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Sample records for turbulent friction factors

  1. Tripping Effects on the Friction Factor in Turbulent Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Salaymeh, A.; Bayoumi, O. A.; Durst, F.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2004-11-01

    Tripping devices are usually installed at the entrance of laboratory-scale pipe test sections to obtain a fully developed turbulent flow sooner. The tripping of laminar flow to induce turbulence can be carried out in different ways, such as using cylindrical wires, sand papers, well-organized tape letters, fences, etc. Claims of tripping effects have been made periodically since the classical experiments of Nikuradse (1932), which covered a significant range of Reynolds numbers. NikuradseÂ's data have become the metric by which theories are established, and have also been the subject of intense scrutiny. Several subsequent experiments reported friction factors as much as 5% lower than those measured by Nikuradse, and the authors of those reports attributed the difference to tripping effects. In the present study, measurements with and without ring tripping devices of different blocking areas of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% have been carried out to determine the effect of entrance condition on the developing flow field in pipes. Along with pressure drop measurements to compute the skin friction, both Pitot tube and hot-wire anemometry measurements have been used to accurately determine the mean velocity profile over the working test section at different Reynolds numbers in the range of 1× 10^5--4.5 × 10^5. The results we obtained suggest that the tripping technique has an insignificant effect on the wall friction factor, in agreement with Nikuradse's original data.

  2. Friction factor for turbulent flow in rough pipes from Heisenberg's closure hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2009-05-01

    We show that the main results of the analysis of the friction factor for turbulent pipe flow reported by Gioia and Chakraborty [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044502 (2006)] can be recovered by assuming the Heisenberg closure hypothesis for the turbulent spectrum. This highlights the structural features of the turbulent spectrum underlying the analysis of Gioia and Chakraborty.

  3. United Formula for the Friction Factor in the Turbulent Region of Pipe Flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuolin; Huai, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Friction factor is an important element in both flow simulations and river engineering. In hydraulics, studies on the friction factor in turbulent regions have been based on the concept of three flow regimes, namely, the fully smooth regime, the fully rough regime, and the transitional regime, since the establishment of the Nikuradze's chart. However, this study further demonstrates that combining the friction factor with Reynolds number yields a united formula that can scale the entire turbulent region. This formula is derived by investigating the correlation between friction in turbulent pipe flow and its influencing factors, i.e., Reynolds number and relative roughness. In the present study, the formulae of Blasius and Stricklerare modified to rearrange the implicit model of Tao. In addition, we derive a united explicit formula that can compute the friction factor in the entire turbulent regimes based on the asymptotic behavior of the improved Tao's model. Compared with the reported formulae of Nikuradze, the present formula exhibits higher computational accuracy for the original pipe experiment data of Nikuradze. PMID:27136099

  4. United Formula for the Friction Factor in the Turbulent Region of Pipe Flow

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuolin; Huai, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Friction factor is an important element in both flow simulations and river engineering. In hydraulics, studies on the friction factor in turbulent regions have been based on the concept of three flow regimes, namely, the fully smooth regime, the fully rough regime, and the transitional regime, since the establishment of the Nikuradze’s chart. However, this study further demonstrates that combining the friction factor with Reynolds number yields a united formula that can scale the entire turbulent region. This formula is derived by investigating the correlation between friction in turbulent pipe flow and its influencing factors, i.e., Reynolds number and relative roughness. In the present study, the formulae of Blasius and Stricklerare modified to rearrange the implicit model of Tao. In addition, we derive a united explicit formula that can compute the friction factor in the entire turbulent regimes based on the asymptotic behavior of the improved Tao’s model. Compared with the reported formulae of Nikuradze, the present formula exhibits higher computational accuracy for the original pipe experiment data of Nikuradze. PMID:27136099

  5. United Formula for the Friction Factor in the Turbulent Region of Pipe Flow.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuolin; Huai, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Friction factor is an important element in both flow simulations and river engineering. In hydraulics, studies on the friction factor in turbulent regions have been based on the concept of three flow regimes, namely, the fully smooth regime, the fully rough regime, and the transitional regime, since the establishment of the Nikuradze's chart. However, this study further demonstrates that combining the friction factor with Reynolds number yields a united formula that can scale the entire turbulent region. This formula is derived by investigating the correlation between friction in turbulent pipe flow and its influencing factors, i.e., Reynolds number and relative roughness. In the present study, the formulae of Blasius and Stricklerare modified to rearrange the implicit model of Tao. In addition, we derive a united explicit formula that can compute the friction factor in the entire turbulent regimes based on the asymptotic behavior of the improved Tao's model. Compared with the reported formulae of Nikuradze, the present formula exhibits higher computational accuracy for the original pipe experiment data of Nikuradze.

  6. Investigations of rough surface effects on friction factors in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Scaggs, W. F.

    1988-02-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effects of surface roughness on turbulent pipe flow friction factors are presented and compared with predictions from a discrete element roughness model which had been developed previously. Friction factor data were acquired over a pipe Reynolds number range from 10,000 to 600,000 for eleven different rough surfaces, nine of which had uniform roughness elements and two of which were roughened nonuniformly. These surfaces covered a range of roughness element sizes, spacings and shapes. Predictions from the discrete element roughness model were in very good agreement with the data for both the uniform and nonuniform roughness cases.

  7. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  8. Friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2009-06-01

    We use momentum-transfer arguments to predict the friction factor f in two-dimensional turbulent soap film flows with rough boundaries (an analog of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness r , considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of f proportional, variant Re{-1/2} in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of Re{-1/4} . For large Re, f approximately r in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the three-dimensional pipe data of Nikuradse.

  9. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore » a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  10. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  11. Heat Transfer Through Turbulent Friction Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, H.

    1943-01-01

    The "general Prandtl number" Pr(exp 1) - A(sub q)/A Pr, aside from the Reynolds number determines the ratio of turbulent to molecular heat transfer, and the temperature distribution in turbulent friction layers. A(sub q) = exchange coefficient for heat; A = exchange coefficient for momentum transfer. A formula is derived from the equation defining the general Prandtl number which describes the temperature as a function of the velocity. For fully developed thermal boundary layers all questions relating to heat transfer to and from incompressible fluids can be treated in a simple manner if the ratio of the turbulent shear stress to the total stress T(sub t)/T in the layers near the wall is known, and if the A(sub q)/A can be regarded as independent of the distance from the wall. The velocity distribution across a flat smooth channel and deep into the laminar sublayer was measured for isothermal flow to establish the shear stress ratio T(sub t)/T and to extend the universal wall friction law. The values of T(sub t)/T which resulted from these measurements can be approximately represented by a linear function of the velocity in the laminar-turbulent transition zone. The effect of the temperature relationship of the material values on the flow near the wall is briefly analyzed. It was found that the velocity at the laminar boundary (in contrast to the thickness of the laminar layer) is approximately independent of the temperature distribution. The temperature gradient at the wall and the distribution of temperature and heat flow in the turbulent friction layers were calculated on the basis of the data under two equations. The derived formulas and the figures reveal the effects of the Prandtl number, the Reynolds number, the exchange quantities and the temperature relationship of the material values.

  12. Friction-factor characteristics for narrow channels with honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Morrison, G. L.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental determination of friction-factors for the flow of air in a narrow channel lined with various honeycomb geometries has been carried out. Test results show that, generally, the friction-factor is nearly constant or slightly decreases as the Reynolds number increases, a characteristic common to turbulent flow in pipes. However, in some test geometries this trend is remarkably different. The friction factor dramatically drops and then rises as the Reynolds number increases. This phenomenon can be characterized as a 'friction-factor jump'. Further investigations of the acoustic spectrum and friction-factor measurements for a broad range of Reynolds numbers indicate that the 'friction-factor jump' phenomenon is accompanied by an onset of a normal mode resonance excited coherent flow fluctuation structure, which occurs at Reynolds number of the order of 10,000. The purpose of this paper is to explain the friction-factor-jump phenomenon and friction-factor characteristics.

  13. Corrosion effects on friction factors

    SciTech Connect

    Magleby, H.L.; Shaffer, S.J.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of NRC-sponsored material specimen tests that were performed to determine if corrosion increases the friction factors of sliding surfaces of motor-operated gate valves, which could require higher forces to close and open safety-related valves when subjected to their design basis differential pressures. Friction tests were performed with uncorroded specimens and specimens subjected to accelerated corrosion. Preliminary tests at ambient conditions showed that corrosion increased the friction factors, indicating the need for additional tests duplicating valve operating parameters at hot conditions. The additional tests showed friction factors of corroded specimens were 0.1 to 0.2 higher than for uncorroded specimens, and that the friction factors of the corroded specimens were not very dependent on contact stress or corrosion film thickness. The measured values of friction factors for the three corrosion films tested (simulating three operating times) were in the range of 0.3 to 0.4. The friction factor for even the shortest simulated operating time was essentially the same as the others, indicating that the friction factors appear to reach a plateau and that the plateau is reached quickly.

  14. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    PubMed

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics.

  15. Skin friction measurements following manipulation of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Savill, A. M.; Westphal, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from three experiments in which direct, local measurements of the skin friction reduction due to flat-plate turbulence manipulators for overall viscous drag reduction were obtained. The results suggest that only a very small overall net drag reduction will be possible for such devices at moderate momentum thickness-derived Reynolds number values, since maximum skin friction drag is neither large nor sustained.

  16. Phenomenological Blasius-type friction equation for turbulent power-law fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbarlooei, H. R.; Cruz, D. O. A.; Ramos, F.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a friction formula for turbulent power-law fluid flows, a class of purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids commonly found in applications. Our model is derived through an extension of the friction factor analysis based on Kolmogorov's phenomenology, recently proposed by Gioia and Chakraborty. Tests against classical empirical data show excellent agreement over a significant range of Reynolds number. Limits of the model are also discussed.

  17. Phenomenological Blasius-type friction equation for turbulent power-law fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Anbarlooei, H R; Cruz, D O A; Ramos, F; Silva Freire, A P

    2015-12-01

    We propose a friction formula for turbulent power-law fluid flows, a class of purely viscous non-Newtonian fluids commonly found in applications. Our model is derived through an extension of the friction factor analysis based on Kolmogorov's phenomenology, recently proposed by Gioia and Chakraborty. Tests against classical empirical data show excellent agreement over a significant range of Reynolds number. Limits of the model are also discussed.

  18. Tidal friction in rotating turbulent convectivestellar and planetary regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Guenel, M.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.

    2014-12-01

    Turbulent friction in stellar and planetary convection zones is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the dissipation of the kinetic energy of tidal flows in stars and planets hosting companions. This friction acting both on the equilibrium tide and on tidal inertial waves thus deeply impacts the dynamics of the spin of the host star/planet and the orbital architecture of the surrounding system. It is thus very important to obtain robust prescription for this friction. In the current state-of-the-art, it is modeled by a turbulent viscosity coefficient using mixing-length theory. However, none of the existing prescriptions take into account the action of the possibly rapid rotation that strongly affects convective flows. In this work, we propose such a new prescription that takes into account rotation and discuss the possible implication for tidal dissipation in rotating stars and planets.

  19. Skin friction field and thermal plume formation in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Joerg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Kolchinskaya, Anastasiya; Scheel, Janet; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics in the thin boundary layers of temperature and velocity is the key to a deeper understanding of turbulent transport of heat and momentum in thermal convection. The velocity gradient right at the heated plate of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell forms the two-dimensional skin friction field and is related to the formation of thermal plumes in the boundary layer right above the plate. Our analysis is based on a direct numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ = 1 and focused on the critical points of the skin friction field. We identify triplets of critical points, which are composed of two unstable nodes and a saddle between them, as the characteristic building block of the skin friction field. Isolated triplets as well as networks of triplets are detected. The majority of the ridges of line-like thermal plumes coincide with the unstable manifolds of the saddles. From a dynamical Lagrangian perspective, thermal plumes are formed together with an attractive hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structure of the skin friction field. We discuss the differences from the skin friction field in turbulent channel flows from the perspective of the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem for two-dimensional vector field. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  20. A skin friction law for compressible turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.; Wahls, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic skin friction law is derived for adiabatic, compressible, equilibrium, turbulent boundary layer flow. An outer solution in terms of the Clauser defect stream function is matched to an inner empirical expression composed of compressible laws of the wall and wake. The modified Crocco temperature-velocity relationship and the Clauser eddy viscousity model are used in the outer solution. The skin friction law pertains for all pressure gradients in the incompressible through supersonic range and for small pressure gradients in the hypersonic range. Excellent comparisons with experiment are obtained in the appropriate parameter ranges. The application to numerical computation is discussed.

  1. Compliant wall-turbulent skin-friction reduction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.; Ash, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Previous compliant-wall experiments successful in reducing skin-friction drag probably have had a (unplanned) membrane resonance at a favorable frequency, amplitude, wave shape, length, and speed. The most probable drag reduction mechanism involves a direct coupling between the fluid and the moving wall when the wall natural resonance frequencies are near the fundamental turbulent burst frequency. Local skin-friction reductions of 61% were measured with mylar/PVC plastisol compliant surfaces. These reductions were observed only at certain flow conditions, indicating that changing tunnel total temperature may have altered the substrate dynamic modulus, damping, and coupled mylar tension. Apparently, the coupled membrane/substrate must be excited in compatible narrow-band natural frequency modes. An accelerated effort is required to develop practical durable compliant surfaces optimized for maximum drag reduction. Application of compliant walls to other transportation modes appears feasible with liquid flows offering the greatest skin-friction drag reduction potential.

  2. Contribution of velocity-vorticity correlations to the frictional drag in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the frictional drag and the velocity-vorticity correlations in wall-bounded turbulent flows is derived from the mean vorticity equation. A formula for the skin friction coefficient is proposed and evaluated with regards to three canonical wall-bounded flows: turbulent boundary layer, turbulent channel flow, and turbulent pipe flow. The frictional drag encompasses four terms: advective vorticity transport, vortex stretching, viscous, and inhomogeneous terms. Drag-reduced channel flow with the slip condition is used to test the reliability of the formula. The advective vorticity transport and vortex stretching terms are found to dominate the contributions to the frictional drag.

  3. Turbulence and skin friction modification in channel flow with streamwise-aligned superhydrophobic surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelly, T. O.; Jung, S. Y.; Zaki, T. A.

    2014-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a channel with superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) were performed, and the effects of the surface texture on the turbulence and skin-friction coefficient were examined. The SHS is modeled as a planar boundary comprised of spanwise-alternating regions of no-slip and free-slip boundary conditions. Relative to the reference no-slip channel flow at the same bulk Reynolds number, the overall mean skin-friction coefficient is reduced by 21.6%. A detailed analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget demonstrates a reduction in production over the no-slip phases, which is explained by aid of quadrant analysis of the Reynolds shear stresses and statistical analysis of the turbulence structures. The results demonstrate a significant reduction in the strength of streamwise vortical structures in the presence of the SHS texture and a decrease in the Reynolds shear-stress component ⟨R12⟩ which has a favorable influence on drag over the no-slip phases. A secondary flow which is set up at the edges of the texture also effects a beneficial change in drag. Nonetheless, the skin-friction coefficient on the no-slip features is higher than the reference levels in a simple no-slip channel flow. The increase in the skin-friction coefficient is attributed to two factors. First, spanwise diffusion of the mean momentum from free-slip to no-slip regions increases the local skin-friction coefficient on the edges of the no-slip features. Second, the drag-reducing capacity of the SHS is further reduced due to additional Reynolds stresses, ⟨R13⟩.

  4. The Friction Factor in the Forchheimer Equation for Rock Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jia-Qing; Hu, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yi-Feng; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-08-01

    The friction factor is an important dimensionless parameter for fluid flow through rock fractures that relates pressure head loss to average flow velocity; it can be affected by both fracture geometry and flow regime. In this study, a theoretical formula form of the friction factor containing both viscous and inertial terms is formulated by incorporating the Forchheimer equation, and a new friction factor model is proposed based on a recent phenomenological relation for the Forchheimer coefficient. The viscous term in the proposed formula is inversely proportional to Reynolds number and represents the limiting case in Darcy flow regime when the inertial effects diminish, whereas the inertial term is a power function of the relative roughness and represents a limiting case in fully turbulent flow regime when the fracture roughness plays a dominant role. The proposed model is compared with existing friction factor models for fractures through parametric sensitivity analyses and using experimental data on granite fractures, showing that the proposed model has not only clearer physical significance, but also better predictive performance. By accepting proper percentages of nonlinear pressure drop to quantify the onset of Forchheimer flow and fully turbulent flow, a Moody-type diagram with explicitly defined flow regimes is created for rock fractures of varying roughness, indicating that rougher fractures have a large friction factor and are more prone to the Forchheimer flow and fully turbulent flow. These findings may prove useful in better understanding of the flow behaviors in rock fractures and improving the numerical modeling of non-Darcy flow in fractured aquifers.

  5. Measurement and prediction of the effects of nonuniform surface roughness on turbulent flow friction coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Scaggs, W. F.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    The status of prediction methods for friction coefficients in turbulent flows over nonuniform or random rough surfaces is reviewed. Experimental data for friction factors in fully developed pipe flows with Reynolds numbers between 10,000 and 600,000 are presented for two nonuniform rough surfaces. One surface was roughened with a mixture of cones and hemispheres which had the same height and base diameter and were arranged in a uniform array. The other surface was roughened with a mixture of two sizes of cones and two sizes of hemispheres. These data are compared with predictions made using the previously published discrete element prediction approach of Taylor, Coleman and Hodge. The agreement between the data and the predictions is excellent.

  6. The relation between skin friction fluctuations and turbulent fluctuating velocities in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Daniel, Carlos; Laizet, Sylvain; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    The Townsend-Perry hypothesis of wall-attached eddies relates the friction velocity uτ at the wall to velocity fluctuations at a position y from the wall, resulting in a wavenumber range where the streamwise fluctuating velocity spectrum scales as E (k) ~k-1 and the corresponding structure function scales as uτ2 in the corresponding length-scale range. However, this model does not take in account the fluctuations of the skin friction velocity, which are in fact strongly intermittent. A DNS of zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer suggests a 10 to 15 degree angle from the lag of the peak in the cross-correlations between the fluctuations of the shear stress and streamwise fluctuating velocities at different heights in the boundary layer. Using this result, it is possible to refine the definition of the attached eddy range of scales, and our DNS suggests that, in this range, the second order structure function depends on filtered skin friction fluctuations in a way which is about the same at different distances from the wall and different local Reynolds numbers.

