCBV histogram parameters of GBMs were larger than those of PCNSLs, but only average nCBV was statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. Meanwhile, ADC histogram parameters were also larger in GBM compared to those in PCNSL, but these differences were not statistically significant. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the nCBV average and ADC 25th percentile demonstrated the largest area under the curve with values of 0.869 and 0.838, respectively. The LRM combining these two parameters differentiated between GBM and PCNSL with a higher area under the curve value (Logit (P) = -21.12 + 10.00 × ADC 25th percentile (10 -3 mm 2 /s) + 5.420 × nCBV mean, P < 0.001). Our results suggest that whole-tumor histogram analysis of nCBV and ADC combined can be a valuable objective diagnostic method for differentiating between GBM and PCNSL.

  17. Mediastinal germ cell tumour causing superior vena cava tumour thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Suman S; Vaid, Ashok K; Batra, Sandeep; Sharma, Devender

    2015-03-25

    We report a rare case of a 35-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of retrosternal chest pain of moderate intensity. A positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) showed a large fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG)-avid heterogeneously enhancing necrotic mass in the anterosuperior mediastinum with a focal FDG-avid thrombosis of the superior vena cava (SVC) suggestive of tumour thrombus and vascular invasion. α-Fetoprotein levels were raised (5690 IU/L). Image guided biopsy of the mediastinal mass was suggestive of non-seminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT). The patient received four cycles of BEP (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) along with therapeutic anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin. Follow-up whole body PET-CT revealed complete resolution of mediastinal mass and SVC tumour thrombosis. The documentation of FDG-PET-avid tumour thrombus resolving with chemotherapy supports the concept of circulating tumour cells being important not only in common solid tumours such as breast and colon cancer but also in relatively less common tumours such as NSGCT. The detection of circulating tumour cells could help deploy aggressive regimens upfront. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Gastric neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Crosby, David A; Donohoe, Claire L; Fitzgerald, Louise; Muldoon, Cian; Hayes, Brian; O'Toole, Dermot; Reynolds, John V

    2012-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are increasingly recognised, and management decisions may be difficult due to an incomplete understanding of aetiology, natural history and optimum therapy. This article presents a current understanding based on recent advances in epidemiology, classification, molecular profiling, and treatment. Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Gastric NETs may be divided into three clinical prognostic groups: type I is associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II is associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and type III lesions are gastrin-independent, have the greatest metastatic potential and poorest prognosis. There has been an increased frequency of gastric NETs reported. Management approaches have evolved in parallel with advances in endoscopic staging and surgery, as well as improved understanding of the biology and natural history of NETs. Gastric NETs present a spectrum of activity from indolent tumours to metastatic malignancy. Treatment decisions for patients must be individualised and are best managed by a multidisciplinary team approach. The current evidence base is limited to small series and efforts to treat patients within clinical networks of expertise are warranted. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Measurements of diagnostic examination performance and correlation analysis using microvascular leakage, cerebral blood volume, and blood flow derived from 3T dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging in glial tumor grading.

    PubMed

    Server, Andrés; Graff, Bjørn A; Orheim, Tone E Døli; Schellhorn, Till; Josefsen, Roger; Gadmar, Øystein B; Nakstad, Per H

    2011-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of microvascular leakage (MVL), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) values derived from dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DSC-MR imaging) for grading of cerebral glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between vascular permeability/perfusion parameters and tumor grades. A prospective study of 79 patients with cerebral glial tumors underwent DSC-MR imaging. Normalized relative CBV (rCBV) and relative CBF (rCBF) from tumoral (rCBVt and rCBFt), peri-enhancing region (rCBVe and rCBFe), and the value in the tumor divided by the value in the peri-enhancing region (rCBVt/e and rCBFt/e), as well as MVL, expressed as the leakage coefficient K(2) were calculated. Hemodynamic variables and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlations. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were also performed for each of the variables. The differences in rCBVt and the maximum MVL (MVL(max)) values were statistically significant among all tumor grades. Correlation analysis using Pearson was as follows: rCBVt and tumor grade, r = 0.774; rCBFt and tumor grade, r = 0.417; MVL(max) and tumor grade, r = 0.559; MVL(max) and rCBVt, r = 0.440; MVL(max) and rCBFt, r = 0.192; and rCBVt and rCBFt, r = 0.605. According to ROC analyses for distinguishing tumor grade, rCBVt showed the largest areas under ROC curve (AUC), except for grade III from IV. Both rCBVt and MVL(max) showed good discriminative power in distinguishing all tumor grades. rCBVt correlated strongly with tumor grade; the correlation between MVL(max) and tumor grade was moderate.

  20. Clinical management of borderline tumours of the ovary - experience from the "Berlin online tumour conference for gynaecological malignancies".

    PubMed

    Sehouli, Jalid; Oskay-Oezcelik, Guelten; Pietzner, Klaus; Chen, Frank; Coumbos, Alexandra; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Schuback, Beatrix; Heinrich, Georg; Kronenberger, Christel; Lorsbach, Michael; Lichtenegger, Werner; Chekerov, Radoslav

    2010-05-01

    Borderline ovarian tumour (BOT) represents a rare and special tumour entity. Despite a generally favourable prognosis for patients with BOT, the presence of invasive peritoneal implants decreases the survival rate to 30-50%. In contrast to ovarian cancer, only few data exist concerning the current clinical management of patients with BOT. For this reason, the present analyses were performed for patients with BOT who were admitted into our online tumor conference for patients with gynaecological malignancies. Based on the results discussed in this article, the current aspects and problems regarding the diagnostic, surgical and conservative treatment and aftercare management of patients with BOT are considered.

  1. MRI of perfluorocarbon emulsion kinetics in rodent mammary tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaobing; River, Jonathan N.; Muresan, Adrian S.; Popescu, Carmen; Zamora, Marta; Culp, Rita M.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions can be imaged directly by fluorine-19 MRI. We developed an optimized protocol for preparing PFC droplets of uniform size, evaluated use of the resulting droplets as blood pool contrast agents, studied their uptake by tumours and determined the spatial resolution with which they can be imaged at 4.7 T. Perfluorocarbon droplets of three different average sizes (324, 293 and 225 nm) were prepared using a microemulsifier. Images of PFC droplets with good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired with 625 µm in-plane resolution, 3 mm slice thickness and acquisition time of ~4.5 min per image. Kinetics of washout were determined using a simple mathematical model. The maximum uptake of the PFC droplets was three times greater at the tumour rim than in muscle, but the washout rate was two to three times slower in the tumour. The results are consistent with leakage of the droplets into the tumour extravascular space due to the hyper-permeability of tumour capillaries. PFC droplets may allow practical and quantitative measurements of blood volume and capillary permeability in tumours with reasonable spatial resolution.

  2. Significance of tumor volume related to peritumoral edema in intracranial meningioma treated with extreme hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in three to five fractions.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shiomi, Hiroya; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Fukuda, Shoichi; Kagawa, Naoki; Kinoshita, Manabu; Hashimoto, Naoya; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the treatment results of intracranial meningiomas treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in three to five fractions. Thirty-one patients (32 lesions) with intracranial meningioma were treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in three to five fractions using CyberKnife. Fifteen lesions were diagnosed as Grade I (World Health Organization classification) by surgical resection and 17 lesions were diagnosed as meningioma based on radiological findings. The median follow-up time was 48 months. The median planning target volume was 6.3 cm(3) (range, 1.4-27.1), and the prescribed dose (D90≤) ranged from 21 to 36 Gy (median, 27.8) administrated in three to five fractions. Five-year overall and progression-free survival rate of all 31 patients with intracranial meningioma was 86 and 83%, respectively. Five-year progression-free rate of all 32 lesions was 87%. Six of the 31 patients (19%) developed marked peritumoral edema, three of whom were asymptomatic and three symptomatic, the latter with late adverse effects of more than or equal to Grade 3. The mean planning target volume of the six lesions with marked peritumoral edema was 15.6 cm(3), and for the remaining 26 lesions without marked peritumoral edema was 7.1 cm(3) (P = 0.004). The threshold diameter of 2.56 cm for meningioma was calculated from the planning target volume (11 cm(3)) and was used as marker of developing peritumoral edema (P = 0.003). Tumor volume is a significant indicative factor for peritumoral edema in intracranial meningioma treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in three to five factions.

  3. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  4. Metabolic Tumor Volume on 18F-FDG PET/CT Improves Preoperative Identification of High-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Husby, Jenny A; Reitan, Bernt C; Biermann, Martin; Trovik, Jone; Bjørge, Line; Magnussen, Inger J; Salvesen, Øyvind O; Salvesen, Helga B; Haldorsen, Ingfrid S

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to prospectively explore the diagnostic value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging in endometrial carcinomas and to investigate whether (18)F-FDG PET-specific quantitative tumor parameters reflect clinical and histologic characteristics. Preoperative (18)F-FDG PET/CT was prospectively performed on 129 consecutive endometrial carcinoma patients. Two physicians who did not know the clinical findings or staging results independently reviewed the images, assessing primary tumor, cervical stroma involvement and metastatic spread, and determining maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively) for tumor, metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). All parameters were analyzed in relation to histomorphologic and clinical tumor characteristics. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves for identification of deep myometrial invasion and lymph node metastases were generated, and MTV cutoffs for predicting deep myometrial invasion and lymph node metastases were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of (18)F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of lymph node metastases were 77%-85%, 91%-96%, and 89%-93%, respectively. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV, and TLG were significantly related to deep myometrial invasion, presence of lymph node metastases, and high histologic grade (P < 0.015 for all) and independently predicted deep myometrial invasion (P < 0.015) and lymph node metastases (P < 0.025) after adjustment for preoperative histologic risk (based on subtype and grade) in endometrial biopsies. Optimal cutoffs for MTV in predicting deep myometrial invasion (20 mL) and the presence of lymph node metastases (30 mL) yielded odds ratios of 7.8 (P < 0.001) and 16.5 (P = 0.001), respectively. (18)F-FDG PET/CT represents a clinically valuable tool for preoperatively evaluating the presence of lymph node metastases in endometrial carcinoma patients. Applying MTV cutoffs for the prediction of deep myometrial

  5. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  6. Bone fractures following external beam radiotherapy and limb-preservation surgery for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma: relationship to irradiated bone length, volume, tumor location and dose.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Colleen I; Parent, Amy L; Griffin, Anthony M; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W M; Catton, Charles N; Ferguson, Peter C; Wunder, Jay S; Bell, Robert S; Sharpe, Michael B; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >or=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +/- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +/- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +/- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +/- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +/- 17%, compared with 37 +/- 11 Gy, 32 +/- 9 cm, 59 +/- 8 Gy, and 64 +/- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  7. Variation in the Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Large High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu; Bosch, Walter; Kirsch, David G.

    Purpose: To evaluate variability in the definition of preoperative radiotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) delineated by sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Extremity sarcoma planning CT images along with the corresponding diagnostic MRI from two patients were distributed to 10 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions to define GTV and CTV using standardized guidelines. The CT data with contours were then returned for central analysis. Contours representing statistically corrected 95% (V95) and 100% (V100) agreement were computed for each structure. Results: For the GTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) weremore » 674, 798, 752 {+-} 35 for the lower extremity case and 383, 543, 447 {+-} 46 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95 and V100 were 882, 761, and 752 for the lower, and 587, 461, and 455 for the upper extremity, respectively. The overall GTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in both lower and upper extremity cases (kappa = 0.9 [p < 0.0001] and kappa = 0.86 [p < 0.0001]). For the CTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 1145, 1911, 1605 {+-} 211 for the lower extremity case and 637, 1246, 1006 {+-} 180 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95, and V100 were 2094, 1609, and 1593 for the lower, and 1533, 1020, and 965 for the upper extremity cases, respectively. The overall CTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in the lower extremity case (kappa = 0.85 [p < 0.0001]) but only substantial in the upper extremity case (kappa = 0.77 [p < 0.0001]). Conclusions: Almost perfect agreement existed in the GTV of these two representative cases. Tshere was no significant disagreement in the CTV of the lower extremity, but variation in the CTV of upper extremity was seen, perhaps related to the positional differences between the planning CT and the diagnostic MRI.« less

  8. Advances in radio frequency tumor ablation therapy: technical considerations, strategies for increasing coagulation necrosis volume, and preliminary clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, S. Nahum; Gazelle, G. Scott

    1998-04-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation has been demonstrated as a reliable method for creating thermally induced coagulation necrosis using either a percutaneous approach with image- guidance or direct surgical application of thin electrodes into treated tissues. Early clinical trials with this technology have studied the treatment of hepatic, cerebral, and bony malignancies. The extent of coagulation necrosis induced with conventional monopolar radiofrequency electrodes is dependent on overall energy deposition, the duration of RF application, and RF electrode tip length and gauge. This article will discuss these technical considerations with the goal of defining optimal parameters for RF ablation. Strategies to further increase induced coagulation necrosis including: multiprobe and bipolar arrays, and internally-cooled RF electrodes, with or without pulsed-RF or cluster technique will be presented. The development and laboratory results for many of these radiofrequency techniques, initial clinical results, and potential biophysical limitations to RF induced coagulation, such as perfusion mediated tissue cooling (vascular flow) will likewise be discussed.

  9. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs.

  10. The influence of the oestrous cycle on the radiation response of solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Patricia R.

    Oestrogen increases the transcription of nitric oxide synthase, thus increasing nitric oxide production, which can result in vasodilation of blood vessels. Fluctuating levels of oestrogen throughout the menstrual cycle has the potential to affect tumour blood flow. Variations of blood supply to a solid tumour can influence tumour oxygenation and subsequently the percentage of hypoxic cells. As hypoxic cells are more resistant to radiation than well-oxygenated cells, this could potentially affect the radiation response of the tumour. This project evaluated the impact of the oestrous stage on the radiation response of BCHT, RIF-1 and SCCvii tumours in syngeneic C3H mice. The oestrous cycle consists of the following stages, pro-oestrus, oestrus, metoestrus and dioestrus and each stage can be determined by the cellular composition of vaginal smears. The peak of oestrogen occurs in the ovulatory phase and a second smaller peak occurs in dioestrus. Subcutaneous tumour were treated at a volume of 200 - 250 mm3 with local irradiation of 10 Gy ionising radiation at different stages of the oestrous cycle. Tumours were excised either immediately or 24 hours after irradiation and disaggregated into a single cell suspension. Tumour cell survival was assessed by clonogenic assay of the excised tumour relative to untreated tumours excised at the corresponding oestrous stage. Tumours irradiated in oestrus consistently produced the lowest surviving fraction after immediate and delayed excision. Tumours irradiated in pro-oestrus and excised immediately after irradiation, showed a two-fold increase in surviving fraction compared to tumours irradiated in oestrus. The surviving fractions of tumours excised 24 hours after irradiation were less than for tumours excised immediately after irradiation. Surviving fractions of irradiated, clamped KHT tumours were independent of oestrous stage. To confirm that these oestrous stage dependent changes were due to changes in tumour perfusion, the

  11. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  12. Metabolic impact of partial volume correction of [18F]FDG PET-CT oncological studies on the assessment of tumor response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Stefano, A; Gallivanone, F; Messa, C; Gilardi, M C; Gastiglioni, I

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the metabolic impact of Partial Volume Correction (PVC) on the measurement of the Standard Uptake Value (SUV) from [18F]FDG PET-CT oncological studies for treatment monitoring purpose. Twenty-nine breast cancer patients with bone lesions (42 lesions in total) underwent [18F]FDG PET-CT studies after surgical resection of breast cancer primitives, and before (PET-II) chemotherapy and hormone treatment. PVC of bone lesion uptake was performed on the two [18F]FDG PET-CT studies, using a method based on Recovery Coefficients (RC) and on an automatic measurement of lesion metabolic volume. Body-weight average SUV was calculated for each lesion, with and without PVC. The accuracy, reproducibility, clinical feasibility and the metabolic impact on treatment response of the considered PVC method was evaluated. The PVC method was found clinically feasible in bone lesions, with an accuracy of 93% for lesion sphere-equivalent diameter >1 cm. Applying PVC, average SUV values increased, from 7% up to 154% considering both PET-I and PET-II studies, proving the need of the correction. As main finding, PVC modified the therapy response classification in 6 cases according to EORTC 1999 classification and in 5 cases according to PERCIST 1.0 classification. PVC has an important metabolic impact on the assessment of tumor response to treatment by [18F]FDG PET-CT oncological studies.

  13. Gain of 1q As a Prognostic Biomarker in Wilms Tumors (WTs) Treated With Preoperative Chemotherapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) WT 2001 Trial: A SIOP Renal Tumours Biology Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Chagtai, Tasnim; Zill, Christina; Dainese, Linda; Wegert, Jenny; Savola, Suvi; Popov, Sergey; Mifsud, William; Vujanić, Gordan; Sebire, Neil; Le Bouc, Yves; Ambros, Peter F.; Kager, Leo; O'Sullivan, Maureen J.; Blaise, Annick; Bergeron, Christophe; Mengelbier, Linda Holmquist; Gisselsson, David; Kool, Marcel; Tytgat, Godelieve A.M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Graf, Norbert; van Tinteren, Harm; Coulomb, Aurore; Gessler, Manfred; Williams, Richard Dafydd

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common pediatric renal tumor. Treatment planning under International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) protocols is based on staging and histologic assessment of response to preoperative chemotherapy. Despite high overall survival (OS), many relapses occur in patients without specific risk factors, and many successfully treated patients are exposed to treatments with significant risks of late effects. To investigate whether molecular biomarkers could improve risk stratification, we assessed 1q status and other potential copy number biomarkers in a large WT series. Materials and Methods WT nephrectomy samples from 586 SIOP WT 2001 patients were analyzed using a multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay that measured the copy number of 1q and other regions of interest. Results One hundred sixty-seven (28%) of 586 WTs had 1q gain. Five-year event-free survival (EFS) was 75.0% in patients with 1q gain (95% CI, 68.5% to 82.0%) and 88.2% in patients without gain (95% CI, 85.0% to 91.4%). OS was 88.4% with gain (95% CI, 83.5% to 93.6%) and 94.4% without gain (95% CI, 92.1% to 96.7%). In univariable analysis, 1q gain was associated with poorer EFS (P < .001; hazard ratio, 2.33) and OS (P = .01; hazard ratio, 2.16). The association of 1q gain with poorer EFS retained significance in multivariable analysis adjusted for 1p and 16q loss, sex, stage, age, and histologic risk group. Gain of 1q remained associated with poorer EFS in tumor subsets limited to either intermediate-risk localized disease or nonanaplastic localized disease. Other notable aberrations associated with poorer EFS included MYCN gain and TP53 loss. Conclusion Gain of 1q is a potentially valuable prognostic biomarker in WT, in addition to histologic response to preoperative chemotherapy and tumor stage. PMID:27432915

  14. Carcinoid tumor of the small intestine: MDCT findings with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Coulier, B; Pringot, J; Gielen, I; Maldague, P; Broze, B; Ramboux, A; Clausse, M

    2007-01-01

    MDCT currently frequently represents the first choice modality for imaging in acute or subacute abdominal conditions implicating the small bowel. As a consequence, the MDCT features of intestinal carcinoid tumors and of their peculiar metastatic spread have to be known by abdominal radiologists. These features are described and illustrated in the retrospective review of seven proven cases of small intestine carcinoids diagnosed and treated in our institution. The findings are described and correlated with gross anatomy specimens. The primary tumour clearly appeared as a contrast-enhancing intraluminal lesion in all cases except in one case in which the primary lesion remained unlocalized and in another in which the primary tumour finally appeared infracted at gross anatomy. The maximal tumoral enhancement was obtained in 3 patients imaged during the acute arterial phase. The diameter of the primary tumour ranged from 1 to 3 cm and all masses were ileal comprising one lesion in the proximal ileum, two in the medium ileum and three in the distal ileum. 6/7 patients had multiple prominent mesenteric nodal metastases, all also appearing as hypervascularised enhancing masses. In 4/7 patients the nodal metastases represented the major finding being much prominent and larger than the primary tumour. Signs of retractile mesenteritis with soft tissue stranding, retraction and stellate pattern of the mesentery were found around the mesenteric metastases in 5/7 patients and direct incarceration of vessels were found in 3 cases. The analysis of the arterial phase of MDCT study appears primordial to detect the sometimes very small but intensively enhancing primary tumor and to delineate encasement or direct obstruction of mesenteric vessels frequently caused by enhancing nodal metastases which volume often exceeds that of the primary tumor. Secondary retractile mesenteritis, deformation or ischemia of bowel loops, and hypervascular hepatic metastases are typical associated

  15. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopicmore » extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.« less

  16. Influence of Software Tool and Methodological Aspects of Total Metabolic Tumor Volume Calculation on Baseline [18F]FDG PET to Predict Survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kanoun, Salim; Tal, Ilan; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Rossi, Cédric; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Legrand, Louis; Humbert, Olivier; Casasnovas, Olivier; Brunotte, François; Cochet, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the respective influence of software tool and total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV0) calculation method on prognostic stratification of baseline 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). 59 patients with newly diagnosed HL were retrospectively included. [18F]FDG-PET was performed before any treatment. Four sets of TMTV0 were calculated with Beth Israel (BI) software: based on an absolute threshold selecting voxel with standardized uptake value (SUV) >2.5 (TMTV02.5), applying a per-lesion threshold of 41% of the SUV max (TMTV041) and using a per-patient adapted threshold based on SUV max of the liver (>125% and >140% of SUV max of the liver background; TMTV0125 and TMTV0140). TMTV041 was also determined with commercial software for comparison of software tools. ROC curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for each TMTV0 to predict treatment failure. Median follow-up was 39 months. There was an excellent correlation between TMTV041 determined with BI and with the commercial software (r = 0.96, p<0.0001). The median TMTV0 value for TMTV041, TMTV02.5, TMTV0125 and TMTV0140 were respectively 160 (used as reference), 210 ([28;154] p = 0.005), 183 ([-4;114] p = 0.06) and 143 ml ([-58;64] p = 0.9). The respective optimal TMTV0 threshold and area under curve (AUC) for prediction of progression free survival (PFS) were respectively: 313 ml and 0.70, 432 ml and 0.68, 450 ml and 0.68, 330 ml and 0.68. There was no significant difference between ROC curves. High TMTV0 value was predictive of poor PFS in all methodologies: 4-years PFS was 83% vs 42% (p = 0.006) for TMTV02.5, 83% vs 41% (p = 0.003) for TMTV041, 85% vs 40% (p<0.001) for TMTV0125 and 83% vs 42% (p = 0.004) for TMTV0140. In newly diagnosed HL, baseline metabolic tumor volume values were significantly influenced by the choice of the method used for determination of volume. However, no significant differences were found

  17. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  18. Repairing the brain with physical exercise: Cortical thickness and brain volume increases in long-term pediatric brain tumor survivors in response to a structured exercise intervention.

