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Sample records for turbine low-frequency noise

  1. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-06-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3-3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  2. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  3. Theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, R. K.; Mani, R.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements of the existing theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines and development of a working prediction tool are described. The existing actuator-disk model and a new finite-chord model were utilized in an analytical study. The interactive effect of adjacent blade rows, higher order spinning modes, blade-passage shocks, and duct area variations were considered separately. The improved theory was validated using the data acquired in an earlier NASA program. Computer programs incorporating the improved theory were produced for transmission loss prediction purposes. The programs were exercised parametrically and charts constructed to define approximately the low frequency noise transfer through turbines. The loss through the exhaust nozzle and flow(s) was also considered.

  4. Infrasound and low frequency noise from wind turbines: exposure and health effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Karl; Bluhm, Gösta; Eriksson, Gabriella; Nilsson, Mats E.

    2011-07-01

    Wind turbines emit low frequency noise (LFN) and large turbines generally generate more LFN than small turbines. The dominant source of LFN is the interaction between incoming turbulence and the blades. Measurements suggest that indoor levels of LFN in dwellings typically are within recommended guideline values, provided that the outdoor level does not exceed corresponding guidelines for facade exposure. Three cross-sectional questionnaire studies show that annoyance from wind turbine noise is related to the immission level, but several explanations other than low frequency noise are probable. A statistically significant association between noise levels and self-reported sleep disturbance was found in two of the three studies. It has been suggested that LFN from wind turbines causes other, and more serious, health problems, but empirical support for these claims is lacking.

  5. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  6. Low frequency noise study.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-04-01

    This report documents a study to investigate human response to the low-frequency : content of aviation noise, or low-frequency noise (LFN). The study comprised field : measurements and laboratory studies. The major findings were: : 1. Start-of-takeof...

  7. Influences of low-frequency and other noises produced by wind turbines: An epidemiological literature review.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Hasunuma, Hideki; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Hara, Kunio; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Due to its' environment-friendly and clean energy characteristics, wind power has been increasingly used globally, particularly in advanced countries. However, concerns about health hazards, especially due to low-frequency and other noises generated from wind turbines, have been reported repeatedly. In order to manage adverse health effects appropriately, regulatory standards or guidelines that consider the health of residents need to be developed. To provide a scientific basis for the development of such regulatory standards and guidelines, this paper conducted a literature review to analyze epidemiological studies involving residents living in the vicinity of wind farms.Methods Using the PubMED database, epidemiological papers that examined the health effects of noises produced by wind turbines were searched and collected. Additional papers were collected from the abstracts presented at relevant international academic conferences such as the Inter-Noise 2013 and Wind Turbine Noise 2015. An evidence table comprising the study design, subjects, exposure assessment, outcomes, confounders, and research results of each selected study was created.Results A total of 11 papers were collected (2 of which were abstracts from the international academic conferences). These studies reported outcomes such as perception of noises, annoyance caused by the noises, and the association of the noises with stress and sleeplessness. Significant associations between the noises or annoyance produced by wind turbines and subjective adverse health effects were reported repeatedly. Two studies reported an odds ratio of 1.1 for an increase of 1 dB in the A-weighted sound pressure level as a factor representing the influence level. For other factors, it was not possible to compare the magnitude of the impact among the collected studies. Individual attitudes toward wind power and landscapes, economic benefits of wind farms, visibility of wind turbines, sensitivity to sounds

  8. Health-Based Audible Noise Guidelines Account for Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise Produced by Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Robert G.; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D.

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN. PMID:25759808

  9. Health-based audible noise guidelines account for infrasound and low-frequency noise produced by wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Berger, Robert G; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN.

  10. Low-frequency outdoor-indoor noise level difference for wind turbine assessment.

    PubMed

    Thorsson, Pontus; Persson Waye, Kerstin; Smith, Michael; Ögren, Mikael; Pedersen, Eja; Forssén, Jens

    2018-03-01

    To increase the understanding of wind turbine noise on sleep, human physiological reactions need to be studied in a controlled laboratory setting. The paper presents an outdoor-indoor noise level difference as a function of frequency, applicable to creating wind turbine indoor sounds with the outdoor sounds as input. For this, a combination of measurement data and modeling results has been used. The suggested data are provided in a table.

  11. Application of ray theory to propagation of low frequency noise from wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Ray theory is used to explain data from two experiments (1985 and 1985) on the propagation of low frequency sound generated by the WTS-4 wind turbine. Emphasis is on downwind data, but some upwind measurements taken during the 1985 experiment are also considered. General ray theory for a moving medium is reviewed and ray equations obtained. Restrictions are introduced simplifying the equations and permitting the use of a ray theory program MEDUSA, the computed propagation loss curve of which is compared to the measurements. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with 1984 downwind data. The results indicate that the downwind sound field is that of a near-ground sound channel. Although more scatter is seen in the 1985 data, agreement between theory and data is also good. In particular, the position and magnitude of the jump in the sound levels associated with the beginning of the sound channel is correctly predicted. The theoretical explanation of the upwind data is less successful. Ray theory calculations indicate the formation of a shadow zone that, in fact, does not occur. While no sharp shadow zone is apparent in the data, the general expectation (based on ray theory) that sound levels should be much reduced upwind is confirmed by the data.

  12. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    SciT

    Lee, Gwang-Se; Cheong, Cheolung, E-mail: ccheong@pusan.ac.kr

    Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs), few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF) wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF) noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade ofmore » the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson’s acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson’s analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.« less

  13. Wind Turbine Infra and Low-Frequency Sound: Warning Signs that Were Not Heard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines are frequently thought of as benign. However, the literature is reporting adverse health effects associated with the implementation of industrial-scale wind developments. This article explores the historical evidence about what was known regarding infra and low-frequency sound from wind turbines and other noise sources…

  14. Correcting low-frequency noise with continuous measurement.

    PubMed

    Tian, L

    2007-04-13

    Low-frequency noise presents a serious source of decoherence in solid-state qubits. When combined with a continuous weak measurement of the eigenstates, low-frequency noise induces a second-order relaxation between the qubit states. Here, we show that the relaxation provides a unique approach to calibrate the low-frequency noise in the time domain. By encoding one qubit with two physical qubits that are alternatively calibrated, quantum-logic gates with high fidelity can be performed.

  15. Semiconductor Laser Low Frequency Noise Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Logan, Ronald T.

    1996-01-01

    This work summarizes the efforts in identifying the fundamental noise limit in semiconductor optical sources (lasers) to determine the source of 1/F noise and it's associated behavior. In addition, the study also addresses the effects of this 1/F noise on RF phased arrays. The study showed that the 1/F noise in semiconductor lasers has an ultimate physical limit based upon similar factors to fundamental noise generated in other semiconductor and solid state devices. The study also showed that both additive and multiplicative noise can be a significant detriment to the performance of RF phased arrays especially in regard to very low sidelobe performance and ultimate beam steering accuracy. The final result is that a noise power related term must be included in a complete analysis of the noise spectrum of any semiconductor device including semiconductor lasers.

  16. Macroscopic resonant tunneling in the presence of low frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Amin, M H S; Averin, Dmitri V

    2008-05-16

    We develop a theory of macroscopic resonant tunneling of flux in a double-well potential in the presence of realistic flux noise with a significant low-frequency component. The rate of incoherent flux tunneling between the wells exhibits resonant peaks, the shape and position of which reflect qualitative features of the noise, and can thus serve as a diagnostic tool for studying the low-frequency flux noise in SQUID qubits. We show, in particular, that the noise-induced renormalization of the first resonant peak provides direct information on the temperature of the noise source and the strength of its quantum component.

  17. Analytic model for low-frequency noise in nanorod devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungil; Yu, Byung Yong; Han, Ilki; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2008-10-01

    In this work analytic model for generation of excess low-frequency noise in nanorod devices such as field-effect transistors are developed. In back-gate field-effect transistors where most of the surface area of the nanorod is exposed to the ambient, the surface states could be the major noise source via random walk of electrons for the low-frequency or 1/f noise. In dual gate transistors, the interface states and oxide traps can compete with each other as the main noise source via random walk and tunneling, respectively.

  18. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    where potential ice noise sources contributing to the coherent arrivals shown in C-D are located (18b). In the low-frequency band used in this...seismic activity (e.g. along major undersea fault lines) or ice -breaking noise in the Polar Regions (19-22). Ice - generated ambient noise near the...using geodesic paths to obtain a simple estimate of the geographical area from where ice -generated ambient noise is likely to emanate for each site

  19. Cross correlation measurement of low frequency conductivity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Aditya Kumar; Nigudkar, Himanshu; Chakraborti, Himadri; Udupa, Aditi; Gupta, Kantimay Das

    2018-04-01

    In order to study the low frequency noise(1/f noise)an experimental technique based on cross correlation of two channels is presented. In this method the device under test (DUT)is connected to the two independently powered preamplifiers in parallel. The amplified signals from the two preamplifiers are fed to two channels of a digitizer. Subsequent data processing largelyeliminates the uncorrelated noise of the two channels. This method is tested for various commercial carbon/metal film resistors by measuring equilibrium thermal noise (4kBTR). The method is then modified to study the non-equilibrium low frequency noise of heterostructure samples using fiveprobe configuration. Five contact probes allow two parts of the sample to become two arms of a balanced bridge. This configuration helps in suppressing the effect of power supply fluctuations, bath temperature fluctuations and contact resistances.

  20. Low-frequency noise reduction of lightweight airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getline, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the noise attenuation characteristics of aircraft type fuselage structural panels were presented. Of particular interest was noise attenuation at low frequencies, below the fundamental resonances of the panels. All panels were flightweight structures for transport type aircraft in the 34,050 to 45,400 kg (75,000 to 100,000 pounds) gross weight range. Test data include the results of vibration and acoustic transmission loss tests on seven types of isotropic and orthotropically stiffened, flat and curved panels. The results show that stiffness controlled acoustically integrated structures can provide very high noise reductions at low frequencies without significantly affecting their high frequency noise reduction capabilities.

  1. Myocardial fibrosis in rats exposed to low frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Eduardo; Oliveira, Pedro; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João R; Brito, José; Aguas, Artur; Martins, Dos Santos José

    2013-06-01

    Low frequency noise (LFN) characterized by large pressure amplitude (> or =90 dB SPL) and low frequency bands (< or =500 Hz) can lead to structural and ultrastructural modifications in the extracellular matrix of several tissues, with an abnormal proliferation of collagen and development of fibrosis. It is not known whether LFN induces similar structural alterations in the ventricular myocardium of rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate and measure the myocardial fibrosis induced by LFN. Two groups of rats were considered: group A with 26 rats continuously exposed to LFN during a period of 3 months; group B with 20 control rats.The hearts were sectioned from the ventricular apex to the atria and the mid-ventricular fragment was selected. Chromotrope-aniline blue (CAB) staining was used for histological observation. The measurement of fibrosis was performed using the computer image analysis Image J software. Histological observation with CAB staining showed the presence of collagen deposition between the cardiomyocytes. Fibrosis increased 97.5%, 81.5% and 83.7%, respectively, in the left ventricle, interventricular septum and right ventricle, in exposed rats (P <0.001).The ratio fibrosis/muscle in left ventricle, interventricular septum and right ventricle was significantly higher in LFN exposed rats (P< 0.001). Our study demonstrates a significant myocardial fibrosis induced by low frequency noise in rats. Our results reinforce the need for further experimental and clinical investigations concerning the effects of low frequency noise on the heart.

  2. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  3. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices.

    PubMed

    Balandin, Alexander A

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  4. Low-frequency noise measurements: applications, methodologies and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciofi, Carmine; Neri, Bruno

    2003-05-01

    Low frequency noise measurements (f<10Hz) are a powerful tool for the investigation of the quality and reliability of electron devices and material. In most cases, however, the application of this technique is made quite difficult both because of the effect of external interferences (temperature fluctuations, EMI, mechanical vibrations, etc.) and because of the high level of flicker noise of the commercial instrumentation. In this paper the most remarkable results we obtained by using low frequency noise measurements for the characterization of the reliability of VLSI metallic interconnections and thin oxides are resumed. Moreover, we discuss the effects of the several sources of noise and interferences which contribute to reduce the sensitivity of the measurement chain. In particular, we demonstrate that by means of a proper design, dedicated instrumentation can be built which allows for a considerable reduction of the overall background noise. Examples will be given with reference to voltage and transresistance amplifiers (both AC and DC coupled), to programmable biasing systems (both current and voltage sources), to thermal stabilization systems and to data acquisition systems. Finally, we will discuss methods which may allow, in proper conditions, to accurately measure noise levels well below the background noise of the input preamplifiers coupled to the device under test. As the systems we discuss are characterized by moderate complexity and employ components readily available on the market, we trust that this paper may also serve as a simple guideline to anyone interested in exploiting the possibility of using very low frequency noise measurements by building his own instrumentation.

  5. Avoiding low frequency noise in packaged HVAC equipment

    SciT

    Ebbing, C.E.; Blazier, W.E.Jr.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to help those involved in the design and commissioning of packaged HVAC systems to understand the root causes of low frequency noise problems and how to avoid many of them at the design stage. In the 1980's, two things happened to dramatically change the types of noise problems encountered in typical new construction. The first was the introduction of new energy regulations that favored variable air volume (VAV) distribution systems over constant volume air distribution systems. A by-product of VAV design is that mid- and high frequency sound pressure levels produced by current airmore » terminal devices and diffusers in many applications are significantly lower than in the past. The second factor was a trend away from the use of built-up central station fan equipment in favor of packaged, floor-by-floor air handlers or rooftop units. As a result, today's HVAC system noise problems are not confined to just the roar and hiss of the past, but now include intense low frequency rumble and time modulation. Indeed, most current noise problems in modern buildings occur in the frequency range well below 250 Hz. A large fraction of these are a result of the dominant sound pressure levels in the 12 to 40 Hz region. These factors, combined with a substantial increase in the level of low frequency sound from the rest of the system, can produce a non-neutral, time modulated, rumbly sounding background noise that many people find objectionable.« less

  6. Qubit dephasing due to low-frequency noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverdlov, Victor; Rabenstein, Kristian; Averin, Dmitri

    2004-03-01

    We have numerically investigated the effects of the classical low-frequency noise on the qubit dynamics beyond the standard lowest-order perturbation theory in coupling. Noise is generated as a random process with a correlation function characterized by two parameters, the amplitude v0 and the cut-off frequency 2π/τ. Time evolution of the density matrix was averaged over up to 10^7 noise realizations. Contrary to the relaxation time T_1, which for v_0<ω, where ω is the qubit oscillation frequency, is always given correctly by the ``golden-rule'' expression, the dephasing time deviates from the perturbation-theory result, when (v_0/ω)^2(ωτ) ≥1. In this regime, even for unbiased qubit for which the pure dephasing vanishes in perturbation theory, the dephasing is much larger than it's perturbation-theory value 1/(2 T_1).

  7. Low-frequency noise assessment metrics -- What do we know?

    SciT

    Broner, N.

    1994-12-31

    The issue of sound quality in offices and other occupied spaces has been of continuing interest since the 1950s. Existing assessment methods do not adequately account for the low-frequency background sound (< 250 Hz) produced by operating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, in particular, low-frequency rumble. This paper discusses the results of ASHRAE-sponsored research in which more than 75 HVAC noise samples were collected, normalized, and categorized in terms of sound quality. The results support previous findings that a neutral curve has a slope of approximately {minus}5 decibels (dB) per octave. There is also support for the contention thatmore » the balanced noise criterion B (NCB) curves are overly conservative in the region from 63 to 500 Hz and overly permissive below 63 Hz when compared with the room criteria (RC) curves. A modified set of room sound quality (RSQ) curves -- the room sound quality (RSQ) curves -- is proposed.« less

  8. Simple programmable voltage reference for low frequency noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. E.; Chye, En Un

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents a circuit design of a low-noise voltage reference based on an electric double-layer capacitor, a microcontroller and a general purpose DAC. A large capacitance value (1F and more) makes it possible to create low-pass filter with a large time constant, effectively reducing low-frequency noise beyond its bandwidth. Choosing the optimum value of the resistor in the RC filter, one can achieve the best ratio between the transient time, the deviation of the output voltage from the set point and the minimum noise cut-off frequency. As experiments have shown, the spectral density of the voltage at a frequency of 1 kHz does not exceed 1.2 nV/√Hz the maximum deviation of the output voltage from the predetermined does not exceed 1.4 % and depends on the holding time of the previous value. Subsequently, this error is reduced to a constant value and can be compensated.

  9. The Noisiness of Low Frequency Bands of Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The relative noisiness of low frequency 1/3-octave bands of noise was examined. The frequency range investigated was bounded by the bands centered at 25 and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 to 95 db (SPL). Thirty-two subjects used a method of adjustment technique, producing comparison band intensities as noisy as 100 and 200 Hz standard bands at 60 and 72 db. The work resulted in contours of equal noisiness for 1/3-octave bands, ranging in intensity from approximately 58 to 86 db (SPL). These contours were compared with the standard equal noisiness contours; in the region of overlap, between 50 and 200 Hz, the agreement was good.

  10. Mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; De Rosa, Rosario; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric discharge machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation makes it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument of 70mHz with a Q =140 in air without thermal stabilization. This result demonstrates the feasibility of a monolithic folded pendulum sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of millihertz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  11. Mechanical monolithic sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2006), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a new laser optical lever and laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, calculated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is ~ 70mHz with a Q ~ 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of 5 mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  12. Mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for low frequency seismic noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Acernese, Fausto; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; De Rosa, Rosario; Barone, Fabrizio

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric discharge machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation makes it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result is the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument of 70 mHz with a Q=140 in air without thermal stabilization. This result demonstrates the feasibility of a monolithic folded pendulum sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of millihertz with a more refined mechanical tuning.

  13. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines

    PubMed Central

    Salt, Alec N.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2010-01-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit “hearing” to the brain. The sensory stereocilia (“hairs”) on the IHC are “fluid coupled” to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear’s responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that

  14. Responses of the ear to low frequency sounds, infrasound and wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Salt, Alec N; Hullar, Timothy E

    2010-09-01

    Infrasonic sounds are generated internally in the body (by respiration, heartbeat, coughing, etc) and by external sources, such as air conditioning systems, inside vehicles, some industrial processes and, now becoming increasingly prevalent, wind turbines. It is widely assumed that infrasound presented at an amplitude below what is audible has no influence on the ear. In this review, we consider possible ways that low frequency sounds, at levels that may or may not be heard, could influence the function of the ear. The inner ear has elaborate mechanisms to attenuate low frequency sound components before they are transmitted to the brain. The auditory portion of the ear, the cochlea, has two types of sensory cells, inner hair cells (IHC) and outer hair cells (OHC), of which the IHC are coupled to the afferent fibers that transmit "hearing" to the brain. The sensory stereocilia ("hairs") on the IHC are "fluid coupled" to mechanical stimuli, so their responses depend on stimulus velocity and their sensitivity decreases as sound frequency is lowered. In contrast, the OHC are directly coupled to mechanical stimuli, so their input remains greater than for IHC at low frequencies. At very low frequencies the OHC are stimulated by sounds at levels below those that are heard. Although the hair cells in other sensory structures such as the saccule may be tuned to infrasonic frequencies, auditory stimulus coupling to these structures is inefficient so that they are unlikely to be influenced by airborne infrasound. Structures that are involved in endolymph volume regulation are also known to be influenced by infrasound, but their sensitivity is also thought to be low. There are, however, abnormal states in which the ear becomes hypersensitive to infrasound. In most cases, the inner ear's responses to infrasound can be considered normal, but they could be associated with unfamiliar sensations or subtle changes in physiology. This raises the possibility that exposure to the

  15. Low Frequency Noise Contamination in Fan Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise research and development depends on the ability to study and predict the noise created by each engine component in isolation. The presence of a downstream pylon for a model fan test, however, may result in noise contamination through pylon interactions with the free stream and model exhaust airflows. Additionally, there is the problem of separating the fan and jet noise components generated by the model fan. A methodology was therefore developed to improve the data quality for the 9 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center that identifies three noise sources: fan noise, jet noise, and rig noise. The jet noise and rig noise were then measured by mounting a scale model of the 9 15 LSWT model fan installation in a jet rig to simulate everything except the rotating machinery and in duct components of fan noise. The data showed that the spectra measured in the LSWT has a strong rig noise component at frequencies as high as 3 kHz depending on the fan and airflow fan exit velocity. The jet noise was determined to be significantly lower than the rig noise (i.e., noise generated by flow interaction with the downstream support pylon). A mathematical model for the rig noise was then developed using a multi-dimensional least squares fit to the rig noise data. This allows the rig noise to be subtracted or removed, depending on the amplitude of the rig noise relative to the fan noise, at any given frequency, observer angle, or nozzle pressure ratio. The impact of isolating the fan noise with this method on spectra, overall power level (OAPWL), and Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) is studied.

  16. Lightweight Low Frequency Loudspeaker for Active Noise Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-02

    5 The present invention relates to diaphragms for acoustic speakers or transducers, and more specifically, to diaphragms coupled to lightweight...monomorphs and bimorphs. These actuators can deliver reasonable displacement, but in previous configurations when coupled to conventional diaphragms...in air they have failed to produce the combination of force and displacement needed at low frequencies. 15 Polymer speakers have been successful in

  17. Ramanujan sums for signal processing of low-frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Planat, Michel; Rosu, Haret; Perrine, Serge

    2002-11-01

    An aperiodic (low-frequency) spectrum may originate from the error term in the mean value of an arithmetical function such as Möbius function or Mangoldt function, which are coding sequences for prime numbers. In the discrete Fourier transform the analyzing wave is periodic and not well suited to represent the low-frequency regime. In place we introduce a different signal processing tool based on the Ramanujan sums c(q)(n), well adapted to the analysis of arithmetical sequences with many resonances p/q. The sums are quasiperiodic versus the time n and aperiodic versus the order q of the resonance. Different results arise from the use of this Ramanujan-Fourier transform in the context of arithmetical and experimental signals.

  18. Ramanujan sums for signal processing of low-frequency noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel; Rosu, Haret; Perrine, Serge

    2002-11-01

    An aperiodic (low-frequency) spectrum may originate from the error term in the mean value of an arithmetical function such as Möbius function or Mangoldt function, which are coding sequences for prime numbers. In the discrete Fourier transform the analyzing wave is periodic and not well suited to represent the low-frequency regime. In place we introduce a different signal processing tool based on the Ramanujan sums cq(n), well adapted to the analysis of arithmetical sequences with many resonances p/q. The sums are quasiperiodic versus the time n and aperiodic versus the order q of the resonance. Different results arise from the use of this Ramanujan-Fourier transform in the context of arithmetical and experimental signals.

  19. Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Palenskis, Vilius; Maknys, Kęstutis

    2015-01-01

    This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture–emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range. PMID:26674184

  20. The Prevalence of Annoyance and Effects after Long-Term Exposure to Low-Frequency Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PERSSON WAYE, K.; RYLANDER, R.

    2001-02-01

    A cross-sectional questionnaire and noise measurement survey was undertaken among 279 randomly chosen persons exposed to noise from heat pump/ventilation installations in their homes. The aim was to evaluate the prevalence of annoyance, disturbance of rest and concentration and the presence of psycho-social and medical symptoms in relation to noise exposure. Of the sample, 108 persons were exposed to a noise classified as of a low-frequency character (low-frequency noise exposed). As controls were chosen 171 persons living in similar residential areas, but exposed to a noise classified as of a mid-frequency character. The results showed that the prevalence of annoyance and disturbed concentration and rest was significantly higher among the persons exposed to low-frequency noise as compared to controls. Annoyance was suggested to be related to the sound pressure levels of the dominant low frequencies. The dB (A) noise levels did not predict annoyance. No significant differences in medical or psycho-social symptoms were found between the low-frequency noise exposed persons and controls. Among persons reporting themselves to be “rather” or “very” annoyed by low-frequency noise due to the heat pump/ventilation installations, a higher extent of psycho-social symptoms, sleep disturbance and headaches was found.

  1. Map of low-frequency electromagnetic noise in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Gaffet, Stéphane; Astin, Ivan; Smith, Nathan; Evans, Adrian

    2015-06-01

    The Earth's natural electromagnetic environment is disturbed by anthropogenic electromagnetic noise. Here we report the first results from an electromagnetic noise survey of the sky. The locations of electromagnetic noise sources are mapped on the hemisphere above a distributed array of wideband receivers that operate in a small aperture configuration. It is found that the noise sources can be localized at elevation angles up to ˜60° in the sky, well above the horizon. The sky also exhibits zones with little or no noise that are found toward the local zenith and the southwest of the array. These results are obtained by a rigorous analysis of the residuals from the classic dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves using an array analysis of electric field measurements in the frequency range from ˜20 to 250 kHz. The observed locations of the noise sources enable detailed observations of ionospheric modification, for example, caused by particle precipitation and lightning discharges, while the observed exclusion zones enable the detection of weak natural electromagnetic emissions, for example, from streamers in transient luminous events above thunderclouds.

  2. The effects of low frequency noise on mental performance and annoyance.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Sandrock, Stephan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-08-01

    Low frequency noise (LFN) as background noise in urban and work environments is emitted from many artificial sources such as road vehicles, aircraft, and air movement machinery including wind turbines, compressors, and ventilation or air conditioning units. In addition to objective effects, LFN could also cause noise annoyance and influence mental performance; however, there are no homogenous findings regarding this issue. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of LFN on mental performance and annoyance, as well as to consider the role of extraversion and neuroticism on the issue. This study was conducted on 90 students of Iran University of Medical Sciences (54 males and 36 females). The mean age of the students was 23.46 years (SD = 1.97). Personality traits and noise annoyance were measured by using Eysenck Personality Inventory and a 12-scale self-reported questionnaire, respectively. Stroop and Cognitrone computerized tests measured mental performance of participants each exposed to 50 and 70 dBA of LFN and silence. LFNs were produced by Cool Edit Pro 2.1 software. There was no significant difference between mental performance parameters under 50 and 70 dBA of LFN, whereas there were significant differences between most mental performance parameters in quiet and under LFN (50 and 70 dBA). This research showed that LFN, compared to silence, increased the accuracy and the test performance speed (p < 0.01). There was no association between LFN and noise annoyance (p > 0.01). Introverts conducted the tests faster than extraverts (p < 0.05). This research showed that neuroticism does not influence mental performance. It seems that LFN has increased arousal level of participants, and extraversion has a considerable impact on mental performance.

  3. Low-frequency noise effect on terahertz tomography using thermal detectors.

    PubMed

    Guillet, J P; Recur, B; Balacey, H; Bou Sleiman, J; Darracq, F; Lewis, D; Mounaix, P

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the impact of low-frequency noise on terahertz-computed tomography (THz-CT) is analyzed for several measurement configurations and pyroelectric detectors. We acquire real noise data from a continuous millimeter-wave tomographic scanner in order to figure out its impact on reconstructed images. Second, noise characteristics are quantified according to two distinct acquisition methods by (i) extrapolating from experimental acquisitions a sinogram for different noise backgrounds and (ii) reconstructing the corresponding spatial distributions in a slice using a CT reconstruction algorithm. Then we describe the low-frequency noise fingerprint and its influence on reconstructed images. Thanks to the observations, we demonstrate that some experimental choices can dramatically affect the 3D rendering of reconstructions. Thus, we propose some experimental methodologies optimizing the resulting quality and accuracy of the 3D reconstructions, with respect to the low-frequency noise characteristics observed during acquisitions.

  4. Predicting Noise From Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    Computer program WINDY predicts broadband noise spectra of horizontal-axis wind-turbine generators. Enables adequate assessment of impact of broadband wind-turbine noise. Effects of turbulence, trailing-edge wakes, and bluntness taken into account. Program has practical application in design and siting of wind-turbine machines acceptable to community. Written in GW-Basic.

  5. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  6. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level.

  7. A very low noise, high accuracy, programmable voltage source for low frequency noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Graziella; Giusi, Gino; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    In this paper an approach for designing a programmable, very low noise, high accuracy voltage source for biasing devices under test in low frequency noise measurements is proposed. The core of the system is a supercapacitor based two pole low pass filter used for filtering out the noise produced by a standard DA converter down to 100 mHz with an attenuation in excess of 40 dB. The high leakage current of the supercapacitors, however, introduces large DC errors that need to be compensated in order to obtain high accuracy as well as very low output noise. To this end, a proper circuit topology has been developed that allows to considerably reduce the effect of the supercapacitor leakage current on the DC response of the system while maintaining a very low level of output noise. With a proper design an output noise as low as the equivalent input voltage noise of the OP27 operational amplifier, used as the output buffer of the system, can be obtained with DC accuracies better that 0.05% up to the maximum output of 8 V. The expected performances of the proposed voltage source have been confirmed both by means of SPICE simulations and by means of measurements on actual prototypes. Turn on and stabilization times for the system are of the order of a few hundred seconds. These times are fully compatible with noise measurements down to 100 mHz, since measurement times of the order of several tens of minutes are required in any case in order to reduce the statistical error in the measured spectra down to an acceptable level.

  8. Low frequency wind noise contributions in measurement microphones.

    PubMed

    Raspet, Richard; Yu, Jiao; Webster, Jeremy

    2008-03-01

    In a previous paper [R. Raspet, et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 834-843 (2006)], a method was introduced to predict upper and lower bounds for wind noise measured in spherical wind-screens from the measured incident velocity spectra. That paper was restricted in that the predictions were only valid within the inertial range of the incident turbulence, and the data were from a measurement not specifically designed to test the predictions. This paper extends the previous predictions into the source region of the atmospheric wind turbulence, and compares the predictions to measurements made with a large range of wind-screen sizes. Predictions for the turbulence-turbulence interaction pressure spectrum as well as the stagnation pressure fluctuation spectrum are calculated from a form fit to the velocity fluctuation spectrum. While the predictions for turbulence-turbulence interaction agree well with measurements made within large (1.0 m) wind-screens, and the stagnation pressure predictions agree well with unscreened gridded microphone measurements, the mean shear-turbulence interaction spectra do not consistently appear in measurements.

  9. Spectropolarimetric Observations of Solar Noise Storms at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugundhan, V.; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Gireesh, G. V. S.; Hegde, Aathira

    2018-03-01

    A new high-resolution radio spectropolarimeter instrument operating in the frequency range of 15 - 85 MHz has recently been commissioned at the Radio Astronomy Field Station of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics at Gauribidanur, 100 km north of Bangalore, India. We describe the design and construction of this instrument. We present observations of a solar radio noise storm associated with Active Region (AR) 12567 in the frequency range of {≈} 15 - 85 MHz during 18 and 19 July 2016, observed using this instrument in the meridian-transit mode. This is the first report that we are aware of in which both the burst and continuum properties are derived simultaneously. Spectral indices and degree of polarization of both the continuum radiation and bursts are estimated. It is found that i) Type I storm bursts have a spectral index of {≈} {+}3.5, ii) the spectral index of the background continuum is ≈+2.9, iii) the transition frequency between Type I and Type III storms occurs at ≈55 MHz, iv) Type III bursts have an average spectral index of ≈-2.7, v) the spectral index of the Type III continuum is ≈-1.6, and vi) the degree of circular polarization of all Type I (Type III) bursts is ≈90% (30%). The results obtained here indicate that the continuum emission is due to bursts occurring in rapid succession. We find that the derived parameters for Type I bursts are consistent with suprathermal electron acceleration theory and those of Type III favor fundamental plasma emission.

  10. Evaluations of effects due to low-frequency noise in a low demanding work situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, J.; Persson Waye, K.; Kjellberg, A.

    2004-11-01

    Noise sources with a dominating content of low frequencies (20-200 Hz) are found in many occupational environments. This study aimed to evaluate effects of moderate levels of low-frequency noise on attention, tiredness and motivation in a low demanding work situation. Two ventilation noises at the same A-weighted sound pressure level of 45 dB were used: one of a low-frequency character and one of a flat frequency character (reference noise). Thirty-eight female subjects worked with six performance tasks for 4 h in the noises in a between-subject design. Most of the tasks were monotonous and routine in character. Subjective reports were collected using questionnaires and cortisol levels were measured in saliva. The major finding in this study was that low-frequency noise negatively influenced performance on two tasks sensitive to reduced attention and on a proof-reading task. Performances of tasks aimed at evaluating motivation were not significantly affected. The difference in work performance was not reflected by the subjective reports. No effect of noise was found on subjective stress or cortisol levels.

  11. Static and low frequency noise characterization of ultra-thin body InAs MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsori, T. A.; Pastorek, M.; Theodorou, C. G.; Fadjie, A.; Wichmann, N.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Dimitriadis, C. A.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2018-05-01

    A complete static and low frequency noise characterization of ultra-thin body InAs MOSFETs is presented. Characterization techniques, such as the well-known Y-function method established for Si MOSFETs, are applied in order to extract the electrical parameters and study the behavior of these research grade devices. Additionally, the Lambert-W function parameter extraction methodology valid from weak to strong inversion is also used in order to verify its applicability in these experimental level devices. Moreover, a low-frequency noise characterization of the UTB InAs MOSFETs is presented, revealing carrier trapping/detrapping in slow oxide traps and remote Coulomb scattering as origin of 1/f noise, which allowed for the extraction of the oxide trap areal density. Finally, Lorentzian-like noise is also observed in the sub-micron area devices and attributed to both Random Telegraph Noise from oxide individual traps and g-r noise from the semiconductor interface.

  12. The assessment and evaluation of low-frequency noise near the region of infrasound.

    PubMed

    Ziaran, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to present recent knowledge about the assessment and evaluation of low-frequency sounds (noise) and infrasound, close to the threshold of hearing, and identify their potential effect on human health and annoyance. Low-frequency noise generated by air flowing over a moving car with an open window was chosen as a typical scenario which can be subjectively assessed by people traveling by automobile. The principle of noise generated within the interior of the car and its effects on the comfort of the driver and passengers are analyzed at different velocities. An open window of a car at high velocity behaves as a source of specifically strong tonal low-frequency noise which is generally perceived as annoying. The interior noise generated by an open window of a passenger car was measured under different conditions: Driving on a highway and driving on a typical roadway. First, an octave-band analysis was used to assess the noise level and its impact on the driver's comfort. Second, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis and one-third octave-band analysis were used for the detection of tonal low-frequency noise. Comparison between two different car makers was also done. Finally, the paper suggests some possibilities for scientifically assessing and evaluating low-frequency sounds in general, and some recommendations are introduced for scientific discussion, since sounds with strong low-frequency content (but not only strong) engender greater annoyance than is predicted by an A-weighted sound pressure level.

  13. Statistical analysis of low frequency vibrations in variable speed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, X.; Mebarki, T.

    2013-12-01

    The spectral content of the low frequency vibrations in the band from 0 to 10 Hz measured in full scale wind turbines has been statistically analyzed as a function of the whole range of steady operating conditions. Attention has been given to the amplitudes of the vibration peaks and their dependency on rotating speed and power output. Two different wind turbine models of 800 and 2000 kW have been compared. For each model, a sample of units located in the same wind farm and operating during a representative period of time have been considered. A condition monitoring system installed in each wind turbine has been used to register the axial acceleration on the gearbox casing between the intermediate and the high speed shafts. The average frequency spectrum has permitted to identify the vibration signature and the position of the first tower natural frequency in both models. The evolution of the vibration amplitudes at the rotor rotating frequency and its multiples has shown that the tower response is amplified by resonance conditions in one of the models. So, it is concluded that a continuous measurement and control of low frequency vibrations is required to protect the turbines against harmful vibrations of this nature.

  14. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  15. Suppression of low-frequency charge noise in gates-defined GaAs quantum dots

    SciT

    You, Jie; Li, Hai-Ou, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Ke

    To reduce the charge noise of a modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, we have fabricated shallow-etched GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots using the wet-etching method to study the effects of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) underneath the metallic gates. The low-frequency 1/f noise in the Coulomb blockade region of the shallow-etched quantum dot is compared with a non-etched quantum dot on the same wafer. The average values of the gate noise are approximately 0.5 μeV in the shallow-etched quantum dot and 3 μeV in the regular quantum dot. Our results show the quantum dot low-frequency charge noise can be suppressed by the removal ofmore » the 2DEG underneath the metallic gates, which provides an architecture for noise reduction.« less

  16. Low-frequency electronic noise in single-layer MoS2 transistors.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Vinod K; Arnold, Heather N; Jariwala, Deep; Marks, Tobin J; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Hersam, Mark C

    2013-09-11

    Ubiquitous low-frequency 1/f noise can be a limiting factor in the performance and application of nanoscale devices. Here, we quantitatively investigate low-frequency electronic noise in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenide MoS2 field-effect transistors. The measured 1/f noise can be explained by an empirical formulation of mobility fluctuations with the Hooge parameter ranging between 0.005 and 2.0 in vacuum (<10(-5) Torr). The field-effect mobility decreased, and the noise amplitude increased by an order of magnitude in ambient conditions, revealing the significant influence of atmospheric adsorbates on charge transport. In addition, single Lorentzian generation-recombination noise was observed to increase by an order of magnitude as the devices were cooled from 300 to 6.5 K.

  17. Consideration of some factors affecting low-frequency fuselage noise transmission for propeller aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Roussos, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Possible reasons for disagreement between measured and predicted trends of sidewall noise transmission at low frequency are investigated using simplified analysis methods. An analytical model combining incident plane acoustic waves with an infinite flat panel is used to study the effects of sound incidence angle, plate structural properties, frequency, absorption, and the difference between noise reduction and transmission loss. Analysis shows that these factors have significant effects on noise transmission but they do not account for the differences between measured and predicted trends at low frequencies. An analytical model combining an infinite flat plate with a normally incident acoustic wave having exponentially decaying magnitude along one coordinate is used to study the effect of a localized source distribution such as is associated with propeller noise. Results show that the localization brings the predicted low-frequency trend of noise transmission into better agreement with measured propeller results. This effect is independent of low-frequency stiffness effects that have been previously reported to be associated with boundary conditions.

  18. Low frequency noise elimination technique for 24-bit Σ-Δ data acquisition systems.

    PubMed

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Robert, Olivier; Lognonné, Philippe; Zhou, Ze-Bing; Yang, Shan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is one of the key limiting factors of high precision measurement instruments. In this paper, digital correlated double sampling is implemented to reduce the offset and low frequency 1/f noise of a data acquisition system with 24-bit sigma delta (Σ-Δ) analog to digital converter (ADC). The input voltage is modulated by cross-coupled switches, which are synchronized to the sampling clock, and converted into digital signal by ADC. By using a proper switch frequency, the unwanted parasitic signal frequencies generated by the switches are avoided. The noise elimination processing is made through the principle of digital correlated double sampling, which is equivalent to a time shifted subtraction for the sampled voltage. The low frequency 1/f noise spectrum density of the data acquisition system is reduced to be flat down to the measurement frequency lower limit, which is about 0.0001 Hz in this paper. The noise spectrum density is eliminated by more than 60 dB at 0.0001 Hz, with a residual noise floor of (9 ± 2) nV/Hz(1/2) which is limited by the intrinsic white noise floor of the ADC above its corner frequency.

  19. Low frequency North Atlantic SST variability: Weather noise forcing and coupled response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Meizhu

    A method to diagnose the causes of low frequency SST variability is developed, tested and applied in an ideal case and real climate. In the ideal case, a free simulation of the COLA CGCM is taken as synthetic observations. For real climate, we take NCEP reanalysis atmospheric data and Reynolds SST as observations. Both the synthetic and actual observation data show that weather noise is the main component of atmospheric variability at subtropics and high-latitude. Diagnoses of results from the ideal case suggest that most of the synthetic observed SST variability can be reproduced by the weather noise surface fluxes forcing. This includes the "observed" low frequency SST patterns in the North Atlantic and their corresponding time evolution. Among all the noise surface fluxes, heat flux plays a major role. The results from simulations using actual observations also suggest that the observed SST variability is mostly atmospheric weather noise forced. The regional atmospheric noise forcing, especially the heat flux noise forcing, is the major source of the low frequency SST variability in the North Atlantic. The observed SST tripole mode has about a 12 year period and it can be reasonably reproduced by the weather noise forcing in terms of its period, spatial pattern and variance. Based on our diagnosis, it is argued that the SST tripole is mainly forced by local atmospheric heat flux noise. The gyre circulation plays a secondary role: the anomalous gyre circulation advects mean thermal features across the inter-gyre boundary, and the mean gyre advection carries SST anomalies along the inter-gyre boundary. The diagnosis is compared with a delayed oscillator theory. We find that the delayed oscillator theory is not supported and that the SST tripole mode is forced by weather noise heat flux noise. However, the result may be model dependent.

  20. Perception of force and stiffness in the presence of low-frequency haptic noise

    PubMed Central

    Gurari, Netta; Okamura, Allison M.; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This work lays the foundation for future research on quantitative modeling of human stiffness perception. Our goal was to develop a method by which a human’s ability to perceive suprathreshold haptic force stimuli and haptic stiffness stimuli can be affected by adding haptic noise. Methods Five human participants performed a same-different task with a one-degree-of-freedom force-feedback device. Participants used the right index finger to actively interact with variations of force (∼5 and ∼8 N) and stiffness (∼290 N/m) stimuli that included one of four scaled amounts of haptically rendered noise (None, Low, Medium, High). The haptic noise was zero-mean Gaussian white noise that was low-pass filtered with a 2 Hz cut-off frequency; the resulting low-frequency signal was added to the force rendered while the participant interacted with the force and stiffness stimuli. Results We found that the precision with which participants could identify the magnitude of both the force and stiffness stimuli was affected by the magnitude of the low-frequency haptically rendered noise added to the haptic stimulus, as well as the magnitude of the haptic stimulus itself. The Weber fraction strongly correlated with the standard deviation of the low-frequency haptic noise with a Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient of ρ > 0.83. The mean standard deviation of the low-frequency haptic noise in the haptic stimuli ranged from 0.184 N to 1.111 N across the four haptically rendered noise levels, and the corresponding mean Weber fractions spanned between 0.042 and 0.101. Conclusions The human ability to perceive both suprathreshold haptic force and stiffness stimuli degrades in the presence of added low-frequency haptic noise. Future work can use the reported methods to investigate how force perception and stiffness perception may relate, with possible applications in haptic watermarking and in the assessment of the functionality of peripheral pathways in

  1. Low-frequency noise behavior of polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deen, M. Jamal; Pascal, Fabien

    2003-05-01

    For many analog integrated circuit applications, the polysilicon emitter bipolar junction transistor (PE-BJT) is still the preferred choice because of its higher operational frequency and lower noise performance characteristics compared to MOS transistors of similar active areas and at similar biasing currents. In this paper, we begin by motivating the reader with reasons why bipolar transistors are still of great interest for analog integrated circuits. This motivation includes a comparison between BJT and the MOSFET using a simple small-signal equivalent circuit to derive important parameters that can be used to compare these two technologies. An extensive review of the popular theories used to explain low frequency noise results is presented. However, in almost all instances, these theories have not been fully tested. The effects of different processing technologies and conditions on the noise performance of PE-BJTs is reviewed and a summary of some of the key technological steps and device parameters and their effects on noise is discussed. The effects of temperature and emitter geometries scaling is reviewed. It is shown that dispersion of the low frequency noise in ultra-small geometries is a serious issue since the rate of increase of the noise dispersion is faster than the noise itself as the emitter geometry is scaled to smaller values. Finally, some ideas for future research on PE-BJTs, some of which are also applicable to SiGe heteorjunction bipolar transistors and MOSFETs, are presented after the conclusions.

  2. Application of analysis techniques for low frequency interior noise and vibration of commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landmann, A. E.; Tillema, H. F.; Macgregor, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA), statistical energy analysis (SEA), and a power flow method (computer program PAIN) were used to assess low frequency interior noise associated with advanced propeller installations. FEA and SEA models were used to predict cabin noise and vibration and evaluate suppression concepts for structure-borne noise associated with the shaft rotational frequency and harmonics (less than 100 Hz). SEA and PAIN models were used to predict cabin noise and vibration and evaluate suppression concepts for airborne noise associated with engine radiated propeller tones. Both aft-mounted and wing-mounted propeller configurations were evaluated. Ground vibration test data from a 727 airplane modified to accept a propeller engine were used to compare with predictions for the aft-mounted propeller. Similar data from the 767 airplane was used for the wing-mounted comparisons.

  3. Low frequency noise in p-InAsSbP/n-InAs infrared photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakonova, N.; Karandashev, S. A.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Matveev, B. A.; Remennyi, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    We report the first experimental study of low-frequency noise in p-InAsSbP/n-InAs infrared photodiodes. For forward bias, experiments have been carried out at 300 and 77 K, in the photovoltaic regime the measurements have been done at 300 K. At room temperature the current noise spectral density, SI , exhibits the ∼1/f frequency dependence. For low currents, I ≤ I 0 ∼ 4 × 10‑5 A, S I is proportional to I 2, at higher currents this dependence changes to S I ∼ I. At 77 K the noise spectral density is significantly higher than at 300 K, and Lorentzian contributions to noise are observed. The current dependences of spectral noise density can be approximately described as S I ∼ I 1.5 and show particularities suggesting the contribution of defects.

  4. Low frequency dove coos vary across noise gradients in an urbanized environment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengyi; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Dingle, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Urbanization poses a challenge to bird communication due to signal masking by ambient noise and reflective surfaces that lead to signal degradation. Bird species (especially oscines) have been shown to alter their singing behaviour to increase signal efficiency in highly urbanized environments. However, few studies on the effects of noise on song structure have included birds with low frequency vocal signals which may be especially vulnerable to noise pollution due to significant frequency overlap of their signals with traffic noise. We compared the perch coos of spotted doves (Streptopelia chinensis), a species with very low frequency vocalizations, in different background noise levels across urban and peri-urban areas in Hong Kong. We documented a 10% upward shift in the minimum frequency of coos of spotted doves across the noise gradient (a relatively small but significant shift), and a reduced maximum frequency in urban habitats with a higher density of built up area. Hong Kong doves had significantly higher minimum and maximum frequencies than doves from throughout their range (from mostly rural sites). Our results indicate that urban species with extremely low sound frequencies such as doves can alter their vocalizations in response to variable urban acoustic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous exposure to low-frequency noise and carbon disulfide: Combined effects on hearing.

    PubMed

    Venet, Thomas; Carreres-Pons, Maria; Chalansonnet, Monique; Thomas, Aurélie; Merlen, Lise; Nunge, Hervé; Bonfanti, Elodie; Cosnier, Frédéric; Llorens, Jordi; Campo, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS 2 ) is used in industry; it has been shown to have neurotoxic effects, causing central and distal axonopathies.However, it is not considered cochleotoxic as it does not affect hair cells in the organ of Corti, and the only auditory effects reported in the literature were confined to the low-frequency region. No reports on the effects of combined exposure to low-frequency noise and CS 2 have been published to date. This article focuses on the effects on rat hearing of combined exposure to noise with increasing concentrations of CS 2 (0, 63,250, and 500ppm, 6h per day, 5 days per week, for 4 weeks). The noise used was a low-frequency noise ranging from 0.5 to 2kHz at an intensity of 106dB SPL. Auditory function was tested using distortion product oto-acoustic emissions, which mainly reflects the cochlear performances. Exposure to noise alone caused an auditory deficit in a frequency area ranging from 3.6 to 6 kHz. The damaged area was approximately one octave (6kHz) above the highest frequency of the exposure noise (2.8kHz); it was a little wider than expected based on the noise spectrum.Consequently, since maximum hearing sensitivity is located around 8kHz in rats, low-frequency noise exposure can affect the cochlear regions detecting mid-range frequencies. Co-exposure to CS 2 (250-ppm and over) and noise increased the extent of the damaged frequency window since a significant auditory deficit was measured at 9.6kHz in these conditions.Moreover, the significance at 9.6kHz increased with the solvent concentrations. Histological data showed that neither hair cells nor ganglion cells were damaged by CS 2 . This discrepancy between functional and histological data is discussed. Like most aromatic solvents, carbon disulfide should be considered as a key parameter in hearing conservation régulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  7. Vestibular short-latency evoked potential abolished by low-frequency noise exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Courtney E; Kanicki, Ariane C; Altschuler, Richard A; King, W M

    2018-02-01

    The vestibular system plays a critical role in detection of head movements and is essential for normal postural control. Because of their anatomical proximity to the cochlea, the otolith organs are selectively exposed to sound pressure and are at risk for noise overstimulation. Clinical reports suggest a link between noise exposure and balance problems, but the structural and physiological basis for this linkage is not well understood. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of low-frequency noise (LFN) on the otolith organs by correlating changes in vestibular short-latency evoked potentials (VsEPs) with changes in saccular afferent endings following noise exposure. LFN exposure transiently abolished the VsEP and reduced the number of stained calyces within the sacculus. Although some recovery of the VsEP waveform could be observed within 3 days after noise, at 3 wk recovery was only partial in most animals, consistent with a reduced number of afferents with calyceal endings. These data show that a single intense noise exposure is capable of causing a vestibular deficit that appears to mirror the synaptic deficit associated with hidden hearing loss after noise-induced cochlear injury. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to explore the effects of low-frequency high-intensity noise on vestibular short-latency evoked potential (VsEP) responses, which shows a linkage between attenuated noise-induced VsEPs and pathological changes to otolith organ afferents. This finding suggests a potential limitation of the VsEP for evaluation of vestibular dysfunction, since the VsEP measurement may assess the activity of a specific class rather than all afferents.

  8. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciT

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectramore » in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.« less

  9. Nanoscale MOS devices: device parameter fluctuations and low-frequency noise (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Hei; Iwai, Hiroshi; Liou, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    It is well-known in conventional MOS transistors that the low-frequency noise or flicker noise is mainly contributed by the trapping-detrapping events in the gate oxide and the mobility fluctuation in the surface channel. In nanoscale MOS transistors, the number of trapping-detrapping events becomes less important because of the large direct tunneling current through the ultrathin gate dielectric which reduces the probability of trapping-detrapping and the level of leakage current fluctuation. Other noise sources become more significant in nanoscale devices. The source and drain resistance noises have greater impact on the drain current noise. Significant contribution of the parasitic bipolar transistor noise in ultra-short channel and channel mobility fluctuation to the channel noise are observed. The channel mobility fluctuation in nanoscale devices could be due to the local composition fluctuation of the gate dielectric material which gives rise to the permittivity fluctuation along the channel and results in gigantic channel potential fluctuation. On the other hand, the statistical variations of the device parameters across the wafer would cause the noise measurements less accurate which will be a challenge for the applicability of analytical flicker noise model as a process or device evaluation tool for nanoscale devices. Some measures for circumventing these difficulties are proposed.

  10. Development of Lightweight, Compact, Structurally-Integrated Acoustic Liners for Broadband Low-Frequency Noise Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Andrew T.