  7. Program helps friction factor for non-Newtonian fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ohen, H.A. )

    1989-01-02

    A Fortran program has been developed that gives more accurate predictions for shear rates, effective viscosity, Reynold's number, and hence the friction factor from which frictional pressure losses for flowing non-Newtonian fluids can be obtained. The method presented can handle flow in smooth pipes, transition, and fully rough zones of turbulence. Two mathematical models, namely the power law and the Bingham have been widely used with drilling fluids and cement slurries for relating shear stress to shear rate, the most popular being Bingham. However, most non-Newtonian fluids are not correctly represented by either of these models. In fact, experience has shown that the consistency curves of most non-Newtonian fluids fall in between those predicted by these models.

  8. Review of Research into the Concept of the Microblowing Technique for Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A new technology for reducing turbulent skin friction, called the Microblowing Technique (MBT), is presented. Results from proof-of-concept experiments show that this technology could potentially reduce turbulent skin friction by more than 50% of the skin friction of a solid flat plate for subsonic and supersonic flow conditions. The primary purpose of this review paper is to provide readers with information on the turbulent skin friction reduction obtained from many experiments using the MBT. Although the MBT has a penalty for obtaining the microblowing air associated with it, some combinations of the MBT with suction boundary layer control methods are an attractive alternative for a real application. Several computational simulations to understand the flow physics of the MBT are also included. More experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations are needed for the understanding of the unsteady flow nature of the MBT and the optimization of this new technology.

  9. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  10. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  11. Measurement and prediction of rough wall effects on friction factor - Uniform roughness results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, W. F.; Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effects of surface roughness on turbulent pipe flow friction factors are presented and compared with predictions from a previously published discrete element roughness model. Friction factor data were acquired over a pipe Reynolds number range from 10,000 to 600,000 for nine different uniformly rough surfaces. These surfaces covered a range of roughness element sizes, spacings and shapes. Predictions from the discrete element roughness model were in very good agreement with the data.

  12. Turbulent Reynolds analogy factors of stacked large-eddy breakup devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, A. M.

    1986-01-01

    Direct measurements are made of turbulent Reynolds analogy factors, referenced to a flat plate, for turbulent boundary layer flows altered by stacked arrays of large eddy breakup devices (LEBUs). These are of interest as drag reducers when inserted into a boundary layer transverse to the flow. The data thus obtained furnish evidence that heat transfer, skin friction drag, and LEBU performance factors in low Reynolds number flows are sensitive to flow history. Attention is given to the apparatus and measurement procedures used.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Couette-Poiseuille Flow With Zero Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Gary N.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    2015-01-01

    The near-wall scaling of mean velocity U(yw) is addressed for the case of zero skin friction on one wall of a fully turbulent channel flow. The present DNS results can be added to the evidence in support of the conjecture that U is proportional to the square root of yw in the region just above the wall at which the mean shear dU=dy = 0.

  14. An extension of the transpired skin-friction equation to compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Freire, Atila P.

    1988-11-01

    A skin-friction equation for transpired incompressible turbulent boundary layer, proposed in a previous paper (Silva-Freire, 1988), is extended to compressible flow. The expression derived here is simple and gives more consistent results than the momentum-integral equation. The difficulty with the present formulation, however, is that the wake profile parameter due to injection has to be carefully determined in order to obtain good results.

  15. Skin-friction Drag Reduction in Turbulent Channel Flow with Idealized Superhydrophobic Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratsegari, Amirreza; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2013-11-01

    Skin-friction drag reduction by super-hydrophobic (SH) surfaces was investigated using Lattice Boltzmann DNS in turbulent channel flow with SH longitudinal microgrooves on both walls. The liquid/gas interfaces in the SH microgrooves were modeled as flat, shear-free surfaces. Drag reductions (DR) ranging from 5 % to 47 % were observed for microgrooves of size 4 <=g+0 =w+0 <= 128 in channels of bulk Reynolds number Reb =Ub h / ν = 3600 (Reτ0 =uτ0 h / ν ~ 230), where g+0 and w+0 denote the widths of the slip and no-slip surfaces in base flow wall units. It is shown that in both laminar and turbulent flow, DR scales as DR =Us /Ub + ɛ . In laminar flow, where DR is purely due to surface slip, ɛ = 0 . In turbulent flow, ɛ remains negligible when the slip length is smaller than the thickness of the viscous sublayer. For DR > 40 % , where the effect of surface slip can be felt in the buffer layer, ɛ attains a small non-zero value. Analysis of turbulence statistics and turbulence kinetic energy budgets confirms that outside of a layer of size approximately one slip length from the walls, the turbulence dynamics proceeds as in regular channel flow with no-slip walls.

  16. A model for rough wall turbulent heating and skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers on rough walls is used to investigate the effects of roughness character and compressibility. The flow around roughness elements is treated as form drag. A method is presented for deriving the required roughness shape and spacing from profiometer surface measurements. Calculations based on the model compare satisfactorily with low speed data on roughness character and hypersonic measurements with grit roughness. The computer model is exercised systematically over a wide range of parameters to derive a practical scaling law for the equivalent roughness. In contrast to previous correlations, for most roughness element shapes the effective roughness does not show a pronounced maximum as the element spacing decreases. The effect of roughness tends to be reduced with increasing edge Mach number, primarily due to decreasing density in the vicinity of the roughness elements. It is further shown that the required roughness Reynolds number for fully rough behavior increases with increasing Mach number, explaining the small roughness effects observed in some hypersonic tests.

  17. The impact of rotation on turbulent tidal friction in stellar and planetary convective regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Auclair-Desrotour, P.; Guenel, M.; Gallet, F.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Turbulent friction in convective regions in stars and planets is one of the key physical mechanisms that drive the dissipation of the kinetic energy of tidal flows in their interiors and the evolution of their systems. This friction acts both on the equilibrium/non-wave-like tide and on tidal inertial waves in these layers. Aims: It is thus necessary to obtain a robust prescription for this friction. In the current state-of-the-art, it is modelled by a turbulent eddy-viscosity coefficient, based on mixing-length theory, applied to tide velocities. However, none of the current prescriptions take into account the action of rotation that can strongly affect turbulent convection. Therefore, a new prescription that takes this into account must be derived. Methods: We use theoretical scaling laws for convective velocities and characteristic lengthscales in rotating stars and planets that have been recently confirmed by 3D high-resolution non-linear Cartesian numerical simulations to derive the new prescription. A corresponding local model of tidal waves is used to understand the consequences for the linear tidal dissipation. Finally, new grids of rotating stellar models and published values of planetary convective Rossby numbers are used to discuss astrophysical consequences. Results: The action of rotation on convection deeply modifies the turbulent friction applied on tides. In the regime of rapid rotation (with a convective Rossby number below 0.25), the eddy-viscosity may be decreased by several orders of magnitude. It may lead to a loss of efficiency of the viscous dissipation of the equilibrium tide and to a more efficient complex and resonant dissipation of tidal inertial waves in the bulk of convective regions. Conclusions: To understand the complete evolution of planetary systems, tidal friction in rapid rotators such as young low-mass stars, giant and Earth-like planets must be evaluated. Therefore, we need a completely coupled treatment of the tidal

  18. Laser interferometer skin-friction measurements of crossing-shock-wave/turbulent-boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.; Narayanswami, N.; Knight, D. D.

    1994-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossing-shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 deg at Mach 3 and 15 deg at Mach 3.85. The measurements were made using a laser interferometer skin-friction meter, a device that determines the wall shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin-friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction center line. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k-epsilon model, are compared with the experimental results for the Mach 3.85, 15-deg interaction case. Although the k-epsilon model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin-friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near-surface flow in this complex interaction.

  19. On the manner in which outer layer disturbances affect turbulent boundary layer skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savill, A. M.

    This paper presents results, from bth experimental studies and turbulence modelling, of the manipulated flow behind flat plate devices introduced into the outer region of turbulent boundary layers. An analysis of mean velocity profiles, in conjunction with drag balance and other measurements for u sub tau, reveals only small changes in the log law and little influence of plate thickness on skin friction, except in the immediate vicinity of the manipulator where variations in the wall static pressure are recorded. However the drag reducing efficiency of the preferred tandem plate arrangement is found to depend simultaneously on plate length and gap. These observations are discussed together with recent turbulence measurements and previous flow visualisation. Implications emerge regarding the relative importance of the various proposed drag reduction mechanisms, and, in the light of these, alternative 'triplet' and 'quadruplet' configurations are investigated. It is concluded that larger net drag reductions may be attainable, while the skin friction distribution downstream of a single plate is shown to be predicted quite accurately by an Algebraic Stress Model.

  20. Friction drag reduction achievable by near-wall turbulence manipulation in spatially developing boundary-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannier, Amaury; Garnier, Eric; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Various control strategies, such as active feedback control or riblets, end up restraining near-wall turbulence. An analytical study is conducted to estimate the drag-reduction achievable by such control in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary-layers. Based on an idealized control which damps all fluctuations within a near-wall layer, a composite flow profile is established. It leads to explicit models for both the drag-reduction and the boundary-layer development rate. A skin-friction decomposition is applied and gives physical insights on the underlying phenomena. The control is found to alter the spatial development of the boundary-layer, resulting in detrimental impact on the skin-friction. However, the drag-reducing mechanism, attributed to the turbulence weakening, is found predominant and massive drag reductions remain achievable at high Reynolds number, although a minute part of the boundary-layer is manipulated. The model is finally assessed against Large Eddy Simulations of riblet-controlled flow.

  1. Skin-Friction Measurements on Mathematically Generated Roughness in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Engineering systems are affected by surface roughness, however, predicting frictional drag has proven to be challenging. One open question is how roughness topography, whether it is idealized 2D and 3D or irregular with multi-scale features, impacts the frictional drag. A previous study from Flack and Schultz (2010) presented a new model to estimate frictional drag based on surfaces statistics. The present work takes a systematic approach by generating and manufacturing surfaces roughness where surface statistics, such as rms, skewness and power-spectral density can be controlled. Skin-friction measurements are conducted in a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow facility, where the experiments cover all roughness regimes, from hydraulic-smooth to fully-rough. The surface roughness studied herein is produced using the random Fourier modes method with a varying power-law spectral slope, whereas the rms and surface amplitude are kept constant (krms ~ 45 μm and kt ~ 200 μm) while still possessing a Gaussian probability-density-function. These surfaces are then 3D-printed and replicated using a mold/cast technique to generate the top and bottom walls of the channel flow facility. Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  2. Engineering prediction of turbulent skin friction and heat transfer in high-speed flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cary, A. M., Jr.; Bertram, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    A large collection of experimental turbulent-skin-friction and heat-transfer data for flat plates and cones was used to determine the most accurate of six of the most popular engineering-prediction methods; the data represent a Mach number range from 4 to 13 and ratio of wall to total temperature ranging from 0.1 to 0.7. The Spalding and Chi method incorporating virtual-origin concepts was found to be the best prediction method for Mach numbers less than 10; the limited experimental data for Mach numbers greater than 10 were not well predicted by any of the engineering methods except the Coles method.

  3. Effects of Riblets on Skin Friction in High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets are conducted to examine the effects of riblets on skin friction at supersonic speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers with an adiabatic wall, a Mach number of M1 = 2.5, and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Re = 1720 are considered. Simulations are conducted for boundary-layer flows over a clean surface and symmetric V- groove riblets with nominal spacings of 20 and 40 wall units. The DNS results confirm the few existing experimental observations and show that a drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved for riblets with proper spacing. The influence of riblets on turbulence statistics is analyzed in detail with an emphasis on identifying the differences, if any, between the drag reduction mechanisms for incompressible and high-speed boundary layers.

  4. Heat transfer and friction factors in the ribbed square convergent and divergent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Ahn, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer and friction factors are reported for the measurements of turbulent flows in the convergent and divergent square channels with one-sided ribbed wall as well as two opposite in-line ribbed walls. The study covers three different hydraulic diameter ratios between inlet and exit at the test section such as Dho/Dhi = 0.75, 1.0, and 1.33 and Reynolds numbers in the range of 25,000-79,000. The channels, composing of ten isolated copper sections in the length of test section of 1 m, have the hydraulic diameter of 87.5 mm for the straight channel (Dho/Dhi = 1.0); the rib height-to-hydraulic diameter is 0.114; the rib pitch-to-height ratio equals 10. On the contrary to public opinion that the friction factor depends on the portion of the ribbed area, the total friction factor in the two opposite ribbed walls are lower than in the one-sided ribbed wall in the divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 because the total pressure, summing positive dynamic and negative static pressures, is acted. The results show that the two opposite ribbed divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 provides the best heat transfer enhancement and the two opposite ribbed convergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 0.75 provides the worst friction factor enhancement, and the ribbed divergent channels are generally recommended.

  5. Friction law and turbulent properties in a laboratory Ekman boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sous, D.; Sommeria, J.; Boyer, D.

    2013-04-01

    We use spin-up/spin-down laboratory experiments to study the neutrally stratified Ekman boundary layer. The experiments are performed in the 13 m diameter, 1 m deep Coriolis rotating tank of the LEGI in Grenoble, France. A global flow rotation is produced by an initial change in the tank rotation speed. It then slowly decays under the effect of Ekman friction, evolving from the turbulent state to the laminar state. It is checked that the Ekman layer itself remains in a quasi-steady state during this decay. The velocity is measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) at two scales: the global rotation in a horizontal plane, and the vertical profile inside the boundary layer, where the three velocity components are obtained by stereoscopic PIV. The friction law is obtained by relating the decay rate of the bulk velocity to the velocity itself. This method is justified by the fact that this bulk velocity is independent of height beyond the top of the boundary layer (a few cm), as expected from the Taylor-Proudman theorem for rotating fluids. The local measurements inside the boundary layer provide profiles of the mean velocity and Reynolds stress components, in particular the cross-isobar angle between the interior and near surface velocities. In the laminar regime, good agreement is obtained with the classical Ekman's theory, which validates the method. In the turbulent regime, the results are found consistent with the classical Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) model based on the von Karman logarithmic layer. Our experiments therefore indicate that this theory, in principle valid for very large Reynolds numbers, is already relevant close to the transitional regimes. A fit of the empirical coefficients A and B appearing in this theory yields A = 3.3 and B = 3.0. Extrapolating the results to the atmospheric case gives a friction velocity u* about 12% higher than the traditional fit for the ABL. We may safely deduce that for the oceanic bottom boundary layer

  6. Reynolds-number dependence of turbulent skin-friction drag reduction induced by spanwise forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines how increasing the value of the Reynolds number $Re$ affects the ability of spanwise-forcing techniques to yield turbulent skin-friction drag reduction. The considered forcing is based on the streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity (Quadrio {\\em et al. J. Fluid Mech.}, vol. 627, 2009, pp. 161--178). The study builds upon an extensive drag-reduction database created with Direct Numerical Simulation of a turbulent channel flow for two, 5-fold separated values of $Re$, namely $Re_\\tau=200$ and $Re_\\tau=1000$. The sheer size of the database, which for the first time systematically addresses the amplitude of the forcing, allows a comprehensive view of the drag-reducing characteristics of the travelling waves, and enables a detailed description of the changes occurring when $Re$ increases. The effect of using a viscous scaling based on the friction velocity of either the non-controlled flow or the drag-reduced flow is described. In analogy with other wall-based drag reduction techniques, like for example riblets, the performance of the travelling waves is well described by a vertical shift of the logarithmic portion of the mean streamwise velocity profile. Except when $Re$ is very low, this shift remains constant with $Re$, at odds with the percentage reduction of the friction coefficient, which is known to present a mild, logarithmic decline. Our new data agree with the available literature, which is however mostly based on low-$Re$ information and hence predicts a quick drop of maximum drag reduction with $Re$. The present study supports a more optimistic scenario, where for an airplane at flight Reynolds numbers a drag reduction of nearly 30\\% would still be possible thanks to the travelling waves.

  7. Design, modeling, and optimization of compliant tensegrity fabrics for the reduction of turbulent skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas R.

    2003-07-01

    In this project, we have designed a new type of flexible surface, which we call a tensegrity fabric, and simulated the interaction of this flexible surface with a near-wall turbulent flow. The fabric is constructed by weaving together both members in tension (tendons) and members in compression (bars) to form a plate-class tensegrity structure, then covering this discrete flexible structure with a continuous flexible membrane. We have modeled the flow/structure interaction by coupling a spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code resolving the (continuous) turbulent flow system and an efficient structural dynamics code which simulates direclty the motion of the (discrete) extensive, small-scale, and interconnected tensegrity structure. The structural dynamics code used was developed by Prof. Robert Skelton's lab at UC San Diego. An immersed boundary method is used to capture the effect of the moving boundary in the DNS, and a simple tessellation strategy is used to lump the distributed fluid forces (skin friction and pressure) acting on the membrane onto the nearby nodes of the tensegrity structure. Our ultimate goal is to use this new simulation tool to optimize the design of the tensegrity structure (specifically, the orientation, stiffness, mass, and damping of each of the individual tendons and bars in the unit cell upon which the tensegrity structure is based). Our objective in this optimization is to tune the compliance properties of the fabric in such a way as to reduce the skin-friction drag induced at teh flow/structure interface by weakening the vortices near the wall in the overlying turbulent flow.

  8. Pressure-gradient effects on hypersonic turbulent skin friction and boundary-layer profiles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, E. J.; Keener, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Local skin friction, total-temperature profiles, and pitot-pressure profiles were measured on the wall of a Mach-7.4 wind tunnel. The wall to adiabatic wall temperature ratio was varied from 0.3 to 0.5. Boundary-layer characteristics were compared with those predicted by a finite-difference method. Local skin friction was predicted to within 15%. Pressure-gradient effects on the temperature and Mach number distributions and the shape factor (displacement thickness/momentum thickness) were underpredicted, but the velocity distributions were closely predicted.

  9. The impact of algal biofilms on skin-friction in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Walker, Jessica

    2014-11-01

    Experiments were carried out in a fully-developed, turbulent channel flow facility over a wide Reynolds number range. The wall shear stress was determined using the bulk flow rate and the streamwise pressure gradient in the downstream section of the channel. A biofilm dominated by three species of diatoms developed on acrylic test surfaces exposed for four days in a brackish tidal environment at the United States Naval Academy. The resulting biofilm had an average thickness of 200 μm. This biofilm had a significant effect on the flow showing a doubling of the skin-friction compared to the hydraulically-smooth condition at the highest Reynolds number. Scale up of the present results to ship scale indicates that this biofilm would generate an 18% powering penalty for a mid-sized naval ship at cruising speed. This research was funded by ONR.