    PubMed

    Szulc-Lerch, Kamila U; Timmons, Brian W; Bouffet, Eric; Laughlin, Suzanne; de Medeiros, Cynthia B; Skocic, Jovanka; Lerch, Jason P; Mabbott, Donald J

    2018-01-01

    There is growing evidence that exercise induced experience dependent plasticity may foster structural and functional recovery following brain injury. We examined the efficacy of exercise training for neural and cognitive recovery in long-term pediatric brain tumor survivors treated with radiation. We conducted a controlled clinical trial with crossover of exercise training (vs. no training) in a volunteer sample of 28 children treated with cranial radiation for brain tumors (mean age = 11.5 yrs.; mean time since diagnosis = 5.7 yrs). The endpoints were anatomical T1 MRI data and multiple behavioral outcomes presenting a broader analysis of structural MRI data across the entire brain. This included an analysis of changes in cortical thickness and brain volume using automated, user unbiased approaches. A series of general linear mixed effects models evaluating the effects of exercise training on cortical thickness were performed in a voxel and vertex-wise manner, as well as for specific regions of interest. In exploratory analyses, we evaluated the relationship between changes in cortical thickness after exercise with multiple behavioral outcomes, as well as the relation of these measures at baseline. Exercise was associated with increases in cortical thickness within the right pre and postcentral gyri. Other notable areas of increased thickness related to training were present in the left pre and postcentral gyri, left temporal pole, left superior temporal gyrus, and left parahippocampal gyrus. Further, we observed that compared to a separate cohort of healthy children, participants displayed multiple areas with a significantly thinner cortex prior to training and fewer differences following training, indicating amelioration of anatomical deficits. Partial least squares analysis (PLS) revealed specific patterns of relations between cortical thickness and various behavioral outcomes both after training and at baseline. Overall, our results indicate that

  19. Consistency of metabolic tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer primary tumor measured using 18F-FDG PET/CT at two different tracer uptake times.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiping; Chen, Ping; Wroblewski, Kristen; Hou, Peng; Zhang, Chen-Peng; Jiang, Yulei; Pu, Yonglin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) of primary non-small-cell lung cancer is not sensitive to differences in F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) uptake time, and to compare this consistency of MTV measurements with that of standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Under Institutional Review Board approval, 134 consecutive patients with histologically proven non-small-cell lung cancer underwent F-FDG PET/computed tomography scanning at about 1 h (early) and 2 h (delayed) after intravenous injection of F-FDG. MTV, SUV, and TLG of the primary tumor were all measured. Student's t-test and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for paired data were used to compare MTV, SUV, and TLG between the two scans. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess agreement in PET parameters between the two scans and between the measurements made by two observers. MTV was not significantly different (P=0.17) between the two scans. However, SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and TLG increased significantly from the early to the delayed scans (P<0.0001 for all). The median percentage change between the two scans in MTV (1.65%) was smaller than in SUVmax (11.76%), SUVmean(10.57%), SUVpeak(13.51%), and TLG (14.34%); the ICC of MTV (0.996) was greater than that of SUVmax (0.933), SUVmean (0.952), SUVpeak (0.928), and TLG (0.982). Interobserver agreement between the two radiologists was excellent for MTV, SUV, and TLG on both scans (ICC: 0.934-0.999). MTV is not sensitive to common clinical variations in F-FDG uptake time, its consistency is greater than that of SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and TLG, and it has excellent interobserver agreement.

  20. Accuracy and feasibility of estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours: validation using semiautomated technique in 127 patients.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Shinagare, Atul B; O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Nishino, Mizuki; Rosenthal, Michael H; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-01-01

    To validate estimated tumour volumetry in primary gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) using semiautomated volumetry. In this IRB-approved retrospective study, we measured the three longest diameters in x, y, z axes on CTs of primary gastric GISTs in 127 consecutive patients (52 women, 75 men, mean age 61 years) at our institute between 2000 and 2013. Segmented volumes (Vsegmented) were obtained using commercial software by two radiologists. Estimate volumes (V1-V6) were obtained using formulae for spheres and ellipsoids. Intra- and interobserver agreement of Vsegmented and agreement of V1-6 with Vsegmented were analysed with concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and Bland-Altman plots. Median Vsegmented and V1-V6 were 75.9, 124.9, 111.6, 94.0, 94.4, 61.7 and 80.3 cm(3), respectively. There was strong intra- and interobserver agreement for Vsegmented. Agreement with Vsegmented was highest for V6 (scalene ellipsoid, x ≠ y ≠ z), with CCC of 0.96 [95 % CI 0.95-0.97]. Mean relative difference was smallest for V6 (0.6 %), while it was -19.1 % for V5, +14.5 % for V4, +17.9 % for V3, +32.6 % for V2 and +47 % for V1. Ellipsoidal approximations of volume using three measured axes may be used to closely estimate Vsegmented when semiautomated techniques are unavailable. Estimation of tumour volume in primary GIST using mathematical formulae is feasible. Gastric GISTs are rarely spherical. Segmented volumes are highly concordant with three axis-based scalene ellipsoid volumes. Ellipsoid volume can be used as an alternative for automated tumour volumetry.

  1. The interstitial distribution of macromolecules in rat tumours is influenced by the negatively charged matrix components

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Helge; Gyenge, Christina C; Tenstad, Olav

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of macromolecular distribution volumes is essential in understanding fluid transport within normal and pathological tissues. In this study in vivo we determined the distribution volumes of several macromolecules, including one monoclonal antibody, in tumours and tested whether charges associated with the tumour extracellular matrix influence their available volumes. Steady state levels of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) (pI = 9.2), IgG (pI = 7.6) as well as native (pI = 5.0) and cationized albumin (pI = 7.6) were established in rats bearing dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumours by continuous infusion using osmotic minipumps. After a 5–7 day infusion period, the rats were nephrectomized and the extracellular volume was determined with 51Cr-labelled EDTA. Plasma volumes were measured with 125I-labelled human serum albumin or rat IgM in a separate series. Steady state concentrations of probes were determined in the interstitial fluid that was isolated by centrifugation from tumours or by post mortem wick implantation in the back skin. Calculations were made for interstitial fluid volume (Vi), along with the available (Va/Vi) and excluded (Ve/Vi) relative interstitial volume fractions. The Ve/Vi for the positively charged trastuzumab in tumours averaged 0.29 ± 0.03 (n = 16), a value which was significantly lower than the corresponding one for IgG of 0.36 ± 0.02 (n = 16). Native albumin was excluded from 38% of the tumour interstitial fluid, whereas cationization of albumin reduced the excluded volume by ∼50%. Our experiments suggest that the tumour interstitium acts as a negatively charged matrix and is an important factor in determining the macromolecular distribution volume. PMID:15994186

  2. The interstitial distribution of macromolecules in rat tumours is influenced by the negatively charged matrix components.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Helge; Gyenge, Christina C; Tenstad, Olav

    2005-09-01

    Knowledge of macromolecular distribution volumes is essential in understanding fluid transport within normal and pathological tissues. In this study in vivo we determined the distribution volumes of several macromolecules, including one monoclonal antibody, in tumours and tested whether charges associated with the tumour extracellular matrix influence their available volumes. Steady state levels of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) (pI = 9.2), IgG (pI = 7.6) as well as native (pI = 5.0) and cationized albumin (pI = 7.6) were established in rats bearing dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumours by continuous infusion using osmotic minipumps. After a 5-7 day infusion period, the rats were nephrectomized and the extracellular volume was determined with 51Cr-labelled EDTA. Plasma volumes were measured with 125I-labelled human serum albumin or rat IgM in a separate series. Steady state concentrations of probes were determined in the interstitial fluid that was isolated by centrifugation from tumours or by post mortem wick implantation in the back skin. Calculations were made for interstitial fluid volume (Vi), along with the available (Va/Vi) and excluded (Ve/Vi) relative interstitial volume fractions. The Ve/Vi for the positively charged trastuzumab in tumours averaged 0.29 +/- 0.03 (n = 16), a value which was significantly lower than the corresponding one for IgG of 0.36 +/- 0.02 (n = 16). Native albumin was excluded from 38% of the tumour interstitial fluid, whereas cationization of albumin reduced the excluded volume by approximately 50%. Our experiments suggest that the tumour interstitium acts as a negatively charged matrix and is an important factor in determining the macromolecular distribution volume.

  3. Tumours of the soft (mesenchymal) tissues.

    PubMed

    Weiss, E

    1974-01-01

    This is a classification of tumours of fibrous tissue, fat, muscle, blood and lymph vessels, and mast cells, irrespective of the region of the body in which they arise. Tumours of fibrous tissue are divided into fibroma, fibrosarcoma (including "canine haemangiopericytoma"), other sarcomas, equine sarcoid, and various tumour-like lesions. The histological appearance of the tumours is described and illustrated with photographs.

  4. Youngest case of ductal carcinoma in situ arising within a benign phyllodes tumour: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sharat; Muralikrishnan, Vummiti; Brotto, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (PT) is a rare tumour of the female breast. The tumour clinically and radiologically mimics the features of a fibroadenoma. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in the epithelial component of PT is a very rare finding. We present youngest ever case of a 23-year-old nulliparous woman with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ arising within a benign phyllodes tumor. Macroscopically, it is a homogeneous tumour with solid components. Microscopically, it features typical leaf-like pattern with hypercellular stroma with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. To date, eight such rare cases of benign phyllodes tumour with ductal carcinoma in situ have been documented. We report the youngest case known in literature so far. As this is a very rare presentation, it poses several challenges in regard to both management and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  6. Surgical approach to pineal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, F; Broggi, G; Fornari, M; Franzini, A; Solero, C L; Allegranza, A

    1989-01-01

    During a period of 10 years (1977-1986) 40 cases of tumour of the pineal region have been treated at the Istituto Neurologico "C. Besta"-of Milan. Out of these 40 cases, 27 (67.5%) were in the paediatric (10-15 years) or juvenile (15-20 years) age at the time of operation. Since 1983 a specific diagnostic and therapeutic protocol has been adopted and thereafter direct surgical removal of the tumour was performed only when the neuroradiological investigations were highly suggestive of a benign extrinsic lesion. Sixteen cases in this series underwent direct surgical removal; in the remaining 24 cases stereotactic biopsy of the tumour was performed in the first instance. On the basis of the histological diagnosis obtained by this procedure surgical excision of the tumour (9 cases) or radiotherapy (15 cases) was then performed. 25 cases underwent surgical removal of the lesion. In all the cases the infratentorial supracerebellar approach as introduced by Krause and then modified by Stein was adopted. On analysis of the data of this series it was observed that in 25% of the cases completely benign resectable tumours were found; in 25% of the cases astrocytoma (grade I-II) which could be treated at least by partial removal were present; in 30% of the cases radiosensitive lesions were encountered. In the remaining 20% of the cases highly malignant tumours were found which should be treated only by radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.

  7. SU-C-BRA-05: Delineating High-Dose Clinical Target Volumes for Head and Neck Tumors Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, C; The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX; Wong, A

    Purpose: To develop and test population-based machine learning algorithms for delineating high-dose clinical target volumes (CTVs) in H&N tumors. Automating and standardizing the contouring of CTVs can reduce both physician contouring time and inter-physician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in H&N radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-five node-negative patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were selected (6 right base of tongue, 11 left and 9 right tonsil). All patients had GTV and CTVs manually contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist prior to treatment. This contouring process, which is driven by anatomical, pathological, and patient specific information, typically results inmore » non-uniform margin expansions about the GTV. Therefore, we tested two methods to delineate high-dose CTV given a manually-contoured GTV: (1) regression-support vector machines(SVM) and (2) classification-SVM. These models were trained and tested on each patient group using leave-one-out cross-validation. The volume difference(VD) and Dice similarity coefficient(DSC) between the manual and auto-contoured CTV were calculated to evaluate the results. Distances from GTV-to-CTV were computed about each patient’s GTV and these distances, in addition to distances from GTV to surrounding anatomy in the expansion direction, were utilized in the regression-SVM method. The classification-SVM method used categorical voxel-information (GTV, selected anatomical structures, else) from a 3×3×3cm3 ROI centered about the voxel to classify voxels as CTV. Results: Volumes for the auto-contoured CTVs ranged from 17.1 to 149.1cc and 17.4 to 151.9cc; the average(range) VD between manual and auto-contoured CTV were 0.93 (0.48–1.59) and 1.16(0.48–1.97); while average(range) DSC values were 0.75(0.59–0.88) and 0.74(0.59–0.81) for the regression-SVM and classification-SVM methods, respectively. Conclusion: We developed two novel machine learning methods to

  8. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after themore » same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a

  9. [Why are carotid glomus tumours dangerous?].

    PubMed

    Certík, B; Třeška, V

    2014-10-01

    Carotid body tumours are rare, usually benign tumours. The dangerous nature of carotid body tumours is due to their hypervascularization and the intimate relationship to cervical arteries and cranial nerves. In a case report, the authors document that misdiagnosis and efforts to remove or obtain a biopsy of the tumour outside vascular centres can be more dangerous for the patient than the nature of the tumour itself.

  10. Impact of pixel-based machine-learning techniques on automated frameworks for delineation of gross tumor volume regions for stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yasuo; Arimura, Hidetaka; Ikushima, Koujirou; Jin, Ze; Morita, Kento; Tokunaga, Chiaki; Yabu-Uchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Honda, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of pixel-based machine learning (ML) techniques, i.e., fuzzy-c-means clustering method (FCM), and the artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), on an automated framework for delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) regions of lung cancer for stereotactic body radiation therapy. The morphological and metabolic features for GTV regions, which were determined based on the knowledge of radiation oncologists, were fed on a pixel-by-pixel basis into the respective FCM, ANN, and SVM ML techniques. Then, the ML techniques were incorporated into the automated delineation framework of GTVs followed by an optimum contour selection (OCS) method, which we proposed in a previous study. The three-ML-based frameworks were evaluated for 16 lung cancer cases (six solid, four ground glass opacity (GGO), six part-solid GGO) with the datasets of planning computed tomography (CT) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images using the three-dimensional Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). DSC denotes the degree of region similarity between the GTVs contoured by radiation oncologists and those estimated using the automated framework. The FCM-based framework achieved the highest DSCs of 0.79±0.06, whereas DSCs of the ANN-based and SVM-based frameworks were 0.76±0.14 and 0.73±0.14, respectively. The FCM-based framework provided the highest segmentation accuracy and precision without a learning process (lowest calculation cost). Therefore, the FCM-based framework can be useful for delineation of tumor regions in practical treatment planning. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor volume changes on serial imaging with megavoltage CT for non-small-cell lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: how reliable, consistent, and meaningful is the effect?

    PubMed

    Siker, Malika L; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mehta, Minesh P

    2006-09-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy allows treatment plan modification based on data obtained during treatment. Assessing volume changes during treatment is now possible with intratreatment imaging capabilities on radiotherapy devices. This study assesses non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) volume changes during treatment with conformal intensity-modulated radiotherapy by evaluating serial megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans, with a specific emphasis on the frequency, reliability, and meaningfulness of these changes. Megavoltage CTs were retrospectively reviewed for 25 patients treated with the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system at the University of Wisconsin. Twenty-one patients received definitive radiotherapy, 4 with extracranial stereotactic radioablation (60 Gy in five fractions) and 17 on a dose-per-fraction escalation protocol (57-80.5 Gy in 25 fractions). Four patients were treated palliatively (22-30 Gy in 8 to 10 fractions). Gross tumor volumes were contoured on serial MVCTs at weekly intervals. Each patient had 4 to 25 scans, including at least one at the beginning, midway, and one at the end of treatment. At completion of treatment, no patient demonstrated a complete response. Partial response occurred in 3 (12%) and marginal response was noted in 5 (20%). The remaining 17 patients (68%) showed stable disease. The minimum "scorable threshold" for volume discrepancy between scans to account for interscan assessment variability was set at >25% volume change; 10 patients (40%) had >25% tumor regression. None of the patients treated ablatively or palliatively showed tumor regression during treatment. Although gross tumor regression during treatment may be objectively measured using MVCTs, substantial volumetric decrease occurs only in a minority. The clinical significance of this regression is questionable, because there is no way to document histologic tumor clearance, and therefore field reductions during radiotherapy cannot be recommended.

  12. 18-Fluorodeoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography- Computed Tomography (18-FDG-PET/CT) for Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) Delineation in Gastric Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed

    Dębiec, Kinga; Wydmański, Jerzy; Gorczewska, Izabela; Leszczyńska, Paulina; Gorczewski, Kamil; Leszczyński, Wojciech; d’Amico, Andrea; Kalemba, Michał

    2017-11-26

    Purpose: Evaluation of the 18-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18-FDGPET/ CT) for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in gastric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: In this study, 29 gastric cancer patients (17 unresectable and 7 inoperable) were initially enrolled for radical chemoradiotherapy (45Gy/25 fractions + chemotherapy based on 5 fluorouracil) or radiotherapy alone (45Gy/25 fractions) with planning based on the 18-FDG-PET/CT images. Five patients were excluded due to excess blood glucose levels (1), false-negative positron emission tomography (1) and distant metastases revealed by 18-FDG-PET/CT (3). The analysis involved measurement of metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) performed on PET/CT workstations. Different threshold levels of the standardized uptake value (SUV) and liver uptake were set to obtain MTVs. Secondly, GTVPET values were derived manually using the positron emission tomography (PET) dataset blinded to the computed tomography (CT) data. Subsequently, GTVCT values were delineated using a radiotherapy planning system based on the CT scans blinded to the PET data. The referenced GTVCT values were correlated with the GTVPET and were compared with a conformality index (CI). Results: The mean CI was 0.52 (range, 0.12-0.85). In 13/24 patients (54%), the GTVPET was larger than GTVCT, and in the remainder, GTVPET was smaller. Moreover, the cranio-caudal diameter of GTVPET in 16 cases (64%) was larger than that of GTVCT, smaller in 7 cases (29%), and unchanged in one case. Manual PET delineation (GTVPET) achieved the best correlation with GTVCT (Pearson correlation = 0.76, p <0.0001). Among the analyzed MTVs, a statistically significant correlation with GTVCT was revealed for MTV10%SUVmax (r = 0.63; p = 0.0014), MTVliv (r = 0.60; p = 0.0021), MTVSUV2.5 (r = 0.54; p = 0.0063); MTV20%SUVmax (r = 0.44; p = 0.0344); MTV30%SUVmax (r = 0.44; p = 0.0373). Conclusion: 18-FDG-PET/CT in gastric cancer radiotherapy

  13. The Volume of Three-Dimensional Cultures of Cancer Cells InVitro Influences Transcriptional Profile Differences and Similarities with Monolayer Cultures and Xenografted Tumors.

    PubMed

    Boghaert, Erwin R; Lu, Xin; Hessler, Paul E; McGonigal, Thomas P; Oleksijew, Anatol; Mitten, Michael J; Foster-Duke, Kelly; Hickson, Jonathan A; Santo, Vitor E; Brito, Catarina; Uziel, Tamar; Vaidya, Kedar S

    2017-09-01

    Improving the congruity of preclinical models with cancer as it is manifested in humans is a potential way to mitigate the high attrition rate of new cancer therapies in the clinic. In this regard, three-dimensional (3D) tumor cultures in vitro have recently regained interest as they have been acclaimed to have higher similarity to tumors in vivo than to cells grown in monolayers (2D). To identify cancer functions that are active in 3D rather than in 2D cultures, we compared the transcriptional profiles (TPs) of two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines, NCI-H1650 and EBC-1 grown in both conditions to the TP of xenografted tumors. Because confluence, diameter or volume can hypothetically alter TPs, we made intra- and inter-culture comparisons using samples with defined dimensions. As projected by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), a limited number of signal transduction pathways operational in vivo were better represented by 3D than by 2D cultures in vitro. Growth of 2D and 3D cultures as well as xenografts induced major changes in the TPs of these 3 modes of culturing. Alterations of transcriptional network activation that were predicted to evolve similarly during progression of 3D cultures and xenografts involved the following functions: hypoxia, proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and interleukin activation. Direct comparison of TPs of 3D cultures and xenografts to monolayer cultures yielded up-regulation of networks involved in hypoxia, TGF and Wnt signaling as well as regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition. Differences in TP of 2D and 3D cancer cell cultures are subject to progression of the cultures. The emulation of the predicted cell functions in vivo is therefore not only determined by the type of culture in vitro but also by the confluence or diameter of the 2D or 3D cultures, respectively. Consequently, the successful implementation of 3D models will require phenotypic characterization to verify the relevance of

  14. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu; Kim, Sinae; Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinicalmore » information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.« less

  15. Ganoderma lucidum total triterpenes attenuate DLA induced ascites and EAC induced solid tumours in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Mathew, J; Janardhanan, K K

    2016-04-30

    G. lucidum total triterpenes were assessed for its apoptosis-inducing and anti-tumour activities. The ability of the total triterpenes to induce apoptosis was evaluated in Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) and Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma (EAC) cell lines. Total triterpenes were found to be highly cytotoxic to DLA and EAC cell lines with IC50 values 5 ± 0.32 and 7.9 ± 0.2 µg/ml respectively. Total triterpenes induced apoptosis in both cell lines which is evident from the DNA fragmentation assay. Anti-tumour activity was accessed using DLA induced solid and EAC induced ascites tumour models in Swiss albino mice. Administration of 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg b. wt. total triterpenes showed 11.86, 27.27 and 40.57% increase in life span of animals in ascites tumour model. Treatment with 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg b. wt. total triterpenes exhibited 76.86, 85.01 and 91.03% inhibition in tumour volume and 67.96, 72.38 and 77.90% inhibition in tumour weight respectively in the solid tumour model. The study reveals the significant dose-dependent anti-tumour activity of total triterpenes in both models. Total triterpenes were more active against the solid tumour than the ascites tumour. The anti-oxidant potential and ability to induce cell-specific apoptosis could be contributing to its anti-tumour activities.

  16. High Tumor Volume to Fetal Weight Ratio Is Associated with Worse Fetal Outcomes and Increased Maternal Risk in Fetuses with Sacrococcygeal Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Gebb, Juliana S; Khalek, Nahla; Qamar, Huma; Johnson, Mark P; Oliver, Edward R; Coleman, Beverly G; Peranteau, William H; Hedrick, Holly L; Flake, Alan W; Adzick, N Scott; Moldenhauer, Julie S

    2018-03-01

    Tumor volume to fetal weight ratio (TFR) > 0.12 before 24 weeks has been associated with poor outcome in fetuses with sacrococcygeal teratoma (SCT). We evaluated TFR in predicting poor fetal outcome and increased maternal operative risk in our cohort of SCT pregnancies. This is a retrospective, single-center review of fetuses seen with SCT from 1997 to 2015. Patients who chose termination of pregnancy (TOP), delivered elsewhere, or had initial evaluation at > 24 weeks were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis determined the optimal TFR to predict poor fetal outcome and increased maternal operative risk. Poor fetal outcome included fetal demise, neonatal demise, or fetal deterioration warranting open fetal surgery or delivery < 32 weeks. Increased maternal operative risk included cases necessitating open fetal surgery, classical cesarean delivery, or ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT). Of 139 pregnancies with SCT, 27 chose TOP, 14 delivered elsewhere, and 40 had initial evaluation at > 24 weeks. Thus, 58 fetuses were reviewed. ROC analysis revealed that at ≤24 weeks, TFR > 0.095 was predictive of poor fetal outcome and TFR > 0.12 was predictive of increased maternal operative risk. This study supports the use of TFR at ≤24 weeks for risk stratification of pregnancies with SCT. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Metabolic tumor volume assessed by 18F-FDG PET/CT for the prediction of outcome in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Rosa; Larobina, Michele; Del Vecchio, Silvana; De Luca, Serena; Fabbricini, Rossella; Catalano, Lucio; Pane, Fabrizio; Salvatore, Marco; Pace, Leonardo

    2012-12-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT allows the direct measurement of metabolic tumor burden in a variety of different malignancies. The aim of this study was to assess whether metabolic tumor volume (MTV) determined by (18)F-FDG PET/CT could be used in the prediction of progression-free and overall survival in multiple myeloma patients. Forty-seven patients (18 women, 29 men; mean age ± SD, 63 ± 11 y) with stage IIIA disease who had undergone whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively evaluated. Images underwent a 3-dimensional region-of-interest analysis including all focal lesions with a maximum standardized uptake value > 2.5. The MTV of each lesion was calculated using an automated contouring program based on the standardized uptake value and developed with a threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value. The total MTV of each patient was defined as the sum of metabolic volume of all focal lesions. Patients were treated and then subjected to a mean follow-up period of 24 mo. In the 47 patients studied, MTV range was 1.3-316.3 mL, with a median of 23.7 mL. A direct, significant correlation was found between MTV and the percentage of diffuse infiltration of bone marrow by plasma cells (r = 0.46, P = 0.006), whereas hemoglobin levels were inversely correlated with MTV (r = -0.56, P = 0.0001). At follow-up, patients who developed progressive disease (n = 18) showed a significantly higher MTV (74.7 ± 19.3 vs. 29.8 ± 5.1 mL, P = 0.009) than patients without progressive disease (n = 29). Furthermore, patients who died of myeloma (n = 9) had a significantly higher MTV (123.2 ± 30.6 vs. 28.9 ± 4.2 mL, P = 0.0001) than survivors (n = 38). No differences in age, plasma cell infiltration, M protein, albumin, β2-microglobulin, performance status, International Staging System score, and presence or absence of a bone marrow transplant were found between groups. The MTV cutoff level was determined by receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis, and the best

  18. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2)more » for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that

  19. Putting tumours in context

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumor growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets. Under normal conditions, ORGANS are made up of TISSUES that exchange information with other cell types via cell-cell contact, cytokines and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM). The ECM, which is produced by collaboration between STROMAL fibroblasts and EPITHELIALmore » cells, provides structural scaffolding for cells, as well as contextual information. The endothelial vasculature provides nutrients and oxygen, and cells of the immune system combat pathogens and remove apoptotic cells. Epithelial cells associate into intact, polarized sheets. These tissues communicate through a complex network of interactions: physically, through direct contact or through the intervening ECM, and biochemically, through both soluble and insoluble signalling molecules. In combination, these interactions provide the information that is necessary to maintain cellular differentiation and to create complex tissue structures. Occasionally, the intercellular signals that define the normal context become disrupted. Alterations in epithelial tissues can lead to movement of epithelial sheets and proliferation - for example, after activation of mesenchymal fibroblasts due to wounding.Normally, these conditions are temporary and reversible, but when inflammation is sustained, an escalating feedback loop ensues.Under persistent inflammatory conditions, continual upregulation of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by stromal fibroblasts can disrupt the ECM, and invading immune cells can overproduce factors that promote abnormal proliferation. As this process

  20. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  1. Differential Patterns of Vasculature to Liver Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Assa, J.