    Airborne noise with a low dominant frequency content (< 500 Hz) has detrimental effects in many applications, but is as yet beyond the scope of conventional acoustic noise mitigation techniques using liners, foams or claddings owing to mass and volume considerations. Its low evanescence contributes significantly to environmental noise pollution, and unwanted structural vibrations causing diminished efficiency, comfort, payload integrity and mission capabilities. An alternative approach using liner configurations with realistic mass and volume constraints having innovative 'folded' core geometries is investigated to ascertain its low-frequency noise absorption characteristics. In contrast to mass-driven approaches, the folded core approach relies on tailoring interactions between acoustic resonances to tune the liner's impedance to suit the dominant low-frequency content of the source. This allows to keep non-structural mass-addition to a minimum, while retaining an overall thickness comparable to conventional liners for these low-frequency liner designs. The relative acoustic performance of various candidate folded core designs is evaluated by means of a new composite metric termed the Low-Frequency Performance (LFP) factor, which is educed from the absorption coefficient spectrum obtained using Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) theory-based numerical studies. An LFP-based software tool is developed to determine optimal 3D cavity packing for a prescribed liner volume and target frequency range. ZKTL-based parametric studies on core dimensions and face sheet porosity are utilized for detailed design of test articles. Experimental verification of absorption coefficient spectra conducted using 3D printed test articles in a normal incidence acoustic impedance tube yield good correlation with simulations. More than 100 Hz of continuous bandwidth with an absorption coefficient greater than 0.6 is shown to be possible in the 300 to 400 Hz range with a 38.1-mm (1

  11. Low-frequency noise properties in Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide Schottky diodes

    SciT

    Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Linqing; Ma, Xiaochen

    2015-08-31

    The low-frequency noise properties of Pt-indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) Schottky diodes at different forward biases are investigated. The IGZO layer and Pt contact were deposited by RF sputtering at room temperature. The diode showed an ideality factor of 1.2 and a barrier height of 0.94 eV. The current noise spectral density exhibited 1/f behavior at low frequencies. The analysis of the current dependency of the noise spectral density revealed that for the as-deposited diode, the noise followed Luo's mobility and diffusivity fluctuation model in the thermionic-emission-limited region and Hooge's empirical theory in the series-resistance-limited region. A low Hooge's constant ofmore » 1.4 × 10{sup −9} was found in the space-charge region. In the series-resistance-limited region, the Hooge's constant was 2.2 × 10{sup −5}. After annealing, the diode showed degradation in the electrical performance. The interface-trap-induced noise dominated the noise spectrum. By using the random walk model, the interface-trap density was obtained to be 3.6 × 10{sup 15 }eV{sup −1 }cm{sup −2}. This work provides a quantitative approach to analyze the properties of Pt-IGZO interfacial layers. These low noise properties are a prerequisite to the use of IGZO Schottky diodes in switch elements in memory devices, photosensors, and mixer diodes.« less

  12. Spots of Seismic Danger Extracted by Properties of Low-Frequency Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    A new method of seismic danger estimate is presented which is based on using properties of low-frequency seismic noise from broadband networks. Two statistics of noise waveforms are considered: multi-fractal singularity spectrum support width D and minimum normalized entropy En of squared orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The maps of D and En are plotted in the moving time window. Let us call the regions extracted by low values of D and high values of En as "spots of seismic danger" - SSD. Mean values of D and En are strongly anti-correlated - that is why statistics D and En extract the same SSD. Nevertheless their mutual considering is expedient because these parameters are based on different approaches. The physical mechanism which underlies the method is consolidation of small blocks of the Earth's crust into the large one before the strong earthquake. This effect has a consequence that seismic noise does not include spikes which are connected with mutual movements of small blocks. The absence of irregular spikes in the noise follows the decreasing of D and increasing of entropy En. The stability in space and size of the SSD provides estimates of the place and energy of the probable future earthquake. The increasing or decreasing of SSD size and minimum or maximum values of D and En within SSD allows estimate the trend of seismic danger. The method is illustrating by the analysis of seismic noise from broadband seismic network F-net in Japan [1-5]. Statistically significant decreasing of D allowed a hypothesis about approaching Japan to a future seismic catastrophe to be formulated at the middle of 2008. The peculiarities of correlation coefficient estimate within 1 year time window between median values of D and generalized Hurst exponent allowed to make a decision that starting from July of 2010 Japan come to the state of waiting strong earthquake [3]. The method extracted a huge SSD near Japan which includes the region of future Tohoku mega-earthquake and the

  13. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraghi, M. J.; Sasada, I.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, Y. H.

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic noise of a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler (PT) was measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS Double Relaxation Oscillation SQUID (DROS) first-order planar gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm distance from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the second pulse tube. The magnetic noise spectrum showed a clear peak at 1.8 Hz, which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise registered a peak, during the cooling down process, when the second cold-stage temperature was around 12 K, which is well correlated with the 1.8 Hz variation of the temperature of the second cold stage. Hence, we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature variation of the magnetic moments resulting from magnetic regenerative materials, Er 3Ni and HoCu 2, in the presence of background static magnetic fields. We have also pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield of lead sheets reduced the low frequency magnetic noise generated from the magnetic regenerative materials. With this arrangement, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the LTS DROS gradiometer, mounted at 7 cm horizontal distance from the magnetic regenerative materials, in the optimum condition, was lower than 500 pT peak-to-peak, whereas the noise level without lead shielding was higher than the dynamic range of DROS instrumentations which was around ±10nT.

  14. Low frequency noise as a control test for spacial solar panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsal, B.; Alabedra, R.; Ruas, R.

    1986-07-01

    The present study of low frequency noise in a forward-biased dark solar cell, in order to develop an NDE test method for solar panels, notes that a single cell with a given defect is thus detectable under dark conditions. The test subject was a space solar panel consisting of five cells in parallel and five in series; these cells are of the n(+)-p monocrystalline Si junction type. It is demonstrated that the noise associated with the defective cell is 10-15 times higher than that of a good cell. Replacement of a good cell by a defective one leads to a 30-percent increase in the noise level of the panel as a whole.

  15. Microscopic origin of low frequency noise in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciT

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Jain, Manish; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-09-01

    We report measurement of low frequency 1/f noise in molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors in multiple device configurations including MoS{sub 2} on silicon dioxide as well as MoS{sub 2}-hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. All as-fabricated devices show similar magnitude of noise with number fluctuation as the dominant mechanism at high temperatures and density, although the calculated density of traps is two orders of magnitude higher than that at the SiO{sub 2} interface. Measurements on the heterostructure devices with vacuum annealing and dual gated configuration reveals that along with the channel, metal-MoS{sub 2} contacts also play a significant role inmore » determining noise magnitude in these devices.« less

  16. The Effect of Low-Frequency Road Noise on Driver Sleepiness and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anund, Anna; Lahti, Eva; Fors, Carina; Genell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It is a well-known fact today that driver sleepiness is a contributory factor in crashes. Factors considered as sleepiness contributor are mostly related to time of the day, hours being awake and hours slept. Factors contributing to active and passive fatigue are mostly focusing on the level of cognitive load. Less is known what role external factors, e.g. type of road, sound/noise, vibrations etc., have on the ability to stay awake both under conditions of sleepiness and under active or passive fatigue. The aim of this moving base driving simulator study with 19 drivers participating in a random order day and night time, was to evaluate the effect of low-frequency road noise on driver sleepiness and performance, including both long-term and short-term effects. The results support to some extent the hypothesis that road-induced interior vehicle sound affects driving performance and driver sleepiness. Increased low-frequency noise helps to reduce speed during both day- and night time driving, but also contributes to increase the number of lane crossings during night time. PMID:25874883

  17. The effect of low-frequency road noise on driver sleepiness and performance.

    PubMed

    Anund, Anna; Lahti, Eva; Fors, Carina; Genell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    It is a well-known fact today that driver sleepiness is a contributory factor in crashes. Factors considered as sleepiness contributor are mostly related to time of the day, hours being awake and hours slept. Factors contributing to active and passive fatigue are mostly focusing on the level of cognitive load. Less is known what role external factors, e.g. type of road, sound/noise, vibrations etc., have on the ability to stay awake both under conditions of sleepiness and under active or passive fatigue. The aim of this moving base driving simulator study with 19 drivers participating in a random order day and night time, was to evaluate the effect of low-frequency road noise on driver sleepiness and performance, including both long-term and short-term effects. The results support to some extent the hypothesis that road-induced interior vehicle sound affects driving performance and driver sleepiness. Increased low-frequency noise helps to reduce speed during both day- and night time driving, but also contributes to increase the number of lane crossings during night time.

  18. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4–8 kHz). CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz) and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception. PMID:26730702

  19. Schottky barrier parameters and low frequency noise characteristics of graphene-germanium Schottky barrier diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurelbaatar, Zagarzusem; Kil, Yeon-Ho; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Cho, Hyunjin; Kim, Myung-Jong; Lee, Sung-Nam; Jeong, Jae-chan; Hong, Hyobong; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of chemical vapor deposition-grown monolayer graphene/n-type germanium (Ge) Schottky barrier diodes (SBD) using current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and low frequency noise measurements. The Schottky barrier parameters of graphene/n-type Ge SBDs, such as Schottky barrier height (VB), ideality factor (n), and series resistance (Rs), were extracted using the forward I-V and Cheung's methods. The VB and n extracted from the forward ln(I)-V plot were found to be 0.63 eV and 1.78, respectively. In contrast, from Cheung method, the VB and n were calculated to be 0.53 eV and 1.76, respectively. Such a discrepancy between the values of VB calculated from the forward I-V and Cheung's methods indicated a deviation from the ideal thermionic emission of graphene/n-type Ge SBD associated with the voltage drop across graphene. The low frequency noise measurements performed at the frequencies in the range of 10 Hz-1 kHz showed that the graphene/n-type Ge SBD had 1/f γ frequency dependence, with γ ranging from 1.09 to 1.12, regardless of applied forward biases. Similar to forward-biased SBDs operating in the thermionic emission mode, the current noise power spectral density of graphene/n-type Ge SBD was linearly proportional to the forward current.

  20. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  1. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device

    SciT

    Zhao, Jing; Peter Grünberg Institute; Zhang, Yi

    2014-05-15

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mAmore » to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.« less

  2. Global examination of the wind-dependence of very low frequency underwater ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Stephen M; Bradley, David L

    2016-03-01

    Ocean surface winds play a key role in underwater ambient noise generation. One particular frequency band of interest is the infrasonic or very low frequency (VLF) band from 1 to 20 Hz. In this spectral band, wind generated ocean surface waves interact non-linearly to produce acoustic waves, which couple into the seafloor to generate microseisms, as explained by the theory developed by Longuet-Higgins. This study examines long term data sets in the VLF portion of the ambient noise spectrum, collected by the hydroacoustic systems of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Three properties of the noise field were examined: (a) the behavior of the acoustic spectrum slope from 1 to 5 Hz, (b) correlation of noise levels and wind speeds, and (c) the autocorrelation behavior of both the noise field and the wind. Analysis results indicate the spectrum slope is site dependent, and for both correlation methods, a high correlation between wind and the noise field in the 1-5 Hz band.

  3. Low-frequency (1/f) noise in nanocrystal field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuming; Li, Haipeng; Kim, David K; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R

    2014-09-23

    We investigate the origins and magnitude of low-frequency noise in high-mobility nanocrystal field-effect transistors and show the noise is of 1/f-type. Sub-band gap states, in particular, those introduced by nanocrystal surfaces, have a significant influence on the 1/f noise. By engineering the device geometry and passivating nanocrystal surfaces, we show that in the linear and saturation regimes the 1/f noise obeys Hooge's model of mobility fluctuations, consistent with transport of a high density of accumulated carriers in extended electronic states of the NC thin films. In the subthreshold regime, the Fermi energy moves deeper into the mobility gap and sub-band gap trap states give rise to a transition to noise dominated by carrier number fluctuations as described in McWhorter's model. CdSe nanocrystal field-effect transistors have a Hooge parameter of 3 × 10(-2), comparable to other solution-deposited, thin-film devices, promising high-performance, low-cost, low-noise integrated circuitry.

  4. Instability waves and low-frequency noise radiation in the subsonic chevron jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Lingke; Ye, Chuangchao; Wan, Zhenhua; Yang, Haihua; Sun, Dejun

    2018-06-01

    Spatial instability waves associated with low-frequency noise radiation at shallow polar angles in the chevron jet are investigated and are compared to the round counterpart. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to obtain the mean flow fields, which serve as the baseflow for linear stability analysis. The chevron jet has more complicated instability waves than the round jet, where three types of instability modes are identified in the vicinity of the nozzle, corresponding to radial shear, azimuthal shear, and their integrated effect of the baseflow, respectively. The most unstable frequency of all chevron modes and round modes in both jets decrease as the axial location moves downstream. Besides, the azimuthal shear effect related modes are more unstable than radial shear effect related modes at low frequencies. Compared to a round jet, a chevron jet reduces the growth rate of the most unstable modes at downstream locations. Moreover, linearized Euler equations are employed to obtain the beam pattern of pressure generated by spatially evolving instability waves at a dominant low frequency St=0.3, and the acoustic efficiencies of these linear wavepackets are evaluated for both jets. It is found that the acoustic efficiency of linear wavepacket is able to be reduced greatly in the chevron jet, compared to the round jet.

  5. Instability waves and low-frequency noise radiation in the subsonic chevron jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Lingke; Ye, Chuangchao; Wan, Zhenhua; Yang, Haihua; Sun, Dejun

    2017-11-01

    Spatial instability waves associated with low-frequency noise radiation at shallow polar angles in the chevron jet are investigated and are compared to the round counterpart. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to obtain the mean flow fields, which serve as the baseflow for linear stability analysis. The chevron jet has more complicated instability waves than the round jet, where three types of instability modes are identified in the vicinity of the nozzle, corresponding to radial shear, azimuthal shear, and their integrated effect of the baseflow, respectively. The most unstable frequency of all chevron modes and round modes in both jets decrease as the axial location moves downstream. Besides, the azimuthal shear effect related modes are more unstable than radial shear effect related modes at low frequencies. Compared to a round jet, a chevron jet reduces the growth rate of the most unstable modes at downstream locations. Moreover, linearized Euler equations are employed to obtain the beam pattern of pressure generated by spatially evolving instability waves at a dominant low frequency St=0.3 , and the acoustic efficiencies of these linear wavepackets are evaluated for both jets. It is found that the acoustic efficiency of linear wavepacket is able to be reduced greatly in the chevron jet, compared to the round jet.

  6. Low frequency critical current noise and two level system defects in Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, Christopher Daniel

    The critical current in a Josephson junction is known to exhibit a 1/falpha low frequency noise. Implemented as a superconducting qubit, this low frequency noise can lead to decoherence. While the 1/f noise has been known to arise from an ensemble of two level systems connected to the tunnel barrier, the precise microscopic nature of these TLSs remain a mystery. In this thesis we will present measurements of the 1/f alpha low frequency noise in the critical current and tunneling resistance of Al-AlOx-Al Josephson junctions. Measurements in a wide range of resistively shunted and unshunted junctions confirm the equality of critical current and tunneling resistance noise. That is the critical current fluctuation corresponds to fluctuations of the tunneling resistance. In not too small Al-AlOx-Al junctions we have found that the fractional power spectral density scales linearly with temperature. We confirmed that the 1/falpha power spectrum is the result of a large number of two level systems modulating the tunneling resistance. At small junction areas and low temperatures, the number of thermally active TLSs is insufficient to integrate out a featureless 1/ f spectral shape. By analyzing the spectral variance in small junction areas, we have been able to deduce the TLS defect density, n ≈ 2.53 per micrometer squared per Kelvin spread in the TLS energy per factor e in the TLS lifetimes. This density is consistent with the density of tunneling TLSs found in glassy insulators, as well as the density deduced from coherent TLSs interacting at qubit frequencies. The deduced TLS density combined with the magnitude of the 1/f power spectral density in large area junctions, gives an average TLS effective area, A ˜ 0.3 nanometer squared. In ultra small tunnel junctions, we have studied the time-domain dynamics of isolated TLSs. We have found a TLS whose dynamics is described by the quantum tunneling between the two localized wells, and a one-phonon absorption

  7. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  8. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  9. Low-frequency noise in MoSe{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciT

    Das, Suprem R., E-mail: srdaspurdue@gmail.com, E-mail: janes@purdue.edu; Kwon, Jiseok; Prakash, Abhijith

    One of the important performance metrics of emerging nanoelectronic devices, including low dimensional Field Effect Transistors (FETs), is the magnitude of the low-frequency noise. Atomically thin 2D semiconductor channel materials such as MoX{sub 2} (X ≡ S, Se) have shown promising transistor characteristics such as I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio exceeding 10{sup 6} and low I{sub OFF}, making them attractive as channel materials for next generation nanoelectronic devices. However, MoS{sub 2} FETs demonstrated to date exhibit high noise levels under ambient conditions. In this letter, we report at least two orders of magnitude smaller values of Hooge parameter in a back-gatedmore » MoSe{sub 2} FET (10 atomic layers) with nickel S/D contacts and measured at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The channel dominated regime of noise was extracted from the total noise spectrum and is shown to follow a mobility fluctuation model with 1/f dependence. The low noise in MoSe{sub 2} FETs is comparable to other 1D nanoelectronic devices such as carbon nanotube FETs (CNT-FETs) and paves the way for use in future applications in precision sensing and communications.« less

  10. Origin of low-frequency noise in pentacene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Minari, Takeo; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Chroboczek, Jan; Balestra, Francis; Ghibaudo, Gerard

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of power spectral density (PSD) of low-frequency noise (LFN) in pentacene field-effect transistors reveal the preponderance of a 1/ f-type PSD behavior with the amplitude varying as the squared transistor gain and increasing as the inverse of the gate surface area. Such features impose an interpretation of LFN by carrier number fluctuations model involving capture/release of charges on traps uniformly distributed over the gate surface. The surface slow trap density extracted by the noise analysis is close to the surface states density deduced independently from static I(V) data, which confirms the validity of the proposed LFN interpretation. Further, we found that the trap densities in bottom-contact (BC) devices were higher than in their top-contact (TC) counterparts, in agreement with observations of a poorer crystal structure of BC devices, in the contact regions in particular. At the highest bias the noise originating from the contact resistance is also shown to be a dominant component in the PSD, and it is well explained by the noise originating from a gate-voltage dependent contact resistance. A gate area scaling was also performed, and the good scaling and the dispersion at the highest bias confirm the validity of the applied carrier number fluctuations model and the predominant contact noise at high current intensities.

  11. Research Plans for Improving Understanding of Effects of Very Low-Frequency Noise of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Horonieff, Richard D.; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews the English-language technical literature on infrasonic and low-frequency noise effects; identifies the most salient effects of noise produced by a future large civil tiltrotor aircraft on crew, passengers, and communities near landing areas; and recommends research needed to improve understanding of the effects of such noise on passengers, crew, and residents of areas near landing pads.

  12. A low-frequency noise model with carrier generation-recombination process for pentacene organic thin-film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C. Y.; Qian, L. X.; Leung, C. H.; Che, C. M.; Lai, P. T.

    2013-07-01

    By including the generation-recombination process of charge carriers in conduction channel, a model for low-frequency noise in pentacene organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) is proposed. In this model, the slope and magnitude of power spectral density for low-frequency noise are related to the traps in the gate dielectric and accumulation layer of the OTFT for the first time. The model can well fit the measured low-frequency noise data of pentacene OTFTs with HfO2 or HfLaO gate dielectric, which validates this model, thus providing an estimate on the densities of traps in the gate dielectric and accumulation layer. It is revealed that the traps in the accumulation layer are much more than those in the gate dielectric, and so dominate the low-frequency noise of pentacene OTFTs.

  13. Mobility-dependent low-frequency noise in graphene field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mendez, Emilio E; Du, Xu

    2011-10-25

    We have investigated the low-frequency 1/f noise of both suspended and on-substrate graphene field-effect transistors and its dependence on gate voltage, in the temperature range between 300 and 30 K. We have found that the noise amplitude away from the Dirac point can be described by a generalized Hooge's relation in which the Hooge parameter α(H) is not constant but decreases monotonically with the device's mobility, with a universal dependence that is sample and temperature independent. The value of α(H) is also affected by the dynamics of disorder, which is not reflected in the DC transport characteristics and varies with sample and temperature. We attribute the diverse behavior of gate voltage dependence of the noise amplitude to the relative contributions from various scattering mechanisms, and to potential fluctuations near the Dirac point caused by charge carrier inhomogeneity. The higher carrier mobility of suspended graphene devices accounts for values of 1/f noise significantly lower than those observed in on-substrate graphene devices and most traditional electronic materials.

  14. A mathematical model of extremely low frequency ocean induced electromagnetic noise

    SciT

    Dautta, Manik, E-mail: manik.dautta@anyeshan.com; Faruque, Rumana Binte, E-mail: rumana.faruque@anyeshan.com; Islam, Rakibul, E-mail: rakibul.islam@anyeshan.com

    2016-07-12

    Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system uses the principle that ferromagnetic objects disturb the magnetic lines of force of the earth. These lines of force are able to pass through both water and air in similar manners. A MAD system, usually mounted on an aerial vehicle, is thus often employed to confirm the detection and accomplish localization of large ferromagnetic objects submerged in a sea-water environment. However, the total magnetic signal encountered by a MAD system includes contributions from a myriad of low to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) sources. The goal of the MAD system is to detect small anomaly signalsmore » in the midst of these low-frequency interfering signals. Both the Range of Detection (R{sub d}) and the Probability of Detection (P{sub d}) are limited by the ratio of anomaly signal strength to the interfering magnetic noise. In this paper, we report a generic mathematical model to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio or SNR. Since time-variant electro-magnetic signals are affected by conduction losses due to sea-water conductivity and the presence of air-water interface, we employ the general formulation of dipole induced electromagnetic field propagation in stratified media [1]. As a first step we employ a volumetric distribution of isolated elementary magnetic dipoles, each having its own dipole strength and orientation, to estimate the magnetic noise observed by a MAD system. Numerical results are presented for a few realizations out of an ensemble of possible realizations of elementary dipole source distributions.« less

  15. Evaluation of analysis techniques for low frequency interior noise and vibration of commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landmann, A. E.; Tillema, H. F.; Marshall, S. E.

    1989-01-01

    The application of selected analysis techniques to low frequency cabin noise associated with advanced propeller engine installations is evaluated. Three design analysis techniques were chosen for evaluation including finite element analysis, statistical energy analysis (SEA), and a power flow method using element of SEA (computer program Propeller Aircraft Interior Noise). An overview of the three procedures is provided. Data from tests of a 727 airplane (modified to accept a propeller engine) were used to compare with predictions. Comparisons of predicted and measured levels at the end of the first year's effort showed reasonable agreement leading to the conclusion that each technique had value for propeller engine noise predictions on large commercial transports. However, variations in agreement were large enough to remain cautious and to lead to recommendations for further work with each technique. Assessment of the second year's results leads to the conclusion that the selected techniques can accurately predict trends and can be useful to a designer, but that absolute level predictions remain unreliable due to complexity of the aircraft structure and low modal densities.

  16. Noisy Icebergs: Low Frequency Acoustic Noise Levels Observed off Palmyra Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sirovic, A.; Tournadre, J.; Oleson, E.; Haxel, J. H.; Dziak, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    Annually tens of thousands of icebergs from Antarctica drift into the open ocean. In late 2007, two unusually large icebergs, B15a and C19a, entered the Pacific region of the Southern Ocean, and began rapidly disintegrating. Approximately 1.5 years later in April 2009, both icebergs had completely fragmented. An unappreciated aspect of the destructive processes that occur while these large icebergs break apart is the high acoustic source levels that are generated and the contribution of those signals to the ocean soundscape throughout the southern hemisphere. Matsumoto et al. (2014) found evidence of B15a and C19a affecting low-frequency noise levels below 36 Hz at 8°N, 110°W in the eastern equatorial Pacific at a range of 7,500 km. Similar evidence for disintegrating icebergs affecting soundscapes at a similar range was observed in data from 2007-2009 High-frequency Acoustic Recording Package recordings by Scripps Institution of Oceanography near Palmyra atoll in the central equatorial Pacific. Noise levels rose in 2007 as the icebergs entered the Pacific and decreased as the destructive processes declined and the icebergs disintegrated in 2009. This suggests that iceberg sounds are a significant natural noise source in the global ocean, and the area affected by the destructive processes during their decomposition can be as large as the entire southern hemisphere.

  17. Evidence of Cnidarians sensitivity to sound after exposure to low frequency noise underwater sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, Marta; Lenoir, Marc; Fontuño, José Manuel; Durfort, Mercè; van der Schaar, Mike; André, Michel

    2016-12-01

    Jellyfishes represent a group of species that play an important role in oceans, particularly as a food source for different taxa and as a predator of fish larvae and planktonic prey. The massive introduction of artificial sound sources in the oceans has become a concern to science and society. While we are only beginning to understand that non-hearing specialists like cephalopods can be affected by anthropogenic noises and regulation is underway to measure European water noise levels, we still don’t know yet if the impact of sound may be extended to other lower level taxa of the food web. Here we exposed two species of Mediterranean Scyphozoan medusa, Cotylorhiza tuberculata and Rhizostoma pulmo to a sweep of low frequency sounds. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed injuries in the statocyst sensory epithelium of both species after exposure to sound, that are consistent with the manifestation of a massive acoustic trauma observed in other species. The presence of acoustic trauma in marine species that are not hearing specialists, like medusa, shows the magnitude of the problem of noise pollution and the complexity of the task to determine threshold values that would help building up regulation to prevent permanent damage of the ecosystems.

  18. Comparison of low-frequency noise levels of the Concorde supersonic transport with other commercial service airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Mccurdy, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-two airplane noise recordings, made at several locations around Dulles International Airport, were analyzed to compare the low-frequency noise levels of the Concorde supersonic transport with those of other commercial jet airplanes. Comparisons of the relative low-frequency noise levels which were produced at close and distant locations for departures and arrivals were made for three noise measures: the sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave band centered at 20 Hz, the total sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave bands with center frequencies less than or equal to 125 Hz, and the total sound pressure level in the 1/3 octave bands with center frequencies less than or equal to 500 Hz. Although the absolute noise levels for Concorde were found, in general, to be higher than those for the other airplane types, the level of low-frequency noise of the Concorde relative to the perceived noise level (PNL), effective perceived noise level (EPNL), and overall sound pressure level (OASPL) was within the range established by the other airplane types, except for the arrival operations of four-engine, narrow-body airplanes. The measure OASPL was found to be a significantly better predictor of low-frequency noise level than PNL or EPNL.

  19. Double-gated Si NW FET sensors: Low-frequency noise and photoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparyan, F.; Khondkaryan, H.; Arakelyan, A.; Zadorozhnyi, I.; Pud, S.; Vitusevich, S.

    2016-08-01

    The transport, noise, and photosensitivity properties of an array of silicon nanowire (NW) p+-p-p+ field-effect transistors (FETs) are investigated. The peculiarities of photosensitivity and detectivity are analyzed over a wide spectrum range. The absorbance of p-Si NW shifts to the short wavelength region compared with bulk Si. The photocurrent and photosensitivity reach increased values in the UV range of the spectrum at 300 K. It is shown that sensitivity values can be tuned by the drain-source voltage and may reach record values of up to 2-4 A/W at a wavelength of 300 nm at room temperature. Low-frequency noise studies allow calculating the photodetectivity values, which increase with decreasing wavelength down to 300 nm. We show that the drain current of Si NW biochemical sensors substantially depends on pH value and the signal-to-noise ratio reaches the high value of 105. Increasing pH sensitivity with gate voltage is revealed for certain source-drain currents of pH-sensors based on Si NW FETs. The noise characteristic index decreases from 1.1 to 0.7 with the growth of the liquid gate voltage. Noise behavior is successfully explained in the framework of the correlated number-mobility unified fluctuation model. pH sensitivity increases as a result of the increase in liquid gate voltage, thus giving the opportunity to measure very low proton concentrations in the electrolyte medium at certain values of the liquid gate voltage.

  20. Double-gated Si NW FET sensors: Low-frequency noise and photoelectric properties

    SciT

    Gasparyan, F.; Forschungszentrum Jülich, Peter Grünberg Institute; Khondkaryan, H.

    2016-08-14

    The transport, noise, and photosensitivity properties of an array of silicon nanowire (NW) p{sup +}-p-p{sup +} field-effect transistors (FETs) are investigated. The peculiarities of photosensitivity and detectivity are analyzed over a wide spectrum range. The absorbance of p-Si NW shifts to the short wavelength region compared with bulk Si. The photocurrent and photosensitivity reach increased values in the UV range of the spectrum at 300 K. It is shown that sensitivity values can be tuned by the drain-source voltage and may reach record values of up to 2–4 A/W at a wavelength of 300 nm at room temperature. Low-frequency noise studies allow calculatingmore » the photodetectivity values, which increase with decreasing wavelength down to 300 nm. We show that the drain current of Si NW biochemical sensors substantially depends on pH value and the signal-to-noise ratio reaches the high value of 10{sup 5}. Increasing pH sensitivity with gate voltage is revealed for certain source-drain currents of pH-sensors based on Si NW FETs. The noise characteristic index decreases from 1.1 to 0.7 with the growth of the liquid gate voltage. Noise behavior is successfully explained in the framework of the correlated number-mobility unified fluctuation model. pH sensitivity increases as a result of the increase in liquid gate voltage, thus giving the opportunity to measure very low proton concentrations in the electrolyte medium at certain values of the liquid gate voltage.« less

  1. Chronic exposure to low frequency noise at moderate levels causes impaired balance in mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Haruka; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Ohgami, Kyoko; Fujii, Noriko; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kusudo, Tastuya; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz) at moderate levels of 60-70 dB sound pressure level (SPL) generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz) and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz) at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10-20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance.

  2. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensor with interferometric readout for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve both for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result, for example, is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is 70 mHz with a Q = 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning. Results on the readout system based on polarimetric homodyne Michelson interferometer is discussed.

  3. Chronic Exposure to Low Frequency Noise at Moderate Levels Causes Impaired Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Haruka; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Yajima, Ichiro; Iida, Machiko; Ohgami, Kyoko; Fujii, Noriko; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kusudo, Tastuya; Yamashita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz) at moderate levels of 60–70 dB sound pressure level (SPL) generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz) and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz) at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10–20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance. PMID:22768129

  4. Effects of large pressure amplitude low frequency noise in the parotid gland perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Mendes, João; da Fonseca, Jorge; Águas, Artur; Martins dos Santos, José

    2013-01-01

    In tissues and organs exposed to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise fibrosis occurs in the absence of inflammatory signs, which is thought to be a protective response. In the parotid gland the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue surrounds arteries, veins and the ductal tree. Perivasculo-ductal connective tissue is believed to function as a mechanical stabilizer of the glandular tissue. In order to quantify the proliferation of perivasculo-ductal connective tissue in large pressure amplitude low frequency noise-exposed rats we used sixty Wistar rats which were equally divided into 6 groups. One group kept in silence, and the remaining five exposed to continuous large pressure amplitude low frequency noise: g1-168h (1 week); g2-504h (3 weeks); g3-840h (5 weeks); g4-1512h (9 weeks); and g5-2184h (13 weeks). After exposure, parotid glands were removed and the perivasculo-ductal connective tissue area was measured in all groups. We applied ANOVA statistical analysis, using SPSS 13.0. The global trend is an increase in the average perivasculo-ductal connective tissue areas, that develops linearly and significantly with large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure time (p < 0.001). It has been suggested that the biological response to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure is associated with the need to maintain structural integrity. The structural reinforcement would be achieved by increased perivasculo-ductal connective tissue. Hence, these results show that in response to large pressure amplitude low frequency noise exposure, rat parotid glands increase their perivasculo-ductal connective tissue.

  5. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiulong; Yang, Kunde; Cao, Ran; Duan, Shunli

    2018-01-23

    Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP) and Volunteer Observation System (VOS) were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line array deployed near

  6. Risk Assessment of Neonatal Exposure to Low Frequency Noise Based on Balance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Oshino, Reina; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Li, Xiang; Kato, Masashi; Yajima, Ichiro; Kato, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    General electric devices and ventilation systems are known to generate low frequency noise (LFN) with frequencies of <100 Hz. Previous studies showed that exposure to LFN caused impairments of balance in humans and mice during adulthood. On the other hand, a previous study showed that noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were greater than those in general home or office environments. Therefore, it is possible that neonates have a potential risk to be exposed to LFN in the NICU. However, the risk of neonatal exposure to LFN remains unclear in humans and mice. In this study, male ICR mice were exposed to LFN at 100 Hz for 4 weeks after birth and then subjected to rotarod and beam crossing tests in order to assess LFN-mediated risk of imbalance during the neonatal period. Exposure to LFN at 70 dB, but not exposure to LFN up to 60 dB, during the neonatal period significantly decreased performance scores for rotarod and beam crossing tests compared to the scores of the control group. The number of calbindin-positive hair cells in the saccule and utricle was decreased in mice exposed to LFN at 70 dB for 4 weeks in the neonatal phase. Cessation of exposure for 10 weeks did not result in recovery of the decreased performance in rotarod and beam crossing tests. Thus, our results suggest that 70 dB is a possible threshold for exposure to LFN for 4 weeks during the neonatal period causing unrecoverable imbalance in mice. PMID:28275341

  7. Shapiro effect as a possible cause of the low-frequency pulsar timing noise in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larchenkova, T. I.; Kopeikin, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    A prolonged timing of millisecond pulsars has revealed low-frequency uncorrelated (infrared) noise, presumably of astrophysical origin, in the pulse arrival time (PAT) residuals for some of them. Currently available pulsar timing methods allow the statistical parameters of this noise to be reliably measured by decomposing the PAT residual function into orthogonal Fourier harmonics. In most cases, pulsars in globular clusters show a low-frequency modulation of their rotational phase and spin rate. The relativistic time delay of the pulsar signal in the curved spacetime of randomly distributed and moving globular cluster stars (the Shapiro effect) is suggested as a possible cause of this modulation. Extremely important (from an astrophysical point of view) information about the structure of the globular cluster core, which is inaccessible to study by other observational methods, could be obtained by analyzing the spectral parameters of the low-frequency noise caused by the Shapiro effect and attributable to the random passages of stars near the line of sight to the pulsar. Given the smallness of the aberration corrections that arise from the nonstationarity of the gravitational field of the randomly distributed ensemble of stars under consideration, a formula is derived for the Shapiro effect for a pulsar in a globular cluster. The derived formula is used to calculate the autocorrelation function of the low-frequency pulsar noise, the slope of its power spectrum, and the behavior of the σz statistic that characterizes the spectral properties of this noise in the form of a time function. The Shapiro effect under discussion is shown to manifest itself for large impact parameters as a low-frequency noise of the pulsar spin rate with a spectral index of n = -1.8 that depends weakly on the specific model distribution of stars in the globular cluster. For small impact parameters, the spectral index of the noise is n = -1.5.

  8. Low-Frequency Acoustic Noise Mitigation Characteristics of Metamaterials-Inspired Vibro-Impact Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhy, Anuj

    Acoustic absorbers like foams, fiberglass or liners have been used commonly in structures for infrastructural, industrial, automotive and aerospace applications to mitigate noise. However, these conventional materials have limited effectiveness to mitigate low-frequency (LF) acoustic waves with frequency less than 400 Hz owing to the need for impractically large mass or volume. LF acoustic waves contribute significantly towards environmental noise pollution as well as unwanted structural responses. Therefore, there is a need to develop lightweight, compact, structurally-integrated solutions to mitigate LF noise in several applications. Inspired by metamaterials, which are man-made structural materials that derive their unique dynamic behavior not just from material constituents but more so from engineered configurations, tuned mass-loaded membranes as vibro-impact attachments on a baseline structure are investigated to determine their performance as a LF acoustic barrier. The hypothesis is that the LF incident waves are up-converted via impact to higher modes in the baseline structure which are far more evanescent and may then be effectively mitigated using conventional means. Such Metamaterials-Inspired Vibro-Impact Structures (MIVIS) could be tuned to match the dominant frequency content of LF acoustic sources in specific applications. Prototype MIVIS unit cells were designed and tested to study the energy transfer mechanism via impact-induced frequency up-conversion, and the consequent sound transmission loss. Structural acoustic simulations were done to predict responses using models based on normal incidence transmission loss tests. Experimental proof-of-concept was achieved and further correlations to simulations were utilized to optimize the energy up-conversion mechanism using parametric studies. Up to 36 dB of sound transmission loss increase is obtained at the anti-resonance frequency (326 Hz) within a tunable LF bandwidth of about 200 Hz while impact

  9. Long term estimations of low frequency noise levels over water from an off-shore wind farm.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Karl; Almgren, Martin; Ohlsson, Esbjörn; Karasalo, Ilkka

    2014-03-01

    This article focuses on computations of low frequency sound propagation from an off-shore wind farm. Two different methods for sound propagation calculations are combined with meteorological data for every 3 hours in the year 2010 to examine the varying noise levels at a reception point at 13 km distance. It is shown that sound propagation conditions play a vital role in the noise impact from the off-shore wind farm and ordinary assessment methods can become inaccurate at longer propagation distances over water. Therefore, this paper suggests that methodologies to calculate noise immission with realistic sound speed profiles need to be combined with meteorological data over extended time periods to evaluate the impact of low frequency noise from modern off-shore wind farms.

  10. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    SciT

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong, E-mail: ewanghong@ntu.edu.sg; Ke, Feixiang

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  11. Low frequency noise in the unstable contact region of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Haodong; Wang, Hong; Ke, Feixiang

    2014-06-01

    The noise behavior of Au-to-Au microcontact for microelectromechanical system switches has been experimentally studied in the unstable contact region. The results suggest that the electrical conduction remains nonmetallic at the initial stage during contact formation due to the existence of alien films, and traps in the alien layer located at the contact interface could play an important role in determining the conduction noise. The conduction fluctuation induced by electron trapping-detrapping associated with the hydrocarbon layer is found to be an intrinsic noise source contributing to the low frequency noise in the unstable contact region.

  12. Vibroacoustic disease: biological effects of infrasound and low-frequency noise explained by mechanotransduction cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2007-01-01

    At present, infrasound (0-20 Hz) and low-frequency noise (20-500 Hz) (ILFN, 0-500 Hz) are agents of disease that go unchecked. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body pathology that develops in individuals excessively exposed to ILFN. VAD has been diagnosed within several professional groups employed within the aeronautical industry, and in other heavy industries. However, given the ubiquitous nature of ILFN and the absence of legislation concerning ILFN, VAD is increasingly being diagnosed among members of the general population, including children. VAD is associated with the abnormal growth of extra-cellular matrices (collagen and elastin), in the absence of an inflammatory process. In VAD, the end-product of collagen and elastin growth is reinforcement of structural integrity. This is seen in blood vessels, cardiac structures, trachea, lung, and kidney of both VAD patients and ILFN-exposed animals. VAD is, essentially, a mechanotransduction disease. Inter- and intra-cellular communication is achieved through both biochemical and mechanotranduction signalling. When the structural components of tissue are altered, as is seen in ILFN-exposed specimens, the mechanically mediated signalling is, at best, impaired. Common medical diagnostic tests, such as EKG, EEG, as well as many blood chemistry analyses, are based on the mal-function of biochemical signalling processes. VAD patients typically present normal values for these tests. However, when echocardiography, brain MRI or histological studies are performed, where structural changes can be identified, all consistently show significant changes in VAD patients and ILFN-exposed animals. Frequency-specific effects are not yet known, valid dose-responses have been difficult to identify, and large-scale epidemiological studies are still lacking.

  13. Health Effects Related to Wind Turbine Noise Exposure: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Background Wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects thereof have attracted substantial attention. Various symptoms such as sleep-related problems, headache, tinnitus and vertigo have been described by subjects suspected of having been exposed to wind turbine noise. Objective This review was conducted systematically with the purpose of identifying any reported associations between wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects. Data Sources A search of the scientific literature concerning the health-related effects of wind turbine noise was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. Study Eligibility Criteria All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. Results Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which decreases incrementally with increases in distance from the wind turbines. Likewise, evidence of a dose-response relationship between wind turbine noise linked to noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and possibly even psychological distress was present in the literature. Currently, there is no further existing statistically-significant evidence indicating any association between wind turbine noise exposure and tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo or headache. Limitations Selection bias and information bias of differing magnitudes were found to be present in all current studies investigating wind turbine noise exposure and adverse health effects. Only articles published in English, German or Scandinavian languages were reviewed. Conclusions Exposure to wind turbines does seem to increase the risk of annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance in a dose-response relationship. There appears, though, to be a tolerable level of around LAeq of 35 dB. Of the many other claimed health effects of wind turbine noise exposure reported in the literature, however, no conclusive evidence could be found

  14. Health effects related to wind turbine noise exposure: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects thereof have attracted substantial attention. Various symptoms such as sleep-related problems, headache, tinnitus and vertigo have been described by subjects suspected of having been exposed to wind turbine noise. This review was conducted systematically with the purpose of identifying any reported associations between wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects. A search of the scientific literature concerning the health-related effects of wind turbine noise was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which decreases incrementally with increases in distance from the wind turbines. Likewise, evidence of a dose-response relationship between wind turbine noise linked to noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and possibly even psychological distress was present in the literature. Currently, there is no further existing statistically-significant evidence indicating any association between wind turbine noise exposure and tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo or headache. Selection bias and information bias of differing magnitudes were found to be present in all current studies investigating wind turbine noise exposure and adverse health effects. Only articles published in English, German or Scandinavian languages were reviewed. Exposure to wind turbines does seem to increase the risk of annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance in a dose-response relationship. There appears, though, to be a tolerable level of around LAeq of 35 dB. Of the many other claimed health effects of wind turbine noise exposure reported in the literature, however, no conclusive evidence could be found. Future studies should focus on investigations aimed at objectively demonstrating whether or not

  15. Experimental characterization of turbulent inflow noise on a full-scale wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Steven; Oerlemans, Stefan; Palo, Scott

    2016-12-01

    An extensive experimental campaign was conducted on a 108-m diameter 2.3-MW wind turbine in order to assess the effect of inflow turbulence conditions on wind turbine acoustics. Over 50 h of continuous acoustic data was acquired at power-generating wind speeds. Twelve precision microphones were used, arranged in a one rotor radius ring about the turbine tower in order to assess the directivity of the noise emission. Turbine operational and atmospheric conditions were gathered simultaneously with acoustics measurements. The testing and analysis constitute perhaps the most thorough experimental characterization of turbulent inflow noise from a wind turbine to date. Turbulence intensities typically varied between 10 percent and 35 percent, and wind speeds covered most of the operational range of the wind turbine, from cut-on to well above its rated power. A method was developed for using blade-mounted accelerometers for determining the turbulence conditions in the immediate vicinity of the blades, which are the primary turbulence noise generating bodies. The method uses the blades' vibrational energy within a specified frequency range to estimate the overall turbulence conditions by assuming a von Kármán turbulence spectrum. Using this method, a clear positive correlation is shown between turbulence intensity and noise levels. The turbulence noise is dominant at low frequencies and is primarily observed in the upwind and downwind directions. Low frequency noise increases by as much as 6 dB for the range of turbulence conditions measured. Comparisons are made between the measured turbine noise directivity and theory using a simple acoustic model of the turbine as three point-sources. Strong agreement is found between the theoretical leading edge noise directivity model and the measured low frequency noise directivity.

  16. Low-frequency flicker noise in a MSM device made with single Si nanowire (diameter ≈ 50 nm).

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sudeshna; Das, Kaustuv; Raychaudhuri, Arup Kumar

    2013-04-10

    : Low-frequency flicker noise has been measured in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device made from a single strand of a single crystalline Si nanowire (diameter approximately 50 nm). Measurement was done with an alternating current (ac) excitation for the noise measurement superimposed with direct current (dc) bias that can be controlled independently. The observed noise has a spectral power density ∝1/fα. Application of the superimposed dc bias (retaining the ac bias unchanged) with a value more than the Schottky barrier height at the junction leads to a large suppression of the noise amplitude along with a change of α from 2 to ≈ 1. The dc bias-dependent part of the noise has been interpreted as arising from the interface region. The residual dc bias-independent flicker noise is suggested to arise from the single strand of Si nanowire, which has the conventional 1/f spectral power density.

  17. Low-frequency flicker noise in a MSM device made with single Si nanowire (diameter ≈ 50 nm)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency flicker noise has been measured in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device made from a single strand of a single crystalline Si nanowire (diameter approximately 50 nm). Measurement was done with an alternating current (ac) excitation for the noise measurement superimposed with direct current (dc) bias that can be controlled independently. The observed noise has a spectral power density ∝1/fα. Application of the superimposed dc bias (retaining the ac bias unchanged) with a value more than the Schottky barrier height at the junction leads to a large suppression of the noise amplitude along with a change of α from 2 to ≈ 1. The dc bias-dependent part of the noise has been interpreted as arising from the interface region. The residual dc bias-independent flicker noise is suggested to arise from the single strand of Si nanowire, which has the conventional 1/f spectral power density. PMID:23574820

  18. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiulong; Yang, Kunde; Cao, Ran; Duan, Shunli

    2018-01-01

    Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP) and Volunteer Observation System (VOS) were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line array deployed near

  19. Noise and low-frequency sound levels due to aerial fireworks and prediction of the occupational exposure of pyrotechnicians to noise

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tagayasu; Inaba, Ryoichi; Aoyama, Atsuhito

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the actual situation of noise and low-frequency sounds in firework events and their impact on pyrotechnicians. Methods: Data on firework noise and low-frequency sounds were obtained at a point located approximately 100 m away from the launch site of a firework display held in "A" City in 2013. We obtained the data by continuously measuring and analyzing the equivalent continuous sound level (Leq) and the one-third octave band of the noise and low-frequency sounds emanating from the major firework detonations, and predicted sound levels at the original launch site. Results: Sound levels of 100-115 dB and low-frequency sounds of 100-125 dB were observed at night. The maximum and mean Leq values were 97 and 95 dB, respectively. The launching noise level predicted from the sounds (85 dB) at the noise measurement point was 133 dB. Occupational exposure to noise for pyrotechnicians at the remote operation point (located 20-30 m away from the launch site) was estimated to be below 100 dB. Conclusions: Pyrotechnicians are exposed to very loud noise (>100 dB) at the launch point. We believe that it is necessary to implement measures such as fixing earplugs or earmuffs, posting a warning at the workplace, and executing a remote launching operation to prevent hearing loss caused by occupational exposure of pyrotechnicians to noise. It is predicted that both sound levels and low-frequency sounds would be reduced by approximately 35 dB at the remote operation site. PMID:27725489

  20. Noise and low-frequency sound levels due to aerial fireworks and prediction of the occupational exposure of pyrotechnicians to noise.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tagayasu; Inaba, Ryoichi; Aoyama, Atsuhito

    2016-11-29

    This study investigated the actual situation of noise and low-frequency sounds in firework events and their impact on pyrotechnicians. Data on firework noise and low-frequency sounds were obtained at a point located approximately 100 m away from the launch site of a firework display held in "A" City in 2013. We obtained the data by continuously measuring and analyzing the equivalent continuous sound level (Leq) and the one-third octave band of the noise and low-frequency sounds emanating from the major firework detonations, and predicted sound levels at the original launch site. Sound levels of 100-115 dB and low-frequency sounds of 100-125 dB were observed at night. The maximum and mean Leq values were 97 and 95 dB, respectively. The launching noise level predicted from the sounds (85 dB) at the noise measurement point was 133 dB. Occupational exposure to noise for pyrotechnicians at the remote operation point (located 20-30 m away from the launch site) was estimated to be below 100 dB. Pyrotechnicians are exposed to very loud noise (>100 dB) at the launch point. We believe that it is necessary to implement measures such as fixing earplugs or earmuffs, posting a warning at the workplace, and executing a remote launching operation to prevent hearing loss caused by occupational exposure of pyrotechnicians to noise. It is predicted that both sound levels and low-frequency sounds would be reduced by approximately 35 dB at the remote operation site.

  1. Ultra-low noise high electron mobility transistors for high-impedance and low-frequency deep cryogenic readout electronics

    SciT

    Dong, Q.; Liang, Y. X.; Ferry, D.

    2014-07-07

    We report on the results obtained from specially designed high electron mobility transistors at 4.2 K: the gate leakage current can be limited lower than 1 aA, and the equivalent input noise-voltage and noise-current at 1 Hz can reach 6.3 nV/Hz{sup 1∕2} and 20 aA/Hz{sup 1∕2}, respectively. These results open the way to realize high performance low-frequency readout electronics under very low-temperature conditions.

  2. Noise model for low-frequency through-the-Earth communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Frederick H.

    2010-12-01

    Analysis and simulation of through-the-Earth communication links and signal processing techniques require a more complete noise model than is needed for the analysis of conventional communication systems. This paper presents a multicomponent noise model that includes impulsive characteristics, direction-of-arrival characteristics, and effects of local geology. The noise model is derived from theoretical considerations and confirmed by field tests.

  3. Low frequency noise and whole-body vibration cause increased levels of sister chromatid exchange in splenocytes of exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, M J; Dias, A; Barreta, A; Nogueira, P J; Castelo-Branco, N A A; Boavida, M G

    2002-01-01

    Chronic exposure to low frequency (LF) noise and whole-body vibration (WBV) induces both physiological and psychological alterations in man. Recently, we have shown that long-term occupational exposure to LF noise and WBV produces genotoxic effects in man expressed as an increase in sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels in lymphocytes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether the observed effect could be reproduced in a murine model and, if so, which of the agents, LF noise alone or in combination with WBV, would be instrumental in the SCE induction. SCEs were analyzed in spleen lymphocytes of mice exposed to LF noise alone and in combination with WBV for 300 and 600 hr. An effect at the cell cycle kinetics level was also investigated. The results revealed significant increases in the mean SCE number per cell and in the proportion of cells with high frequency of SCEs (HFCs) in lymphocytes of mice submitted to combined noise and WBV over controls. No significant differences were found between single noise-exposed and control mice. A cell cycle delay was observed exclusively in the noise and WBV exposure groups. In conclusion, we demonstrated that, as in exposed workers, prolonged exposure to the combination of LF noise and WBV determines an increase in SCE level in mice while LF noise alone is not effective in SCE induction. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Opposite effects of high- and low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation probed with visual motion adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Gianluca; Camilleri, Rebecca; Moret, Beatrice; Ghin, Filippo; Pavan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) is a recent neuro-modulation technique whose effects at both behavioural and neural level are still debated. Here we employed the well-known phenomenon of motion after-effect (MAE) in order to investigate the effects of high- vs. low-frequency tRNS on motion adaptation and recovery. Participants were asked to estimate the MAE duration following prolonged adaptation (20 s) to a complex moving pattern, while being stimulated with either sham or tRNS across different blocks. Different groups were administered with either high- or low-frequency tRNS. Stimulation sites were either bilateral human MT complex (hMT+) or frontal areas. The results showed that, whereas no effects on MAE duration were induced by stimulating frontal areas, when applied to the bilateral hMT+, high-frequency tRNS caused a significant decrease in MAE duration whereas low-frequency tRNS caused a significant corresponding increase in MAE duration. These findings indicate that high- and low-frequency tRNS have opposed effects on the adaptation-dependent unbalance between neurons tuned to opposite motion directions, and thus on neuronal excitability. PMID:27934947

  5. A numerical model for ocean ultra-low frequency noise: wave-generated acoustic-gravity and Rayleigh modes.

    PubMed

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Lavanant, Thibaut; Obrebski, Mathias; Marié, Louis; Royer, Jean-Yves; d'Eu, Jean-François; Howe, Bruce M; Lukas, Roger; Aucan, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    The generation of ultra-low frequency acoustic noise (0.1 to 1 Hz) by the nonlinear interaction of ocean surface gravity waves is well established. More controversial are the quantitative theories that attempt to predict the recorded noise levels and their variability. Here a single theoretical framework is used to predict the noise level associated with propagating pseudo-Rayleigh modes and evanescent acoustic-gravity modes. The latter are dominant only within 200 m from the sea surface, in shallow or deep water. At depths larger than 500 m, the comparison of a numerical noise model with hydrophone records from two open-ocean sites near Hawaii and the Kerguelen islands reveal: (a) Deep ocean acoustic noise at frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz is consistent with the Rayleigh wave theory, in which the presence of the ocean bottom amplifies the noise by 10 to 20 dB; (b) in agreement with previous results, the local maxima in the noise spectrum support the theoretical prediction for the vertical structure of acoustic modes; and (c) noise level and variability are well predicted for frequencies up to 0.4 Hz. Above 0.6 Hz, the model results are less accurate, probably due to the poor estimation of the directional properties of wind-waves with frequencies higher than 0.3 Hz.

  6. Simple analytical model for low-frequency frequency-modulation noise of monolithic tunable lasers.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Tam N; Ó Dúill, Seán P; Nguyen, Lim; Rusch, Leslie A; Barry, Liam P

    2014-02-10

    We employ simple analytical models to construct the entire frequency-modulation (FM)-noise spectrum of tunable semiconductor lasers. Many contributions to the laser FM noise can be clearly identified from the FM-noise spectrum, such as standard Weiner FM noise incorporating laser relaxation oscillation, excess FM noise due to thermal fluctuations, and carrier-induced refractive index fluctuations from stochastic carrier generation in the passive tuning sections. The contribution of the latter effect is identified by noting a correlation between part of the FM-noise spectrum with the FM-modulation response of the passive sections. We pay particular attention to the case of widely tunable lasers with three independent tuning sections, mainly the sampled-grating distributed Bragg reflector laser, and compare with that of a distributed feedback laser. The theoretical model is confirmed with experimental measurements, with the calculations of the important phase-error variance demonstrating excellent agreement.