  10. Experimental Study of Characteristics of Micro-Hole Porous Skins for Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of micro-hole porous skins for the turbulent skin friction reduction technology called the micro-blowing technique (MBT) were assessed experimentally at Mach 0.4 and blowing fractions from zero to 0.005. The objective of this study was to provide guidelines for the selection of porous plates for MBT. The hole angle, pattern, diameter, aspect ratio, and porosity were the parameters considered for this study. The additional effort to angle and stagger the holes was experimentally determined to be unwarranted in terms of skin friction benefit; therefore, these parameters were systematically eliminated from the parametric study. The impact of the remaining three parameters was evaluated by fixing two parameters at the reference values while varying the third parameter. The best hole-diameter Reynolds number was found to be around 400, with an optimum aspect ratio of about 6. The optimum porosity was not conclusively discerned because the range of porosities in the test plates considered was not great enough. However, the porosity was estimated to be about 15 percent or less.

  11. Friction factor for isothermal and nonisothermal flow through porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.; Fortini, A.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure drops for gaseous flow through porous materials of different microstructures, porosities, and thickness under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions at various temperature levels. Results were satisfactorily correlated by a simple equation relating the friction factor to the Reynolds number and porosities.

  12. Friction Factor Characterization for High-Porosity Random Fiber Regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, the Department of Energy (DOE), and Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, Washington are developing a Stirling convertor for a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Power System to provide electric power for NASA Space Science Missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Steady-flow tests were completed to determine the friction factor for the high-porosity regenerators that are used in the TDC. STC fabricated a flow test fixture and three random fiber regenerator test samples, one each at approximately 80, 88, and 96 percent porosities. The flow tests were then completed by the NASA Glenn Flow Calibration Laboratory, and the data reduced to Reynolds number and friction factor. The results showed that the 80 and 88 percent porosity samples had similar characteristics while the 96 percent porosity sample had significantly higher friction factors for given Reynolds numbers compared to the samples with lower porosities. Comparisons were also made between the test data and existing correlations. STC used this data to derive a modified regenerator friction factor correlation for use in the Stirling design code GLIMPS for porosities greater than 88 percent. Using this new correlation, the final optimized regenerator design porosity was reduced from 96 to 90 percent.

  13. Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Yoshihiro; Clarke, Daryl D.; Ozeki, Shinichi

    Friction materials such as disk pads, brake linings, and clutch facings are widely used for automotive applications. Friction materials function during braking due to frictional resistance that transforms kinetic energy into thermal energy. There has been a rudimentary evolution, from materials like leather or wood to asbestos fabric or asbestos fabric saturated with various resins such as asphalt or resin combined with pitch. These efforts were further developed by the use of woven asbestos material saturated by either rubber solution or liquid resin binder and functioned as an internal expanding brake, similar to brake lining system. The role of asbestos continued through the use of chopped asbestos saturated by rubber, but none was entirely successful due to the poor rubber heat resistance required for increased speeds and heavy gearing demands of the automobile industry. The use of phenolic resins as binder for asbestos friction materials provided the necessary thermal resistance and performance characteristics. Thus, the utility of asbestos as the main friction component, for over 100 years, has been significantly reduced in friction materials due to asbestos identity as a carcinogen. Steel and other fibrous components have displaced asbestos in disk pads. Currently, non-asbestos organics are the predominate friction material. Phenolic resins continue to be the preferred binder, and increased amounts are necessary to meet the requirements of highly functional asbestos-free disk pads for the automotive industry. With annual automobile production exceeding 70 million vehicles and additional automobile production occurring in developing countries worldwide and increasing yearly, the amount of phenolic resin for friction material is also increasing (Fig. 14.1). Fig. 14.1 Worldwide commercial vehicle production Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  14. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  15. Measuring and modelling the frictional velocity u*, turbulence and heat fluxes above the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambke, Jens; Bye, John A. T.; Schmidt, Michael; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we analyse the frictional velocity u*, drag coefficient, vertical wind speed and turbulence profiles observed at different met-masts in the German North and Baltic Sea. We present an analysis of different models for the frictional velocity u* in convective, neutral and stable thermal stratification of the atmosphere. Atmospheric turbulent momentum and heat flux measurements performed with ultra-sonic anemometers are compared to profile-derived values and a bulk Richardson number formulation of the atmospheric thermal stability. Modelling: An improved approach to model the vertical wind speed profile is presented and compared against meso-scale model results (WRF, COSMO): Bye-Ekman-Coupling (BEC) describes the flux of momentum from the Ekman layer of the atmosphere through the Prandtl layer down to the air-sea interface by a modified wave boundary layer with enhanced Charnock dynamics (Bye et al. 2010). The BEC model is based on the coupled pair of similarity relations for "aerodynamically rough flow" in both fluids (air and sea). The derived drag law is of Charnock form, almost independent of the wave age and consistent with the transfer of momentum to the wave spectrum - which takes place in the smaller rather than the dominant wavelengths. Measurements: It was found that the frictional velocity u* is considerably smaller than predicted by conventional approaches using the Charnock relation: For wind speeds between 10 m/s and 15 m/s at 40 m height above the sea surface, u*(observed) is 14% smaller than u*(Charnock). Most important, we found unexpected, strong and obviously artificial distortions concerning the three wind speed components in the 10Hz data of the three ultra-sonic anemometers at the offshore met-mast FINO1 at 40 m, 60 m and 80 m height. The pattern of these distortions is independent from different post-processing procedures (planar-fit etc.). We anticipate that these artefacts imply severe problems for the eddy covariance technique

  16. A Comparative Study of Material Flow Behavior in Friction Stir Welding Using Laminar and Turbulent Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadian, Arun Kumar; Biswas, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding has been quite successful in joining aluminum alloy which has gained importance in almost all industrial sectors over the past two decades. It is a newer technique and therefore needs more attention in many sectors, flow of material being one among them. The material flow pattern actually helps in deciding the parameters required for particular tool geometry. The knowledge of material flow is very significant in removing defects from the weldment. In the work presented in this paper, the flow behavior of AA6061 under a threaded tool has been studied. The convective heat loss has been considered from all the surfaces, and a comparative study has been made with and without the use of temperature-dependent properties and their significance in the finite volume method model. The two types of models that have been implemented are turbulent and laminar models. Their thermal histories have been studied for all the cases. The material flow velocity has been analyzed to predict the flow of material. A swirl inside the weld material has been observed in all the simulations.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Skin-Friction Drag Reduction in Turbulent Channel Flow with Slip/No Slip Wall Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegari, Amirreza; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2011-11-01

    To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms at work in skin friction drag reduction with superhydrophobic surfaces, Lattice Boltzmann simulations were performed in turbulent channels with alternating slip/no slip ridges on the walls. Simulations were performed in turbulent channels of size 5 h × 2 . 5 × 2 h and 10 h × 5 h × 2 h at a base Reynolds number of Reτ ~ 230 . Alternating slip/no slip ridges of width 4 <= w + <= 140 , aligned in the streamwise direction, all with the same fractional area of slip boundary, were studied. Drag reductions of 4%, 8%, 21%, 33% and 47%, corresponding to slip velocities of Uslip /Ubulk = 0 . 05 , 0.1, 0.26, 0.31 and 0.36 were observed for w + = g + = 4, 8, 40, 70 and 140, respectively. The mean velocity profiles display the characteristics of combined slip described by Min and Kim [Min et al. 2004]. The streamwise and spanwise turbulence intensities show large slips at the wall, the magnitude of which increases with increasing drag reduction. Examination of the anisotropy invariant maps shows a shift of turbulence structure towards the one-dimensional turbulence limit near the wall with increasing drag reduction. For z+ > 25 , the turbulence structure returns to the isotropic limit.

  18. Friction Factor for Flow in Rectangular Ducts with One Side Rib-Roughened

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Yuen, C.; Mills, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations of incompressible turbulent flow through rectangular ducts with one side rib-roughened were performed to determine pressure drop. The "PHOENICS " software package was used for the computations, which required provision of a wall function for transverse rib-roughened surfaces. The present study was conducted in the range of 10(exp 5) less than or equal to Reynolds number less than or equal to 10(exp 7), 0.01 less than or equal to rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio less than or equal to 0.04, 10 less than or equal to pitch to rib height ratio less than or equal to 40. Using the numerical results, friction factor charts for various aspect ratios were generated. The numerical results agreed well with experimental data that was obtained for 10(exp 5) less than Reynolds less than 2 x 10(exp 5). In addition, a scheme for predicting friction factor using existing correlations for smooth and rough walls was developed.

  19. Laser Interferometer Skin-Friction measurements of crossing-shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, T. J.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    Wall shear stress measurements beneath crossingshock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions have been made for three interactions of different strengths. The interactions are generated by two sharp fins at symmetric angles of attack mounted on a flat plate. The shear stress measurements were made for fin angles of 7 and 11 degrees at Mach 3 and 15 degrees at Mach 4. The measurements were made using a Laser Interferometer Skin Friction (LISF) meter; a device which determines the wail shear by optically measuring the time rate of thinning of an oil film placed on the test model surface. Results of the measurements reveal high skin friction coefficients in the vicinity of the fin/plate junction and the presence of quasi-two-dimensional flow separation on the interaction centerline. Additionally, two Navier-Stokes computations, one using a Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and one using a k- model, are compared to the experimental results for the Mach 4, 15 degree interaction case. While the k- model did a reasonable job of predicting the overall trend in portions of the skin friction distribution, neither computation fully captured the physics of the near surface flow in this complex interaction.

  1. Direct measurements and analysis of skin friction and cooling downstream of multiple flush-slot injection into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. G.; Strokowski, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the reduction in surface skin friction and the effectiveness of surface cooling downstream of one to four successive flush slots injecting cold air at an angle of 10 deg into a turbulent Mach 6 boundary layer. Data were obtained by direct measurement of surface shear and equilibrium temperatures, respectively. Increasing the number of slots decreased the skin friction, but the incremental improvement in skin-friction reduction decreased as the number of slots was increased. Cooling effectiveness was found to improve, for a given total mass injection, as the number of slots was increased from one to four. Comparison with previously reported step-slot data, however, indicated that step slots with tangential injection are more effective for both reducing skin friction and cooling than the present flush-slot configuration. Finite-difference predictions are in reasonable agreement with skin-friction data and with boundary-layer profile data.

  2. Friction factor data for flat plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Tae Woong

    1989-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  3. Friction-factor data for flat-plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Childs, Dara W.

    1992-01-01

    Friction factors for honeycomb surfaces were measured with a flat plate tester. The flat plate test apparatus was described and a method was discussed for determining the friction factor experimentally. The friction factor model was developed for the flat plate test based on the Fanno Line Flow. The comparisons of the friction factor were plotted for smooth surfaces and six-honeycomb surfaces with three-clearances, 6.9 bar to 17.9 bar range of inlet pressures, and 5,000 to 100,000 range of the Reynolds number. The optimum geometries for the maximum friction factor were found as a function of cell width to cell depth and cell width to clearance ratios.

  4. Structure of atmospheric turbulence in the friction layer below 500 meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, S. J.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of wind direction and speed, vertical velocity, and temperature were made from several levels of the 444 m tower near Oklahoma City. Turbulence quantities were calculated from the covariances between observed variables over periods ranging from 5 min to 1 hr. It was found that in some cases parameters such as mean wind speed, shearing stress, and vertical heat flux could be expressed by simple equations for periods of 15 min to 1 hr. Changes in these quantities with time are related to changes in vertical motion and stability. Power spectra were calculated for sequential 15 min, 30 min, and 1 hr periods. The effects of stability, wind speed, and surface roughness on the spectra of longitudinal and lateral velocity were examined, along with the effect of height on the spectrum of vertical velocity. This region was shown to be composed of a lower region in which mechanical turbulence dominates and an upper region dominated by convective turbulence.

  5. High-Reynolds-number turbulent-boundary-layer wall pressure fluctuations with skin-friction reduction by air injection.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Eric S; Elbing, Brian R; Ceccio, Steven L; Perlin, Marc; Dowling, David R

    2008-05-01

    The hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations that occur on the solid surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer are a common source of flow noise. This paper reports multipoint surface pressure fluctuation measurements in water beneath a high-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer with wall injection of air to reduce skin-friction drag. The experiments were conducted in the U.S. Navy's Large Cavitation Channel on a 12.9-m-long, 3.05-m-wide hydrodynamically smooth flat plate at freestream speeds up to 20 ms and downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers exceeding 200 x 10(6). Air was injected from one of two spanwise slots through flush-mounted porous stainless steel frits (approximately 40 microm mean pore diameter) at volume flow rates from 17.8 to 142.5 l/s per meter span. The two injectors were located 1.32 and 9.78 m from the model's leading edge and spanned the center 87% of the test model. Surface pressure measurements were made with 16 flush-mounted transducers in an "L-shaped" array located 10.7 m from the plate's leading edge. When compared to no-injection conditions, the observed wall-pressure variance was reduced by as much as 87% with air injection. In addition, air injection altered the inferred convection speed of pressure fluctuation sources and the streamwise coherence of pressure fluctuations.

  6. Calculation of skin-friction coefficients for low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer flows. M.S. Thesis - California Univ. at Davis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the reliability of various generally accepted empirical expressions for the prediction of the skin-friction coefficient C/sub f/ of turbulent boundary layers at low Reynolds numbers in zero-pressure-gradient flows on a smooth flat plate. The skin-friction coefficients predicted from these expressions were compared to the skin-friction coefficients of experimental profiles that were determined from a graphical method formulated from the law of the wall. These expressions are found to predict values that are consistently different than those obtained from the graphical method over the range 600 Re/sub theta 2000. A curve-fitted empirical relationship was developed from the present data and yields a better estimated value of C/sub f/ in this range. The data, covering the range 200 Re/sub theta 7000, provide insight into the nature of transitional flows. They show that fully developed turbulent boundary layers occur at Reynolds numbers Re/sub theta/ down to 425. Below this level there appears to be a well-ordered evolutionary process from the laminar to the turbulent profiles. These profiles clearly display the development of the turbulent core region and the shrinking of the laminar sublayer with increasing values of Re/sub theta/.

  7. Modified friction factor correlation for CICC's based on a porous media analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Bagnasco, Maurizio

    2011-09-01

    A modified correlation for the bundle friction factor in CICC's based on a porous media analogy is presented. The correlation is obtained by the analysis of the collected pressure drop data measured for 23 CICC's. The friction factors predicted by the proposed correlation are compared with those resulting from the pressure drop data for two CICC's measured recently using cryogenic helium in the SULTAN test facility at EPFL-CRPP.

  8. Development of colburn ` j' factor and fanning friction factor ` f' correlations for compact heat exchanger plain fins by using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala Sundar Rao, R.; Ranganath, G.; Ranganayakulu, C.

    2013-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed for plain fin of plate fin heat exchanger. Plain fin performance has been analyzed with the help of CFD by changing the various parameters of the fin, Colburn ` j' and fanning friction ` f' factors are calculated. These values compared with the standard values. The correlations have been developed between Reynolds number Re, fin height h, fin thickness t, fin spacing s, Colburn factor ` j' and friction factor ` f'.

  9. Global effect of local skin friction drag reduction in spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Schlatter, P.; Frohnapfel, B.

    2016-10-01

    A numerical investigation of two locally applied drag reducing control schemes is carried out in the configuration of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL). One control is designed to damp near-wall turbulence and the other induces constant mass flux in the wall-normal direction. Both control schemes yield similar local drag reduction rates within the control region. However, the flow development downstream of the control significantly differs: persistent drag reduction is found for the uniform blowing case whereas drag increase is found for the turbulence damping case. In order to account for this difference the formulation of a global drag reduction rate is suggested. It represents the reduction of the streamwise force exerted by the fluid on a finite length plate. Furthermore, it is shown that the far downstream development of the TBL after the control region can be described by a single quantity, namely a streamwise shift of the uncontrolled boundary layer, i.e. a changed virtual origin. Based on this result, a simple model is developed that allows relating for the local drag reduction rate to the global one without the need of conducting expensive simulations or measurements far downstream of the control region.

  10. The obstacle block as a device to measure turbulent skin friction in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfstrom, G. M.; Kostopoulos, C.; Peake, D. J.; Fisher, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    The obstacle block, developed as an alternative to the Preston tube for indirectly measuring skin friction on smooth surfaces in incompressible flows, is examined as a device for compressible flows as well. The block, which is congruent with a surface static pressure orifice, has a geometry which is easily specified and thus has a universal calibration. Data from two independent studies are used to establish such a calibration using 'wall' variables, valid for Mach numbers up to about 3. Various aspects concerning practical application of the device are examined, such as sensitivity to yaw and the minimum permissible axial spacing between blocks. Several examples showing the utility of the device are given.

  11. Friction Factor Evaluation Using Experimental and Finite Element Methods for Al-4%Cu Preforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalegn, Wogaso; Davidson, M. J.; Khanra, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, ring compression tests and finite element (FE) simulations have been utilized to evaluate the friction factor, m, under different lubricating conditions for powder metallurgical (P/M) Al-4%Cu preforms. A series of ring compression tests were carried out to obtain friction factor ( m) for a number of lubricating conditions, including zinc stearate, graphite, molybdenum disulfide powder, and unlubricated condition. FE simulations were used to analyze materials deformation, densification, and geometric changes, and to derive the friction calibration curves. The friction factor has been determined for various initial relative densities and different lubricating conditions, and a proper lubricant for cold forging of P/M Al-4%Cu preforms is found. Studies show that the use of lubricants has reduced the friction. However, increase in the number of pores in the preforms leads to excessive friction. The FE simulation results demonstrate a shift in the neutral plane distance from the axis of ring specimen, which occurred due to variations in the frictional conditions and initial relative densities. The load requirement for deformation, effective stress, and effective strain induced, and bulging phenomena obtained by FE simulations have a good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Entrance and exit region friction factor models for annular seal analysis. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David Alan

    1988-01-01

    The Mach number definition and boundary conditions in Nelson's nominally-centered, annular gas seal analysis are revised. A method is described for determining the wall shear stress characteristics of an annular gas seal experimentally. Two friction factor models are developed for annular seal analysis; one model is based on flat-plate flow theory; the other uses empirical entrance and exit region friction factors. The friction factor predictions of the models are compared to experimental results. Each friction model is used in an annular gas seal analysis. The seal characteristics predicted by the two seal analyses are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis. The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb stators. The comparisons show that the analysis which uses empirical entrance and exit region shear stress models predicts the static and stability characteristics of annular gas seals better than the other analyses. The analyses predict direct stiffness poorly.