    1970-01-01

    An angiographic study of the vasculature of Vx2 tumour deposits in the rabbit's liver is described. Tumours transplanted from donor rabbits within less than 2 weeks incubation, developed into an amorphic infiltrating tumour, characterized by a rich arterial network. Tumours harvested after 3 weeks growth in donors, became cystic and had a scanty arterial supply. In both groups there was no portal circulation to the tumours' deposits. It is suggested that prior to intra-arterial treatment of cancer in the liver, the morphology of the tumour should be assessed. ImagesFigs. 3-4Figs. 5-6Figs. 7-8Figs. 1-2 PMID:5451574

  2. Multifocal multi-site Warthin tumour.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Jennifer M; Phillips, John S; Hellquist, Henrik B; Premachandra, Don J

    2008-12-01

    The unique case of a 55-year-old man with multifocal adenolymphoma (Warthin's tumour) of both parotid glands, the neck and post-nasal space is presented. Warthin tumour is almost exclusively a parotid tumour but is known to be bilateral in 7-10% of cases and multifocal in 2% of cases. Most extraglandular Warthin tumours have been located in neck lymph nodes and only a few cases have been reported from other sites. The presented case is unique in having synchronous and metachronous Warthin tumours, as well as one of the tumours being neither truly parotid, nor within a lymph node.

  3. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  4. Impact of dose escalation and adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancers on tumour shrinkage—a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røthe Arnesen, Marius; Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Malinen, Eirik

    2017-03-01

    Tumour shrinkage occurs during fractionated radiotherapy and is regulated by radiation induced cellular damage, repopulation of viable cells and clearance of dead cells. In some cases additional tumour shrinkage during external beam therapy may be beneficial, particularly for locally advanced cervical cancer where a small tumour volume may simplify and improve brachytherapy. In the current work, a mathematical tumour model is utilized to investigate how local dose escalation affects tumour shrinkage, focusing on implications for brachytherapy. The iterative two-compartment model is based upon linear-quadratic radiation response, a doubling time for viable cells and a half-time for clearance of dead cells. The model was individually fitted to clinical tumour volume data from fractionated radiotherapy of 25 cervical cancer patients. Three different fractionation patterns for dose escalation, all with an additional dose of 12.2 Gy, were simulated and compared to standard fractionation in terms of tumour shrinkage. An adaptive strategy where dose escalation was initiated after one week of treatment was also considered. For 22 out of 25 patients, a good model fit was achieved to the observed tumour shrinkage. A large degree of inter-patient variation was seen in predicted volume reduction following dose escalation. For the 10 best responding patients, a mean tumour volume reduction of 34  ±  3% (relative to standard treatment) was estimated at the time of brachytherapy. Timing of initiating dose escalation had a larger impact than the number of fractions applied. In conclusion, the model was found useful in evaluating the impact from dose escalation on tumour shrinkage. The results indicate that dose escalation could be conducted from the start of external beam radiotherapy in order to obtain additional tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy.

  5. [Diagnostic accuracy of fine needle aspiration cytology in parotid tumours].

    PubMed

    Zerpa Zerpa, Vanessa; Cuesta Gonzáles, Maria Teresa; Agostini Porras, Gabriela; Marcano Acuña, Martin; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2014-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a globally accepted technique in the preoperative evaluations of head and neck tumours; however, the effectiveness in the interpretation of salivary glands neoplastic lesions is still controversial. The objective of this study consisted of assessing the efficacy of FNAC in preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumours. This retrospective study was conducted using 93 patient samples with parotid gland tumoral pathology, treated at the Otorhinolaryngology Department in our institution during the 2007-2011 period. Preoperative FNAC was employed and the patients subsequently submitted to surgical excision with histopathological diagnosis of the specimen. Cytology results were classified as negative for malignancy, positive for malignancy or insufficient sample, and later compared with the definitive histological diagnosis. The mean age of the studied sample was 52.9 years (range: 11 to 88 years); 55.9% were men. The FNAC showed significant sensitivity of 57.1%, with a specificity of 95.1%, for detecting malignancy in parotid gland tumours. The positive and negative predictive values for malignancy were 50 and 96.3%, respectively. FNAC is considered a simple test but of limited use for diagnostic guidance in tumour pathology of the parotid gland in our environment, mainly because of its low sensitivity. However, the high specificity and high negative predictive value of FNAC makes it a more accurate test in benign or negative result cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, which holds the promise of non-invasive thermoablation treatment on an outpatient basis. PMID:11950826

  7. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesionmore » glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may

  8. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  9. Lymphopenia Association With Gross Tumor Volume and Lung V5 and Its Effects on Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chad; Liao, Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Gomez, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) can both suppress and stimulate the immune system. We sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced lymphopenia and its associations with patient outcomes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects consisted of 711 patients who had received definitive RT for NSCLC. A lymphocyte nadir was calculated as the minimum lymphocyte value measured during definitive RT. Associations between gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters with lymphocyte nadirs were assessed with Spearman correlation coefficients. Relationships between lymphocyte nadirs with overall survival (OS) and event free survival (EFS) were evaluated with Kaplan-Meiermore » analysis and compared with log-rank test results. Multivariate regressions were conducted with linear and Cox regression analyses. All variables were analyzed as continuous if possible. Results: Larger GTVs were correlated with lower lymphocyte nadirs regardless of concurrent chemotherapy receipt (with concurrent: r = −0.26, P<.0001; without: r = −0.48, P<.0001). Analyses of lung DVH parameters revealed significant correlations at lower doses (lung V5-V10: P<.0001) that incrementally decreased and became nonsignificant at higher doses (lung V60-V70: P>.05). Of note, no significant associations were detected between GTV and lung DVH parameters with total leukocyte, neutrophil, or monocyte nadirs during RT or with lymphocyte count prior to RT. Multivariate analysis revealed larger GTV (P<.0001), receipt of concurrent chemotherapy (P<.0001), twice-daily radiation fractionation (P=.02), and stage III disease (P=.05) to be associated with lower lymphocyte nadirs. On univariate analysis, patients with higher lymphocyte nadirs exhibited significantly improved OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.51 per 10{sup 3} lymphocytes/μL, P=.01) and EFS (HR = 0.46 per 10{sup 3} lymphocytes/μL, P<.0001). These differences held on multivariate

  10. Position paper: Rationale for the treatment of Wilms tumour in the UMBRELLA SIOP-RTSG 2016 protocol.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Hol, Janna A; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; van Tinteren, Harm; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Verschuur, Arnauld C; Vujanic, Gordan M; Leuschner, Ivo; Brok, Jesper; Rübe, Christian; Smets, Anne M; Janssens, Geert O; Godzinski, Jan; Ramírez-Villar, Gema L; de Camargo, Beatriz; Segers, Heidi; Collini, Paola; Gessler, Manfred; Bergeron, Christophe; Spreafico, Filippo; Graf, Norbert

    2017-12-01

    The Renal Tumour Study Group of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP-RTSG) has developed a new protocol for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood renal tumours, the UMBRELLA SIOP-RTSG 2016 (the UMBRELLA protocol), to continue international collaboration in the treatment of childhood renal tumours. This protocol will support integrated biomarker and imaging research, focussing on assessing the independent prognostic value of genomic changes within the tumour and the volume of the blastemal component that survives preoperative chemotherapy. Treatment guidelines for Wilms tumours in the UMBRELLA protocol include recommendations for localized, metastatic, and bilateral disease, for all age groups, and for relapsed disease. These recommendations have been established by a multidisciplinary panel of leading experts on renal tumours within the SIOP-RTSG. The UMBRELLA protocol should promote international collaboration and research and serve as the SIOP-RTSG best available treatment standard.

  11. Spinal intradural primary germ cell tumour--review of literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ahitagni; Puri, Tarun; Goyal, Shikha; Gupta, Ruchika; Eesa, Muneer; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2009-03-01

    Primary spinal cord germ cell tumour is a rare tumour. We herein review the tumour characteristics, associated risk factors, treatment policy, and patterns of failure of primary intradural germ cell tumour. We conducted a PUBMED search using a combination of keywords such as "spinal germ cell tumor," "germinoma," "extradural," "intradural," "intramedullary," "extramedullary," and identified 19 cases of primary spinal germ cell tumour. Clinical features, pathologic characteristics, and treatment details of these patients including status at follow-up were noted from respective case reports. We also describe a case of a young Indian patient of intradural extramedullary germ cell tumour treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. The median age at presentation was 24 years. The most common location of the tumour was thoracic (40%). Beta-HCG overproduction was noted in 40% of the patients. Most patients were treated with a combination of surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 16.5 months. Recurrence was observed in 10% of the patients, all in beta-HCG over-producing tumours. The illustrative case was a 28-year male, presenting with pain in lower back and both lower limbs for 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging spine showed an inhomogeneous hyperintense soft tissue mass at L(2)-L(4) spinal level. He was treated with complete surgical excision and four cycles of chemotherapy with BEP regimen following a histological diagnosis of non-seminomatous germ cell tumour. Palliative irradiation to the lumbar spine was given on progression at 3 months. The patient eventually succumbed to his condition, due to compressive transverse myelitis possibly due to cervical cord metastasis. Limited surgery followed by upfront radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal management of this rare group of tumour. Omission of radiation therapy from the treatment armamentarium might engender local recurrence and

  12. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  13. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Henzel, Martin; Hamm, Klaus; Sitter, Helmut; Gross, Markus W; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2009-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. From 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up > or = 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose (< 13 Gy) was the only determinant factor for TV shrinkage after SRS (p = 0.001). Age, gender, initial TV, and previous operations did not affect TV shrinkage. Acute or late toxicity (> or = grade 3) was never seen. Concerning QoL, no significant differences were observed after SRS/SRT. Previous operations and gender did not affect QoL (p > 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT.

  14. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value.

    PubMed

    Hussien, Amr Elsayed M; Furth, Christian; Schönberger, Stefan; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Steffen, Ingo G; Amthauer, Holger; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Hautzel, Hubertus

    2015-01-28

    In pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  15. Tumor Volume and Metabolism of Prostate Cancer Determined by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3T Without Endorectal Coil Reveal Potential Clinical Implications in the Context of Radiation Oncology;Prostate cancer; Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging; Radiation oncology; Tumor volume; Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Crehange, Gilles, E-mail: gcrehange@cgfl.fr; Parfait, Sebastien; Liegard, Melanie

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a relationship exists between the tumor volume (TV) or relative choline content determined using magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) at 3T and the clinical prognostic parameters for patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: A total of 72 men (mean age, 67.8 {+-} 6.2 years) were stratified as having low-risk (n = 26), intermediate-risk (n = 24), or high-risk (n = 22) PCa. MRSI was performed at 3T using a phased-array coil. Spectra are expressed as the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamines plus creatine/citrate ratios. The mean ratiomore » of the most pathologic voxels and the MRSI-based TV were also determined. Results: The mean values of the total choline/citrate, total choline plus creatine/citrate, and total choline plus polyamine plus creatine/citrate ratios were greater for Stage T2b or greater tumors vs. Stage T2a or less tumors: 7.53 {+-} 13.60 vs. 2.31 {+-} 5.65 (p = .018), 8.98 {+-} 14.58 vs. 2.56 {+-} 5.70 (p = .016), and 10.32 {+-} 15.47 vs. 3.55 {+-} 6.16 (p = .014), respectively. The mean MRSI-based TV for Stage T2b or greater and Stage T2a or less tumors was significantly different (2.23 {+-} 2.62 cm{sup 3} vs. 1.26 {+-} 2.06 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p = .030). This TV correlated with increased prostate-specific antigen levels (odds ratio, 1.293; p = .012). Patients with high-risk PCa had a larger TV than did the patients with intermediate-risk PCa. A similar result was found for the intermediate-risk group compared with the low-risk group (odds ratio, 1.225; p = .041). Conclusion: Biomarkers expressing the relative choline content and TV were significant parameters for the localization of PCa and could be helpful for determining the prognosis more accurately.« less

  16. Tumour T1 changes in vivo are highly predictive of response to chemotherapy and reflect the number of viable tumour cells – a preclinical MR study in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective chemotherapy rapidly reduces the spin–lattice relaxation of water protons (T1) in solid tumours and this change (ΔT1) often precedes and strongly correlates with the eventual change in tumour volume (TVol). To understand the biological nature of ΔT1, we have performed studies in vivo and ex vivo with the allosteric mTOR inhibitor, everolimus. Methods Mice bearing RIF-1 tumours were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine TVol and T1, and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to determine levels of the proliferation marker choline and levels of lipid apoptosis markers, prior to and 5 days (endpoint) after daily treatment with vehicle or everolimus (10 mg/kg). At the endpoint, tumours were ablated and an entire section analysed for cellular and necrotic quantification and staining for the proliferation antigen Ki67 and cleaved-caspase-3 as a measure of apoptosis. The number of blood-vessels (BV) was evaluated by CD31 staining. Mice bearing B16/BL6 melanoma tumours were studied by MRI to determine T1 under similar everolimus treatment. At the endpoint, cell bioluminescence of the tumours was measured ex vivo. Results Everolimus blocked RIF-1 tumour growth and significantly reduced tumour T1 and total choline (Cho) levels, and increased polyunsaturated fatty-acids which are markers of apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry showed that everolimus reduced the %Ki67+ cells but did not affect caspase-3 apoptosis, necrosis, BV-number or cell density. The change in T1 (ΔT1) correlated strongly with the changes in TVol and Cho and %Ki67+. In B16/BL6 tumours, everolimus also decreased T1 and this correlated with cell bioluminescence; another marker of cell viability. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves (ROC) for everolimus on RIF-1 tumours showed that ΔT1 had very high levels of sensitivity and specificity (ROCAUC = 0.84) and this was confirmed for the cytotoxic patupilone in the same tumour model (ROCAUC = 0.97). Conclusion These studies

  17. 31P NMR spectroscopy studies of phospholipid metabolism in human melanoma xenograft lines differing in rate of tumour cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lyng, H; Olsen, D R; Petersen, S B; Rofstad, E K

    1995-04-01

    The concentration of phospholipid metabolites in tumours has been hypothesized to be related to rate of cell membrane turnover and may reflect rate of cell proliferation. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate whether 31P NMR resonance ratios involving the phosphomonoester (PME) or phosphodiester (PDE) resonance are correlated to fraction of cells in S-phase or volume-doubling time in experimental tumours. Four human melanoma xenograft lines (BEX-t, HUX-t, SAX-t, WIX-t) were included in the study. The tumours were grown subcutaneously in male BALB/c-nu/nu mice. 31P NMR spectroscopy was performed at a magnetic field strength of 4.7 T. Fraction of cells in S-phase was measured by flow cytometry. Tumour volume-doubling time was determined by Gompertzian analysis of volumetric growth data. BEX-t and SAX-t tumours differed in fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time, but showed similar 31P NMR resonance ratios. BEX-t and WIX-t tumours showed significantly different 31P NMR resonance ratios but similar fractions of cells in S-phase. The 31P NMR resonance ratios were significantly different for small and large HUX-t tumours even though fraction of cells in S-phase and volume-doubling time did not differ with tumour volume. None of the 31P NMR resonance ratios showed significant increase with increasing fraction of cells in S-phase or significant decrease with increasing tumour volume-doubling time across the four xenograft lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Tumour functional sphericity from PET images: prognostic value in NSCLC and impact of delineation method.

    PubMed

    Hatt, Mathieu; Laurent, Baptiste; Fayad, Hadi; Jaouen, Vincent; Visvikis, Dimitris; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze

    2018-04-01

    Sphericity has been proposed as a parameter for characterizing PET tumour volumes, with complementary prognostic value with respect to SUV and volume in both head and neck cancer and lung cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate its dependency on tumour delineation and the resulting impact on its prognostic value. Five segmentation methods were considered: two thresholds (40% and 50% of SUV max ), ant colony optimization, fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB), and gradient-aided region-based active contour. The accuracy of each method in extracting sphericity was evaluated using a dataset of 176 simulated, phantom and clinical PET images of tumours with associated ground truth. The prognostic value of sphericity and its complementary value with respect to volume for each segmentation method was evaluated in a cohort of 87 patients with stage II/III lung cancer. Volume and associated sphericity values were dependent on the segmentation method. The correlation between segmentation accuracy and sphericity error was moderate (|ρ| from 0.24 to 0.57). The accuracy in measuring sphericity was not dependent on volume (|ρ| < 0.4). In the patients with lung cancer, sphericity had prognostic value, although lower than that of volume, except for that derived using FLAB for which when combined with volume showed a small improvement over volume alone (hazard ratio 2.67, compared with 2.5). Substantial differences in patient prognosis stratification were observed depending on the segmentation method used. Tumour functional sphericity was found to be dependent on the segmentation method, although the accuracy in retrieving the true sphericity was not dependent on tumour volume. In addition, even accurate segmentation can lead to an inaccurate sphericity value, and vice versa. Sphericity had similar or lower prognostic value than volume alone in the patients with lung cancer, except when determined using the FLAB method for which there was a small

  19. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  20. A dynamic model for tumour growth and metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Haustein, Volker; Schumacher, Udo

    2012-07-05

    A simple and fast computational model to describe the dynamics of tumour growth and metastasis formation is presented. The model is based on the calculation of successive generations of tumour cells and enables one to describe biologically important entities like tumour volume, time point of 1st metastatic growth or number of metastatic colonies at a given time. The model entirely relies on the chronology of these successive events of the metastatic cascade. The simulation calculations were performed for two embedded growth models to describe the Gompertzian like growth behaviour of tumours. The initial training of the models was carried out using an analytical solution for the size distribution of metastases of a hepatocellular carcinoma. We then show the applicability of our models to clinical data from the Munich Cancer Registry. Growth and dissemination characteristics of metastatic cells originating from cells in the primary breast cancer can be modelled thus showing its ability to perform systematic analyses relevant for clinical breast cancer research and treatment. In particular, our calculations show that generally metastases formation has already been initiated before the primary can be detected clinically.

  1. A dynamic model for tumour growth and metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A simple and fast computational model to describe the dynamics of tumour growth and metastasis formation is presented. The model is based on the calculation of successive generations of tumour cells and enables one to describe biologically important entities like tumour volume, time point of 1st metastatic growth or number of metastatic colonies at a given time. The model entirely relies on the chronology of these successive events of the metastatic cascade. The simulation calculations were performed for two embedded growth models to describe the Gompertzian like growth behaviour of tumours. The initial training of the models was carried out using an analytical solution for the size distribution of metastases of a hepatocellular carcinoma. We then show the applicability of our models to clinical data from the Munich Cancer Registry. Growth and dissemination characteristics of metastatic cells originating from cells in the primary breast cancer can be modelled thus showing its ability to perform systematic analyses relevant for clinical breast cancer research and treatment. In particular, our calculations show that generally metastases formation has already been initiated before the primary can be detected clinically. PMID:22548735

  2. A rare case of combined placental site trophoblastic tumour with mature cystic teratoma and mixed germ cell tumour in the testis.

    PubMed

    Leow, Wei Qiang; Loh, Hwai Liang Alwin; Lee, Lui Shiong; Goh, Chin Hong Ronald

    2015-08-01

    A 20-year-old male presented with persistent right testicular pain. Following ultrasound detection of testicular nodules and biopsy for intraoperative consultation which yielded germ cell tumour, he underwent radical orchidectomy. A predominantly whitish cyst and a lobulated, variegated nodule were identified. Histology showed a mature cystic teratoma with a focus of infiltrative epithelioid cells containing eosinophilic cytoplasm and pleomorphic nuclei, invading ectatic vessel wall associated with fibrinoid change. These cells were positive for cytokeratin, human placental lactogen and inhibin, while negative for Melan-A, p63 and alpha-fetoprotein, consistent with placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT). The variegated nodule was a mixed germ cell tumour composed of embryonal carcinoma and immature teratoma. Aside from choriocarcinoma, primary trophoblastic tumors such as PSTT, which are derived from intermediate trophoblasts, are extremely rare in the testis. Aside from a case of pure testicular PSTT, 2 other cases have been described in association with germ cell tumour, of which one is a mature teratoma with PSTT that demonstrated gain of chromosome 12p. The other presented with PSTT in retroperitoneal recurrence of a testicular mixed germ cell tumour. We discussed the features of this tumour in the testis and important differentials in its diagnosis.

  3. Interstitial ultrasound ablation of vertebral and paraspinal tumours: Parametric and patient-specific simulations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Prakash, Punit; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Theoretical parametric and patient-specific models are applied to assess the feasibility of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumours in and near the spine and to identify potential treatment delivery strategies. Methods 3D patient-specific finite element models (n=11) of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumours associated with spine were generated. Gaseous nerve insulation and various applicator configurations, frequencies (3 and 7 MHz), placement trajectories, and tumour locations were simulated. Parametric studies with multilayered models investigated the impacts of tumour attenuation, tumour dimension, and the thickness of bone insulating critical structures. Temperature and thermal dose were calculated to define ablation (>240 equivalent minutes at 43°C (EM43°C)) and safety margins (<45°C & <6 EM43°C), and to determine performance and required delivery parameters. Results Osteolytic tumours (≤44 mm) encapsulated by bone could be successfully ablated with 7 MHz interstitial ultrasound (8.1-16.6 W/cm2, 120-5900 J, 0.4-15 min). Ablation of tumours (94.6-100% volumetric) 0-14.5 mm from the spinal canal was achieved within 3-15 min without damaging critical nerves. 3 MHz devices provided faster ablation (390 versus 930 s) of an 18 mm diameter osteoblastic (high bone content) volume than 7 MHz devices. Critical anatomy in proximity to the tumour could be protected by selection of appropriate applicator configurations, active sectors, and applied power schemas, and through gaseous insulation. Preferential ultrasound absorption at bone surfaces facilitated faster, more effective ablations in osteolytic tumours and provided isolation of ablative energies and temperatures. Conclusions Parametric and patient-specific studies demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantages of interstitial ultrasound ablation treatment of paraspinal and osteolytic vertebral tumours. PMID:25017322

  4. Accuracy and variability of tumor burden measurement on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salarian, Mehrnoush; Gibson, Eli; Shahedi, Maysam; Gaed, Mena; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Romagnoli, Cesare; Cool, Derek W.; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Chin, Joseph L.; Pautler, Stephen; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of prostate tumour volume can inform prognosis and treatment selection, including an assessment of the suitability and feasibility of focal therapy, which can potentially spare patients the deleterious side effects of radical treatment. Prostate biopsy is the clinical standard for diagnosis but provides limited information regarding tumour volume due to sparse tissue sampling. A non-invasive means for accurate determination of tumour burden could be of clinical value and an important step toward reduction of overtreatment. Multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) is showing promise for prostate cancer diagnosis. However, the accuracy and inter-observer variability of prostate tumour volume estimation based on separate expert contouring of T2-weighted (T2W), dynamic contrastenhanced (DCE), and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI sequences acquired using an endorectal coil at 3T is currently unknown. We investigated this question using a histologic reference standard based on a highly accurate MPMRIhistology image registration and a smooth interpolation of planimetric tumour measurements on histology. Our results showed that prostate tumour volumes estimated based on MPMRI consistently overestimated histological reference tumour volumes. The variability of tumour volume estimates across the different pulse sequences exceeded interobserver variability within any sequence. Tumour volume estimates on DCE MRI provided the lowest inter-observer variability and the highest correlation with histology tumour volumes, whereas the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provided the lowest volume estimation error. If validated on a larger data set, the observed correlations could support the development of automated prostate tumour volume segmentation algorithms as well as correction schemes for tumour burden estimation on MPMRI.