  7. Spectral Discrete Probability Density Function of Measured Wind Turbine Noise in the Far Field

    PubMed Central

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources. PMID:25905097

  8. A Study of Acoustic Reflections in Full-Scale Rotor Low Frequency Noise Measurements Acquired in Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbely, Natasha L.; Sim, Ben W.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Goulding, Pat, II

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining full-scale rotor low frequency noise measurements in wind tunnels are addressed via residual sound reflections due to non-ideal anechoic wall treatments. Examples illustrated with the Boeing-SMART rotor test in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel facility demonstrated that these reflections introduced distortions in the measured acoustic time histories that are not representative of free-field rotor noise radiation. A simplified reflection analysis, based on the method of images, is used to examine the sound measurement quality in such "less-than-anechoic" environment. Predictions of reflection-adjusted acoustic time histories are qualitatively shown to account for some of the spurious fluctuations observed in wind tunnel noise measurements

  9. Low-frequency Electronic Transport Noise in La2-xBaxCuO4 Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Adam; Xin, Yizhou; van Harlingen, Dale

    2013-03-01

    In the pseudogap regime, high temperature superconductors often exhibit electronic structure, such as charge stripes. Charge stripes pinned to disorder have been predicted to contribute to low-frequency resistance fluctuations when sample dimensions are comparable to the size of stripe domains (Carlson, 2006). We are extending our previous studies of resistance fluctuations in YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Bonetti, 2004; Caplan, 2010) to thin films of La-based cuprates expected to have a more stable stripe phase, particularly in the regime near 1/8-filling. We present measurements of the low-frequency electronic transport in La2-xBaxCuO4 nanowires fabricated by pulsed laser deposition and lithographic techniques. We discuss temperature dependence of the power spectral density and its relevance to correlated electron phases above Tc. This research was supported by the DOE-DMS under grant DE-FG02-07ER46453, through the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  10. Suppression of low-frequency charge noise in superconducting resonators by surface spin desorption.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, S E; Faoro, L; Burnett, J; Adamyan, A A; Tzalenchuk, A Ya; Kubatkin, S E; Lindström, T; Danilov, A V

    2018-03-20

    Noise and decoherence due to spurious two-level systems located at material interfaces are long-standing issues for solid-state quantum devices. Efforts to mitigate the effects of two-level systems have been hampered by a lack of knowledge about their chemical and physical nature. Here, by combining dielectric loss, frequency noise and on-chip electron spin resonance measurements in superconducting resonators, we demonstrate that desorption of surface spins is accompanied by an almost tenfold reduction in the charge-induced frequency noise in the resonators. These measurements provide experimental evidence that simultaneously reveals the chemical signatures of adsorbed magnetic moments and highlights their role in generating charge noise in solid-state quantum devices.

  11. Underwater, low-frequency noise in a coastal sea turtle habitat.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Y; Morreale, S J; Clark, C W; Greene, C H; Richmond, M E

    2005-03-01

    Underwater sound was recorded in one of the major coastal foraging areas for juvenile sea turtles in the Peconic Bay Estuary system in Long Island, New York. The recording season of the underwater environment coincided with the sea turtle activity season in an inshore area where there is considerable boating and recreational activity, especially during the summer between Independence Day and Labor Day. Within the range of sea turtle hearing, average noise pressure reached 110 dB during periods of high human activity and diminished proportionally, down to 80 dB, with decreasing human presence. Therefore, during much of the season when sea turtles are actively foraging in New York waters, their coastal habitats are flooded with underwater noise. During the period of highest human activity, average noise pressures within the range of frequencies heard by sea turtles were greater by over two orders of magnitude (26 dB) than during the lowest period of human activity. Sea turtles undoubtedly are exposed to high levels of noise, most of which is anthropogenic. Results suggest that continued exposure to existing high levels of pervasive anthropogenic noise in vital sea turtle habitats and any increase in noise could affect sea turtle behavior and ecology.

  12. Prediction and measurement of low-frequency harmonic noise of a hovering model helicopter rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarawal, H. R.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Far-field acoustic data for a model helicopter rotor have been gathered in a large open-jet, acoustically treated wind tunnel with the rotor operating in hover and out of ground-effect. The four-bladed Boeing 360 model rotor with advanced airfoils, planform, and tip shape was run over a range of conditions typical of today's modern helicopter main rotor. Near in-plane acoustic measurements were compared with two independent implementations of classical linear theory. Measured steady thrust and torque were used together with a free-wake analysis (to predict the thrust and drag distributions along the rotor radius) as input to this first-principles theoretical approach. Good agreement between theory and experiment was shown for both amplitude and phase for measurements made in those positions that minimized distortion of the radiated acoustic signature at low-frequencies.

  13. The low-frequency continuum as observed in the solar wind from ISEE 3 - Thermal electrostatic noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, S.; Steinberg, J.-L.; Epstein, G.; Tilloles, P.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The low frequency continuum (LFC) noise between 30 and 200 kHz has been investigated from the ISEE 3 spacecraft in the solar wind by means of a radio astronomy experiment more sensitive than previously available. It is demonstrated that the LFC radiation observed in the solar wind is in the form of longitudinal plasma waves rather than transverse electromagnetic waves. The observed spectral characteristics are found to be a function of antenna length. In addition, both the absence of antenna spin modulation and the fact that these plasma waves do not propagate to large distances imply a local origin for the LFC.

  14. Low-frequency 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors: Relative contributions of the channel and contacts

    SciT

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C.; Samnakay, R.

    2014-04-14

    We report on the results of the low-frequency (1/f, where f is frequency) noise measurements in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors revealing the relative contributions of the MoS{sub 2} channel and Ti/Au contacts to the overall noise level. The investigation of the 1/f noise was performed for both as fabricated and aged transistors. It was established that the McWhorter model of the carrier number fluctuations describes well the 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors, in contrast to what is observed in graphene devices. The trap densities extracted from the 1/f noise data for MoS{sub 2} transistors, are 2 × 10{sup 19} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −3}more » and 2.5 × 10{sup 20} eV{sup −1}cm{sup −3} for the as fabricated and aged devices, respectively. It was found that the increase in the noise level of the aged MoS{sub 2} transistors is due to the channel rather than the contact degradation. The obtained results are important for the proposed electronic applications of MoS{sub 2} and other van der Waals materials.« less

  15. Suspending Effect on Low-Frequency Charge Noise in Graphene Quantum Dot

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiang-Xiang; Li, Hai-Ou; You, Jie; Han, Tian-Yi; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Charge noise is critical in the performance of gate-controlled quantum dots (QDs). Such information is not yet available for QDs made out of the new material graphene, where both substrate and edge states are known to have important effects. Here we show the 1/f noise for a microscopic graphene QD is substantially larger than that for a macroscopic graphene field-effect transistor (FET), increasing linearly with temperature. To understand its origin, we suspended the graphene QD above the substrate. In contrast to large area graphene FETs, we find that a suspended graphene QD has an almost-identical noise level as an unsuspended one. Tracking noise levels around the Coulomb blockade peak as a function of gate voltage yields potential fluctuations of order 1 μeV, almost one order larger than in GaAs/GaAlAs QDs. Edge states and surface impurities rather than substrate-induced disorders, appear to dominate the 1/f noise, thus affecting the coherency of graphene nano-devices. PMID:25634250

  16. Suspending effect on low-frequency charge noise in graphene quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiang-Xiang; Li, Hai-Ou; You, Jie; Han, Tian-Yi; Cao, Gang; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-30

    Charge noise is critical in the performance of gate-controlled quantum dots (QDs). Such information is not yet available for QDs made out of the new material graphene, where both substrate and edge states are known to have important effects. Here we show the 1/f noise for a microscopic graphene QD is substantially larger than that for a macroscopic graphene field-effect transistor (FET), increasing linearly with temperature. To understand its origin, we suspended the graphene QD above the substrate. In contrast to large area graphene FETs, we find that a suspended graphene QD has an almost-identical noise level as an unsuspended one. Tracking noise levels around the Coulomb blockade peak as a function of gate voltage yields potential fluctuations of order 1 μeV, almost one order larger than in GaAs/GaAlAs QDs. Edge states and surface impurities rather than substrate-induced disorders, appear to dominate the 1/f noise, thus affecting the coherency of graphene nano-devices.

  17. Low frequency gyro-synchrotron radio noise from the earth's outer radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of detecting cyclotron and synchrotron noise from superthermal electrons is analyzed for the frequency range 30 kHz 300 kHz. Due to the earth's ionosphere, ground based observation of this noise is improbable. Therefore, the calculations are made for an observer in the interplanetary medium. In particular, the location is chosen in the geomagnetic equatorial plane at a geocentric distance of 32 earth radii. This position of the observer allows the theoretical results to be compared directly with data obtained from the radio astronomy experiment aboard the IMP-6 spacecraft.

  18. Effects of Negative-Bias-Temperature-Instability on Low-Frequency Noise in SiGe $${p}$$ MOSFETs

    DOE PAGES

    Duan, Guo Xing; Hachtel, Jordan A.; Zhang, En Xia; ...

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we have measured the low-frequency 1/f noise of Si 0.55Ge 0.45 pMOSFETs with a Si capping layer and SiO 2/HfO 2/TiN gate stack as a function of frequency, gate voltage, and temperature (100-440 K). The magnitude of the excess drain voltage noise power spectral density (Svd) is unaffected by negative-bias-temperature stress (NBTS) for temperatures below ~250 K, but increases significantly at higher temperatures. The noise is described well by the Dutta-Horn model before and after NBTS. The noise at higher measuring temperatures is attributed primarily to oxygen-vacancy and hydrogen-related defects in the SiO 2 and HfO 2more » layers. Finally, at lower measuring temperatures, the noise also appears to be affected strongly by hydrogen-dopant interactions in the SiGe layer of the device.« less

  19. Electrical transport and low-frequency noise in chemical vapor deposited single-layer MoS2 devices.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Amani, Matin; Motayed, Abhishek; Shah, Pankaj B; Birdwell, A Glen; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Dubey, Madan; Li, Qiliang; Davydov, Albert V

    2014-04-18

    We have studied temperature-dependent (77-300 K) electrical characteristics and low-frequency noise (LFN) in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based back-gated field-effect transistors (FETs). Electrical characterization and LFN measurements were conducted on MoS2 FETs with Al2O3 top-surface passivation. We also studied the effect of top-surface passivation etching on the electrical characteristics of the device. Significant decrease in channel current and transconductance was observed in these devices after the Al2O3 passivation etching. For passivated devices, the two-terminal resistance variation with temperature showed a good fit to the activation energy model, whereas for the etched devices the trend indicated a hopping transport mechanism. A significant increase in the normalized drain current noise power spectral density (PSD) was observed after the etching of the top passivation layer. The observed channel current noise was explained using a standard unified model incorporating carrier number fluctuation and correlated surface mobility fluctuation mechanisms. Detailed analysis of the gate-referred noise voltage PSD indicated the presence of different trapping states in passivated devices when compared to the etched devices. Etched devices showed weak temperature dependence of the channel current noise, whereas passivated devices exhibited near-linear temperature dependence.

  20. Measurement and Simulation of Low Frequency Impulse Noise and Ground Vibration from Airblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, L. R.; Kaynia, A. M.; Madshus, C.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of low frequency ground vibration and dynamic overpressure in air using two different numerical models. Analysis is based on actual recordings during blast tests at Haslemoen test site in Norway in June 1994. It is attempted to use the collected airblast-induced overpressures and ground vibrations in order to asses the applicability of the two models. The first model is a computer code which is based on a global representation of ground and atmospheric layers, a so-called Fast Field Program (FFP). A viscoelastic and a poroelastic version of this model is used. The second model is a two-dimensionalmoving-loadformulation for the propagation of airblast over ground. The poroelastic FFP gives the most complete and realistic reproduction of the processes involved, including decay of peak overpressure amplitude and dominant frequency of signals with range. It turns out that themoving-loadformulation does not provide a complete description of the physics involved when the speed of sound in air is different from the ground wavespeeds.

  1. Modulation of cochlear responses in the guinea pig by low-frequency, phase-shifted maskers following noise trauma.

    PubMed

    Hoehmann, D; Müller, S; Dornhoffer, J L

    1995-01-01

    Low-frequency acoustic biasing using an intensive phase-shifted, low-frequency masker was studied according to its ability to determine disorders of cochlear micromechanics following noise trauma in the guinea pig as animal model. Statistical analyses proved that this technique allowed electrophysiological differentiation of controls versus groups with different degrees of experimentally induced threshold shifts. To substantiate group differences an intensity of at least 70 dB SPL was required for the 52 Hz masker and the difference in relation to the test-tone intensity had to be +/- 10 or +/- 20 dB SPL. The noise-traumatized cochlea could be identified by means of a threshold shift for the 5 microV pseudothreshold, a low modulation span of the compound action potential amplitude (< 25-50 microV frequency dependent), and reduced positive summating potential amplitude with negative non-modulating values within the different measurement phases for 1 and 2 kHz stimulation.

  2. The Impact of ENSO on Extratropical Low Frequency Noise in Seasonal Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried D.; Suarez, Max J.; Chang, Yehui; Branstator, Grant

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the uncertainty in forecasts of the January-February-March (JFM) mean extratropical circulation, and how that uncertainty is modulated by the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The analysis is based on ensembles of hindcasts made with an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) forced with sea surface temperatures observed during; the 1983 El Nino and 1989 La Nina events. The AGCM produces pronounced interannual differences in the magnitude of the extratropical seasonal mean noise (intra-ensemble variability). The North Pacific, in particular, shows extensive regions where the 1989 seasonal mean noise kinetic energy (SKE), which is dominated by a "PNA-like" spatial structure, is more than twice that of the 1983 forecasts. The larger SKE in 1989 is associated with a larger than normal barotropic conversion of kinetic energy from the mean Pacific jet to the seasonal mean noise. The generation of SKE due to sub-monthly transients also shows substantial interannual differences, though these are much smaller than the differences in the mean flow conversions. An analysis of the Generation of monthly mean noise kinetic energy (NIKE) and its variability suggests that the seasonal mean noise is predominantly a statistical residue of variability resulting from dynamical processes operating on monthly and shorter times scales. A stochastically-forced barotropic model (linearized about the AGCM's 1983 and 1989 base states) is used to further assess the role of the basic state, submonthly transients, and tropical forcing, in modulating the uncertainties in the seasonal AGCM forecasts. When forced globally with spatially-white noise, the linear model generates much larger variance for the 1989 base state, consistent with the AGCM results. The extratropical variability for the 1989 base state is dominanted by a single eigenmode, and is strongly coupled with forcing over tropical western Pacific and the Indian Ocean, again consistent with the AGCM results

  3. Low frequency seismic noise acquisition and analysis in the Homestake Mine with tunable monolithic horizontal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Giordano, Gerardo; Harms, Jan; Mandic, Vuk; Sajeva, Angelo; Trancynger, Thomas; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe the scientific data recorded along one month of data taking of two mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor prototypes located in a blind-ended (side) tunnel 2000 ft deep in the Homestake (South Dakota, USA) mine chosen to host the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). The two mechanical monolithic sensors, developed at the University of Salerno, are placed, in thermally insulating enclosures, onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock, and behind a sound-proofing wall. The main goal of this experiment is to characterize the Homestake site in the frequency band 10-4 - 30Hz and to estimate the level of Newtonian noise in a deep underegropund laboratory. The horizontal semidiurnal Earth tide and the Peterson's New Low Noise Model have been measured.

  4. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    rotating -frame cyclic variations, of two- per-rev or greater, to augment blade motions and blade airloads. Recent studies (Refs. 5, 6) have...Advancing tip Mach number MH Rotational (Hover) tip Mach number NM Noise metric, peak-to-peak value R Blade radius α...from a full-scale, 2,900 lb. gross weight, four-bladed S-434TM helicopter. The rotor head, blade cuffs , and swash-plate were production S

  5. Analysis of the cochlear microphonic to a low-frequency tone embedded in filtered noise

    PubMed Central

    Chertoff, Mark E.; Earl, Brian R.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Sorensen, Janna L.

    2012-01-01

    The cochlear microphonic was recorded in response to a 733 Hz tone embedded in noise that was high-pass filtered at 25 different frequencies. The amplitude of the cochlear microphonic increased as the high-pass cutoff frequency of the noise increased. The amplitude growth for a 60 dB SPL tone was steeper and saturated sooner than that of an 80 dB SPL tone. The growth for both signal levels, however, was not entirely cumulative with plateaus occurring at about 4 and 7 mm from the apex. A phenomenological model of the electrical potential in the cochlea that included a hair cell probability function and spiral geometry of the cochlea could account for both the slope of the growth functions and the plateau regions. This suggests that with high-pass-filtered noise, the cochlear microphonic recorded at the round window comes from the electric field generated at the source directed towards the electrode and not down the longitudinal axis of the cochlea. PMID:23145616

  6. Vertical Directionality of Low Frequency Ambient Noise in the South Fiji Basin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-21

    6611 MAW- 10 414 -F- SIM04 To get a perspective on the size of the Autobuoy, it is shown here in a pre- deployment mode over the stern of an AGOR ship...The only practical limitation regarding noise measurements is a reluctance to deploy and retrieve in high sea I . , i, i j i, H i iii i • S TD6611 DAY...Diachok) 7 NOSC, San Diego (J. R. Lovett; J. L. Stewart (Code 724); Library) 3 NPS, Monterey (Prof. C. N. Mooers, Prof. H . Medwin, Library) 3 NORDA, NSTL

  7. Effect of CoFeB electrode compositions on low frequency magnetic noise in tunneling magnetoresistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniowski, P.; Dabek, M.; Wrona, J.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    We study the effect of CoFeB electrode compositions on frequency dependent magnetic noise in tunneling magnetoresistance sensors with variable field sensitivity. We use the relationship between the normalized 1/f noise parameter (αt) and the magnetoresistance sensitivity product (MSP) to compare the magnetic noise of sensors with Co40Fe40B20, Co60Fe20B20, and Co20Fe60B20 electrodes. We observed the lowest slope of the αt vs. MSP curve of 9.1 × 10-13 μm3 T and a 1/f noise corner as low as 300 Hz for the sensors with Co60Fe20B20 electrodes. Furthermore, all sensors at a specific value of the magnetoresistance sensitivity product showed a deviation from the linear relationship between αt and MSP. The results show that in the design of high sensitivity CoFeB-MgO-CoFeB based tunneling magnetoresistance sensors for low field detection, selection of CoFeB electrodes is important and can be used to significantly improve the low frequency field detection limit.

  8. Interface studies of N2 plasma-treated ZnSnO nanowire transistors using low-frequency noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongmin; Kim, Hwansoo; Janes, David B; Ju, Sanghyun

    2013-08-02

    Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires, the quality of nanowire-insulator interfaces as well as the nanowire surface characteristics significantly influence the electrical characteristics of nanowire transistors (NWTs). To improve the electrical characteristics by doping or post-processing, it is important to evaluate the interface characteristics and stability of NWTs. In this study, we have synthesized ZnSnO (ZTO) nanowires using the chemical vapor deposition method, characterized the composition of ZTO nanowires using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and fabricated ZTO NWTs. We have characterized the current-voltage characteristics and low-frequency noise of ZTO NWTs in order to investigate the effects of interface states on subthreshold slope (SS) and the noise before and after N2 plasma treatments. The as-fabricated device exhibited a SS of 0.29 V/dec and Hooge parameter of ~1.20 × 10(-2). Upon N2 plasma treatment with N2 gas flow rate of 40 sccm (20 sccm), the SS improved to 0.12 V/dec (0.21 V/dec) and the Hooge parameter decreased to ~4.99 × 10(-3) (8.14 × 10(-3)). The interface trap densities inferred from both SS and low-frequency noise decrease upon plasma treatment, with the highest flow rate yielding the smallest trap density. These results demonstrate that the N2 plasma treatment decreases the interface trap states and defects on ZTO nanowires, thereby enabling the fabrication of high-quality nanowire interfaces.

  9. Low frequency noise fiber delay stabilized laser with reduced sensitivity to acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argence, B.; Clivati, C.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Holleville, D.; Faure, B.; Lemonde, P.; Santarelli, G.

    2017-11-01

    Lasers with sub-hertz line-width and fractional frequency instability around 1×10-15 for 0.1 s to 10 s averaging time are currently realized by locking onto an ultra-stable Fabry-Perot cavity using the Pound-Drever-Hall method. This powerful method requires tight alignment of free space optical components, precise polarization adjustment and spatial mode matching. To circumvent these issues, we use an all-fiber Michelson interferometer with a long fiber spool as a frequency reference and a heterodyne detection technique with a fibered acousto optical modulator (AOM)1. At low Fourier frequencies, the frequency noise of our system is mainly limited by mechanical vibrations, an issue that has already been explored in the field of optoelectronic oscillators.2,3,4

  10. Effects of the intensity of masking noise on ear canal recorded low-frequency cochlear microphonic waveforms in normal hearing subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Compared to auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), cochlear microphonics (CMs) may be more appropriate to serve as a supplement to the test of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Researchers have shown that low-frequency CMs from the apical cochlea are measurable at the tympanic membrane using high-pass masking noise. Our objective is to study the effect of such noise at different intensities on low-frequency CMs recorded at the ear canal, which is not completely known. Six components were involved in this CM measurement including an ear canal electrode (1), a relatively long and low-frequency toneburst (2), and high-pass masking noise at different intensities (3). The rest components include statistical analysis based on multiple human subjects (4), curve modeling based on amplitudes of CM waveforms (CMWs) and noise intensity (5), and a technique based on electrocochleography (ECochG or ECoG) (6). Results show that low-frequency CMWs appeared clearly. The CMW amplitude decreased with an increase in noise level. It decreased first slowly, then faster, and finally slowly again. In conclusion, when masked with high-pass noise, the low-frequency CMs are measurable at the human ear canal. Such noise reduces the low-frequency CM amplitude. The reduction is noise-intensity dependent but not completely linear. The reduction may be caused by the excited basal cochlea which the low-frequency has to travel and pass through. Although not completely clear, six mechanisms related to such reduction are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Notched-noise precursors improve detection of low-frequency amplitude modulationa)

    PubMed Central

    Almishaal, Ali; Bidelman, Gavin M.; Jennings, Skyler G.

    2017-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) detection was measured with a short (50 ms), high-frequency carrier as a function of carrier level (Experiment I) and modulation frequency (Experiment II) for conditions with or without a notched-noise precursor. A longer carrier (500 ms) was also included in Experiment I. When the carrier was preceded by silence (no precursor condition) AM detection thresholds worsened for moderate-level carriers compared to lower- or higher-level carriers, resulting in a “mid-level hump.” AM detection thresholds with a precursor were better than those without a precursor, primarily for moderate-to-high level carriers, thus eliminating the mid-level hump in AM detection. When the carrier was 500 ms, AM thresholds improved by a constant (across all levels) relative to AM thresholds with a precursor, consistent with the longer carrier providing more “looks” to detect the AM signal. Experiment II revealed that improved AM detection with compared to without a precursor is limited to low-modulation frequencies (<60 Hz). These results are consistent with (1) a reduction in cochlear gain over the course of the precursor perhaps via the medial olivocochlear reflex or (2) a form of perceptual enhancement which may be mediated by adaptation of inhibition. PMID:28147582

  12. Attenuation of low frequency duct noise by a flute-like silencer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lixi

    2009-09-01

    A broadband, duct noise reflection mechanism is introduced in this theoretical study. It consists of side-branch cavities filled with a light gas, e.g. helium, and covered by impervious, tensioned membranes as two apertures, one at the inlet and another at the exit. Incident waves are scattered by the membranes into two passages, one through the central duct and another through the cavity bypass. Due to the faster speed of sound in the bypass, a Herschel-Quincke tube resonance appears and gives a peak in the transmission loss spectrum. Another resonance occurs when the frequency of the incident sound coincides with the vibroacoustic frequency determined by the membrane tension and inertia contributions from the membrane and the fluid media. With appropriate tensile stress, the trough between the two spectral peaks can be elevated to a desirable high level, e.g. 10 dB, and the crucial factor is identified as the low density of the cavity gas filling. The broadband sound reflection performance is comparable with and even exceeds that of the drum-like silencer [L. Huang, Parametric study of a drum-like silencer, Journal of Sound and Vibration 269 (2004) 467-488] with the same cavity geometry, but the current mechanism requires a low tensile stress which is much easier to implement in practice.

  13. Low frequency electrical noise across contacts between a normal conductor and superconducting bulk YBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J.; Chen, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    Virtually every device that makes use of the new ceramic superconductors will need normal conductor to superconductor contacts. The current-voltage and electrical noise characteristics of these contacts could become important design considerations. I-V and low frequency electrical noise measurements are presented on contacts between a normal conductor and superconducting polycrystalline YBa2Cu3O7. The contacts were formed by first sputtering gold palladium pads onto the surface of the bulk superconductor and then using silver epoxy to attach a wire(s) to each pad. Voltage across the contacts was found for small current densities. The voltage spectral density, S sub v(f), a quantity often used to characterize electrical noise, very closely followed an empirical relationship given by S sub v(f) = C(VR)sq/f, where V is the DC voltage across the contact, R is the contact resistance, F is frequency, and C is a contant found to be 2 x 10(exp -10)/Omega sq at 78 K. This relationship was found to be independent of contact area, contact geometry, sample fabrication technique, and sample density.

  14. Low frequency electrical noise across contacts between a normal conductor and superconducting bulk YBa2Cu3O7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J.; Chen, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Virtually every device that makes use of the new ceramic superconductors will need normal conductor to supercondutor contacts. The current-voltage and electrical noise characteristics of these contacts could be become important design considerations. I-V and low frequency electrical noise measurements are presented on contacts between a normal conductor and superconducting polycrystalline YBa2Cu3O7. The contacts were formed by first sputtering gold palladium pads onto the surface of the bulk superconductor and then using silver epoxy to attach a wire(s) to each pad. Voltage across the contacts was found for small current densities. The voltage spectral density, S sub v(f), a quanity often used to characterize electrical noise, very closely followed an empirical relationship given by, S sub v(f) = C(VR)sq/f, where V is the DC voltage across the contact, R is the contact resistance, F is frequency, and C is a contant found to be 2 x 10(exp -10)/Omega sq at 78 K. This relationship was found to be independent of contact area, contact geometry, sample fabrication technique, and sample density.

  15. The quasi-periodic oscillations and very low frequency noise of Scorpius X-1 as transient chaos - A dripping handrail?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas; Young, Karl; Donoho, David L.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) characteristic of many accretion sources are different aspects of the same physical process. We analyzed a long, high time resolution EXOSAT observation of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Sco X-1. The X-ray luminosity varies stochastically on time scales from milliseconds to hours. The nature of this variability - as quantified with both power spectrum analysis and a new wavelet technique, the scalegram - agrees well with the dripping handrail accretion model, a simple dynamical system which exhibits transient chaos. In this model both the QPO and VLFN are produced by radiation from blobs with a wide size distribution, resulting from accretion and subsequent diffusion of hot gas, the density of which is limited by an unspecified instability to lie below a threshold.

  16. The Noisiness of Low-Frequency One-Third Octave Bands of Noise. M.S. Thesis - Southampton Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the relative noisiness of low frequency one-third octave bands of noise bounded by the bands centered at 25 Hz and 200 Hz, with intensities ranging from 50 db sound pressure level (SPL) to 95 db SPL. The thirty-two subjects used a method-of-adjustment technique, producing comparison-band intensities as noisy as standard bands centered at 100 Hz and 200 Hz with intensities of 60 db SPL and 72 db SPL. Four contours of equal noisiness were developed for one-third octave bands, extending down to 25 Hz and ranging in intensity from approximately 58 db SPL to 86 db SPL. These curves were compared with the contours of equal noisiness of Kryter and Pearsons. In the region of overlap (between 50 Hz and 200 Hz) the agreement was good.

  17. Relationship Between Psychomotor Efficiency and Sensation Seeking of People Exposed to Noise and Low Frequency Vibration Stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchut, Aleksander; Kowalska-Koczwara, Alicja; Romanska – Zapała, Anna; Stypula, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    At the workplace of the machine operator, low frequency whole body and hand- arm vibrations are observed. They occur together with noise. Whole body vibration in the range of 3-25 Hz are detrimental to the human body due to the location of the resonant frequency of large organs of the human body in this range. It can be assumed that for this reason people working every day in such conditions can have reduced working efficiency. The influence of low frequency vibration and noise on the human body leads to both physiological and functional changes. The result of the impact of noise and vibration stimuli depends largely on the specific characteristics of the objects, which include among other personality traits, temperament and emotional factor. The pilot study conducted in the laboratory was attended by 30 young men. The aim of the study was to look for correlations between the need for stimulation of the objects and their psychomotor efficiency in case of vibration exposure and vibration together with noise exposure in variable conditions task. The need for stimulation of the objects as defined in the study is based on theoretical assumptions of one dimensional model of temperament developed by Marvin Zuckerman. This theory defines the need for stimulation as the search for different, new, complex and intense sensations, as well as the willingness to take risks. The aim of research was to verify if from four factors such as: the search for adventure and horror, sensation seeking, disinhibition and susceptibility to boredom, we can choose the ones that in conjunction with varying operating conditions, may significantly determine the efficiency of the task situation. The objects performed the test evaluation of their motor skills which consisted in keeping the cursor controlled by a joystick through the path. The number of exceeds of the cursor beyond the path and its maximum deviation was recorded. The collected data were used to determine the correlation between the

  18. Low frequency cabin noise reduction based on the intrinsic structural tuning concept: The theory and the experimental results, phase 2. [jet aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, G.

    1978-01-01

    Low frequency cabin noise and sonically induced stresses in an aircraft fuselage may be reduced by intrinsic tuning of the various structural members such as the skin, stringers, and frames and then applying damping treatments on these members. The concept is also useful in identifying the key structural resonance mechanisms controlling the fuselage response to broadband random excitation and in developing suitable damping treatments for reducing the structural response in various frequency ranges. The mathematical proof of the concept and the results of some laboratory and field tests on a group of skin-stringer panels are described. In the so-called stiffness-controlled region, the noise transmission may actually be controlled by stiffener resonances, depending upon the relationship between the natural frequencies of the skin bay and the stiffeners. Therefore, cabin noise in the stiffness-controlled region may be effectively reduced by applying damping treatments on the stiffeners.

  19. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  20. Annoyance, detection and recognition of wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, Timothy; Bockstael, Annelies; De Weirt, Valentine; Botteldooren, Dick

    2013-07-01

    Annoyance, recognition and detection of noise from a single wind turbine were studied by means of a two-stage listening experiment with 50 participants with normal hearing abilities. In-situ recordings made at close distance from a 1.8-MW wind turbine operating at 22 rpm were mixed with road traffic noise, and processed to simulate indoor sound pressure levels at LAeq 40 dBA. In a first part, where people were unaware of the true purpose of the experiment, samples were played during a quiet leisure activity. Under these conditions, pure wind turbine noise gave very similar annoyance ratings as unmixed highway noise at the same equivalent level, while annoyance by local road traffic noise was significantly higher. In a second experiment, listeners were asked to identify the sample containing wind turbine noise in a paired comparison test. The detection limit of wind turbine noise in presence of highway noise was estimated to be as low as a signal-to-noise ratio of -23 dBA. When mixed with local road traffic, such a detection limit could not be determined. These findings support that noticing the sound could be an important aspect of wind turbine noise annoyance at the low equivalent levels typically observed indoors in practice. Participants that easily recognized wind-turbine(-like) sounds could detect wind turbine noise better when submersed in road traffic noise. Recognition of wind turbine sounds is also linked to higher annoyance. Awareness of the source is therefore a relevant aspect of wind turbine noise perception which is consistent with previous research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A study on the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise, we conducted two experiments. In Experiment 1, eight male subjects were exposed to seven types of low-frequency noise stimuli: two pure tones [a 31.5-Hz, 100-dB(SPL) tone and a 50-Hz, 100-dB(SPL) tone] and five complex noises composed of the pure tones. For the complex noise stimuli, the sound pressure level of one tonal component was 100 dB(SPL) and that of another one was either 90, 95, or 100 dB(SPL). Vibration induced on the body surface was measured at five locations, and the correlation with the subjective rating of the vibratory sensation at each site of measurement was examined. In Experiment 2, the correlation between the body surface vibration and the vibratory sensation was similarly examined using seven types of noise stimuli composed of a 25-Hz tone and a 50-Hz tone. In both the experiments, we found that at the chest and the abdomen, the rating of the vibratory sensation was in close correlation with the vibration acceleration level (VAL) of the body surface vibration measured at each corresponding location. This was consistent with our previous results and suggested that at the trunk of the body (the chest and the abdomen), the mechanoreception of body vibrations plays an important role in the experience of the vibratory sensation in persons exposed to high-level low-frequency noise. At the head, however, no close correlation was found between the rating of the vibratory sensation and the VAL of body surface vibration. This suggested that at the head, the perceptual mechanisms of vibration induced by high-level low-frequency noise were different from those in the trunk of the body.

  2. Impact of Silicon Doping on Low-Frequency Charge Noise and Conductance Drift in GaAs/AlxGa1 -xAs Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, S.; Nakamura, J. R.; Gardner, G. C.; Yannell, M. M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    We present measurements of low-frequency charge noise and conductance drift in modulation-doped GaAs /AlxGa1 -xAs heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy in which the silicon doping density is varied from 2.4 ×1018 (critically doped) to 6.0 ×1018 cm-3 (overdoped). Quantum point contacts are used to detect charge fluctuations. A clear reduction of both short-time-scale telegraphic noise and long-time-scale conductance drift with decreased doping density is observed. These measurements indicate that the neutral doping region plays a significant role in charge noise and conductance drift.

  3. Escape conditioning and low-frequency whole-body vibration - The effects of frequency, amplitude, and controls for noise and activation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, E. L.; Wike, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Seven experiments are reported on low-frequency whole-body vibration and rats' escape conditioning in a modified Skinner box. In the first three studies, conditioning was observed but was independent of frequency. In experiment four, the number of escape responses was directly related to vibration amplitude. Experiment five was a control for vibration noise and noise termination; experiments six and seven studied vibration-induced activation. Noise termination did not produce conditioning. In experiment six, subjects made more responses when responding led to termination than when it did not. In experiment seven, subjects preferred a bar which terminated vibration to one which did not.

  4. Comparison of low frequency charge noise in identically patterned Si/SiO{sub 2} and Si/SiGe quantum dots

    SciT

    Freeman, Blake M.; Schoenfield, Joshua S.; Jiang, HongWen

    We investigate and compare the charge noise in Si/SiO{sub 2} and Si/SiGe gate defined quantum dots with identically patterned gates by measuring the low frequency 1/f current noise through the biased quantum dots in the coulomb blockade regime. The current noise is normalized and used to extract a measurement of the potential energy noise in the system. Additionally, the temperature dependence of this noise is investigated. The measured charge noise in Si/SiO{sub 2} compares favorably with that of the SiGe device as well as previous measurements made on other substrates suggesting Si/SiO{sub 2} is a potential candidate for spin basedmore » quantum computing.« less

  5. Acoustic noise generation by the DOE/NASA MOD-1 wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of measurements taken over the past year of the acoustic emissions from the DOE/NASA MOD-1 Wind Turbine show the maximum acoustic energy is concentrated in the low frequency range, often below 100 Hz. The temporal as well as the frequency characteristics of the turbine sounds have been shown to be important since the MOD-1 is capable of radiating both coherent and incoherent noise. The coherent sounds are usually impulsive and are manifested in an averaged frequency domain plot as large numbers of discrete energy bands extending from the blade passage frequency to beyond 50 Hz on occasion. It is these impulsive sounds which are identified as the principal source of the annoyance to a dozen families living within 3 km of the turbine. The source of the coherent noise appears to be the rapid, unsteady blade loads encountered as the blade passes through the wake of the tower structure. Annoying levels are occasionally reached at nearby homes due to the interaction of the low frequency, high energy peaks in the acoustic impulses and the structural modes of the homes as well as by direct radiation outdoors. The peak levels of these impulses can be enhanced or subdued through complete propagation.

  6. Impact of wind turbine noise in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Verheijen, Edwin; Jabben, Jan; Schreurs, Eric; Smith, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch government aims at an increase of wind energy up to 6 000 MW in 2020 by placing new wind turbines on land or offshore. At the same time, the existing noise legislation for wind turbines is being reconsidered. For the purpose of establishing a new noise reception limit value expressed in L den , the impact of wind turbine noise under the given policy targets needs to be explored. For this purpose, the consequences of different reception limit values for the new Dutch noise legislation have been studied, both in terms of effects on the population and regarding sustainable energy policy targets. On the basis of a nation-wide noise map containing all wind turbines in The Netherlands, it is calculated that 3% of the inhabitants of The Netherlands are currently exposed to noise from wind turbines above 28 dB(A) at the faηade. Newly established dose-response relationships indicate that about 1500 of these inhabitants are likely to be severely annoyed inside their dwellings. The available space for new wind turbines strongly depends on the noise limit value that will be chosen. This study suggests an outdoor A-weighted reception limit of L den = 45 dB as a trade-off between the need for protection against noise annoyance and the feasibility of national targets for renewable energy.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of low-frequency noise variability components in bulk and fully depleted silicon-on-insulator metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Keiichi; Makiyama, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yoshiki; Hasegawa, Takumi; Okanishi, Shinobu; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Shinkawata, Hiroki; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kamohara, Shiro; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2018-04-01

    The low-frequency noise (LFN) variability in bulk and fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FDSOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with silicon on thin box (SOTB) technology was investigated. LFN typically shows a flicker noise component and a signal Lorentzian component by random telegraph noise (RTN). At a weak inversion state, the random dopant fluctuation (RDF) in a channel is strongly affected to not only RTN variability but also flicker noise variability in the bulk MOSFET compared with SOTB MOSFET because of local carrier number fluctuation in the channel. On the other hand, the typical level of LFN in SOTB MOSFET is slightly larger than that in the bulk MOSFET because of an additional interface on the buried oxide layer. However, considering the tailing characteristics of LFN variability, LFN in SOTB MOSFET can be assumed to be smaller than that in the bulk MOSFET, which enables the low-voltage operation of analog circuits.

  8. Territorial black-capped chickadee males respond faster to high- than to low-frequency songs in experimentally elevated noise conditions

    PubMed Central

    Slabbekoorn, Hans; Otter, Ken A.

    2017-01-01

    Low-frequency urban noise can interfere with avian communication through masking. Some species are able to shift the frequency of their vocalizations upwards in noisy conditions, which may reduce the effects of masking. However, results from playback studies investigating whether or not such vocal changes improve audibility in noisy conditions are not clear; the responses of free-ranging individuals to shifted signals are potentially confounded by functional trade-offs between masking-related audibility and frequency-dependent signal quality. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) naturally sing their songs at several different frequencies as they pitch-shift to match conspecifics during song-matching contests. They are also known to switch to higher song frequencies in response to experimental noise exposure. Each male produces both high- and low-frequency songs and absolute frequency is not a signal of aggression or dominance, making this an interesting species in which to test whether higher-frequency songs are more audible than lower-frequency songs in noisy conditions. We conducted playback studies across southern and central British Columbia, Canada, using paired song stimuli (high- vs low-frequency songs, n = 24 pairs) embedded in synthetic background noise created to match typical urban sound profiles. Over the course of each playback, the signal-to-noise ratio of the song stimuli was gradually increased by raising the amplitude of the song stimuli while maintaining background noise at a constant amplitude. We evaluated variation in how quickly and aggressively territorial males reacted to each of the paired stimuli. We found that males responded more quickly to playbacks of high- than low-frequency songs when high-frequency songs were presented first, but not when low-frequency songs were first. This difference may be explained by high-frequency songs being more audible combined with a carry-over effect resulting in slower responses to the second

  9. Modeling and characterization of the low frequency noise behavior for amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistors in the subthreshold region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Minxi; Yao, Ruohe

    2017-10-01

    An analytical model of the low-frequency noise (LFN) for amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) in the subthreshold region is developed. For a-IGZO TFTs, relations between the device noise and the subgap defects are characterized based on the dominant multiple trapping and release (MTR) mechanism. The LFN is considered to be contributed from trapping/detrapping of carriers both into the border traps and the subgap density of states (DOS). It is revealed that the LFN behavior of a-IGZO TFTs in the subthreshold region is significantly influenced by the distribution of tail states, where MTR process prevails. The 1/f α (with α < 1) spectrum of the drain current noise is also related to the characteristic temperature of the tail states. The new method is introduced to calculate the LFN of devices by extracting the LFN-related DOS parameters from the current-voltage characteristics.

  10. High sensitivity measurement system for the direct-current, capacitance-voltage, and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Giusi, G; Giordano, O; Scandurra, G; Rapisarda, M; Calvi, S; Ciofi, C

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of current fluctuations originating in electron devices have been largely used to understand the electrical properties of materials and ultimate device performances. In this work, we propose a high-sensitivity measurement setup topology suitable for the automatic and programmable Direct-Current (DC), Capacitance-Voltage (CV), and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors at wafer level. Automatic and programmable operation is particularly useful when the device characteristics relax or degrade with time due to optical, bias, or temperature stress. The noise sensitivity of the proposed topology is in the order of fA/Hz(1/2), while DC performances are limited only by the source and measurement units used to bias the device under test. DC, CV, and NOISE measurements, down to 1 pA of DC gate and drain bias currents, in organic thin film transistors are reported to demonstrate system operation and performances.

  11. Proceedings of the Very Low Frequency (VLF) Ambient Noise Workshop Held in Stennis, Mississippi on 20-21 September 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    20-21 September 1988 (This document contains the unclassified presentations only.) DTIC Ronad A by&S"LECTE 0 iCompiled W.y: Ronald A. Wagstaff 0140...7 IV* Summary........................11 V. Presentations ................................... 37 "Opening Remarks," R. Wagstaff ............... 39...34Influence of Noise Source Distributions and Propagation Mechanisms on Noise Field Directionality," M. Bradley/R. Wagstaff ...... 51 "Distant Storm

  12. Probing in-plane anisotropy in few-layer ReS2 using low frequency noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Richa; Jariwala, Bhakti; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Das, Anindya

    2018-02-19

    ReS 2 , a layered two-dimensional material popular for its in-plane anisotropic properties, is emerging as one of the potential candidates for flexible electronics and ultrafast optical applications. It is an n-type semiconducting material having a layer independent bandgap of 1.55 eV. In this paper we have characterized the intrinsic electronic noise level of few-layer ReS 2 for the first time. Few-layer ReS 2 field effect transistor devices show a 1/f nature of noise for frequency ranging over three orders of magnitude. We have also observed that not only the electrical response of the material is anisotropic; the noise level is also dependent on direction. In fact the noise is found to be more sensitive towards the anisotropy. This fact has been explained by evoking the theory where the Hooge parameter is not a constant quantity, but has a distinct power law dependence on mobility along the two-axes direction. The anisotropy in 1/f noise measurement will pave the way to quantify the anisotropic nature of two-dimensional (2D) materials, which will be helpful for the design of low-noise transistors in future.

  13. Probing in-plane anisotropy in fewlayer ReS2 using low frequency noise measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Richa; Jariwala, Bhakti; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Das, Anindya

    2018-01-31

    ReS<sub>2</sub>, a layered two-dimensional material popular for its in-plane anisotropic properties is emerging as one of the potential candidates for flexible electronics and ultrafast optical applications. It is an n-type semiconducting material having a layer independent bandgap of 1.55 eV. In this paper we have characterized the intrinsic electronic noise level of fewlayer ReS<sub>2</sub> for the first time. Fewlayer ReS<sub>2</sub> FET devices show 1/f nature of noise for frequency ranging over three orders of magnitude. We have also observed that not only the electrical response of the material is anisotropic; the noise level is also direction dependent. In fact the noise is found to be more sensitive towards the anisotropy. This fact has been explained by evoking the theory where the Hooge parameter is not a constant quantity, but has a distinct power law dependence on mobility along the two axes direction. The anisotropy in 1/f noise measurement will pave the way to quantify the anisotropic nature of two-dimensional (2D) materials, which will be helpful for the design of low noise transistor in future. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Probing in-plane anisotropy in few-layer ReS2 using low frequency noise measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Richa; Jariwala, Bhakti; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Das, Anindya

    2018-04-01

    ReS2, a layered two-dimensional material popular for its in-plane anisotropic properties, is emerging as one of the potential candidates for flexible electronics and ultrafast optical applications. It is an n-type semiconducting material having a layer independent bandgap of 1.55 eV. In this paper we have characterized the intrinsic electronic noise level of few-layer ReS2 for the first time. Few-layer ReS2 field effect transistor devices show a 1/f nature of noise for frequency ranging over three orders of magnitude. We have also observed that not only the electrical response of the material is anisotropic; the noise level is also dependent on direction. In fact the noise is found to be more sensitive towards the anisotropy. This fact has been explained by evoking the theory where the Hooge parameter is not a constant quantity, but has a distinct power law dependence on mobility along the two-axes direction. The anisotropy in 1/f noise measurement will pave the way to quantify the anisotropic nature of two-dimensional (2D) materials, which will be helpful for the design of low-noise transistors in future.

  15. Survey of inlet noise reduction concepts for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.; Chestnutt, D.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of advanced concepts for the suppression of noise in the inlets of gas turbine engines. Noise suppression concepts are described, the directions of current research are reviewed, and problem areas requiring further work are indicated. The discussion focuses on acoustic liners, high Mach number inlets, active acoustic absorption, water vapor injection, and blade row reflection.

  16. Examination of the low frequency limit for helicopter noise data in the Federal Aviation Administration's Aviation Environmental Design Tool and Integrated Noise Model

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-04-19

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aircraft noise modeling tools Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDTc) and Integrated Noise Model (INM) do not currently consider noise below 50 Hz in their computations. This paper describes a preliminary ...

  17. Theoretical study of low-frequency noise and amplitude – frequency characteristics of a semiconductor laser with a fiber Bragg grating

    SciT

    Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V

    2013-09-30

    Using the rate equations for the density of photons and charge carriers, we have studied the amplitude low-frequency noise of a fibre Bragg grating semiconductor laser. The calculations rely on two versions of the rate equation for the carriers, characterised by the presence of the optical confinement coefficient for the term, which takes into account the rate of stimulated recombination. It is shown that the relative noise intensity, which is calculated by using the rate equation for the carriers without optical confinement, agrees better with the experimental results. The calculation of the amplitude – frequency characteristics (AFCs) has shown thatmore » it is impossible to give preference to any one of these systems, since the AFCs for the two versions of the rate equations for the carriers coincide. (lasers)« less

  18. Enroute NASA/FAA low-frequency propfan test in Alabama (October 1987): A versatile atmospheric aircraft long-range noise prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouka, Despina G.

    In order to obtain a flight-to-static noise prediction of an advanced Turboprop (propfan) Aircraft, FAA went on an elaboration of the data that were measured during a full scale measuring program that was conducted by NASA and FAA/DOT/TSC on October 1987 in Alabama. The elaboration process was based on aircraft simulation to a point source, on an atmospheric two dimensional noise model, on the American National Standard algorithm for the calculation of atmospheric absortion, and on the DOT/TSC convention for ground reflection effects. Using the data of the Alabama measurements, the present paper examines the development of a generalized, flexible and more accurate process for the evaluation of the static and flight low-frequency long-range noise data. This paper also examines the applicability of the assumptions made by the Integrated Noise Model about linear propagation, of the three dimensional Hamiltonian Rays Tracing model and of the Weyl-Van der Pol model. The model proposes some assumptions in order to increase the calculations flexibility without significant loss of accuracy. In addition, it proposes the usage of the three dimensional Hamiltonian Rays Tracing model and the Weyl-Van der Pol model in order to increase the accuracy and to ensure the generalization of noise propagation prediction over grounds with variable impedance.

  19. Pseudomorphic InGaAs/AlGaAs modulation-doped FET's with reduced low-frequency noise and thermally stable performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shih-Ming; Das, M. B.; Peng, C. K.; Klem, J.; Henderson, T.

    1987-01-01

    A high-performance MODFET structure grown by MBE with the incorporation of a single quantum well In(0.15)Ga(0.85)As layer for the transport of two-dimensional electron gas has been critically examined for its thermal stability at 80 K and low-frequency noise form 0.01 to 10 to the 8th Hz. Experimental results indicate that the behavior of this device in both these respects is much superior when compared with the same behavior of conventional MODFETs. A maximum low-field carrier mobility of 29,000 sq cm/s at 80 K and an average carrier saturation velocity of 2 x 10 to the 7th cm/s at 300 K in a 1-micron gate device clearly indicate that the quality of the pseudomorphic quantum well (InGaAs) layer is either comparable or better than that of the usual GaAs buffer layer. The deep level spectra, obtained through photo-FET measurements, and the low-frequency noise spectra at different temperatures obtained for the new pseudomorphic and conventional MODFET's have clearly indicated that contributions from various deep levels present in the new structure are significantly reduced.

  20. Health effects from low-frequency noise and infrasound in the general population: Is it time to listen? A systematic review of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; van Poll, Ric; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-07-01

    A systematic review of observational studies was conducted to assess the association between everyday life low-frequency noise (LFN) components, including infrasound and health effects in the general population. Literature databases Pubmed, Embase and PsycInfo and additional bibliographic sources such as reference sections of key publications and journal databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies published from 2000 to 2015. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Most of them examined subjective annoyance as primary outcome. The adequacy of provided information in the included papers and methodological quality of studies was also addressed. Moreover, studies were screened for meta-analysis eligibility. Some associations were observed between exposure to LFN and annoyance, sleep-related problems, concentration difficulties and headache in the adult population living in the vicinity of a range of LFN sources. However, evidence, especially in relation to chronic medical conditions, was very limited. The estimated pooled prevalence of high subjective annoyance attributed to LFN was about 10%. Epidemiological research on LFN and health effects is scarce and suffers from methodological shortcomings. Low frequency noise in the everyday environment constitutes an issue that requires more research attention, particularly for people living in the vicinity of relevant sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A theoretical analysis of the effect of thrust-related turbulence distortion on helicopter rotor low-frequency broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M.; Harris, W. L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the analysis is to determine if inflow turbulence distortion may be a cause of experimentally observed changes in sound pressure levels when the rotor mean loading is varied. The effect of helicopter rotor mean aerodynamics on inflow turbulence is studied within the framework of the turbulence rapid distortion theory developed by Pearson (1959) and Deissler (1961). The distorted inflow turbulence is related to the resultant noise by conventional broadband noise theory. A comparison of the distortion model with experimental data shows that the theoretical model is unable to totally explain observed increases in model rotor sound pressures with increased rotor mean thrust. Comparison of full scale rotor data with the theoretical model shows that a shear-type distortion may explain decreasing sound pressure levels with increasing thrust.

  2. Electrical Transport and Low-Frequency Noise in Chemical Vapor Deposited Single-Layer MoS2 Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    dependent noise in both passivated and etched devices could be explained by carrier number fluctuation arising from random trapping and de -trapping of...for 30 min at room temperature, followed by a de -ionized water/acetone/isopropanol rinse. Additional details about the processing steps can be found in...trends in these devices. 4 Nanotechnology 25 (2014) 155702 D Sharma et al Carrier number fluctuations arise from dynamic trapping and de -trapping of free

  3. Statistics and vertical directionality of low-frequency ambient noise at the North Pacific Acoustics Laboratory site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggeroer, Arthur B.; NPAL Group; Colosi, J. A.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Dushaw, B. D.; Dzieciuch, M. A.; Howe, B. M.; Mercer, J. A.; Munk, W. H.; Spindel, R. C.; Worcester, P. F.

    2005-03-01

    We examine statistical and directional properties of the ambient noise in the 10-100 Hz frequency band from the NPAL array. Marginal probability densities are estimated as well as mean square levels, skewness and kurtoses in third octave bands. The kurotoses are markedly different from Gaussian except when only distant shipping is present. Extremal levels reached ~150 dB re 1 μ Pa, suggesting levels 60dB greater than the mean ambient were common in the NPAL data sets. Generally, these were passing ships. We select four examples: i) quiescent noise, ii) nearby shipping, iii) whale vocalizations and iv) a micro earthquake for the vertical directional properties of the NPAL noise since they are representative of the phenomena encountered. We find there is modest broadband coherence for most of these cases in their occupancy band across the NPAL aperture. Narrowband coherence analysis from VLA to VLA was not successful due to ambiguities. Examples of localizing sources based upon this coherence are included. kw diagrams allow us to use data above the vertical aliasing frequency. Ducted propagation for both the quiescent and micro earthquake (T phase) are identified and the arrival angles of nearby shipping and whale vocalizations. MFP localizations were modestly successful for nearby sources, but long range ones could not be identified, most likely because of signal mismatch in the MFP replica. .

  4. A case study of interior low-frequency noise from box-shaped bridge girders induced by running trains: Its mechanism, prediction and countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xun; Li, Xiaozhen; Hao, Hong; Wang, Dangxiong; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    A side effect of high-speed railway and urban rail transit systems is the associated vibration and noise. Since the use of concrete viaducts is predominant in railway construction due to scarce land resources, low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-radiated noise from concrete bridges is a principal concern. Although it is the most commonly used bridge type, the mechanism of noise emission from box-shaped bridge girders when subjected to impact forces from moving trains, which sounds like beating a drum, has not been well studied. In this study, a field measurement was first made on a simply-supported box-shaped bridge to record the acceleration of the slabs and the associated sound pressures induced by running trains. These data indicated that a significant beat-wave noise occurred in the box-shaped cavity when the train speed was around 340 km/h, which arose from the interference between two sound waves of 75.0 Hz and 78.8 Hz. The noise leakage from the bridge expansion joint was serious and resulted in obvious noise pollution near the bridge once the beat-wave noise was generated in the cavity. The dominant frequency of the interior noise at 75.0 Hz was confirmed from the spectrum of the data and the modal analysis results, and originated from the peak vibration of the top slab due to resonance and the first-order vertical acoustic mode, which led to cavity resonance, amplifying the corresponding noise. The three-dimensional acoustic modes and local vibration modes of the slab were calculated by using the finite element method. A simplified vehicle-track-bridge coupling vibration model was then developed to calculate the wheel-rail interaction force in a frequency range of 20-200 Hz. Numerical simulations using the boundary element method confirmed the cavity resonance effect and the numerical results agreed well with the data. Based on the calibrated numerical model, three noise reduction measures, i.e., adding a horizontal baffle in the interior cavity, narrowing

  5. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-wei; Zhao, Chong-jun; Feng, Chun; Zhou, Zhongfu; Yu, Guang-hua

    2015-08-01

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three orders of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress.