  13. A robust post-processing method to determine skin friction in turbulent boundary layers from the velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes a method to extrapolate the mean wall shear stress, , and the accurate relative position of a velocity probe with respect to the wall, , from an experimentally measured mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer. Validation is made between experimental and direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer flows with independent measurement of the shear stress. The set of parameters which minimize the residual error with respect to the canonical description of the boundary layer profile is taken as the solution. Several methods are compared, testing different descriptions of the canonical mean velocity profile (with and without overshoot over the logarithmic law) and different definitions of the residual function of the optimization. The von Kármán constant is used as a parameter of the fitting process in order to avoid any hypothesis regarding its value that may be affected by different initial or boundary conditions of the flow. Results show that the best method provides an accuracy of for the estimation of the friction velocity and for the position of the wall. The robustness of the method is tested including unconverged near-wall measurements, pressure gradient, and reduced number of points; the importance of the location of the first point is also tested, and it is shown that the method presents a high robustness even in highly distorted flows, keeping the aforementioned accuracies if one acquires at least one data point in . The wake component and the thickness of the boundary layer are also simultaneously extrapolated from the mean velocity profile. This results in the first study, to the knowledge of the authors, where a five-parameter fitting is carried out without any assumption on the von Kármán constant and the limits of the logarithmic layer further from its existence.

  14. An annular gas seal analysis using empirical entrance and exit region friction factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.; Nelson, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Wall shear stress results from stationary-rotor flow tests of five annular gas seals are used to develop entrance and exit region friction factor models. The friction factor models are used in a bulk-flow seal analysis which predicts leakage and rotor-dynamic coefficients. The predictions of the analysis are compared to experimental results and to the predictions of Nelson's analysis (1985). The comparisons are for smooth-rotor seals with smooth and honeycomb-stators. The present analysis predicts the destabilizing cross-coupled stiffness of a seal better than Nelson's analysis. Both analyses predict direct damping well and direct stiffness poorly.

  15. Drag reduction by polymer additives from turbulent spectra.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Esteban

    2010-12-01

    We extend the analysis of the friction factor for turbulent pipe flow reported by G. Gioia and P. Chakraborty [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044502 (2006)] to the case where drag is reduced by polymer additives.

  16. Optimization of conical hydrostatic bearing for minimum friction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Hamrock, B. J.; Scibbe, H. W.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Equations for the flow rate, load capacity, and friction torque for a conical hydrostatic bearing were developed. These equations were solved by a digital computer program to determine bearing configurations for minimum friction torque. Design curves are presented that show optimal bearing dimensions for minimum friction torque as a function of dimensionless flow rate for a range of dimensionless load capacity. Results are shown for both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The results indicate that hydrostatic pocket friction is a significant portion of the total friction torque. However, the bearing dimensions for a minimum friction design are affected very little by inclusion of pocket friction in the analysis. For laminar flow the values of the outer-land radius ratio X3 and outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change significantly with increasing friction factor. For turbulent flow, the outer bearing radius ratio X4 did not change with increasing friction factor; therefore the value determined for X4 in the laminar flow case is valid for all turbulent flows.

  17. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  18. Surface-specific flow factors for prediction of friction of cross-hatched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, M.; Rahmani, R.; Rahnejat, H.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a combined numerical and experimental study of generated sliding friction at low sliding speeds and high load intensity, typical of the top compression ring-cylinder liner conjunction at top dead centre in the compression stroke of high performance race engines. Frictional losses in the transition from compression to power stroke represent a significant portion of cyclic cylinder losses. The cylinder liner is cross-hatch honed with non-Gaussian topography, including larger groove features and a fairly smooth plateau roughness. Surface-specific flow factors are derived to closely represent the actual real rough conjunction. The predictions closely agree with the representative reported precision tribometric study of measured friction.

  19. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures. PMID:25553671

  20. Biomechanical risk factors and flexor tendon frictional work in the cadaveric carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kociolek, Aaron M; Tat, Jimmy; Keir, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Pathological changes in carpal tunnel syndrome patients include fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) adjacent to the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. These clinical findings suggest an etiology of excessive shear-strain force between the tendon and SSCT, underscoring the need to assess tendon gliding characteristics representative of repetitive and forceful work. A mechanical actuator moved the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon proximally and distally in eight fresh frozen cadaver arms. Eighteen experimental conditions tested the effects of three well-established biomechanical predictors of injury, including a combination of two wrist postures (0° and 30° flexion), three tendon velocities (50, 100, 150mm/sec), and three forces (10, 20, 40N). Tendon gliding resistance was determined with two light-weight load cells, and integrated over tendon displacement to represent tendon frictional work. During proximal tendon displacement, frictional work increased with tendon velocity (58.0% from 50-150mm/sec). There was a significant interaction between wrist posture and tendon force. In wrist flexion, frictional work increased 93.0% between tendon forces of 10 and 40N. In the neutral wrist posture, frictional work only increased 33.5% (from 10-40N). During distal tendon displacement, there was a similar multiplicative interaction on tendon frictional work. Concurrent exposure to multiple biomechanical work factors markedly increased tendon frictional work, thus providing a plausible link to the pathogenesis of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Additionally, our study provides the conceptual basis to evaluate injury risk, including the multiplicative repercussions of combined physical exposures.

  1. Internal friction Q factor measurements in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations to aid in the interpretation of seismic data obtained below the lunar surface are reported. Fine grained basalt with about 1.0% open core porosity was encapsulated under hard vacuum and measured. A Q value just under 2,000 at 0.5 kbar was achieved for a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt. In contrast to the modulus which increases by as much as 10%, the quality factor Q shows little or no change with pressure (a well outgassed sample maintains a high Q, whereas one exposed to laboratory atmosphere maintains a low Q). This result suggests that the absence of volatiles plays an important role in determining the q factor even at a depth of 10 km below the lunar surface.

  2. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  3. Roughness-induced critical phenomena in a turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-02-01

    I present empirical evidence that turbulent flows are closely analogous to critical phenomena, from a reanalysis of friction factor measurements in rough pipes. The data collapse found here corresponds to Widom scaling near critical points, and implies that a full understanding of turbulence requires explicit accounting for boundary roughness.

  4. Exploring factors affecting measurements of the static coefficient of friction: An application of fractional factorial experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkerts, Timothy J.

    2004-10-01

    The common undergraduate experiment for determining the static coefficient of friction between a wooden block and a horizontal tabletop often produces inconsistent results. We show how several factors influence the measured magnitude and consistency of the coefficient of friction. We utilize a fractional factorial experimental design, which is a method that has been specifically developed to effectively and efficiently uncover key factors that most strongly influence experimental results.

  5. The influence of void fraction on the submerged perforated sheet hydraulic friction factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinkov, V. N.; Elkin, I. V.; Emelianov, D. A.; Melikhov, V. I.; Melikhov, O. I.; Nerovnov, A. A.; Nikonov, S. M.; Parfenov, Yu. V.

    2015-07-01

    The results from an experimental investigation of two-phase flow motion through a submerged perforated sheet (SPS) obtained at the Elektrogorsk Research Center test facility are presented. The test facility, the test section of which is a transverse "cutout" from the full-scale PGV-1000 steam generator with the models of vessel internals, is described in detail. The procedure for carrying out trial startups is outlined, and the system of instrument and control devices is described. The SPS used in all experimental modes of operation had the perforation ratio (the hole area to the sheet area ratio) equal to 5.7%. The pressure in the system was around 7 MPa, and the flow rate of supplied steam was varied from 4.23 to 7.94 t/h, which corresponded to the steam velocity at the evaporation surface equal to 0.15-0.29 m/s. Distributions of pressure difference across the SPS and void fractions under the SPS and above it are obtained. The SPS hydraulic friction factor for a two-phase flow is determined as a result of processing the experimental data. A correction for two-phase nature of the flow for the SPS operating conditions is determined by comparing the obtained SPS hydraulic friction factor for a two-phase flow with the SPS hydraulic friction factor to single-phase flow of steam. It is shown that this correction can be either greater than unity (at low void fractions) or less than unity (at high void fractions).

  6. Apparatus for measuring internal friction Q factors in brittle materials. [applied to lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Curnow, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A flexural analog of the torsion pendulum for measuring the Young's modulus and the internal friction Q factor of brittle materials has been developed for Q greater than 10 to the 3rd measurements at a zero static stress and at 10 to the -7th strains of brittle materials in the Hz frequency range. The present design was motivated by the desire to measure Q in fragile lunar return samples at zero static stress to shed light on the anomalously low attenuation of seismic waves on the moon. The use of the apparatus is demonstrated with data on fused silica and on a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt.

  7. Refinement of the dependences of the contact friction stresses in the deformation zone during cold rolling on the technological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, E. A.; Yagudin, I. V.; Traino, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    The regression equation used to calculate the friction coefficient between a strip and rolls in the working stands of cold-rolling mills is refined using a database containing 580 friction coefficients. The reliability of this equation and the importance of the factors entering into it are proved by mathematical statistics methods. As compared to the calculations performed by alternative equations, the calculation of the rolling force by the refined formula decreases the difference between the calculated and experimental results more than twofold.

  8. Prediction of friction factor of pure water flowing inside vertical smooth and microfin tubes by using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çebi, A.; Akdoğan, E.; Celen, A.; Dalkilic, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model of friction factor in smooth and microfin tubes under heating, cooling and isothermal conditions was developed in this study. Data used in ANN was taken from a vertically positioned heat exchanger experimental setup. Multi-layered feed-forward neural network with backpropagation algorithm, radial basis function networks and hybrid PSO-neural network algorithm were applied to the database. Inputs were the ratio of cross sectional flow area to hydraulic diameter, experimental condition number depending on isothermal, heating, or cooling conditions and mass flow rate while the friction factor was the output of the constructed system. It was observed that such neural network based system could effectively predict the friction factor values of the flows regardless of their tube types. A dependency analysis to determine the strongest parameter that affected the network and database was also performed and tube geometry was found to be the strongest parameter of all as a result of analysis.

  9. Reynolds-number dependence of the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flow.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Christopher; Angheluta, Luiza; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    In Taylor's theory, the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flows approaches, on long time scales, a diffusive behavior with a constant diffusivity K_{L}, which depends empirically on the Reynolds number Re. We show that the dependence on Re can be determined from the turbulent energy spectrum. By using the intimate connection between the friction factor and the longitudinal dispersion in wall-bounded turbulence, we predict different asymptotic scaling laws of K_{L}(Re) depending on the different turbulent cascades in two-dimensional turbulence. We also explore numerically the K_{L}(Re) dependence in turbulent channel flows with smooth and rough walls using a lattice Boltzmann method.

  10. Laminar heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of carbon nano tube/water nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Rathnakumar, P; Mayilsamy, K; Suresh, S; Murugesan, P

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of CNT/water nanofluid through a circular tube fitted with helical screw tape inserts with constant heat flux under laminar flow condition. Nanofluids of 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions are prepared by two step method. Thermo-physical properties like thermal conductivity and viscosity are measured by using KD2 thermal property analyzer and Brooke field cone and plate viscometer respectively. From the measurements, it is found that the viscosity increase is substantially higher than the increase in the thermal conductivity. The helical screw tape insets with twist ratios Y = 3, 2.44 and 1.78 are used to study the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics under laminar flow in the Reynolds number range of 520-2500. It is observed that, in a plain tube, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number for 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions of nanofluids compared to pure water is 15% and 32% respectively. With the use of inserts, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number corresponding to twist ratios of 1.78, 2.44 and 3 are obtained as 8%, 16% and 4.6% for 0.1% volume fraction of nanofluid and 5%, 4% and 12% for 0.2% volume fraction of nanofluid when compared with water in plain tube. Thermal performance factor evaluation revealed that the values at all Reynolds number for all twist ratios and both concentration of CNT nanofluid are greater than unity which indicates that helical screw tape inserts with twist ratios considered are feasible in terms of energy saving in laminar flow.

  11. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, Jon A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent bounday layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free stream to the boundary layers.

  12. The influence of free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with mild adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Kassir, S. M.; Larwood, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of near isotropic free-stream turbulence on the shape factors and skin friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers is presented for the cases of zero and mild adverse pressure gradients. With free-stream turbulence, improved fluid mixing occurs in boundary layers with adverse pressure gradients relative to the zero pressure gradient condition, with the same free-stream turbulence intensity and length scale. Stronger boundary layers with lower shape factors occur as a result of a lower ratio of the integral scale of turbulence to the boundary layer thickness, and to vortex stretching of the turbulent eddies in the free-stream, both of which act to improve the transmission of momentum from the free-stream to the boundary layers.

  13. Propagation factors of cosine-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model beams in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Feng; Zhang, Zhou; Qu, Jun; Huang, Wei

    2014-09-22

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function (WDF), we have studied the relative root-mean-square (rms) angular width and the propagation factor of cosine-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model (CGSM) beams propagating in non-Kolmogorov turbulence. It has been found that the CGSM beam has advantage over the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam for reducing the turbulence-induced degradation, and this advantage will be more obvious for the beams with larger parameter n and spatial coherence δ or under the condition of stronger fluctuation of turbulence. The CGSM beam with larger parameter n or smaller spatial coherence δ will be less affected by the turbulence. In addition, the effects of the slope-parameter α, inner and outer scale and the refractive-index structure constant of the non-Kolmogorov's power spectrum on the propagation factor are also analyzed in detailed.

  14. Beam propagation factor of partially coherent flat-topped beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zhang, Bin

    2008-09-29

    The Wigner distribution function (WDF) has been used to study the beam propagation factor (M(2)-factor) for partially coherent flat-topped (PCFT) beams with circular symmetry in a turbulent atmosphere. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the definition of the WDF, an expression for the WDF of PCFT beams in turbulence has been given. By use of the second-order moments of the WDF, the analytical formulas for the root-mean-square (rms) spatial width, the rms angular width, and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been derived, which can be applied to cases of different spatial power spectra of the refractive index fluctuations. The rms angular width and the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence have been discussed with numerical examples. It can be shown that the M(2)-factor of PCFT beams in turbulence depends on the beam order, degree of global coherence of the source, waist width, wavelength, spatial power spectrum of the refractive index fluctuations, and propagation distance.

  15. Propagation factors of multi-sinc Schell-model beams in non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenzhen; Liu, Zhengjun; Zhou, Keya; Sun, Qiongge; Liu, Shutian

    2016-01-25

    We derive several analytical expressions for the root-mean-square (rms) angular width and the M(2)-factor of the multi-sinc Schell-model (MSSM) beams propagating in non-Kolmogorov turbulence with the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle and the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function. Numerical results show that a MSSM beam with dark-hollow far fields in free space has advantage over the one with flat-topped or multi-rings far fields for reducing the turbulence-induced degradation, which will become more obvious with larger dark-hollow size. Beam quality of MSSM beams can be further improved with longer wavelength and larger beam width, or under the condition of weaker turbulence. We also demonstrate that the non-Kolmogorov turbulence has significantly less effect on the MSSM beams than the Gaussian Schell-model beam.

  16. Diminishing friction of joint surfaces as initiating factor for destabilising permafrost rocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, Daniel; Krautblatter, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Degrading alpine permafrost due to changing climate conditions causes instabilities in steep rock slopes. Due to a lack in process understanding, the hazard is still difficult to asses in terms of its timing, location, magnitude and frequency. Current research is focused on ice within joints which is considered to be the key-factor. Monitoring of permafrost-induced rock failure comprises monitoring of temperature and moisture in rock-joints. The effect of low temperatures on the strength of intact rock and its mechanical relevance for shear strength has not been considered yet. But this effect is signifcant since compressive and tensile strength is reduced by up to 50% and more when rock thaws (Mellor, 1973). We hypotheisze, that the thawing of permafrost in rocks reduces the shear strength of joints by facilitating the shearing/damaging of asperities due to the drop of the compressive/tensile strength of rock. We think, that decreasing surface friction, a neglected factor in stability analysis, is crucial for the onset of destabilisation of permafrost rocks. A potential rock slide within the permafrost zone in the Wetterstein Mountains (Zugspitze, Germany) is the basis for the data we use for the empirical joint model of Barton (1973) to estimate the peak shear strength of the shear plane. Parameters are the JRC (joint roughness coefficient), the JCS (joint compressive strength) and the residual friction angle (φr). The surface roughness is measured in the field with a profile gauge to create 2D-profiles of joint surfaces. Samples of rock were taken to the laboratory to measure compressive strength using a high-impact Schmidt-Hammer under air-dry, saturated and frozen conditions on weathered and unweathered surfaces. Plugs where cut out of the rock and sand blasted for shear tests under frozen and unfrozen conditions. Peak shear strength of frozen and unfrozen rocks will be calculated using Barton's model. First results show a mean decrease of compressive

  17. Turbulent forced diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaci, V.S.; Li, C.Y.

    1995-07-01

    It is the purpose of this study to introduce a turbulent microscale appropriate for forced diffusion flames and to propose models for fuel consumption and skin friction in terms of this scale. The study consists of four sections. Following the introduction, Section 2 recapitulates the laminar theories of reacting boundary layers in terms of dimensional arguments and proposes models for fuel consumption and skin friction. Section 3 extends these arguments by introducing a microscale appropriate for turbulent flames and, in terms of this scale, develops models for fuel consumption and skin friction, correlates the experimental data on skin friction, and Section 4 concludes the study.