  5. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  6. A phase II comparative study of gross tumor volume definition with or without PET/CT fusion in dosimetric planning for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): primary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (≥ 60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. [Awake craniotomy for brain tumours].

    PubMed

    Milos, Peter; Metcalf, Kerstin; Vigren, Patrick; Lindehammar, Hans; Nilsson, Malin; Boström, Sverre

    2016-10-11

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumours  Awake neurosurgery is a useful method in lesions near eloquent brain areas, particularly low-grade gliomas.The aim is to maximise tumour resection and preserve neurological function. We performed 40 primary awake surgeries and 8 residual surgeries. Patients were operated awake throughout the procedure or with a laryngeal mask and general anaesthesia during the opening stage and then awake during intracerebral surgery. Language and motor function were mapped with direct cortical stimulation, motor evoked potential and standardised neurological testing. Radiologically, complete resection was achieved in 18 out of 40 patients in the primary surgeries. Full neurological recovery at three months was observed in 29 patients. Of the 11 patients with persisting neurological deficits at three months, symptoms were present preoperatively in 9 patients. We conclude that awake surgery, combined with intraoperative neurophysiological methods, is a safe method to improve treatment for low-grade gliomas.

  8. Malignant Brain Tumours in Children : Present and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutka, James T

    2018-05-01

    In contrast to many of the malignant tumors that occur in the central nervous system in adults, the management, responses to therapy, and future perspectives of children with malignant lesions of the brain hold considerable promise. Within the past 5 years, remarkable progress has been made with our understanding of the basic biology of the molecular genetics of several pediatric malignant brain tumors including medulloblastoma, ependymoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour, and high grade glioma/diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. The recent literature in pediatric neuro-oncology was reviewed, and a summary of the major findings are presented. Meaningful sub-classifications of these tumors have arisen, placing children into discrete categories of disease with requirements for targeted therapy. While the mainstay of therapy these past 30 years has been a combination of central nervous system irradiation and conventional chemotherapy, now with the advent of high resolution genetic mapping, targeted therapies have emerged, and less emphasis is being placed on craniospinal irradiation. In this article, the present and future perspective of pediatric brain malignancy are reviewed in detail. The progress that has been made offers significant hope for the future for patients with these tumours.

  9. Tumour cell dispersion by the ultrasonic aspirator during brain tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Preston, J K; Masciopinto, J; Salamat, M S; Badie, B

    1999-10-01

    Ultrasonic aspirators are commonly used to resect brain tumours because they allow safe, rapid and accurate removal of diseased tissue. Since ultrasonic aspirators generate a spray of aerosolized irrigating fluid around the instrument tip, we questioned whether this spray might contain viable tumours cells that could contribute to intraoperative spread of tumour fragments. To test this hypothesis, we collected the spray produced during the resection of nine brain tumours with an ultrasonic aspirator and semi-quantitatively analysed it for tumour presence. The aerosolized irrigation fluid was found to contain intact tumour cells or clumps of tumour cells in all nine instances, and there was a trend of increasing tumour cell dispersion with increasing ultrasonic aspiration times. Further examination is required to determine if this intraoperative dispersion of apparently viable tumour fragments contributes to local neoplasm recurrence.

  10. HIFU and Chemotherapy Synergistic Inhibitory Effect on Dunning AT2 Tumour-Bearing Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Paparel, Philipe; Chesnais, Sabrina; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2005-03-01

    Since there is no 100% satisfactory treatment for localized prostate cancer in patients presenting symptoms representing a poor prognosis (stage T3, high Gleason score, PSA level greater than 15 ng/ml, etc.), this study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic and synergistic inhibition effects of using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in combination with chemotherapy (Taxane + Estramustine). Forty-one Dunning AT2 tumour-bearing Copenhagen rats receiving HIFU and/or chemotherapy were divided into four groups: control group; chemotherapy group; HIFU group; and HIFU-chemotherapy combined group. Increase in the tumour volume was observed over 3 weeks and the tumour volume doubling time was evaluated. Growth curves for each group were then plotted and statistically evaluated. HIFU treatment combined with Taxane + Estramusine was found to have a significant synergistic effect; on day 30, the distribution of tumour volume relative to the treatment group was significantly different (p = 0.0007). The control group volumes were significantly greater than those of the chemotherapy-only (p = 0.006) or HIFU-only group (p = 0.006). The greatest difference was observed between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and the control group. Additionally, tumour-doubling times were 7.7 days for the control group, 13.2 days for the HIFU-only group, and 31.2 days for the chemotherapy plus HIFU group. The differences in tumour growth rates between the chemotherapy plus HIFU combined group and a chemotherapy-only + HIFU-only grouping was 3.8% (p = 0.0020). Thus, the combined chemotherapy plus HIFU treatment was clearly more effective in reducing the tumour size than HIFU only or chemotherapy only, which indicates a synergy between the two types of treatment. Our results suggest that this combined therapy could be useful for the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

  11. Low tumour cell content in a lung tumour bank: implications for molecular characterisation.

    PubMed

    Goh, Felicia; Duhig, Edwina E; Clarke, Belinda E; McCaul, Elizabeth; Passmore, Linda; Courtney, Deborah; Windsor, Morgan; Naidoo, Rishendren; Franz, Louise; Parsonson, Kylie; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer encompasses multiple malignant epithelial tumour types, each with specific targetable, potentially actionable mutations, such that precision management mandates accurate tumour typing. Molecular characterisation studies require high tumour cell content and low necrosis content, yet lung cancers are frequently a heterogeneous mixture of tumour and stromal cells. We hypothesised that there may be systematic differences in tumour cell content according to histological subtype, and that this may have implications for tumour banks as a resource for comprehensive molecular characterisation studies in lung cancer. To investigate this, we estimated tumour cell and necrosis content of 4267 samples resected from 752 primary lung tumour specimens contributed to a lung tissue bank. We found that banked lung cancer samples had low tumour cell content (33%) generally, although it was higher in carcinoids (77.5%) than other lung cancer subtypes. Tumour cells comprise a variable and often small component of banked resected tumour samples, and are accompanied by stromal reaction, inflammation, fibrosis, and normal structures. This has implications for the adequacy of unselected tumour bank samples for diagnostic and molecular investigations, and further research is needed to determine whether tumour cell content has a significant impact on analytical results in studies using tissue from tumour bank resources. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Modern Management of Pancoast Tumour].

    PubMed

    Marra, Alessandro

    2018-06-01

    Pancoast or superior pulmonary sulcus tumour is a subset of lung carcinoma that invades the structures of the thoracic inlet - first ribs, distal roots of the brachial plexus, stellate ganglion, vertebrae, and subclavian vessels. The first symptom is usually shoulder pain; consequently, most patients are initially treated for osteoarthritis. Late diagnosis is common. Success of therapy depends on an accurate staging: standard imaging with CT scan of the chest, PET-CT scan, brain MRI are needed to rule out distant metastases, endobronchial ultrasound-guided needle biopsy (EBUS-TBNA) or mediastinoscopy are mandatory for reliable nodal staging. An MRI of the thoracic inlet allows to clearly define the boundaries of local invasion. Modern management of Pancoast tumour includes induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection. As compared with historical series treated by preoperative radiation, a trimodally approach did enhance complete resection rates and perhaps long-term survival - from about 30% 5-year survival rate to 60% in R0-resected patients. In patients who have unresectable but non-metastatic Pancoast tumours and appropriate performance status, definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy are recommended options. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. High folic acid diet enhances tumour growth in PyMT-induced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Mariann Fagernæs; Jensen, Sarah Østrup; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Martensen, Pia M

    2017-01-01

    Background: The B-vitamin folate is among the most studied bioactive food compound, and a dietary intake meeting the daily requirements has been found to reduce the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases as well as preventing neural tube defects during fetal development. Several countries have therefore introduced dietary fortification with folic acid. However, clinical and animal studies suggest that folic acid has a dual role in cancer development. Methods: During the period of initial tumour progression, MMTV-PyMT (MMTV-polyoma virus middle T) transgenic mice were fed with normal diet and high folic acid diet. Results: We found that PyMT-induced breast tumours highly express the cancer-specific folate receptor (FR), a feature they share with several human epithelial cancers in which expression of FRα correlates with tumour grade. Mice receiving a high folic acid diet displayed a significantly increased tumour volume compared with mice receiving normal diet. In the largest tumours, only found in mice on high folic acid diet, STAT3 was activated. In primary cells from PyMT tumours, STAT3 was activated upon treatment with folic acid in culture. Conclusions: Our results offer a novel molecular explanation for folic acid-induced growth of existing tumours. PMID:28152548

  14. Influence of tumour size on the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy with (213)Bi-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]-octreotate.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Sze; Konijnenberg, Mark W; de Blois, Erik; Koelewijn, Stuart; Baum, Richard P; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Breeman, Wouter A; de Jong, Marion

    2016-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy has been postulated to have great potential for the treatment of small clusters of tumour cells as well as small metastases. (213)Bismuth, an α-emitter with a half-life of 46 min, has shown to be effective in preclinical as well as in clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated whether (213)Bi-[DOTA(0), Tyr(3)]-octreotate ((213)Bi-DOTATATE), a (213)Bi-labelled somatostatin analogue with high affinity for somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2), is suitable for the treatment of larger neuroendocrine tumours overexpressing SSTR2 in comparison to its effectiveness for smaller tumours. We performed a preclinical targeted radionuclide therapy study with (213)Bi-DOTATATE in animals bearing tumours of different sizes (50 and 200 mm(3)) using two tumour models: H69 (human small cell lung carcinoma) and CA20948 (rat pancreatic tumour). Pharmacokinetics was determined for calculation of dosimetry in organs and tumours. H69- or CA20948-xenografted mice with tumour volumes of approximately 120 mm(3) were euthanized at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min post injection of a single dose of (213)Bi-DOTATATE (1.5-4.8 MBq). To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of (213)Bi-DOTATATE, xenografted H69 and CA20948 tumour-bearing mice with tumour sizes of 50 and 200 mm(3) were administered daily with a therapeutic dose of (213)Bi-DOTATATE (0.3 nmol, 2-4 MBq) for three consecutive days. The animals were followed for 90 days after treatment. At day 90, mice were injected with 25 MBq (99m)Tc-DMSA and imaged by SPECT/CT to investigate possible renal dysfunction due to (213)Bi-DOTATATE treatment. Higher tumour uptakes were found in CA20948 tumour-bearing animals compared to those in H69 tumour-bearing mice with the highest tumour uptake of 19.6 ± 6.6 %IA/g in CA20948 tumour-bearing animals, while for H69 tumour-bearing mice, the highest tumour uptake was found to be 9.8 ± 2.4 %IA/g. Nevertheless, as the anti-tumour effect was more pronounced in H69

  15. Low abdominoperineal excision rates are associated with high-workload surgeons and lower tumour height. Is further specialization needed?

    PubMed

    Morris, E J A; Birch, R; West, N P; Finan, P J; Forman, D; Fairley, L; Quirke, P

    2011-07-01

    Wide variation, independent of disease extent and case mix, has been observed in the rate of use of abdominoperineal excision (APE) for rectal cancer. Previous analyses have, however, been confounded by failure to adjust for the location of the tumour within the rectum. This population-based study sought to examine whether variations in tumour height explained differences in APE use. Information was obtained on all individuals who underwent a major resection for a rectal tumour diagnosed between 1998 and 2005 across the Northern and Yorkshire regions of the UK. Median distances from the dentate line were calculated for all tumours excised by APE and compared with rates of use of APE between specialists and nonspecialist surgeons and across hospital trusts. The completeness of pathological reporting of height of tumour within the rectum was variable. A low rate of APE use was associated with a lower median distance of tumours from the dentate line. Specialist colorectal cancer surgeons performed fewer APEs on patients with a tumour located lower in the rectum than nonspecialist surgeons. Variations in the height of tumour did not explain the variation in APE use. Specialist high-volume surgeons undertook fewer APEs and those they performed were closer to the dentate line than low-volume nonspecialist surgeons. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. The impact of surgical resection of the primary tumor on the development of synchronous colorectal liver metastasis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pinson, H; Cosyns, S; Ceelen, Wim P

    2018-05-22

    In recent years different therapeutic strategies for synchronously liver metastasized colorectal cancer were described. Apart from the classical staged surgical approach, simultaneous and liver-first strategies are now commonly used. One theoretical drawback of the classical approach is, however, the stimulatory effect on liver metastases growth that may result from resection of the primary tumour. This systematic review, therefore, aims to investigate the current insights on the stimulatory effects of colorectal surgery on the growth of synchronous colorectal liver metastases in humans. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. A literature search was performed using PubMed and Embase. Articles investigating the effects of colorectal surgery on synchronous colorectal liver metastases were included. Primary endpoints were metastatic tumor volume, metabolic and proliferative activity and tumour vascularization. Four articles meeting the selection criteria were found involving 200 patients. These studies investigate the effects of resection of the primary tumour on synchronous liver metastases using histological and radiological techniques. These papers support a possible stimulatory effect of resection of the primary tumor. Some limited evidence supports the hypothesis that colorectal surgery might stimulate the growth and development of synchronous colorectal liver metastases.

  17. Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, K; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, K; Stenram, U; Tranberg, K-G

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time–response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6–8 days later (tumour size 0.25–0.40 cm3) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n=8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. PMID:16091763

  18. In vivo PET evaluation in tumour-bearing rats of 2-[ 18F]fluoromethyl- L-phenylalanine as a new potential tracer for molecular imaging of brain and extra-cranial tumours in humans with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersemans, Ken; Bauwens, Matthias; Lahoutte, Tony; Bossuyt, Axel; Mertens, John

    2007-02-01

    The Na +-independent L-type LAT1 amino acid transport system for large and neutral amino acids has been shown to be expressed higher in tumour tissue relative to normal tissue and has been regarded as a key point for the development of new amino acid based tumour tracers for molecular imaging. We developed a new fluorinated phenylalanine analogue, 2-[ 18F]fluoromethyl- L-phenylalanine, considering that the spatial volume of FCH 3 is comparable with that of the iodine atom in 2-I- L-phenylalanine, of which we have proven that it is taken up excellently in tumours by the LAT1 system. The substrate molecule for radiolabeling, Boc-2-bromomethyl- L-phenylalanine- tButylester, was prepared by radical bromination of Boc-2-methyl- L-phenylalanine- tButylester. [ 18F -] for bromine exchange is performed within 3 min in conditions comparable to the [ 18F]FDG synthesis with a radiochemical yield of at least 85%. After deprotection and semi-preparative HPLC purification, the 2-[ 18F]fluoromethyl- L-phenylalanine is recovered n.c.a. (57%) with a high purity and 3.7 MBq were injected into R1M rhabdomyosarcoma tumour-bearing rats. Imaging was performed with a human PET camera from 5 to 45 min p.i. The tumour/background and tumour/blood ratios obtained from PET acquisition were at least 2.5. DUR values for the tumours were at least about 5. Furthermore, a small tumour implanted near a kidney could be well visualized completely separated from this kidney. Moreover in all tumours the "active" tumour tissue can clearly be differentiated from less active tumour tissue. This proves that 2-[ 18F]fluoromethyl- L-phenylalanine has a great potential as a new tracer for specific tumour diagnosis with PET.

  19. Development of a Tumour Growth Inhibition Model to Elucidate the Effects of Ritonavir on Intratumoural Metabolism and Anti-tumour Effect of Docetaxel in a Mouse Model for Hereditary Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huixin; Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Rottenberg, Sven; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2016-03-01

    In a mouse tumour model for hereditary breast cancer, we previously explored the anti-cancer effects of docetaxel, ritonavir and the combination of both and studied the effect of ritonavir on the intratumoural concentration of docetaxel. The objective of the current study was to apply pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) modelling on this previous study to further elucidate and quantify the effects of docetaxel when co-administered with ritonavir. PK models of docetaxel and ritonavir in plasma and in tumour were developed. The effect of ritonavir on docetaxel concentration in the systemic circulation of Cyp3a knock-out mice and in the implanted tumour (with inherent Cyp3a expression) was studied, respectively. Subsequently, we designed a tumour growth inhibition model that included the inhibitory effects of both docetaxel and ritonavir. Ritonavir decreased docetaxel systemic clearance with 8% (relative standard error 0.4%) in the co-treated group compared to that in the docetaxel only-treated group. The docetaxel concentration in tumour tissues was significantly increased by ritonavir with mean area under the concentration-time curve 2.5-fold higher when combined with ritonavir. Observed tumour volume profiles in mice could be properly described by the PK/PD model. In the co-treated group, the enhanced anti-tumour effect was mainly due to increased docetaxel tumour concentration; however, we demonstrated a small but significant anti-tumour effect of ritonavir addition (p value <0.001). In conclusion, we showed that the increased anti-tumour effect observed when docetaxel is combined with ritonavir is mainly caused by enhanced docetaxel tumour concentration and to a minor extent by a direct anti-tumour effect of ritonavir.

  20. Primary intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xia; Xiang, Yingming; Shi, Hongcan; Zhang, Fangbiao

    2018-01-01

    Due to the extreme rarity of primary intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs), their clinical course, imaging characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are poorly understood. The present study therefore assessed the diagnosis and management of primary intrapulmonary SFTs and systematically reviewed previously reported cases in the literature. A total of 5 patients who underwent resection for primary intrapulmonary SFTs were enrolled in the present study and their clinical course, tumour characteristics, management and survival were assessed in this retrospective study. Relevant studies regarding primary intrapulmonary SFTs were searched using PubMed and tumour characteristics, clinicopathologic features, therapeutic strategy and survival outcomes were reviewed. Of the 5 cases, all were males, with a mean age of 57.6 years (range, 37–68 years). All patients were asymptomatic and were identified incidentally on routine computed tomography examination. A total of 3 patients underwent thoracotomy and 2 patients underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. All tumours were completely resected. Postoperative haemorrhage occurred in 1 patient and he received surgical intervention for haemostasis. The average hospital stay was 15 (4–22) days, and no mortality occurred. The mean length of the postoperative follow-up was 37.6 (1–67) months. One patient was lost to follow-up, and 4 patients were asymptomatic. A total of 19 studies were identified from database searches. They included a total of 45 patients: Twenty-three males and 22 females (mean age, 59.4 years; range, 7–81 years). A total of 12 patients were asymptomatic, and pain and coughing were the major symptoms. Five, one, two, four, and 17 tumours occurred in the right upper lobe, right middle lobe, right lower lobe, left upper lobe and left lower lobe, respectively. A total of 39 patients underwent surgery, 1 patient underwent radiotherapy, and 1 patient underwent radiofrequency ablation

  1. Evasion of tumours from the control of the immune system: consequences of brief encounters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this work a mathematical model describing the growth of a solid tumour in the presence of an immune system response is presented. Specifically, attention is focused on the interactions between cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) and tumour cells in a small, avascular multicellular tumour. At this stage of the disease the CTLs and the tumour cells are considered to be in a state of dynamic equilibrium or cancer dormancy. The precise biochemical and cellular mechanisms by which CTLs can control a cancer and keep it in a dormant state are still not completely understood from a biological and immunological point of view. The mathematical model focuses on the spatio-temporal dynamics of tumour cells, immune cells, chemokines and “chemorepellents” in an immunogenic tumour. The CTLs and tumour cells are assumed to migrate and interact with each other in such a way that lymphocyte-tumour cell complexes are formed. These complexes result in either the death of the tumour cells (the normal situation) or the inactivation of the lymphocytes and consequently the survival of the tumour cells. In the latter case, we assume that each tumour cell that survives its “brief encounter” with the CTLs undergoes certain beneficial phenotypic changes. Results We explore the dynamics of the model under these assumptions and show that the process of immuno-evasion can arise as a consequence of these encounters. We show that the proposed mechanism not only shape the dynamics of the total number of tumor cells and of CTLs, but also the dynamics of their spatial distribution. We also briefly discuss the evolutionary features of our model, by framing them in the recent quasi-Lamarckian theories. Conclusions Our findings might have some interesting implication of interest for clinical practice. Indeed, immuno-editing process can be seen as an “involuntary” antagonistic process acting against immunotherapies, which aim at maintaining a tumor in a dormant state, or at

  2. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    PubMed

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  3. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  4. Volumetry based biomarker speed of growth: Quantifying the change of total tumor volume in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging over time improves risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Piraud, Marie; Menze, Bjoern H.; Hielscher, Thomas; Hofmanninger, Johannes; Wagner, Barbara; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Merz, Maximilian; Hillengass, Jens; Langs, Georg; Weber, Marc-André

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients, introducing new 3D-volumetry based imaging biomarkers derived from whole-body MRI. Two-hundred twenty whole-body MRIs from 63 patients with smoldering multiple myeloma were retrospectively analyzed and all focal lesions >5mm were manually segmented for volume quantification. The imaging biomarkers total tumor volume, speed of growth (development of the total tumor volume over time), number of focal lesions, development of the number of focal lesions over time and the recent imaging biomarker ‘>1 focal lesion’ of the International Myeloma Working Group were compared, taking 2-year progression rate, sensitivity and false positive rate into account. Speed of growth, using a cutoff of 114mm3/month, was able to isolate a high-risk group with a 2-year progression rate of 82.5%. Additionally, it showed by far the highest sensitivity in this study and in comparison to other biomarkers in the literature, detecting 63.2% of patients who progress within 2 years. Furthermore, its false positive rate (8.7%) was much lower compared to the recent imaging biomarker ‘>1 focal lesion’ of the International Myeloma Working Group. Therefore, speed of growth is the preferable imaging biomarker for risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients. PMID:29861868

  5. Volumetry based biomarker speed of growth: Quantifying the change of total tumor volume in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging over time improves risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Wennmann, Markus; Kintzelé, Laurent; Piraud, Marie; Menze, Bjoern H; Hielscher, Thomas; Hofmanninger, Johannes; Wagner, Barbara; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Merz, Maximilian; Hillengass, Jens; Langs, Georg; Weber, Marc-André

    2018-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to improve risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients, introducing new 3D-volumetry based imaging biomarkers derived from whole-body MRI. Two-hundred twenty whole-body MRIs from 63 patients with smoldering multiple myeloma were retrospectively analyzed and all focal lesions >5mm were manually segmented for volume quantification. The imaging biomarkers total tumor volume, speed of growth (development of the total tumor volume over time), number of focal lesions, development of the number of focal lesions over time and the recent imaging biomarker '>1 focal lesion' of the International Myeloma Working Group were compared, taking 2-year progression rate, sensitivity and false positive rate into account. Speed of growth, using a cutoff of 114mm 3 /month, was able to isolate a high-risk group with a 2-year progression rate of 82.5%. Additionally, it showed by far the highest sensitivity in this study and in comparison to other biomarkers in the literature, detecting 63.2% of patients who progress within 2 years. Furthermore, its false positive rate (8.7%) was much lower compared to the recent imaging biomarker '>1 focal lesion' of the International Myeloma Working Group. Therefore, speed of growth is the preferable imaging biomarker for risk stratification of smoldering multiple myeloma patients.