  6. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    SciT

    Li, Jian-wei; School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083; Zhao, Chong-jun

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three ordersmore » of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress.« less

  7. Potential of neuro-fuzzy methodology to estimate noise level of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Vlastimir; Petković, Dalibor; Por, Lip Yee; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Zamani, Mazdak; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Motamedi, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines noise effect became large problem because of increasing of wind farms numbers since renewable energy becomes the most influential energy sources. However, wind turbine noise generation and propagation is not understandable in all aspects. Mechanical noise of wind turbines can be ignored since aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades is the main source of the noise generation. Numerical simulations of the noise effects of the wind turbine can be very challenging task. Therefore in this article soft computing method is used to evaluate noise level of wind turbines. The main goal of the study is to estimate wind turbine noise in regard of wind speed at different heights and for different sound frequency. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to estimate the wind turbine noise levels.

  8. Low-Frequency Noise in Layered ReS2 Field Effect Transistors on HfO2 and Its Application for pH Sensing.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wugang; Wei, Wei; Tong, Yu; Chim, Wai Kin; Zhu, Chunxiang

    2018-02-28

    Layered rhenium disulfide (ReS 2 ) field effect transistors (FETs), with thickness ranging from few to dozens of layers, are demonstrated on 20 nm thick HfO 2 /Si substrates. A small threshold voltage of -0.25 V, high on/off current ratio of up to ∼10 7 , small subthreshold swing of 116 mV/dec, and electron carrier mobility of 6.02 cm 2 /V·s are obtained for the two-layer ReS 2 FETs. Low-frequency noise characteristics in ReS 2 FETs are analyzed for the first time, and it is found that the carrier number fluctuation mechanism well describes the flicker (1/f) noise of ReS 2 FETs with different thicknesses. pH sensing using a two-layer ReS 2 FET with HfO 2 as a sensing oxide is then demonstrated with a voltage sensitivity of 54.8 mV/pH and a current sensitivity of 126. The noise characteristics of the ReS 2 FET-based pH sensors are also examined, and a corresponding detection limit of 0.0132 pH is obtained. Our studies suggest the high potential of ReS 2 for future low-power nanoelectronics and biosensor applications.

  9. High sensitivity measurement system for the direct-current, capacitance-voltage, and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors

    SciT

    Giusi, G.; Giordano, O.; Scandurra, G.

    Measurements of current fluctuations originating in electron devices have been largely used to understand the electrical properties of materials and ultimate device performances. In this work, we propose a high-sensitivity measurement setup topology suitable for the automatic and programmable Direct-Current (DC), Capacitance-Voltage (CV), and gate-drain low frequency noise characterization of field effect transistors at wafer level. Automatic and programmable operation is particularly useful when the device characteristics relax or degrade with time due to optical, bias, or temperature stress. The noise sensitivity of the proposed topology is in the order of fA/Hz{sup 1/2}, while DC performances are limited only bymore » the source and measurement units used to bias the device under test. DC, CV, and NOISE measurements, down to 1 pA of DC gate and drain bias currents, in organic thin film transistors are reported to demonstrate system operation and performances.« less

  10. A 2.5-dimensional method for the prediction of structure-borne low-frequency noise from concrete rail transit bridges.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Song, Xiaodong; Wu, Dingjun

    2014-05-01

    Predicting structure-borne noise from bridges subjected to moving trains using the three-dimensional (3D) boundary element method (BEM) is a time consuming process. This paper presents a two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) BEM-based procedure for simulating bridge-borne low-frequency noise with higher efficiency, yet no loss of accuracy. The two-dimensional (2D) BEM of a bridge with a constant cross section along the track direction is adopted to calculate the spatial modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) of the bridge using the space-wave number transforms of its 3D modal shapes. The MATVs calculated using the 2.5D method are then validated by those computed using the 3D BEM. The bridge-borne noise is finally obtained through the MATVs and modal coordinate responses of the bridge, considering time-varying vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction. The presented procedure is applied to predict the sound pressure radiating from a U-shaped concrete bridge, and the computed results are compared with those obtained from field tests on Shanghai rail transit line 8. The numerical results match well with the measured results in both time and frequency domains at near-field points. Nevertheless, the computed results are smaller than the measured ones for far-field points, mainly due to the sound radiation from adjacent spans neglected in the current model.

  11. Origins of Highly Stable Al-evaporated Solution-processed ZnO Thin Film Transistors: Insights from Low Frequency and Random Telegraph Signal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Tae Sung; Yang, Jung Yup; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-11-01

    One long-standing goal in the emerging field of flexible and transparent electronic devices is to meet the demand of key markets, such as enhanced output performance for metal oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) prepared by a solution process. While solution-based fabrication techniques are cost-effective and ensure large-area coverage at low temperature, their utilization has the disadvantage of introducing large trap states into TFTs. Such states, the formation of which is induced by intrinsic defects initially produced during preparation, have a significant impact on electrical performance. Therefore, the ability to enhance the electrical characteristics of solution-processed TFTs, along with attaining a firm understanding of their physical nature, remains a key step towards extending their use. In this study, measurements of low-frequency noise and random telegraph signal noise are employed as generic alternative tools to examine the origins of enhanced output performance for solution-processed ZnO TFTs through the control of defect sites by Al evaporation.

  12. Wind turbine acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-01-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  13. Low-frequency noise in multilayer MoS2 field-effect transistors: the effect of high-k passivation.

    PubMed

    Na, Junhong; Joo, Min-Kyu; Shin, Minju; Huh, Junghwan; Kim, Jae-Sung; Piao, Mingxing; Jin, Jun-Eon; Jang, Ho-Kyun; Choi, Hyung Jong; Shim, Joon Hyung; Kim, Gyu-Tae

    2014-01-07

    Diagnosing of the interface quality and the interactions between insulators and semiconductors is significant to achieve the high performance of nanodevices. Herein, low-frequency noise (LFN) in mechanically exfoliated multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) (~11.3 nm-thick) field-effect transistors with back-gate control was characterized with and without an Al2O3 high-k passivation layer. The carrier number fluctuation (CNF) model associated with trapping/detrapping the charge carriers at the interface nicely described the noise behavior in the strong accumulation regime both with and without the Al2O3 passivation layer. The interface trap density at the MoS2-SiO2 interface was extracted from the LFN analysis, and estimated to be Nit ~ 10(10) eV(-1) cm(-2) without and with the passivation layer. This suggested that the accumulation channel induced by the back-gate was not significantly influenced by the passivation layer. The Hooge mobility fluctuation (HMF) model implying the bulk conduction was found to describe the drain current fluctuations in the subthreshold regime, which is rarely observed in other nanodevices, attributed to those extremely thin channel sizes. In the case of the thick-MoS2 (~40 nm-thick) without the passivation, the HMF model was clearly observed all over the operation regime, ensuring the existence of the bulk conduction in multilayer MoS2. With the Al2O3 passivation layer, the change in the noise behavior was explained from the point of formation of the additional top channel in the MoS2 because of the fixed charges in the Al2O3. The interface trap density from the additional CNF model was Nit = 1.8 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2) at the MoS2-Al2O3 interface.

  14. Measurements of Operational Wind Turbine Noise in UK Waters.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The effects of wind farm operational noise have not been addressed to the same extent as their construction methods such as piling and drilling of the foundations despite their long operational lifetimes compared with weeks of construction. The results of five postconstruction underwater sound-monitoring surveys on wind farms located throughout the waters of the British Isles are discussed. These wind farms consist of differing turbine power outputs, from 3 to 3.6 MW, and differing numbers of turbines. This work presents an overview of the results obtained and discusses both the levels and frequency components of the sound in several metrics.

  15. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method.

  16. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Methodology for Noise Assessment of Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine noise is one of the major obstacles for the widespread use of wind energy. Noise tone can greatly increase the annoyance factor and the negative impact on human health. Noise annoyance caused by wind turbines has become an emerging problem in recent years, due to the rapid increase in number of wind turbines, triggered by sustainable energy goals set forward at the national and international level. Up to now, not all aspects of the generation, propagation and perception of wind turbine noise are well understood. For a modern large wind turbine, aerodynamic noise from the blades is generally considered to be the dominant noise source, provided that mechanical noise is adequately eliminated. The sources of aerodynamic noise can be divided into tonal noise, inflow turbulence noise, and airfoil self-noise. Many analytical and experimental acoustical studies performed the wind turbines. Since the wind turbine noise level analyzing by numerical methods or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) could be very challenging and time consuming, soft computing techniques are preferred. To estimate noise level of wind turbine, this paper constructed a process which simulates the wind turbine noise levels in regard to wind speed and sound frequency with adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This intelligent estimator is implemented using Matlab/Simulink and the performances are investigated. The simulation results presented in this paper show the effectiveness of the developed method. PMID:25075621

  17. Gas turbine exhaust nozzle. [for noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, D. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An elongated hollow string is disposed in an exhaust nozzle combustion chamber and communicates with an air source through hollow struts at one end. The other end of the string is bell-mouth shaped and extends over the front portion of a nozzle plug. The bell-mouth may be formed by pivotally mounted flaps or leaves which are used to vary the exhaust throat area and the area between the plug and the leaves. Air from the engine inlet flows into the string and also between the combustion chamber and a housing disposed around the chamber. The air cools the plug and serves as a low velocity inner core of secondary gas to provide noise reduction for the primary exhaust gas while the other air, when it exits from the nozzle, forms an outer low velocity layer to further reduce noise. The structure produces increased thrust in a turbojet or turbofan engine.

  18. Low-frequency noise reduction in vertical MOSFETs having tunable threshold voltage fabricated with 60 nm CMOS technology on 300 mm wafer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamoto, Takuya; Ma, Yitao; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, DC and low-frequency noise (LFN) characteristics have been investigated with actual measurement data in both n- and p-type vertical MOSFETs (V-MOSFETs) for the first time. The V-MOSFETs which was fabricated on 300 mm bulk silicon wafer process have realized excellent DC performance and a significant reduction of flicker (1/f) noise. The measurement results show that the fabricated V-MOSFETs with 60 nm silicon pillar and 100 nm gate length achieve excellent steep sub-threshold swing (69 mV/decade for n-type and 66 mV/decade for p-type), good on-current (281 µA/µm for n-type 149 µA/µm for p-type), low off-leakage current (28.1 pA/µm for n-type and 79.6 pA/µm for p-type), and excellent on-off ratio (1 × 107 for n-type and 2 × 106 for p-type). In addition, it is demonstrated that our fabricated V-MOSFETs can control the threshold voltage (Vth) by changing the channel doping condition, which is the useful and low-cost technique as it has been widely used in the conventional bulk planar MOSFET. This result indicates that V-MOSFETs can control Vth more finely and flexibly by the combined the use of the doping technique with other techniques such as work function engineering of metal-gate. Moreover, it is also shown that V-MOSFETs can suppress 1/f noise (L\\text{gate}WS\\text{Id}/I\\text{d}2 of 10-13-10-11 µm2/Hz for n-type and 10-12-10-10 µm2/Hz for p-type) to one or two order lower level than previously reported nanowire type MOSFET, FinFET, Tri-Gate, and planar MOSFETs. The results have also proved that both DC and 1/f noise performances are independent from the bias voltage which is applied to substrate or well layer. Therefore, it is verified that V-MOSFETs can eliminate the effects from substrate or well layer, which always adversely affects the circuit performances due to this serial connection.

  19. Transfer characteristics and low-frequency noise in single- and multi-layer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciT

    Sharma, Deepak; Theiss Research, Inc., La Jolla, California 92037; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030

    Leveraging nanoscale field-effect transistors (FETs) in integrated circuits depends heavily on its transfer characteristics and low-frequency noise (LFN) properties. Here, we report the transfer characteristics and LFN in FETs fabricated with molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) with different layer (L) counts. 4L to 6L devices showed highest I{sub ON}-I{sub OFF} ratio (≈10{sup 8}) whereas LFN was maximum for 1L device with normalized power spectral density (PSD) ≈1.5 × 10{sup −5 }Hz{sup −1}. For devices with L ≈ 6, PSD was minimum (≈2 × 10{sup −8 }Hz{sup −1}). Further, LFN for single and few layer devices satisfied carrier number fluctuation (CNF) model in both weak andmore » strong accumulation regimes while thicker devices followed Hooge's mobility fluctuation model in the weak accumulation regime and CNF model in strong accumulation regime, respectively. Transfer-characteristics and LFN experimental data are explained with the help of model incorporating Thomas-Fermi charge screening and inter-layer resistance coupling.« less

  20. Generation Mechanism and Prediction Model for Low Frequency Noise Induced by Energy Dissipating Submerged Jets during Flood Discharge from a High Dam

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jijian; Zhang, Wenjiao; Guo, Qizhong; Liu, Fang

    2016-01-01

    As flood water is discharged from a high dam, low frequency (i.e., lower than 10 Hz) noise (LFN) associated with air pulsation is generated and propagated in the surrounding areas, causing environmental problems such as vibrations of windows and doors and discomfort of residents and construction workers. To study the generation mechanisms and key influencing factors of LFN induced by energy dissipation through submerged jets at a high dam, detailed prototype observations and analyses of LFN are conducted. The discharge flow field is simulated using a gas-liquid turbulent flow model, and the vorticity fluctuation characteristics are then analyzed. The mathematical model for the LFN intensity is developed based on vortex sound theory and a turbulent flow model, verified by prototype observations. The model results reveal that the vorticity fluctuation in strong shear layers around the high-velocity submerged jets is highly correlated with the on-site LFN, and the strong shear layers are the main regions of acoustic source for the LFN. In addition, the predicted and observed magnitudes of LFN intensity agree quite well. This is the first time that the LFN intensity has been shown to be able to be predicted quantitatively. PMID:27314374

  1. Guide to the evaluation of human exposure to noise from large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.; Grosveld, F.

    1982-01-01

    Guidance for evaluating human exposure to wind turbine noise is provided and includes consideration of the source characteristics, the propagation to the receiver location, and the exposure of the receiver to the noise. The criteria for evaluation of human exposure are based on comparisons of the noise at the receiver location with the human perception thresholds for wind turbine noise and noise-induced building vibrations in the presence of background noise.

  2. Experimental characterization of vertical-axis wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Pearson, C E; Graham, W R

    2015-01-01

    Vertical-axis wind turbines are wind-energy generators suitable for use in urban environments. Their associated noise thus needs to be characterized and understood. As a first step, this work investigates the relative importance of harmonic and broadband contributions via model-scale wind-tunnel experiments. Cross-spectra from a pair of flush-mounted wall microphones exhibit both components, but further analysis shows that the broadband dominates at frequencies corresponding to the audible range in full-scale operation. This observation has detrimental implications for noise-prediction reliability and hence also for acoustic design optimization.

  3. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  4. Multi-Source Generation Mechanisms for Low Frequency Noise Induced by Flood Discharge and Energy Dissipation from a High Dam with a Ski-Jump Type Spillway

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jijian; Zhang, Wenjiao; Ma, Bin; Liu, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    As excess water is discharged from a high dam, low frequency noise (air pulsation lower than 10 Hz, LFN) is generated and propagated in the surrounding areas, causing environmental hazards such as the vibration of windows and doors and the discomfort of local residents. To study the generation mechanisms and key influencing factors of LFN induced by flood discharge and energy dissipation from a high dam with a ski-jump type spillway, detailed prototype observations and analyses of LFN are carried out. The discharge flow field is simulated and analyzed using a gas-liquid turbulent flow model. The acoustic response characteristics of the air cavity, which is formed between the discharge nappe and dam body, are analyzed using an acoustic numerical model. The multi-sources generation mechanisms are first proposed basing on the prototype observation results, vortex sound model, turbulent flow model and acoustic numerical model. Two kinds of sources of LFN are studied. One comes from the energy dissipation of submerged jets in the plunge pool, the other comes from nappe-cavity coupled vibration. The results of the analyses reveal that the submerged jets in the plunge pool only contribute to an on-site LFN energy of 0–1.0 Hz, and the strong shear layers around the high-velocity submerged jets and wall jet development areas are the main acoustic source regions of LFN in the plunge pool. In addition, the nappe-cavity coupled vibration, which is induced when the discharge nappe vibrates with close frequency to the model frequency of the cavity, can induce on-site LFN energy with wider frequency spectrum energy within 0–4.0 Hz. By contrast, the contribution degrees to LFN energy from two acoustic sources are almost same, while the contribution degree from nappe-cavity coupled vibration is slightly higher. PMID:29189750

  5. Low-frequency noise in AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor devices: A comparison with Schottky devices

    SciT

    Le, Son Phuong; Nguyen, Tuan Quy; Shih, Hong-An

    2014-08-07

    We have systematically investigated low-frequency noise (LFN) in AlN/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices, where the AlN gate insulator layer was sputtering-deposited on the AlGaN surface, in comparison with LFN in AlGaN/GaN Schottky devices. By measuring LFN in ungated two-terminal devices and heterojunction field-effect transistors (HFETs), we extracted LFN characteristics in the intrinsic gated region of the HFETs. Although there is a bias regime of the Schottky-HFETs in which LFN is dominated by the gate leakage current, LFN in the MIS-HFETs is always dominated by only the channel current. Analyzing the channel-current-dominated LFN, we obtained Hooge parameters α for the gated regionmore » as a function of the sheet electron concentration n{sub s} under the gate. In a regime of small n{sub s}, both the MIS- and Schottky-HFETs exhibit α∝n{sub s}{sup −1}. On the other hand, in a middle n{sub s} regime of the MIS-HFETs, α decreases rapidly like n{sub s}{sup −ξ} with ξ ∼ 2-3, which is not observed for the Schottky-HFETs. In addition, we observe strong increase in α∝n{sub s}{sup 3} in a large n{sub s} regime for both the MIS- and Schottky-HFETs.« less

  6. 'Wind turbine syndrome': fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Farboud, A; Crunkhorn, R; Trinidade, A

    2013-03-01

    Symptoms, including tinnitus, ear pain and vertigo, have been reported following exposure to wind turbine noise. This review addresses the effects of infrasound and low frequency noise and questions the existence of 'wind turbine syndrome'. This review is based on a search for articles published within the last 10 years, conducted using the PubMed database and Google Scholar search engine, which included in their title or abstract the terms 'wind turbine', 'infrasound' or 'low frequency noise'. There is evidence that infrasound has a physiological effect on the ear. Until this effect is fully understood, it is impossible to conclude that wind turbine noise does not cause any of the symptoms described. However, many believe that these symptoms are related largely to the stress caused by unwanted noise exposure. There is some evidence of symptoms in patients exposed to wind turbine noise. The effects of infrasound require further investigation.

  7. A methodology for assessment of wind turbine noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. D.; Hemphill, R. R.; McKenna, H. E.

    1982-05-01

    An investigation of the sources of impulsive noise generated by the operation of the Mod 1 2 MW wind turbine was performed to establish criteria for assessing the noise-producing potential of other large wind turbines. Unsteady loading of the rotors was determined to be the cause of the sound pressure, which was generally below 100 Hz. Complaints originated from people in dwellings with a room with a window facing the machine. Indoor monitoring revealed pressure traces in the 31.5 Hz band with energy densities exceeding background by about 30 dB. It was concluded that the sound pressure was conveyed by the walls acting as a diaphragm. The induced vibration coupled with human body fundamental modes to produce a feeling of whole-body vibration. Spectral analyses were made of the vibration fields of the Mod 2, a 17 m Darrieus, and a Mod OA to allow comparison with the nuisance points of the Mod 1. Sound pressure levels were found at certain frequencies which would eliminate the occurrence of acoustic pollution.

  8. Effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on small wind turbine noise

    The effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on the noise level of two different size wind turbines was investigated at the Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, TX. Noise and performance data were collected on two blade designs tested on a wind turbine rated a...

  9. Audiovisual Perception of Noise Vocoded Speech in Dyslexic and Non-Dyslexic Adults: The Role of Low-Frequency Visual Modulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megnin-Viggars, Odette; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Visual speech inputs can enhance auditory speech information, particularly in noisy or degraded conditions. The natural statistics of audiovisual speech highlight the temporal correspondence between visual and auditory prosody, with lip, jaw, cheek and head movements conveying information about the speech envelope. Low-frequency spatial and…

  10. Ground noise measurements during static and flyby operations of the Cessna 02-T turbine powered airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field noise measurements on the Cessna 02-T turbine powered propeller aircraft are presented. The objective of the study was to obtain the basic noise characteristics of the aircraft during static ground runs and flyover tests, to identify the sources of the noise, and to correlate the noises with the aircraft operating conditions. The results are presented in the form of a overall noise levels, radiation patterns, and frequency spectra. The noise characteristics of the turbine powered aircraft are compared with those of the reciprocating engine powered aircraft.

  11. Survey of techniques for reduction of wind turbine blade trailing edge noise.

    SciT

    Barone, Matthew Franklin

    2011-08-01

    Aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors leads to constraints in both rotor design and turbine siting. The primary source of aerodynamic noise on wind turbine rotors is the interaction of turbulent boundary layers on the blades with the blade trailing edges. This report surveys concepts that have been proposed for trailing edge noise reduction, with emphasis on concepts that have been tested at either sub-scale or full-scale. These concepts include trailing edge serrations, low-noise airfoil designs, trailing edge brushes, and porous trailing edges. The demonstrated noise reductions of these concepts are cited, along with their impacts on aerodynamic performance. Anmore » assessment is made of future research opportunities in trailing edge noise reduction for wind turbine rotors.« less

  12. The effect of microphone wind noise on the amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise and its mitigation.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Paul; von Hünerbein, Sabine; Cox, Trevor J

    2016-07-01

    Microphone wind noise can corrupt outdoor recordings even when wind shields are used. When monitoring wind turbine noise, microphone wind noise is almost inevitable because measurements cannot be made in still conditions. The effect of microphone wind noise on two amplitude modulation (AM) metrics is quantified in a simulation, showing that even at low wind speeds of 2.5 m/s errors of over 4 dBA can result. As microphone wind noise is intermittent, a wind noise detection algorithm is used to automatically find uncorrupted sections of the recording, and so recover the true AM metrics to within ±2/±0.5 dBA.

  13. Low-frequency random telegraphic noise and 1/f noise in the rare-earth manganite Pr0.63Ca0.37MnO3 near the charge-ordering transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bid, Aveek; Guha, Ayan; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2003-05-01

    We have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations (noise) in a single crystal of the rare-earth perovskite manganite Pr0.63Ca0.37MnO3, which shows a charge-ordering transition at a temperature TCO≈245 K. The measurements were made across the charge-ordering transition covering the temperature range 200 Knoise measurements were made using an ac bias with and without a dc bias current imposed on it. We find that the spectral power SV(f) contains two components—one broad band 1/f part that exists for all frequency and temperature ranges and a single-frequency Lorentzian of frequency fc, which is strongly temperature dependent. The Lorentzian in SV(f) that appears due to random telegraphic noise (RTN) as seen in the time series of the fluctuation is seen in a very narrow temperature window around TCO where it makes the dominating contribution to the fluctuation. When the applied dc bias is increased beyond a certain threshold current density Jth, the electrical conduction becomes nonlinear and one sees the appearance of a significant Lorentzian contribution in the spectral power due to RTN. We explain the appearance of the RTN as due to coexisting charge-ordered (CO) and reverse orbitally ordered (ROO) phases. These phases are in dynamical equilibrium over a mesoscopic length scale (≈30 nm), the kinetics being controlled by an activation barrier Ea≈0.45 eV. The destabilization of the CO phase to the ROO phase causes nonlinear conductivity as well as the appearance of a RTN-type fluctuation when the bias current exceeds a threshold. The 1/f noise is low for T≫TCO but increases by nearly two orders in a narrow temperature range as TCO is approached from above and the probability distribution function (PDF) deviates strongly from a Gaussian dependence. We explain this behavior as due to approach of charge localization with correlated fluctuators which make the PDF non-Gaussian.

  14. Effects of industrial wind turbine noise on sleep and health.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, Michael A; Aramini, Jeffery J; Hanning, Christopher D

    2012-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a new source of noise in previously quiet rural environments. Environmental noise is a public health concern, of which sleep disruption is a major factor. To compare sleep and general health outcomes between participants living close to IWTs and those living further away from them, participants living between 375 and 1400 m (n = 38) and 3.3 and 6.6 km (n = 41) from IWTs were enrolled in a stratified cross-sectional study involving two rural sites. Validated questionnaires were used to collect information on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - PSQI), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Score - ESS), and general health (SF36v2), together with psychiatric disorders, attitude, and demographics. Descriptive and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate the effect of the main exposure variable of interest (distance to the nearest IWT) on various health outcome measures. Participants living within 1.4 km of an IWT had worse sleep, were sleepier during the day, and had worse SF36 Mental Component Scores compared to those living further than 1.4 km away. Significant dose-response relationships between PSQI, ESS, SF36 Mental Component Score, and log-distance to the nearest IWT were identified after controlling for gender, age, and household clustering. The adverse event reports of sleep disturbance and ill health by those living close to IWTs are supported.

  15. Design of low noise wind turbine blades using Betz and Joukowski concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. Z.; Hrgovan, I.; Okulov, V.; Zhu, W. J.; Madsen, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the aerodynamic design of low noise wind turbine blades using Betz and Joukowski concepts. The aerodynamic model is based on Blade Element Momentum theory whereas the aeroacoustic prediction model is based on the BPM model. The investigation is started with a 3MW baseline/reference turbine rotor with a diameter of 80 m. To reduce the noise emission from the baseline rotor, the rotor is reconstructed with the low noise CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils which has been tested in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech. Finally, 3MW low noise turbine rotors are designed using the concepts of Betz and Joukowski, and the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils. Performance analysis shows that the newly designed turbine rotors can achieve an overall noise reduction of 6 dB and 1.5 dB(A) with a similar power output as compared to the reference rotor.

  16. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    SciT

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  17. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. The investigation relies on highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flowfield inside a modern high-pressure turbine (HPT). The simulations are developed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code capable of multi-stage simulations. The purpose of this study is twofold. First, to determine an estimate of the relative importance of the contributions to the coherent part of the acoustic signature of a turbine from the three potential sources of turbine noise generation, namely, blade-row viscous interaction, potential field interaction, and entropic source associated with the interaction of the blade rows with the temperature nonuniformities caused by the incomplete mixing of the hot fluid and the cooling flow. Second, to develop an understanding of the turbine acoustic transmission characteristics and to assess the applicability of existing empirical and analytical transmission loss models to realistic geometries and flow conditions for modern turbine designs. The investigation so far has concentrated on two simulations: (1) a single-stage HPT and (2) a two-stage HPT and the associated inter-turbine duct/strut segment. The simulations are designed to resolve up to the second harmonic of the blade passing frequency tone in accordance with accepted rules for second order solvers like TURBO. The calculations include blade and vane cooling flows and a radial profile of pressure and temperature at the turbine inlet. The calculation can be modified later to include the combustor pattern factor at the

  18. Estimating annoyance to calculated wind turbine shadow flicker is improved when variables associated with wind turbine noise exposure are considered.

    PubMed

    Voicescu, Sonia A; Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Bower, Tara; van den Berg, Frits; Broner, Norm; Lavigne, Eric

    2016-03-01

    The Community Noise and Health Study conducted by Health Canada included randomly selected participants aged 18-79 yrs (606 males, 632 females, response rate 78.9%), living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from operational wind turbines. Annoyance to wind turbine noise (WTN) and other features, including shadow flicker (SF) was assessed. The current analysis reports on the degree to which estimating high annoyance to wind turbine shadow flicker (HAWTSF) was improved when variables known to be related to WTN exposure were also considered. As SF exposure increased [calculated as maximum minutes per day (SFm)], HAWTSF increased from 3.8% at 0 ≤ SFm < 10 to 21.1% at SFm ≥ 30, p < 0.0001. For each unit increase in SFm the odds ratio was 2.02 [95% confidence interval: (1.68,2.43)]. Stepwise regression models for HAWTSF had a predictive strength of up to 53% with 10% attributed to SFm. Variables associated with HAWTSF included, but were not limited to, annoyance to other wind turbine-related features, concern for physical safety, and noise sensitivity. Reported dizziness was also retained in the final model at p = 0.0581. Study findings add to the growing science base in this area and may be helpful in identifying factors associated with community reactions to SF exposure from wind turbines.

  19. An exploratory survey of noise levels associated with a 100kW wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balombin, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Noise measurements of a 125-foot diameter, 100 kW wind turbine are presented. The data include measurements as functions of distance from the turbine and directivity angle and cover a frequency range from 1 Hz to several kHz. Potential community impact is discussed in terms of A-weighted noise levels relative to background levels, and the intrasonic spectral content. Finally, the change in the sound power spectrum associated with a change in the rotor speed in described. The acoustic impact of this size wind turbine is judged to be minimal.

  20. Wind turbines and human health.

    PubMed

    Knopper, Loren D; Ollson, Christopher A; McCallum, Lindsay C; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L; Berger, Robert G; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health.

  1. Wind Turbines and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Knopper, Loren D.; Ollson, Christopher A.; McCallum, Lindsay C.; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L.; Berger, Robert G.; Souweine, Kathleen; McDaniel, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The association between wind turbines and health effects is highly debated. Some argue that reported health effects are related to wind turbine operation [electromagnetic fields (EMF), shadow flicker, audible noise, low-frequency noise, infrasound]. Others suggest that when turbines are sited correctly, effects are more likely attributable to a number of subjective variables that result in an annoyed/stressed state. In this review, we provide a bibliographic-like summary and analysis of the science around this issue specifically in terms of noise (including audible, low-frequency noise, and infrasound), EMF, and shadow flicker. Now there are roughly 60 scientific peer-reviewed articles on this issue. The available scientific evidence suggests that EMF, shadow flicker, low-frequency noise, and infrasound from wind turbines are not likely to affect human health; some studies have found that audible noise from wind turbines can be annoying to some. Annoyance may be associated with some self-reported health effects (e.g., sleep disturbance) especially at sound pressure levels >40 dB(A). Because environmental noise above certain levels is a recognized factor in a number of health issues, siting restrictions have been implemented in many jurisdictions to limit noise exposure. These setbacks should help alleviate annoyance from noise. Subjective variables (attitudes and expectations) are also linked to annoyance and have the potential to facilitate other health complaints via the nocebo effect. Therefore, it is possible that a segment of the population may remain annoyed (or report other health impacts) even when noise limits are enforced. Based on the findings and scientific merit of the available studies, the weight of evidence suggests that when sited properly, wind turbines are not related to adverse health. Stemming from this review, we provide a number of recommended best practices for wind turbine development in the context of human health. PMID:24995266

  2. Anechoic wind tunnel study of turbulence effects on wind turbine broadband noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Harris, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes recent results obtained at MIT on the experimental and theoretical modelling of aerodynamic broadband noise generated by a downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine. The aerodynamic broadband noise generated by the wind turbine rotor is attributed to the interaction of ingested turbulence with the rotor blades. The turbulence was generated in the MIT anechoic wind tunnel facility with the aid of biplanar grids of various sizes. The spectra and the intensity of the aerodynamic broadband noise have been studied as a function of parameters which characterize the turbulence and of wind turbine performance parameters. Specifically, the longitudinal integral scale of turbulence, the size scale of turbulence, the number of turbine blades, and free stream velocity were varied. Simultaneous measurements of acoustic and turbulence signals were made. The sound pressure level was found to vary directly with the integral scale of the ingested turbulence but not with its intensity level. A theoretical model based on unsteady aerodynamics is proposed.

  3. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ping; Lien, Fue-Sang; Yee, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz.

  4. Computational Acoustic Beamforming for Noise Source Identification for Small Wind Turbines

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Fue-Sang

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a computational acoustic beamforming (CAB) methodology for identification of sources of small wind turbine noise. This methodology is validated using the case of the NACA 0012 airfoil trailing edge noise. For this validation case, the predicted acoustic maps were in excellent conformance with the results of the measurements obtained from the acoustic beamforming experiment. Following this validation study, the CAB methodology was applied to the identification of noise sources generated by a commercial small wind turbine. The simulated acoustic maps revealed that the blade tower interaction and the wind turbine nacelle were the two primary mechanisms for sound generation for this small wind turbine at frequencies between 100 and 630 Hz. PMID:28378012

  5. Simulation of Turbine Tone Noise Generation Using a Turbomachinery Aerodynamics Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2010-01-01

    As turbofan engine bypass ratios continue to increase, the contribution of the turbine to the engine noise signature is receiving more attention. Understanding the relative importance of the various turbine noise generation mechanisms and the characteristics of the turbine acoustic transmission loss are essential ingredients in developing robust reduced-order models for predicting the turbine noise signature. A computationally based investigation has been undertaken to help guide the development of a turbine noise prediction capability that does not rely on empiricism. As proof-of-concept for this approach, two highly detailed numerical simulations of the unsteady flow field inside the first stage of a modern high-pressure turbine were carried out. The simulations were computed using TURBO, which is an unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes code capable of multi-stage simulations. Spectral and modal analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulation of the turbine stage show a circumferential modal distribution that is consistent with the Tyler-Sofrin rule. Within the high-pressure turbine, the interaction of velocity, pressure and temperature fluctuations with the downstream blade rows are all possible tone noise source mechanisms. We have taken the initial step in determining the source strength hierarchy by artificially reducing the level of temperature fluctuations in the turbine flowfield. This was accomplished by changing the vane cooling flow temperature in order to mitigate the vane thermal wake in the second of the two simulations. The results indicated that, despite a dramatic change in the vane cooling flow, the computed modal levels changed very little indicating that the contribution of temperature fluctuations to the overall pressure field is rather small compared with the viscous and potential field interaction mechanisms.

  6. Short-term nighttime wind turbine noise and cardiovascular events: A nationwide case-crossover study from Denmark.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Peña, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Ketzel, Matthias; Brandt, Jørgen; Sørensen, Mette

    2018-05-01

    The number of people exposed to wind turbine noise (WTN) is increasing. WTN is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels. Long-term exposure to traffic noise has consistently been associated with cardiovascular disease, whereas effects of short-term exposure are much less investigated due to little day-to-day variation of e.g. road traffic noise. WTN varies considerably due to changing weather conditions allowing investigation of short-term effects of WTN on cardiovascular events. We identified all hospitalisations and deaths from stroke (16,913 cases) and myocardial infarction (MI) (17,559 cases) among Danes exposed to WTN between 1982 and 2013. We applied a time-stratified, case-crossover design. Using detailed data on wind turbine type and hourly wind data at each wind turbine, we simulated mean nighttime outdoor (10-10,000 Hz) and nighttime low frequency (LF) indoor WTN (10-160 Hz) over the 4 days preceding diagnosis and reference days. For indoor LF WTN between 10 and 15 dB(A) and above 15 dB(A), odds ratios (ORs) for MI were 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.97-1.67; cases = 198) and 1.62 (95% CI: 0.76-3.45; cases = 21), respectively, when compared to indoor LF WTN below 5 dB(A). For stroke, corresponding ORs were 1.17 (95% CI: 0.95-1.69; cases = 166) and 2.30 (95% CI: 0.96-5.50; cases = 15). The elevated ORs above 15 dB(A) persisted across sensitivity analyses. When looking at specific lag times, noise exposure one day before MI events and three days before stroke events were associated with the highest ORs. For outdoor WTN at night, we observed both increased and decreased risk estimates. This study did not provide conclusive evidence of an association between WTN and MI or stroke. It does however suggest that indoor LF WTN at night may trigger cardiovascular events, whereas these events seemed largely unaffected by nighttime outdoor WTN. These findings need reproduction, as they were based on few cases

  7. Low-frequency noise in charge ordered system Pr0.63Ca0.37MnO3 near the charge-ordering transition and in the current induced destabilized state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, Arup K.

    2003-05-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of co-existing phases in the Charge Ordered (CO) manganite Pr0.63Ca0.37MnO3 using the technique of conductance noise spectroscopy. We note that close to the CO transition temperature Tco the spectral power of Sv(f)/V2 deviates significantly from the 1/f frequency dependence for f<=0.12Hz. Our analysis shows that this deviation can be described by a single frequency Lorentzian with corner frequency fc in addition to the usual broadband 1/f noise. Such a Lorentzian contribution to Sv(f)/V2 can come from a two level system (TLS). In the time serioues this shows up as RTN. For T<=Tco the system shows the onset of a non-linear conduction close to a threshold value Jdc = Jth the noise spectra is mainly 1/f in nature. For J > Jth a large low frequency component of noise (characterized again by a frequency fc) appears. We associate fc with the relaxation time tc of the TLS fluctuator so the tc = 1/fc. For thermal activation of the TLS the temperature dependence of fc will follow fc=foexp(-Ea/kBT) where Ea is an energy barrier. The value of fc shows an increase with Jdc showing that the value of the activation energy Ea is being lowered by the applied bias.

  8. On the Influence of Freight Trains on Humans: A Laboratory Investigation of the Impact of Nocturnal Low Frequency Vibration and Noise on Sleep and Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael G.; Croy, Ilona; Ögren, Mikael; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Background A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. Methodology/Principal Findings The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic. PMID:23409055

  9. On the influence of freight trains on humans: a laboratory investigation of the impact of nocturnal low frequency vibration and noise on sleep and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael G; Croy, Ilona; Ogren, Mikael; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic.

  10. Evaluating the impact of wind turbine noise on health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; McBride, David; Welch, David; Dirks, Kim N; Hill, Erin M

    2011-01-01

    We report a cross-sectional study comparing the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of individuals residing in the proximity of a wind farm to those residing in a demographically matched area sufficiently displaced from wind turbines. The study employed a nonequivalent comparison group posttest-only design. Self-administered questionnaires, which included the brief version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale, were delivered to residents in two adjacent areas in semirural New Zealand. Participants were also asked to identify annoying noises, indicate their degree of noise sensitivity, and rate amenity. Statistically significant differences were noted in some HRQOL domain scores, with residents living within 2 km of a turbine installation reporting lower overall quality of life, physical quality of life, and environmental quality of life. Those exposed to turbine noise also reported significantly lower sleep quality, and rated their environment as less restful. Our data suggest that wind farm noise can negatively impact facets of HRQOL.

  11. Comparison of Predicted and Measured Attenuation of Turbine Noise from a Static Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Eugene W.; Ruiz, Marta; Yu, Jia; Morin, Bruce L.; Cicon, Dennis; Schwieger, Paul S.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft noise has become an increasing concern for commercial airlines. Worldwide demand for quieter aircraft is increasing, making the prediction of engine noise suppression one of the most important fields of research. The Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) can be an important noise source during the approach condition for commercial aircraft. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Pratt & Whitney (P&W), and Goodrich Aerostructures (Goodrich) conducted a joint program to validate a method for predicting turbine noise attenuation. The method includes noise-source estimation, acoustic treatment impedance prediction, and in-duct noise propagation analysis. Two noise propagation prediction codes, Eversman Finite Element Method (FEM) code [1] and the CDUCT-LaRC [2] code, were used in this study to compare the predicted and the measured turbine noise attenuation from a static engine test. In this paper, the test setup, test configurations and test results are detailed in Section II. A description of the input parameters, including estimated noise modal content (in terms of acoustic potential), and acoustic treatment impedance values are provided in Section III. The prediction-to-test correlation study results are illustrated and discussed in Section IV and V for the FEM and the CDUCT-LaRC codes, respectively, and a summary of the results is presented in Section VI.

  12. Auditory recognition of familiar and unfamiliar subjects with wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Luigi; Masullo, Massimiliano; Gabriele, Maria Di; Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P; Pantis, John D; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo

    2015-04-17

    Considering the wide growth of the wind turbine market over the last decade as well as their increasing power size, more and more potential conflicts have arisen in society due to the noise radiated by these plants. Our goal was to determine whether the annoyance caused by wind farms is related to aspects other than noise. To accomplish this, an auditory experiment on the recognition of wind turbine noise was conducted to people with long experience of wind turbine noise exposure and to people with no previous experience to this type of noise source. Our findings demonstrated that the trend of the auditory recognition is the same for the two examined groups, as far as the increase of the distance and the decrease of the values of sound equivalent levels and loudness are concerned. Significant differences between the two groups were observed as the distance increases. People with wind turbine noise experience showed a higher tendency to report false alarms than people without experience.

  13. Auditory recognition of familiar and unfamiliar subjects with wind turbine noise

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Luigi; Masullo, Massimiliano; Di Gabriele, Maria; Votsi, Nefta-Eleftheria P.; Pantis, John D.; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Considering the wide growth of the wind turbine market over the last decade as well as their increasing power size, more and more potential conflicts have arisen in society due to the noise radiated by these plants. Our goal was to determine whether the annoyance caused by wind farms is related to aspects other than noise. To accomplish this, an auditory experiment on the recognition of wind turbine noise was conducted to people with long experience of wind turbine noise exposure and to people with no previous experience to this type of noise source. Our findings demonstrated that the trend of the auditory recognition is the same for the two examined groups, as far as the increase of the distance and the decrease of the values of sound equivalent levels and loudness are concerned. Significant differences between the two groups were observed as the distance increases. People with wind turbine noise experience showed a higher tendency to report false alarms than people without experience. PMID:25898408

  14. The influence of periodic wind turbine noise on infrasound array measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, Christoph; Ceranna, Lars

    2017-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise emissions from the continuously growing number of wind turbines in Germany are creating increasing problems for infrasound recording systems. These systems are equipped with highly sensitive micro pressure sensors accurately measuring acoustic signals in a frequency range inaudible to the human ear. Ten years of data (2006-2015) from the infrasound array IGADE in Northern Germany are analysed to quantify the influence of wind turbine noise on infrasound recordings. Furthermore, a theoretical model is derived and validated by a field experiment with mobile micro-barometer stations. Fieldwork was carried out 2004 to measure the infrasonic pressure level of a single horizontal-axis wind turbine and to extrapolate the sound effect for a larger number of nearby wind turbines. The model estimates the generated sound pressure level of wind turbines and thus enables for specifying the minimum allowable distance between wind turbines and infrasound stations for undisturbed recording. This aspect is particularly important to guarantee the monitoring performance of the German infrasound stations I26DE in the Bavarian Forest and I27DE in Antarctica. These stations are part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), and thus have to meet stringent specifications with respect to infrasonic background noise.

  15. Evaluation of annoyance from the wind turbine noise: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Małgorzata; Dudarewicz, Adam; Zaborowski, Kamil; Zamojska-Daniszewska, Małgorzata; Waszkowska, Małgorzata

    2014-06-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of and annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines in populated areas of Poland. The study group comprised 156 subjects. All subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire developed to enable evaluation of their living conditions, including prevalence of annoyance due to the noise from wind turbines and the self-assessment of physical health and well-being. In addition, current mental health status of the respondents was assessed using Goldberg General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. For areas where the respondents lived, A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated as the sum of the contributions from the wind power plants in the specific area. It has been shown that the wind turbine noise at the calculated A-weighted SPL of 30-48 dB was noticed outdoors by 60.3% of the respondents. This noise was perceived as annoying outdoors by 33.3% of the respondents, while indoors by 20.5% of them. The odds ratio of being annoyed outdoors by the wind turbine noise increased along with increasing SPLs (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.22-3.62). The subjects' attitude to wind turbines in general and sensitivity to landscape littering was found to have significant impact on the perceived annoyance. About 63% of variance in outdoors annoyance assessment might be explained by the noise level, general attitude to wind turbines and sensitivity to landscape littering. Before firm conclusions can be drawn further studies are needed, including a larger number of respondents with different living environments (i.e., dissimilar terrain, different urbanization and road traffic intensity).

  16. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Dag, Kaya O; Moriarty, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.

  17. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

    DOE PAGES

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; ...

    2017-11-28

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. Themore » local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.« less

  18. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

    SciT

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. Themore » local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.« less

  19. Long-term exposure to wind turbine noise at night and risk for diabetes: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Peña, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Ketzel, Matthias; Brandt, Jørgen; Sørensen, Mette

    2018-04-14

    Focus on renewable energy sources and reduced unit costs has led to increased number of wind turbines (WTs). WT noise (WTN) is reported to be highly annoying at levels from 30 to 35 dB and up, whereas for traffic noise people report to be highly annoyed from 40 to 45 dB and up. This has raised concerns as to whether WTN may increase risk for major diseases, as exposure to traffic noise has consistently been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We identified all Danish dwellings within a radius of 20 WT heights and 25% of all dwellings within 20-40 WT heights from a WT. Using detailed data on WT type and hourly wind data at each WT position and height, we estimated hourly outdoor and low frequency indoor WTN for all dwellings, aggregated as nighttime 1- and 5-year running means. Using nationwide registries, we identified a study population of 614,731 persons living in these dwellings in the period from 1996 to 2012, of whom 25,148 developed diabetes. Data were analysed using Poisson regression with adjustment for individual and area-levels covariates. We found no associations between long-term exposure to WTN during night and diabetes risk, with incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of 0.90 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.79-1.02) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.68-1.24) for 5-year mean nighttime outdoor WTN of 36-42 and ≥ 42 dB, respectively, compared to < 24 dB. For 5-year mean nighttime indoor low frequency WTN of 10-15 and ≥ 15 dB we found IRRs of 0.90 (0.78-1.04) and 0.74 (95% CI: 0.41-1.34), respectively, when compared to and < 5 dB. The lack of association was consistent across strata of sex, distance to major road, validity of noise estimate and WT height. The present study does not support an association between nighttime WTN and higher risk of diabetes. However, there were only few cases in the highest exposure groups and findings need reproduction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of aeroacoustic noise generated on wind turbine blades modified by trailing edge brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asheim, Michael J.

    As wind technology becomes a larger portion of the energy production picture, the problematic interactions between the machines and society will continue to become more pronounced. Of these problems, wind turbine noise is one of the most important to the future of wind turbine development. This study looks at the effect trailing edge brushes mounted on the 2 bladed Controls Advance Research Turbine (CART 2), located at the National Wind Technology Center, have on the overall acoustic and aerodynamic performance of the blades. The use of trailing edge brushes reduced the aeroacoustic noise by 1.0 to 5.0 dB over the baseline blade, depending on wind speed. This acoustic performance comes at a cost to the aerodynamic performance of the blades. The aerodynamic performance indicators, such as turbine power and root bending moments show that increased drag due to the brushes is the main contributor to the reduction in power production. An economic analysis also investigated how to best use noise mitigation devices to optimize acoustic, power performance and loads of a 600 kW baseline turbine, such as the CART 2. The analysis shows that the use of up a noise mitigation device of 4 dB is best used by increasing the rotor diameter and the power rating of the machine, from a 43.3 m diameter, 600 kW machine to a 68.8 m diameter, 886.7 kW machine. This increase resulted in an annual energy production increase of 414% when using a Rayleigh wind distribution with at a mean annual wind speed of 8.5 m/s. This is a reduction of cost of energy from 0.0463 per kWh to 0.0422 kWh. This reduction in energy production costs helps to explain the continuing trend of turbine machine growth in both rotor diameter and power rating.

  1. Low frequency events on Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, K.; Neuberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    Earthquake swarms observed on volcanoes consist generally of low frequency events. The low frequency content of these events indicates the presence of interface waves at the boundary of the magma filled conduit and the surrounding country rock. The observed seismic signal at the surface shows therefore a complicated interference pattern of waves originating at various parts of the magma filled conduit, interacting with the free surface and interfaces in the volcanic edifice. This research investigates the applicability of conventional seismic tools on these low frequency events, focusing on hypocenter location analysis using arrival times and particle motion analysis for the Soufrière Hills Volcano on Montserrat. Both single low frequency events and swarms are observed on this volcano. Synthetic low frequency events are used for comparison. Results show that reliable hypocenter locations and particle motions can only be obtained if the low frequency events are single events with an identifiable P wave onset, for example the single events preceding swarms on Montserrat or the first low frequency event of a swarm. Consecutive events of the same swarm are dominated by interface waves which are converted at the top of the conduit into weak secondary P waves and surface waves. Conventional seismic tools fail to correctly analyse these events.

  2. Coherence between internal and external noise generated by gas turbine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.; Muthukrishnan, M.; Neale, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments and analysis on a gas turbine combustor unit are reported with a view in mind to separate propagated acoustic power from non-propagating 'pseudo-sound'. Analytically, it is suggested that a transition frequency will exist below which the interior pressure fluctuations are non-propagating, whereas above this frequency, of the order of 100 Hz, the noise is dominated by propagating acoustic waves. Coherence measurements are reported which show this concept to be borne out experimentally. Coherence between interior and exterior microphones is measured over a wide range of experimental conditions for a gas turbine combustor exhausting directly to the atmosphere. The purpose is to show that below a certain frequency, measurements of interior noise are not indicative of combustion noise ultimately propagating from an engine.

  3. Measurement and prediction of broadband noise from large horizontal axis wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, F. W.; Shepherd, K. P.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the broadband noise spectra of large wind turbine generators. It includes contributions from such noise sources as the inflow turbulence to the rotor, the interactions between the turbulent boundary layers on the blade surfaces with their trailing edges and the wake due to a blunt trailing edge. The method is partly empirical and is based on acoustic measurements of large wind turbines and airfoil models. Spectra are predicted for several large machines including the proposed MOD-5B. Measured data are presented for the MOD-2, the WTS-4, the MOD-OA, and the U.S. Windpower Inc. machines. Good agreement is shown between the predicted and measured far field noise spectra.

  4. Exposure to wind turbine noise: Perceptual responses and reported health effects.

    PubMed

    Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E; Voicescu, Sonia A; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; McGuire, D'Arcy; Bower, Tara; Lavigne, Eric; Murray, Brian J; Weiss, Shelly K; van den Berg, Frits

    2016-03-01

    Health Canada, in collaboration with Statistics Canada, and other external experts, conducted the Community Noise and Health Study to better understand the impacts of wind turbine noise (WTN) on health and well-being. A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out between May and September 2013 in southwestern Ontario and Prince Edward Island on 1238 randomly selected participants (606 males, 632 females) aged 18-79 years, living between 0.25 and 11.22 km from operational wind turbines. Calculated outdoor WTN levels at the dwelling reached 46 dBA. Response rate was 78.9% and did not significantly differ across sample strata. Self-reported health effects (e.g., migraines, tinnitus, dizziness, etc.), sleep disturbance, sleep disorders, quality of life, and perceived stress were not related to WTN levels. Visual and auditory perception of wind turbines as reported by respondents increased significantly with increasing WTN levels as did high annoyance toward several wind turbine features, including the following: noise, blinking lights, shadow flicker, visual impacts, and vibrations. Concern for physical safety and closing bedroom windows to reduce WTN during sleep also increased with increasing WTN levels. Other sample characteristics are discussed in relation to WTN levels. Beyond annoyance, results do not support an association between exposure to WTN up to 46 dBA and the evaluated health-related endpoints.

  5. Location of aerodynamic noise sources from a 200 kW vertical-axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottermo, Fredric; Möllerström, Erik; Nordborg, Anders; Hylander, Jonny; Bernhoff, Hans

    2017-07-01

    Noise levels emitted from a 200 kW H-rotor vertical-axis wind turbine have been measured using a microphone array at four different positions, each at a hub-height distance from the tower. The microphone array, comprising 48 microphones in a spiral pattern, allows for directional mapping of the noise sources in the range of 500 Hz to 4 kHz. The produced images indicate that most of the noise is generated in a narrow azimuth-angle range, compatible with the location where increased turbulence is known to be present in the flow, as a result of the previous passage of a blade and its support arms. It is also shown that a semi-empirical model for inflow-turbulence noise seems to produce noise levels of the correct order of magnitude, based on the amount of turbulence that could be expected from power extraction considerations.

  6. Is low frequency ocean sound increasing globally?

    PubMed

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Nichols, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency sound has increased in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over the past 60 yr [Ross (1993) Acoust. Bull. 18, 5-8; (2005) IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 30, 257-261; Andrew, Howe, Mercer, and Dzieciuch (2002) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651; McDonald, Hildebrand, and Wiggins (2006) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 711-717; Chapman and Price (2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, EL161-EL165] and in the Indian Ocean over the past decade, [Miksis-Olds, Bradley, and Niu (2013) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134, 3464-3475]. More recently, Andrew, Howe, and Mercer's [(2011) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129, 642-651] observations in the Northeast Pacific show a level or slightly decreasing trend in low frequency noise. It remains unclear what the low frequency trends are in other regions of the world. In this work, data from the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty Organization International Monitoring System was used to examine the rate and magnitude of change in low frequency sound (5-115 Hz) over the past decade in the South Atlantic and Equatorial Pacific Oceans. The dominant source observed in the South Atlantic was seismic air gun signals, while shipping and biologic sources contributed more to the acoustic environment at the Equatorial Pacific location. Sound levels over the past 5-6 yr in the Equatorial Pacific have decreased. Decreases were also observed in the ambient sound floor in the South Atlantic Ocean. Based on these observations, it does not appear that low frequency sound levels are increasing globally.