  18. Internal friction quality-factor Q under confining pressure. [of lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Ahlberg, L.; Nadler, H.; Curnow, J.; Smith, T.; Cohen, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    It has been found in previous studies that small amounts of adsorbed volatiles can have a profound effect on the internal friction quality-factor Q of rocks and other porous media. Pandit and Tozer (1970) have suggested that the laboratory-measured Q of volatile-free rocks should be similar to the in situ seismic Q values of near-surface lunar rocks which according to Latham et al. (1970) are in the range of 3000-5000. Observations of dramatic increases in Q with outgassing up to values approaching 2000 in the seismic frequency range confirm this supposition. Measurements under confining pressures with the sample encapsulated under hard vacuum are reported to aid in the interpretation of seismic data obtained below the lunar surface. It has been possible to achieve in the experiments Q values just under 2000 at about 1 kbar for a terrestrial analog of lunar basalt. It was found that a well-outgassed sample maintains a high Q whereas one exposed to moisture maintains a low Q as the confining pressure is raised to 2.5 kbar. This result suggests that volatiles can indeed affect Q when cracks are partially closed and the high lunar seismic Q values reported are concomitant with very dry rock down to depths of at least 50 km.

  19. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazridoust, Kambiz; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2006-09-01

    SummarySingle-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the Gambit™ code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENT™ was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  20. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Nazridoust, K.; Ahmadi, G.; Smith, D.H.

    2006-09-30

    Single-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the GambitTM code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENTTM was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  1. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  2. An entrance region friction factor model applied to annular seal analysis - Theory versus experiment for smooth and honeycomb seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D.; Nelson, C.; Childs, D.

    1989-01-01

    A friction factor model is developed for the entrance-region of a duct. The model is used in an annular gas seal analysis similar to Nelson's (1984). Predictions of the analysis are compared to experimental results for a smooth-stator/smooth-rotor seal and three honeycomb-stator/smooth-rotor seals. The model predicts a leakage and direct damping well. The model overpredicts the dependence of cross-coupled stiffness on fluid prerotation. The model predicts direct stiffness poorly.

  3. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers and friction; Proceedings of the Energy Sources Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, February 12-15, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggert, D. C.; Martin, C. S.

    1983-09-01

    The present conference discusses experiments in periodic turbulent pipe flow whose fluids include air, water, oil, and electrolyte solutions, as well as pressure and heat transfer measurements around a cylinder in pulsating crossflow and the calculation of oscillatory turbulent flows in open channels. Also considered are the transient response of a turbulent boundary layer to a spontaneous change in freestream velocity distribution, evidence of large scale time-dependent flow in a wing-wall interaction wake, and the effect of the interaction between mean and fluctuating velocity components on turbulent dispersion in unsteady turbulent boundary layers.

  4. Modelling of the subgrid scale wrinkling factor for large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesset, Fabien; Maurice, Guillaume; Halter, Fabien; Mazellier, Nicolas; Chauveau, Christian; Gökalp, Iskender

    2016-05-01

    We propose a model for assessing the unresolved wrinkling factor in the large eddy simulation of turbulent premixed combustion. It relies essentially on a power-law dependence of the wrinkling factor on the filter size and an original expression for the 'active' corrugating strain rate. The latter is written as the turbulent strain multiplied by an efficiency function that accounts for viscous effects and the kinematic constraint of Peters. This yields functional expressions for the fractal dimension and the inner cut-off length scale, the latter being (i) filter-size independent and (ii) consistent with the Damköhler asymptotic behaviours at both large and small Karlovitz numbers. A new expression for the wrinkling factor that incorporates finite Reynolds number effects is further proposed. Finally, the model is successfully assessed on an experimental filtered database.

  5. Friction in orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Prashant, P. S.; Nandan, Hemant; Gopalakrishnan, Meera

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that resistance to sliding (RS) generated at the wire-bracket interface has a bearing on the force transmitted to the teeth. The relative importance of static and kinetic friction and also the effect of friction on anchorage has been a topic of debate. Lot of research work has been done to evaluate the various factors that affect friction and thus purportedly retards the rate of tooth movement. However, relevancy of these studies is questionable as the methodology used hardly simulates the oral conditions. Lately studies have concluded that more emphasis should be laid on binding and notching of archwires as these are considered to be the primary factors involved in retarding the tooth movement. This article reviews the various components involved in RS and the factors affecting friction. Further, research work should be carried out to provide cost effective alternatives aimed at reducing friction. PMID:26538873

  6. CFD analysis of heat transfer and friction factor charaterstics in a circular tube fitted with horizontal baffles twisted tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Bakar Mohamad, Abu

    2013-12-01

    Swirl/vortex flow generator is an important form of passive augmentation techniques. Twisted-tape is one of the most important members of this form which is used extensively in different type heat exchangers. This paper reports the effect of twisted tape inserts on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in circular tube under constant heat flux and laminar flow conditions using CFD simulation. Plain twisted tape inserts with twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91) and baffled twisted tape inserts with twist ratio (y = 2.93) have been used for the simulation using Fluent version 6.3.26. The results obtained by simulation matched with the literature correlations for plain tube with the discrepancy of less than ± 8% for Nusselt number and ± 6.25% for friction factor. The results have also revealed that the heat transfer in term of the Nusselt number enhanced with increases of Reynolds number, decreases of twist ratio and baffle insert. Among the various twist ratios, the twisted tape with twist ratio of y=2.93 and baffle is offered a maximum heat transfer enhancement.

  7. Effects of temperature factor of cone nose-tip on a transition to turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.; Nastobursky, A. S.; Maslov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    During the flight of a hypersonic vehicle the areas of local heating of the surface can appear due to various reasons: the local separation zone, the incident shock wave, the joints of different materials and so forth. These areas change the temperature factor, i.e. the ratio of the surface temperature to the recovery temperature. Previous studies have shown that a local change of the temperature factor strongly influences the position of the laminar-turbulent transition in hypersonic boundary layer [1]. It was also shown that the degree of this effect depends on the position of the local heating/cooling area of the model surface. The leading edge or nose-tip of the model is an important area where the processes of receptivity occur. Disturbances converted to inner pulsation of the boundary layer is gradually increasing downstream, provoking non-linear processes, resulting in a laminar-turbulent transition. It is well known that the bluntness of model-tip substantially shifts transition position downstream. On the other hand the biggest heat loads occurs in the area of nose of reentry vehicle sufficiently changing temperature of nose-tip. Behavior of disturbances when changing the temperature factor of a blunt nose has not yet been investigated. In this paper the effect of temperature factor of blunt nose-tip change on the development of the perturbation of the boundary layer and the position of the transition was studied.

  8. Factors controlling threshold friction velocity in semiarid and arid areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marticorena, Beatrice; Bergametti, G.; Belnap, Jayne

    1997-01-01

    A physical model was developed to explain threshold friction velocities u*t for particles of the size 60a??120 I?m lying on a rough surface in loose soils for semiarid and arid parts of the United States. The model corrected for the effect of momentum absorption by the nonerodible roughness. For loose or disturbed soils the most important parameter that controls u*t is the aerodynamic roughness height z 0. For physical crusts damaged by wind the size of erodible crust pieces is important along with the roughness. The presence of cyanobacteriallichen soil crusts roughens the surface, and the biological fibrous growth aggregates soil particles. Only undisturbed sandy soils and disturbed soils of all types would be expected to be erodible in normal wind storms. Therefore disturbance of soils by both cattle and humans is very important in predicting wind erosion as confirmed by our measurements.

  9. Factors Influencing Pitot Probe Centerline Displacement in a Turbulent Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosser, Wendy I.

    1997-01-01

    When a total pressure probe is used for measuring flows with transverse total pressure gradients, a displacement of the effective center of the probe is observed (designated Delta). While this phenomenon is well documented in incompressible flow and supersonic laminar flow, there is insufficient information concerning supersonic turbulent flow. In this study, three NASA Lewis Research Center Supersonic Wind Tunnels (SWT's) were used to investigate pitot probe centerline displacement in supersonic turbulent boundary layers. The relationship between test conditions and pitot probe centerline displacement error was to be determined. For this investigation, ten circular probes with diameter-to-boundary layer ratios (D/delta) ranging from 0.015 to 0.256 were tested in the 10 ft x 10 ft SWT, the 15 cm x 15 cm SWT, and the 1 ft x 1 ft SWT. Reynolds numbers of 4.27 x 10(exp 6)/m, 6.00 x 10(exp 6)/in, 10.33 x 10(exp 6)/in, and 16.9 x 10(exp 6)/m were tested at nominal Mach numbers of 2.0 and 2.5. Boundary layer thicknesses for the three tunnels were approximately 200 mm, 13 mm, and 30 mm, respectively. Initial results indicate that boundary layer thickness, delta, and probe diameter, D/delta play a minimal role in pitot probe centerline offset error, Delta/D. It appears that the Mach gradient, dM/dy, is an important factor, though the exact relationship has not yet been determined. More data is needed to fill the map before a conclusion can be drawn with any certainty. This research provides valuable supersonic, turbulent boundary layer data from three supersonic wind tunnels with three very different boundary layers. It will prove a valuable stepping stone for future research into the factors influencing pitot probe centerline offset error.

  10. Local convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of CuO/water nanofluid in a microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabi, A. R.; Zarrinabadi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Salimi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Forced convective heat transfer in a microchannel heat sink (MCHS) using CuO/water nanofluids with 0.1 and 0.2 vol% as coolant was investigated. The experiments were focused on the heat transfer enhancement in the channel entrance region at Re < 1800. Hydraulic performance of the MCHS was also estimated by measuring friction factor and pressure drop. Results showed that higher convective heat transfer coefficient was obtained at the microchannel entrance. Maximum enhancement of the average heat transfer coefficient compared with deionized water was about 40 % for 0.2 vol% nanofluid at Re = 1150. Enhancement of the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid decreased with further increasing of Reynolds number.

  11. Direct Measurements of Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, Satish

    1953-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure local skin friction on a flat plate by measuring the force exerted upon a very small movable part of the surface of the flat plate. These forces, which range from about 1 milligram to about 100 milligrams, are measured by means of a reactance device. The apparatus was first applied to measurements in the low-speed range, both for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The measured skin-friction coefficients show excellent agreement with Blasius' and Von Karman's results. The device was then applied to high-speed subsonic flow and the turbulent-skin-friction coefficients were determined up to a Mach number of about 0.8. A few measurements in supersonic flow were also made. This paper describes the design and construction of the device and the results of the measurements.

  12. Semiempirical methods for computing turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, I. A.; Ginzburg, I. P.

    1986-01-01

    Two semiempirical theories which provide a basis for determining the turbulent friction and heat exchange near a wall are presented: (1) the Prandtl-Karman theory, and (2) the theory utilizing an equation for the energy of turbulent pulsations. A comparison is made between exact numerical methods and approximate integral methods for computing the turbulent boundary layers in the presence of pressure, blowing, or suction gradients. Using the turbulent flow around a plate as an example, it is shown that, when computing turbulent flows with external turbulence, it is preferable to construct a turbulence model based on the equation for energy of turbulent pulsations.

  13. Reynolds-number dependence of the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flow.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Christopher; Angheluta, Luiza; Krotkiewski, Marcin; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    In Taylor's theory, the longitudinal dispersion in turbulent pipe flows approaches, on long time scales, a diffusive behavior with a constant diffusivity K_{L}, which depends empirically on the Reynolds number Re. We show that the dependence on Re can be determined from the turbulent energy spectrum. By using the intimate connection between the friction factor and the longitudinal dispersion in wall-bounded turbulence, we predict different asymptotic scaling laws of K_{L}(Re) depending on the different turbulent cascades in two-dimensional turbulence. We also explore numerically the K_{L}(Re) dependence in turbulent channel flows with smooth and rough walls using a lattice Boltzmann method. PMID:27176402

  14. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  15. New Empirical Relationship between Thrust Coefficient and Induction Factor for the Turbulent Windmill State

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.L., Jr.

    2005-08-01

    Wind turbines sometimes experience the turbulent windmill state during startup or shutdown. This rarely happens during normal operation, so it has little effect on power curves or energy production. However, for completeness we need to be able to model situations where the axial induction factor exceeds 0.5. Classical momentum theory, which shows a relationship between the thrust coefficient and the axial induction factor, is not valid in this region. Glauert plotted some experimental data taken by Lock in the 1920s against this parabolic relationship and found very poor agreement for operation in this high-induction state. He proposed a new empirical relationship to fit the experimental data. Unfortunately, the new empirical curve does not account for tip or hub losses. Others have proposed multiplying the axial induction factor by the loss factor to correct the curve, but this still leaves a mathematical no-man's-land between the classical curve and the modified version of Glauert's empirical curve. The purpose of this paper is to document the derivation of a new curve that accounts for tip and hub losses and eliminates the numerical problems of the previous approaches.

  16. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  17. Elasto-inertial turbulence.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-06-25

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called "maximum drag reduction" asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids.

  18. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N.; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called “maximum drag reduction” asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  19. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  20. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 108 and between 10−7 and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  1. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    PubMed

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation.

  2. Intelligent Flow Friction Estimation.

    PubMed

    Brkić, Dejan; Ćojbašić, Žarko

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the Colebrook equation is used as a mostly accepted relation for the calculation of fluid flow friction factor. However, the Colebrook equation is implicit with respect to the friction factor (λ). In the present study, a noniterative approach using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was developed to calculate the friction factor. To configure the ANN model, the input parameters of the Reynolds Number (Re) and the relative roughness of pipe (ε/D) were transformed to logarithmic scales. The 90,000 sets of data were fed to the ANN model involving three layers: input, hidden, and output layers with, 2, 50, and 1 neurons, respectively. This configuration was capable of predicting the values of friction factor in the Colebrook equation for any given values of the Reynolds number (Re) and the relative roughness (ε/D) ranging between 5000 and 10(8) and between 10(-7) and 0.1, respectively. The proposed ANN demonstrates the relative error up to 0.07% which had the high accuracy compared with the vast majority of the precise explicit approximations of the Colebrook equation. PMID:27127498

  3. Heat transfer augmentation in double pipe heat exchanger using mechanical turbulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboj, Kushal; Singh, Gurjeet; Sharma, Rohit; Panchal, Dilbagh; Hira, Jaspreet

    2016-05-01

    The work presented here focuses on heat transfer augmentation by means of divergent-convergent spring turbulator (the enhancement device). Aim of the present work is to find such an optimum pitch at which the augmentation in heat transfer is maximum and the amount of power consumption is minimum, so that an economic design can be created with maximum thermal efficiency. So, the concept of pitch variation is introduced, which is defined as the horizontal distance between two consecutive turbulators. It describes that, the lesser is the pitch the more number of turbulators that can be inserted in inner pipe of double pipe heat exchanger, hence more will be the friction factor. This physics increases convective ability of the heat transfer process from the surface of inner pipe. There is a certain limit to which a pitch can be decreased, lesser the pitch the more the pressure drop and friction factor and hence the more will be the pumping power requirement to maintain a desired mass flow rate of hot water. Analysis of thermal factors such as Nusselts number, friction factor, with different pitches of divergent convergent spring turbulators of circular cross-section 15, 10, and 5 cm at Reynolds's number ranging between 9000 < Re < 40,000 is done graphically.

  4. Active nematic materials with substrate friction.

    PubMed

    Thampi, Sumesh P; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M

    2014-12-01

    Active turbulence in dense active systems is characterized by high vorticity on a length scale that is large compared to that of individual entities. We describe the properties of active turbulence as momentum propagation is screened by frictional damping. As friction is increased, the spacing between the walls in the nematic director field decreases as a consequence of the more rapid velocity decays. This leads to, first, a regime with more walls and an increased number of topological defects, and then to a jammed state in which the walls deliminate bands of opposing flow, analogous to the shear bands observed in passive complex fluids. PMID:25615093

  5. Skin friction drag measurements by LDV.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, M K; Wanchoo, S; McLeod, P C; Ballard, G S; Mozumdar, S; Caraballo, N

    1981-08-15

    A laser Doppler velocimeter employing a microscope objective as the receiving lens has been developed for measuring fluid velocity inside the boundary layer flow field with a spatial resolution of 40 microm. The method was applied for direct measurement of aerodynamic skin friction drag from the measured velocity gradient at the wall. Experimental results obtained on skin friction and on velocity components in a turbulent boundary layer on a low speed wind tunnel showed good agreement with previously reported data using conventional instruments such as hot-wire anemometers and Preston tubes. The method thus provides a tool for measurement and control of skin friction on aerodynamic bodies without perturbing the flow field.

  6. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features.

  7. On the factors governing water vapor turbulence mixing in the convective boundary layer over land: Concept and data analysis technique using ground-based lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip

    2016-06-01

    The convective boundary layer (CBL) turbulence is the key process for exchanging heat, momentum, moisture and trace gases between the earth's surface and the lower part of the troposphere. The turbulence parameterization of the CBL is a challenging but important component in numerical models. In particular, correct estimation of CBL turbulence features, parameterization, and the determination of the contribution of eddy diffusivity are important for simulating convection initiation, and the dispersion of health hazardous air pollutants and Greenhouse gases. In general, measurements of higher-order moments of water vapor mixing ratio (q) variability yield unique estimates of turbulence in the CBL. Using the high-resolution lidar-derived profiles of q variance, third-order moment, and skewness and analyzing concurrent profiles of vertical velocity, potential temperature, horizontal wind and time series of near-surface measurements of surface flux and meteorological parameters, a conceptual framework based on bottom up approach is proposed here for the first time for a robust characterization of the turbulent structure of CBL over land so that our understanding on the processes governing CBL q turbulence could be improved. Finally, principal component analyses will be applied on the lidar-derived long-term data sets of q turbulence statistics to identify the meteorological factors and the dominant physical mechanisms governing the CBL turbulence features. PMID:26950615

  8. Dissipation of wave energy and turbulence in a shallow coral reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Lenain, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Middleton, Jason H.; Reineman, Benjamin; Statom, Nicholas; McCabe, Ryan M.

    2012-03-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of waves, currents and turbulence are presented to describe dissipation rates of wave energy and turbulent kinetic energy in the windward coral reef-lagoon system at Lady Elliot Island (LEI), Australia. The dissipation of wave energy in the lagoon is tidally modulated and strongly correlates with frictional dissipation due to the presence of the extremely rough bottom boundary. The observed turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate, ɛ, in this wave-dominated lagoon is much larger than recently reported values for unidirectional flows over natural fringing coral reefs. The correlation between the wave dissipation and ɛ is examined. The average rate of dissipation induced by the rough turbulent flow was estimated directly from the observed ɛ coupled with both a depth-integrated approach and with a bottom boundary layer scaling. Rates of TKE dissipation estimated using the two approaches approximate well, within a factor of 1.5 to 2.4, to the surface-wave energy dissipation rate. The wave dissipation and friction factor in the lagoon can be described by a spectral wave-frictional model with a bottom roughness length scale that is approximately constant across the lagoon. We also present estimates of dissipation induced by the canopy drag force of the coral heads. The dissipation in this case is enhanced and becomes more significant for the total energy dissipation when the water depth in the lagoon is comparable to the height of the coral heads.