  6. Tumour location within the breast: Does tumour site have prognostic ability?

    PubMed

    Rummel, Seth; Hueman, Matthew T; Costantino, Nick; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Tumour location within the breast varies with the highest frequency in the upper outer quadrant (UOQ) and lowest frequency in the lower inner quadrant (LIQ). Whether tumour location is prognostic is unclear. To determine whether tumour location is prognostic, associations between tumour site and clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated. All patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Care Project whose tumour site-UOQ, upper inner quadrant (UIQ), central, LIQ, lower outer quadrant (LOQ)-was determined by a single, dedicated breast pathologist were included in this study. Patients with multicentric disease (n = 122) or tumours spanning multiple quadrants (n = 381) were excluded from further analysis. Clinicopathological characteristics were analysed using chi-square tests for univariate analysis with multivariate analysis performed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple logistic regression. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Of the 980 patients with defined tumour location, 30 had bilateral disease. Tumour location in the UOQ (51.5%) was significantly higher than in the UIQ (15.6%), LOQ (14.2%), central (10.6%), or LIQ (8.1%). Tumours in the central quadrant were significantly more likely to have higher tumour stage (P = 0.003) and size (P < 0.001), metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.001), and mortality (P = 0.011). After multivariate analysis, only tumour size and lymph node status remained significantly associated with survival. Evaluation of tumour location as a prognostic factor revealed that although tumours in the central region are associated with less favourable outcome, these associations are not independent of location but rather driven by larger tumour size. Tumours in the central region are more difficult to detect mammographically, resulting in larger tumour size at diagnosis and thus less favourable prognosis. Together, these data demonstrate that tumour location is not an independent prognostic factor.

  7. Expression of podoplanin in Warthin tumours.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Torsten; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2010-12-01

    Warthin tumour is the second most common benign tumour of the parotid gland. This study was designed to investigate the lymphatic vessels in Warthin tumours in an effort to understand better its pathogenesis. Tissue specimens of 31 patients (19 men and 11 women; mean age 57 years, median size of the tumours 2.86 cm) were analysed by means of immunohistochemistry applying the monoclonal antibody D2-40. We found numerous D2-40-positive sinus-like vessels particularly at the inner layer of the capsule. Since subcapsular sinuses are a major morphological feature of lymph nodes in general, the finding of podoplanin expression in the large majority of subcapsular vessels in Warthin tumours confirms the view that this tumour has its origin in regional lymph nodes.

  8. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10–15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  9. Overexpression of vasopressin (V3) and corticotrophin-releasing hormone receptor genes in corticotroph tumours.

    PubMed

    de Keyzer, Y; René, P; Beldjord, C; Lenne, F; Bertagna, X

    1998-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying ACTH-secreting tumour formation remain unknown. Transmembrane signalling pathways play an important role in several endocrine disorders including pituitary tumours. To investigate the role of the pituitary vasopressin (V3) receptor (R) in ACTH-secreting tumours we have qualitatively and quantitatively analysed its mRNA. RT-PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and S1 nuclease protection experiments were used to analyse V3 mRNA structure in ACTH-secreting tumours. We also developed a competitive RT-PCR system to compare the levels of expression of POMC, V3 and CRH-R genes. This system used as competitor a single mutant template (termed multi-mutant) containing primers for the three genes flanking an unrelated core sequence allowing multiple quantifications from the same cDNA preparations. We analysed 12 normal pituitaries, 15 corticotroph pituitary adenomas and 6 ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. The V3 mRNA structure and sequence were found to be identical in normal and tumoural pituitary indicating that the tumoural Vs mRNA codes for a normal receptor. POMC RT-PCR signals in the pituitary tumour group were approximately 7-fold higher than in the normal pituitary group. Similarly, V3 and CRH-R signal were increased in pituitary tumors (mean +/- SEM: 5.87 x 10(-6) +/- 1.73 x 10(-6), and 2.33 x 10(-4) +/- 1.4 x 10(-4), respectively), when compared to normal pituitaries (1.19 x 10(-7) +/- 2.39 x 10(-8), and 1.7 x 10(-6) +/- 4.65 x 10(-7), respectively) suggesting that these two genes are expressed at very high levels in corticotroph tumours. When expressed relative to the corresponding POMC signals, increases in V3 and CRH-R signals reached 49-fold and 137-fold, respectively, in pituitary tumours. In ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids V3 gene expression level was also higher than in normal pituitary, whereas CRH-R signals were detected in only 4 of the 6 tumours with wide variations. Our results show that both vasopressin

  10. Central nervous system tumours profile at a referral center in the Brazilian Amazon region, 1997–2014

    PubMed Central

    Semblano, Aluízio Augusto Pereira; Moreira, Matheus Acácio; de Lemos, Manuela Nascimento; de Mello, Vanessa Jóia; Hamoy, Moisés; Nazareth Junior, Mario Hermes; Paschoal Junior, Fernando Mendes; Adami, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Tumours of the Central Nervous System (CNS) are an important cause of mortality from cancer. Epidemiological data on neoplams affecting the CNS are scarce in Brazil, especially in the Amazon region. The study aims at describing the histopathological profile of CNS tumours cases at a high-complexity referral cancer center. This study has described a 17-year-series profile of CNS tumours, registered at a high-complexity referral cancer center in Pará state, from January 1997 until July 2014 in the Brazilian Amazon Region. Data was gathered from histopathology reports kept in the hospital’s cancer registry and 949 cases of CNS tumours were analyzed. The most common histopathology were neuroepithelial tumours (approx. 40%) and meningioma was the most frequent especific tumor histologic subtype (22.2%). Neuroepithelial tumours were more frequent in patients with ages ranging from less than a year to 19 years, whereas metastatic tumours were prevalent in patients over 40 years of age. It was not found temporal trends during the studied period. The knowledge of these tumours profile is valuable for the understanding of cancer epidemiology in the region, since its prevalence is currently underreported and more awareness on the disease is needed. PMID:28369089

  11. Primary Tumours of the Fallopian Tube

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Winifred M.

    1967-01-01

    Nine patients with primary tumour of the fallopian tube were seen at the Royal Marsden Hospital and Chelsea Hospital for Women, London. All the tumours except one were adenocarcinomas. Histologically, the exception resembled an adenomatoid tumour, but was clinically malignant and had some features of a hemangiopericytoma. Postoperative irradiation did not increase survival. The only five-year survivor was a patient who received radiation therapy for a late local recurrence. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5334754

  12. A giant testicular mixed germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Reekhaye, A; Harris, A; Nagarajan, S; Chadwick, D

    2016-11-01

    We present a case that we believe to be the largest mixed germ cell testicular tumour reported in the United Kingdom. A 23-year-old male was admitted to our urology department with a large scrotal swelling. The patient was found to have a giant left testicular tumour and a solitary lung metastasis at presentation. He underwent an emergency radical orchidectomy and subsequently received four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy. Four months after starting treatment, the tumour markers had normalised and a repeat staging computed tomography showed no active disease. The tumour reached that size because of the patient's failure to seek medical attention due to fear and embarrassment.

  13. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 1 PMID:1086147

  14. Tumours of the soft (mesenchymal) tissues

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, E.

    1974-01-01

    This is a classification of tumours of fibrous tissue, fat, muscle, blood and lymph vessels, and mast cells, irrespective of the region of the body in which they arise. Tumours of fibrous tissue are divided into fibroma, fibrosarcoma (including “canine haemangiopericytoma”), other sarcomas, equine sarcoid, and various tumour-like lesions. The histological appearance of the tumours is described and illustrated with photographs. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16 PMID:4371740

  15. [Hepatocellular tumours in noncirrhotic liver tissue].

    PubMed

    Goltz, D; Fischer, H-P

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the spectrum of tissue-based diagnostics of hepatocellular tumours has changed due to novel molecular pathological findings. Innovative radiographics filter out small lesions and ambiguous tumours for bioptical sampling. The spectrum of these tumours includes hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatocellular adenomas, focal nodular hyperplasia and macroregenerative nodules. Primarily, morphological analysis should identify the dignity of a lesion. After exclusion of HCC and reactive liver cell nodules, hepatocellular adenomas should be further subclassified based on immunohistochemical/molecular pathological criteria according to the WHO classification of liver tumours. This procedure provides significant additional information regarding the prognosis and therapeutic implications of hepatocellular adenomas.

  16. MRI volumetry for prediction of tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seierstad, T; Hole, K H; Grøholt, K K; Dueland, S; Ree, A H; Flatmark, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if MRI-assessed tumour volumetry correlates with histological tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and subsequent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Data from 69 prospectively enrolled patients with LARC receiving NACT followed by CRT and radical surgery were analysed. Whole-tumour volumes were contoured in T2 weighted MR images obtained pre-treatment (VPRE), after NACT (VNACT) and after the full course of NACT followed by CRT (VCRT). VPRE, VNACT and tumour volume changes relative to VPRE, ΔVNACT and ΔVCRT were calculated and correlated to histological tumour regression grade (TRG). Results: 61% of good histological responders (TRG 1–2) to NACT followed by CRT were correctly predicted by combining VPRE < 10.5 cm3, ΔVNACT > −78.2% and VNACT < 3.3 cm3. The highest accuracy was found for VNACT, with 55.1% sensitivity given 100% specificity. The volume regression after completed NACT and CRT (VCRT) was not significantly different between good and poor responders (TRG 1–2 vs TRG 3–5). Conclusion: MRI-assessed small tumour volumes after NACT correlated with good histological tumour response (TRG 1–2) to the completed course of NACT and CRT. Furthermore, by combining tumour volume measurements before, during and after NACT, more good responders were identified. Advances in knowledge: MRI volumetry may be a tool for early identification of good and poor responders to NACT followed by CRT and surgery in LARC in order to aid more individualized, multimodal treatment. PMID:25899892

  17. Morphology of 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea induced rat mammary tumours after treatment with precursor of phytanic acid or its combination with vitamin D analogue.

    PubMed

    Liska, J; Macejova, D; Ondkova, S; Brtko, J

    2012-01-01

    The proposed therapeutical effect of phytol (PHY), a precursor of the phytanic acid (PHYA), on mammary tumours induced with 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU), was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats in combination with vitamin D analogue, Seocalcitol (SEO). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneally with MNU (50 mg/kg of body weight) at the 46th and 52th days of age. Controls and MNU animals received propyleneglycol appropriate to their body weight. PHY (MNU + PHY) (500 mg/kg) was administered after tumour detection (approximately in 100th day of the life) three times/week. Combination of PHY with SEO (7 μg/kg per week) was administered to rats after tumour detection (approximately in 100th day of the life) until the 181st day of age. Then the animals were sacrificed, the tumours removed, and fixed in 10% formalin. Haematoxylin and eosine stained sections were evaluated under microscope. Tumour invasiveness observed in all groups of animals was ranging from 80 to 90%. Treatment with PHY alone did not inhibit the progression of the MNU induced tumours in the rat breast but it decreased the tumour burden and volume in comparison with MNU treated controls. Decreased tumour burden and volume were induced by combined treatment of PHY with SEO. Malignity and invasivity of carcinomas were not affected. No redifferentiating effect on mammary tumour cells induced by NMU after treatment with PHY alone or in combination with SEO was observed in rats. SEO alone or in combination with PHY inhibited the progression of MNU induced mammary tumours and also inhibited the increase of tumour burden and volume in comparison with MNU treated control group. However, none of the compounds, either alone or in mutual combination, reduced the malignity or the number of invasive tumours in this experimental study.

  18. Equine nasal and paranasal sinus tumours. Part 1: review of the literature and tumour classification.

    PubMed

    Head, K W; Dixon, P M

    1999-05-01

    The normal gross and histological anatomy of the equine nasal and paranasal sinuses are reviewed and the relationships between the local anatomy, the occurrence of different tumour types, and of tumour spread are examined. The histological classification of the more common equine sinonasal tumours and tumour-like lesions are discussed. Clinical and pathological descriptions of 50 more recently recorded such tumours are separately tabulated. The literature shows that equine sinonasal tumours, both endemic and sporadic, are relatively uncommon in horses, with non-neoplastic growths such as maxillary (sinus) cysts, progressive ethmoid haematoma and inflammatory nasal polyps more commonly recorded. The equine paranasal sinuses, especially the caudal maxillary sinus, are the most common sites for sinonasal tumours and, in contrast to other species, primary nasal tumours are uncommon. The more common tumour types include squamous cell carcinoma that, in some cases, arise in the oral cavity and spread to the maxillary sinuses; adenocarcinomas; bone and dental tumours; fibrosarcomas and haemangiosarcomas. Except for some benign bone tumours, there are few records of successful treatment of equine sinonasal tumours.

  19. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapy System and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fucheng; He, Ye; Li, Rui

    2007-05-01

    At the end of last century, a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) tumor therapy system was successfully developed and manufactured in China, which has been already applied to clinical therapy. This article aims to discuss the HIFU therapy system and its application. Detailed research includes the following: power amplifiers for high-power ultrasound, ultrasound transducers with large apertures, accurate 3-D mechanical drives, a software control system (both high-voltage control and low-voltage control), and the B-mode ultrasonic diagnostic equipment used for treatment monitoring. Research on the dosage of ultrasound required for tumour therapy in multiple human cases has made it possible to relate a dosage formula, presented in this paper, to other significant parameters such as the volume of thermal tumor solidification, the acoustic intensity (I), and the ultrasound emission time (tn). Moreover, the HIFU therapy system can be applied to the clinical treatment of both benign and malignant tumors in the pelvic and abdominal cavity, such as uterine fibroids, liver cancer and pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Human tumour xenografts in nude mice: chemotherapy trials with titanocene dichloride in different dosages.

    PubMed

    Villena-Heinsen, C; Friedrich, M; Ertan, A K; Schmidt, W

    1998-01-01

    In this study new cytostatic therapies with titanocene dichloride in different dosages for the treatment of ovarian cancer are analyzed on human tumour xenografts in nude mice. The aim was to compare the effects of different dosages of titanocene dichloride on the growth of human tumour xenografts and nude mice body weight. Biopsy material from one human ovarian carcinoma was expanded and transplanted into 52 nude mice. The treatment protocol included one experiment that consisted of the following six treatment groups: titanocene dichloride 3 x 10 mg/kg, titanocene dichloride 3 x 20 mg/kg, titanocene dichloride 3 x 30 mg/kg, titanocene dichloride 1 x 30 mg/kg, titanocene dichloride 1 x 40 mg/kg and a control group treated with 0.9% saline. Treatment groups were evaluated in terms of average daily increase in tumour volume and average daily body weight increase on nude mice. The slope factors alpha and beta of the body weight and tumour volume changes were calculated. Titanocene dichloride in the dosage of 3 x 30 mg/kg and 3 x 20 mg/kg brought about a significant reduction in tumour volume (p < 0.05) compared to the control group and to the treatment group under medication with titanocene dichloride 1 x 30 mg/kg. There were no significant changes in the body weight of nude mice. We found titanocene dichloride to be effective in the reduction of tumour volume increase in nude mice. Titanocene dichloride could be an active chemotherapeutic drug in women with ovarian carcinoma not responding to standard therapies.

  1. Multiple model predictive control for optimal drug administration of mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, N; Ozgoli, S; Ramezani, A

    2017-06-01

    Mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours is one of the most efficient ways to improve cancer treatment strategies. However, it is important to 'design' an effective treatment programme which can optimize the ways of combining immunotherapy and chemotherapy to diminish their imminent side effects. Control engineering techniques could be used for this. The method of multiple model predictive controller (MMPC) is applied to the modified Stepanova model to induce the best combination of drugs scheduling under a better health criteria profile. The proposed MMPC is a feedback scheme that can perform global optimization for both tumour volume and immune competent cell density by performing multiple constraints. Although current studies usually assume that immunotherapy has no side effect, this paper presents a new method of mixed drug administration by employing MMPC, which implements several constraints for chemotherapy and immunotherapy by considering both drug toxicity and autoimmune. With designed controller we need maximum 57% and 28% of full dosage of drugs for chemotherapy and immunotherapy in some instances, respectively. Therefore, through the proposed controller less dosage of drugs are needed, which contribute to suitable results with a perceptible reduction in medicine side effects. It is observed that in the presence of MMPC, the amount of required drugs is minimized, while the tumour volume is reduced. The efficiency of the presented method has been illustrated through simulations, as the system from an initial condition in the malignant region of the state space (macroscopic tumour volume) transfers into the benign region (microscopic tumour volume) in which the immune system can control tumour growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Abdominal tumours in children: 3-D visualisation and surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Günther, P; Schenk, J P; Wunsch, R; Tröger, J; Waag, K L

    2004-10-01

    Solid abdominal tumours are of special importance in the field of paediatric surgery. Because of the dangers of cumulative irradiation and improved delineation of soft parts MRI is usually employed in children for diagnostic assessment. Compiling the radiologic information for surgical planning is often difficult by conventional methods. Newly improved and efficient 3-D volume rendering software is now available for visual reconstruction of tumour anatomy utilising segmentation and other special techniques. Because the intraoperative complication rate is close to 20 % as described in the literature, optimal preoperative visualisation and planning would seem imperative. All children with solid abdominal tumours at Heidelberg University in the year 2002 were included in this study. MR examinations were performed with a 0.5 Tesla magnet using a standard protocol. All MR data were processed with VG Studio Max 1.1, converting the two-dimensional data into three-dimensional data. This report presents 15 cases using this special technique: 7 with abdominal neuroblastoma, 6 with nephroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma, and 1 ovarian teratoma. Our experience shows that a better understanding of the surgical anatomy, particularly regarding the surrounding organs and vasculature, can be helpful in decreasing the incidence of inadvertent intraoperative injuries to these structures.

  3. Inhibitory effects of CP on the growth of human gastric adenocarcinoma BGC-823 tumours in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Jun; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Bao-Jun; Zhang, Zhan-Xue; Li, Ai-Ying; An, Ran; Yue, Bin; Fan, Li-Qiao; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Objective To investigate the potential antitumour effects of [2-(6-amino-purine-9-yl)-1-hydroxy-phosphine acyl ethyl] phosphonic acid (CP) against gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods Human BGC-823 xenotransplants were established in nude mice. Animals were randomly divided into control and CP groups, which were administered NaHCO 3 vehicle alone or CP dissolved in NaHCO 3 (200 µg/kg body weight) daily, respectively. Tumour volume was measured weekly for 6 weeks. Resected tumours were assayed for proliferative activity with anti-Ki-67 or anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antibodies. Cell apoptosis was examined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assays and with caspase-3 immunostaining. Proteins were measured by Western blotting. Results There was a significant reduction in tumour volume and a reduced percentage of Ki-67-positive or PCNA-positive cells in the CP group compared with the control group. The percentage of TUNEL-positive or caspase 3-positive cells significantly increased following CP treatment compared with the control group. Tumours from the CP group had higher levels of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated-AKT (p-AKT) compared with control tumours. Conclusion CP treatment inhibited tumour growth and induced tumour cell apoptosis in a nude mouse model of BGC-823 gastric adenocarcinoma. Activation of the AKT and ERK signalling pathways may mediate this antitumour activity.

  4. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  5. [Phyllodes tumor].

    PubMed

    Barbari, S G; Søreide, J A; Anda, O; Grude, T H; Bjørke, J R; Hansen, A

    1989-05-10

    This very rare breast tumour has been diagnosed in five cases, four females and one male, at our hospital during the last two years. The females all presented tumours with a diameter ranging from 5 to 15 cm. Age at diagnosis ranged from 21 to 54 years. We focus on diagnostic challenges, since 3 of our patients were recently treated by removal of a breast tumour diagnosed morphologically as fibroadenomatosis. Our patients underwent different surgical therapy, and we focus on local treatment modalities advocated in recent literature. Systemic chemotherapy, endocrine treatment and/or radiation therapy, in the adjuvant setting or in advanced disease, do not increase survival in patients with malignant phyllodes tumour.

  6. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dilman, V. M.; Berstein, L. M.; Ostroumova, M. N.; Tsyrlina, Y. V.; Golubev, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer). PMID:7248149

  7. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Dilman, V M; Berstein, L M; Ostroumova, M N; Tsyrlina, Y V; Golubev, A G

    1981-05-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer).

  8. Congenital portosystemic shunts associated with liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Pupulim, L F; Vullierme, M-P; Paradis, V; Valla, D; Terraz, S; Vilgrain, V

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnosis and presentation of liver tumours in patients with congenital portosystemic shunts (CPS). Eight patients were diagnosed in Hôpital Beaujon as having CPS. All patients underwent Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological examination of liver tumours. CPS were classified according to anatomy and the amount of portal flow deviated to the systemic circulation as: total, subtotal, or partial. Liver tumours were diagnosed by needle core biopsy (n = 5) or surgery (n = 3). Clinical follow-up was available in all patients but one (mean follow-up 36 months; range 1-5 years). Six patients had total CPS, one patient had a subtotal CPS, and the last had a partial CPS. All patients presented with multiple liver nodules (range four to >15). The tumours were characterized as focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH; n = 4), FNH with hepatocellular adenoma (n = 2), and regenerative nodular hyperplasia (n = 2). In four of seven patients (57%) that had follow-up, tumours showed enlargement or new lesions appeared. In this series of CPS patients, tumours were all benign, multiple, and of hepatocellular origin, and different tumours were present simultaneously in two patients. Tumour enlargement or new nodules were common during follow-up. Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo of six human melanoma xenograft lines: tumour bioenergetic status and blood supply.

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, H.; Olsen, D. R.; Southon, T. E.; Rofstad, E. K.

    1993-01-01

    Six human melanoma xenograft lines grown s.c. in BALB/c-nu/nu mice were subjected to 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy in vivo. The following resonances were detected: phosphomonoesters (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiesters (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and nucleoside triphosphate gamma, alpha and beta (NTP gamma, alpha and beta). The main purpose of the work was to search for possible relationships between 31P-NMR resonance ratios and tumour pH on the one hand and blood supply per viable tumour cell on the other. The latter parameter was measured by using the 86Rb uptake method. Tumour bioenergetic status [the (PCr + NTP beta)/Pi resonance ratio], tumour pH and blood supply per viable tumour cell decreased with increasing tumour volume for five of the six xenograft lines. The decrease in tumour bioenergetic status was due to a decrease in the (PCr + NTP beta)/total resonance ratio as well as an increase in the Pi/total resonance ratio. The decrease in the (PCr + NTP beta)/total resonance ratio was mainly a consequence of a decrease in the PCr/total resonance ratio for two lines and mainly a consequence of a decrease in the NTP beta/total resonance ratio for three lines. The magnitude of the decrease in the (PCr + NTP beta)/total resonance ratio and the magnitude of the decrease in tumour pH were correlated to the magnitude of the decrease in blood supply per viable tumour cell. Tumour pH decreased with decreasing tumour bioenergetic status, and the magnitude of this decrease was larger for the tumour lines showing a high than for those showing a low blood supply per viable tumour cell. No correlations across the tumour lines were found between tumour pH and tumour bioenergetic status or any other resonance ratio on the one hand and blood supply per viable tumour cell on the other. The differences in the 31P-NMR spectrum between the tumour lines were probably caused by differences in the intrinsic biochemical properties of the tumour

  10. Primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis: US-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jie

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the value of ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in the treatment of primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis. Eleven patients with primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis received US-guided HIFU ablation. The maximum tumour size ranged from 5.6 to 25.0 cm (median 10.5 cm). Treatment was curative in four patients and palliative in seven patients. During follow-up, the effectiveness of HIFU ablation was assessed by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR). Significant coagulative necrosis was obtained in all patients after scheduled HIFU ablations; the volume ablation ratio was 86.7% ± 12.5% (range 65-100%). Complete tumour necrosis was achieved in all patients receiving curative HIFU ablation. No major complications were encountered. No patients died of local tumour progression during follow-up. US-guided HIFU ablation may be a safe and effective minimally invasive technique for the local treatment of primary malignant tumours of the bony pelvis.