  7. The Effects of Vision-Related Aspects on Noise Perception of Wind Turbines in Quiet Areas

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, Luigi; Iachini, Tina; Masullo, Massimiliano; Aletta, Francesco; Sorrentino, Francesco; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo; Ruotolo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Preserving the soundscape and geographic extension of quiet areas is a great challenge against the wide-spreading of environmental noise. The E.U. Environmental Noise Directive underlines the need to preserve quiet areas as a new aim for the management of noise in European countries. At the same time, due to their low population density, rural areas characterized by suitable wind are considered appropriate locations for installing wind farms. However, despite the fact that wind farms are represented as environmentally friendly projects, these plants are often viewed as visual and audible intruders, that spoil the landscape and generate noise. Even though the correlations are still unclear, it is obvious that visual impacts of wind farms could increase due to their size and coherence with respect to the rural/quiet environment. In this paper, by using the Immersive Virtual Reality technique, some visual and acoustical aspects of the impact of a wind farm on a sample of subjects were assessed and analyzed. The subjects were immersed in a virtual scenario that represented a situation of a typical rural outdoor scenario that they experienced at different distances from the wind turbines. The influence of the number and the colour of wind turbines on global, visual and auditory judgment were investigated. The main results showed that, regarding the number of wind turbines, the visual component has a weak effect on individual reactions, while the colour influences both visual and auditory individual reactions, although in a different way. PMID:23624578

  8. The effects of vision-related aspects on noise perception of wind turbines in quiet areas.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Luigi; Iachini, Tina; Masullo, Massimiliano; Aletta, Francesco; Sorrentino, Francesco; Senese, Vincenzo Paolo; Ruotolo, Francesco

    2013-04-26

    Preserving the soundscape and geographic extension of quiet areas is a great challenge against the wide-spreading of environmental noise. The E.U. Environmental Noise Directive underlines the need to preserve quiet areas as a new aim for the management of noise in European countries. At the same time, due to their low population density, rural areas characterized by suitable wind are considered appropriate locations for installing wind farms. However, despite the fact that wind farms are represented as environmentally friendly projects, these plants are often viewed as visual and audible intruders, that spoil the landscape and generate noise. Even though the correlations are still unclear, it is obvious that visual impacts of wind farms could increase due to their size and coherence with respect to the rural/quiet environment. In this paper, by using the Immersive Virtual Reality technique, some visual and acoustical aspects of the impact of a wind farm on a sample of subjects were assessed and analyzed. The subjects were immersed in a virtual scenario that represented a situation of a typical rural outdoor scenario that they experienced at different distances from the wind turbines. The influence of the number and the colour of wind turbines on global, visual and auditory judgment were investigated. The main results showed that, regarding the number of wind turbines, the visual component has a weak effect on individual reactions, while the colour influences both visual and auditory individual reactions, although in a different way.

  9. The Impact of Measurement Noise in GPA Diagnostic Analysis of a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntantis, Efstratios L.; Li, Y. G.

    2013-12-01

    The performance diagnostic analysis of a gas turbine is accomplished by estimating a set of internal engine health parameters from available sensor measurements. No physical measuring instruments however can ever completely eliminate the presence of measurement uncertainties. Sensor measurements are often distorted by noise and bias leading to inaccurate estimation results. This paper explores the impact of measurement noise on Gas Turbine GPA analysis. The analysis is demonstrated with a test case where gas turbine performance simulation and diagnostics code TURBOMATCH is used to build a performance model of a model engine similar to Rolls-Royce Trent 500 turbofan engine, and carry out the diagnostic analysis with the presence of different levels of measurement noise. Conclusively, to improve the reliability of the diagnostic results, a statistical analysis of the data scattering caused by sensor uncertainties is made. The diagnostic tool used to deal with the statistical analysis of measurement noise impact is a model-based method utilizing a non-linear GPA.

  10. Coupling of Helmholtz resonators to improve acoustic liners for turbofan engines at low frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted to evaluate means for increasing the effectiveness of low frequency sound absorbing liners for aircraft turbine engines. Three schemes for coupling low frequency absorber elements were considered. These schemes were analytically modeled and their impedance was predicted over a frequency range of 50 to 1,000 Hz. An optimum and two off-optimum designs of the most promising, a parallel coupled scheme, were fabricated and tested in a flow duct facility. Impedance measurements were in good agreement with predicted values and validated the procedure used to transform modeled parameters to hardware designs. Measurements of attenuation for panels of coupled resonators were consistent with predictions based on measured impedance. All coupled resonator panels tested showed an increase in peak attenuation of about 50% and an increase in attenuation bandwidth of one one-third octave band over that measured for an uncoupled panel. These attenuation characteristics equate to about 35% greater reduction in source perceived noise level (PNL), relative to the uncoupled panel, or a reduction in treatment length of about 24% for constant PNL reduction. The increased effectiveness of the coupled resonator concept for attenuation of low frequency broad spectrum noise is demonstrated.

  11. Measures against mechanical noise from large wind turbines: A design guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunggren, Sten; Johansson, Melker

    1991-06-01

    The noise generated by the machinery of the two Swedish prototypes contains pure tones which are very important with respect to the environmental impact. A discussion of the results of noise measurements carried out at these turbines, that are meant to be used as a guide as to how to predict and control the noise around a large wind turbine during the design stage, is presented. The design targets are discussed, stressing the importance of the audibility of pure tones and not only the annoyance; a simple criterion is cited. The main noise source is the gearbox and a simple empirical expression for the sound power level is shown to give good agreement with the measurement results. The influence of the noise of the gearbox design is discussed in some detail. Formulas for the prediction of the airborne sound transmission to the ground outside the nacelle are presented, together with a number of empirical data on the sound reduction indices for single and double constructions. The structure-borne noise transmission is discussed.

  12. A comparison between exposure-response relationships for wind turbine annoyance and annoyance due to other noise sources.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Sabine A; Vos, Henk; Eisses, Arno R; Pedersen, Eja

    2011-12-01

    Surveys have shown that noise from wind turbines is perceived as annoying by a proportion of residents living in their vicinity, apparently at much lower noise levels than those inducing annoyance due to other environmental sources. The aim of the present study was to derive the exposure-response relationship between wind turbine noise exposure in L(den) and the expected percentage annoyed residents and to compare it to previously established relationships for industrial noise and transportation noise. In addition, the influence of several individual and situational factors was assessed. On the basis of available data from two surveys in Sweden (N=341, N=754) and one survey in the Netherlands (N=725), a relationship was derived for annoyance indoors and for annoyance outdoors at the dwelling. In comparison to other sources of environmental noise, annoyance due to wind turbine noise was found at relatively low noise exposure levels. Furthermore, annoyance was lower among residents who received economical benefit from wind turbines and higher among residents for whom the wind turbine was visible from the dwelling. Age and noise sensitivity had similar effects on annoyance to those found in research on annoyance by other sources. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  13. Noise measurements for single and multiple operation of 50 kw wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    The noise characteristics of the U.S. Windpower Inc., 50 kw wind turbine generator were measured at various distances from 30 m to 1100 m and for a range of output power. The generated noise is affected by the aerodynamic wakes of the tower legs at frequencies below about 120 Hz and the blade trailing edge thickness at frequencies of about 2 kHz. Rope strakes and airfoil fairings on the legs did not result in substantial noise reductions. Sharpening the blade trailing edges near the tip was effective in reducing broad band noise near 2 kHz. For multiple machines the sound fields are superposed. A three-fold increase in number of machines (from 1 to 3) results in a predicted increase in he sound pressure level of about 5 dB. The detection threshold for 14 machines operating in a 13 - 20 mph wind is observed to be at approximately 1160 m in the downwind direction.

  14. Study of the Efficiency of the Polarization-Diversity Reception of a Very Low Frequency Signal Against the Background of Atmospheric Noise and Jamming in the Communication-Channel Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelev, S. A.; Lvov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a model of forming the signals and interference in the very low frequency wave range. Using this model, we determine the potentials of the space-polarization interference compensators in a communication channel with natural interference and jamming.

  15. Seafloor Pressure Array Studies at Ultra-Low Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    broadband instrument design and deployment. In order to measure broadband noise routinely, a low frequency pressure gauge designed for deep ocean...below the microseism band (Moore et al, 1981). A differential pressure gauge , developed for low frequency recordings by Cox et al (1984) and sensitive to...design differential pressure gauge (Cox et al, 1984) with a sensitivity -3- ULF Seafloor Pressure Array Studies range of 0.01-5 Hz. The high

  16. Tower wake/blade interaction noise of a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Hideo; Takeda, Katsumi

    1987-10-01

    A scale model of a 1.5m dia. two-bladed windturbine was used in an anechoic chamber that provided a free-stream velocity of 8m/s. The blades used were a 1.5/8 scale model of a test machine for a local energy utilization project promoted by the Science and Technology Agency. The height of the tower from the ground level was 1.8m. The acoustic measurements were made in a circle of 1.6m downstream from the machine at the height of the windmill centerline. The noise level of the on-axis spectra was about 15dB larger than that of the off-axis. This is a result of the dipole nature of the acoustic impulse. The Wortmann airfoil (FX 77-W series) was employed for the blade profiles and the Reynolds number was 10(5), based on the tip chord length. The experiment revealed that the sound intensity at each harmonic was not proportional to the axial and radial extents of the wake. The elliptic slender configuration was the quietest, while the square configuration was the loudest. From a practical point of view, it is suggested that the circular section is most suitable for the tower leg.

  17. Short-term annoyance reactions to stationary and time-varying wind turbine and road traffic noise: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Beat; Schlittmeier, Sabine J; Pieren, Reto; Heutschi, Kurt; Brink, Mark; Graf, Ralf; Hellbrück, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Current literature suggests that wind turbine noise is more annoying than transportation noise. To date, however, it is not known which acoustic characteristics of wind turbines alone, i.e., without effect modifiers such as visibility, are associated with annoyance. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate and compare the short-term noise annoyance reactions to wind turbines and road traffic in controlled laboratory listening tests. A set of acoustic scenarios was created which, combined with the factorial design of the listening tests, allowed separating the individual associations of three acoustic characteristics with annoyance, namely, source type (wind turbine, road traffic), A-weighted sound pressure level, and amplitude modulation (without, periodic, random). Sixty participants rated their annoyance to the sounds. At the same A-weighted sound pressure level, wind turbine noise was found to be associated with higher annoyance than road traffic noise, particularly with amplitude modulation. The increased annoyance to amplitude modulation of wind turbines is not related to its periodicity, but seems to depend on the modulation frequency range. The study discloses a direct link of different acoustic characteristics to annoyance, yet the generalizability to long-term exposure in the field still needs to be verified.

  18. Low-frequency electrical properties.

    Olhoeft, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the interpretation of induced polarization data, it is commonly assumed that metallic mineral polarization dominantly or solely causes the observed response. However, at low frequencies, there is a variety of active chemical processes which involve the movement or transfer of electrical charge. Measurements of electrical properties at low frequencies (such as induced polarization) observe such movement of charge and thus monitor many geochemical processes at a distance. Examples in which this has been done include oxidation-reduction of metallic minerals such as sulfides, cation exchange on clays, and a variety of clay-organic reactions relevant to problems in toxic waste disposal and petroleum exploration. By using both the frequency dependence and nonlinear character of the complex resistivity spectrum, these reactions may be distinguished from each other and from barren or reactionless materials.-Author

  19. Wind turbine noise, annoyance and self-reported health and well-being in different living environments.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eja; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise among people living near the turbines, and to study relations between noise and perception/annoyance, with focus on differences between living environments. A cross-sectional study was carried out in seven areas in Sweden across dissimilar terrain and different degrees of urbanisation. A postal questionnaire regarding living conditions including response to wind turbine noise was completed by 754 subjects. Outdoor A-weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for each respondent. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise in relation to SPLs was analysed with regard to dissimilarities between the areas. The odds of perceiving wind turbine noise increased with increasing SPL (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.25 to 1.40). The odds of being annoyed by wind turbine noise also increased with increasing SPLs (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.25). Perception and annoyance were associated with terrain and urbanisation: (1) a rural area increased the risk of perception and annoyance in comparison with a suburban area; and (2) in a rural setting, complex ground (hilly or rocky terrain) increased the risk compared with flat ground. Annoyance was associated with both objective and subjective factors of wind turbine visibility, and was further associated with lowered sleep quality and negative emotions. There is a need to take the unique environment into account when planning a new wind farm so that adverse health effects are avoided. The influence of area-related factors should also be considered in future community noise research.

  20. Wind turbine noise, annoyance and self‐reported health and well‐being in different living environments

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Eja

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise among people living near the turbines, and to study relations between noise and perception/annoyance, with focus on differences between living environments. Methods A cross‐sectional study was carried out in seven areas in Sweden across dissimilar terrain and different degrees of urbanisation. A postal questionnaire regarding living conditions including response to wind turbine noise was completed by 754 subjects. Outdoor A‐weighted sound pressure levels (SPLs) were calculated for each respondent. Perception and annoyance due to wind turbine noise in relation to SPLs was analysed with regard to dissimilarities between the areas. Results The odds of perceiving wind turbine noise increased with increasing SPL (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.25 to 1.40). The odds of being annoyed by wind turbine noise also increased with increasing SPLs (OR 1.1; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.25). Perception and annoyance were associated with terrain and urbanisation: (1) a rural area increased the risk of perception and annoyance in comparison with a suburban area; and (2) in a rural setting, complex ground (hilly or rocky terrain) increased the risk compared with flat ground. Annoyance was associated with both objective and subjective factors of wind turbine visibility, and was further associated with lowered sleep quality and negative emotions. Conclusion There is a need to take the unique environment into account when planning a new wind farm so that adverse health effects are avoided. The influence of area‐related factors should also be considered in future community noise research. PMID:17332136

  1. Aeroacoustics of large wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews published information on aerodynamically generated noise from large horizontal axis wind turbines operated for electric power generation. Methods are presented for predicting both the discrete frequency rotational noise components and the broadband noise components, and results are compared with measurements. Refraction effects that result in the formation of high-frequency shadow zones in the upwind direction and channeling effects for the low frequencies in the downwind direction are illustrated. Special topics such as distributed source effects in prediction and the role of building dynamics in perception are also included.

  2. Predicting broadband noise from a stator vane of a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Donald B. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A computer-implemented model of fan section of a gas turbine engine accounts for the turbulence in the gas flow emanating from the rotor assembly and impinging upon an inlet to the stator vane cascade. The model allows for user-input variations in the sweep and/or lean angles for the stator vanes. The model determines the resulting acoustic response of the fan section as a function of the turbulence and the lean and/or sweep angles of the vanes. The model may be embodied in software that is rapidly executed in a computer. This way, an optimum arrangement in terms of fan noise reduction is quickly determined for the stator vane lean and sweep physical positioning in the fan section of a gas turbine engine.

  3. Improvement of Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Frequency Acceleration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stec, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The noise floor of low frequency acceleration data acquired on the Space Shuttle Main Engines is higher than desirable. Difficulties of acquiring high quality acceleration data on this engine are discussed. The approach presented in this paper for reducing the acceleration noise floor focuses on a search for an accelerometer more capable of measuring low frequency accelerations. An overview is given of the current measurement system used to acquire engine vibratory data. The severity of vibration, temperature, and moisture environments are considered. Vibratory measurements from both laboratory and rocket engine tests are presented.

  4. Low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1989-01-01

    Following preliminary investigations of the low frequency electric and magnetic fields that may exists in the Earth-ionospheric cavity, measurements were taken with state-of-the art spectrum analyzers. As a follow up to this activity, an investigation was initiated to determine sources and values for possible low frequency signal that would appear in the cavity. The lowest cavity resonance is estimated at about 8 Hz, but lower frequencies may be an important component of our electromagnetic environment. The potential field frequencies produced by the electron were investigated by a classical model that included possible cross coupling of the electric and gravitation fields. During this work, an interesting relationship was found that related the high frequency charge field with the extremely low frequency of the gravitation field. The results of numerical calculations were surprisingly accurate and this area of investigation is continuing. The work toward continued development of a standardized monitoring facility is continuing with the potential of installing the prototype at West Virginia State College early in 1990. This installation would be capable of real time monitoring of ELF signals in the Earth-ionoshpere cavity and would provide some directional information. A high gain, low noise, 1/f frequency corrected preamplifier was designed and tested for the ferrite core magnetic sensor. The potential application of a super conducting sensor for the ELF magnetic field detection is under investigation. It is hoped that a fully operational monitoring network could pinpoint the location of ELF signal sources and provide new information on where these signals originate and what causes them, assuming that they are natural in origin.

  5. Quiet engine program: Turbine noise suppression. -Volume 1: General treatment evaluation and measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, A.; Hehmann, H.; Radecki, K.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic treatment was developed for jet engine turbine noise suppression. Acoustic impedance and duct transmission loss measurements were made for various suppression systems. An environmental compatibility study on several material types having suppression characteristics is presented. Two sets of engine hardware were designed and are described along with engine test results which include probe, farfield, near field, and acoustic directional array data. Comparisons of the expected and the measured suppression levels are given as well as a discussion of test results and design techniques.

  6. Before-after field study of effects of wind turbine noise on polysomnographic sleep parameters.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Leila; Bigelow, Philip; Nezhad-Ahmadi, Mohammad-Reza; Gohari, Mahmood; Williams, Diane; McColl, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Wind is considered one of the most advantageous alternatives to fossil energy because of its low operating cost and extensive availability. However, alleged health-related effects of exposure to wind turbine (WT) noise have attracted much public attention and various symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, have been reported by residents living close to wind developments. Prospective cohort study with synchronous measurement of noise and sleep physiologic signals was conducted to explore the possibility of sleep disturbance in people hosting new industrial WTs in Ontario, Canada, using a pre and post-exposure design. Objective and subjective sleep data were collected through polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard diagnostic test, and sleep diary. Sixteen participants were studied before and after WT installation during two consecutive nights in their own bedrooms. Both audible and infrasound noises were also concurrently measured inside the bedroom of each participant. Different noise exposure parameters were calculated (LAeq, LZeq) and analyzed in relation to whole-night sleep parameters. Results obtained from PSG show that sleep parameters were not significantly changed after exposure. However, reported sleep qualities were significantly (P = 0.008) worsened after exposure. Average noise levels during the exposure period were low to moderate and the mean of inside noise levels did not significantly change after exposure. The result of this study based on advanced sleep recording methodology together with extensive noise measurements in an ecologically valid setting cautiously suggests that there are no major changes in the sleep of participants who host new industrial WTs in their community. Further studies with a larger sample size and including comprehensive single-event analyses are warranted.

  7. Before–After Field Study of Effects of Wind Turbine Noise on Polysomnographic Sleep Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Leila; Bigelow, Philip; Nezhad-Ahmadi, Mohammad-Reza; Gohari, Mahmood; Williams, Diane; McColl, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Wind is considered one of the most advantageous alternatives to fossil energy because of its low operating cost and extensive availability. However, alleged health-related effects of exposure to wind turbine (WT) noise have attracted much public attention and various symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, have been reported by residents living close to wind developments. Prospective cohort study with synchronous measurement of noise and sleep physiologic signals was conducted to explore the possibility of sleep disturbance in people hosting new industrial WTs in Ontario, Canada, using a pre and post-exposure design. Objective and subjective sleep data were collected through polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard diagnostic test, and sleep diary. Sixteen participants were studied before and after WT installation during two consecutive nights in their own bedrooms. Both audible and infrasound noises were also concurrently measured inside the bedroom of each participant. Different noise exposure parameters were calculated (LAeq, LZeq) and analyzed in relation to whole-night sleep parameters. Results obtained from PSG show that sleep parameters were not significantly changed after exposure. However, reported sleep qualities were significantly (P=0.008) worsened after exposure. Average noise levels during the exposure period were low to moderate and the mean of inside noise levels did not significantly change after exposure. The result of this study based on advanced sleep recording methodology together with extensive noise measurements in an ecologically valid setting cautiously suggests that there are no major changes in the sleep of participants who host new industrial WTs in their community. Further studies with a larger sample size and including comprehensive single-event analyses are warranted. PMID:27569407

  8. Response measurements for two building structures excited by noise from a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, H. H.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    Window and wall acceleration measurements and interior noise measurements ere made for two different building structures during excitation by noise from the WTS-4 horizontal axis wind turbine generator operating in a normal power generation mode. With turbine noise input pulses resulted in acceleration pulses for the wall and window elements of the two tests buildings. Response spectra suggest that natural vibration modes of the structures are excited. Responses of a house trailer were substantially greater than those for a building of sturdier construction. Peak acceleration values correlate well with similar data for houses excited by flyover noise from commercial and military airplanes and helicopters, and sonic booms from supersonic aircraft. Interior noise spectra have peaks at frequencies corresponding to structural vibration modes and room standing waves; and the levels for particular frequencies and locations can be higher than the outside levels.

  9. Indoor noise annoyance due to 3-5 megawatt wind turbines-An exposure-response relationship.

    PubMed

    Hongisto, Valtteri; Oliva, David; Keränen, Jukka

    2017-10-01

    The existing exposure-response relationships describing the association between wind turbine sound level and noise annoyance concern turbine sizes of 0.15-3.0 MW. The main purpose of this study was to determine a relationship concerning turbines with nominal power of 3-5 MW. A cross-sectional survey was conducted around three wind power areas in Finland. The survey involved all households within a 2 km distance from the nearest turbine. Altogether, 429 households out of 753 participated. The households were exposed to wind turbine noise having sound levels within 26.7-44.2 dB L Aeq . Standard prediction methods were applied to determine the sound level, L Aeq , in each participant's yard. The measured sound level agreed well with the predicted sound level. The exposure-response relationship was derived between L Aeq outdoors and the indoor noise annoyance. The relationship was in rather good agreement with two previous studies involving much smaller turbines (0.15-1.5 MW) under 40 dB L Aeq . The Community Tolerance Level (CTL), CTL 20  = 50 dB, was 3 dB lower than for two previous studies. Above 40 dB, a small number of participants prevented a reliable comparison to previous studies.

  10. Effects of Wind Turbine Noise on Self-Reported and Objective Measures of Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, David S.; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E.; Voicescu, Sonia A.; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Murray, Brian J.; Weiss, Shelly K.; Villeneuve, Paul J.; van den Berg, Frits; Bower, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the association between self-reported and objective measures of sleep and wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure. Methods: The Community Noise and Health Study, a cross-sectional epidemiological study, included an in-house computer-assisted interview and sleep pattern monitoring over a 7 d period. Outdoor WTN levels were calculated following international standards for conditions that typically approximate the highest long-term average levels at each dwelling. Study data were collected between May and September 2013 from adults, aged 18–79 y (606 males, 632 females) randomly selected from each household and living between 0.25 and 11.22 kilometers from operational wind turbines in two Canadian provinces. Self-reported sleep quality over the past 30 d was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Additional questions assessed the prevalence of diagnosed sleep disorders and the magnitude of sleep disturbance over the previous year. Objective measures for sleep latency, sleep efficiency, total sleep time, rate of awakening bouts, and wake duration after sleep onset were recorded using the wrist worn Actiwatch2® from a subsample of 654 participants (289 males, 365 females) for a total of 3,772 sleep nights. Results: Participant response rate for the interview was 78.9%. Outdoor WTN levels reached 46 dB(A) with an arithmetic mean of 35.6 and a standard deviation of 7.4. Self-reported and objectively measured sleep outcomes consistently revealed no apparent pattern or statistically significant relationship to WTN levels. However, sleep was significantly influenced by other factors, including, but not limited to, the use of sleep medication, other health conditions (including sleep disorders), caffeine consumption, and annoyance with blinking lights on wind turbines. Conclusions: Study results do not support an association between exposure to outdoor WTN up to 46 dB(A) and an increase in the prevalence of disturbed sleep

  11. [Low-Frequency Flow Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of the research conducted under this grant are presented in detail in three Master theses, by Heinrich, Balow, and Broeren. Additional analysis of the experimental data can be found in two AIAA Journal articles and two conference papers. Citations for all of the studies' publications can be found in the bibliography which is attached. The objective of Heinrich's study was to document the low-frequency flow oscillation on the LRN-1007 airfoil, which had been previously observed at low Reynolds number, to determine its origin, and explore the phenomenon at higher Reynolds number. Heinrich performed detailed flow visualization on the airfoil using surface fluorescent oil and laser-sheet off-body visualization. A large leading-edge separation bubble and trailing-edge separation was identified on the airfoil just prior to the onset of the unsteady stall flow oscillation. From the laser-sheet data, the unsteady flow appeared as a massive boundary-layer separation followed by flow reattachment. Hot-wire data were taken in the wake to identify the presence of the flow oscillation and the dominant frequency. The oscillation was found in the flow from a Reynolds number of 0.3 to 1.3 x 10 exp 6. The Strouhal number based on airfoil projected height was nominally 0.02 and increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number and significantly with increasing airfoil angle of attack. Balow focused his research on the leading-edge separation bubble which was hypothesized to be the origin of the low-frequency oscillation. Initially, experimental measurements in the bubble at the onset of the low-frequency oscillation were attempted to study the characteristics of the bubble and explain possible relationships to the shear-layer-flapping phenomena. Unfortunately, the bubble proved to be extremely sensitive to the probe interference and it drastically reduced the size of the bubble. These detailed measurements were then abandoned by Balow. However, this led to a series of

  12. Automatic bearing fault diagnosis of permanent magnet synchronous generators in wind turbines subjected to noise interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun; Lu, Siliang; Zhai, Chao; He, Qingbo

    2018-02-01

    An automatic bearing fault diagnosis method is proposed for permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSGs), which are widely installed in wind turbines subjected to low rotating speeds, speed fluctuations, and electrical device noise interferences. The mechanical rotating angle curve is first extracted from the phase current of a PMSG by sequentially applying a series of algorithms. The synchronous sampled vibration signal of the fault bearing is then resampled in the angular domain according to the obtained rotating phase information. Considering that the resampled vibration signal is still overwhelmed by heavy background noise, an adaptive stochastic resonance filter is applied to the resampled signal to enhance the fault indicator and facilitate bearing fault identification. Two types of fault bearings with different fault sizes in a PMSG test rig are subjected to experiments to test the effectiveness of the proposed method. The proposed method is fully automated and thus shows potential for convenient, highly efficient and in situ bearing fault diagnosis for wind turbines subjected to harsh environments.

  13. A new multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance for enhanced fault diagnosis in wind turbine drivetrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingbing; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    It is very difficult to detect weak fault signatures due to the large amount of noise in a wind turbine system. Multiscale noise tuning stochastic resonance (MSTSR) has proved to be an effective way to extract weak signals buried in strong noise. However, the MSTSR method originally based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has disadvantages such as shift variance and the aliasing effects in engineering application. In this paper, the dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is introduced into the MSTSR method, which makes it possible to further improve the system output signal-to-noise ratio and the accuracy of fault diagnosis by the merits of DTCWT (nearly shift invariant and reduced aliasing effects). Moreover, this method utilizes the relationship between the two dual-tree wavelet basis functions, instead of matching the single wavelet basis function to the signal being analyzed, which may speed up the signal processing and be employed in on-line engineering monitoring. The proposed method is applied to the analysis of bearing outer ring and shaft coupling vibration signals carrying fault information. The results confirm that the method performs better in extracting the fault features than the original DWT-based MSTSR, the wavelet transform with post spectral analysis, and EMD-based spectral analysis methods.

  14. Underwater noise from three types of offshore wind turbines: estimation of impact zones for harbor porpoises and harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Tougaard, Jakob; Henriksen, Oluf Damsgaard; Miller, Lee A

    2009-06-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from three different types of wind turbines in Denmark and Sweden (Middelgrunden, Vindeby, and Bockstigen-Valar) during normal operation. Wind turbine noise was only measurable above ambient noise at frequencies below 500 Hz. Total sound pressure level was in the range 109-127 dB re 1 microPa rms, measured at distances between 14 and 20 m from the foundations. The 1/3-octave noise levels were compared with audiograms of harbor seals and harbor porpoises. Maximum 1/3-octave levels were in the range 106-126 dB re 1 microPa rms. Maximum range of audibility was estimated under two extreme assumptions on transmission loss (3 and 9 dB per doubling of distance, respectively). Audibility was low for harbor porpoises extending 20-70 m from the foundation, whereas audibility for harbor seals ranged from less than 100 m to several kilometers. Behavioral reactions of porpoises to the noise appear unlikely except if they are very close to the foundations. However, behavioral reactions from seals cannot be excluded up to distances of a few hundred meters. It is unlikely that the noise reaches dangerous levels at any distance from the turbines and the noise is considered incapable of masking acoustic communication by seals and porpoises.

  15. Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Roy D; Krogh, Carmen M E; Horner, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Some people living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs) report experiencing adverse health and socioeconomic effects. This review considers the hypothesis that annoyance from audible IWTs is the cause of these adverse health effects. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published since 2000 that included the terms "wind turbine health," "wind turbine infrasound," "wind turbine annoyance," "noise annoyance" or "low frequency noise" in the title or abstract. Industrial wind turbines produce sound that is perceived to be more annoying than other sources of sound. Reported effects from exposure to IWTs are consistent with well-known stress effects from persistent unwanted sound. If placed too close to residents, IWTs can negatively affect the physical, mental and social well-being of people. There is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that noise from audible IWTs is a potential cause of health effects. Inaudible low-frequency noise and infrasound from IWTs cannot be ruled out as plausible causes of health effects.

  16. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.; Ramirez, J. M.; Gatti, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation.

  17. The isolation of low frequency impact sounds in hotel construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, John J.; Dong, David W.

    2002-11-01

    One of the design challenges in the acoustical design of hotels is reducing low frequency sounds from footfalls occurring on both carpeted and hard-surfaced floors. Research on low frequency impact noise [W. Blazier and R. DuPree, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1521-1532 (1994)] resulted in a conclusion that in wood construction low frequency impact sounds were clearly audible and that feasible control methods were not available. The results of numerous FIIC (Field Impact Insulation Class) measurements performed in accordance with ASTM E1007 indicate the lack of correlation between FIIC ratings and the reaction of occupants in the room below. The measurements presented include FIIC ratings and sound pressure level measurements below the ASTM E1007 low frequency limit of 100 Hertz, and reveal that excessive sound levels in the frequency range of 63 to 100 Hertz correlate with occupant complaints. Based upon this history, a tentative criterion for maximum impact sound level in the low frequency range is presented. The results presented of modifying existing constructions to reduce the transmission of impact sounds at low frequencies indicate that there may be practical solutions to this longstanding problem.

  18. Effect of Wind Turbine Noise on Workers' Sleep Disorder: A Case Study of Manjil Wind Farm in Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Milad; Monnazzam, Mohammad Reza; Zakerian, Sayedabbolfazl; Yousefzadeh, Arsalan

    2015-04-01

    Noise from wind turbines is one of the most important factors affecting the health, welfare, and human sleep. This research was carried out to study the effect of wind turbine noise on workers' sleep disorder. For this, Manjil Wind Farm, because of the greater number of staff and turbines than other wind farms in Iran, was chosen as case study. A total number of 53 participants took part in this survey. They were classified into three groups of mechanics, security, and official. In this study, daytime sleepiness data of workers were gathered using Epworth Sleepiness Scales (ESS) was used to determine the level of daytime sleepiness among the workers. The 8-h equivalent sound level (LAeq,8h) was measured to determine the individuals' exposure at each occupational group. Finally, the effect of sound, age, and workers' experience on individuals' sleep disorder was analyzed through multiple regression analysis in the R software. The results showed that there was a positive and significant relationship between age, workers' experience, equivalent sound level, and the level of sleep disorder. When age is constant, sleep disorder will increase by 26% as per each 1 dB increase in equivalent sound level. In situations where equivalent sound level is constant, an increase of 17% in sleep disorder is occurred as per each year of work experience. Because of the difference in sound exposure in different occupational groups. The effect of noise in repairing group was about 6.5 times of official group and also 3.4 times of the security group. Sleep disorder effect caused by wind turbine noise in the security group is almost two times more than the official group. Unlike most studies on wind turbine noise that address the sleep disorder among inhabitants nearby wind farms, this study, for the first time in the world, examines the impact of wind turbine noise on sleep disorder of workers who are more closer to wind turbines and exposed to higher levels of noise. So despite all the

  19. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  20. Low frequency AC waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, Oscar W.

    1986-01-01

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stabilization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform itself. The cosine is synthesized by squaring the triangular waveform, raising the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  1. Low frequency ac waveform generator

    DOEpatents

    Bilharz, O.W.

    1983-11-22

    Low frequency sine, cosine, triangle and square waves are synthesized in circuitry which allows variation in the waveform amplitude and frequency while exhibiting good stability and without requiring significant stablization time. A triangle waveform is formed by a ramped integration process controlled by a saturation amplifier circuit which produces the necessary hysteresis for the triangle waveform. The output of the saturation circuit is tapped to produce the square waveform. The sine waveform is synthesized by taking the absolute value of the triangular waveform, raising this absolute value to a predetermined power, multiplying the raised absolute value of the triangle wave with the triangle wave itself and properly scaling the resultant waveform and subtracting it from the triangular waveform to a predetermined power and adding the squared waveform raised to the predetermined power with a DC reference and subtracting the squared waveform therefrom, with all waveforms properly scaled. The resultant waveform is then multiplied with a square wave in order to correct the polarity and produce the resultant cosine waveform.

  2. Underwater operational noise level emitted by a tidal current turbine and its potential impact on marine fauna.

    PubMed

    Lossent, J; Lejart, M; Folegot, T; Clorennec, D; Di Iorio, L; Gervaise, C

    2018-06-01

    Marine renewable energy development raised concerns over the impact of underwater noise. Here we assess the acoustic impacts of an operating tidal current turbine (Paimpol-Bréhat site, France) on marine fauna. Its source level (SL) has been measured in situ using 19 drifting transects at distances between 100 m to 2400 m from the turbine. SL ranged from 118 to 152 dB re1 μPa@1 m in third-octave bands at frequencies between 40 and 8192 Hz. It is comparable to the SL of a 19 m boat travelling at 10kt speed. This SL was used to estimate the impact of this noise type based on acoustic propagation simulations. The acoustic footprint of the device corresponds to a 1.5 km radius disk. Our results show that within this area of greatest potential impact, physiological injury of the hearing apparatus of invertebrates, fishes and marine mammals is improbable. Behavioral disturbance may occur up to 1 km around the device for harbor porpoises only. This is of little concern for a single turbine. However, greater concern on turbine noise impact, particularly on behavioral reactions has to be granted for a farm with up to 100 turbine. The lack of consolidated knowledge on behavioral disturbances identifies the needs for specific research programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ionospheric very low frequency transmitter

    SciT

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-02-15

    The theme of this paper is to establish a reliable ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) transmitter, which is also broad band. Two approaches are studied that generate VLF waves in the ionosphere. The first, classic approach employs a ground-based HF heater to directly modulate the high latitude ionospheric, or auroral electrojet. In the classic approach, the intensity-modulated HF heater induces an alternating current in the electrojet, which serves as a virtual antenna to transmit VLF waves. The spatial and temporal variations of the electrojet impact the reliability of the classic approach. The second, beat-wave approach also employs a ground-based HFmore » heater; however, in this approach, the heater operates in a continuous wave mode at two HF frequencies separated by the desired VLF frequency. Theories for both approaches are formulated, calculations performed with numerical model simulations, and the calculations are compared to experimental results. Theory for the classic approach shows that an HF heater wave, intensity-modulated at VLF, modulates the electron temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the ionospheric electrojet, which, in turn, induces an ac electrojet current. Thus, the electrojet becomes a virtual VLF antenna. The numerical results show that the radiation intensity of the modulated electrojet decreases with an increase in VLF radiation frequency. Theory for the beat wave approach shows that the VLF radiation intensity depends upon the HF heater intensity rather than the electrojet strength, and yet this approach can also modulate the electrojet when present. HF heater experiments were conducted for both the intensity modulated and beat wave approaches. VLF radiations were generated and the experimental results confirm the numerical simulations. Theory and experimental results both show that in the absence of the electrojet, VLF radiation from the F-region is generated via the beat wave approach. Additionally, the beat wave

  4. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    SciT

    Roadman, Jason; Huskey, Arlinda

    2015-07-01

    A series of tests were conducted to characterize the baseline properties and performance of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1.5-megawatt wind turbine (DOE 1.5) to enable research model development and quantify the effects of future turbine research modifications. The DOE 1.5 is built on the platform of GE's 1.5-MW SLE commercial wind turbine model. It was installed in a nonstandard configuration at the NWTC with the objective of supporting DOE Wind Program research initiatives such as A2e. Therefore, the test results may not represent the performance capabilities of other GE 1.5-MW SLE turbines. The acoustic noise test documented inmore » this report is one of a series of tests carried out to establish a performance baseline for the DOE 1.5 in the NWTC inflow environment.« less

  5. Masking in three pinnipeds: underwater, low-frequency critical ratios.

    PubMed

    Southall, B L; Schusterman, R J; Kastak, D

    2000-09-01

    Behavioral techniques were used to determine underwater masked hearing thresholds for a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Octave-band white noise maskers were centered at five test frequencies ranging from 200 to 2500 Hz; a slightly wider noise band was used for testing at 100 Hz. Critical ratios were calculated at one masking noise level for each test frequency. Above 200 Hz, critical ratios increased with frequency. This pattern is similar to that observed in most animals tested, and indicates that these pinnipeds lack specializations for detecting low-frequency tonal sounds in noise. However, the individual pinnipeds in this study, particularly the northern elephant seal, detected signals at relatively low signal-to-noise ratios. These results provide a means of estimating zones of auditory masking for pinnipeds exposed to anthropogenic noise sources.

  6. Some calculated effects of non-uniform inflow on the radiated noise of a large wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, G. C.; Hubbard, H. H.

    1980-01-01

    Far field computations were performed for a large wind turbine to evaluate the effects of non-uniform aerodynamic loading over the rotor disk. A modified version of the Farassat/Nystrom propeller noise prediction program was applied to account for the variations in loading due to inflow interruption by the upstream support tower. The computations indicate that for the uniform inflow case, relatively low noise levels are generated and the first rotational harmonic dominated the spectrum. For cases representing wake flow deficiences due to the tower structure, subtantially increased noise levels for all harmonics are indicated, the greatest increases being associated with the higher order harmonics.

  7. Effects of Wind Turbine Noise on Self-Reported and Objective Measures of Sleep.

    PubMed

    Michaud, David S; Feder, Katya; Keith, Stephen E; Voicescu, Sonia A; Marro, Leonora; Than, John; Guay, Mireille; Denning, Allison; Murray, Brian J; Weiss, Shelly K; Villeneuve, Paul J; van den Berg, Frits; Bower, Tara

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between self-reported and objective measures of sleep and wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure. The Community Noise and Health Study, a cross-sectional epidemiological study, included an in-house computer-assisted interview and sleep pattern monitoring over a 7 d period. Outdoor WTN levels were calculated following international standards for conditions that typically approximate the highest long-term average levels at each dwelling. Study data were collected between May and September 2013 from adults, aged 18-79 y (606 males, 632 females) randomly selected from each household and living between 0.25 and 11.22 kilometers from operational wind turbines in two Canadian provinces. Self-reported sleep quality over the past 30 d was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Additional questions assessed the prevalence of diagnosed sleep disorders and the magnitude of sleep disturbance over the previous year. Objective measures for sleep latency, sleep efficiency, total sleep time, rate of awakening bouts, and wake duration after sleep onset were recorded using the wrist worn Actiwatch2® from a subsample of 654 participants (289 males, 365 females) for a total of 3,772 sleep nights. Participant response rate for the interview was 78.9%. Outdoor WTN levels reached 46 dB(A) with an arithmetic mean of 35.6 and a standard deviation of 7.4. Self-reported and objectively measured sleep outcomes consistently revealed no apparent pattern or statistically significant relationship to WTN levels. However, sleep was significantly influenced by other factors, including, but not limited to, the use of sleep medication, other health conditions (including sleep disorders), caffeine consumption, and annoyance with blinking lights on wind turbines. Study results do not support an association between exposure to outdoor WTN up to 46 dB(A) and an increase in the prevalence of disturbed sleep. Conclusions are based on WTN levels averaged over 1 y and, in

  8. Prediction of far-field wind turbine noise propagation with parabolic equation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongkyu; Lee, Dongjai; Honhoff, Saskia

    2016-08-01

    Sound propagation of wind farms is typically simulated by the use of engineering tools that are neglecting some atmospheric conditions and terrain effects. Wind and temperature profiles, however, can affect the propagation of sound and thus the perceived sound in the far field. A better understanding and application of those effects would allow a more optimized farm operation towards meeting noise regulations and optimizing energy yield. This paper presents the parabolic equation (PE) model development for accurate wind turbine noise propagation. The model is validated against analytic solutions for a uniform sound speed profile, benchmark problems for nonuniform sound speed profiles, and field sound test data for real environmental acoustics. It is shown that PE provides good agreement with the measured data, except upwind propagation cases in which turbulence scattering is important. Finally, the PE model uses computational fluid dynamics results as input to accurately predict sound propagation for complex flows such as wake flows. It is demonstrated that wake flows significantly modify the sound propagation characteristics.

  9. On the biological plausibility of Wind Turbine Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert V

    2015-01-01

    An emerging environmental health issue relates to potential ill-effects of wind turbine noise. There have been numerous suggestions that the low-frequency acoustic components in wind turbine signals can cause symptoms associated with vestibular system disorders, namely vertigo, nausea, and nystagmus. This constellation of symptoms has been labeled as Wind Turbine Syndrome, and has been identified in case studies of individuals living close to wind farms. This review discusses whether it is biologically plausible for the turbine noise to stimulate the vestibular parts of the inner ear and, by extension, cause Wind Turbine Syndrome. We consider the sound levels that can activate the semicircular canals or otolith end organs in normal subjects, as well as in those with preexisting conditions known to lower vestibular threshold to sound stimulation.

  10. The effect of wind turbine noise on sleep and quality of life: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, Igho J; O'Sullivan, Jack; Thompson, Matthew J; Heneghan, Carl J

    2015-09-01

    Noise generated by wind turbines has been reported to affect sleep and quality of life (QOL), but the relationship is unclear. Our objective was to explore the association between wind turbine noise, sleep disturbance and quality of life, using data from published observational studies. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Google Scholar databases. No language restrictions were imposed. Hand searches of bibliography of retrieved full texts were also conducted. The reporting quality of included studies was assessed using the STROBE guidelines. Two reviewers independently determined the eligibility of studies, assessed the quality of included studies, and extracted the data. We included eight studies with a total of 2433 participants. All studies were cross-sectional, and the overall reporting quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of six studies (n=2364) revealed that the odds of being annoyed is significantly increased by wind turbine noise (OR: 4.08; 95% CI: 2.37 to 7.04; p<0.00001). The odds of sleep disturbance was also significantly increased with greater exposure to wind turbine noise (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.98 to 4.37; p<0.00001). Four studies reported that wind turbine noise significantly interfered with QOL. Further, visual perception of wind turbine generators was associated with greater frequency of reported negative health effects. In conclusion, there is some evidence that exposure to wind turbine noise is associated with increased odds of annoyance and sleep problems. Individual attitudes could influence the type of response to noise from wind turbines. Experimental and observational studies investigating the relationship between wind turbine noise and health are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Core noise measurements on a YF-102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, M.; Karchmer, A. M.; Penko, P. F.; Mcardle, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Core noise from a YF-102 high bypass ratio turbofan engine was investigated through the use of simultaneous measurements of internal fluctuating pressures and far field noise. Acoustic waveguide probes, located in the engine at the compressor exit, in the combustor, at the turbine exit, and in the core nozzle, were employed to measure internal fluctuating pressures. Spectra showed that the internal signals were free of tones, except at high frequency where machinery noise was present. Data obtained over a wide range of engine conditions suggest that below 60% of maximum fan speed the low frequency core noise contributes significantly to the far field noise.

  12. Low-frequency oscillations in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li-Qiu; Han, Liang; Yu, Da-Ren; Guo, Ning

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we summarize the research development of low-frequency oscillations in the last few decades. The findings of physical mechanism, characteristics and stabilizing methods of low-frequency oscillations are discussed. It shows that it is unreasonable and incomplete to model an ionization region separately to analyze the physical mechanism of low-frequency oscillations. Electro-dynamics as well as the formation conditions of ionization distribution play an important role in characteristics and stabilizing of low-frequency oscillations. Understanding the physical mechanism and characteristics of low- frequency oscillations thoroughly and developing a feasible method stabilizing this instability are still important research subjects. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51477035), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. HIT.NSRIF 2015064), and the Open Research Fund Program of State Key Laboratory of Cryogenic Vacuum Technology and Physics, China (Grant No. ZDK201304).

  13. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    SciT

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels of different sizes and other underwater sound sources in both static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines onmore » the Mississippi River, where the sound of flowing water is included in background measurements. The size of vessels measured ranged from a small fishing boat with a 60 HP outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, and when compared to the sound created by an operating HK turbine were many times greater. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed values.« less

  14. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines.

    PubMed

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Deng, Z Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where sounds created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.

  15. Coupling of an aeroacoustic model and a parabolic equation code for long range wind turbine noise propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotté, B.

    2018-05-01

    This study proposes to couple a source model based on Amiet's theory and a parabolic equation code in order to model wind turbine noise emission and propagation in an inhomogeneous atmosphere. Two broadband noise generation mechanisms are considered, namely trailing edge noise and turbulent inflow noise. The effects of wind shear and atmospheric turbulence are taken into account using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. The coupling approach, based on the backpropagation method to preserve the directivity of the aeroacoustic sources, is validated by comparison with an analytical solution for the propagation over a finite impedance ground in a homogeneous atmosphere. The influence of refraction effects is then analyzed for different directions of propagation. The spectrum modification related to the ground effect and the presence of a shadow zone for upwind receivers are emphasized. The validity of the point source approximation that is often used in wind turbine noise propagation models is finally assessed. This approximation exaggerates the interference dips in the spectra, and is not able to correctly predict the amplitude modulation.

  16. Robust Audio Watermarking by Using Low-Frequency Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shijun

    In continuation to earlier work where the problem of time-scale modification (TSM) has been studied [1] by modifying the shape of audio time domain histogram, here we consider the additional ingredient of resisting additive noise-like operations, such as Gaussian noise, lossy compression and low-pass filtering. In other words, we study the problem of the watermark against both TSM and additive noises. To this end, in this paper we extract the histogram from a Gaussian-filtered low-frequency component for audio watermarking. The watermark is inserted by shaping the histogram in a way that the use of two consecutive bins as a group is exploited for hiding a bit by reassigning their population. The watermarked signals are perceptibly similar to the original one. Comparing with the previous time-domain watermarking scheme [1], the proposed watermarking method is more robust against additive noise, MP3 compression, low-pass filtering, etc.

  17. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  18. Wind turbines and health: a critical review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    McCunney, Robert J; Mundt, Kenneth A; Colby, W David; Dobie, Robert; Kaliski, Kenneth; Blais, Mark

    2014-11-01

    This review examines the literature related to health effects of wind turbines. We reviewed literature related to sound measurements near turbines, epidemiological and experimental studies, and factors associated with annoyance. (1) Infrasound sound near wind turbines does not exceed audibility thresholds. (2) Epidemiological studies have shown associations between living near wind turbines and annoyance. (3) Infrasound and low-frequency sound do not present unique health risks. (4) Annoyance seems more strongly related to individual characteristics than noise from turbines. Further areas of inquiry include enhanced noise characterization, analysis of predicted noise values contrasted with measured levels postinstallation, longitudinal assessments of health pre- and postinstallation, experimental studies in which subjects are "blinded" to the presence or absence of infrasound, and enhanced measurement techniques to evaluate annoyance.

  19. Measurement of the tower wake of the Swedish prototype Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) Maglarp (Sweden) and calculations of its effect on noise and blade loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, K.; Dahlberg, J. A.; Meijer, S.

    Hot-wire measurements of the velocity deficit in the wake behind the tower of a wind turbine are presented. The measurements were performed at one height and at three distances from the tower center when the turbine was not running. The low frequency noise caused by the passage of a turbine blade through the wake of the tower is calculated using wake data from the measurements. A comparision with noise emission measurements is included. The variation in blade loading and turbine power output caused by the wake are also calculated. Results show that wake deficits can be of the same order of magnitude as the freestream velocity.

  20. Impact of low-frequency sound on historic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Louis C.; Horonjeff, Richard D.

    2005-09-01

    In common usage, the term soundscape usually refers to portions of the sound spectrum audible to human observers, and perhaps more broadly other members of the animal kingdom. There is, however, a soundscape regime at the low end of the frequency spectrum (e.g., 10-25 Hz), which is inaudible to humans, where nonindigenous sound energy may cause noise-induced vibrations in structures. Such low frequency components may be of sufficient magnitude to pose damage risk potential to historic structures and cultural resources. Examples include Anasazi cliff and cave dwellings, and pueblo structures of vega type roof construction. Both are susceptible to noise induced vibration from low-frequency sound pressures that excite resonant frequencies in these structures. The initial damage mechanism is usually fatigue cracking. Many mechanisms are subtle, temporally multiphased, and not initially evident to the naked eye. This paper reviews the types of sources posing the greatest potential threat, their low-frequency spectral characteristics, typical structural responses, and the damage risk mechanisms involved. Measured sound and vibration levels, case history studies, and conditions favorable to damage risk are presented. The paper concludes with recommendations for increasing the damage risk knowledge base to better protect these resources.

  1. Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine

    SciT

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Eckholdt, Haftan

    2010-06-23

    Neighbors living near the 3 turbine, 4.5 MW Vinalhaven, Maine wind power facility, which began operations in late 2009, have complained that the noise from the turbines is unwelcome and annoying. Fox Islands Wind, the owner of the facility, hypothesized that implementing a Noise Reduced Operation (NRO) for the turbines, which effectively limits the turbines maximum rpm and power output, would reduce the sound levels produced by the turbines, and therefore might also reduce the degree to which the neighbors report being annoyed by those sounds. To test this hypothesis in a preliminary fashion, a pilot study was conducted inmore » early 2010, the results of which are the subject of this brief report. The study included asking near-by residents - those within roughly 3000 feet - to rate the sounds and the degree to which they were annoyed by them using logs which they filled out at multiple times during the day on as many days as were possible in the 35 day study period in February and March, 2010. Meanwhile, FIW adjusted the NRO settings of the turbines in a random fashion in the evenings during the same period, but in a pattern that the respondents were not made aware of. Ultimately, nine individuals turned in roughly 200 log entries (i.e., responses), each of which was time coded to allow testing if the response was correlated with the wind facility operating conditions at that time. The analysis of these data found small, non-statistically-significant differences in self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings between the periods when the NRO was enacted and when it was not, after controlling for many of the relationships that could independently influence perceived loudness and annoyance (e.g., wind direction, time of day). Possible explanations for these small differences in self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings include: the relative difference in sound output from the turbines when NRO was engaged and when it was not was small; and

  2. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    DOE PAGES

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin C.

    2016-01-06

    Underwaternoise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels and natural underwater sound sources in static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where soundsmore » created by flowing water are part of all measurements, both natural ambient and anthropogenic sources. Vessel sizes ranged from a small fishing boat with 60 hp outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, which were, on average, 40 dB greater than the sound created by an operating hydrokinetic turbine. As a result, a comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed sound attenuation.« less

  3. Infra-sound cancellation and mitigation in wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boretti, Albert; Ordys, Andrew; Al Zubaidy, Sarim

    2018-03-01

    The infra-sound spectra recorded inside homes located even several kilometres far from wind turbine installations is characterized by large pressure fluctuation in the low frequency range. There is a significant body of literature suggesting inaudible sounds at low frequency are sensed by humans and affect the wellbeing through different mechanisms. These mechanisms include amplitude modulation of heard sounds, stimulating subconscious pathways, causing endolymphatic hydrops, and possibly potentiating noise-induced hearing loss. We suggest the study of infra-sound active cancellation and mitigation to address the low frequency noise issues. Loudspeakers generate pressure wave components of same amplitude and frequency but opposite phase of the recorded infra sound. They also produce pressure wave components within the audible range reducing the perception of the infra-sound to minimize the sensing of the residual infra sound.