  9. Continuum modeling of crowd turbulence.

    PubMed

    Golas, Abhinav; Narain, Rahul; Lin, Ming C

    2014-10-01

    With the growth in world population, the density of crowds in public places has been increasing steadily, leading to a higher incidence of crowd disasters at high densities. Recent research suggests that emergent chaotic behavior at high densities-known collectively as crowd turbulence-is to blame. Thus, a deeper understanding of crowd turbulence is needed to facilitate efforts to prevent and plan for chaotic conditions in high-density crowds. However, it has been noted that existing algorithms modeling collision avoidance cannot faithfully simulate crowd turbulence. We hypothesize that simulation of crowd turbulence requires modeling of both collision avoidance and frictional forces arising from pedestrian interactions. Accordingly, we propose a model for turbulent crowd simulation, which incorporates a model for interpersonal stress and acceleration constraints similar to real-world pedestrians. Our simulated results demonstrate a close correspondence with observed metrics for crowd turbulence as measured in known crowd disasters.

  10. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  11. Numerical investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in a circular tube fitted with V-cut twisted tape inserts.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sami D; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Takriff, Mohd S; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  13. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  14. Direct numerical simulation of wall turbulent flows with microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Akihiro; Miyata, Hideaki

    2001-03-01

    The marker-density-function (MDF) method has been developed to conduct direct numerical simulation (DNS) for bubbly flows. The method is applied to turbulent bubbly channel flows to elucidate the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence. The simulation is designed to clarify the structure of the turbulent boundary layer containing microbubbles and the mechanism of frictional drag reduction. It is deduced from the numerical tests that the interaction between bubbles and wall turbulence depends on the Weber and Froude numbers. The reduction of the frictional resistance on the wall is attained and its mechanism is explained from the modulation of the three-dimensional structure of the turbulent flow. Copyright

  15. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; Ergun Cekli, Hakki; Joosten, Rene

    2011-11-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the large eddies in the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a flow with interesting statistics, but it is not turbulence.

  16. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  17. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-02-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  18. Hydrodynamic skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for reducing skin friction, inhibiting the effects of liquid turbulence, and decreasing heat transfer in a system involving flow of a liquid along a surface of a body includes applying a substantially integral sheet of a gas, e.g., air, immediately adjacent to the surface of the body, e.g., a marine vehicle, which has a longitudinally grooved surface in proximity with the liquid and with a surface material having high contact angle between the liquid and said wall to reduce interaction of the liquid, e.g., water, with the surface of the body, e.g., the hull of the marine vehicle.

  19. Turbulent current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  20. Heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microfluidic heat sink with variously-shaped ribs for chip cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-04-22

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types.

  1. Heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microfluidic heat sink with variously-shaped ribs for chip cooling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  2. Heat Transfer and Friction Characteristics of the Microfluidic Heat Sink with Variously-Shaped Ribs for Chip Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Da-Wei; Wang, Yan; Niu, Di; Zhao, Xiao-Lin; Ding, Gui-Fu

    2015-01-01

    This paper experimentally and numerically investigated the heat transfer and friction characteristics of microfluidic heat sinks with variously-shaped micro-ribs, i.e., rectangular, triangular and semicircular ribs. The micro-ribs were fabricated on the sidewalls of microfluidic channels by a surface-micromachining micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process and used as turbulators to improve the heat transfer rate of the microfluidic heat sink. The results indicate that the utilizing of micro-ribs provides a better heat transfer rate, but also increases the pressure drop penalty for microchannels. Furthermore, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the microchannels are strongly affected by the rib shape. In comparison, the triangular ribbed microchannel possesses the highest Nusselt number and friction factor among the three rib types. PMID:25912351

  3. Stirring turbulence with turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Joosten, René; van de Water, Willem

    2015-12-01

    We stir wind-tunnel turbulence with an active grid that consists of rods with attached vanes. The time-varying angle of these rods is controlled by random numbers. We study the response of turbulence on the statistical properties of these random numbers. The random numbers are generated by the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell model, which is a simple dynamical model of turbulence that produces a velocity field displaying inertial-range scaling behavior. The range of scales can be adjusted by selection of shells. We find that the largest energy input and the smallest anisotropy are reached when the time scale of the random numbers matches that of the largest eddies of the wind-tunnel turbulence. A large mismatch of these times creates a highly intermittent random flow with interesting but quite anomalous statistics.

  4. Prediction of Very High Reynolds Number Compressible Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1998-01-01

    Flat plate skin friction calculations over a range of Mach numbers from 0.4 to 3.5 at Reynolds numbers from 16 million to 492 million using a Navier Stokes method with advanced turbulence modeling are compared with incompressible skin friction coefficient correlations. The semi-empirical correlation theories of van Driest; Cope; Winkler and Cha; and Sommer and Short T' are used to transform the predicted skin friction coefficients of solutions using two algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence models in the Navier-Stokes method PAB3D. In general, the predicted skin friction coefficients scaled well with each reference temperature theory though, overall the theory by Sommer and Short appeared to best collapse the predicted coefficients. At the lower Reynolds number 3 to 30 million, both the Girimaji and Shih, Zhu and Lumley turbulence models predicted skin-friction coefficients within 2% of the semi-empirical correlation skin friction coefficients. At the higher Reynolds numbers of 100 to 500 million, the turbulence models by Shih, Zhu and Lumley and Girimaji predicted coefficients that were 6% less and 10% greater, respectively, than the semi-empirical coefficients.

  5. Drag reduction: enticing turbulence, and then an industry.

    PubMed

    Spalart, Philippe R; McLean, J Douglas

    2011-04-13

    We examine drag-reduction proposals, as presented in this volume and in general, first with concrete examples of how to bridge the distance from pure science through engineering to what makes inventions go into service; namely, the value to the public. We point out that the true drag reduction can be markedly different from an estimate based simply on the difference between turbulent and laminar skin friction over the laminarized region, or between the respective skin frictions of the baseline and the riblet-treated flow. In some situations, this difference is favourable, and is due to secondary differences in pressure drag. We reiterate that the benefit of riblets, if it is expressed as a percentage in skin-friction reduction, is unfortunately lower at full-size Reynolds numbers than in a small-scale experiment or simulation. The Reynolds number-independent measure of such benefits is a shift of the logarithmic law, or 'ΔU(+)'. Anticipating the design of a flight test and then a product, we note the relative ease in representing riblets or laminarization in computational fluid dynamics, in contrast with the huge numerical and turbulence-modelling challenge of resolving active flow control systems in a calculation of the full flow field. We discuss in general terms the practical factors that have limited applications of concepts that would appear more than ready after all these years, particularly riblets and laminar-flow control.

  6. Distinguishing ichthyogenic turbulence from geophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujiana, Kandaga; Moum, James N.; Smyth, William D.; Warner, Sally J.

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of currents and turbulence beneath a geostationary ship in the equatorial Indian Ocean during a period of weak surface forcing revealed unexpectedly strong turbulence beneath the surface mixed layer. Coincident with the turbulence was a marked reduction of the current speeds registered by shipboard Doppler current profilers, and an increase in their variability. At a mooring 1 km away, measurements of turbulence and currents showed no such anomalies. Correlation with the shipboard echo sounder measurements indicate that these nighttime anomalies were associated with fish aggregations beneath the ship. The fish created turbulence by swimming against the strong zonal current in order to remain beneath the ship, and their presence affected the Doppler speed measurements. The principal characteristics of the resultant ichthyogenic turbulence are (i) low wave number roll-off of shear spectra in the inertial subrange relative to geophysical turbulence, (ii) Thorpe overturning scales that are small compared with the Ozmidov scale, and (iii) low mixing efficiency. These factors extend previous findings by Gregg and Horne (2009) to a very different biophysical regime and support the general conclusion that the biological contribution to mixing the ocean via turbulence is negligible.

  7. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence; Smith, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  8. Relaminarisation of fully turbulent flow in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehnen, Jakob; Hof, Bjoern

    2014-11-01

    Drag reduction still remains one of the most alluring applications of turbulence control. We will show that flattening the streamwise velocity profile in pipes can force turbulent flow to decay and become laminar. Two different experimental control schemes are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. Both control schemes act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. Since, in a smooth straight pipe, the flow remains laminar from that position a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 5 can be accomplished. We will present measurements with high-speed particle image velocimetry, measurements of the pressure drop and videos of the development of the flow during relaminarisation. The guiding fundamental principle behind our approach to control the velocity profile will be explained and discussed.

  9. Polymer flexibility and turbulent drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, J J J

    2008-10-01

    Polymer-induced drag reduction is the phenomenon by which the friction factor of a turbulent flow is reduced by the addition of small amounts of high-molecular-weight linear polymers, which conformation in solution at rest can vary between randomly coiled and rodlike. It is well known that drag reduction is positively correlated to viscous stresses, which are generated by extended polymers. Rodlike polymers always assume this favorable conformation, while randomly coiling chains need to be unraveled by fluid strain rate in order to become effective. The coiling and stretching of flexible polymers in turbulent flow produce an additional elastic component in the polymer stress. The effect of the elastic stresses on drag reduction is unclear. To study this issue, we compare direct numerical simulations of turbulent drag reduction in channel flow using constitutive equations describing solutions of rigid and flexible polymers. When compared at constant phi r2, both simulations predict the same amount of drag reduction. Here phi is the polymer volume fraction and r is the polymer aspect ratio, which for flexible polymers is based on average polymer extension at the channel wall. This demonstrates that polymer elasticity plays a marginal role in the mechanism for drag reduction.

  10. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  11. Riblets for aircraft skin-friction reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    Energy conservation and aerodynamic efficiency are the driving forces behind research into methods to reduce turbulent skin friction drag on aircraft fuselages. Fuselage skin friction reductions as small as 10 percent provide the potential for a 250 million dollar per year fuel savings for the commercial airline fleet. One passive drag reduction concept which is relatively simple to implement and retrofit is that of longitudinally grooved surfaces aligned with the stream velocity. These grooves (riblets) have heights and spacings on the order of the turbulent wall streak and burst dimensions. The riblet performance (8 percent net drag reduction thus far), sensitivity to operational/application considerations such as yaw and Reynolds number variation, an alternative fabrication technique, results of extensive parametric experiments for geometrical optimization, and flight test applications are summarized.

  12. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated.

  13. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  14. The effect of wall friction on magnetohydrodynamic generator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of wall friction on magnetohydrodynamic generator performance is determined by introduction of a wall friction factor into the one-dimensional generator equations. This addition should be useful in improving generator analysis and determining optimum generator geometry. The curves presented can be used to determine the effects of changes in wall friction and generator performance. Wall friction has an increasing effect on the Mach number increases and a decreasing effect as the pressure drop across the generator increase.

  15. Turbulent boundary layers over nonstationary plane boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.

    1976-01-01

    Methods of predicting integral parameters and skin-friction coefficients of turbulent boundary layers developing over moving-ground-planes are evaluated using test information from three different wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Langley Research Center. These data include test information from the VSTOL tunnel which is presented for the first time. The three methods evaluated were: (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) relative power law method, and (3) modified law of the wall method. Methods (1) and (2) can be used to predict moving-ground-plane shape factors with an expected accuracy of + or - 10%. They may also be used to predict moving-ground-plane displacement and momentum thicknesses with lower expected accuracy. This decrease in accuracy can be traced to the failure of approximations upon which these methods are based to prove universal when compared with VSTOL tunnel test results.

  16. Intermittency and rough-pipe turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mehrafarin, Mohammad; Pourtolami, Nima

    2008-05-01

    Recently, by analyzing the measurement data of Nikuradze [NACA Tech. Memo No. 1292 (1950)], it has been proposed [N. Goldenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044503 (2006)] that the friction factor, f , of rough-pipe flow obeys a scaling law in the turbulent regime. Here, we provide a phenomenological scaling argument to explain this law and demonstrate how intermittency modifies the scaling form, thereby relating f to the intermittency exponent, eta . By statistically analyzing the measurement data of f , we infer a satisfactory estimate for eta ( approximately 0.02) , the inclusion of which is shown to improve the data-collapse curve. This provides empirical evidence for intermittency other than the direct measurement of velocity fluctuations.

  17. Scale-invariant cascades in turbulence and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Nicholas Ryan

    In this dissertation, I present work addressing three systems which are traditionally considered to be unrelated: turbulence, evolution, and social organization. The commonality between these systems is that in each case, microscopic interaction rules give rise to an emergent behavior that in some way makes contact with the macroscopic scale of the problem. The open-ended evolution of complexity in evolving systems is analogous to the scale-free structure established in turbulent flows through local transportation of energy. In both cases, an invariance is required for the cascading behavior to occur, and in both cases the scale-free structure is built up from some initial scale from which the behavior is fed. In turbulence, I examine the case of two-dimensional turbulence in order to support the hypothesis that the friction factor and velocity profile of turbulent pipe flows depend on the turbulent energy spectrum in a way unpredicted by the classic Prandtl theory. By simulating two-dimensional flows in controlled geometries, either an inverse energy cascade or forward enstrophy cascade can be produced. The friction factor scaling of the flow changes depending on which cascade is present, in a way consistent with momentum transfer theory and roughness-induced criticality. In the problem of evolution, I show that open-ended growth of complexity can be obtained by ensuring that the evolutionary dynamics are invariant with respect to changes in complexity. Finite system size, finite point mutation rate, and fixed points in the fitness landscape can all interrupt this cascade behavior, producing an analogue to the integral scale of turbulence. This complexity cascade can exist both for competing and for symbiotic sets of organisms. Extending this picture to the qualitatively-different levels of organization of real lifeforms (viruses, unicellular, biofilms, multicellular) requires an understanding of how the processes of evolution themselves evolve. I show that a

  18. Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes with Two-Dimensional Rib Roughness

    1994-01-24

    A commonly used internal enhancement for single-phase forced-convective turbulent flow applications is tranverse and/or near tranverse ribs. These enhanced surfaces consist of a uniform inside diameter with periodic and discrete disruption of ribs. Enhanced tubes of this type are made by an extrusion process and are used in some condensers and evaporators in refrigeration systems. Tubes of this type fall into an enhancement category called separation and reattachment that has been identified as one ofmore » the most energy efficient. Lacking are prediction methods that are mechanistic based that can be used to calculate the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factors for tubes with this enhancement type. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor for enhanced tubes with tranverse, rectangular ribs with a spacing exceeding the reattachment length. The input quantities are the enhancement height, spacing, and the width. The Nusselt number and friction factor are calculated for a specific Reynolds number or for a range of Reynolds numbers. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods. The manufacturers of refrigeration heat exchangers and enhanced tube suppliers are potential users of this software.« less

  19. Tactile texture and friction of soft sponge surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Makoto; Imai, Yumi; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the tactile texture and frictional properties of five soft sponges with various cell sizes. The frictional forces were measured by a friction meter containing a contact probe with human-finger-like geometry and mechanical properties. When the subjects touched these sponges with their fingers, hard-textured sponges were deemed unpleasant. This tactile feeling changed with friction factors including friction coefficients, their temporal patterns, as well as mechanical and shape factors. These findings provide useful information on how to control the tactile textures of various sponges.

  20. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  1. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Flat-plate Turbulent Boundary Layer at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Michio

    The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model [Chung and Pullin, "Large-eddy simulation and wall-modeling of turbulent channel flow'', J. Fluid Mech. 631, 281--309 (2009)] is used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. This is then used to study several aspects of zero- and adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. First, LES of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are performed at Reynolds numbers Retheta based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness in the range Retheta = 103-1012. Results include the inverse skin friction coefficient, 2/Cf , velocity profiles, the shape factor H, the Karman "constant", and the Coles wake factor as functions of Re theta. Comparisons with some direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiment are made, including turbulent intensity data from atmospheric-layer measurements at Retheta = O (106). At extremely large Retheta , the empirical Coles-Fernholz relation for skin-friction coefficient provides a reasonable representation of the LES predictions. While the present LES methodology cannot of itself probe the structure of the near-wall region, the present results show turbulence intensities that scale on the wall-friction velocity and on the Clauser length scale over almost all of the outer boundary layer. It is argued that the LES is suggestive of the asymptotic, infinite Reynolds-number limit for the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer and different ways in which this limit can be approached are discussed. The maximum Retheta of the present simulations appears to be limited by machine

  2. Microblowing Technique Demonstrated to Reduce Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Biesiadny, Tom J.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most challenging areas of research in aerodynamics is the reduction of skin friction, especially for turbulent flow. Reduced skin friction means less drag. For aircraft, less drag can lead to less fuel burned or to a greater flight range for a fixed amount of fuel. Many techniques and methods have been tried; however, none of them has significantly reduced skin friction in the flight environment. An innovative skin-friction reduction technique, the Microblowing Technique (MBT), was invented in 1993. This is a unique concept in which an extremely small amount of air is blown vertically at a surface through very small holes. It can be used for aircraft or marine vehicles, such as submarines (where water is blown through the holes instead of air). As shown in the figure, the outer layer, which controls vertical flow, is a plate with high-vertical holes. The inner layer, which produces evenly distributed flow, is a low-permeability porous plate. Microblowing reduces the surface roughness and changes the flow velocity profile on the surface, thereby reducing skin friction.

  3. New DNS and modeling results for turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Arne; El Khoury, George; Grundestam, Olof; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Linne Flow Centre Team

    2013-11-01

    The near-wall region of turbulent pipe and channel flows (as well as zero-pressure gradient boundary layers) have been shown to exhibit a very high degree of similarity in terms of all statistical moments and many other features, while even the mean velocity profile in the two cases exhibits significant differences between in the outer region. The wake part of the profile, i.e. the deviation from the log-law, in the outer region is of substantially larger amplitude in pipe flow as compared to channel flow (although weaker than in boundary layer flow). This intriguing feature has been well known but has no simple explanation. Model predictions typically give identical results for the two flows. We have analyzed a new set of DNS for pipe and channel flows (el Khoury et al. 2013, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion) for friction Reynolds numbers up to 1000 and made comparing calculations with differential Reynolds stress models (DRSM). We have strong indications that the key factor behind the difference in mean velocity in the outer region can be coupled to differences in the turbulent diffusion in this region. This is also supported by DRSM results, where interesting differences are seen depending on the sophistication of modeling the turbulent diffusion coefficient.