  11. Quantification of the effect of electrical and thermal parameters on radiofrequency ablation for concentric tumour model of different sizes.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Ng, E Y K

    2015-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been increasingly used in treating cancer for multitude of situations in various tissue types. To perform the therapy safely and reliably, the effect of critical parameters needs to be known beforehand. Temperature plays an important role in the outcome of the therapy and any uncertainties in temperature assessment can be lethal. This study presents the RFA case of fixed tip temperature where we've analysed the effect of electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and blood perfusion rate of the tumour and surrounding normal tissue on the radiofrequency ablation. Ablation volume was chosen as the characteristic to be optimised and temperature control was achieved via PID controller. The effect of all 6 parameters each having 3 levels was quantified with minimum number of experiments harnessing the fractional factorial characteristic of Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. It was observed that as the blood perfusion increases the ablation volume decreases. Increasing electrical conductivity of the tumour results in increase of ablation volume whereas increase in normal tissue conductivity tends to decrease the ablation volume and vice versa. Likewise, increasing thermal conductivity of the tumour results in enhanced ablation volume whereas an increase in thermal conductivity of the surrounding normal tissue has a debilitating effect on the ablation volume and vice versa. With increase in the size of the tumour (i.e., 2-3cm) the effect of each parameter is not linear. The parameter effect varies with change in size of the tumour that is manifested by the different gradient observed in ablation volume. Most important is the relative insensitivity of ablation volume to blood perfusion rate for smaller tumour size (2cm) that is also in accordance with the previous results presented in literature. These findings will provide initial insight for safe, reliable and improved treatment planning perceptively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Estimated incidence rate and distribution of tumours in 4,653 cases of archival submissions derived from the Dutch golden retriever population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A genetic predisposition for certain tumour types has been proven for some dog breeds. Some studies have suggested that this may also be true for the Golden retriever breed. The present study aimed to examine a possible existence of a tumour (type) predisposition in the Dutch population of Golden retrievers by evaluating annual estimated incidence rates compared to incidence rates from previous publications. A second aim was to evaluate whether incidences of various tumours differed as related to the diagnostic method chosen, being either cytology or histology. Results Tumours submitted to Utrecht University during the period 1998–2004 diagnosed either by means of cytology (n = 2,529) or histology (n = 2,124), were related to an average annual Dutch kennel club population of 29,304 Golden retrievers. Combining individual tumours from both the cytological and the histopathological data-set resulted in an annual estimated incidence rate of 2,242 for 100,000 dog-years at risk regarding tumour development in general. The most common cytological tumor diagnoses were ‘fat, possibly lipoma’ (35%), mast cell tumour (21%) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (10%). The most commonly diagnosed tumours by histology were mast cell tumour (26%), soft tissue sarcomas (11%) and melanoma (8%). Both the cytological and histopathological data-sets, showed variation; in patient age distribution, age of onset and incidence of various tumours. Conclusion Comparing our data with previous reports in non-breed-specified dog populations, the Golden retriever breed shows an increased risk for the development of tumours in general, as well as an increased risk for the development of specific tumour types, including the group of soft tissue sarcomas. Variations in age, location and incidence of various tumours were observed between the two data-sets, indicating a selection bias for diagnostic procedure. PMID:24484635

  13. Sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumour: a sinonasal glomus tumour or a haemangiopericytoma?

    PubMed

    Tse, L L Y; Chan, J K C

    2002-06-01

    Sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumour is controversial with regard to its nosologic nature. This study aims to investigate its relationship with glomus tumour and haemangiopericytoma. Six cases of sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumours identified in our files were reviewed for clinicopathological features, and compared with five cases each of soft tissue glomus tumour and meningeal haemangiopericytoma. Immunohistochemical studies for muscle-specific actin, smooth muscle actin, desmin and CD34 were performed. Sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumour demonstrated a uniform histological appearance with bland-looking short, spindly cells forming sheets and short fascicles. The tumour cells were interspersed with slit-like, round and ectatic blood vessels. Actin immunoreactivity was demonstrated in all six cases, although occasionally patchy. The histological appearance and immunohistochemical phenotype of sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumour were very similar to and focally indistinguishable from glomus tumour. Meningeal haemangiopericytoma, in contrast, was characterized by high tumour cellularity, random nuclear orientation, presence of staghorn vasculature and lack of immunohistochemical evidence of myogenic differentiation. We conclude that sinonasal haemangiopericytoma-like tumour is biologically close to or identical to glomus tumour, but is not related to haemangiopericytoma.

  14. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  15. Canine transmissible venereal tumour: a review.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, B; Das, U; Das, A K

    2016-03-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT) is a contagious venereal tumour of dogs, commonly observed in dogs that are in close contact with one another, or in stray and wild dogs that exhibit unrestrained sexual activity. CTVT represents a unique, naturally transmissible, contagious tumour, where the mutated tumour cell itself is the causative agent and perpetuates as a parasitic allograft in the host. Clinical history, signalment and cytological features are often obvious for establishing a diagnosis though biopsy and histological examination may be needed in atypical cases. Most cases are curable with three intravenous injections of vincristine sulphate at weekly intervals. The role of stray and wild dogs makes the disease difficult to control and necessitates sustained animal birth control in stray dogs along with prompt therapy of the affected dogs. This review captures the manifold developments in different areas embracing this fascinating tumour, including its biology, diagnosis and therapeutic alternatives. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular pathology of bone tumours: diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Puls, Florian; Niblett, Angela J; Mangham, D Chas

    2014-03-01

    Alongside histomorphology and immunohistochemistry, molecular pathology is now established as one of the cornerstones in the tissue diagnosis of bone tumours. We describe the principal molecular pathological techniques employed, and each of the bone tumour entities where their identified characteristic molecular pathological changes can be detected to support and confirm the suspected histological diagnosis. Tumours discussed include fibrous dysplasia, classical and subtype osteosarcomas, central and surface cartilaginous tumours, Ewing's sarcoma, vascular tumours, aneurysmal bone cyst, chordoma, myoepithelioma, and angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. This is a rapidly evolving field with discoveries occurring every few months, and some of the newer entities (the Ewing's-like sarcomas), which are principally identified by their molecular pathology characteristics, are discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Feasibility study of stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral lung tumors with a maximum dose of 100 Gy in five fractions and a heterogeneous dose distribution in the planning target volume.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Aoki, Yousuke; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shuichi; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated toxicity and outcomes for patients with peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in a dose-escalation and dose-convergence study. A total of 15 patients were enrolled. SBRT was performed with 60 Gy in 5 fractions (fr.) prescribed to the 60% isodose line of maximum dose, which was 100 Gy in 5 fr., covering the planning target volume (PTV) surface (60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose)) using dynamic conformal multiple arc therapy (DCMAT). The primary endpoint was radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ Grade 2 within 6 months. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Using dose-volumetric analysis, the trial regimen of 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) was compared with our institutional conventional regimen of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose). The enrolled consecutive patients had either a solitary peripheral tumor or two ipsilateral tumors. The median follow-up duration was 22.0 (12.0-27.0) months. After 6 months post-SBRT, the respective number of RP Grade 0, 1 and 2 cases was 5, 9 and 1. In the Grade 2 RP patient, the image showed an organizing pneumonia pattern at 6.0 months post-SBRT. No other toxicity was found. At last follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence of the treated tumors. The target volumes of 60 Gy/ 5 fr. - (60%-isodose) were irradiated with a significantly higher dose than those of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose), while the former dosimetric parameters of normal lung were almost equivalent to the latter. SBRT with 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) using DCMAT allowed the delivery of very high and convergent doses to peripheral lung tumors with feasibility in the acute and subacute phases. Further follow-up is required to assess for late toxicity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  18. A novel pipeline for adrenal tumour segmentation.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Hasan; Ceylan, Rahime; Erdogan, Hasan; Sivri, Mesut

    2018-06-01

    Adrenal tumours occur on adrenal glands surrounded by organs and osteoid. These tumours can be categorized as either functional, non-functional, malign, or benign. Depending on their appearance in the abdomen, adrenal tumours can arise from one adrenal gland (unilateral) or from both adrenal glands (bilateral) and can connect with other organs, including the liver, spleen, pancreas, etc. This connection phenomenon constitutes the most important handicap against adrenal tumour segmentation. Size change, variety of shape, diverse location, and low contrast (similar grey values between the various tissues) are other disadvantages compounding segmentation difficulty. Few studies have considered adrenal tumour segmentation, and no significant improvement has been achieved for unilateral, bilateral, adherent, or noncohesive tumour segmentation. There is also no recognised segmentation pipeline or method for adrenal tumours including different shape, size, or location information. This study proposes an adrenal tumour segmentation (ATUS) pipeline designed to eliminate the above disadvantages for adrenal tumour segmentation. ATUS incorporates a number of image methods, including contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, split and merge based on quadtree decomposition, mean shift segmentation, large grey level eliminator, and region growing. Performance assessment of ATUS was realised on 32 arterial and portal phase computed tomography images using six metrics: dice, jaccard, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and structural similarity index. ATUS achieved remarkable segmentation performance, and was not affected by the discussed handicaps, on particularly adherence to other organs, with success rates of 83.06%, 71.44%, 86.44%, 99.66%, 99.43%, and 98.51% for the metrics, respectively, for images including sufficient contrast uptake. The proposed ATUS system realises detailed adrenal tumour segmentation, and avoids known disadvantages preventing accurate

  19. Transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Feng; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). Methods: In total, 56 patients with bladder tumour were treated by TURD-Bt. The results in these patients were compared with 32 patients treated by current transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR-Bt). Patients with or without disease progressive factors were respectively compared between the 2 groups. The factors included recurrent tumour, multiple tumours, tumour ≥3 cm in diameter, clinical stage T2, histological grade 3, adenocarcinoma, and ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis. Results: Follow-up time was 48.55 ± 23.74 months in TURD-Bt group and 56.28 ± 17.61 months in the TUR-Bt group (p > 0.05). In patients without progressive factors, no tumour recurrence was found and overall survival was 14 (100%) in the TURD-Bt group; 3 (37.50%) patients had recurrence and overall survival was 5 (62.5%) in the TUR-Bt group. In patients with progressive factors, 8 (19.05%) patients had tumour recurrence, overall survival was 32 (76.19%) and cancer death was 3 (7.14%) in TURD-Bt group; 18 (75.00%) patients had tumour recurrence (p < 0.05), overall survival was 12 (50.00%) (p < 0.01) and cancer death was 8 (33.33%) (p < 0.05) in TUR-Bt group. No significant complication was found in TURD-Bt group. Conclusion: This study suggests that complete resection and degeneration of bladder tumour can be expected by TURD-Bt. The surgical procedure is safe and efficacious, and could be predictable and controllable before and during surgery. We would conclude that for bladder cancers without lymph node metastasis and distal metastasis, TURD-Bt could be performed to replace radical TUR-Bt and preserve the bladder. PMID:24475002

  20. Monte Carlo based protocol for cell survival and tumour control probability in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Ye, S J

    1999-02-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the theoretical cell survival probability (nominally, the cell survival fraction) is developed to evaluate preclinical treatment conditions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A treatment condition is characterized by the neutron beam spectra, single or bilateral exposure, and the choice of boron carrier drug (boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boron sulfhydryl hydride (BSH)). The cell survival probability defined from Poisson statistics is expressed with the cell-killing yield, the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction density, and the tolerable neutron fluence. The radiation transport calculation from the neutron source to tumours is carried out using Monte Carlo methods: (i) reactor-based BNCT facility modelling to yield the neutron beam library at an irradiation port; (ii) dosimetry to limit the neutron fluence below a tolerance dose (10.5 Gy-Eq); (iii) calculation of the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction density in tumours. A shallow surface tumour could be effectively treated by single exposure producing an average cell survival probability of 10(-3)-10(-5) for probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs, while a deep tumour will require bilateral exposure to achieve comparable cell kills at depth. With very pure epithermal beams eliminating thermal, low epithermal and fast neutrons, the cell survival can be decreased by factors of 2-10 compared with the unmodified neutron spectrum. A dominant effect of cell-killing yield on tumour cell survival demonstrates the importance of choice of boron carrier drug. However, these calculations do not indicate an unambiguous preference for one drug, due to the large overlap of tumour cell survival in the probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs. The cell survival value averaged over a bulky tumour volume is used to predict the overall BNCT therapeutic efficacy, using a simple model of tumour control probability (TCP).

  1. Comparison of patient-specific internal gross tumor volume for radiation treatment of primary esophageal cancer based separately on three-dimensional and four-dimensional computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Li, J; Zhang, Y; Li, F; Xu, M; Fan, T; Shao, Q; Shang, D

    2014-01-01

    To compare the target volume, position and matching index of the patient-specific internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) based on three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images for primary esophageal cancer. Twenty-nine patients with primary thoracic esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT scans during free breathing. IGTVs were constructed using three approaches: combining the gross target volumes from the 10 respiratory phases of the 4DCT dataset to produce IGTV10 ; IGTV2 was acquired by combining the two extreme phases; and IGTV3D was created from the 3DCT-based gross target volume by enlarging the 95th percentile of motion in each direction measured by the 4DCT. 0.16 cm lateral (LR), 0.14 cm anteroposterior (AP) and 0.29 cm superoinferior (SI) in the upper; 0.18 cm LR, 0.10 cm AP and 0.63 cm SI in the middle; and 0.40 cm LR, 0.58 cm AP and 0.82 cm in the lower thoracic esophagus could account for 95% of respiratory-induced tumor motion. The centroid position shift between IGTV10 and IGTV2 was all below 0.10 cm, and less than 0.20 cm between IGTV10 and IGTV3D . IGTV10 was bigger than IGTV2 ; the mean value of matching index for IGTV2 to IGTV10 was 0.87 ± 0.05, 0.85 ± 0.06 and 0.83 ± 0.05 for upper, middle and distal thoracic esophageal tumors, respectively, and just 0.57 ± 0.11, 0.56 ± 0.13 and 0.40 ± 0.03 between IGTV3D and IGTV10 . 4DCT-based IGTV10 is a reasonable patient-specific IGTV for primary thoracic esophageal cancer, and IGTV2 is considered as an acceptable alternative to IGTV10 . However, it seems unreasonable to use IGTV3D substitute IGTV10 . © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Tumour-induced osteomalacia’

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Javier; Michel Ortega, Rosa; Celzo, Florence; Donthireddy, Vijayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented 2 years before his diagnosis with long-standing muscle cramping, progressive generalised weakness and chronic hip pain. The patient was found to have bilateral femoral neck pathologic fractures therefore, underwent reamed intramedullary nailing of both femurs. Laboratory studies showed hypophosphataemia. Bone marrow biopsy was negative for malignancy. Positron emission tomography demonstrated fludeoxyglucose uptake only in the posterior neck. Bone scan showed innumerable foci of increased activity throughout the skeleton consistent with pseudofractures seen in osteomalacia. Fine needle aspiration from the mass in the neck revealed a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour of mixed connective tissue type. Resection of the mass in the neck resulted in resolution of generalised complaints with no evidence of recurrence with a follow-up of 12 months. PMID:22736784

  3. Management of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Crandon, Alex J

    2004-10-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are known to occur in younger women than invasive cancers and to also have a better prognosis. However, there is also much disagreement about the best approaches to management. At the Queensland Centre for Gynaecological Cancer we have had a particular interest in this disease for some years. Regular reviews of our management have indicated many important guides to management. In our most recent review of 606 cases we have concluded that. Early stage disease can and should be treated conservatively if the patient desires to retain her reproductive function, Treatment should be aimed at leaving no visible disease, Adjuvant therapy does not improve survival, Re-staging laparotomy in clinical Stage 1A patients is not justified as the pick-up is too small, The best prognosis is to be expected in the youngest patients. We will continue to track the progress of these patients in the hope that better management can be offered in the future.

  4. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  5. Blue Cell Tumour at Unusual Site: Retropritoneal Ewings Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Javalgi, Anita P; Karigoudar, Mahesh H; Palur, Katyayani

    2016-04-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour of osseous or non-osseous origin, tremed as extra-skeletal Ewings sarcoma if arising from soft tissue. It is rare occurrence tumor most commonly occurring in paravertebral area, chest wall, head & neck and retroperitoneum. Reporting an interesting case of retroperitoneal Ewing's sarcoma in 39 years old female. Patient had complains of abdominal discomfort & vague pain since 2 months, following weakness in lower limb and loss of weight. On detail history and examination she was further referred to detail pathological and radiological investigations. Haematological profile, renal function test and liver function test were in normal limits. USG abdomen was normal, MRI showed a mass in pelvis retroperitoneum measuring 10x10cms, bilateral ovaries and tubes were normal. Because of retroperitoneal nature of tumor and suspicion of uterine sarcoma, laparotomy was performed. The large retroperitoneal mass adherent to posterior of uterus was excised and send for histopathological diagnosis. On gross and microscopy examination the diagnosis of blue cell tumor with PAS positivity, possibility of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor was made which was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, positive for S100, Vementin and CD99 and negative for desmin and CK. Confirmed diagnosis help in accurate management and improves survival rate.

  6. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Balderson, Michael; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic-based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between tumour infiltrating lymphocytes, histotype and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    James, Fiona R; Jiminez-Linan, Mercedes; Alsop, Jennifer; Mack, Marie; Song, Honglin; Brenton, James D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Ali, H Raza

    2017-09-20

    There is evidence that some ovarian tumours evoke an immune response, which can be assessed by tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). To facilitate adoption of TILs as a clinical biomarker, a standardised method for their H&E visual evaluation has been validated in breast cancer. We sought to investigate the prognostic significance of TILs in a study of 953 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer tumour samples, both primary and metastatic, from 707 patients from the prospective population-based SEARCH study. TILs were analysed using a standardised method based on H&E staining producing a percentage score for stromal and intratumoral compartments. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios of the association between TILs and survival. The extent of stromal and intra-tumoral TILs were correlated in the primary tumours (n = 679, Spearman's rank correlation = 0.60, P < 0.001) with a similar correlation in secondary tumours (n = 224, Spearman's rank correlation = 0.62, P < 0.001). There was a weak correlation between stromal TIL levels in primary and secondary tumour samples (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.29, P < 0.001) and intra-tumoral TIL levels in primary and secondary tumour samples (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.19, P = 0.0094). The extent of stromal TILs differed between histotypes (Pearson chi2 (12d.f.) 54.1, P < 0.0001) with higher levels of stromal infiltration in the high-grade serous and endometriod cases. A significant association was observed for higher intratumoral TIL levels and a favourable prognosis (HR 0.74 95% CI 0.55-1.00 p = 0.047). This study is the largest collection of epithelial ovarian tumour samples evaluated for TILs. We have shown that stromal and intratumoral TIL levels are correlated and that their levels correlate with clinical variables such as tumour histological subtype. We have also shown that increased levels of both intratumoral and stromal TILs are associated with a better prognosis; however, this is

  8. The Utility of the Remnant Kidney Volume/Body Surface Area Ratio and Tumor Diameter as Predictors of Postoperative Degree of Renal Functional Decline in Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma Treated by Radical Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Noriya; Iwamoto, Hideto; Masago, Toshihiko; Morizane, Shuichi; Ono, Koji; Koumi, Tsutomu; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the preoperative factors affecting renal cell carcinoma patients as predictive of post-radical nephrectomy (RN) mild (M-decline) or severe (S-decline) renal functional decline and to elucidate the histopathologic features of the resected normal kidney cortex, as well as the occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in both M-decline and S-decline patients. M-decline and S-decline were categorized as a percentage of postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate decline of <20 and of >40, respectively. The preoperative factors analyzed were patient demographics, comorbidities, and radiographic findings, including remnant kidney status and tumor size. The factors based on postoperative information analyzed were tumor and normal cortex pathology and CVD events. In 175 patient cohort, 21 and 32 cases were categorized as M-decline and S-decline, respectively. Absence of comorbidities, larger remnant kidney volume (RKV)/body surface area (BSA) ratio, and larger tumor diameter were significantly predictive of M-decline, whereas smaller tumor diameter was significantly predictive of S-decline. The global glomerulosclerosis extent in nephrectomized normal cortex of S-decline cases was significantly higher than in other types of cases. No CVD event was observed in M-decline cases. This is the first report to identify the RKV/BSA ratio as a promising predictor of post-RN degree of renal functional decline. Post-RN prevention of life-threatening outcomes according to preoperative and postoperative information, including the degree of post-RN renal functional decline and histopathology of the nephrectomized normal cortex, should be considerable in future urological tasks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Synchronous tumours of the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Gilks, C Blake; Kommoss, Friedrich

    2018-02-01

    Many ovarian endometrioid carcinomas present with concurrent endometrial carcinoma, and these organ-confined, low-grade synchronous endometrial and ovarian tumours consistently behave as independent primary tumours, rather than a single advanced-stage carcinoma; they are associated with a very favourable prognosis and there is no need for adjuvant treatment. This phenomenon of synchronous tumours involving two or more sites within the female reproductive tract is well recognised, occurring in 1-2% of cases. Although some tumours can be recognised as metastasis, in many the relationship between the synchronous tumours is uncertain. Recently, application of next generation sequencing to synchronous endometrial and ovarian carcinomas has shed light on the relationship between these tumours, but raised more questions about the biology of this curious phenomenon. Herein, we review synchronous tumours involving more than one site in the female genital tract, discuss the pathogenesis, and offer guidelines for how to handle in routine practice. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Histopathology of malignant salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Seifert, G

    1992-07-01

    This report is based upon the Salivary Gland Register in Hamburg and on the second revised edition of the WHO Histological Typing of Salivary Gland Tumours. The group of malignant salivary gland tumours contains carcinomas, malignant non-epithelial tumours, malignant lymphomas and secondary tumours. The various carcinomas are classified in a continuous separate listing because the different types are distinguished not only by histopathology, but also by differences in prognosis and treatment. The term "tumour" is replaced by "carcinoma" in two entities: acinic cell carcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma. New entities are: polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, salivary duct carcinoma and malignant myoepithelioma. Carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma can be distinguished as non-invasive and invasive carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma. Malignant non-epithelial tumours are mostly malignant fibrous histiocytoma, malignant schwannoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. The large majority of malignant lymphomas are non-Hodgkin-lymphomas with high differentiation. Many lymphomas are associated with chronic immunosialadenitis (Sjögren's syndrome). Secondary tumours are mostly metastases from primary squamous cell carcinomas or from melanomas of the skin (head and neck area). Haematogeneous metastases are very rare (mainly from lung, kidney or breast).

  11. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  12. Imaging of retinal and choroidal vascular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H; Jmor, F; Damato, B

    2013-01-01

    The most common intraocular vascular tumours are choroidal haemangiomas, vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastomas. Rarer conditions include cavernous retinal angioma and arteriovenous malformations. Options for ablating the tumour include photodynamic therapy, argon laser photocoagulation, trans-scleral diathermy, cryotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents, plaque radiotherapy, and proton beam radiotherapy. Secondary effects are common and include retinal exudates, macular oedema, epiretinal membranes, retinal fibrosis, as well as serous and tractional retinal detachment, which are treated using standard methods (ie, intravitreal anti-angiogenic agents or steroids as well as vitreoretinal procedures, such as epiretinal membrane peeling and release of retinal traction). The detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of vascular tumours and their complications have improved considerably thanks to advances in imaging. These include spectral domain and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and EDI-OCT, respectively), wide-angle photography and angiography as well as wide-angle fundus autofluorescence. Such novel imaging has provided new diagnostic clues and has profoundly influenced therapeutic strategies so that vascular tumours and secondary effects are now treated concurrently instead of sequentially, enhancing any opportunities for conserving vision and the eye. In this review, we describe how SD-OCT, EDI-OCT, autofluorescence, wide-angle photography and wide-angle angiography have facilitated the evaluation of eyes with the more common vascular tumours, that is, choroidal haemangioma, retinal vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastoma. PMID:23196648

  13. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.