  4. An implementation of an aeroacoustic prediction model for broadband noise from a vertical axis wind turbine using a CFD informed methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, J. D. M.; Shahroki, A.; Rice, H.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents an enhanced method for predicting aerodynamically generated broadband noise produced by a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). The method improves on existing work for VAWT noise prediction and incorporates recently developed airfoil noise prediction models. Inflow-turbulence and airfoil self-noise mechanisms are both considered. Airfoil noise predictions are dependent on aerodynamic input data and time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations are carried out to solve for the aerodynamic solution. Analytical flow methods are also benchmarked against the CFD informed noise prediction results to quantify errors in the former approach. Comparisons to experimental noise measurements for an existing turbine are encouraging. A parameter study is performed and shows the sensitivity of overall noise levels to changes in inflow velocity and inflow turbulence. Noise sources are characterised and the location and mechanism of the primary sources is determined, inflow-turbulence noise is seen to be the dominant source. The use of CFD calculations is seen to improve the accuracy of noise predictions when compared to the analytic flow solution as well as showing that, for inflow-turbulence noise sources, blade generated turbulence dominates the atmospheric inflow turbulence.

  5. Low frequency acoustic and electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Maccamy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with two classes of problems arising from acoustics and electromagnetics scattering in the low frequency stations. The first class of problem is solving Helmholtz equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an arbitrary two dimensional body while the second one is an interior-exterior interface problem with Helmholtz equation in the exterior. Low frequency analysis show that there are two intermediate problems which solve the above problems accurate to 0(k/2/ log k) where k is the frequency. These solutions greatly differ from the zero frequency approximations. For the Dirichlet problem numerical examples are shown to verify the theoretical estimates.

  6. Low frequency Raman study of the nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Lee, Scott

    2011-04-01

    In both transcription and replication, the two helices of the DNA molecule move apart. Consequently, vibrations involving the relative motions of large portions of the molecule with respect to one another are of intrinsic interest. Such vibrations have relatively low frequencies because they involve weak bonds and large masses. Low frequency modes are difficult to observe in Raman spectroscopy because they are very close to the signal from the Rayleigh scattered light (which is very intense). In this poster, we will describe our results for the eight nucleosides: adenosine, deoxyadenosine, guanosine, deoxyguanosine, cytidine, deoxycytidine, uracil and deoxythymidine.

  7. Low frequency Raman study of the nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Lee, Scott

    2011-03-01

    In both transcription and replication, the two helices of the DNA molecule move apart. Consequently, vibrations involving the relative motions of large portions of the molecule with respect to one another are of intrinsic interest. Such vibrations have relatively low frequencies because they involve weak bonds and large masses. Low frequency modes are difficult to observe in Raman spectroscopy because they are very close to the signal from the Rayleigh scattered light (which is very intense). In this poster, we will describe our results for the eight nucleosides: adenosine, deoxyadenosine, guanosine, deoxyguanosine, cytidine, deoxycytidine, uracil and deoxythymidine.

  8. Low frequency Raman study of the nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koontz, Craig; Lee, Scott

    2010-10-01

    In both transcription and replication, the two helices of the DNA molecule move apart. Consequently, vibrations involving the relative motions of large portions of the molecule with respect to one another are of intrinsic interest. Such vibrations have relatively low frequencies because they involve weak bonds and large masses. Low frequency modes are difficult to observe in Raman spectroscopy because they are very close to the signal from the Rayleigh scattered light (which is very intense). In this poster, we will describe our results for the eight nucleosides: adenosine, deoxyadenosine, guanosine, deoxyguanosine, cytidine, deoxycytidine, uracil and deoxythymidine.

  9. The Astronomical Low-Frequency Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Allen, R. J.; Blume, W. H.; Desch, M. M.; Erickson, W. C.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kassim, N. E.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Mahoney, M. J.; Marsh, K. A.; hide

    1996-01-01

    An array of satellites is proposed to make astronomic observations in the low frequency range of a few tens of MHz down to roughly 100 kHz, a range that cannot be observed through the ionosphere. The array would be in a solar orbit to avoid radio interference from Earth and to simplify trajectory tracking and control.

  10. Low Frequency Ocean Ambient Noise: Measurements and Theory,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-14

    entrained gas bubbles which result from wave breaking and which are forced by intense velocity of the gravity-capil- lary waves. For wind speeds with a...ternal force acting on the volume and has a dipole character. These two terms could be important in the incorporation of entrained bubble oscil- lation and...Applied Research Lab, Penn. State Univ., State College, PA 16804 Mellen, R.H., 1987: private communication. Minnaert, M., 1933: ’ Musical Air-Bubbles

  11. Low Frequency Noise: A Major Risk Factor in Military Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    disease before signs of cortical atrophy; and cerebral atrophy and dilation of the perivascular Virchow-Robin spaces - also seen in dementia [ 12,13...Revista Portuguesa de Medicina Militar 1992: 40(1-4): 41-45. 17. GIMOGMA. Epilepsia sintomidtica de etiologia vascular, manifestaqao da sindrome das

  12. Narrow sidebranch arrays for low frequency duct noise control.

    PubMed

    Tang, S K

    2012-11-01

    The present study investigates the sound transmission loss across a section of an infinitely long duct where one or more narrow sidebranch tubes are installed flushed with the duct wall. The finite-element method is used to compute the wave propagation characteristics, and a simplified theoretical analysis is carried out at the same time to explain the wave mechanism at frequencies of high sound reduction. Results show that the high sound transmission loss at a particular frequency is due to the concerted actions of three consecutive sidebranch tubes with the most upstream one in the resonant state. The expansion chamber effect of the setup also plays a role in enhancing sound attenuation at non-resonance frequencies. Broadband performance of the device can be greatly enhanced by appropriate arrangements of tube lengths and/or by coupling arrays on the two sides of the duct.

  13. Passive Acoustic Thermometry Using Low-Frequency Deep Water Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    M. Fowler, S. Salo, Antarctic icebergs : A significant natural ocean sound source in the Southern Hemisphere. Geochem. Geophys. DOI: 10.1002...1974). 24. J. Tournadre, F. Girard-Ardhuin, B. Legrésy, Antarctic icebergs distributions, 2002-2010. J. Geophys. Res: Oceans 117, C05004, (2012...surface in the Polar Regions (e.g. due to loud iceberg cracking events with levels up to 245 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m) can efficiently couple directly to the

  14. Experimental clean combustor program: Noise study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofrin, T. G.; Riloff, N., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Under a Noise Addendum to the NASA Experimental Clean Combustor Program (ECCP) internal pressure fluctuations were measured during tests of JT9D combustor designs conducted in a burner test rig. Measurements were correlated with burner operating parameters using an expression relating farfield noise to these parameters. For a given combustor, variation of internal noise with operating parameters was reasonably well predicted by this expression but the levels were higher than farfield predictions and differed significantly among several combustors. For two burners, discharge stream temperature fluctuations were obtained with fast-response thermocouples to allow calculation of indirect combustion noise which would be generated by passage of the temperature inhomogeneities through the high pressure turbine stages of a JT9D turbofan engine. Using a previously developed analysis, the computed indirect combustion noise was significantly lower than total low frequency core noise observed on this and several other engines.

  15. A framework with nonlinear system model and nonparametric noise for gas turbine degradation state estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanachi, Houman; Liu, Jie; Banerjee, Avisekh; Chen, Ying

    2015-06-01

    Modern health management approaches for gas turbine engines (GTEs) aim to precisely estimate the health state of the GTE components to optimize maintenance decisions with respect to both economy and safety. In this research, we propose an advanced framework to identify the most likely degradation state of the turbine section in a GTE for prognostics and health management (PHM) applications. A novel nonlinear thermodynamic model is used to predict the performance parameters of the GTE given the measurements. The ratio between real efficiency of the GTE and simulated efficiency in the newly installed condition is defined as the health indicator and provided at each sequence. The symptom of nonrecoverable degradations in the turbine section, i.e. loss of turbine efficiency, is assumed to be the internal degradation state. A regularized auxiliary particle filter (RAPF) is developed to sequentially estimate the internal degradation state in nonuniform time sequences upon receiving sets of new measurements. The effectiveness of the technique is examined using the operating data over an entire time-between-overhaul cycle of a simple-cycle industrial GTE. The results clearly show the trend of degradation in the turbine section and the occasional fluctuations, which are well supported by the service history of the GTE. The research also suggests the efficacy of the proposed technique to monitor the health state of the turbine section of a GTE by implementing model-based PHM without the need for additional instrumentation.

  16. Low Frequency Acoustic Detection Research in Support of Human Detection Range Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    beat at narrow separations and hence made estimates of bandwidth difficult. In addition, Zwicker’s and Green’s data show large discrepancies, the...already known that this spurious low frequency noise can profoundly influence psychoacoustic results. For some years a binaural phenomenon known as the...tend to be uncorrelated in the two ears) and thus preserved the binaural advantage for the low frequency signals. Green et al. (Reference 21) used a

  17. Sensitive ultrasonic vibrometer for very low frequency applications.

    PubMed

    Cretin, B; Vairac, P; Jachez, N; Pergaud, J

    2007-08-01

    Ultrasonic measurement of distance is a well-known low cost method but only a few vibrometers have been developed because sensitivity, spatial resolution, and bandwidth are not high or wide enough for standard laboratory applications. Nevertheless, compared to optical vibrometers, two interesting properties should be considered: very low frequency noise (0.1 Hz to 1 kHz) is reduced and the long wavelength enables rough surfaces to be investigated. Moreover, the ultrasonic probe is a differential sensor, without being a mechanical load for the vibrating structure as usual accelerometers based on contacting transducers are. The main specificity of the presented probe is its ultralow noise electronics including a 3/2 order phase locked loop which extracts the phase modulation related to the amplitude of the detected vibration. This article presents the main useful physical aspects and details of the actual probe. The given application is the measurement of the vibration of an isolated optical bench excited at very low frequency with an electromagnetic transducer.

  18. Extreme low frequency acoustic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  19. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  20. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2005-04-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5-2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still requires a high definition for good sound quality. Ideally, the absorption of the hall should be adjustable in all frequency bands in order to provide good sound quality for all types of performances. The mid and high frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.

  1. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  2. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  3. Aircraft gas-turbine engines: Noise reduction and vibration control. (Latest citations from Information Services in Mechanical Engineering data base). Published Search

    SciT

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and analysis of aircraft gas turbine engines with respect to noise and vibration control. Included are studies regarding the measurement and reduction of noise at its source, within the aircraft, and on the ground. Inlet, nozzle and core aerodynamic studies are cited. Propfan, turbofan, turboprop engines, and applications in short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft are included. (Contains a minimum of 202 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Investigation of computational aeroacoustic tools for noise predictions of wind turbine aerofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpf, A.; Ferrer, E.; Munduate, X.

    2007-07-01

    In this work trailing edge noise levels of a research aerofoil have been computed and compared to aeroacoustic measurements using two different approaches. On the other hand, aerodynamic and aeroacoustic calculations were performed with the full Navier-Stokes CFD code Fluent [Fluent Inc 2005 Fluent 6.2 Users Guide, Lebanon, NH, USA] on the basis of a steady RANS simulation. Aerodynamic characteristics were computed by the aid of various turbulence models. By the combined usage of implemented broadband noise source models, it was tried to isolate and determine the trailing edge noise level. Throughout this work two methods of different computational cost have been tested and quantitative and qualitative results obtained. On the one hand, the semi-empirical noise prediction tool NAFNoise [Moriarty P 2005 NAFNoise User's Guide. Golden, Colorado, July. http://wind.nrel.gov/designcodes/ simulators/NAFNoise] was used to directly predict trailing edge noise by taking into consideration the nature of the experiments.

  5. Comparison of broadband noise mechanisms, analyses, and experiments on helicopters, propellers, and wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data on broadband noise from airfoils are compared, together with analytical methods, in order to identify the mechanisms of noise emission. Rotor noise is categorized into discrete frequency, impulsive, and broadband components, the last having a continuous spectrum originating from a random source. The results of computer simulations of different rotor blade types which produce broadband noise were compared with experimental data and among themselves in terms of predictions of the spectra obtained. Consideration was given to the overall sound pressure level, unsteady turbulence forces, rotational forces, inflow turbulence, self-generated turbulence, and turbulence in the flow. Data are presented for a helicopter rotor and light aircraft propeller. The most significant source was found to be inflow turbulence induced lift fluctuations in helicopter rotors and boundary layer trailing edge noise on large wind energy conversion systems

  6. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Belyayev, S M; Dudkin, F L

    2016-03-01

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones.

  7. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields

    SciT

    Belyayev, S. M., E-mail: belyayev@isr.lviv.ua; Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 11428; Dudkin, F. L.

    2016-03-15

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accuratemore » than the conventional ones.« less

  8. Low-Frequency Temporal Variability in Mira and Semiregular Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.; Karovska, M.; Waagen, E. O.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate low-frequency variability in a large sample of Mira and semiregular variables with long-term visual light curves from the AAVSO International Database. Our aim is to determine whether we can detect and measure long-timescale variable phenomena in these stars, for example photometric variations that might be associated with supergranular convection. We analyzed the long-term light curves of 522 variable stars of the Mira and SRa, b, c, and d classes. We calculated their low-frequency time-series spectra to characterize rednoise with the power density spectrum index, and then correlate this index with other observable characteristics such as spectral type and primary pulsation period. In our initial analysis of the sample, we see that the semiregular variables have a much broader range of spectral index than the Mira types, with the SRb subtype having the broadest range. Among Mira variables we see that the M- and S-type Miras have similarly wide ranges of index, while the C-types have the narrowest with generally shallower slopes. There is also a trend of steeper slope with larger amplitude, but at a given amplitude, a wide range of slopes are seen. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify stars with strong intrinsic red noise components as possible targets for resolved surface imaging with interferometry.

  9. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  10. SQUID magnetometers for low-frequency applications

    SciT

    Ryhaenen, T.; Seppae, H.; Ilmoniemi, R.

    1989-09-01

    The authors present a novel formulation for SQUID operation, which enables them to evaluate and compare the sensitivity and applicability of different devices. SQUID magnetometers for low-frequency applications are analyzed, taking into account the coupling circuits and electronics. They discuss nonhysteretic and hysteretic single-junction rf SQUIDs, but the main emphasis is on the dynamics, sensitivity, and coupling considerations of dc-SQUID magnetometers. A short review of current ideas on thin-film, dc-SQUID design presents the problems in coupling and the basic limits of sensitivity. The fabrication technology of tunnel-junction devices is discussed with emphasis on how it limits critical current densities, specificmore » capacitances of junctions, minimum linewidths, conductor separations, etc. Properties of high-temperature superconductors are evaluated on the basis of recently published results on increased flux creep, low density of current carriers, and problems in fabricating reliable junctions. The optimization of electronics for different types of SQUIDs is presented. Finally, the most important low-frequency applications of SQUIDs in biomagnetism, metrology, geomagnetism, and some physics experiments demonstrate the various possibilities that state-of-the-art SQUIDs can provide.« less

  11. A low frequency RFI monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Shahram; Shankar, N. Udaya; Girish, B. S.; Somashekar, R.

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a growing problem for research in radio astronomy particularly at wavelengths longer than 2m. For satisfactory operation of a radio telescope, several bands have been protected for radio astronomy observations by the International Telecommunication Union. Since the radiation from cosmic sources are typically 40 to 100 dB below the emission from services operating in unprotected bands, often the out-of-band emission limits the sensitivity of astronomical observations. Moreover, several radio spectral emissions from cosmic sources are present in the frequency range outside the allocated band for radio astronomy. Thus monitoring of RFI is essential before building a receiver system for low frequency radio astronomy. We describe the design and development of an RFI monitoring system operating in the frequency band 30 to 100 MHz. This was designed keeping in view our proposal to extend the frequency of operation of GMRT down to 40 MHz. The monitor is a PC based spectrometer recording the voltage output of a receiver connected to an antenna, capable of digitizing the low frequency RF directly with an 8 bit ADC and sampling bandwidths up to 16 MHz. The system can operate continuously in almost real-time with a loss of only 2% of data. Here we will present the systems design aspects and the results of RFI monitoring carried out at the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore and at the GMRT site in Khodad.

  12. Low frequency oscillations in total ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, X. H.; Stanford, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Low frequency oscillations with periods of approximately one to two months are found in eight years of global grids of total ozone data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite instrument. The low frequency oscillations corroborate earlier analyses based on four years of data. In addition, both annual and seasonal one-point correlation maps based on the 8-year TOMS data are presented. The results clearly show a standing dipole in ozone perturbations, oscillating with 35 to 50 day periods over the equatorial Indian Ocean-west Pacific region. This contrasts with the eastward moving dipole reported in other data sets. The standing ozone dipole appears to be a dynamical feature associated with vertical atmospheric motions. Consistent with prior analyses based on lower stratospheric temperature fields, large-scale standing patterns are also found in the extratropics of both hemispheres, correlated with ozone fluctuations over the equatorial west Pacific. In the Northern Hemisphere, a standing pattern is observed extending from the tropical Indian Ocean to the north Pacific, across North America, and down to the equatorial Atlantic Ocean region. This feature is most pronounced in the NH summer.

  13. Impacts of Industrial Wind Turbine Noise on Sleep Quality: Results From a Field Study of Rural Residents in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lane, James D; Bigelow, Philip L; Majowicz, Shannon E; McColl, R Stephen

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether grid-connected industrial wind turbines (IWTs) are a risk factor for poor sleep quality, and if IWT noise is associated with sleep parameters in rural Ontarians. A daily sleep diary and actigraphy-derived measures of sleep were obtained from 12 participants from an IWT community and 10 participants from a comparison community with no wind power installations. The equivalent and maximum sound pressure levels within the bedroom were also assessed. No statistically significant differences were observed between IWT residents and non-IWT residents for any of the parameters measured in this study. Actigraphy and sleep diaries are feasible tools to understand the impact of IWTs on the quality of sleep for nearby residents. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to determine whether the lack of statistical significance observed here is a result of sample size, or reflects a true lack of association.

  14. A lightweight low-frequency sound insulation membrane-type acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kuan; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Gao, Nansha; Jing, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel membrane-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequencies (⩽500Hz) was designed and the mechanisms were investigated by using negative mass density theory. This metamaterial's structure is like a sandwich with a thin (thickness=0.25mm) lightweight flexible rubber material within two layers of honeycomb cell plates. Negative mass density was demonstrated at frequencies below the first natural frequency, which results in the excellent low-frequency sound insulation. The effects of different structural parameters of the membrane on the sound-proofed performance at low frequencies were investigated by using finite element method (FEM). The numerical results show that, the STL can be modulated to higher value by changing the structural parameters, such as the membrane surface density, the unite cell film shape, and the membrane tension. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  15. Evaluation of community response to wind turbine-related noise in western New York state.

    PubMed

    Magari, Shannon R; Smith, Clinton E; Schiff, Martin; Rohr, Annette C

    2014-01-01

    As the boundaries of harvesting wind energy expand to meet the ever-increasing societal energy demands, the number and size of wind turbines being constructed rises. As part of a larger project to monitor sound in an operating wind park in western New York State, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among individuals living in and around the wind park to characterize the perception, level of annoyance, and self-reported health effects of residents. We conducted the study in a 126 MW wind park consisting of 84 turbines spanning approximately 19 square miles of farmland. Short-term outdoor and indoor sound level measurements were also performed at each dwelling in which a questionnaire was administered. To our knowledge, this study is the first to collect sound measurements at individual residences. There was no apparent exposure-response relationship between an individual's level of annoyance and the short duration sound measurements collected at the time of the survey. There was a correlation between an individual's concern regarding health effects and the prevalence of sleep disturbance and stress among the study population. The siting process is unique to each community with varying degrees of success. Additional sound level measurements inside and outside homes in larger cohorts in concert with detailed questionnaires would be useful in verifying those exposure-response relationships found in studies using calculated sound level data. Additional research should include a detailed investigation of sleep patterns and possible disturbance in those living in and near operating wind turbine projects.

  16. Modeling and investigative studies of Jovian low frequency emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Green, James L.; Six, N. Frank; Gulkis, S.

    1986-01-01

    Jovian decametric (DAM) and hectometric (HOM) emissions were first observed over the entire spectrum by the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of the planet. They display unusual arc-like structures on frequency-versus-time spectrograms. Software for the modeling of the Jovian plasma and magnetic field environment was performed. In addition, an extensive library of programs was developed for the retrieval of Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data in both the high and low frequency bands from new noise-free, recalibrated data tapes. This software allows the option of retrieving data sorted with respect to particular sub-Io longitudes. This has proven to be invaluable in the analyses of the data. Graphics routines were also developed to display the data on color spectrograms.

  17. Modeling and investigative studies of Jovian low frequency emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Green, James L.; Six, N. Frank; Gulkis, S.

    1986-08-01

    Jovian decametric (DAM) and hectometric (HOM) emissions were first observed over the entire spectrum by the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys of the planet. They display unusual arc-like structures on frequency-versus-time spectrograms. Software for the modeling of the Jovian plasma and magnetic field environment was performed. In addition, an extensive library of programs was developed for the retrieval of Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) data in both the high and low frequency bands from new noise-free, recalibrated data tapes. This software allows the option of retrieving data sorted with respect to particular sub-Io longitudes. This has proven to be invaluable in the analyses of the data. Graphics routines were also developed to display the data on color spectrograms.

  18. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, A.; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Shaner, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R.; Asadoor, M.; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Kim, C.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-07-01

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  19. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    SciT

    O’Toole, A., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organizedmore » Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.« less

  20. Increasing low frequency sound attenuation using compounded single layer of sonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulia, Preeti; Gupta, Arpan

    2018-05-01

    Sonic crystals (SC) are man-made periodic structures where sound hard scatterers are arranged in a crystalline manner. SC reduces noise in a particular range of frequencies called as band gap. Sonic crystals have a promising application in noise shielding; however, the application is limited due to the size of structure. Particularly for low frequencies, the structure becomes quite bulky, restricting its practical application. This paper presents a compounded model of SC, which has the same overall area and filling fraction but with increased low frequency sound attenuation. Two cases have been considered, a three layer SC and a compounded single layer SC. Both models have been analyzed using finite element simulation and plane wave expansion method. Band gaps for periodic structures have been obtained using both methods which are in good agreement. Further, sound transmission loss has been evaluated using finite element method. The results demonstrate the use of compounded model of Sonic Crystal for low frequency sound attenuation.

  1. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Pulse and Explosions

    SciT

    Sweeney, J J

    2011-02-01

    This paper reviews and summarizes prior work related to low frequency (< 100 Hz) EMP (ElectroMagnetic Pulse) observed from explosions. It focuses on how EMP signals might, or might not, be useful in monitoring underground nuclear tests, based on the limits of detection, and physical understanding of these signals. In summary: (1) Both chemical and nuclear explosions produce an EMP. (2) The amplitude of the EMP from underground explosions is at least two orders of magnitude lower than from above ground explosions and higher frequency components of the signal are rapidly attenuated due to ground conductivity. (3) In general, inmore » the near field, that is distances (r) of less than 10s of kilometers from the source, the amplitude of the EMP decays approximately as 1/r{sup 3}, which practically limits EMP applications to very close (<{approx}1km) distances. (4) One computational model suggests that the EMP from a decoupled nuclear explosion may be enhanced over the fully coupled case. This has not been validated with laboratory or field data. (5) The magnitude of the EMP from an underground nuclear explosion is about two orders of magnitude larger than that from a chemical explosion, and has a larger component of higher frequencies. In principle these differences might be used to discriminate a nuclear from a chemical explosion using sensors at very close (<{approx}1 km) distances. (6) Arming and firing systems (e.g. detonators, exploding bridge wires) can also produce an EMP from any type of explosion. (7) To develop the understanding needed to apply low frequency EMP to nuclear explosion monitoring, it is recommended to carry out a series of controlled underground chemical explosions with a variety of sizes, emplacements (e.g. fully coupled and decoupled), and arming and firing systems.« less

  2. The Noise from Wind Turbines: Potential Adverse Impacts on Children's Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronzaft, Arline L.

    2011-01-01

    Research linking loud sounds to hearing loss in youngsters is now widespread, resulting in the issuance of warnings to protect children's hearing. However, studies attesting to the adverse effects of intrusive sounds and noise on children's overall mental and physical health and well-being have not received similar attention. This, despite the…

  3. The LWA1 Low Frequency Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jayce; Taylor, Gregory B.; LWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The LWA1 Low Frequency Sky Survey is a survey of the sky visible from the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1) across the frequency range of 35 to 80 MHz. The primary motivation behind this effort is to improve our understanding of the sky at these frequencies. In particular, an understanding of the low frequency foreground emission is necessary for work on detecting the epoch of reionization and the cosmic dark ages where the foreground signal dwarfs the expected redshifted HI signal by many orders of magnitude (Pritchard & Loeb 2012, Rep. Prog. Phys., 75, 086901). The leading model for the sky in the frequency range of 20 to 200 MHz is the Global Sky Model (GSM) by de Oliveria-Costas et al. (2008, MNRAS, 288, 247). This model is based upon a principle component analysis of 11 sky maps ranging in frequency from 10 MHz to 94 GHz. Of these 11 maps, only four are below 1 GHz; 10 MHz from Caswell (1976, MNRAS, 177, 601), 22 MHz from Roger et al. (1999, A&AS, 137, 7), 45 MHz from Alvarez et al. (1997, A&AS, 124, 315) and Maeda et al. (1999, A&AS, 140, 145), and 408 MHz from Haslam et al. (1982, A&AS, 47, 1). Thus, within this model, the region of interest to both cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization is largely unconstrained based on the available survey data, and are also limited in terms of the spatial coverage and calibration. A self-consistent collection of maps is necessary for both our understanding of the sky and the removal of the foregrounds that mask the redshifted 21-cm signal.We present the current state of the survey and discuss the imaging and calibration challenges faced by dipole arrays that are capable of imaging nearly 2π steradians of sky simultaneously over a large fractional bandwidth.Construction of the LWA has been supported by the Office of Naval Research under Contract N00014-07-C-0147. Support for operations and continuing development of the LWA1 is provided by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1139963 and AST

  4. How Far Is Quasar UV/Optical Variability from a Damped Random Walk at Low Frequency?

    SciT

    Guo Hengxiao; Wang Junxian; Cai Zhenyi

    Studies have shown that UV/optical light curves of quasars can be described using the prevalent damped random walk (DRW) model, also known as the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process. A white noise power spectral density (PSD) is expected at low frequency in this model; however, a direct observational constraint to the low-frequency PSD slope is difficult due to the limited lengths of the light curves available. Meanwhile, quasars show scatter in their DRW parameters that is too large to be attributed to uncertainties in the measurements and dependence on the variation of known physical factors. In this work we present simulations showing that,more » if the low-frequency PSD deviates from the DRW, the red noise leakage can naturally produce large scatter in the variation parameters measured from simulated light curves. The steeper the low-frequency PSD slope, the larger scatter we expect. Based on observations of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, we find that the low-frequency PSD slope should be no steeper than −1.3. The actual slope could be flatter, which consequently requires that the quasar variabilities should be influenced by other unknown factors. We speculate that the magnetic field and/or metallicity could be such additional factors.« less

  5. Broadband low-frequency sound isolation by lightweight adaptive metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yunhong; Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    Blocking broadband low-frequency airborne noises is highly desirable in lots of engineering applications, while it is extremely difficult to be realized with lightweight materials and/or structures. Recently, a new class of lightweight adaptive metamaterials with hybrid shunting circuits has been proposed, demonstrating super broadband structure-borne bandgaps. In this study, we aim at examining their potentials in broadband sound isolation by establishing an analytical model that rigorously combines the piezoelectric dynamic couplings between adaptive metamaterials and acoustics. Sound transmission loss of the adaptive metamaterial is investigated with respect to both the frequency and angular spectrum to demonstrate their sound-insulation effects. We find that efficient sound isolation can indeed be pursued in the broadband bi-spectrum for not only the case of the small resonator's periodicity where only one mode relevant to the mass-spring resonance exists, but also for the large-periodicity scenario, so that the total weight can be even lighter, in which the multiple plate-resonator coupling modes appear. In the latter case, the negative spring stiffness provided by the piezoelectric stack has been utilized to suppress the resonance-induced high acoustic transmission. Such kinds of adaptive metamaterials could open a new approach for broadband noise isolation with extremely lightweight structures.

  6. Establishing the Response of Low Frequency Auditory Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafaelof, Menachem; Christian, Andrew; Shepherd, Kevin; Rizzi, Stephen; Stephenson, James

    2017-01-01

    The response of auditory filters is central to frequency selectivity of sound by the human auditory system. This is true especially for realistic complex sounds that are often encountered in many applications such as modeling the audibility of sound, voice recognition, noise cancelation, and the development of advanced hearing aid devices. The purpose of this study was to establish the response of low frequency (below 100Hz) auditory filters. Two experiments were designed and executed; the first was to measure subject's hearing threshold for pure tones (at 25, 31.5, 40, 50, 63 and 80 Hz), and the second was to measure the Psychophysical Tuning Curves (PTCs) at two signal frequencies (Fs= 40 and 63Hz). Experiment 1 involved 36 subjects while experiment 2 used 20 subjects selected from experiment 1. Both experiments were based on a 3-down 1-up 3AFC adaptive staircase test procedure using either a variable level narrow-band noise masker or a tone. A summary of the results includes masked threshold data in form of PTCs, the response of auditory filters, their distribution, and comparison with similar recently published data.

  7. Configuration Considerations for Low Frequency Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    The advance of digital signal processing capabilities has spurred a new effort to exploit the lowest radio frequencies observable from the ground, from ˜10 MHz to a few hundred MHz. Multiple scientifically and technically complementary instruments are planned, including the Mileura Widefield Array (MWA) in the 80-300 MHz range, and the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) in the 20-80 MHz range. The latter instrument will target relatively high angular resolution, and baselines up to a few hundred km. An important practical question for the design of such an array is how to distribute the collecting area on the ground. The answer to this question profoundly affects both cost and performance. In this contribution, the factors which determine the anticipated performance of any such array are examined, paying particular attention to the viability and accuracy of array calibration. It is argued that due to the severity of ionospheric effects in particular, it will be difficult or impossible to achieve routine, high dynamic range imaging with a geographically large low frequency array, unless a large number of physically separate array stations is built. This conclusion is general, is based on the need for adequate sampling of ionospheric irregularities, and is independent of the calibration algorithms and techniques that might be employed. It is further argued that array configuration figures of merit that are traditionally used for higher frequency arrays are inappropriate, and a different set of criteria are proposed.

  8. Interaural Phase and Level Difference Sensitivity in Low-Frequency Neurons in the Lateral Superior Olive

    PubMed Central

    Tollin, Daniel J.; Yin, Tom C. T.

    2006-01-01

    The lateral superior olive (LSO) is believed to encode differences in sound level at the two ears, a cue for azimuthal sound location. Most high-frequency-sensitive LSO neurons are binaural, receiving inputs from both ears. An inhibitory input from the contralateral ear, via the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB), and excitatory input from the ipsilateral ear enable level differences to be encoded. However, the classical descriptions of low-frequency-sensitive neurons report primarily monaural cells with no contralateral inhibition. Anatomical and physiological evidence, however, shows that low-frequency LSO neurons receive low-frequency inhibitory input from ipsilateral MNTB, which in turn receives excitatory input from the contralateral cochlear nucleus and low-frequency excitatory input from the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus. Therefore, these neurons would be expected to be binaural with contralateral inhibition. Here, we re-examined binaural interaction in low-frequency (less than ~3 kHz) LSO neurons and phase locking in the MNTB. Phase locking to low-frequency tones in MNTB and ipsilaterally driven LSO neurons with frequency sensitivities < 1.2 kHz was enhanced relative to the auditory nerve. Moreover, most low-frequency LSO neurons exhibited contralateral inhibition: ipsilaterally driven responses were suppressed by raising the level of the contralateral stimulus; most neurons were sensitive to interaural time delays in pure tone and noise stimuli such that inhibition was nearly maximal when the stimuli were presented to the ears in-phase. The data demonstrate that low-frequency LSO neurons of cat are not monaural and can exhibit contralateral inhibition like their high-frequency counterparts. PMID:16291937

  9. Direct CFD Predictions of Low Frequency Sounds Generated by a Helicopter Main Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark A.; Conner, Dave A.; Conner, Dave A.; Watts, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of CFD to directly predict helicopter main rotor noise is shown to be quite promising as an alternative mean for low frequency source noise evaluation. Results using existing state-of-the-art grid structures and finite-difference schemes demonstrated that small perturbation pressures, associated with acoustics radiation, can be extracted with some degree of fidelity. Accuracy of the predictions are demonstrated via comparing to predictions from conventional acoustic analogy-based models, and with measurements obtained from wind tunnel and flight tests for the MD-902 helicopter at several operating conditions. Findings show that the direct CFD approach is quite successfully in yielding low frequency results due to thickness and steady loading noise mechanisms. Mid-to-high frequency contents, due to blade-vortex interactions, are not predicted due to CFD modeling and grid constraints.

  10. Exposure-response relationship of wind turbine noise with self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems: A nationwide socioacoustic survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kageyama, Takayuki; Yano, Takashi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Sueoka, Shinichi; Tachibana, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The association of wind turbine noise (WTN) with sleep and physical/mental health has not been fully investigated. To investigate the relationship of WTN with the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems, a socioacoustic survey of 1079 adult residents was conducted throughout Japan (2010-2012): 747 in 34 areas surrounding wind turbine plants and 332 in 16 control areas. During face-to-face interviews, the respondents were not informed of the purpose of the survey. Questions on symptoms such as sleeplessness and physical/mental complaints were asked without specifying reasons. Insomnia was defined as having one or any combination of the following that occurs three or more times a week and bothers a respondent: Difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, premature morning awakening, and feeling of light overnight sleep. Poor health was defined as having high scores for health complaints, as determined using the Total Health Index, exceeding the criteria proposed by the authors of the index. The noise descriptor for WTN was LAeq,n outdoor, estimated from the results of actual measurement at some locations in each site. Multiple logistic analysis was applied to the LAeq,n and insomnia or poor health. The odds ratio (OR) of insomnia was significantly higher when the noise exposure level exceeded 40 dB, whereas the self-reported sensitivity to noise and visual annoyance with wind turbines were also independently associated with insomnia. OR of poor health was not significant for noise exposure, but significant for noise sensitivity and visual annoyance. The above two moderators appear to indicate the features of respondents who are sensitive to stimuli or changes in their homeostasis. PMID:26960782

  11. Exposure-response relationship of wind turbine noise with self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems: A nationwide socioacoustic survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Takayuki; Yano, Takashi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Sueoka, Shinichi; Tachibana, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The association of wind turbine noise (WTN) with sleep and physical/mental health has not been fully investigated. To investigate the relationship of WTN with the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems, a socioacoustic survey of 1079 adult residents was conducted throughout Japan (2010-2012): 747 in 34 areas surrounding wind turbine plants and 332 in 16 control areas. During face-to-face interviews, the respondents were not informed of the purpose of the survey. Questions on symptoms such as sleeplessness and physical/mental complaints were asked without specifying reasons. Insomnia was defined as having one or any combination of the following that occurs three or more times a week and bothers a respondent: Difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, premature morning awakening, and feeling of light overnight sleep. Poor health was defined as having high scores for health complaints, as determined using the Total Health Index, exceeding the criteria proposed by the authors of the index. The noise descriptor for WTN was LAeq,n outdoor, estimated from the results of actual measurement at some locations in each site. Multiple logistic analysis was applied to the LAeq,n and insomnia or poor health. The odds ratio (OR) of insomnia was significantly higher when the noise exposure level exceeded 40 dB, whereas the self-reported sensitivity to noise and visual annoyance with wind turbines were also independently associated with insomnia. OR of poor health was not significant for noise exposure, but significant for noise sensitivity and visual annoyance. The above two moderators appear to indicate the features of respondents who are sensitive to stimuli or changes in their homeostasis.

  12. Borehole strain observations of very low frequency earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Ghosh, A.; Hutchinson, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the signals of very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) in PBO borehole strain data in central Cascadia. These MW 3.3 - 4.1 earthquakes are best observed in seismograms at periods of 20 to 50 seconds. We look for the strain they produce on timescales from about 1 to 30 minutes. First, we stack the strain produced by 13 VLFEs identified by a grid search moment tensor inversion algorithm by Ghosh et. al. (2015) and Hutchinson and Ghosh (2016), as well as several thousand VLFEs detected through template matching these events. The VLFEs are located beneath southernmost Vancouver Island and the eastern Olympic Peninsula, and are best recorded at co-located stations B005 and B007. However, even at these stations, the signal to noise in the stack is often low, and the records are difficult to interpret. Therefore we also combine data from multiple stations and VLFE locations, and simply look for increases in the strain rate at the VLFE times, as increases in strain rate would suggest an increase in the moment rate. We compare the background strain rate in the 12 hours centered on the VLFEs with the strain rate in the 10 minutes centered on the VLFEs. The 10-minute duration is chosen as a compromise that averages out some instrumental noise without introducing too much longer-period random walk noise. Our results suggest a factor of 2 increase in strain rate--and thus moment rate--during the 10-minute VLFE intervals. The increase gives an average VLFE magnitude around M 3.5, within the range of magnitudes obtained with seismology. Further analyses are currently being carried out to better understand the evolution of moment release before, during, and after the VLFEs.

  13. Reduced Noise Gas Turbine Engine System and Supersonic Exhaust Nozzle System Using Elector to Entrain Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokhey, Jagdish S. (Inventor); Pierluissi, Anthony F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique gas turbine engine system. Another embodiment is a unique exhaust nozzle system for a gas turbine engine. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for gas turbine engine systems and exhaust nozzle systems for gas turbine engines. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  14. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  15. Noise radiation characteristics of the Westinghouse WWG-0600 (600kW) wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from five different WWG-0600 machines for the wind speed range 6.7 to 13.4 m/s, for a power output range of 51 to 600 kW and for upwind, downwind and crosswind locations. Both broadband and narrowband data are presented and are compared with calculations and with similar data from other machines. Predicted broadband spectra are in good agreement with measurements at high power and underestimate them at low power. Discrete frequency rotational noise components are present in all measurements and are believed due to terrain induced wind gradients. Predictions are in general agreement with measurements upwind and downwind but underestimate them in the crosswind direction.

  16. Do our reconstructions of ENSO have too much low-frequency variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, G. R.; Overpeck, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Reconstructing the spectrum of Pacific SST variability has proven to be difficult both because of complications with proxy systems such as tree rings and the relatively small number of records from the tropical Pacific. We show that the small number of long coral δ18O and Sr/Ca records has caused a bias towards having too much low-frequency variability in PCR, CPS, and RegEM reconstructions of Pacific variability. This occurs because the individual coral records used in the reconstructions have redder spectra than the shared signal (e.g. ENSO). This causes some of the unshared, low-frequency signal from local climate, salinity and possibly coral biology to bleed into the reconstruction. With enough chronologies in a reconstruction, this unshared noise cancels out but the problem is exacerbated in our longest reconstructions where fewer records are available. Coral proxies tend to have more low-frequency variability than SST observations so this problem is smaller but can still be seen in pseudoproxy experiments using observations and reanalysis data. The identification of this low-frequency bias in coral reconstructions helps bring the spectra of ENSO reconstructions back into line with both models and observations. Although our analysis is mostly constrained to the 20th century due to lack of sufficient data, we expect that as more long chronologies are developed, the low-frequency signal in ENSO reconstructions will be greatly reduced.

  17. Investigation of Temperature Ratio Effect on the Low-Frequency Acoustic Spectra of Heated Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Sofia

    Jet noise remains one of the most important problems in the aviation industry, and its reduction is sought in the context of both commercial and military aircraft. In this thesis, an investigation of the jet noise is conducted in terms of the effect of temperature and Mach number on low frequency acoustic spectra. A low-order model derived from the generalized acoustic analogy method via a low-frequency asymptotic approach is utilized, where the mean flow and pertinent statistical quantities are obtained from RANS simulations. The study involves a combination of seven acoustic Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 and five temperature ratios (TR) ranging from 1 to 3. The model is calibrated with existing experimental measurements of a Mach 0.9 and TR = 1 jet. The results show that the sound pressure level increases with the increase in Mach number, and decreases with the decrease in temperature ratios.

  18. Simulating 3D Spacecraft Constellations for Low Frequency Radio Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, A. M.; Amiri, N.; Lazio, J.; Belov, K.; Kasper, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Constellations of small spacecraft could be used to realize a low-frequency phased array for either heliophysics or astrophysics observations. However, there are issues that arise with an orbiting array that do not occur on the ground, thus rendering much of the existing radio astronomy software inadequate for data analysis and simulation. In this work we address these issues and consider the performance of two constellation concepts. The first is a 32-spacecraft constellation for astrophysical observations, and the second is a 5-element concept for pointing to the location of radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs). For the first, we fill the software gap by extending the APSYNSIM software to simulate the aperture synthesis for a radio interferometer in orbit. This involves using the dynamic baselines from the relative motion of the individual spacecraft as well as the capability to add galactic noise. The ability to simulate phase errors corresponding to positional uncertainty of the antennas was also added. The upgraded software was then used to model the imaging of a 32 spacecraft constellation that would orbit the moon to image radio galaxies like Cygnus A at .3-30 MHz. Animated images showing the improvement of the dirty image as the orbits progressed were made. RMSE plots that show how well the dirty image matches the input image as a function of integration time were made. For the second concept we performed radio interferometric simulations of the Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SunRISE) using the Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) package. SunRISE is a five spacecraft phased array that would orbit Earth to localize the low frequency radio emission from CMEs. This involved simulating the array in CASA, creating truth images for the CMEs over the entire frequency band of SunRISE, and observing them with the simulated array to see how well it could localize the true position of the CME. The results of our analysis show that we

  19. Wind turbines acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Iannace, Gino

    2017-07-01

    The importance of wind turbines has increased over the last few years throughout the European Community. The European energy policy guidelines state that for the year 2020 20% of all energy must be produced by alternative energy sources. Wind turbines are an important type of energy production without petrol. A wind speed in a range from 2.5 m/s to 25.0 m/s is needed. One of the obstacles to the widespread diffusion of wind turbine is noise generation. This work presents some noise measurements of wind turbines in the South of Italy, and discusses the noise problems for the people living near wind farms.

  20. The relative immunity of high-frequency transposed stimuli to low-frequency binaural interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Leslie R.; Trahiotis, Constantine

    2004-05-01

    We have recently demonstrated that high-frequency transposed stimuli, having envelopes designed to provide high-frequency channels with information similar to that normally available in only low-frequency channels, yield threshold-ITDs and extents of laterality comparable to those obtained with conventional low-frequency stimuli. This enhanced potency of ITDs conveyed by high-frequency transposed stimuli, as compared to conventional high-frequency stimuli, suggested to us that ITDs conveyed by transposed stimuli might be relatively immune to the presence of low-frequency binaural interferers. To investigate this issue, threshold-ITDs and extents of laterality were measured with a variety of conventional and transposed targets centered at 4 kHz. The targets were presented either in the presence or absence of a simultaneously gated diotic noise centered at 500 Hz, the interferer. As expected, the presence of the low-frequency interferer resulted in substantially elevated threshold-ITDs and reduced extents of laterality for the conventional high-frequency stimuli. In contrast, these interference effects were either greatly attenuated or absent for ITDs conveyed by the high-frequency transposed targets. The results will be discussed in the context of current models of binaural interference. [Work supported by NIH DC 04147, NIH DC04073, NIH DC 002304.

  1. The effect of low-frequency oscillations on cardio-respiratory synchronization. Observations during rest and exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenwright, D. A.; Bahraminasab, A.; Stefanovska, A.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2008-10-01

    We show that the transitions which occur between close orders of synchronization in the cardiorespiratory system are mainly due to modulation of the cardiac and respiratory processes by low-frequency components. The experimental evidence is derived from recordings on healthy subjects at rest and during exercise. Exercise acts as a perturbation of the system that alters the mean cardiac and respiratory frequencies and changes the amount of their modulation by low-frequency oscillations. The conclusion is supported by numerical evidence based on a model of phase-coupled oscillators, with white noise and lowfrequency noise. Both the experimental and numerical approaches confirm that low-frequency oscillations play a significant role in the transitional behavior between close orders of synchronization.

  2. 7. Survivable low frequency communication system pathway, looking east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Survivable low frequency communication system pathway, looking east - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. Low-Frequency Oscillations and Control of the Motor Output

    PubMed Central

    Lodha, Neha; Christou, Evangelos A.

    2017-01-01

    A less precise force output impairs our ability to perform movements, learn new motor tasks, and use tools. Here we show that low-frequency oscillations in force are detrimental to force precision. We summarize the recent evidence that low-frequency oscillations in force output represent oscillations of the spinal motor neuron pool from the voluntary drive, and can be modulated by shifting power to higher frequencies. Further, force oscillations below 0.5 Hz impair force precision with increased voluntary drive, aging, and neurological disease. We argue that the low-frequency oscillations are (1) embedded in the descending drive as shown by the activation of multiple spinal motor neurons, (2) are altered with force intensity and brain pathology, and (3) can be modulated by visual feedback and motor training to enhance force precision. Thus, low-frequency oscillations in force provide insight into how the human brain regulates force precision. PMID:28261107

  4. [Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of workers].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long-yu; Song, Chun-xiao; Yu, Duo; Liu, Xiao-liang; Guo, Jian-qiu; Wang, Chuan; Ding, Yuan-wei; Zhou, Hong-xia; Ma, Shu-mei; Liu, Xiao-dong; Liu, Xin

    2012-03-01

    To observe the exposure levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in workplaces and to analyze the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation on cardiovascular system of occupationally exposed people. Intensity of electromagnetic fields in two workplaces (control and exposure groups) was detected with EFA-300 frequency electromagnetic field strength tester, and intensity of the noise was detected with AWA5610D integral sound level. The information of health physical indicators of 188 controls and 642 occupationally exposed workers was collected. Data were analyzed by SPSS17.0 statistic software. The intensity of electric fields and the magnetic fields in exposure groups was significantly higher than that in control group (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference of noise between two workplaces (P > 0.05). The results of physical examination showed that the abnormal rates of HCY, ALT, AST, GGT, ECG in the exposure group were significantly higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). There were no differences of sex, age, height, weight between two groups (P > 0.05). Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation may have some effects on the cardiovascular system of workers.

  5. Plate-type metamaterials for extremely broadband low-frequency sound insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Guo, Xinwei; Chen, Tianning; Yao, Ge

    2018-01-01

    A novel plate-type acoustic metamaterial with a high sound transmission loss (STL) in the low-frequency range ( ≤1000 Hz) is designed, theoretically proven and then experimentally verified. The thin plates with large modulus used in this paper mean that we do not need to apply tension to the plates, which is more applicable to practical engineering, the achievement of noise reduction is better and the installation of plates is more user-friendly than that of the membranes. The effects of different structural parameters of the plates on the sound-proofed performance at low-frequencies were also investigated by experiment and finite element method (FEM). The results showed that the STL can be modulated effectively and predictably using vibration theory by changing the structural parameters, such as the radius and thickness of the plate. Furthermore, using unit cells of different geometric sizes which are responsible for different frequency regions, the stacked panels with thickness ≤16 mm and weight ≤5 kg/m2 showed high STL below 2000 Hz. The acoustic metamaterial proposed in this study could provide a potential application in the low-frequency noise insulation.

  6. The Effects of Sediment Properties on Low Frequency Acoustic Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The Effects of Sediment Properties on Low Frequency...investigations have indicated that water-borne acoustic arrival properties such as their Airy Phase are sensitive to sediment shear properties. Our major...goals of our research are to: • Improve inversion schemes for the estimation of sediment geoacoustic properties using low frequency broadband

  7. Development of a procedure to model high-resolution wind profiles from smoothed or low-frequency data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The derivation of simulated Jimsphere wind profiles from low-frequency rawinsonde data and a generated set of white noise data are presented. A computer program is developed to model high-resolution wind profiles based on the statistical properties of data from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Comparison of the measured Jimsphere data, rawinsonde data, and the simulated profiles shows excellent agreement.

  8. Active shielding to reduce low frequency disturbances in direct current near biomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzek, D.; Nowak, H.; Giessler, F.; Röther, J.; Eiselt, M.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of dc near biomagnetic fields are disturbed by low frequency noise that is not reduced sufficiently by most of the magnetically shielded rooms or gradiometers. For this reason an active shielding system has been developed at the Biomagnetic Center of the University of Jena. This work describes the principle of the active shielding system and demonstrates its properties concerning the attenuation of disturbing fields, frequency range, and some applications in biomedical measurements. We achieved a reduction of external low frequency magnetic fields by more than 50 dB and an attenuation of the field gradient by about 25 dB. This active shielding enables measurements of near dc biomagnetic fields in investigations of periinfarct depolarizations after ischemic stroke and spreading depression in migraine patients.

  9. A stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback for the stratospheric northern annular mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yueyue; Cai, Ming; Ren, Rongcai

    2017-08-01

    We consider three indices to measure the polar stratospheric mass and stratospheric meridional mass circulation variability: anomalies of (1) total mass in the polar stratospheric cap (60-90°N, above the isentropic surface 400 K, PSM), (2) total adiabatic mass transport across 60°N into the polar stratosphere cap (AMT), (3) and total diabetic mass transport across 400 K from the polar stratosphere into the troposphere below (DMT). It is confirmed that the negative stratospheric Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and PSM indices have a nearly indistinguishable temporal evolution and a similar red-noise-like spectrum with a de-correlation timescale of 4 weeks. This enables us to examine the low-frequency nature of the NAM in the framework of mass circulation, namely, d/{dt}{PSM}={AMT} - {DMT} . The DMT index tends to be positively correlated with the PSM with a red-noise-like spectrum, representing slow radiative cooling processes giving rise to a de-correlation timescale of 3-4 weeks. The AMT is nearly perfectly correlated with the day-to-day tendency of PSM, reflecting a robust quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM at all frequency bands. Variations of vertically westward tilting of planetary waves contribute mainly to the high-frequency portion of AMT. It is the wave amplitude's slow vacillation that plays the leading role in the quasi 90° out-of-phase relation between the AMT and PSM. Based on this, we put forward a linear stochastic model with a low-frequency amplification feedback from low-frequency amplitude vacillations of planetary waves to explain the amplified low-frequency response of PSM/NAM to a stochastic forcing from the westward tilting variability.

  10. I. S. Shklovsky and Low-Frequency Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: Proving of the high astrophysical significance of the low-frequency radio astronomy (decameter and adjacent hectometer and meter wavelengths), demonstration of the priority results of the Ukrainian low-frequency radio astronomy as well as significant contribution of I. S. Shklovsky to its development. Design/methodology/approach: The requirements to characteristics of high efficiency radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT and to sensitive and interference immune observational methods at low frequencies are formulated by using the theoretical analysis and astrophysical predictions including those I. S. Shklovsky’s. Findings: New generation radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, GURT are created and modernized. New observational methods at low frequencies are introduced. Large-scale investigations of the Solar system, Galaxy and Methagalaxy are carried out. They have allowed to detect new objects and phenomena for the continuum, monochromatic, pulse and sporadic cosmic radio emission. The role of I. S. Shklovsky in the development of many low-frequency radio astronomy directions is noted, too. Conclusions: The unique possibilities of the low-frequency radio astronomy which gives new information about the Universe, inaccessible with the other astrophysical methods, are shown. The progress of the low-frequency radio astronomy opens the impressive possibilities for the future. It includes modernization of the largest radio telescopes UTR-2, URAN, NDA and creation of new instruments GURT, NenuFAR, LOFAR, LWA, MWA, SKA as well as making multi-antenna and ground-space experiments. The contribution of outstanding astrophysicist of the XX century I. S. Shklovsky to this part of actual astronomical science is evident, claiming for attention and will never be forgotten.

  11. Mechanical characterisation of the TorPeDO: a low frequency gravitational force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, D. J.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Yap, M. J.; Ward, R. L.; Shaddock, D. A.; McClelland, D. E.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.

    2017-07-01

    Newtonian noise is likely to be a future challenge at low frequencies for Advanced LIGO and other second generation gravitational wave detectors. We present the TorPeDO system: a dual torsion pendulum sensor designed to measure local gravitational forces to high precision. Gravitational forces induce a differential rotation between the two torsion beams, which is measured with an optical read-out. Both torsion pendulums have a common suspension point, tunable centre of mass, and resonant frequency. This produces a high level of mechanical common mode noise cancellation. We report on a controls prototype of the TorPeDO system, presenting the frequency response and tuning range of both pendulums. A noise budget and mechanical cross-coupling model for this system are also presented. We demonstrate frequency tuning of the two torsion pendulums to a difference of 4.3 μHz.

  12. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  13. A Mass Circulation View of the Low Frequency Nature of the Stratospheric Northern Annular Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Cai, M.