  4. The friction of explanted hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Hall, R M; Unsworth, A; Wroblewski, B M; Siney, P; Powell, N J

    1997-01-01

    Charnley prostheses, retrieved at revision surgery, were studied to assess the effects of friction on the total hip replacement procedure. Frictional resistance was measured using the Durham hip function simulator under both dry and lubricated conditions. The friction factor values (f) for the explanted prostheses were found to have a non-Gaussian distribution with medians of 0.13 [inter-quartile range (IQR) 0.10-0.16] and 0.06 (IQR 0.005-0.08) for dry and lubricated (n = 0.01 Pa s) regimes, respectively. New Charnley prostheses had values of f equal to 0.11 +/- 0.025 and 0.04 +/- 0.01 under the same conditions, and showed no large deviation from a Gaussian distribution. There was found to be a statistically significant difference in the medians of the friction factors for new and retrieved prostheses in the lubricated regime. Ingression of cement into the worn region of the cup was found to increase the friction factor significantly under dry conditions. There was no evidence of an increase in the friction factor or torque for those joints that had a loose socket with respect to those that were fixed at revision. A decrease in the frictional torque against number of cycles undergone by the joint in vivo may indicate that a fatigue-type process may have a role in the loosening of the socket. However, this relationship was found not to be significant for friction measured under lubricated conditions and it seems unlikely that the frictional torque generated in this type of prosthesis will contribute significantly to the long-term loosening of the socket.

  5. Shell Models of Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Daniel H.; Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2011-12-01

    Superfluid helium consists of two inter-penetrating fluids, a viscous normal fluid and an inviscid superfluid, coupled by a mutual friction. We develop a two-fluid shell model to study superfluid turbulence and investigate the energy spectra and the balance of fluxes between the two fluids in a steady state. At sufficiently low temperatures a 'bottle-neck' develops at high wavenumbers suggesting the need for a further dissipative effect, such as the Kelvin wave cascade.

  6. Numerical investigation of pressure drop and heat transfer in developing laminar and turbulent nanofluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei-Rad, Masoud

    2013-07-01

    This paper concerns the study of laminar and turbulent force convection heat transfer and pressure drop between horizontal parallel plates with a nanofluid composed of Al2O3 and water. A set of governing equations are solved using a non-staggered SIMPLE procedure for the velocity-pressure coupling. For the convection-diffusion terms a power-law scheme is employed. A modified k-ɛ model with a two-layer technique for the near-wall region has been used to predict the turbulent viscosity. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction in the base fluid on laminar and turbulent flow variables are presented and discussed. The velocity and temperature profiles, friction factor, pressure coefficient and Nusselt number at different Reynolds numbers in the entrance region for both the laminar and turbulent flow regimes are reported under different thermal boundary conditions. The results show that the effect of the presence of nanoparticles in the base fluid on hydraulic and thermal parameters for the turbulent flow is not very significant, while the rate of heat transfer for the laminar flow with nanoparticles is greater than that of the base liquid. Furthermore, the thermal boundary layer and consequently the Nusselt number more quickly reach their fully developed values by increasing the percentage of nanoparticles in the base fluid for the laminar flow regime, while no changes in the trend are observed for the turbulent flow.

  7. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 <= m <= 2 / 3 where Ue is velocity at boundary layer edge. Long & Chen (1981 JFM) intermediate layer/ mesolayer scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 with velocity Um the friction velocity uτ, is untenable assumption (Afzal 1984 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  8. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOEpatents

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  9. Analytical and experimental study of fluid friction and heat transfer in low Reynolds number flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzychka, Yuri Stephan

    1999-11-01

    Analysis of fluid friction and heat transfer in low Reynolds number flow heat exchangers is undertaken. Three configurations typically utilized in compact heat exchangers are examined. These are: the plain non- circular duct of constant cross-sectional area, the offset or interrupted strip fin, and the turbulator strip. Analytical models for each of these geometries are developed by combining asymptotic solutions using simple non-linear superposition. Models for predicting the friction factor-Reynolds number product, f Re, and Nusselt number, Nu, in non-circular ducts for hydrodynamically fully developed flow (HFDF), hydrodynamically developing flow (HDF), thermally fully developed flow (TFDF), thermally developing flow (TDF), and simultaneously developing flow (SDF) are developed. Thermal and hydrodynamic entrance models are developed by combining the asymptotic solutions for small and large values of the dimensionless duct length. Through the use of a novel characteristic length, the square root of the cross-sectional flow area, scatter in the dimensionless data for fully developed laminar flows is considerably reduced. Most numerical and analytical data are predicted within +/-10% for HFDF and TFDF, +/-12% for HDF and TDF, and +/-15% for SDF for most non-circular ducts. Simple analytic models for predicting the Fanning friction factor, f, and Colburn j factor of two common enhancement devices, the offset strip fin and the turbulator strip are developed from fundamental solutions of fluid dynamics and heat transfer. Models for the offset strip fin are valid over the full range of Reynolds numbers for rectangular and other non-circular sub-channel cross- sections. Model predictions for the offset strip fin agree with published experimental data within +/-20%. Models for the turbulator strip are valid over the full Reynolds number range for both straight and curved turbulator profiles. Model predictions for the turbulator strip agree with new experimental data to

  10. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  11. Turbulence modeling for sharp-fin-induced shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presented and compared with a family of experimental results for the 3-D interaction of a sharp fin induced shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. Several algebraic and two equation eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed. The computed results are compared with experimental surface pressure, skin friction, and yaw angle data as well as the overall size of the interaction. Although the major feature of the flow fields are correctly predicted, several discrepancies are noted. Namely, the maximum skin friction values are significantly underpredicted for the strongest interaction cases. These and other deficiencies are discussed.

  12. Mesolayer analysis in a turbulent boundary layer and DNS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2012-11-01

    The intermediate layer (mesolayer) in turbulent boundary layer has been analysed by the matched asymptotic expansions where matching is implemented by Izakson-Millikan-Kolmogorov hypothesis. The large-scale motions and very large scale motion are modifying the influences of the outer geometries, and most significantly near the locus of the peak in shear stress in the mesolayer. The mesolayer is formed by the interaction of inner and outer layer scales, whose length (time) scale is the geometric mean of the inner and outer length (time) scales, and is also proportional to Taylor micro length (time) scale. The mesolayer variable is proportional to inverse square root of appropriate friction Reynolds number, provided Reynolds number is large. It is shown that the shape factor and Reynolds shear maxima scale with mesolayer scale equivalent to Taylor micro length scale. Further, the turbulent bursting time period scales is shown to mesolayer time scale which is equivalent to Taylor micro time scale. The implications of mesolayer on higher order effects on skin friction law for lower Reynolds number have also been analyzed. The implications of shift origin are proposed by the Prandtl's transposition theorem, and consequently without any closure model.

  13. Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Liquid or Gas Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latzko, H.

    1944-01-01

    The,theory of heat.transfer from a solid body to a liquid stream could he presented previously** only with limiting assumptions about the movement of the fluid (potential flow, laminar frictional flow). (See references 1, 2, and 3). For turbulent flow, the most important practical case, the previous theoretical considerations did not go beyond dimensionless formulas and certain conclusions as to the analogy between the friction factor and the unit thermal conductance, (See references 4, 5, 6, and 7,) In order to obtain numerical results, an experimental treatment of the problem was resorted to, which gave rise to numerous investigations because of the importance of this problem in many branches of technology. However, the results of these investigations frequently deviate from one another. The experimental results are especially dependent upon the overall dimensions and the specific proportions of the equipment. In the present work, the attempt will be made to develop systematically the theory of the heat transfer and of the dependence of the unit thermal conductance upon shape and dimensions, using as a basis the velocity distribution for turbulent flow set up by Prandtl and Von Karman.

  14. Influence of tube-entrance configuration on average heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors for air flowing in an Inconel tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowdermilk, Warren H; Grele, Milton D

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air flowing through an electrically heated Inconel tube having either a long-approach or a right-angle-edge entrance, an inside diameter of 0.402 inch, and a length of 24 inches over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 375,000 and average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 2000 degrees R. Good correlation of heat-transfer data was obtained for both entrances, which substantiates work previously reported. A fair correlation of friction data was obtained for both entrances. The entrance configuration had little effect on the average heat-transfer and friction coefficients.

  15. Frictional drag reduction by bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    The injection of gas bubbles into a turbulent boundary layer of a liquid phase has multiple different impacts on the original flow structure. Frictional drag reduction is a phenomenon resulting from their combined effects. This explains why a number of different void-drag reduction relationships have been reported to date, while early works pursued a simple universal mechanism. In the last 15 years, a series of precisely designed experimentations has led to the conclusion that the frictional drag reduction by bubble injection has multiple manifestations dependent on bubble size and flow speed. The phenomena are classified into several regimes of two-phase interaction mechanisms. Each regime has inherent physics of bubbly liquid, highlighted by keywords such as bubbly mixture rheology, the spectral response of bubbles in turbulence, buoyancy-dominated bubble behavior, and gas cavity breakup. Among the regimes, bubbles in some selected situations lose the drag reduction effect owing to extra momentum transfer promoted by their active motions. This separates engineers into two communities: those studying small bubbles for high-speed flow applications and those studying large bubbles for low-speed flow applications. This article reviews the roles of bubbles in drag reduction, which have been revealed from fundamental studies of simplified flow geometries and from development of measurement techniques that resolve the inner layer structure of bubble-mixed turbulent boundary layers.

  16. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene. PMID:22720882

  17. Friction and nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, N.; Braun, O. M.; Tosatti, E.; Guerra, R.; Vanossi, A.

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction.

  18. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercooled under-ice ocean boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, Miles G.; Stevens, Craig L.; Smith, Inga J.; Robinson, Natalie J.

    2016-04-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercooled seawater. The data show that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. Platelet growth in supercooled water under thick ice appears to be rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the underside of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  19. Turbulent heat transfer as a control of platelet ice growth in supercool under-ice ocean boundary-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, M. G.; Stevens, C. L.; Smith, I. J.; Robinson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    Late winter measurements of turbulent quantities in tidally modulated flow under land-fast sea ice near the Erebus Glacier Tongue, McMurdo Sound, identified processes that influence growth at the interface of an ice surface in contact with supercool seawater. The data suggest that turbulent heat exchange at the ocean-ice boundary is characterized by the product of friction velocity and (negative) water temperature departure from freezing, analogous to similar results for moderate melting rates in seawater above freezing. Platelet ice growth appears to increase the hydraulic roughness (drag) of fast ice compared with undeformed fast ice without platelets. We hypothesize that platelet growth in supercool water under thick ice is rate-limited by turbulent heat transfer and that this is a significant factor to be considered in mass transfer at the under-side of ice shelves and sea ice in the vicinity of ice shelves.

  20. Statistics of Frictional Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tianqi; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; O'Hern, Corey S.; Shattuck, Mark D.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a theoretical description for mechanically stable frictional packings in terms of the difference between the total number of contacts required for isostatic packings of frictionless disks and the number of contacts in frictional packings, m=Nc0-Nc. The saddle order m represents the number of unconstrained degrees of freedom that a static packing would possess if friction were removed. Using a novel numerical method that allows us to enumerate disk packings for each m, we show that the probability to obtain a packing with saddle order m at a given static friction coefficient μ, Pm(μ), can be expressed as a power series in μ. Using this form for Pm(μ), we quantitatively describe the dependence of the average contact number on the friction coefficient for static disk packings obtained from direct simulations of the Cundall-Strack model for all μ and N.

  1. Air friction and rolling resistance during cycling.

    PubMed

    de Groot, G; Sargeant, A; Geysel, J

    1995-07-01

    To calculate the power output during actual cycling, the air friction force Fa and rolling resistance Fr have to be known. Instead of wind tunnel experiments or towing experiments at steady speed, in this study these friction forces were measured by coasting down experiments. Towing experiments at constant acceleration (increasing velocity) were also done for comparison. From the equation of motion, the velocity-time curve v(t) was obtained. Curve-fitting procedures on experimental data of the velocity v yielded values of the rolling resistance force Fr and of the air friction coefficient k = Fa/v2. For the coasting down experiments, the group mean values per body mass m (N = 7) were km = k/m = (2.15 +/- 0.32) x 10(-3)m-1 and ar = Fr/m = (3.76 +/- 0.18) x 10(-2)ms-2, close to other values from the literature. The curves in the phase plane (velocity vs acceleration) and the small residual sum of squares indicated the validity of the theory. The towing experiments were not congruent with the coasting down experiments. Higher values of the air friction were found, probably due to turbulence of the air.

  2. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  3. Extended ion pumped vacuum friction test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Boundary layer friction data under ion pumped vacuum was taken for sixteen material couples. The test series was an extension of a previous study of the effects of modified ion pumped environments. Sliding distances imposed in the present effort greatly exceeded any studied in the previous contiguous, flight or ground tests. Wear out of specific couples, in particular, thin film lubricants was noted. The behavior of the test hardware including wear out of the mechanisms was noted. As a result, the impact of test interruption was observed for several test couples. Recovery of the friction upon re-establishing sliding in vacuum was generally rapid. The results of the extended sliding study reinforce the previous conclusion that sliding distance (mechanical history) is the primary factor in establishing the force limiting boundary layer friction. General friction value under the extended sliding confirm those observed in previous orbital and the related ground test studies.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  5. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  6. In vitro friction and lubrication of large bearing hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, S; Jones, E; Birkinshaw, C

    2010-01-01

    New material combinations and designs of artificial hip implants are being introduced in an effort to improve proprioception and functional longevity. Larger joints in particular are being developed to improve joint stability, and it is thought that these larger implants will be more satisfactory for younger and more physically active patients. The study detailed here used a hip friction simulator to assess the friction and lubrication properties of large-diameter hip bearings of metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer couplings. Joints of different diameters were evaluated to determine what effect, if any, bearing diameter had on lubrication. In addition, the effects of lubricant type are considered, using carboxymethyl cellulose and bovine calf serum, and the physiological lubricant is shown to be considerably more effective at reducing friction. The frictional studies showed that the metal-on-metal joints worked under a mixed lubrication regime, producing similar friction factor values to each other. The addition of bovine calf serum (BCS) reduced the friction. The ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer samples were shown to operate with high friction factors and mixed lubrication. When tested with BCS, the larger-diameter bearings showed a decrease in friction compared with the smaller-size bearings, and the addition of BCS resulted in an increase in friction, unlike the metal-on-metal system. The study demonstrated that the component's diameter had little or no influence on the lubrication and friction of the large bearing combinations tested.

  7. Presentation of computer code SPIRALI for incompressible, turbulent, plane and spiral grooved cylindrical and face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walowit, Jed A.

    1994-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation is made showing the capabilities of the computer code SPIRALI. Overall capabilities of SPIRALI include: computes rotor dynamic coefficients, flow, and power loss for cylindrical and face seals; treats turbulent, laminar, Couette, and Poiseuille dominated flows; fluid inertia effects are included; rotor dynamic coefficients in three (face) or four (cylindrical) degrees of freedom; includes effects of spiral grooves; user definable transverse film geometry including circular steps and grooves; independent user definable friction factor models for rotor and stator; and user definable loss coefficients for sudden expansions and contractions.

  8. Turbulent shear flow in a rapidly rotating spherical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Daniel S.

    This dissertation presents experimental measurements of torque, wall shear stress, pressure, and velocity in the boundary-driven turbulent flow of water between concentric, independently rotating spheres, commonly known as spherical Couette flow. The spheres' radius ratio is 0.35, geometrically similar to that of Earth's core. The measurements are performed at unprecedented Reynolds number for this geometry, as high as fifty-six million. The role of rapid overall rotation on the turbulence is investigated. A number of different turbulent flow states are possible, selected by the Rossby number, a dimensionless measure of the differential rotation. In certain ranges of the Rossby number near state borders, bistable co-existence of states is possible. In these ranges the flow undergoes intermittent transitions between neighboring states. At fixed Rossby number, the flow properties vary with Reynolds number in a way similar to that of other turbulent flows. At most parameters investigated, the large scales of the turbulent flow are characterized by system-wide spatial and temporal correlations that co-exist with intense broadband velocity fluctuations. Some of these wave-like motions are identifiable as inertial modes. All waves are consistent with slowly drifting large scale patterns of vorticity, which include Rossby waves and inertial modes as a subset. The observed waves are generally very energetic, and imply significant inhomogeneity in the turbulent flow. Increasing rapidity of rotation as the Ekman number is lowered intensifies those waves identified as inertial modes with respect to other velocity fluctuations. The turbulent scaling of the torque on inner sphere is a focus of this dissertation. The Rossby-number dependence of the torque is complicated. We normalize the torque at a given Reynolds number in the rotating states by that when the outer sphere is stationary. We find that this normalized quantity can be considered a Rossby-dependent friction factor

  9. Macroscopic effects of the spectral structure in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T.; Chakraborty, P.; Guttenberg, N.; Prescott, A.; Kellay, H.; Goldburg, W.; Goldenfeld, N.; Gioia, G.

    2010-11-01

    There is a missing link between macroscopic properties of turbulent flows, such as the frictional drag of a wall-bounded flow, and the turbulent spectrum. To seek the missing link we carry out unprecedented experimental measurements of the frictional drag in turbulent soap-film flows over smooth walls. These flows are effectively two-dimensional, and we are able to create soap-film flows with the two types of turbulent spectrum that are theoretically possible in two dimensions: the "enstrophy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 3, and the "inverse energy cascade," for which the spectral exponent α= 5/3. We find that the functional relation between the frictional drag f and the Reynolds number Re depends on the spectral exponent: where α= 3, f ˜Re-1/2; where α= 5/3, f ˜Re-1/4. Each of these scalings may be predicted from the attendant value of α by using a recently proposed spectral theory of the frictional drag. In this theory the frictional drag of turbulent flows on smooth walls is predicted to be f ˜Re^(1-α)/(1+α).