  14. TP53 alterations in Wilms tumour represent progression events with strong intratumour heterogeneity that are closely linked but not limited to anaplasia.

    PubMed

    Wegert, Jenny; Vokuhl, Christian; Ziegler, Barbara; Ernestus, Karen; Leuschner, Ivo; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert; Gessler, Manfred

    2017-10-01

    TP53 mutations have been associated with anaplasia in Wilms tumour, which conveys a high risk for relapse and fatal outcome. Nevertheless, TP53 alterations have been reported in no more than 60% of anaplastic tumours, and recent data have suggested their presence in tumours that do not fulfil the criteria for anaplasia, questioning the clinical utility of TP53 analysis. Therefore, we characterized the TP53 status in 84 fatal cases of Wilms tumour, irrespective of histological subtype. We identified TP53 alterations in at least 90% of fatal cases of anaplastic Wilms tumour, and even more when diffuse anaplasia was present, indicating a very strong if not absolute coupling between anaplasia and deregulation of p53 function. Unfortunately, TP53 mutations do not provide additional predictive value in anaplastic tumours since the same mutation rate was found in a cohort of non-fatal anaplastic tumours. When classified according to tumour stage, patients with stage I diffuse anaplastic tumours still had a high chance of survival (87%), but this rate dropped to 26% for stages II-IV. Thus, volume of anaplasia or possible spread may turn out to be critical parameters. Importantly, among non-anaplastic fatal tumours, 26% had TP53 alterations, indicating that TP53 screening may identify additional cases at risk. Several of these non-anaplastic tumours fulfilled some criteria for anaplasia, for example nuclear unrest, suggesting that such partial phenotypes should be under special scrutiny to enhance detection of high-risk tumours via TP53 screening. A major drawback is that these alterations are secondary changes that occur only later in tumour development, leading to striking intratumour heterogeneity that requires multiple biopsies and analysis guided by histological criteria. In conclusion, we found a very close correlation between histological signs of anaplasia and TP53 alterations. The latter may precede development of anaplasia and thereby provide diagnostic value

  15. TP53 alterations in Wilms tumour represent progression events with strong intratumour heterogeneity that are closely linked but not limited to anaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wegert, Jenny; Vokuhl, Christian; Ziegler, Barbara; Ernestus, Karen; Leuschner, Ivo; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Graf, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract TP53 mutations have been associated with anaplasia in Wilms tumour, which conveys a high risk for relapse and fatal outcome. Nevertheless, TP53 alterations have been reported in no more than 60% of anaplastic tumours, and recent data have suggested their presence in tumours that do not fulfil the criteria for anaplasia, questioning the clinical utility of TP53 analysis. Therefore, we characterized the TP53 status in 84 fatal cases of Wilms tumour, irrespective of histological subtype. We identified TP53 alterations in at least 90% of fatal cases of anaplastic Wilms tumour, and even more when diffuse anaplasia was present, indicating a very strong if not absolute coupling between anaplasia and deregulation of p53 function. Unfortunately, TP53 mutations do not provide additional predictive value in anaplastic tumours since the same mutation rate was found in a cohort of non‐fatal anaplastic tumours. When classified according to tumour stage, patients with stage I diffuse anaplastic tumours still had a high chance of survival (87%), but this rate dropped to 26% for stages II–IV. Thus, volume of anaplasia or possible spread may turn out to be critical parameters. Importantly, among non‐anaplastic fatal tumours, 26% had TP53 alterations, indicating that TP53 screening may identify additional cases at risk. Several of these non‐anaplastic tumours fulfilled some criteria for anaplasia, for example nuclear unrest, suggesting that such partial phenotypes should be under special scrutiny to enhance detection of high‐risk tumours via TP53 screening. A major drawback is that these alterations are secondary changes that occur only later in tumour development, leading to striking intratumour heterogeneity that requires multiple biopsies and analysis guided by histological criteria. In conclusion, we found a very close correlation between histological signs of anaplasia and TP53 alterations. The latter may precede development of anaplasia and thereby provide

  16. Tumours of the lower alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    This classification is presented in two parts: (a) tumours of the gastrointestinal tract; and (b) tumours of the anal canal and margin. In the gastrointestinal tract the tumours are classified as adenoma, adenocarcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma, with several subtypes. Most polyps prove to be non-neoplastic, hyperplastic, or regenerative rather than adenomatous. Carcinoma of the stomach occurs mainly in dogs, but is a rare tumour in all parts of the world. Moderately differentiated, tubular adenocarcinoma of the small intestine with excessive fibrosis occurs in all six species; in some geographical locations it may occur frequently in sheep and cattle. The adenoma/carcinoma sequence in the rectum of the dog is similar to that in man but is encountered less often. Carcinoid tumours are very rare in domestic animals. Among the soft tissue tumours, those of smooth muscle and adipose tissue are found fairly frequently and congenital mesothelioma in the peritoneum of calves occurs occasionally. Tumours of the haematopoietic and related tissues are the most common gastrointestinal neoplasms in all species and most belong to the lymphosarcoma group. Tumours of the anal canal and margin are common in the dog and 90% of these are tumours of the hepatoid (perianal) glands. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24 PMID:1086148

  17. From pericytes to perivascular tumours: correlation between pathology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mravic, Marco; Asatrian, Greg; Soo, Chia; Lugassy, Claire; Barnhill, Raymond L; Dry, Sarah M; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W

    2014-09-01

    Pericytes were once thought only to aid in angiogenesis and blood pressure control. Gradually, the known functions of pericytes and other perivascular stem cells (PSC) have broadly increased. The following review article will summarize the known functions and importance of pericytes across disciplines of pathology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. A literature review was performed for studies examining the importance of pericytes in pathology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. The importance of pericytes most prominently includes the identification of the perivascular identity of mesenchymal stem cells (or MSC). Now, pericytes and other PSC are known to display surface markers and multilineage differentiation potential of MSC. Accordingly, interest in the purification and use of PSC for mesenchymal tissue formation and regeneration has increased. Significant demonstration of in vivo efficacy in bone and muscle regeneration has been made in laboratory animals. Contemporaneously with the uncovering of an MSC identity for pericytes, investigators in tumour biology have found biologically relevant roles for pericytes in tumor formation, lymphovascular invasion, and perivascular tumor spread. As well, the contribution of pericytes to perivascular tumors has been examined (and debated), including glomus tumour, myopericytoma and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma. In addition, an expanding recognition of pericyte mimicry and perivascular tumour invasion has occurred, encompassing common malignancies of the brain and skin. In summary, pericytes have a wide range of roles in health and disease. Pericytes are being increasingly studied for their role in tumour formation, growth and invasion. Likewise, the application of pericytes/PSC for mesenchymal tissue engineering is an expanding field of interest.

  18. [Perivascular epithelioid cell tumours in the liver].

    PubMed

    Ellebæk, Signe Bremholm; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Mandi, Bassam; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2015-02-23

    The PEComa family is a group of tumours having perivascular epithelioid cells (PEC) as the predominating component. PEComas occur in various organs and are considered to be benign tumours. However, rare cases showing pleomorphic morphology, atypical mitoses or necrosis should be considered malignant sarcomas. The precise incidence is unknown but PEComas are reported with increasing frequency. Standard treatment is surgery but there are no guidelines on further follow-up or treatment. PEComa in the liver is a rare tumour, and to our knowledge this is the first published case from Denmark.

  19. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: hypoenhancement on arterial phase computed tomography predicts biological aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Worhunsky, David J; Krampitz, Geoffrey W; Poullos, Peter D; Visser, Brendan C; Kunz, Pamela L; Fisher, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Poultsides, George A

    2014-04-01

    Contrary to pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) are commonly hyperenhancing on arterial phase computed tomography (APCT). However, a subset of these tumours can be hypoenhancing. The prognostic significance of the CT appearance of these tumors remains unclear. From 2001 to 2012, 146 patients with well-differentiated PNET underwent surgical resection. The degree of tumour enhancement on APCT was recorded and correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall survival. APCT images were available for re-review in 118 patients (81%). The majority had hyperenhancing tumours (n = 80, 68%), 12 (10%) were isoenhancing (including cases where no mass was visualized) and 26 (22%) were hypoenhancing. Hypoenhancing PNET were larger, more commonly intermediate grade, and had higher rates of lymph node and synchronous liver metastases. Hypoenhancing PNET were also associated with significantly worse overall survival after a resection as opposed to isoenhancing and hyperenhancing tumours (5-year, 54% versus 89% versus 93%). On multivariate analysis of factors available pre-operatively, only hypoenhancement (HR 2.32, P = 0.02) was independently associated with survival. Hypoenhancement on APCT was noted in 22% of well-differentiated PNET and was an independent predictor of poor outcome. This information can inform pre-operative decisions in the multidisciplinary treatment of these neoplasms. © 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  20. Complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor volume is associated with improved survival in recurrent glioblastoma—results from the DIRECTOR trial

    PubMed Central

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Senft, Christian; Hau, Peter; Sabel, Michael C.; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ketter, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Marosi, Christine; Reifenberger, Guido; Wick, Wolfgang; Tonn, Jörg C.; Wirsching, Hans-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of reoperation for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. Prospective studies are lacking. Here, we studied the association of clinical outcome with extent of resection upon surgery for recurrent GBM in the patient cohort of DIRECTOR, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing 2 dose-intensified temozolomide regimens at recurrence of GBM. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected clinical and imaging data from the DIRECTOR cohort (N = 105). Volumetric analysis was performed on gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI as well as fluid attenuated inversion recovery/T2 MRI and correlated with PFS after initial progression (PFS2) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Quality of life was monitored by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires at 8-week intervals. Results Seventy-one patients received surgery at first recurrence. Prognostic factors, including age, MGMT promoter methylation, and Karnofsky performance score, were balanced between patients with and without reoperation. Outcome in patients with versus without surgery at recurrence was similar for PFS2 (2.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, P = .360) and PRS (11.4 mo vs 9.8 mo, P = .633). Among reoperated patients, post-surgery imaging was available in 59 cases. In these patients, complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor (N = 40) versus residual detection of contrast enhancement (N = 19) was associated with improved PRS (12.9 mo [95% CI: 11.5–18.2] vs 6.5 mo [95% CI: 3.6–9.9], P < .001) and better quality of life. Incomplete tumor resection was associated with inferior PRS compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (6.5 vs 9.8 mo, P = .052). Quality of life was similar in these 2 groups. Conclusion Surgery at first recurrence of GBM improves outcome if complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor is achieved. PMID:26823503

  1. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodesmore » by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.« less

  2. [Imflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of nose and paranasal sinuses in a little girl of 7-year-old].

    PubMed

    Lawson, S L A; Azoumah, D K; Lawson-Evi, K; N'Timon, B; Savi de Tove, H-M; Yehouessi-Vignikin, B; Kpemissi, E

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMTs) are clinical and pathological distinct entities with controversial biological entities. IMTs have been described in the lungs, abdomen, retroperitoneum and extremities but rarely in the head and neck region. This case report corresponds to an IMT of the nose and the paranasal sinuses in a little girl of 7 years of age. The computed tomography scan showed an expanding tumoral process without skull destruction. First case report in the west African region, this observation describes the treatment instituted according to the possible care in our medical area, and the treatment when the patient was referred to a centre with efficient technical platform. This case underlines the aggressiveness of this type of tumour: an invasive tumour with local-regional extension and high recurrence potential. Currently, after 2 years, the tumoral process is considered cured after several radical surgical excisions. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A forgotten facial nerve tumour: granular cell tumour of the parotid and its implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Lerut, B; Vosbeck, J; Linder, T E

    2011-04-01

    We present a rare case of a facial nerve granular cell tumour in the right parotid gland, in a 10-year-old boy. A parotid or neurogenic tumour was suspected, based on magnetic resonance imaging. Intra-operatively, strong adhesions to surrounding structures were found, and a midfacial nerve branch had to be sacrificed for complete tumour removal. Recent reports verify that granular cell tumours arise from Schwann cells of peripheral nerve branches. The rarity of this tumour within the parotid gland, its origin from peripheral nerves, its sometimes misleading imaging characteristics, and its rare presentation with facial weakness and pain all have considerable implications on the surgical strategy and pre-operative counselling. Fine needle aspiration cytology may confirm the neurogenic origin of this lesion. When resecting the tumour, the surgeon must anticipate strong adherence to the facial nerve and be prepared to graft, or sacrifice, certain branches of this nerve.

  4. SU-G-JeP3-09: Tumor Location Prediction Using Natural Respiratory Volume for Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT): System Verification Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Jung, J; Yoon, D

    Purpose: Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient’s breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be fully aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. In order to bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a target location prediction system for RGRT that uses only natural respiratory volume, and confirm its application. Methods: In order to verify the proposed target location prediction system, an in-house phantom set was used. This set involves a chest phantom including target, external markers, and motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using themore » random function in MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target takes a linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted target location prediction using random respiratory volume values. Results: The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41%. In addition, the average error rate of target location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. Conclusion: We confirmed the applicability of our proposed target location prediction system for RGRT using natural respiratory volume. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction system can be realized without requiring respiratory pattern training.« less

  5. Assessment of induced rat mammary tumour response to chemotherapy using the apparent diffusion coefficient of tissue water as determined by diffusion-weighted 1H-NMR spectroscopy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, L; Howe, F A; Rodrigues, L M; Griffiths, J R

    1999-03-01

    Chemosensitivity of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced rat mammary tumours treated with 5-fluorouracil at a dose of 100 mg kg(-1) i.p. was assessed by using diffusion-weighted 1H-MRS to measure the average diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water in the tumour tissue. ADC measurements prior to any therapy correlated positively with necrotic fraction. Tumours with low initial ADC (< 0.95 x 10(9) m2 s(-1)) showed an increase in ADC 7 days after treatment, whereas tumours with a high initial ADC (> 1.2 x 10(9) m2 s(-1)) showed a decrease. All tumours decreased significantly in volume (P < 0.05) 2, 5 and 7 days after treatment. At day 7 post-treatment, tumours with a high pre-treatment ADC started to regrow. The initial ADC value, as well as changes after treatment predict tumour chemosensitivity, which could be clinically relevant.

  6. A novel recombinant anti-epidermal growth factor receptor peptide vaccine capable of active immunization and reduction of tumor volume in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Rasaee, Mohamad Javad; RajabiBazl, Masoumeh; Khosravani, Masood; Motaghinejad, Majid; Javanmardi, Masoud; Khalili, Saeed; Modjtahedi, Helmout; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-12-01

    Over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported in a number of human malignancies. Strong expression of this receptor has been associated with poor survival in many such patients. Active immunizations that elicit antibodies of the desired type could be an appealing alternative to conventional passive immunization. In this regard, a novel recombinant peptide vaccine capable of prophylactic and therapeutic effects was constructed. A novel fusion recombinant peptide base vaccine consisting of L2 domain of murine extra-cellular domain-EGFR and EGFR mimotope (EM-L2) was constructed and its prophylactic and therapeutic effects in a Lewis lung carcinoma mouse (C57/BL6) model evaluated. Constructed recombinant peptide vaccine is capable of reacting with anti-EGFR antibodies. Immunization of mice with EM-L2 peptide resulted in antibody production against EM-L2. The constructed recombinant peptide vaccine reduced tumor growth and increased the survival rate. Designing effective peptide vaccines could be an encouraging strategy in contemporary cancer immunotherapy. Investigating the efficacy of such cancer immunotherapy approaches may open exciting possibilities concerning hyperimmunization, leading to more promising effects on tumor regression and proliferation. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney: radiologic-pathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Chea, Y W; Agrawal, Rashi; Poh, Angeline C C

    2008-06-01

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney is a rare malignancy. We report the computed tomographic features and the histopathological correlation of such a tumour occurring in a middle-aged man. Although the radiological appearance has significant overlap with other renal tumours, this tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of a large renal mass in younger patients.

  8. Ovarian yolk sac tumour in a girl - case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Charu; Shah, Hemanshi; Sisodiya Shenoy, Neha; Makhija, Deepa; Waghmare, Mukta

    2017-01-01

    Yolk sac tumours are rare ovarian malignancies accounting for less than 1% of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours. They are mostly seen in adolescents and young women and are usually unilateral making fertility preservation imperative. Raised alpha-feto protein level is the hallmark of this tumour. We describe stage III yolk sac tumour in a girl child.

  9. Pancreatic pseudopapillary tumour: A rare misdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    Affirul, C.A.; Qisti, F.N.; Zamri, Z.; Azlanuddin, A.; Hairol, A.O.; Razman, J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Solid pseudo papillary pancreatic tumour is a rare entity. The atypical presentation causes a delayed or misdiagnosis of these pathology. It commonly affects the female population in the 2nd and 3rd decade of life. The presentation varies from non-specific abdominal pain to incidental findings in asymptomatic patients. It is a low-grade premalignant condition that is curable by excision of the tumour. PRESENTATION OF CASE This paper presents a 17-year-old girl with intra-abdominal mass diagnosed with solid pseudo papillary tumour that underwent Whipple's procedure. DISCUSSION We discuss the presentations, diagnosis and pathology findings of this rare pathology. CONCLUSION The diagnosis remains an enigma in view of the nature and location of the tumour. Resection is still the best choice remains for this condition. PMID:25462046

  10. Pancreatic pseudopapillary tumour: A rare misdiagnosed entity.

    PubMed

    Affirul, C A; Qisti, F N; Zamri, Z; Azlanuddin, A; Hairol, A O; Razman, J

    2014-01-01

    Solid pseudo papillary pancreatic tumour is a rare entity. The atypical presentation causes a delayed or misdiagnosis of these pathology. It commonly affects the female population in the 2nd and 3rd decade of life. The presentation varies from non-specific abdominal pain to incidental findings in asymptomatic patients. It is a low-grade premalignant condition that is curable by excision of the tumour. This paper presents a 17-year-old girl with intra-abdominal mass diagnosed with solid pseudo papillary tumour that underwent Whipple's procedure. We discuss the presentations, diagnosis and pathology findings of this rare pathology. The diagnosis remains an enigma in view of the nature and location of the tumour. Resection is still the best choice remains for this condition. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Systemic Effects of Non-Endocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James D.; Rona, George

    1964-01-01

    Tumours of non-endocrine origin may exert deleterious effects by elaborating active principles which disturb body regulation. Systemic manifestations are fairly common with neoplasms of the lung, kidney, gastro-intestinal tract and thymus. The secretion of these tumours may have a known chemical structure (serotonin), may present hormone-like action (parathormone, antidiuretic hormone, insulinoid), or have well-defined biological properties (erythropoietin, gastrin-like principle). Tumours may stimulate endocrine glands by an unknown mechanism, producing disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, hypercalcemia, gynecomastia and hypoglycemia. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune diseases. Tumours may extensively utilize or excrete some metabolite (glucose) or electrolyte (Na or K). Awareness of the systemic effects of various neoplasms may lead to an early diagnosis and proper treatment of these manifestations. PMID:14204555

  12. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-03-04

    The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α₉ integrin was determined. o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α₉ integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α₉ binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α₉ integrin are likely involved.

  13. An innovative iterative thresholding algorithm for tumour segmentation and volumetric quantification on SPECT images: Monte Carlo-based methodology and validation.

    PubMed

    Pacilio, M; Basile, C; Shcherbinin, S; Caselli, F; Ventroni, G; Aragno, D; Mango, L; Santini, E

    2011-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging play an important role in the segmentation of functioning parts of organs or tumours, but an accurate and reproducible delineation is still a challenging task. In this work, an innovative iterative thresholding method for tumour segmentation has been proposed and implemented for a SPECT system. This method, which is based on experimental threshold-volume calibrations, implements also the recovery coefficients (RC) of the imaging system, so it has been called recovering iterative thresholding method (RIThM). The possibility to employ Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for system calibration was also investigated. The RIThM is an iterative algorithm coded using MATLAB: after an initial rough estimate of the volume of interest, the following calculations are repeated: (i) the corresponding source-to-background ratio (SBR) is measured and corrected by means of the RC curve; (ii) the threshold corresponding to the amended SBR value and the volume estimate is then found using threshold-volume data; (iii) new volume estimate is obtained by image thresholding. The process goes on until convergence. The RIThM was implemented for an Infinia Hawkeye 4 (GE Healthcare) SPECT/CT system, using a Jaszczak phantom and several test objects. Two MC codes were tested to simulate the calibration images: SIMIND and SimSet. For validation, test images consisting of hot spheres and some anatomical structures of the Zubal head phantom were simulated with SIMIND code. Additional test objects (flasks and vials) were also imaged experimentally. Finally, the RIThM was applied to evaluate three cases of brain metastases and two cases of high grade gliomas. Comparing experimental thresholds and those obtained by MC simulations, a maximum difference of about 4% was found, within the errors (+/- 2% and +/- 5%, for volumes > or = 5 ml or < 5 ml, respectively). Also for the RC data, the comparison showed

  14. Multiscale modelling and nonlinear simulation of vascular tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present a new multiscale mathematical model for solid tumour growth which couples an improved model of tumour invasion with a model of tumour-induced angiogenesis. We perform nonlinear simulations of the multi-scale model that demonstrate the importance of the coupling between the development and remodeling of the vascular network, the blood flow through the network and the tumour progression. Consistent with clinical observations, the hydrostatic stress generated by tumour cell proliferation shuts down large portions of the vascular network dramatically affecting the flow, the subsequent network remodeling, the delivery of nutrients to the tumour and the subsequent tumour progression. In addition, extracellular matrix degradation by tumour cells is seen to have a dramatic affect on both the development of the vascular network and the growth response of the tumour. In particular, the newly developing vessels tend to encapsulate, rather than penetrate, the tumour and are thus less effective in delivering nutrients. PMID:18781303

  15. In vivo detection of small tumour lesions by multi-pinhole SPECT applying a 99mTc-labelled nanobody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Krüwel, Thomas; Nevoltris, Damien; Bode, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Alves, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumours in an early phase of tumour development in combination with the knowledge of expression of tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important prerequisite for clinical decisions. In this study we applied the anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10 for visualizing small tumour lesions with volumes below 100 mm3 by targeting EGFR in orthotopic human mammary MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and subcutaneous human epidermoid A431 carcinoma mouse models. Use of nanobody 99mTc-D10 of a size as small as 15.5 kDa enables detection of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging already 45 min post intravenous administration with high tumour uptake (>3% ID/g) in small MDA-MB-468 and A431 tumours, with tumour volumes of 52.5 mm3 ± 21.2 and 26.6 mm3 ± 16.7, respectively. Fast blood clearance with a serum half-life of 4.9 min resulted in high in vivo contrast and ex vivo tumour to blood and tissue ratios. In contrast, no accumulation of 99mTc-D10 in MDA-MB-231 tumours characterized by a very low expression of EGFR was observed. Here we present specific and high contrast in vivo visualization of small human tumours overexpressing EGFR by preclinical multi-pinhole SPECT shortly after administration of anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10. PMID:26912069

  16. Challenges in surgical pathology of adrenocortical tumours.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Lori A

    2018-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas are rare tumours that can be diagnostically challenging. Numerous multiparametric scoring systems and diagnostic algorithms have been proposed to differentiate adrenocortical adenoma from adrenocortical carcinoma. Adrenocortical neoplasms must also be differentiated from other primary adrenal tumours, such as phaeochromocytoma and unusual primary adrenal tumours, as well as metastases to the adrenal gland. Myxoid, oncocytic and sarcomatoid variants of adrenocortical tumours must be recognized so that they are not confused with other tumours. The diagnostic criteria for oncocytic adrenocortical carcinoma are different from those for conventional adrenocortical carcinomas. Adrenocortical neoplasms in children are particularly challenging to diagnose, as histological features of malignancy in adrenocortical neoplasms in adults may not be associated with aggressive disease in the tumours of children. Recent histological and immunohistochemical studies and more comprehensive and integrated genomic characterizations continue to advance our understanding of the tumorigenesis of these aggressive neoplasms, and may provide additional diagnostic and prognostic utility and guide the development of therapeutic targets. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Soft Tissue Tumours of the Retroperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Van Roggen, J. Frans Graadt

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. This review summarizes the more prevalent soft tissue tumours arising in the retroperitoneum and highlights some recent fundamental and diagnostic developments relevant to mesenchymal tumours. Discussion. The retroperitoneum is an underestimated site for benign and malignant neoplastic disease, and represents the second most common site of origin of primary malignant soft tissue tumours (sarcomas) after the deep tissues of the lower extremity. In contrast to the predominance of benign soft tissue lesions over malignant sarcomas elsewhere, retroperitoneal mesenchymal lesions are far more likely to be malignant. The differential diagnosis is primarily with the more common lymphoproliferative and parenchymatous epithelial lesions arising in this area, and with metastatic disease from known or unknown primary sites elsewhere.The most prevalent mesenchymal tumours at this site are of a lipomatous, myogenic or neural nature.Their generally late clinical presentation and poorly accessible location provides numerous clinical challenges; optimal radiological imaging and a properly performed biopsy are essential cogs in the management route. Histopathological diagnosis may be complicated, but has been aided by developments in the fields of immunohistochemistry and tumour (cyto)genetics. Despite significant advances in oncological management protocols, the prognosis remains generally less favourable than for similar tumours at more accessible sites. PMID:18521430

  18. Odontogenic tumours: A review of 266 cases.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Ahmed O; Adisa, Akinyele O; Olusanya, Adeola A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumours at a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, as well as to study the various histologic types based on WHO 2005 classification and to compare results from this study with those of previous studies. The records of the Oral Pathology Department of University College Hospital were reviewed. Lesions diagnosed as odontogenic tumours were categorized into four groups based on WHO 2005 classification and were analyzed for age, sex and site using SPSS for Window (version 18.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL) and frequency tables were generated. Two hundred and sixty six (41.7%) cases of odontogenic tumours were seen. The mean age of occurrence was 32.6 (±15.815) years (range3-82 years) and peak age was in the third decade of life. Eleven (4.1%) malignant odontogenic tumours were seen. Ameloblastoma with 65.4% of cases was the most common odontogenic tumour followed by fibromyxoma (14.7%), no case of odontoma was seen in this series. The findings were mostly similar to those of African and Asian series and showed variations from reports from the Americas. The reason for the disparity in African and American series needs further investigations. Key words:Odontogenic tumour, classification, Nigeria.