    2016-12-01

    We consider three indices to measure polar stratospheric mass and stratospheric meridional mass circulation variability: anomalies of (i) total mass in the polar stratospheric cap (60-90°N, above the isentropic surface 400 K, PSM), (ii) total adiabatic mass transport across 60°N into the polar stratosphere cap (AMT), (iii) and total diabatic mass transport across 400 K into the polar stratosphere (DMT). It is confirmed that the negative stratospheric Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and normalized PSM indices have a nearly indistinguishable temporal evolution and both indices have the same red-noise-like spectrum with the de-correlation timescale of 4 weeks. In this sense, these two indices are synonymous with each other. This enables us to examine the low-frequency nature of the PSM (or NAM) index in the framework of the mass conservation, namely, dPSM/dt=AMT+DMT . Results indicate that the DMT index tends to be negatively correlated with the PSM index and also has a red-noise-like spectrum with the de-correlation timescale of 3-4 weeks. The AMT index, however, has a large positive correlation with the tendency of the PSM rather than the PSM itself. The temporal variability of the AMT has otherwise white-noise-like spectrum except with a pronounced peak at the 2-week timescale. Therefore, the conservation equation of the PSM behaves like a linear stochastic differential equation with the DMT serving as the thermal damping term and the AMT as the high-frequency white noise source term. It follows that the low-frequency nature of the stratospheric NAM (or PSM) index can be viewed as the red-noise response to a white noise in a fluctuation-dissipation system.

  14. Very low-frequency signals support perceptual organization of implant-simulated speech for adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Nittrouer, Susan; Tarr, Eric; Bolster, Virginia; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Moberly, Aaron C.; Lowenstein, Joanna H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Using signals processed to simulate speech received through cochlear implants and low-frequency extended hearing aids, this study examined the proposal that low-frequency signals facilitate the perceptual organization of broader, spectrally degraded signals. Design In two experiments, words and sentences were presented in diotic and dichotic configurations as four-channel noise-vocoded signals (VOC-only), and as those signals combined with the acoustic signal below 250 Hz (LOW-plus). Dependent measures were percent correct recognition scores, and the difference between scores for the two processing conditions given as proportions of recognition scores for VOC-only. The influence of linguistic context was also examined. Study Sample Participants had normal hearing. In all, 40 adults, 40 7-year-olds, and 20 5-year-olds participated. Results Participants of all ages showed benefits of adding the low-frequency signal. The effect was greater for sentences than words, but no effect of configuration was found. The influence of linguistic context was similar across age groups, and did not contribute to the low-frequency effect. Listeners who scored more poorly with VOC-only stimuli showed greater low-frequency effects. Conclusion The benefit of adding a very low-frequency signal to a broader, spectrally degraded signal seems to derive from its facilitative influence on perceptual organization of the sensory input. PMID:24456179

  15. Low-frequency Raman scattering in a Xe hydrate.

    PubMed

    Adichtchev, S V; Belosludov, V R; Ildyakov, A V; Malinovsky, V K; Manakov, A Yu; Subbotin, O S; Surovtsev, N V

    2013-09-12

    The physics of gas hydrates are rich in interesting phenomena such as anomalies for thermal conductivity, self-preservation effects for decomposition, and others. Some of these phenomena are presumably attributed to the resonance interaction of the rattling motions of guest molecules or atoms with the lattice modes. This can be expected to induce some specific features in the low-frequency (THz) vibrational response. Here we present results for low-frequency Raman scattering in a Xe hydrate, supported by numerical calculations of vibrational density of states. A number of narrow lines, located in the range from 18 to 90 cm(-1), were found in the Raman spectrum. Numerical calculations confirm that these lines correspond to resonance modes of the Xe hydrate. Also, low-frequency Raman scattering was studied during gas hydrate decomposition, and two scenarios were observed. The first one is the direct decomposition of the Xe hydrate to water and gas. The second one is the hydrate decomposition to ice and gas with subsequent melting of ice. In the latter case, a transient low-frequency Raman band is observed, which is associated with low-frequency bands (e.g., boson peak) of disordered solids.

  16. Infrasound from Wind Turbines Could Affect Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines generate low-frequency sounds that affect the ear. The ear is superficially similar to a microphone, converting mechanical sound waves into electrical signals, but does this by complex physiologic processes. Serious misconceptions about low-frequency sound and the ear have resulted from a failure to consider in detail how the ear…

  17. Airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, David G.

    1991-08-01

    Current understanding of airframe noise was reviewed as represented by experiment at model and full scale, by theoretical modeling, and by empirical correlation models. The principal component sources are associated with the trailing edges of wing and tail, deflected trailing edge flaps, flap side edges, leading edge flaps or slats, undercarriage gear elements, gear wheel wells, fuselage and wing boundary layers, and panel vibration, together with many minor protrusions like radio antennas and air conditioning intakes which may contribute significantly to perceived noise. There are also possibilities for interactions between the various mechanisms. With current engine technology, the principal airframe noise mechanisms dominate only at low frequencies, typically less than 1 kHz and often much lower, but further reduction of turbomachinery noise in particular may make airframe noise the principal element of approach noise at frequencies in the sensitive range.

  18. Spatial Release From Masking in Simulated Cochlear Implant Users With and Without Access to Low-Frequency Acoustic Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker; Jürgens, Tim

    2015-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, speech intelligibility improves if speech and noise are spatially separated. While this spatial release from masking has already been quantified in normal-hearing listeners in many studies, it is less clear how spatial release from masking changes in cochlear implant listeners with and without access to low-frequency acoustic hearing. Spatial release from masking depends on differences in access to speech cues due to hearing status and hearing device. To investigate the influence of these factors on speech intelligibility, the present study measured speech reception thresholds in spatially separated speech and noise for 10 different listener types. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant processing and low-frequency filtering was used to simulate residual low-frequency hearing. These forms of processing were combined to simulate cochlear implant listening, listening based on low-frequency residual hearing, and combinations thereof. Simulated cochlear implant users with additional low-frequency acoustic hearing showed better speech intelligibility in noise than simulated cochlear implant users without acoustic hearing and had access to more spatial speech cues (e.g., higher binaural squelch). Cochlear implant listener types showed higher spatial release from masking with bilateral access to low-frequency acoustic hearing than without. A binaural speech intelligibility model with normal binaural processing showed overall good agreement with measured speech reception thresholds, spatial release from masking, and spatial speech cues. This indicates that differences in speech cues available to listener types are sufficient to explain the changes of spatial release from masking across these simulated listener types. PMID:26721918

  19. The Detection of Very Low Frequency Earthquake using Broadband Seismic Array Data in South-Western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamanaka, Y.; Kikuchi, M.

    2002-12-01

    The existences of variety of low-frequency seismic sources are obvious by the dense and equalized equipment_fs seismic network. Kikuchi(2000) and Kumagai et.al. (2001) analyzed about 50sec period ground motion excited by the volcanic activities Miyake-jima, Izu Islands. JMA is listing the low frequency earthquakes routinely in their hypocenter determination. Obara (2002) detected the low frequency, 2-4 Hz, tremor that occurred along subducting Philippine Sea plate by envelope analysis of high dense and short period seismic network (Hi-net). The monitoring of continuos long period waveform show us the existence of many unknown sources. Recently, the broadband seismic network of Japan (F-net, previous name is FREESIA) is developed and extends to linear array about 3,000 km. We reviewed the long period seismic data and earthquake catalogues. Many candidates, which are excited by unknown sources, are picked up manually. The candidates are reconfirmed in detail by the original seismograms and their rough frequency characteristics are evaluated. Most events have the very low frequency seismograms that is dominated period of 20 _E30 sec and smaller amplitude than ground noise level in shorter period range. We developed the hypocenter determination technique applied the grid search method. Moreover for the major events moment tensor inversion was performed. The most source locates at subducting plate and their depth is greater than 30km. However the location don_ft overlap the low frequency tremor source region. Major event_fs moment magnitude is 4 or greater and estimated source time is around 20 sec. We concluded that low frequency seismic event series exist in wide period range in subduction area. The very low frequency earthquakes occurred along Nankai and Ryukyu trough at southwestern Japan. We are planing to survey the very low frequency event systematically in wider western Pacific region.

  20. Minimal basilar membrane motion in low-frequency hearing

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Rebecca L.; Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Ciganović, Nikola; Zhang, Yuan; Wilson, Teresa M.; Petrie, Tracy; Wang, Ruikang K.; Jacques, Steven L.; Reichenbach, Tobias; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Fridberger, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency hearing is critically important for speech and music perception, but no mechanical measurements have previously been available from inner ears with intact low-frequency parts. These regions of the cochlea may function in ways different from the extensively studied high-frequency regions, where the sensory outer hair cells produce force that greatly increases the sound-evoked vibrations of the basilar membrane. We used laser interferometry in vitro and optical coherence tomography in vivo to study the low-frequency part of the guinea pig cochlea, and found that sound stimulation caused motion of a minimal portion of the basilar membrane. Outside the region of peak movement, an exponential decline in motion amplitude occurred across the basilar membrane. The moving region had different dependence on stimulus frequency than the vibrations measured near the mechanosensitive stereocilia. This behavior differs substantially from the behavior found in the extensively studied high-frequency regions of the cochlea. PMID:27407145

  1. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  2. Mechanical logic switches based on DNA-inspired acoustic metamaterials with ultrabroad low-frequency band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bowen; Xu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical information processing and control has attracted great attention in recent years. A challenging pursuit is to achieve broad functioning frequency ranges, especially at low-frequency domain. Here, we propose a design of mechanical logic switches based on DNA-inspired chiral acoustic metamaterials, which are capable of having ultrabroad band gaps at low-frequency domain. Logic operations can be easily performed by applying constraints at different locations and the functioning frequency ranges are able to be low, broad and tunable. This work may have an impact on the development of mechanical information processing, programmable materials, stress wave manipulation, as well as the isolation of noise and harmful vibration.

  3. Improvement of the low frequency oscillation model for Hall thrusters

    SciT

    Wang, Chunsheng, E-mail: wangcs@hit.edu.cn; Wang, Huashan

    2016-08-15

    The low frequency oscillation of the discharge current in Hall thrusters is a major aspect of these devices that requires further study. While the existing model captures the ionization mechanism of the low frequency oscillation, it unfortunately fails to express the dynamic characteristics of the ion acceleration. The analysis in this paper shows this is because of the simplification of the electron equation, which affects both the electric field distribution and the ion acceleration process. Additionally, the electron density equation is revised and a new model that is based on the physical properties of ion movement is proposed.

  4. High sensitive vectorial B-probe for low frequency plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stefan; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas; Rahbarnia, Kian

    2013-11-01

    A miniaturized multidimensional magnetic probe is developed for application in a low-temperature plasma environment. A very high sensitivity for low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations with constant phase run, a very good signal-to-noise ratio combined with an efficient electrostatic pickup rejection, renders the probe superior compared with any commercial solution. A two-step calibration allows for absolute measurement of amplitude and direction of magnetic field fluctuations. The excellent probe performance is demonstrated by measurements of the parallel current pattern of coherent electrostatic drift wave modes in the VINETA (versatile instrument for studies on nonlinearity, electromagnetism, turbulence, and applications) experiment.

  5. MOD-2 wind turbine farm stability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of single and multiple 2.5 ME, Boeing MOD-2 wind turbine generators (WTGs) connected to utility power systems were investigated. The analysis was based on digital simulation. Both time response and frequency response methods were used. The dynamics of this type of WTG are characterized by two torsional modes, a low frequency 'shaft' mode below 1 Hz and an 'electrical' mode at 3-5 Hz. High turbine inertia and low torsional stiffness between turbine and generator are inherent features. Turbine control is based on electrical power, not turbine speed as in conventional utility turbine generators. Multi-machine dynamics differ very little from single machine dynamics.

  6. Experimental observation of a large low-frequency band gap in a polymer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Mazzotti, Matteo; Radzieński, Maciej; Kherraz, Nesrine; Kudela, Pawel; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw; Morvan, Bruno; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2018-02-01

    The quest for large and low frequency band gaps is one of the principal objectives pursued in a number of engineering applications, ranging from noise absorption to vibration control, to seismic wave abatement. For this purpose, a plethora of complex architectures (including multi-phase materials) and multi-physics approaches have been proposed in the past, often involving difficulties in their practical realization. To address this issue, in this work we propose an easy-to-manufacture design able to open large, low frequency complete Lamb band gaps exploiting a suitable arrangement of masses and stiffnesses produced by cavities in a monolithic material. The performance of the designed structure is evaluated by numerical simulations and confirmed by Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) measurements on an isotropic polyvinyl chloride plate in which a square ring region of cross-like cavities is fabricated. The full wave field reconstruction clearly confirms the ability of even a limited number of unit cell rows of the proposed design to efficiently attenuate Lamb waves. In addition, numerical simulations show that the structure allows to shift of the central frequency of the BG through geometrical modifications. The design may be of interest for applications in which large BGs at low frequencies are required.

  7. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  8. Low-frequency switching voltage regulators for terrestrial photovoltaic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The photovoltaic technology project and the stand alone applications project are discussed. Two types of low frequency switching type regulators were investigated. The design, operating characteristics and field application of these regulators is described. The regulators are small in size, low in cost, very low in power dissipation, reliable and allow considerable flexibility in system design.

  9. Is Reaction Time Variability in ADHD Mainly at Low Frequencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karalunas, Sarah L.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia L.; Nigg, Joel T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intraindividual variability in reaction times (RT variability) has garnered increasing interest as an indicator of cognitive and neurobiological dysfunction in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent theory and research has emphasized specific low-frequency patterns of RT variability. However, whether…

  10. A Numerical Investigation of Turbine Noise Source Hierarchy and Its Acoustic Transmission Characteristics: Proof-of-Concept Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale; Envia, Edmane

    2008-01-01

    A CFD-based simulation of single-stage turbine was done using the TURBO code to assess its viability for determining acoustic transmission through blade rows. Temporal and spectral analysis of the unsteady pressure data from the numerical simulations showed the allowable Tyler-Sofrin modes that are consistent with expectations. This indicated that high-fidelity acoustic transmission calculations are feasible with TURBO.

  11. Effects of Stimulus Intensity on Low-Frequency Toneburst Cochlear Microphonic Waveforms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming

    2013-01-02

    This study investigates changes in amplitude and delays in low-frequency toneburst cochlear microphonic (CM) waveforms recorded at the ear canal in response to different stimulus intensities. Ten volunteers aged 20-30 were recruited. Low-frequency CM waveforms at 500 Hz in response to a 14-ms toneburst were recorded from an ear canal electrode using electrocochleography techniques. The data was statistically analyzed in order to confirm whether the differences were significant in the effects of stimulus intensity on the amplitudes and delays of the low-frequency CM waveforms. Electromagnetic interference artifacts can jeopardize CM measurements but such artifacts can be avoided. The CM waveforms can be recorded at the ear canal in response to a toneburst which is longer than that used in ABR measurements. The CM waveforms thus recorded are robust, and the amplitude of CM waveforms is intensity-dependent. In contrast, the delay of CM waveforms is intensity-independent, which is different from neural responses as their delay or latency is intensity-dependent. These findings may be useful for development of the application of CM measurement as a supplementary approach to otoacoustic emission (OAE) measurement in the clinic which is severely affected by background acoustic noise. The development of the application in the assessment of low-frequency cochlear function may become possible if a further series of studies can verify the feasibility, but it is not meant to be a substitute for audiometry or OAE measurements. The measurement of detection threshold of CM waveform responses using growth function approach may become possible in the clinic. The intensity-independent nature of CMs with regards to delay measurements may also become an impacting factor for differential diagnoses and for designing new research studies.

  12. Masking of low-frequency signals by high-frequency, high-level narrow bands of noisea

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Harisadhan; Roup, Christina M.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency masking by intense high-frequency noise bands, referred to as remote masking (RM), was the first evidence to challenge energy-detection models of signal detection. Its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. RM was measured in five normal-hearing young-adults at 250, 350, 500, and 700 Hz using equal-power, spectrally matched random-phase noise (RPN) and low-noise noise (LNN) narrowband maskers. RM was also measured using equal-power, two-tone complex (TC2) and eight-tone complex (TC8). Maskers were centered at 3000 Hz with one or two equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs). Masker levels varied from 80 to 95 dB sound pressure level in 5 dB steps. LNN produced negligible masking for all conditions. An increase in bandwidth in RPN yielded greater masking over a wider frequency region. Masking for TC2 was limited to 350 and 700 Hz for one ERB but shifted to only 700 Hz for two ERBs. A spread of masking to 500 and 700 Hz was observed for TC8 when the bandwidth was increased from one to two ERBs. Results suggest that high-frequency noise bands at high levels could generate significant low-frequency masking. It is possible that listeners experience significant RM due to the amplification of various competing noises that might have significant implications for speech perception in noise. PMID:21361445

  13. Low frequency acoustic properties of a honeycomb-silicone rubber acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Hou, Hong

    2017-04-01

    In order to overcome the influence of mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure which can effectively isolate the low frequency noises, a honeycomb-silicone rubber acoustic metamaterial was proposed. Experimental results show that the sound transmission loss (STL) of acoustic metamaterial in this paper is greatly higher than that of monolayer silicone rubber metamaterial. Based on the band structure, modal shapes, as well as the sound transmission simulation, the sound insulation mechanism of the designed honeycomb-silicone rubber structure was analyzed from a new perspective, which had been validated experimentally. Side length of honeycomb structure and thickness of the unit structure would affect STL in damping control zone. Relevant conclusions and design method provide a new concept for engineering noise control.

  14. Large endolymphatic potentials from low-frequency and infrasonic tones in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Salt, Alec N; Lichtenhan, Jeffery T; Gill, Ruth M; Hartsock, Jared J

    2013-03-01

    Responses of the ear to low-frequency and infrasonic sounds have not been extensively studied. Understanding how the ear responds to low frequencies is increasingly important as environmental infrasounds are becoming more pervasive from sources such as wind turbines. This study shows endolymphatic potentials in the third cochlear turn from acoustic infrasound (5 Hz) are larger than from tones in the audible range (e.g., 50 and 500 Hz), in some cases with peak-to-peak amplitude greater than 20 mV. These large potentials were suppressed by higher-frequency tones and were rapidly abolished by perilymphatic injection of KCl at the cochlear apex, demonstrating their third-turn origins. Endolymphatic iso-potentials from 5 to 500 Hz were enhanced relative to perilymphatic potentials as frequency was lowered. Probe and infrasonic bias tones were used to study the origin of the enhanced potentials. Potentials were best explained as a saturating response summed with a sinusoidal voltage (Vo), that was phase delayed by an average of 60° relative to the biasing effects of the infrasound. Vo is thought to arise indirectly from hair cell activity, such as from strial potential changes caused by sustained current changes through the hair cells in each half cycle of the infrasound.

  15. Extremely low-frequency Lamb wave band gaps in a sandwich phononic crystal thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Liu, Zhangyi; Fu, Gang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a kind of sandwich phononic crystal (PC) plate with silicon rubber scatterers embedded in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix is proposed to demonstrate its low-frequency Lamb wave band gap (BG) characteristics. The dispersion relationship and the displacement vector fields of the basic slab modes and the locally resonant modes are investigated to show the BG formation mechanism. The anti-symmetric Lamb wave BG is further studied due to its important function in reducing vibration. The analysis on the BG characteristics of the PC through changing their geometrical parameters is performed. By optimizing the structure, a sandwich PC plate with a thickness of only 3 mm and a lower boundary (as low as 23.9 Hz) of the first anti-symmetric BG is designed. Finally, sound insulation experiment on a sandwich PC plate with the thickness of only 2.5 mm is conducted, showing satisfactory noise reduction effect in the frequency range of the anti-symmetric Lamb BG. Therefore, this kind of sandwich PC plate has potential applications in controlling vibration and noise in low-frequency ranges.

  16. The very low frequency power spectrum of Centaurus X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    The long-term variability of Cen X-3 on time scales ranging from days to years has been examined by combining data obtained by the HEAO 1 A-4 instrument with data from Vela 5B. A simple interpretation of the data is made in terms of the standard alpha-disk model of accretion disk structure and dynamics. Assuming that the low-frequency variance represents the inherent variability of the mass transfer from the companion, the decline in power at higher frequencies results from the leveling of radial structure in the accretion disk through viscous mixing. The shape of the observed power spectrum is shown to be in excellent agreement with a calculation based on a simplified form of this model. The observed low-frequency power spectrum of Cen X-3 is consistent with a disk in which viscous mixing occurs about as rapidly as possible and on the largest scale possible.

  17. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  18. Low frequency electromagnetic fluctuations in Kappa magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunjung; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; López, R. A.; Yoon, P. H.

    2018-07-01

    The present paper provides a theoretical approach for the evaluation of the low frequency spontaneously emitted electromagnetic (EM) fluctuations in Kappa magnetized plasmas, which include the kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, kinetic slow mode, ion Bernstein cyclotron modes, and higher-order modes. The model predictions are consistent with particle-in-cell simulations. Effects of suprathermal particles on low frequency fluctuations are studied by varying the power index, either for ions (κ i) or for electrons (κ e). Computations for an arbitrary wave vector orientation and wave polarization provide the intensity of spontaneous emissions to be enhanced in the presence of suprathermal populations. These results strongly suggest that spontaneous fluctuations may significantly contribute to the EM fluctuations observed in space plasmas, where suprathermal Kappa distributed particles are ubiquitous.

  19. Method for sputtering with low frequency alternating current

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.

    1996-01-01

    Low frequency alternating current sputtering is provided by connecting a low frequency alternating current source to a high voltage transformer having outer taps and a center tap for stepping up the voltage of the alternating current. The center tap of the transformer is connected to a vacuum vessel containing argon or helium gas. Target electrodes, in close proximity to each other, and containing material with which the substrates will be coated, are connected to the outer taps of the transformer. With an applied potential, the gas will ionize and sputtering from the target electrodes onto the substrate will then result. The target electrodes can be copper or boron, and the substrate can be stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. Copper coatings produced are used in place of nickel and/or copper striking.

  20. Method for sputtering with low frequency alternating current

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.

    1996-04-30

    Low frequency alternating current sputtering is provided by connecting a low frequency alternating current source to a high voltage transformer having outer taps and a center tap for stepping up the voltage of the alternating current. The center tap of the transformer is connected to a vacuum vessel containing argon or helium gas. Target electrodes, in close proximity to each other, and containing material with which the substrates will be coated, are connected to the outer taps of the transformer. With an applied potential, the gas will ionize and sputtering from the target electrodes onto the substrate will then result. The target electrodes can be copper or boron, and the substrate can be stainless steel, aluminum, or titanium. Copper coatings produced are used in place of nickel and/or copper striking. 6 figs.

  1. Low-frequency seismic events in a wider volcanological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberg, J. W.; Collombet, M.

    2006-12-01

    Low-frequency seismic events have been in the centre of attention for several years, particularly on volcanoes with highly viscous magmas. The ultimate aim is to detect changes in volcanic activity by identifying changes in the seismic behaviour in order to forecast an eruption, or in case of an ongoing eruption, forecast the short and longterm behaviour of the volcanic system. A major boost in recent years arose through several attempts of multi-parameter volcanic monitoring and modelling programs, which allowed multi-disciplinary groups of volcanologists to interpret seismic signals together with, e.g. ground deformation, stress field analysis and petrological information. This talk will give several examples of such multi-disciplinary projects, focussing on the joint modelling of seismic source processes for low-frequency events together with advanced magma flow models, and the signs of magma movement in the deformation and stress field at the surface.

  2. The influence of cochlear shape on low-frequency hearing.

    PubMed

    Manoussaki, Daphne; Chadwick, Richard S; Ketten, Darlene R; Arruda, Julie; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; O'Malley, Jen T

    2008-04-22

    The conventional theory about the snail shell shape of the mammalian cochlea is that it evolved essentially and perhaps solely to conserve space inside the skull. Recently, a theory proposed that the spiral's graded curvature enhances the cochlea's mechanical response to low frequencies. This article provides a multispecies analysis of cochlear shape to test this theory and demonstrates that the ratio of the radii of curvature from the outermost and innermost turns of the cochlear spiral is a significant cochlear feature that correlates strongly with low-frequency hearing limits. The ratio, which is a measure of curvature gradient, is a reflection of the ability of cochlear curvature to focus acoustic energy at the outer wall of the cochlear canal as the wave propagates toward the apex of the cochlea.

  3. A lunar far-side very low frequency array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O. (Editor); Duric, Nebojsa (Editor); Johnson, Stewart (Editor); Taylor, G. Jeffrey (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers were presented to consider very low frequency (VLF) radio astronomical observations from the moon. In part 1, the environment in which a lunar VLF radio array would function is described. Part 2 is a review of previous and proposed low-frequency observatories. The science that could be conducted with a lunar VLF array is described in part 3. The design of a lunar VLF array and site selection criteria are considered, respectively, in parts 4 and 5. Part 6 is a proposal for precursor lunar VLF observations. Finally, part 7 is a summary and statement of conclusions, with suggestions for future science and engineering studies. The workshop concluded with a general consensus on the scientific goals and preliminary design for a lunar VLF array.

  4. Low frequency creep in CoNiFe films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Chow, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation of domain wall motion excited by slow rise-time, bipolar, hard-axis pulses in vacuum deposited CoNiFe films 1500A to 2000A thick are presented. The results are consistent with those of comparable NiFe films in spite of large differences in film properties. The present low frequency creep data together with previously published results in this and other laboratories can be accounted for by a model which requires that the wall structure change usually associated with low frequency creep be predominately a gyromagnetic process. The correctness of this model is reinforced by the observation that the wall coercive force, the planar wall mobility, and the occurrence of an abrupt wall structure change are the only properties closely correlated to the creep displacement characteristics of a planar wall in low dispersion films.

  5. Loads and low frequency dynamics - An ENVIRONET data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garba, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The loads and low frequency dynamics data base, part of Environet, is described with particular attention given to its development and contents. The objective of the data base is to provide the payload designer with design approaches and design data to meet STS safety requirements. Currently the data base consists of the following sections: abstract, scope, glossary, requirements, interaction with other environments, summary of the loads analysis process, design considerations, guidelines for payload design loads, information data base, and references.

  6. Low-frequency creep in CoNiFe films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartran, D. S.; Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Chow, L. G.

    1972-01-01

    Domain wall motion excited by slow rise-time, bipolar, hard-axis pulses in vacuum deposited CoNiFe films from 1500 to 2000 A thick is studied. The results are consistent with those of comparable NiFe films. Furthermore, the wall coercivity is found to be the most significant sample property correlated to the low-frequency creep properties of all the samples.

  7. Low-frequency collective modes in dry and hydrated proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bellissent-Funel, M C; Teixeira, J; Chen, S H; Dorner, B; Middendorf, H D; Crespi, H L

    1989-01-01

    We have observed Brillouin-like low frequency collective modes in the scattering of 1 A neutrons from a fully in vivo deuterated protein. These modes are tentatively interpreted as due to short-lived coherent excitations propagating with velocities between 2,000 and 4,000 m/s in elements of the secondary structure and patches of closely associated water. PMID:2554989

  8. Zinc oxide piezoelectric nano-generators for low frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nour, E. S.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2017-06-01

    Piezoelectric Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanogenerators (NGs) have been fabricated for low frequency (<100 Hz) energy harvesting applications. Different types of NGs based on ZnO nanostructures have been carefully developed, and studied for testing under different kinds of low frequency mechanical deformations. Well aligned ZnO nanowires (NWs) possessing high piezoelectric coefficient were synthesized on flexible substrates using the low temperature hydrothermal route. These ZnO NWs were then used in different configurations to demonstrate different low frequency energy harvesting devices. Using piezoelectric ZnO NWs, we started with the fabrication of a sandwiched NG for a handwriting enabled energy harvesting device based on a thin silver layer coated paper substrate. Such device configurations can be used for the development of electronic programmable smart paper. Further, we developed this NG to work as a triggered sensor for a wireless system using footstep pressure. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a ZnO NWs piezoelectric NG as a low-frequency self- powered sensor, with potential applications in wireless sensor networks. After that, we investigated and fabricated a sensor on a PEDOT: PSS plastic substrate using a one-sided growth and double-sided growth technique. For the first growth technique, the fabricated NG has been used as a sensor for an acceleration system; while the fabricated NG by the second technique works as an anisotropic direction sensor. This fabricated configuration showed stability for sensing and can be used in surveillance, security, and auto-Mobil applications. In addition to that, we investigated the fabrication of a sandwiched NG on plastic substrates. Finally, we demonstrated that doping ZnO NWs with extrinsic elements (such as Ag) will lead to the reduction of the piezoelectric effect due to the loss of crystal symmetry. A brief summary into future opportunities and challenges is also presented.

  9. Large-N correlator systems for low frequency radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Griffin

    Low frequency radio astronomy has entered a second golden age driven by the development of a new class of large-N interferometric arrays. The low frequency array (LOFAR) and a number of redshifted HI Epoch of Reionization (EoR) arrays are currently undergoing commission and regularly observing. Future arrays of unprecedented sensitivity and resolutions at low frequencies, such as the square kilometer array (SKA) and the hydrogen epoch of reionization array (HERA), are in development. The combination of advancements in specialized field programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware for signal processing, computing and graphics processing unit (GPU) resources, and new imaging and calibration algorithms has opened up the oft underused radio band below 300 MHz. These interferometric arrays require efficient implementation of digital signal processing (DSP) hardware to compute the baseline correlations. FPGA technology provides an optimal platform to develop new correlators. The significant growth in data rates from these systems requires automated software to reduce the correlations in real time before storing the data products to disk. Low frequency, widefield observations introduce a number of unique calibration and imaging challenges. The efficient implementation of FX correlators using FPGA hardware is presented. Two correlators have been developed, one for the 32 element BEST-2 array at Medicina Observatory and the other for the 96 element LOFAR station at Chilbolton Observatory. In addition, calibration and imaging software has been developed for each system which makes use of the radio interferometry measurement equation (RIME) to derive calibrations. A process for generating sky maps from widefield LOFAR station observations is presented. Shapelets, a method of modelling extended structures such as resolved sources and beam patterns has been adapted for radio astronomy use to further improve system calibration. Scaling of computing technology allows for the

  10. Galactic foreground science: Faraday Tomography at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    2018-05-01

    This contribution describes how low-frequency radio-spectropolarimetric imaging as done for Epoch of Reionization detection is used to investigate the nearby Galactic interstellar medium. The method of Faraday Tomography allows disentangling of every line of sight into various components in Faraday depth, which is a proxy for density-weighted magnetic field. I discuss instrumental biases and side effects of this method, and early results it has yielded.

  11. Kinetic scale structure of low-frequency waves and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Herrera, R. A.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Araneda, J. A.; Yoon, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for heating the corona and accelerating the wind. Linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool in identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow mode), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, kinetic mode structure near the vicinity of ion cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present poster aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion Bernstein versus quasi modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén wave can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave-particle interactions.

  12. Measurement of Flux Density of Cas A at Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajinkya; Fisher, R.

    2012-01-01

    Cas A is used as a flux calibrator throughout the radio spectrum. Therefore it is important to know the spectral and secular variations in its flux density. Earlier observations by Scott et. al. (1969) and Baars et. al. (1972) suggested a secular decrease in flux density of Cas A at a rate of about 1% per year at all frequencies. However later observations by Erickson & Perley (1975) and Read (1977) indicated anomalously high flux from Cas A at 38 MHz. Also, these observations suggested that the original idea of faster decay of the flux density rate at low frequencies may be in error or that something more complex than simple decay is affecting the flux density at low frequencies. The source changes at 38 MHz still remains a mystery. We intend to present the results of follow up observations made from 1995 to 1998 with a three element interferometer in Green Bank operating in frequency range 30 to 120 MHz. We will discuss the problems at such low frequencies due to large beamwidth and unstable ionosphere. We will also discuss the strategies we have used so far to to find the flux density of Cas A by calculating the ratio of flux density of Cas A to that of Cyg A, assuming flux density of Cyg A to be constant. Above mentioned work was performed in summer student program sponsored by National Radio Astronomy Observatory.

  13. Stabilizing Effect of Sweep on Low-Frequency STBLI Unsteadiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Michael; Gaitonde, Datta

    2017-11-01

    A Large-Eddy Simulation database is generated to examine unsteady shock/turbulent boundary-layer-interaction (STBLI) mechanisms in a Mach 2 swept-compression-corner. Such interactions exhibit open separation, with separation relief from the sweep, and lack the closed mean recirculation found in spanwise-homogeneous STBLIs. We find that the swept interaction lacks the low-frequency coherent shock unsteadiness, two-decades below incoming turbulent boundary layer scales, that is a principal feature of comparable closed separation STBLIs. Rather, the prominent unsteady content is a mid-frequency regime that develops in the separated shear layer and scales weakly with the local separation length. Additionally, a linear perturbation analysis of the unsteady flow indicates that the feedback pathway (associated with an absolute instability in spanwise-homogeneous interactions) is absent in swept-compression-corner interactions. This suggests that 1) the linear oscillator is an essential component of low-frequency unsteadiness in interactions with closed separation. 2) Low-frequency control efforts should be focused on disrupting this oscillator. 3) Introduction of 3D effects constitute one mechanism to disrupt the oscillator.

  14. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    SciT

    López, Rodrigo A.; Yoon, Peter H.; Viñas, Adolfo F.

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. Themore » theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave–particle interactions.« less

  15. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  16. Solar observations with a low frequency radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myserlis, I.; Seiradakis, J.; Dogramatzidis, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have set up a low frequency radio monitoring station for solar bursts at the Observatory of the Aristotle University in Thessaloniki. The station consists of a dual dipole phased array, a radio receiver and a dedicated computer with the necessary software installed. The constructed radio receiver is based on NASA's Radio Jove project. It operates continuously, since July 2010, at 20.1 MHz (close to the long-wavelength ionospheric cut-off of the radio window) with a narrow bandwidth (~5 kHz). The system is properly calibrated, so that the recorded data are expressed in antenna temperature. Despite the high interference level of an urban region like Thessaloniki (strong broadcasting shortwave radio stations, periodic experimental signals, CBs, etc), we have detected several low frequency solar radio bursts and correlated them with solar flares, X-ray events and other low frequency solar observations. The received signal is monitored in ordinary ASCII format and as audio signal, in order to investigate and exclude man-made radio interference. In order to exclude narrow band interference and calculate the spectral indices of the observed events, a second monitoring station, working at 36 MHz, is under construction at the village of Nikiforos near the town of Drama, about 130 km away of Thessaloniki. Finally, we plan to construct a third monitoring station at 58 MHz, in Thessaloniki. This frequency was revealed to be relatively free of interference, after a thorough investigation of the region.

  17. A fiber-optic interferometer with subpicometer resolution for dc and low-frequency displacement measurement.

    PubMed

    Smith, D T; Pratt, J R; Howard, L P

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic interferometer optimized for best performance in the frequency range from dc to 1 kHz, with displacement linearity of 1% over a range of +/- 25 nm, and noise-limited resolution of 2 pm. The interferometer uses a tunable infrared laser source (nominal 1550 nm wavelength) with high amplitude and wavelength stability, low spontaneous self-emission noise, high sideband suppression, and a coherence control feature that broadens the laser linewidth and dramatically lowers the low-frequency noise in the system. The amplitude stability of the source, combined with the use of specially manufactured "bend-insensitive" fiber and all-spliced fiber construction, results in a robust homodyne interferometer system, which achieves resolution of 40 fm Hz(-1/2) above 20 Hz and approaches the shot-noise-limit of 20 fm Hz(-1/2) at 1 kHz for an optical power of 10 microW, without the need for differential detection. Here we describe the design and construction of the interferometer, as well as modes of operation, and demonstrate its performance.

  18. Narrowband high temperature superconducting receiver for low frequency radio waves

    DOEpatents

    Reagor, David W.

    2001-01-01

    An underground communicating device has a low-noise SQUID using high temperature superconductor components connected to detect a modulated external magnetic flux for outputting a voltage signal spectrum that is related to the varying magnetic flux. A narrow bandwidth filter may be used to select a portion of the voltage signal spectrum that is relatively free of power line noise to output a relatively low noise output signal when operating in a portion of the electromagnetic spectra where such power line noise exists. A demodulator outputs a communication signal, which may be an FM signal, indicative of a modulation on the modulated external magnetic flux.

  19. Measurement of the quality factor of a new low-frequency differential accelerometer for testing the equivalence principle.

    PubMed

    Iafolla, V; Lefevre, C; Fiorenza, E; Santoli, F; Nozzoli, S; Magnafico, C; Lucente, M; Lucchesi, D; Peron, R; Shapiro, I I; Glashow, S; Lorenzini, E C

    2014-01-01

    A cryogenic differential accelerometer has been developed to test the weak equivalence principle to a few parts in 10(15) within the framework of the general relativity accuracy test in an Einstein elevator experiment. The prototype sensor was designed to identify, address, and solve the major issues associated with various aspects of the experiment. This paper illustrates the measurements conducted on this prototype sensor to attain a high quality factor (Q ∼ 10(5)) at low frequencies (<20 Hz). Such a value is necessary for reducing the Brownian noise to match the target acceleration noise of 10(-14) g/√Hz, hence providing the desired experimental accuracy.

  20. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Exploration for Groundwater on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Water with even a small amount of dissolved solids has an electrical conductivity orders of magnitude higher than dry rock and is therefore a near-ideal exploration target on Mars for low frequency, diffusive electromagnetic methods. Models of the temperature- and frequency-dependent electrical properties of rock-ice-water mixtures are used to predict the electromagnetic response of the Martian subsurface. Detection of ice is difficult unless it is massively segregated. In contrast, liquid water profoundly affects soundings, and even a small amount of adsorbed water in the cryosphere can be detected. Subcryospheric water is readily distinguishable at frequencies as low as 100 Hz for fresh water to 10 mHz for brines. These responses can be measured using either natural or artificial sources. Ultra low frequency signals from solar wind and diurnal-heating perturbations of the ionosphere are likely, and disturbances of regional crustal magnetic fields may also be observable. Spherics, or extremely to very low frequency signals from lightning discharge, would provide optimal soundings; however, lightning may be the least likely of the possible natural sources. Among the active techniques, only the time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) method can accommodate a closely spaced transmitter and receiver and sound to depths of hundreds of meters or more. A ground- or aircraft-based TDEM system of several kilograms can detect water to a depth of several hundred meters, and a system of tens of kilograms featuring a large, fixed, rover- or ballistically deployed loop can detect water to several kilometers depth.

  1. Low frequency acoustic properties of Posidonia oceanica seagrass leaf blades

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jay R.; Venegas, Gabriel R.; Wilson, Preston S.; Hermand, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The acoustics of seagrass meadows impacts naval and oceanographic sonar applications. To study this environment, a one-dimensional resonator was used to assess the low-frequency (1–5 kHz) acoustic response of the leaf blades of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica in water. Three separate collections of plants from Crete, Greece, and Sicily, Italy were investigated. A high consistency in effective sound speed was observed within each collection while a strong variability was observed between different collections. Average size, mass, and epiphytic coverage within each collection were quantified, and discoloration and stiffness are discussed qualitatively with respect to the observed acoustic variability. PMID:28618796

  2. Weak low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations in water.

    PubMed

    Liboff, A R; Poggi, Claudio; Pratesi, Piero

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations of low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations in water suggest an inductive structural component. Accordingly, we assume a helical basis enabling us to model water as an LC tuned oscillator. A proposed tetrahedral structure consisting of three water molecules and one hydronium ion is incorporated into the Boerdijk-Coxeter tetrahelix to form long water chains that are shown to have resonance frequencies consistent with observation. This model also serves to explain separately reported claims of ion cyclotron resonance of hydronium ions, in that the tetrahelix provides a built-in path for helical proton-hopping.

  3. Infrasonic and low-frequency insert earphone hearing threshold.

    PubMed

    Kuehler, Robert; Fedtke, Thomas; Hensel, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Low-frequency and infrasonic pure-tone monaural hearing threshold data down to 2.5 Hz are presented. These measurements were made by means of a newly developed insert-earphone source. The source is able to generate pure-tone sound pressure levels up to 130 dB between 2 and 250 Hz with very low harmonic distortions. Behavioral hearing thresholds were determined in the frequency range from 2.5 to 125 Hz for 18 otologically normal test persons. The median hearing thresholds are comparable to values given in the literature. They are intended for stimulus calibration in subsequent brain imaging investigations.

  4. Fetal exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cech, R.; Leitgeb, N.; Pediaditis, M.

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields with pregnant women and in particular with the fetus, an anatomical voxel model of an 89 kg woman at week 30 of pregnancy was developed. Intracorporal electric current density distributions due to exposure to homogeneous 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields were calculated and results were compared with basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP guidelines. It could be shown that the basic restriction is met within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother at exposure to reference level of either electric or magnetic fields. However, within the fetus the basic restriction is considerably exceeded. Revision of reference levels might be necessary.

  5. Compton interaction of free electrons with intense low frequency radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A. F.; Kompaneyets, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    Electron behavior in an intense low frequency radiation field, with induced Compton scattering as the primary mechanism of interaction, is investigated. Evolution of the electron energy spectrum is studied, and the equilibrium spectrum of relativistic electrons in a radiation field with high brightness temperature is found. The induced radiation pressure and heating rate of an electron gas are calculated. The direction of the induced pressure depends on the radiation spectrum. The form of spectrum, under the induced force can accelerate electrons to superrelativistic energies is found.

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation into structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yan; Liu, Yuyou

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational energy is transmitted in buried fluid-filled pipes in a variety of wave types. Axisymmetric (n = 0) waves are of practical interest in the application of acoustic techniques for the detection of leaks in underground pipelines. At low frequencies n = 0 waves propagate longitudinally as fluid-dominated (s = 1) and shell-dominated (s = 2) waves. Whilst sensors such as hydrophones and accelerometers are commonly used to detect leaks in water distribution pipes, the mechanism governing the structural and fluid motions is not well documented. In this paper, the low-frequency behaviour of the pipe wall and the contained fluid is investigated. For most practical pipework systems, these two waves are strongly coupled; in this circumstance the ratios of the radial pipe wall displacements along with the internal pressures associated with these two wave types are obtained. Numerical examples show the relative insensitivity of the structural and fluid motions to the s = 2 wave for both metallic and plastic pipes buried in two typical soils. It is also demonstrated that although both acoustic and vibration sensors at the same location provide the identical phase information of the transmitted signals, pressure responses have significantly higher levels than acceleration responses, and thus hydrophones are better suited in a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environment. This is supported by experimental work carried out at a leak detection facility. Additional pressure measurements involved excitation of the fluid and the pipe fitting (hydrant) on a dedicated water pipe. This work demonstrates that the s = 1 wave is mainly responsible for the structural and fluid motions at low frequencies in water distribution pipes as a result of water leakage and direct pipe excitation.

  7. Gender Identification Using High-Frequency Speech Energy: Effects of Increasing the Low-Frequency Limit.

    PubMed

    Donai, Jeremy J; Halbritter, Rachel M

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of normal-hearing listeners to use high-frequency energy for gender identification from naturally produced speech signals. Two experiments were conducted using a repeated-measures design. Experiment 1 investigated the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff (i.e., increasing the low-frequency spectral limit) on gender identification from naturally produced vowel segments. Experiment 2 studied the effects of increasing high-pass filter cutoff on gender identification from naturally produced sentences. Confidence ratings for the gender identification task were also obtained for both experiments. Listeners in experiment 1 were capable of extracting talker gender information at levels significantly above chance from vowel segments high-pass filtered up to 8.5 kHz. Listeners in experiment 2 also performed above chance on the gender identification task from sentences high-pass filtered up to 12 kHz. Cumulatively, the results of both experiments provide evidence that normal-hearing listeners can utilize information from the very high-frequency region (above 4 to 5 kHz) of the speech signal for talker gender identification. These findings are at variance with current assumptions regarding the perceptual information regarding talker gender within this frequency region. The current results also corroborate and extend previous studies of the use of high-frequency speech energy for perceptual tasks. These findings have potential implications for the study of information contained within the high-frequency region of the speech spectrum and the role this region may play in navigating the auditory scene, particularly when the low-frequency portion of the spectrum is masked by environmental noise sources or for listeners with substantial hearing loss in the low-frequency region and better hearing sensitivity in the high-frequency region (i.e., reverse slope hearing loss).

  8. Aircraft gas-turbine engines: noise reduction and vibration control. January 1973-November 1988 (Citations from Information Services in Mechanical Engineering data base). Report for January 1973-November 1988

    SciT

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design of aircraft gas-turbine engines with respect to noise reduction and vibration control. The aerodynamics of inlet design is presented for several types of engine applications including turbofan, turboprop, and vertical takeoff and landing aircraft. Helicopter engines are excluded from this bibliography. (This updated bibliography contains 212 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  9. Optimization of low frequency sound absorption by cell size control and multiscale poroacoustics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ju Hyuk; Yang, Sei Hyun; Lee, Hyeong Rae; Yu, Cheng Bin; Pak, Seong Yeol; Oh, Chi Sung; Kang, Yeon June; Youn, Jae Ryoun

    2017-06-01

    Sound absorption of a polyurethane (PU) foam was predicted for various geometries to fabricate the optimum microstructure of a sound absorbing foam. Multiscale numerical analysis for sound absorption was carried out by solving flow problems in representative unit cell (RUC) and the pressure acoustics equation using Johnson-Champoux-Allard (JCA) model. From the numerical analysis, theoretical optimum cell diameter for low frequency sound absorption was evaluated in the vicinity of 400 μm under the condition of 2 cm-80 K (thickness of 2 cm and density of 80 kg/m3) foam. An ultrasonic foaming method was employed to modulate microcellular structure of PU foam. Mechanical activation was only employed to manipulate the internal structure of PU foam without any other treatment. A mean cell diameter of PU foam was gradually decreased with increase in the amplitude of ultrasonic waves. It was empirically found that the reduction of mean cell diameter induced by the ultrasonic wave enhances acoustic damping efficiency in low frequency ranges. Moreover, further analyses were performed with several acoustic evaluation factors; root mean square (RMS) values, noise reduction coefficients (NRC), and 1/3 octave band spectrograms.

  10. Composite 3D-printed metastructures for low-frequency and broadband vibration absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Bauhofer, Anton; Krödel, Sebastian; Palermo, Antonio; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Architected materials that control elastic wave propagation are essential in vibration mitigation and sound attenuation. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials use band-gap engineering to forbid certain frequencies from propagating through a material. However, existing solutions are limited in the low-frequency regimes and in their bandwidth of operation because they require impractical sizes and masses. Here, we present a class of materials (labeled elastic metastructures) that supports the formation of wide and low-frequency band gaps, while simultaneously reducing their global mass. To achieve these properties, the metastructures combine local resonances with structural modes of a periodic architected lattice. Whereas the band gaps in these metastructures are induced by Bragg scattering mechanisms, their key feature is that the band-gap size and frequency range can be controlled and broadened through local resonances, which are linked to changes in the lattice geometry. We demonstrate these principles experimentally, using advanced additive manufacturing methods, and inform our designs using finite-element simulations. This design strategy has a broad range of applications, including control of structural vibrations, noise, and shock mitigation.

  11. A programmable broadband low frequency active vibration isolation system for atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Zhou, Lin; Xiong, Zongyuan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2014-09-01

    Vibration isolation at low frequency is important for some precision measurement experiments that use atom interferometry. To decrease the vibrational noise caused by the reflecting mirror of Raman beams in atom interferometry, we designed and demonstrated a compact stable active low frequency vibration isolation system. In this system, a digital control subsystem is used to process and feedback the vibration measured by a seismometer. A voice coil actuator is used to control and cancel the motion of a commercial passive vibration isolation platform. With the help of field programmable gate array-based control subsystem, the vibration isolation system performed flexibly and accurately. When the feedback is on, the intrinsic resonance frequency of the system will change from 0.8 Hz to about 0.015 Hz. The vertical vibration (0.01-10 Hz) measured by the in-loop seismometer is reduced by an additional factor of up to 500 on the basis of a passive vibration isolation platform, and we have proved the performance by adding an additional seismometer as well as applying it in the atom interferometry experiment.

  12. The Engineering Development Array: A Low Frequency Radio Telescope Utilising SKA Precursor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayth, Randall; Sokolowski, Marcin; Booler, Tom; Crosse, Brian; Emrich, David; Grootjans, Robert; Hall, Peter J.; Horsley, Luke; Juswardy, Budi; Kenney, David; Steele, Kim; Sutinjo, Adrian; Tingay, Steven J.; Ung, Daniel; Walker, Mia; Williams, Andrew; Beardsley, A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Pallot, D.; Trott, C. M.; Wu, C.

    2017-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Engineering Development Array, which is a low-frequency radio telescope comprising 256 dual-polarisation dipole antennas working as a phased array. The Engineering Development Array was conceived of, developed, and deployed in just 18 months via re-use of Square Kilometre Array precursor technology and expertise, specifically from the Murchison Widefield Array radio telescope. Using drift scans and a model for the sky brightness temperature at low frequencies, we have derived the Engineering Development Array's receiver temperature as a function of frequency. The Engineering Development Array is shown to be sky-noise limited over most of the frequency range measured between 60 and 240 MHz. By using the Engineering Development Array in interferometric mode with the Murchison Widefield Array, we used calibrated visibilities to measure the absolute sensitivity of the array. The measured array sensitivity matches very well with a model based on the array layout and measured receiver temperature. The results demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of using Murchison Widefield Array-style precursor technology for Square Kilometre Array-scale stations. The modular architecture of the Engineering Development Array allows upgrades to the array to be rolled out in a staged approach. Future improvements to the Engineering Development Array include replacing the second stage beamformer with a fully digital system, and to transition to using RF-over-fibre for the signal output from first stage beamformers.

  13. Resonant modal group theory of membrane-type acoustical metamaterials for low-frequency sound attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng

    2015-09-01

    In order to overcome the influence of the structural resonance on the continuous structures and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure which can effectively isolate the low-frequency noises, an elastic membrane structure was proposed. In the low-frequency range below 500 Hz, the sound transmission loss (STL) of this membrane type structure is greatly higher than that of the current sound insulation material EVA (ethylene-vinyl acetate copo) of vehicle, so it is possible to replace the EVA by the membrane-type metamaterial structure in practice engineering. Based on the band structure, modal shapes, as well as the sound transmission simulation, the sound insulation mechanism of the designed membrane-type acoustic metamaterials was analyzed from a new perspective, which had been validated experimentally. It is suggested that in the frequency range above 200 Hz for this membrane-mass type structure, the sound insulation effect was principally not due to the low-level locally resonant mode of the mass block, but the continuous vertical resonant modes of the localized membrane. So based on such a physical property, a resonant modal group theory is initially proposed in this paper. In addition, the sound insulation mechanism of the membrane-type structure and thin plate structure were combined by the membrane/plate resonant theory.

  14. Electrohydrodynamic deposition of polymeric droplets under low-frequency pulsation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Xiang; Lei, Tingping; Sun, Daoheng; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-17

    Circularly shaped polymeric droplets with diameter of about 20 μm have been intermittently ejected and deposited in an orderly manner on a collector from a syringe needle by means of near-field, electrohydrodynamic reactions using pulsating voltages at around 2.25 kV. The needle has an inner diameter of 100 μm and was placed 1 mm above a silicon conductor substrate to have location control for droplet depositions. Under low-frequency operation of less than 100 Hz, the deposition frequency of droplets, f(dep), has been observed to be equal to the frequency of the applied driving voltage divided by an integer, N, as small as 1. Furthermore, the diameter of the deposited droplets has been found to be linearly dependent on (Q/f(dep))(1/3), where Q is the polymer solution supply rate at around 30 nL/s. These experimentally observed droplet ejection rules under low-frequency pulsation provide useful design guidelines for controllable deposition of polymer droplets in various potential applications, including electrohydrodynamic printing.

  15. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  16. Current Status of The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, Louis; Creighton, Teviet; Jenet, Fredrick; Dolch, Timothy; Boehler, Keith; Bres, Luis; Cole, Brent; Luo, Jing; Miller, Rossina; Murray, James; Reyes, Alex; Rivera, Jesse

    2018-01-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of cross-dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. LoFASM consists of antennas and front end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of 4 stations, each consisting of 12 dual- polarization dipole antenna stands. The primary science goals of LoFASM will be the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council’s ASTRO2010 decadal survey. The data acquisition system for the LoFASM antenna array uses Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to implement a real time full Stokes spectrometer and data recorder. This poster presents an overview of the LoFASM Radio Telescope as well as the status of data analysis of initial commissioning observations.

  17. Low frequency wave propagation in a cold magnetized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S.; Ghosh, S.; Khan, M.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper several characteristics of low frequency waves in a cold magnetized dusty plasma propagating parallel and perpendicular to the static background magnetic field have been investigated. In the case of parallel propagation the negatively charged dust particles resonate with the right circularly polarized (RCP) component of em waves when the wave frequency equals the dust cyclotron frequency. It has been shown that an RCP wave in dusty plasma consists of two branches and there exists a region where an RCP wave propagation is not possible. Dispersion relation, phase velocity and group velocity of RCP waves have been obtained and propagation characteristics have been shown graphically. Poynting flux and Faraday rotation angles have been calculated for both lower and upper branches of the RCP wave. It has been observed that sense of rotation of the plane of polarization of the RCP wave corresponding to two distinct branches are opposite. Finally, the effect of dust particles on the induced magnetization from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) due to the interaction of low frequency propagating and standing em waves with dusty plasmas has been evaluated.

  18. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation.