  19. Renal and adrenal tumours in children

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of renal and supra-renal masses firstly depends on the age of the child. Neuroblastoma (NBL) may be seen antenatally or in the newborn period; this tumour has a good prognosis unlike NBL seen in older children (particularly NBL in those aged 2–4 years). Benign renal masses predominate in early infancy but beyond the first year of life Wilms' tumour is the most common renal malignancy, until adolescence when renal cell carcinoma has similar or increased frequency as children get older. Adrenal adenomas and carcinomas also occur in childhood; these tumours are indistinguishable on imaging but criteria for the diagnosis of adrenal carcinoma include size larger than 5 cm, a tendency to invade the inferior vena cava and to metastasise. The most topical dilemmas in the radiological assessment of renal and adrenal tumours are presented. Topics covered include a proposed revision to the staging of NBL, the problems inherent in distinguishing nephrogenic rests from Wilms' tumour and the current recently altered approach regarding small lung nodules in children with Wilms' tumour. PMID:17339140

  20. Potential values of metabolic tumor volume and heterogeneity measured with ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT pretreatment to evaluate local control for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma treated with nonsurgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Fu, Xiao-Long; Yu, Wen; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Zhang, Ying-Jian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictive value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT) pretreatment on local control (LC) and survival after radical radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and to discuss its potential value for establishing optimal radiation treatment plans. Fifty-eight patients with pathologically proven esophageal SCC who underwent ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT pretreatment in our center were retrospectively reviewed. We examined the correlation between the PET parameters of primary tumors and LC and overall survival. The coefficient of variation was used to estimate the ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in heterogeneity. The mean duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 38 months, and 36 patients died because of tumor recurrence or other diseases. The rates of 3-year overall survival and LC were 40.4 and 50.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis of LC revealed that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) greater than 16.08 ml was the only predictor of outcome, with a lower 3-year LC (P=0.017, hazard ratio: 1.608, 95% confidence interval: 1.090-2.371). The coefficient of variations of their primary lesion were higher compared with those of patients who had smaller MTVs. In this study, MTV assessed by PET/CT might be an adverse factor for predicting LC in esophageal SCC. For those with higher MTVs, higher intratumor heterogeneity suggests that irradiation may need to be boosted in stable high-uptake regions to improve LC. These results need to be prospectively validated in larger cohorts.

  1. Mechanisms and biomaterials in pH-responsive tumour targeted drug delivery: A review.

    PubMed

    Kanamala, Manju; Wilson, William R; Yang, Mimi; Palmer, Brian D; Wu, Zimei

    2016-04-01

    As the mainstay in the treatment of various cancers, chemotherapy plays a vital role, but still faces many challenges, such as poor tumour selectivity and multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology has provided a new strategy for addressing the limitations of the conventional chemotherapy. In the last decade, the volume of research published in this area has increased tremendously, especially with functional nano drug delivery systems (nanocarriers). Coupling a specific stimuli-triggered drug release mechanism with these delivery systems is one of the most prevalent approaches for improving therapeutic outcomes. Among the various stimuli, pH triggered delivery is regarded as the most general strategy, targeting the acidic extracellular microenvironment and intracellular organelles of solid tumours. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of pH-sensitive nanocarriers for tumour-targeted drug delivery. The review focuses on the chemical design of pH-sensitive biomaterials, which are used to fabricate nanocarriers for extracellular and/or intracellular tumour site-specific drug release. The pH-responsive biomaterials bring forth conformational changes in these nanocarriers through various mechanisms such as protonation, charge reversal or cleavage of a chemical bond, facilitating tumour specific cell uptake or drug release. A greater understanding of these mechanisms will help to design more efficient drug delivery systems to address the challenges encountered in conventional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aspiration cytology of extramammary tumours metastatic to the breast.

    PubMed

    Handa, Uma; Chhabra, Seema; Mohan, Harsh

    2007-10-01

    This study was undertaken to highlight the use of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) to distinguish tumours metastatic to the breast from primary breast malignancies. A total of 1866 fine needle aspirates of the breast were performed during a period of 7 years. Three hundred and fourteen cases of breast malignancies were diagnosed and 5 (1.5%) out of these cases were metastatic in origin. The metastatic tumors included, 2 cases of malignant melanoma (chest wall and left arm), 1 case each of haematolymphoid malignancy, adenocarcinoma of the ovary, and squamous cell carcinoma (left leg). FNA diagnosis of metastasis to the breast is essential in order to avoid unnecessary mastectomy and to ensure appropriate chemotherapy and/or irradiation treatment.

  3. Incidence of Diabetes Insipidus in Postoperative Period among the Patients Undergoing Pituitary Tumour Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kadir, M L; Islam, M T; Hossain, M M; Sultana, S; Nasrin, R; Hossain, M M

    2017-07-01

    Post operative complications after pituitary tumour surgery vary according to procedure. There are several surgical procedures being done such as transcranial, transsphenoidal microsurgical and transsphenoidal endoscopic approaches. One of the commonest complications is diabetes insipidus (DI). Our main objective was to find out the incidence of diabetes insipidus in post operative period among patients undergoing surgical intervention for pituitary tumour in our institute. The presence of diabetes insipidus in the postoperative period was established by measuring serum Na+ concentration, hourly urine output and urinary specific gravity to find out the incidence of diabetes insipidus in postoperative period in relation to age, gender, tumour diameter, function of tumour (i.e., either hormone secreting or not) and operative procedure used for surgical resection of pituitary tumor. As it is the most common postoperative complication so, in this study we tried to find out how many of the patients develop diabetes insipidus in postoperative period following surgical resection of pituitary tumour. This cross sectional type of observational study was carried out in the department of Neurosurgery, BSMMU from May 2014 to October 2015 on 33 consecutive patients who underwent surgical intervention for pituitary tumour for the first time. Data was collected by using a data collection sheet. The incidence of diabetes insipidus was found 23.1% of patients in <30 year age group, 38.5% of patients in 31-40 year age group and 38.5% of patients in ≥40 year age group (p=0.764). In case of distribution of patients according to gender 38.5% of male and 61.5% of female developed diabetes insipidus (p=0.073). Regarding tumour size 30.8% and 69.2% of patients developed diabetes insipidus having tumour diameter <30mm and ≥30mm respectively (p=0.590). In case of operative procedure 69.2% of patients developed diabetes insipidus who was operated by transsphenoidal endoscopic approach

  4. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3more » mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.« less

  5. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet <10 cm3 prior to RT, DSS did not reach the median, the mean is 82.1±6.1 months, while in cases with GTVpet 10-40 cm3 the median of the DSS was 28.8±4.9 months (HR = 3.57; 95% CI: 1.5-8.3), and in those with GTVpet >40

  6. Tumours and dysplasias of the mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J. F.; Misdorp, W.

    1974-01-01

    As mammary tumours occur frequently in the dog and cat but rarely in other domestic animals, only the tumours of these two species are classified. The epithelial tumours are termed “complex” when they consist of cells resembling both secretory and myoepithelial cells: these tumours are biologically less malignant than tumours of the “simple” type in which only one of these kinds of cell is present. The carcinomas are subdivided into adenocarcinoma, solid carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and mucinous carcinoma. The term “carcinosarcoma or malignant mixed tumour” was used only when there were cells morphologically resembling not only one or both of the epithelial components but also connective tissue cells with their products of differentiation. The benign tumours are classed as adenoma, papilloma, fibroadenoma, or benign soft tissue tumour. The dysplasias are described under the following headings: cyst, adenosis, regular typical epithelial proliferation in ducts and lobules (epitheliosis), duct ectasia, fibrosclerosis, and lobular hyperplasia. ImagesFig. 41Fig. 42Fig. 43Fig. 44Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 45Fig. 46Fig. 47Fig. 48Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36 PMID:4371737

  7. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p < 0.05, one-way analysis of variance). The probabilities of a surgeon obtaining a 10 mm surgical margin with a 3 mm tolerance were 90.2% in AR-assisted resections, and 70.7% in conventional resections. Conclusion We demonstrated that the accuracy of tumour resection was satisfactory with the help of the AR navigation system, with the tumour shown as a virtual template. In addition, this concept made the navigation system simple and available without additional cost or time. Cite this article: H. S. Cho, Y. K. Park, S. Gupta, C. Yoon, I. Han, H-S. Kim, H. Choi, J. Hong. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  8. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, L.; Bezak, E.; Olver, I.; van Doorn, T.

    2005-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure.

  9. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones in your body. This can cause endocrine diseases such as Cushing's syndrome and hyperthyroidism. Symptoms of pituitary tumors include Headaches Vision problems Nausea and vomiting Problems caused ... the tumor. Other options include medicines, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

  10. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  11. CD34 + tumours of the orbit including solitary fibrous tumours: a six-case series.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su Kyung; Paik, Ji Sun; Park, Gyeong Sin; Yang, Suk-Woo

    2017-04-27

    To report six cases of CD34+ fibroblastic mesenchymal tumours, which are uncommon neoplasms in the orbit. Six patients presenting with proptosis and palpable mass who were later diagnosed with fibrous solitary tumours, fibrous histocytoma or haemangiopericytoma in the orbit were included. All patients received radiologic examinations and surgical excision for histopathology and immunohistochemistry examinations. Five patients had no recurrence after a minimum follow-up of 12 months. One patient (case 6) experienced recurrence twice, and had debulking surgeries each time. At present, the patient still has remnant tumour in the orbit, but no growth has been detected during the past two years. The tumour size will be closely monitored. Even though fibroblastic tumours are rarely found in the orbit, they can present as a palpable mass with proptosis. Complete surgical excision is important for long-term prognosis, and immunohistochemical study is helpful for confirming pathologic diagnosis.

  12. Ciliated muconodular papillary tumour of the lung: a newly defined low-grade malignant tumour.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shuichi; Koike, Teruaki; Homma, Keiichi; Yokoyama, Akira

    2010-11-01

    We present two cases of ciliated muconodular papillary tumour (CMPT) in this report. CMPT is a newly defined low-grade malignant tumour with ciliated columnar epithelial cells, occurring in the peripheral lung. Both patients underwent pulmonary resection due to an enlarged solitary pulmonary nodule. Pathological findings in both cases confirmed a papillary tumour with a mixture of ciliated columnar and goblet cells. The tumours were rich in mucous and had spread along the alveolar walls, as observed in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Nuclear atypia was mild, and no mitotic activity was observed. Immunohistochemically, tumour cells stained positive for carcinoembryonic antigen, thyroid transcription factor-1 and cytokeratin 7 but not for cytokeratin 20. The immunohistochemical staining patterns were almost identical to those of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. We definitively diagnosed as CMPT. Both patients remained relapse-free.

  13. Mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) and human breast cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation.

    PubMed

    Js, Lawson; Cc, Ngan; Wk, Glenn; Dd, Tran

    2017-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTVs) may have a role in a subset of human breast cancers. MMTV positive human breast cancers have similar histological characteristics to neuroendocrine breast cancers and to MMTV positive mouse mammary tumours. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of neuroendocrine biomarkers - synaptophysin and chromogranin, to determine if these histological characteristics and biomarker expression were due to the influences of MMTV. Immunohistochemistry analyses to identify synaptophysin and chromogranin were conducted on a series of human breast cancers in which (i) MMTV had been previously identified and had similar histological characteristics to MMTV positive mouse mammary tumours and (ii) MMTV positive mouse mammary tumours. The expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin in MMTV positive mouse mammary tumors were all positive (7 of 7 specimens - 100% positive). The expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin in MMTV positive human breast cancers was much less prevalent (3 of 22 - 14%). There was no expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin in the normal breast tissue control specimens. It is not possible to draw any firm conclusions from these observations. However, despite the small numbers of MMTV positive mouse mammary tumours in this study, the universal expression in these specimens of synaptophysin and chromogranin proteins is striking. This pattern of synaptophysin and chromogranin expression is very different from their expression in MMTV positive human breast cancers. The reason for these differences is not known. The high prevalence of positive expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin in MMTV positive mouse mammary tumours and low expression of synaptophysin and chromogranin in MMTV positive human breast cancers indicates that MMTV is not usually associated with neuroendocrine human breast cancers.

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: Correlation of apparent diffusion coefficient or WHO classification with recurrence-free survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mimi; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kwon, Wooil; Ha, Sang Yun; Ji, Sang A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the correlation between grade of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) based on the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and to assess whether the ADC value and WHO classification can predict recurrence-free survival (RFS) after surgery for pNETs. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The requirement for informed consent was waived. Between March 2009 and November 2014, forty-nine patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with diffusion-weighted image and subsequent surgery for single pNETs were included. Correlations among qualitative MR imaging findings, quantitative ADC values, and WHO classifications were assessed. An ordered logistic regression test was used to control for tumour size as a confounding factor. The association between ADC value (or WHO classification) and RFS was analysed. All tumors (n=49) were classified as low- (n=29, grade 1), intermediate- (n=17, grade 2), and high-grade (n=3, grade 3), respectively. The mean ADC of pNETs was moderately negatively correlated with WHO classification before and after adjustment for tumour size (ρ=-0.64, p<0.001 and ρ=-0.55, p=0.001 respectively). RFS was significantly associated with WHO classification (p=0.007), but not with the ADC value (p=0.569). The ADC value of pNETs is moderately correlated with WHO tumour grade, regardless of tumour size. However, the WHO tumour classification of pNET may be more suitable for predicting RFS than the ADC value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  17. Naturally occurring tumours in the basal metazoan Hydra.

    PubMed

    Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klimovich, Alexander; Anokhin, Boris; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Hamm, Mailin J; Lange, Christina; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2014-06-24

    The molecular nature of tumours is well studied in vertebrates, although their evolutionary origin remains unknown. In particular, there is no evidence for naturally occurring tumours in pre-bilaterian animals, such as sponges and cnidarians. This is somewhat surprising given that recent computational studies have predicted that most metazoans might be prone to develop tumours. Here we provide first evidence for naturally occurring tumours in two species of Hydra. Histological, cellular and molecular data reveal that these tumours are transplantable and might originate by differentiation arrest of female gametes. Growth of tumour cells is independent from the cellular environment. Tumour-bearing polyps have significantly reduced fitness. In addition, Hydra tumours show a greatly altered transcriptome that mimics expression shifts in vertebrate cancers. Therefore, this study shows that spontaneous tumours have deep evolutionary roots and that early branching animals may be informative in revealing the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis.

  18. Phylogenetic Quantification of Intra-tumour Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland F.; Trinh, Anne; Sipos, Botond; Brenton, James D.; Goldman, Nick; Markowetz, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity is the result of ongoing evolutionary change within each cancer. The expansion of genetically distinct sub-clonal populations may explain the emergence of drug resistance, and if so, would have prognostic and predictive utility. However, methods for objectively quantifying tumour heterogeneity have been missing and are particularly difficult to establish in cancers where predominant copy number variation prevents accurate phylogenetic reconstruction owing to horizontal dependencies caused by long and cascading genomic rearrangements. To address these challenges, we present MEDICC, a method for phylogenetic reconstruction and heterogeneity quantification based on a Minimum Event Distance for Intra-tumour Copy-number Comparisons. Using a transducer-based pairwise comparison function, we determine optimal phasing of major and minor alleles, as well as evolutionary distances between samples, and are able to reconstruct ancestral genomes. Rigorous simulations and an extensive clinical study show the power of our method, which outperforms state-of-the-art competitors in reconstruction accuracy, and additionally allows unbiased numerical quantification of tumour heterogeneity. Accurate quantification and evolutionary inference are essential to understand the functional consequences of tumour heterogeneity. The MEDICC algorithms are independent of the experimental techniques used and are applicable to both next-generation sequencing and array CGH data. PMID:24743184

  19. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sympathetic Chain Schwannoma Resembling Carotid Body Tumour.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Tallat; Khan, Musaddiq

    2016-06-01

    Schwannomas are rare, benign nerve sheath tumours of parapharyngeal space. Differential diagnosis should include salivary gland tumours, paragangliomas, neurofibromas, and metastatic lymph nodes. The tumours may arise from vagus nerve and cervical sympathetic chain (CSC). Diagnosis is usually made by imaging techniques: contrast CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is useful diagnostic procedure but poor results are seen in neurogenic tumours. Rarely, a vascular CSC schwannoma at the level of carotid arteries bifurcation may mimic carotid body tumour (CBT) on imaging techniques, especially if they are vascular, causing splaying of internal and external carotid arteries. Clinically patient was asymptomatic except for a pulsatile swelling in neck for 5 years. The presented case resembled CBTclinically, on ultrasound and on imaging techniques causing splaying of carotid arteries. FNAC was inconclusive and was always hemorrhagic. During operation, it was found to be CSC schwannoma just posterior to carotid body. CSC was sacrificed and patient developed Horner syndrome postoperatively.

  1. [Surgical Management of Peritoneal Surface Malignancy with Respect to Tumour Type, Tumour Stage and Individual Tumour Biology].

    PubMed

    Beckert, S; Struller, F; Grischke, E-M; Glatzle, J; Zieker, D; Königsrainer, A; Königsrainer, I

    2016-08-01

    Peritoneal tumour dissemination is still considered as a terminal disease. For the last two decades, cytoreductive surgery (CRS) combined with intraoperative hyperthermic chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been popularised by Paul Sugarbaker almost doubling survival in selected patients compared with systemic chemotherapy alone. Nowadays, this particular treatment protocol is available in comprehensive cancer centres with reasonable mortality and morbidity. However, patient selection is still challenging. In general, CRS and HIPEC is indicated in primary peritoneal tumours such as mesothelioma and pseudomyxoma peritonei as well as in peritoneal metastases derived from gastrointestinal malignancies and ovarian cancers. Since systemic tumour spread is uncommon in patients with peritoneal metastases, peritoneal tumour dissemination was defined as localised disease within the "compartment abdomen". However, CRS and HIPEC are only beneficial as long as complete cytoreduction is achieved (CC-0 or CC-1). Histopathological parameters, the Sugarbaker peritoneal carcinomatosis index (PCI) and general condition of the patient have been established as patient selection criteria. In primary peritoneal cancers, individual tumour biology is the predominant criterium for patient selection as opposed to intraabdominal tumour load in peritoneal metastases derived from gastrointestinal cancers. In gastric cancer, CRS and HIPEC should be restricted to synchronous limited disease because of its biological aggressiveness. In patients with free floating cancer cells without macroscopic signs of peritoneal spread, however, CRS and HIPEC following preoperative "neoadjuvant" chemotherapy preserves chances for cure. So far, there is no general recommendation for CRS and HIPEC by clinical practice guidelines. In the recent S3 guideline for treatment of colorectal cancer, however, CRS and HIPEC have been included as possible treatment options. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. [Values and limits in fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of Warthin tumour of the parotid gland].

    PubMed

    Righi, A; Foschini, M P

    2006-12-01

    Recent paper state that cytological diagnosis of Warthin Tumour of the parotid gland is poorly reproducible and that aspiration procedures damage the tumoral tissue as to make difficult the histological diagnosis. Aim of the present study is to review cytological sampling performed with fine needle sampling without aspiration and to compare them with the relative surgical specimens in order to determine the value of fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of Warthin Tumour and to quantify' the damage in histological tissue. All cases with cytological and/or histological diagnosis of Warthin Tumour during the period 1/1/98 to 30/6/04 were retrieved. In all cases both cytological and histological slides were reviewed and compared. In all cases fine needle aspiration (FNA) was performed according to the technique described by Zajdela et al. in 1987. A cytologic sample was considered diagnostic when there were in the same sample mucoid substance, lymphocytes scattered with a range of maturation and oncocytes organized in flat sheets of cells. 38 cases were selected corresponding to 37 patients (1 case of Warthin Tumour bilateral): all tumors were localized in the parotid gland. Fine needle sampling were 43. Nine cytological sample (20.9%) were inadequate. Sensitivity and specificity, in the preent series, had the same value, being 97.1%. A spectrum of histologic alterations were observed in 30/38 cases (79%). These alterations were squamous metaplasia (7 cases), acute and chronic hemorrhage and inflammation with multinucleated giant cells (26 cases) and granulation tissue with subsequent fibrosis (24 cases). In all cases the histologic alterations from fine needle were focal, limited to less than 20% of the tumoral area (first category of Batsakis 'classification), and did not prevent the histologic diagnosis of Warthin Tumour. These data suggest that fine needle aspiration without aspiration is a valuable tool for the per-operative diagnosis of Warthin Tumour. In

  3. Vasculogenic Mimicry of HT1080 Tumour Cells In Vivo: Critical Role of HIF-1α-Neuropilin-1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Roli M.; Bajaj, Manmohan S.; Kale, Vaijayanti P.

    2012-01-01

    HT1080 - a human fibrosarcoma-derived cell line – forms aggressive angiogenic tumours in immuno-compromised mice. In spite of its extensive use as a model of tumour angiogenesis, the molecular event(s) initiating the angiogenic program in these cells are not known. Since hypoxia stimulates tumour angiogenesis, we examined the hypoxia-induced events evoked in these cells. In contrast to cells grown under normoxic conditions, hypoxia-primed (1% O2) HT1080 cells formed robust tubules on growth factor-reduced matrigel and formed significantly larger tumours in xenograft models in a chetomin-sensitive manner, indicating the role of HIF-1α-mediated transcription in these processes. Immuno-histochemical analyses of tumours formed by GFP-expressing HT1080 cells clearly showed that the tumour cells themselves expressed various angiogenic markers including Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) and formed functional vessels containing red blood cells, thereby unambiguously demonstrating the vasculogenic mimicry of HT1080 cells in vivo. Experiments performed with the HT1080 cells stably transfected with plasmid constructs expressing shNRP-1 or full-length NRP-1 clearly established that the HIF1α-mediated up-regulation of NRP-1 played a determinist