    PubMed

    Olson, P

    2007-12-18

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions.

  19. The trigger mechanism of low-frequency earthquakes on Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberg, J. W.; Tuffen, H.; Collier, L.; Green, D.; Powell, T.; Dingwell, D.

    2006-05-01

    A careful analysis of low-frequency seismic events on Soufrièere Hills volcano, Montserrat, points to a source mechanism that is non-destructive, repetitive, and has a stationary source location. By combining these seismological clues with new field evidence and numerical magma flow modelling, we propose a seismic trigger model which is based on brittle failure of magma in the glass transition. Loss of heat and gas from the magma results in a strong viscosity gradient across a dyke or conduit. This leads to a build-up of shear stress near the conduit wall where magma can rupture in a brittle manner, as field evidence from a rhyolitic dyke demonstrates. This brittle failure provides seismic energy, the majority of which is trapped in the conduit or dyke forming the low-frequency coda of the observed seismic signal. The trigger source location marks the transition from ductile conduit flow to friction-controlled magma ascent. As the trigger mechanism is governed by the depth-dependent magma parameters, the source location remains fixed at a depth where the conditions allow brittle failure. This is reflected in the fixed seismic source locations.

  20. Alternative source models of very low frequency events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J.; Agnew, D. C.; Schwartz, S. Y.

    2016-09-01

    We present alternative source models for very low frequency (VLF) events, previously inferred to be radiation from individual slow earthquakes that partly fill the period range between slow slip events lasting thousands of seconds and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) with durations of tenths of a second. We show that VLF events may emerge from bandpass filtering a sum of clustered, shorter duration, LFE signals, believed to be the components of tectonic tremor. Most published studies show VLF events occurring concurrently with tremor bursts and LFE signals. Our analysis of continuous data from Costa Rica detected VLF events only when tremor was also occurring, which was only 7% of the total time examined. Using analytic and synthetic models, we show that a cluster of LFE signals produces the distinguishing characteristics of VLF events, which may be determined by the cluster envelope. The envelope may be diagnostic of a single, dynamic, slowly slipping event that propagates coherently over kilometers or represents a narrowly band-passed version of nearly simultaneous arrivals of radiation from slip on multiple higher stress drop and/or faster propagating slip patches with dimensions of tens of meters (i.e., LFE sources). Temporally clustered LFE sources may be triggered by single or multiple distinct aseismic slip events or represent the nearly simultaneous chance occurrence of background LFEs. Given the nonuniqueness in possible source durations, we suggest it is premature to draw conclusions about VLF event sources or how they scale.

  1. Low frequency mechanical actuation accelerates reperfusion in-vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rapid restoration of vessel patency after acute myocardial infarction is key to reducing myocardial muscle death and increases survival rates. Standard therapies include thrombolysis and direct PTCA. Alternative or adjunctive emergency therapies that could be initiated by minimally trained personnel in the field are of potential clinical benefit. This paper evaluates a method of accelerating reperfusion through application of low frequency mechanical stimulus to the blood carrying vessels. Materials and method We consider a stenosed, heparinized flow system with aortic-like pressure variations subject to direct vessel vibration at the occlusion site or vessel deformation proximal and distal to the occlusion site, versus a reference system lacking any form of mechanical stimulus on the vessels. Results The experimental results show limited effectiveness of the direct mechanical vibration method and a drastic increase in the patency rate when vessel deformation is induced. For vessel deformation at occlusion site 95% of clots perfused within 11 minutes of application of mechanical stimulus, for vessel deformation 60 centimeters from the occlusion site 95% percent of clots perfused within 16 minutes of stimulus application, while only 2.3% of clots perfused within 20 minutes in the reference system. Conclusion The presented in-vitro results suggest that low frequency mechanical actuation applied during the pre-hospitalization phase in patients with acute myocardial infarction have potential of being a simple and efficient adjunct therapy. PMID:24257116

  2. Functional subdivisions in low-frequency primary auditory cortex (AI).

    PubMed

    Wallace, M N; Palmer, A R

    2009-04-01

    We wished to test the hypothesis that there are modules in low-frequency AI that can be identified by their responsiveness to communication calls or particular regions of space. Units were recorded in anaesthetised guinea pig AI and stimulated with conspecific vocalizations and a virtual motion stimulus (binaural beats) presented via a closed sound system. Recording tracks were mainly oriented orthogonally to the cortical surface. Some of these contained units that were all time-locked to the structure of the chutter call (14/22 tracks) and/or the purr call (12/22 tracks) and/or that had a preference for stimuli from a particular region of space (8/20 tracks with four contralateral, two ipsilateral and two midline), or where there was a strong asymmetry in the response to beats of different direction (two tracks). We conclude that about half of low-frequency AI is organized into modules that are consistent with separate "what" and "where" pathways.

  3. Passive Super-Low Frequency electromagnetic prospecting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhao, Shanshan; Hui, Jian; Qin, Qiming

    2017-03-01

    The Super-Low Frequency (SLF) electromagnetic prospecting technique, adopted as a non-imaging remote sensing tool for depth sounding, is systematically proposed for subsurface geological survey. In this paper, we propose and theoretically illustrate natural source magnetic amplitudes as SLF responses for the first step. In order to directly calculate multi-dimensional theoretical SLF responses, modeling algorithms were developed and evaluated using the finite difference method. The theoretical results of three-dimensional (3-D) models show that the average normalized SLF magnetic amplitude responses were numerically stable and appropriate for practical interpretation. To explore the depth resolution, three-layer models were configured. The modeling results prove that the SLF technique is more sensitive to conductive objective layers than high resistive ones, with the SLF responses of conductive objective layers obviously showing uprising amplitudes in the low frequency range. Afterwards, we proposed an improved Frequency-Depth transformation based on Bostick inversion to realize the depth sounding by empirically adjusting two parameters. The SLF technique has already been successfully applied in geothermal exploration and coalbed methane (CBM) reservoir interpretation, which demonstrates that the proposed methodology is effective in revealing low resistive distributions. Furthermore, it siginificantly contributes to reservoir identification with electromagnetic radiation anomaly extraction. Meanwhile, the SLF interpretation results are in accordance with dynamic production status of CBM reservoirs, which means it could provide an economical, convenient and promising method for exploring and monitoring subsurface geo-objects.

  4. Alternative source models of very low frequency events

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Agnew, D.C.; Schwartz, S.Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present alternative source models for very low frequency (VLF) events, previously inferred to be radiation from individual slow earthquakes that partly fill the period range between slow slip events lasting thousands of seconds and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) with durations of tenths of a second. We show that VLF events may emerge from bandpass filtering a sum of clustered, shorter duration, LFE signals, believed to be the components of tectonic tremor. Most published studies show VLF events occurring concurrently with tremor bursts and LFE signals. Our analysis of continuous data from Costa Rica detected VLF events only when tremor was also occurring, which was only 7% of the total time examined. Using analytic and synthetic models, we show that a cluster of LFE signals produces the distinguishing characteristics of VLF events, which may be determined by the cluster envelope. The envelope may be diagnostic of a single, dynamic, slowly slipping event that propagates coherently over kilometers or represents a narrowly band-passed version of nearly simultaneous arrivals of radiation from slip on multiple higher stress drop and/or faster propagating slip patches with dimensions of tens of meters (i.e., LFE sources). Temporally clustered LFE sources may be triggered by single or multiple distinct aseismic slip events or represent the nearly simultaneous chance occurrence of background LFEs. Given the nonuniqueness in possible source durations, we suggest it is premature to draw conclusions about VLF event sources or how they scale.

  5. Wideband, low-frequency springless vibration energy harvesters: part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendame, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Soliman, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel architecture for wideband and low-frequency vibration energy harvesting (VEH). Springless vibration energy harvesters (SVEH) employ impact oscillators as energy harvesting elements. A seismic mass moves along a linear guide limited by stoppers at both ends of the track. An electromagnetic transducer converts the kinetic energy captured by the mass into electrical energy. Experiments using prototypes of the horizontal SVEH demonstrated low frequency harvesting (<20 Hz), wideband harvesting (up to 6.0 Hz), and an optimal rectified output power of P  =  12 mW for a base acceleration amplitude of 0.5 g. A model of the electromagnetic SVEH was developed and validated experimentally. A figure of merit was defined to quantify realizable output power in linear and nonlinear VEHs. Comparison using this figure of merit shows that electromagnetic SVEHs outperform their linear counterparts by 92%-232% for acceleration amplitudes in the range of 0.4-0.6 g.

  6. Technologies for Low Frequency Radio Observations of the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Dayton L.

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing concepts and technologies for low frequency radio astronomy space missions aimed at observing highly redshifted neutral Hydrogen from the Dark Ages. This is the period of cosmic history between the recombination epoch when the microwave background radiation was produced and the re-ionization of the intergalactic medium by the first generation of stars (Cosmic Dawn). This period, at redshifts greater than about 20, is a critical epoch for the formation and evolution of large-scale structure in the universe. The 21-cm spectral line of Hydrogen provides the most promising method for directly studying the Dark Ages, but the corresponding frequencies at such large redshifts are only tens of MHz and thus require space-based observations to avoid terrestrial RFI and ionospheric absorption and refraction. This paper reports on the status of several low frequency technology development activities at JPL, including deployable bi-conical dipoles for a planned lunar-orbiting mission, and both rover-deployed and inflation-deployed long dipole antennas for use on the lunar surface.

  7. A Digital Backend for the Low Frequency All Sky Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartez, L. P.

    2014-04-01

    The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM) is a distributed array of dipole antennas that are sensitive to radio frequencies from 10 to 88 MHz. The primary science goals of LoFASM are the detection and study of low-frequency radio transients, a high priority science goal as deemed by the National Research Council's decadal survey. LoFASM consists of antennas and front-end electronics that were originally developed for the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) by the U.S. Naval Research Lab, the University of New Mexico, Virginia Tech, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. LoFASM, funded by the U.S. Department of Defense, will initially consist of four stations, each consisting of 12 dual-polarization dipole antennas. In a single station, RF signals from each of the individual LoFASM dipoles are combined in phase in order to synthesize LoFASM's beam. The LoFASM RF signals are phased up so that the resulting beam is sensitive to radio emission that originates from the zenith and RF signals approaching from the horizon are attenuated. Digitally, this is achieved using a full Stokes 100MHz correlating spectrometer constructed using field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology. In this thesis I will describe the design and usage of the LoFASM Correlator.

  8. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    PubMed Central

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  9. Factors constraining the benefit to speech understanding of combining information from low-frequency hearing and a cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Michael F; Cook, Sarah; Spahr, Anthony; Zhang, Ting; Loiselle, Louise; Schramm, David; Whittingham, JoAnne; Gifford, Rene

    2015-04-01

    Many studies have documented the benefits to speech understanding when cochlear implant (CI) patients can access low-frequency acoustic information from the ear opposite the implant. In this study we assessed the role of three factors in determining the magnitude of bimodal benefit - (i) the level of CI-only performance, (ii) the magnitude of the hearing loss in the ear with low-frequency acoustic hearing and (iii) the type of test material. The patients had low-frequency PTAs (average of 125, 250 and 500 Hz) varying over a large range (<30 dB HL to >70 dB HL) in the ear contralateral to the implant. The patients were tested with (i) CNC words presented in quiet (n = 105) (ii) AzBio sentences presented in quiet (n = 102), (iii) AzBio sentences in noise at +10 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) (n = 69), and (iv) AzBio sentences at +5 dB SNR (n = 64). We find maximum bimodal benefit when (i) CI scores are less than 60 percent correct, (ii) hearing loss is less than 60 dB HL in low-frequencies and (iii) the test material is sentences presented against a noise background. When these criteria are met, some bimodal patients can gain 40-60 percentage points in performance relative to performance with a CI. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Wind Turbine Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Wind turbine generators, ranging in size from a few kilowatts to several megawatts, are producing electricity both singly and in wind power stations that encompass hundreds of machines. Many installations are in uninhabited areas far from established residences, and therefore there are no apparent environmental impacts in terms of noise. There is, however, the potential for situations in which the radiated noise can be heard by residents of adjacent neighborhoods, particularly those neighborhoods with low ambient noise levels. A widely publicized incident of this nature occurred with the operation of the experimental Mod-1 2-MW wind turbine, which is described in detail elsewhere. Pioneering studies which were conducted at the Mod-1 site on the causes and remedies of noise from wind turbines form the foundation of much of the technology described in this chapter.

  11. Evaluation of a method for enhancing interaural level differences at low frequencies.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Kolarik, Andrew; Stone, Michael A; Lee, Young-Woo

    2016-10-01

    A method (called binaural enhancement) for enhancing interaural level differences at low frequencies, based on estimates of interaural time differences, was developed and evaluated. Five conditions were compared, all using simulated hearing-aid processing: (1) Linear amplification with frequency-response shaping; (2) binaural enhancement combined with linear amplification and frequency-response shaping; (3) slow-acting four-channel amplitude compression with independent compression at the two ears (AGC4CH); (4) binaural enhancement combined with four-channel compression (BE-AGC4CH); and (5) four-channel compression but with the compression gains synchronized across ears. Ten hearing-impaired listeners were tested, and gains and compression ratios for each listener were set to match targets prescribed by the CAM2 fitting method. Stimuli were presented via headphones, using virtualization methods to simulate listening in a moderately reverberant room. The intelligibility of speech at ±60° azimuth in the presence of competing speech on the opposite side of the head at ±60° azimuth was not affected by the binaural enhancement processing. Sound localization was significantly better for condition BE-AGC4CH than for condition AGC4CH for a sentence, but not for broadband noise, lowpass noise, or lowpass amplitude-modulated noise. The results suggest that the binaural enhancement processing can improve localization for sounds with distinct envelope fluctuations.

  12. Error Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor Combing with Coriolis Effect at Low Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yue; Xu, Mengjie; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Tuo, Weixiao; Wu, Jun; Dong, Jiuzhi

    2018-06-13

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) angular rate sensor (ARS) with low noise level in ultra-wide bandwidth is developed in lasing and imaging applications, especially the line-of-sight (LOS) system. A modified MHD ARS combined with the Coriolis effect was studied in this paper to expand the sensor’s bandwidth at low frequency (<1 Hz), which is essential for precision LOS pointing and wide-bandwidth LOS jitter suppression. The model and the simulation method were constructed and a comprehensive solving method based on the magnetic and electric interaction methods was proposed. The numerical results on the Coriolis effect and the frequency response of the modified MHD ARS were detailed. In addition, according to the experimental results of the designed sensor consistent with the simulation results, an error analysis of model errors was discussed. Our study provides an error analysis method of MHD ARS combined with the Coriolis effect and offers a framework for future studies to minimize the error.

  13. Low-frequency, self-sustained oscillations in inductively coupled plasmas used for optical pumping

    SciT

    Coffer, J.; Encalada, N.; Huang, M.

    We have investigated very low frequency, on the order of one hertz, self-pulsing in alkali-metal inductively-coupled plasmas (i.e., rf-discharge lamps). This self-pulsing has the potential to significantly vary signal-to-noise ratios and (via the ac-Stark shift) resonant frequencies in optically pumped atomic clocks and magnetometers (e.g., the atomic clocks now flying on GPS and Galileo global navigation system satellites). The phenomenon arises from a nonlinear interaction between the atomic physics of radiation trapping and the plasma's electrical nature. To explain the effect, we have developed an evaporation/condensation theory (EC theory) of the self-pulsing phenomenon.

  14. Theoretical aspects and the experience of studying spectra of low-frequency microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birialtsev, E.; Vildanov, A.; Eronina, E.; Rizhov, D.; Rizhov, V.; Sharapov, I.

    2009-04-01

    The appearance of low-frequency spectral anomalies in natural microseismic noise over oil and gas deposits is observed since 1989 in different oil and gas regions (S. Arutunov, S. Dangel, G. Goloshubin). Several methods of prospecting and exploration of oil and gas deposits based on this effect (NTK ANCHAR, Spectraseis AG). There are several points of view (S. Arutunov, E. Birialtsev, Y. Podladchikov) about the physical model of effect which are based on fundamentally different geophysical mechanisms. One of them is based on the hypothesis of generation of the microseismic noise in to an oil and gas reservoir. Another point of view is based on the mechanism of the filtering microseismic noise in the geological medium where oil and gas reservoir is the contrast layer. For the first hypothesis an adequate quantity physical-mathematical model is absent. Second hypothesis has a discrepancy of distribution energy on theoretical calculated frequencies of waveguides «ground surface - oil deposit» eigenmodes. The fundamental frequency (less than 1 Hz for most cases) should have a highest amplitude as opposed to the regular observation range is 1-10 Hz. During 2005-2008 years by specialists of «Gradient» JSC were processed microsesmic signals from more 50 geological objects. The parameters of low-frequency anomalies were compared with medium properties (porosity, saturation and viscosity) defined according to drilling, allowed to carry out a statistical analysis and to establish some correlation. This paper presents results of theoretical calculation of spectra of microseisms in the zone of oil and gas deposits by mathematical modeling of propagation of seismic waves and comparing spectra of model microseisms with actually observed. Mathematical modeling of microseismic vibrations spectra showed good correlation of theoretical spectra and observed in practice. This is proof the applicability of microseismic methods of exploration for oil and gas. Correlation between

  15. Flexible and elastic metamaterial absorber for low frequency, based on small-size unit cell

    SciT

    Yoo, Y. J.; Zheng, H. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2014-07-28

    Using a planar and flexible metamaterial (MM), we obtained the low-frequency perfect absorption even with very small unit-cell size in snake-shape structure. These shrunken, deep-sub-wavelength and thin MM absorbers were numerically and experimentally investigated by increasing the inductance. The periodicity/thickness (the figure of merit for perfect absorption) is achieved to be 10 and 2 for single-snake-bar and 5-snake-bar structures, respectively. The ratio between periodicity and resonance wavelength (in mm) is close to 1/12 and 1/30 at 2 GHz and 400 MHz, respectively. The absorbers are specially designed for absorption peaks around 2 GHz and 400 MHz, which can be used for depressing the electromagneticmore » noise from everyday electronic devices and mobile phones.« less

  16. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body

    PubMed Central

    Elfekey, Hatem; Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Okamoto, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body—because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies—resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard. PMID:27918416

  17. Cellular and molecular pathways of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field interactions with living systems

    SciT

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    There is growing evidence that environmental electric and magnetic fields in the extremely-low-frequency (ELF) band below 300 Hz can influence biological functions by mechanisms that are only poorly understood at the present time. The primary objectives of this paper are to review the physical properties of ELF fields, their interactions with living systems at the tissue, cellular, and subcellular levels, and the key role of cell membranes ;in the transduction of signals from imposed ELF fields. Topics of discussion include signal-to-noise ratios for single cells and cell aggregates, resonance phenomena involving a combination of static and ELF magnetic fields, andmore » the possible influence of ELF fields on molecular signaling pathways that involve membrane receptors and cytoplasmic second messengers.« less

  18. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body.

    PubMed

    Elfekey, Hatem; Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Okamoto, Shogo

    2016-12-02

    Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body-because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies-resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard.

  19. Low frequency radio synthesis imaging of the galactic center region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Michael Evans

    2005-11-01

    The Very Large Array radio interferometer has been equipped with new receivers to allow observations at 330 and 74 MHz, frequencies much lower than were previously possible with this instrument. Though the VLA dishes are not optimal for working at these frequencies, the system is successful and regular observations are now taken at these frequencies. However, new data analysis techniques are required to work at these frequencies. The technique of self- calibration, used to remove small atmospheric effects at higher frequencies, has been adapted to compensate for ionospheric turbulence in much the same way that adaptive optics is used in the optical regime. Faceted imaging techniques are required to compensate for the noncoplanar image distortion that affects the system due to the wide fields of view at these frequencies (~2.3° at 330 MHz and ~11° at 74 MHz). Furthermore, radio frequency interference is a much larger problem at these frequencies than in higher frequencies and novel approaches to its mitigation are required. These new techniques and new system are allowing for imaging of the radio sky at sensitivities and resolutions orders of magnitude higher than were possible with the low frequency systems of decades past. In this work I discuss the advancements in low frequency data techniques required to make high resolution, high sensitivity, large field of view measurements with the new Very Large Array low frequency system and then detail the results of turning this new system and techniques on the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. At 330 MHz I image the Galactic center region with roughly 10 inches resolution and 1.6 mJy beam -1 sensitivity. New Galactic center nonthermal filaments, new pulsar candidates, and the lowest frequency detection to date of the radio source associated with our Galaxy's central massive black hole result. At 74 MHz I image a region of the sky roughly 40° x 6° with, ~10 feet resolution. I use the high opacity of H II regions at 74

  20. Physiological and content considerations for a second low frequency channel for bass management, subwoofers, and low frequency enhancement (LFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert E. (Robin)

    2005-04-01

    Perception of very low frequencies (VLF) below 125 Hz reproduced by large woofers and subwoofers (SW), encompassing 3 octaves of the 10 regarded as audible, has physiological and content aspects. Large room acoustics and vibrato add VLF fluctuations, modulating audible carrier frequencies to >1 Hz. By convention, sounds below 90 Hz produce no interaural cues useful for spatial perception or localization, therefore bass management redirects the VLF range from main channels to a single (monaural) subwoofer channel, even if to more than one subwoofer. Yet subjects claim they hear a difference between a single subwoofer channel and two (stereo bass). If recordings contain spatial VLF content, is it possible physiologically to perceive interaural time/phase difference (ITD/IPD) between 16 and 125 Hz? To what extent does this perception have a lifelike quality; to what extent is it localization? If a first approximation of localization, would binaural SWs allow a higher crossover frequency (smaller satellite speakers)? Reported research supports the Jeffress model of ITD determination in brain structures, and extending the accepted lower frequency limit of IPD. Meanwhile, uncorrelated very low frequencies exist in all tested multi-channel music and movie content. The audibility, recording, and reproduction of uncorrelated VLF are explored in theory and experiments.

  1. Do GCM's predict the climate.... Or the low frequency weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Varon, D.

    2012-04-01

    Over twenty-five years ago, a three-regime scaling model was proposed describing the statistical variability of the atmosphere over time scales ranging from weather scales out to ≈ 100 kyrs. Using modern in situ data reanalyses, monthly surface series (at 5ox5o), 8 "multiproxy" (yearly) series of the Northern hemisphere from 1500 - 1980, and GRIP and Vostok paleotemperatures at 5.2 and ≈ 100 year resolutions (over the past 91-420 kyrs), we refine the model and show how it can be understood with the help of new developments in nonlinear dynamics, especially multifractals and cascades. In a scaling range, mean fluctuations in state variables such as temperature ΔT vary in power law manners ≈ Δt**H the where Δt is the duration. At small (weather) scales the fluctuation exponents are generally H>0; they grow with scale (Δt). At longer scales Δt >τw (≈ 10 days) H changes sign, the fluctuations decrease with scale; this is the low variability, "low frequency weather" regime. In this regime, the spectrum is a relatively flat "plateau", it's variability is low, stable, corresponding to our usual idea of "long term weather statistics". Finally for longer times, Δt>τc ≈ 10 - 100 years, once again H>0, so that the variability increases with scale: the true climate regime. These scaling regimes allow us to objectively define the weather as fluctuations over periods <τw, to define "climate states" as fluctuations at scale τc and then "climate change" as the fluctuations at longer periods (Δt>τc). We show that the intermediate low frequency weather regime is the result of the weather regime undergoing a "dimensional transition": at temporal scales longer than the typical lifetime of planetary structures (τw), the spatial degrees of freedom are rapidly quenched so that only the temporal degrees of freedom are important. This low frequency weather regime has statistical properties well reproduced not only by stochastic cascade models of weather, but also by

  2. Do GCM's Predict the Climate.... Or the Low Frequency Weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Varon, D.; Schertzer, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Over twenty-five years ago, a three-regime scaling model was proposed describing the statistical variability of the atmosphere over time scales ranging from weather scales out to ≈ 100 kyrs. Using modern in situ data reanalyses, monthly surface series (at 5ox5o), 8 "multiproxy" (yearly) series of the Northern hemisphere from 1500- 1980, and GRIP and Vostok paleotemperatures at 5.2 and ≈ 100 year resolutions (over the past 91-420 kyrs), we refine the model and show how it can be understood with the help of new developments in nonlinear dynamics, especially multifractals and cascades. In a scaling range, mean fluctuations in state variables such as temperature ΔT ≈ ΔtH the where Δt is the duration. At small (weather) scales the fluctuation exponents are generally H>0; they grow with scale. At longer scales Δt >τw (≈ 10 days) they change sign, the fluctuations decrease with scale; this is the low variability, "low frequency weather" regime the spectrum is a relatively flat "plateau", it's variability is that of the usual idea of "long term weather statistics". Finally for longer times, Δt>τc ≈ 10 - 100 years, again H>0, the variability again increases with scale. This is the true climate regime. These scaling regimes allow us to objectively define the weather as fluctuations over periods <τw, "climate states", as fluctuations at scale τc and "climate change" as the fluctuations at longer periods >τc). We show that the intermediate regime is the result of the weather regime undergoing a "dimensional transition": at temporal scales longer than the typical lifetime of planetary structures (τw), the spatial degrees of freedom are rapidly quenched, only the temporal degrees of freedom are important. This low frequency weather regime has statistical properties well reproduced not only by weather cascade models, but also by control runs (i.e. without climate forcing) of GCM's (including IPSL and ECHAM GCM's). In order for GCM's to go beyond simply

  3. Low-frequency switching in a transistor amplifier.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L

    2003-04-01

    It is known from extensive work with the diode resonator that the nonlinear properties of a P-N junction can lead to period doubling, chaos, and other complicated behaviors in a driven circuit. There has been very little work on what happens when more than one P-N junction is present. In this work, the first step towards multiple P-N junction circuits is taken by doing both experiments and simulations with a single-transistor amplifier using a bipolar transistor. Period doubling and chaos are seen when the amplifier is driven with signals between 100 kHz and 1 MHz, and they coincide with a very low frequency switching between different period doubled (or chaotic) wave forms. The switching frequencies are between 5 and 10 Hz. The switching behavior was confirmed in a simplified model of the transistor amplifier.

  4. Nonlinear beat excitation of low frequency wave in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Zahid; Shahid, M.; Jamil, M.; Rasheed, A.; Shahbaz, A.

    2018-03-01

    The beat phenomenon due to the coupling of two signals at slightly different frequencies that generates the low frequency signal is studied. The linear dispersive properties of the pump and sideband are analyzed. The modified nonlinear dispersion relation through the field coupling of linear modes against the beat frequency is derived in the homogeneous quantum dusty magnetoplasmas. The dispersion relation is used to derive the modified growth rate of three wave parametric instability. Moreover, significant quantum effects of electrons through the exchange-correlation potential, the Bohm potential, and the Fermi pressure evolved in macroscopic three wave interaction are presented. The analytical results are interpreted graphically describing the significance of the work. The applications of this study are pointed out at the end of introduction.

  5. A Low Frequency FBG Accelerometer with Symmetrical Bended Spring Plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fufei; Dai, Yutang; Karanja, Joseph Muna; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-22

    To meet the requirements for low-frequency vibration monitoring, a new type of FBG (fiber Bragg grating) accelerometer with a bended spring plate is proposed. Two symmetrical bended spring plates are used as elastic elements, which drive the FBG to produce axial strains equal in magnitude but opposite in direction when exciting vibrations exist, leading to doubling the wavelength shift of the FBG. The mechanics model and a numerical method are presented in this paper, with which the influence of the structural parameters on the sensitivity and the eigenfrequency are discussed. The test results show that the sensitivity of the accelerometer is more than 1000 pm/g when the frequency is within the 0.7-20 Hz range.

  6. Theory for low-frequency modulated Langmuir wave packets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir wave packets with low frequency modulations (or beats) observed in the Jovian foreshock are argued to be direct evidence for the Langmuir wave decay L yields L-prime + S. In this decay, 'pump' Langmuir waves L, driven by an electron beam, produce backscattered product Langmuir waves L-prime and ion sound waves S. The L and L-prime waves beat at the frequency and wavevector of the S waves, thereby modulating the wave packets. Beam speeds calculated using the modulated Jovian wave packets (1) are reasonable, at 4-10 times the electron thermal speed, (2) are consistent with theoretical limits on the decay process, and (3) decrease with increasing foreshock depth, as expected theoretically. These results strongly support the theory. The modulation depth of some wave packets suggests saturation by the decay L yields L-prime + S. Applications to modulated Langmuir packets in the Venusian and terrestrial foreshocks and in a type III radio source are proposed.

  7. Dissipative elastic metamaterial with a low-frequency passband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongquan; Yi, Jianlin; Li, Zheng; Su, Xianyue; Li, Wenlong; Negahban, Mehrdad

    2017-06-01

    We design and experimentally demonstrate a dissipative elastic metamaterial structure that functions as a bandpass filter with a low-frequency passband. The mechanism of dissipation in this structure is well described by a mass-spring-damper model that reveals that the imaginary part of the wavenumber is non-zero, even in the passband of dissipative metamaterials. This indicates that transmittance in this range can be low. A prototype for this viscoelastic metamaterial model is fabricated by 3D printing techniques using soft and hard acrylics as constituent materials. The transmittance of the printed metamaterial is measured and shows good agreement with theoretical predictions, demonstrating its potential in the design of compact waveguides, filters and other advanced devices for controlling mechanical waves.

  8. Resonant interactions between cometary ions and low frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Richard M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1987-01-01

    The conditions for resonant wave amplification in a plasma with a ring-beam distribution which is intended to model pick-up ions in a cometary environment are investigated. The inclination between the interplanetary field and the solar wind is found to play a crucial role in governing both the resonant frequency and the growth rate of any unstable mode. It is suggested that the low-frequency MHD mode should experience the most rapid amplification for intermediate inclination. In the frame of the solar wind, such waves should propagate along the field in the direction upstream toward the sun with a phase speed lower than the beaming velocity of the pick-up ions. This mechanism may account for the presence of the interior MHD waves noted by satellites over a region surrounding comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley.

  9. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in plant virus suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchenko, E. K.; Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Pershin, S. M.; Savichev, V. I.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-11-01

    The study deals with laser pulse interaction with plant viruses: we investigated tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and two types of potato viruses (PVX and PVA) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water. We used 20 ns ruby laser pulses for excitation. We employed Fabry-Pérot interferometers to record spectra of the light passing through the sample and reflected from it. For TMV and PVX in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer, same as for PVA in water, we observed additional spectral lines corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). We believe we were the first to measure SLFRS frequency shifts, conversion efficiency and threshold. High conversion efficiency of the scattered light is evidence of laser pulses efficiently exciting gigahertz vibrations in viruses. SLFRS can be used to identify and affect biological nanoparticles.

  10. Low frequency mechanical modes of viruses with atomic detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric; Sankey, Otto

    2008-03-01

    The low frequency mechanical modes of viruses can provide important insights into the large global motions that a virus may exhibit. Recently it has been proposed that these large global motions may be excited using impulsive stimulated Raman scattering producing permanent damage to the virus. In order to understand the coupling of external probes to the capsid, vibrational modes with atomic detail are essential. The standard approach to find the atomic modes of a molecule with N atoms requires the formation and diagonlization of a 3Nx3N matrix. As viruses have 10^5 or more atoms, the standard approach is difficult. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, we have developed a method to construct the mechanical modes of large molecules such as viruses with atomic detail. Application to viruses such as the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus, satellite tobacco necrosis virus, and M13 bacteriophage show a fairly complicated picture of the mechanical modes.

  11. Helix structure for low frequency acoustic energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Cao, Ziping; Luo, Jun; Pang, Zongqiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a novel helix acoustic resonator is proposed to realize acoustic energy harvesting (AEH). Compared with the traditional acoustic resonators, the proposed structure occupies a small volume and is suitable for the low frequency range. At a specific incident frequency, the mechanical component of the AEH device can be intensely excited and the bonded piezoelectric patch is utilized to convert the strain energy into electrical energy. Analytical studies are carried out to disclose the acoustic resonant system properties. Meanwhile, the pure acoustic and coupled vibro-acoustic properties of the proposed device are analyzed via the finite element method. The major part of the AEH device is fabricated via 3D printing for experimental study, which is favored for rapid prototyping. At acoustic resonance frequency 175 Hz, 100 dB sound pressure level excitation working condition, the measured experimental data show that the harvested power can be up to 7.3 μW.

  12. Resonant interactions between cometary ions and low frequency electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1987-12-01

    The conditions for resonant wave amplification in a plasma with a ring-beam distribution which is intended to model pick-up ions in a cometary environment are investigated. The inclination between the interplanetary field and the solar wind is found to play a crucial role in governing both the resonant frequency and the growth rate of any unstable mode. It is suggested that the low-frequency MHD mode should experience the most rapid amplification for intermediate inclination. In the frame of the solar wind, such waves should propagate along the field in the direction upstream toward the sun with a phase speed lower than the beaming velocity of the pick-up ions. This mechanism may account for the presence of the interior MHD waves noted by satellites over a region surrounding comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley.

  13. Low-frequency periodicity in the coordination of progressive handwriting.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, A J; Meulenbroek, R G

    1998-11-01

    The paper addresses the question how the effector segments are coordinated during handwriting, in particular as a function of the left-to-right progression within words. It studies the phase relations between wrist and finger-joint rotations during a repetitive graphic task (long words consisting of letters 'e'), and it subjects the resulting continuous phase-relation plots to autocorrelation analysis. A novel phenomenon, viz. that of low-frequency (1-Hz) periodicity, is observed which presumably reflects adjustments of the coordination pattern about once per second, i.e., after every three or four letters 'e'. Moreover, word length and word position are found to affect this periodicity in a predictable manner. These results are related to those of an earlier study which used an ad-hoc method of analysing wrist-finger coordination adjustments. The paper underlines the value of phase-relation analysis for certain graphic tasks, but it also points out its limitations for this purpose.

  14. Helix structure for low frequency acoustic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ming; Cao, Ziping; Luo, Jun; Pang, Zongqiang

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a novel helix acoustic resonator is proposed to realize acoustic energy harvesting (AEH). Compared with the traditional acoustic resonators, the proposed structure occupies a small volume and is suitable for the low frequency range. At a specific incident frequency, the mechanical component of the AEH device can be intensely excited and the bonded piezoelectric patch is utilized to convert the strain energy into electrical energy. Analytical studies are carried out to disclose the acoustic resonant system properties. Meanwhile, the pure acoustic and coupled vibro-acoustic properties of the proposed device are analyzed via the finite element method. The major part of the AEH device is fabricated via 3D printing for experimental study, which is favored for rapid prototyping. At acoustic resonance frequency 175 Hz, 100 dB sound pressure level excitation working condition, the measured experimental data show that the harvested power can be up to 7.3 μW.

  15. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki H.; Xie, Gan Q.

    1994-01-01

    A method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The traveltimes corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter .alpha. for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography.

  16. Method for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Lee, K.H.; Xie, G.Q.

    1994-12-13

    A method is described for imaging with low frequency electromagnetic fields, and for interpreting the electromagnetic data using ray tomography, in order to determine the earth conductivity with high accuracy and resolution. The imaging method includes the steps of placing one or more transmitters, at various positions in a plurality of transmitter holes, and placing a plurality of receivers in a plurality of receiver holes. The transmitters generate electromagnetic signals which diffuse through a medium, such as earth, toward the receivers. The measured diffusion field data H is then transformed into wavefield data U. The travel times corresponding to the wavefield data U, are then obtained, by charting the wavefield data U, using a different regularization parameter [alpha] for each transform. The desired property of the medium, such as conductivity, is then derived from the velocity, which in turn is constructed from the wavefield data U using ray tomography. 13 figures.

  17. Low-frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1985-04-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations. The target SST accuracy is + or - 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other esstential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a dual polarized, dual frequency system at 5.2 and 10.4 GHz using a 4.9 meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  18. Low frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations.The target SST accuracy is + or 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other essential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  19. Low-frequency microwave radiometer for N-ROSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollinger, J. P.; Lo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The all weather, global determination of sea surface temperature (SST) has been identified as a requirement needed to support naval operations. The target SST accuracy is + or - 1.0 K with a surface resolution of 10 km. Investigations of the phenomenology and technology of remote passive microwave sensing of the ocean environment over the past decade have demonstrated that this objective is presently attainable. Preliminary specification and trade off studies were conducted to define the frequency, polarization, scan geometry, antenna size, and other esstential parameters of the low frequency microwave radiometer (LFMR). It will be a dual polarized, dual frequency system at 5.2 and 10.4 GHz using a 4.9 meter deployable mesh surface antenna. It is to be flown on the Navy-Remote Ocean Sensing System (N-ROSS) satellite scheduled to be launched in late 1988.

  20. Planck 2015 results. II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. We refer to other related papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.

  1. Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes

    SciT

    Korneev, Valeri

    2010-09-01

    Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importancemore » of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.« less

  2. High Sensitive Scintillation Observations At Very Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Falkovich, I. S.; Kalinichenko, N. N.; Olyak, M. R.; Lecacheux, A.; Rosolen, C.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Rucker, H. O.; Tokarev, Yu.

    The observation of interplanetary scintillations of compact radio sources is powerful method of solar wind diagnostics. This method is developed mainly at decimeter- meter wavelengths. New possibilities are opened at extremely low frequencies (decameter waves) especially at large elongations. Now this approach is being actively developed using high effective decameter antennas UTR-2, URAN and Nancay Decameter Array. New class of back-end facility like high dynamic range, high resolution digital spectral processors, as well as dynamic spectra determination ideology give us new opportunities for distinguishing of the ionospheric and interplanetary scintillations and for observations of large number of radio sources, whith different angular sizes and elongations, even for the cases of rather weak objects.

  3. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  4. Membrane-constrained acoustic metamaterials for low frequency sound insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaole; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Xudong; Huang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    We present a constrained membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (CMAM) that employs constraint sticks to add out-of-plane dimensions in the design space of MAM. A CMAM sample, which adopts constraint sticks to suppress vibrations at the membrane center, was fabricated to achieve a sound transmission loss (STL) peak of 26 dB at 140 Hz, with the static areal density of 6.0 kg/m2. The working mechanism of the CMAM as an acoustic metamaterial is elucidated by calculating the averaged normal displacement, the equivalent areal density, and the effective dynamic mass of a unit cell through finite element simulations. Furthermore, the vibration modes of the CMAM indicate that the eigenmodes related to STL dips are shifted into high frequencies, thus broadening its effective bandwidth significantly. Three samples possessing the same geometry and material but different constraint areas were fabricated to illustrate the tunability of STL peaks at low frequencies.

  5. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    SciT

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.

    In this paper, we present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. Finally, we refer to other relatedmore » papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.« less

  6. Low-frequency radio absorption in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, M.; Vink, J.; de Gasperin, F.; Salas, P.; Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Blaauw, R.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Geus, E.; Deller, A.; van Dijk, P. C. G.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J. M.; Gunst, A. W.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J.; Hörandel, J.; Holties, H. A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Iacobelli, M.; Juette, E.; Krankowski, A.; van Leeuwen, J.; Mann, G.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Mulder, H.; Nelles, A.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pekal, R.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rothkaehl, H.; Schwarz, D. J.; Smirnov, O.; Soida, M.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, M. C.; Vocks, C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Zucca, P.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Cassiopeia A is one of the best-studied supernova remnants. Its bright radio and X-ray emission is due to shocked ejecta. Cas A is rather unique in that the unshocked ejecta can also be studied: through emission in the infrared, the radio-active decay of 44Ti, and the low-frequency free-free absorption caused by cold ionised gas, which is the topic of this paper. Aims: Free-free absorption processes are affected by the mass, geometry, temperature, and ionisation conditions in the absorbing gas. Observations at the lowest radio frequencies can constrain a combination of these properties. Methods: We used Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band Antenna observations at 30-77 MHz and Very Large Array (VLA) L-band observations at 1-2 GHz to fit for internal absorption as parametrised by the emission measure. We simultaneously fit multiple UV-matched images with a common resolution of 17″ (this corresponds to 0.25 pc for a source at the distance of Cas A). The ample frequency coverage allows us separate the relative contributions from the absorbing gas, the unabsorbed front of the shell, and the absorbed back of the shell to the emission spectrum. We explored the effects that a temperature lower than the 100-500 K proposed from infrared observations and a high degree of clumping can have on the derived physical properties of the unshocked material, such as its mass and density. We also compiled integrated radio flux density measurements, fit for the absorption processes that occur in the radio band, and considered their effect on the secular decline of the source. Results: We find a mass in the unshocked ejecta of M = 2.95 ± 0.48 M⊙ for an assumed gas temperatureof T = 100 K. This estimate is reduced for colder gas temperatures and, most significantly, if the ejecta are clumped. We measure the reverse shock to have a radius of 114″± 6″ and be centred at 23:23:26, +58:48:54 (J2000). We also find that a decrease in the amount of mass in the unshocked ejecta

  7. Planck 2015 results: II. Low Frequency Instrument data processings

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; ...

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we present an updated description of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data processing pipeline, associated with the 2015 data release. We point out the places where our results and methods have remained unchanged since the 2013 paper and we highlight the changes made for the 2015 release, describing the products (especially timelines) and the ways in which they were obtained. We demonstrate that the pipeline is self-consistent (principally based on simulations) and report all null tests. For the first time, we present LFI maps in Stokes Q and U polarization. Finally, we refer to other relatedmore » papers where more detailed descriptions of the LFI data processing pipeline may be found if needed.« less

  8. Low-frequency quadrupole impedance of undulators and wigglers

    DOE PAGES

    Blednykh, A.; Bassi, G.; Hidaka, Y.; ...

    2016-10-25

    An analytical expression of the low-frequency quadrupole impedance for undulators and wigglers is derived and benchmarked against beam-based impedance measurements done at the 3 GeV NSLS-II storage ring. The adopted theoretical model, valid for an arbitrary number of electromagnetic layers with parallel geometry, allows to calculate the quadrupole impedance for arbitrary values of the magnetic permeability μ r. Here, in the comparison of the analytical results with the measurements for variable magnet gaps, two limit cases of the permeability have been studied: the case of perfect magnets (μ r → ∞), and the case in which the magnets are fullymore » saturated (μ r = 1).« less

  9. Compact Polarimetry in a Low Frequency Spaceborne Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong-Loi, M-L.; Freeman, A.; Dubois-Fernandez, P.; Pottier, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compact polarimetry has been shown to be an interesting alternative mode to full polarimetry when global coverage and revisit time are key issues. It consists on transmitting a single polarization, while receiving on two. Several critical points have been identified, one being the Faraday rotation (FR) correction and the other the calibration. When a low frequency electromagnetic wave travels through the ionosphere, it undergoes a rotation of the polarization plane about the radar line of sight for a linearly polarized wave, and a simple phase shift for a circularly polarized wave. In a low frequency radar, the only possible choice of the transmit polarization is the circular one, in order to guaranty that the scattering element on the ground is illuminated with a constant polarization independently of the ionosphere state. This will allow meaningful time series analysis, interferometry as long as the Faraday rotation effect is corrected for the return path. In full-polarimetric (FP) mode, two techniques allow to estimate the FR: Freeman method using linearly polarized data, and Bickel and Bates theory based on the transformation of the measured scattering matrix to a circular basis. In CP mode, an alternate procedure is presented which relies on the bare surface scattering properties. These bare surfaces are selected by the conformity coefficient, invariant with FR. This coefficient is compared to other published classifications to show its potential in distinguishing three different scattering types: surface, doublebounce and volume. The performances of the bare surfaces selection and FR estimation are evaluated on PALSAR and airborne data. Once the bare surfaces are selected and Faraday angle estimated over them, the correction can be applied over the whole scene. The algorithm is compared with both FP techniques. In the last part of the paper, the calibration of a CP system from the point of view of classical matrix transformation methods in polarimetry is

  10. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achaoui, Y.; Antonakakis, T.; Brûlé, S.; Craster, R. V.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2017-06-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1-10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0-30 Hz.

  11. An autocorrelation method to detect low frequency earthquakes within tremor

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Shelly, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that deep tremor in the Nankai Trough under western Shikoku consists of a swarm of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as slow shear slip on the down-dip extension of the primary seismogenic zone of the plate interface. The similarity of tremor in other locations suggests a similar mechanism, but the absence of cataloged low frequency earthquakes prevents a similar analysis. In this study, we develop a method for identifying LFEs within tremor. The method employs a matched-filter algorithm, similar to the technique used to infer that tremor in parts of Shikoku is comprised of LFEs; however, in this case we do not assume the origin times or locations of any LFEs a priori. We search for LFEs using the running autocorrelation of tremor waveforms for 6 Hi-Net stations in the vicinity of the tremor source. Time lags showing strong similarity in the autocorrelation represent either repeats, or near repeats, of LFEs within the tremor. We test the method on an hour of Hi-Net recordings of tremor and demonstrates that it extracts both known and previously unidentified LFEs. Once identified, we cross correlate waveforms to measure relative arrival times and locate the LFEs. The results are able to explain most of the tremor as a swarm of LFEs and the locations of newly identified events appear to fill a gap in the spatial distribution of known LFEs. This method should allow us to extend the analysis of Shelly et al. (2007a) to parts of the Nankai Trough in Shikoku that have sparse LFE coverage, and may also allow us to extend our analysis to other regions that experience deep tremor, but where LFEs have not yet been identified. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  13. Multiscale low-frequency circulation modes in the global atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Sheu, P.-J.; Kang, I.-S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, fundamental multiscale circulation modes in the global atmosphere are identified with the objective of providing better understanding of atmospheric low-frequency variabilities over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. With the use of a combination of rotated principal component technique, singular spectrum analysis, and phase space portraits, three categories of basic multiscale modes in the atmosphere are found. The first is the interannual-mode (IAM), which is dominated by time scales longer than a year and can be attributed to heating and circulation anomalies associated with the coupled tropical ocean-atmosphere, in particular the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The second is a set of tropical intraseasonal modes consisting of three separate multiscale patterns (ISO-1, -2, -3) related to tropical heating that can be identified with the different phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), including its teleconnection to the extratropics. The ISO spatial and temporal patterns suggest that the extratropical wave train in the North Pacific and North America is related to heating over the Maritime Continent and that the evolution of the MJO around the equator may require forcing from the extratropics spawning convection over the Indian Ocean. The third category represents extratropical intraseasonal oscillations arising from internal dynamics of the basic-state circulation. In the Northern Hemisphere, there are two distinct circulation modes with multiple frequencies in this category: the Pacific/North America (PNA) and the North Atlantic/Eurasia (NAE). In the Southern Hemisphere, two phase-locked modes (PSA-1 and PSA-2) are found depicting an eastward propagating wave train from eastern Australia, via the Pacific South America to the South Atlantic. The extratropical modes exhibit temporal characteristics such as phase locking and harmonic oscillations possibly associated with quadratically nonlinear dynamical systems. Additionally, the

  14. Low-frequency sensitivity in a gerbilline rodent, Pachyuromys duprasi.

    PubMed

    Plassmann, W; Kadel, M

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of the bulla to low-frequency hearing capability was studied in the gerbilline rodent Pachyuromys duprasi. In the frequency range of 0.6-3 kHz, the sound pressure behind the tympanic membrane is higher than the pressure in the meatus acusticus externus near the eardrum. Gradual augmentation of frequencies above 0.6 kHz gives rise to steadily increasing phase lag in the bulla relative to that in the meatus. Severing of the incudostapedial joint yields results indicating that the phase difference between meatus and bulla is caused by resonance properties of the bulla and resistance in the cochlea. Both destruction of the bulla and stiffening of the pars flaccida tympani lead to a sound pressure decrease in the frequency range around 2 kHz. This drop is accompanied by an amplitude decrease of the same magnitude in the cochlear microphonic potentials. These results support the hypothesis that the bulla functions like a Helmholtz resonator in the frequency range of 1-3 kHz, improving sound transduction to the cochlea. These experimental findings, in conjunction with theoretical considerations involving bulla volume, orifice area of the resonator, and resonance frequency of the bulla, suggest that the theoretically required area of the resonator's orifice is, in fact, of the same magnitude as the area of the pars flaccida tympani. The middle-ear system of P. duprasi thus consists of a resonating bulla in which the area of the pars flaccida tympani constitutes the resonator's opening towards the meatus and in which the pars tensa tympani functions as a pressure gradient receiver, due to phase differences caused by the resistance of the cochlea and by the resonance properties of the bulla. By these functional principles the peripheral auditory system of P. duprasi is capable of low-frequency perception despite the smallness of its structures. The middle ear in P. duprasi thus represents a prime example of a strategy: the dimensional constraints derived

  15. Very Low Frequency Seismo-Acoustic Noise Below the Sea Floor (0.2-10 Hz).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    applications see Stoffa et al., 1981 and Kappus et al., 1990). Fricke (1991, 1993) outlines a method for calculating the Radon transform on "ser...of Ocean Eng., OE-6, 50-58, 1981. Kappus , M. E. , A. J. Harding, and J. A. Orcutt, A comparison of tau-p transforms methods, Geophysics, 55, 1202

  16. Low frequency seismic noise acquisition and analysis with tunable monolithic horizontal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; Vilasi, Silvia; Barone, Fabrizio

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we describe the scientific data recorded mechanical monolithic horizontal sensor prototypes located in the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. The mechanical monolithic sensors, developed at the University of Salerno, are placed, in thermally insulating enclosures, onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock. The main goal of this experiment is to characterize seismically the sites in the frequency band 10-4 ÷ 10Hz and to get all the necessary information to optimize the sensor.

  17. Method and apparatus for linear low-frequency feedback in monolithic low-noise charge amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi

    2006-02-14

    A charge amplifier includes an amplifier, feedback circuit, and cancellation circuit. The feedback circuit includes a capacitor, inverter, and current mirror. The capacitor is coupled across the signal amplifier, the inverter is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier, and the current mirror is coupled to the input of the signal amplifier. The cancellation circuit is coupled to the output of the signal amplifier. A method of charge amplification includes providing a signal amplifier; coupling a first capacitor across the signal amplifier; coupling an inverter to the output of the signal amplifier; coupling a current mirror to the input of the signal amplifier; and coupling a cancellation circuit to the output of the signal amplifier. A front-end system for use with radiation sensors includes a charge amplifier and a current amplifier, shaping amplifier, baseline stabilizer, discriminator, peak detector, timing detector, and logic circuit coupled to the charge amplifier.

  18. Low-frequency sine wave hard-limiting technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1977-01-01

    Circuit includes serial-in/parallel-out shift register and weighting network that are used to eliminate effects of noise and other nonrepetitive circuit transients. Register and weighting network average decisions from section of signal where decisions are more dependable or where differences between two consecutive samples are larger.

  19. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on the health of workers in automotive industry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Longyu; Yu, Duo; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To observe the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) in automotive industry on occupational workers. A total of 704 workers were investigated, and 374 workers were chosen and divided into two groups (control group and exposure group) according to the inclusive criteria, namely male with age 20-40 years old and ≥ 2 years of exposure. The intensities of ELF-EMFs and noise were detected with EFA-300 Field Analyzer (Narda company, Pfullingen, Germany) and AWA5610D integrating sound level meter (Hangzhou Aihua Instruments Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, China), respectively. Survey data were collected by questionnaire, and the physical check-up was done in hospital. All the data were input into SPSS17.0 software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA), and the appropriate statistic analyses were carried out. The intensity of EMFs in exposure group was significantly higher than that in control group (p < 0.05), while the noise in two workplaces showed no difference (p>0.05). The survey data collected by questionnaires showed that the symptoms of loss of hair in exposure group were significantly different as compared with that in control group (p < 0.05). The check-up parameters of cardiovascular, liver and hematology system showed significant differences between the two groups (p < 0.05). Survey and check-up data suggest that exposure to ELF-EMFs might have effects on the nervous, cardiovascular, liver, and hematology system of workers.

  20. Study of quadrature FIR filters for extraction of low-frequency instantaneous information in biophysical signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Guevara, Valdemar E.; Alba-Cadena, Alfonso; Mendez, Martín O.

    Quadrature bandpass filters take a real-valued signal and output an analytic signal from which the instantaneous amplitude and phase can be computed. For this reason, they represent a useful tool to extract time-varying, narrow-band information from electrophysiological signals such as electroencephalogram (EEG) or electrocardiogram. One of the defining characteristics of quadrature filters is its null response to negative frequencies. However, when the frequency band of interest is close to 0 Hz, a careless filter design could let through negative frequencies, producing distortions in the amplitude and phase of the output. In this work, three types of quadrature filters (Ideal, Gabor and Sinusoidal) have been evaluated using both artificial and real EEG signals. For the artificial signals, the performance of each filter was measured in terms of the distortion in amplitude and phase, and sensitivity to noise and bandwidth selection. For the real EEG signals, a qualitative evaluation of the dynamics of the synchronization between two EEG channels was performed. The results suggest that, while all filters under study behave similarly under noise, they differ in terms of their sensitivity to bandwidth choice. In this study, the Sinusoidal filter showed clear advantages for the estimation of low-frequency EEG synchronization.