  10. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  11. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy. PMID:21063495

  12. Estimation of SO{sub 2} dry deposition using turbulence parameters observed by sonic anemometer-thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chong Bum; Kim, Jeong, Sik; Kim, Yong Goog; Cho, Chang Rae; Byun, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The dry deposition of pollutants can be calculated from the concentration of pollutants in the atmosphere and deposition velocity. To calculate deposition velocity, turbulence parameters such as friction velocity and Monin-Obukhov length are used. However, due to the difficulties in observation of turbulence parameters, usually mean values of wind speed and temperature observed using conventional meteorological instruments are used to estimate the dry deposition. The dry deposition velocity is the function of aerodynamic resistance (R{sub a}), sublayer resistance (R{sub b}), surface resistance (R{sub c}). R{sub a} and R{sub b} are calculated from turbulence parameters and R{sub c} is related to surface characteristics. The purpose of the present study is to compare the dry deposition obtained using the data sets of mean values and turbulence parameters measured by sonic anemometer-thermometer. The field observation was performed for 30 days from October 27 to November 25, 1995. The turbulence parameters were measured by 3 dimensional sonic anemometer-thermometer and mean meteorological variables are obtained at two heights, 2.5 m and 10 m. The results show that the dry deposition velocity is large, in daytime and small in nighttime. The major factor of diurnal variation is Ra. In the daytime the dry deposition velocity calculated using mean meteorological data show relatively similar to the dry deposition velocity calculated using the turbulence data, however there are big differences at night.

  13. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  14. Science 101: What Causes Friction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Defining friction and asking what causes it might seem like a trivial question. Friction seems simple enough to understand. Friction is a force between surfaces that pushes against things that are moving or tending to move, and the rougher the surfaces, the greater the friction. Bill Robertson answers this by saying, "Well, not exactly".…

  15. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  16. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τ{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τ{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τ{sub p,} {sub l} = τ{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τ{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τ{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with τ{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ∝ τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  17. Critical instability and friction scaling of fluid flows through pipes with rough inner surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianjun

    2009-12-31

    It has been shown experimentally over nearly 80 years that surface fine roughness of circular pipes has a crucial effect on the natural transition to turbulence. In this Letter, a theoretical explanation is suggested for the roughness-induced instability. Once the nonlinear effect of roughness is introduced (through a pipe with fine corrugation surface), the mean velocity profile becomes unstable to three-dimensional, asymmetric, and helical traveling waves at moderate Reynolds numbers. The threshold of the aspect ratio or shape factor of the roughness element required to cause instability scales as Re-2. Inspired by the current model, a scaling form is proposed and the scaled friction factor measurements in rough pipes collapse onto a universal curve.

  18. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  19. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  20. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  1. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  2. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  3. Turbulent flow in smooth and rough pipes.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Shockling, M A; Kunkel, G J; Smits, A J

    2007-03-15

    Recent experiments at Princeton University have revealed aspects of smooth pipe flow behaviour that suggest a more complex scaling than previously noted. In particular, the pressure gradient results yield a new friction factor relationship for smooth pipes, and the velocity profiles indicate the presence of a power-law region near the wall and, for Reynolds numbers greater than about 400x103 (R+>9x103), a logarithmic region further out. New experiments on a rough pipe with a honed surface finish with krms/D=19.4x10-6, over a Reynolds number range of 57x103-21x106, show that in the transitionally rough regime this surface follows an inflectional friction factor relationship rather than the monotonic relationship given in the Moody diagram. Outer-layer scaling of the mean velocity data and streamwise turbulence intensities for the rough pipe show excellent collapse and provide strong support for Townsend's outer-layer similarity hypothesis for rough-walled flows. The streamwise rough-wall spectra also agree well with the corresponding smooth-wall data. The pipe exhibited smooth behaviour for ks+ < or =3.5, which supports the suggestion that the original smooth pipe was indeed hydraulically smooth for ReD< or =24x106. The relationship between the velocity shift, DeltaU/utau, and the roughness Reynolds number, ks+, has been used to generalize the form of the transition from smooth to fully rough flow for an arbitrary relative roughness krms/D. These predictions apply for honed pipes when the separation of pipe diameter to roughness height is large, and they differ significantly from the traditional Moody curves.

  4. Friction in volcanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  5. Turbulent boundary layers with high turbulence: Experimental heat transfer and structure on flat and convex walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahm, Michael Kenneth

    1992-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the effects of high levels of free stream turbulence on convex wall boundary layers were made. Using three different means of turbulence generation, intensities from 6 percent to 30 percent and length scales, L sub u/delta from 0.2 to 3 were achieved. The degree of curvature was strong for all cases, ranging from 0.12 to 0.15. Both the attenuating effects of convex wall curvature and the augmenting effects of turbulence were observed for all cases. The augmentation in Stanton number is about two or three times the local turbulence intensity present. The exponential Reynolds number dependence in the upstream flat plate flow maintains a -0.25 slope and in the curve maintains a -1 slope. Skin friction is also augmented by free stream turbulence. Increases in skin friction are comparable to those in heat transfer but do not correspond exactly for each case. Based on length scales determined, it is concluded that smaller relative scales are more effective in augmenting skin friction and larger scales are more effective in augmenting heat transfer. Careful flow field control upstream of the curve resulted in typical curved potential core behavior. An important effect of turbulence on the velocity profile in the curve is the broadening of the transition between the boundary layer and the potential core profile. This transition grows wider and flatter as the turbulence level is increased. With the highest level of turbulence achieved, the outer region profile, transition becomes very wide and flat and a previously unreported viscid/inviscid interaction takes place which leads to rapid boundary layer growth in the curve. The correlation of the present data was examined. The Ludwieg-Tillmann correlation for skin friction was found to predict the present baseline data and the data for all three turbulence cases to about +/- 6 percent including the effects of curvature. A thermal analogy to the LT correlation was developed for use with free stream

  6. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  7. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements. PMID:20355449

  8. Measuring anisotropic friction on WTe2 using atomic force microscopy in the force-distance and friction modes.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory S; Myhra, Sverre; Watson, Jolanta A

    2010-04-01

    Layered materials which can be easily cleaved have proved to be excellent samples for the study of atomic scale friction. The layered transition metal dichalcogenides have been particularly popular. These materials exhibit a number of interesting properties ranging from superconductivity to low frictional coefficients. In this paper we have investigated the tribology of the dichalcogenide-WTe2. The coefficient of friction is less than 0.040 along the Te rows and increases to over 0.045 across the rows. The frictional forces almost doubled at normal loads of 5000 nN when scanning in the [010] direction in comparison to the [100] direction. The frictional responses of the AFM probe have been monitored in the frictional force and force-versus-distance (f-d) mode. A comparison between the outcomes using the two different modes demonstrates the factors which need to be considered for accurate measurements.

  9. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid in a circular pipe under laminar flow with wire coil inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, fully developed laminar flow convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid flowing through a uniformly heated horizontal tube with and without wire coil inserts is presented. For this purpose, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 43 nm size were synthesized, characterized and dispersed in distilled water to form stable suspension containing 0.1% volume concentration of nanoparticles. The Nusselt number in the fully developed region were measured and found to increase by 12.24% at Re = 2275 for plain tube with nanofluid compared to distilled water. Two wire coil inserts made of stainless steel with pitch ratios 2 and 3 were used which increased the Nusselt numbers by 15.91% and 21.53% respectively at Re = 2275 with nanofluid compared to distilled water. The better heat transfer performance of nanofluid with wire coil insert is attributed to the effects of dispersion or back-mixing which flattens the temperature distribution and make the temperature gradient between the fluid and wall steeper. The measured pressure loss with the use of nanofluids is almost equal to that of the distilled water. The empirical correlations developed for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of Reynolds/Peclet number, pitch ratio and volume concentration fits with the experimental data within {+-}15%. (author)

  10. Friction of Aviation Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, S W; Thorne, M A

    1928-01-01

    The first portion of this report discusses measurements of friction made in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards between 1920 and 1926 under research authorization of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. These are discussed with reference to the influence of speed, barometric pressure, jacket-water temperature, and throttle opening upon the friction of aviation engines. The second section of the report deals with measurements of the friction of a group of pistons differing from each other in a single respect, such as length, clearance, area of thrust face, location of thrust face, etc. Results obtained with each type of piston are discussed and attention is directed particularly to the fact that the friction chargeable to piston rings depends upon piston design as well as upon ring design. This is attributed to the effect of the rings upon the thickness and distribution of the oil film which in turn affects the friction of the piston to an extent which depends upon its design.

  11. Skin friction balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ping, Tcheng (Inventor); Supplee, Frank H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A skin friction balance uses a parallel linkage mechanism to avoid inaccuracies in skin friction measurement attributable to off-center normal forces. The parallel linkage mechanism includes a stationary plate mounted in a cage, and an upper and lower movable plate which are linked to each other and to the stationary plate throught three vertical links. Flexure pivots are provided for pivotally connecting the links and the plates. A sensing element connected to the upper plate moves in response to skin friction, and the lower plate moves in the opposite direction of the upper plate. A force motor maintains a null position of the sensing element by exerting a restoring force in response to a signal generated by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT).

  12. Holographic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Chesler, Paul M; Liu, Hong

    2014-04-18

    We construct turbulent black holes in asymptotically AdS4 spacetime by numerically solving Einstein's equations. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence we find that both the dual holographic fluid and bulk geometry display signatures of an inverse cascade with the bulk geometry being well approximated by the fluid-gravity gradient expansion. We argue that statistically steady-state black holes dual to d dimensional turbulent flows have horizons whose area growth has a fractal-like structure with fractal dimension D=d+4/3.

  13. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  14. Two-directional skin friction measurement utilizing a compact internally mounted thin-liquid-film skin friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seto, Jeffrey A.; Hornung, Hans G.

    1993-01-01

    A new, compact oil film skin friction meter capable of measuring skin friction in two directions has been designed and constructed. The instrument allows the thin liquid film technique to now be applied in flight and in a wider variety of laboratory conditions. The instrument was tested by comparing measurements with those given by a floating element gage in laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers with zero pressure gradient. Both instruments agreed satisfactorily with each other and with the expected curves for the laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Significant differences were at first seen between the oil film meter and two floating element gages in the case of a favorable pressure gradient, but when a correction is applied to account for the normal force acting on the pendulum-type gage, the three instruents are much closer. The directional sensitivity of the oil film gage is also demonstrated.

  15. Increase in friction force with sliding speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2005-09-01

    A block sliding down an inclined plane normally accelerates. However, if the friction force increases with speed, then the block can slide at a constant terminal speed in a manner similar to the fall of an object through a fluid. Measurements of the increase in the coefficient of friction for tennis ball cloth sliding on a smooth surface are described over speeds varying by a factor of 9000. For the low speed measurements, the ball cloth was attached to the bottom of a weighted box and pulled along a horizontal surface by a constant horizontal force. Results at higher speeds were obtained by bouncing a tennis ball off the surface.

  16. External Dissipation in Driven Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Michael; Wu, X. L.

    2000-07-01

    Turbulence in a freely suspended soap film is created by electromagnetic forcing and measured by particle tracking. The velocity fluctuations are shown to be adequately described by the forced Navier-Stokes equation for an incompressible two-dimensional fluid with a linear drag term to model the frictional coupling to the surrounding air. Using this equation, the energy dissipation rates due to air friction and the film's internal viscosity are measured, as is the rate of energy injection from the electromagnetic forcing. Comparison of these rates demonstrates that the air friction is a significant energy dissipation mechanism in the system.

  17. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  18. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  19. DPIV, LDV and SSS investigations of forced laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobba, Kumar; Gharib, Morteza; Doyle, John

    2004-11-01

    A systematical experimental study conducted to understand the role of external environment---free stream turbulence---on the boundary layer laminar-turbulent transition on a flat plate will be presented. The experiments are conducted in the GALCIT free surface water tunnel using flow visualization, DPIV, and MEMS based LDV and shear stress sensors (SSS). The results indicate that various transition parameters like shape factor, skin friction coefficient, mean profile, etc., are strong function of the external turbulence level. Neither T-S waves nor turbulent spots were found, but the flow is always embedded with stream wise vortical structures in the parametric range explored. An interesting observation is that the vortical structures are found even at such low Reynolds numbers as 289 (based on displacement thickness). A real time study of the structures in the flow shed more light on their dynamics and evolution. Space-time auto-correlation functions and probability density functions revealed that the wavelength of the span wise and stream wise structures in the boundary layer are independent of the Reynolds number in the parametric range explored. Finally, the experimental observations are compared with the results from our robust flow stability theory and the agreement is good.

  20. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes.

    PubMed

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L

    2012-11-01

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability.

  1. Friction enhancement in concertina locomotion of snakes

    PubMed Central

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Narrow crevices are challenging terrain for most organisms and biomimetic robots. Snakes move through crevices using sequential folding and unfolding of their bodies in the manner of an accordion or concertina. In this combined experimental and theoretical investigation, we elucidate this effective means of moving through channels. We measure the frictional properties of corn snakes, their body kinematics and the transverse forces they apply to channels of varying width and inclination. To climb channels inclined at 60°, we find snakes use a combination of ingenious friction-enhancing techniques, including digging their ventral scales to double their frictional coefficient and pushing channel walls transversely with up to nine times body weight. Theoretical modelling of a one-dimensional n-linked crawler is used to calculate the transverse force factor of safety: we find snakes push up to four times more than required to prevent sliding backwards, presumably trading metabolic energy for an assurance of wall stability. PMID:22728386

  2. Magnetic Low-Friction Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetkau, Mark; Bahniwal, Manpreet; Gamblen, James

    2008-05-01

    The standard low-friction tracks used to test Newton's laws are the air track and the low-friction cart track. Both are commercially available and provide low-friction environments to test various physics concepts. At a recent science fair, one of the authors (JG) presented a magnetically levitated cart and track. A literature search found no previous testing of magnetically levitated carts. This paper compares a magnetically levitated cart against the two standard low-friction tracks.

  3. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  4. Quantum theory of friction

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Cresser, James D.

    2005-08-15

    We present a Markovian quantum theory of friction. Our approach is based on the idea that collisions between a Brownian particle and single molecules of the surrounding medium constitute, as far as the particle is concerned, instantaneous simultaneous measurements of its position and momentum.

  5. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  6. Skin friction measurement on the NASA Common Research Model using global luminescent oil film skin friction meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Lalit Kishore

    Accurate skin friction measurements are indispensable in the design of more efficient aerodynamic vehicles, and is also the controlling variable in closed loop flow control systems. Spatially and temporally resolved skin friction data is required to calibrate turbulence models used in Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis, and can also provide insight into the nature of near-wall turbulence. Luminescent oil film based techniques offer the ability to make distributed wall shear stress measurements with a relatively simple setup. The Global Luminescent Oil Film Skin Friction Meter (GLOSFM) technique involves calculating the shear stress based on observing the thickness of an oil film, which in turn is directly proportional to its luminescent intensity, provided the oil film is sufficiently thin. This technique is briefly reviewed, with some emphasis on uncertainty quantification, and the formation and propagation of ripples/surface waves on the oil film, as well as their impact on the shear stress measurement. Finally, this technique is used to measure the skin friction field on the wing and fuselage of the NASA Common Research Model, a passenger jet configuration. The issue of repeatability and the effects of tripping the flow are investigated, and the effect of flow parameters like the angle of attack and the Reynolds number are studied.

  7. Kolmogorov Behavior of Near-Wall Turbulence and Its Application in Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The near-wall behavior of turbulence is re-examined in a way different from that proposed by Hanjalic and Launder and followers. It is shown that at a certain distance from the wall, all energetic large eddies will reduce to Kolmogorov eddies (the smallest eddies in turbulence). All the important wall parameters, such as friction velocity, viscous length scale, and mean strain rate at the wall, are characterized by Kolmogorov microscales. According to this Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence, the turbulence quantities, such as turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate, etc. at the location where the large eddies become Kolmogorov eddies, can be estimated by using both direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and asymptotic analysis of near-wall turbulence. This information will provide useful boundary conditions for the turbulent transport equations. As an example, the concept is incorporated in the standard k-epsilon model which is then applied to channel and boundary flows. Using appropriate boundary conditions (based on Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence), there is no need for any wall-modification to the k-epsilon equations (including model constants). Results compare very well with the DNS and experimental data.

  8. Micro Surface Texturing for Friction Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashwan, Ola

    Recently, surface texturing has gained momentum as a way to control the friction which is involved in various applications and systems, such as components of internal combustion engines, dies and punches of the metal forming processes and Micro-electrical-mechanical Systems (MEMS). This dissertation demonstrates that under dry sliding, there is a specific significant surface texturing parameter at which the coefficient of friction should be at a minimum. This dissertation met this objective through an extensive study of the relevant literature on surface texturing and friction, analysing the friction mechanisms involved in dry sliding, and highlighting the key factors that control friction as the real area of contact and material properties. An analytical proof is derived demonstrating that a minimum friction force exists if the two components of the friction force, adhesion and mechanical deformation, are differentiated with respect to the real contact area. In addition, numerical simulations and experimental work were performed to test this hypothesis. In the two and three dimensional finite element models, normal and sliding contact between a rigid indenter and elastic-plastic surfaces, which are textured by circular and hexagonal dimples of different sizes and densities, are simulated and analysed. Circular craters of different sizes and densities, are fabricated using laser ablation on hardened tool steel samples, while the hexagonal dimples are fabricated using photo-lithography. The dimples are arranged in adjacent equilateral triangles layout. Coefficients of friction were measured using a scratch tester under dry sliding conditions and constant load. In addition, adhesion forces were estimated using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The adhesion force is found to be exponentially decreasing with the increase of the spatial texture density. The dimensionless quantity, spatial texture density (D/L) was identified as the most significant texturing parameter

  9. PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

  10. Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Alan C.; Rumpf, Benno

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we state and review the premises on which a successful asymptotic closure of the moment equations of wave turbulence is based, describe how and why this closure obtains, and examine the nature of solutions of the kinetic equation. We discuss obstacles that limit the theory's validity and suggest how the theory might then be modified. We also compare the experimental evidence with the theory's predictions in a range of applications. Finally, and most importantly, we suggest open challenges and encourage the reader to apply and explore wave turbulence with confidence. The narrative is terse but, we hope, delivered at a speed more akin to the crisp pace of a Hemingway story than the wordjumblingtumbling rate of a Joycean novel.

  11. In-Flight Capability for Evaluating Skin-Friction Gages and Other Near-Wall Flow Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.; Pipitone, Brett J.; Krake, Keith L.; Richwine, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An 8-in.-square boundary-layer sensor panel has been developed for in-flight evaluation of skin-friction gages and other near-wall flow sensors on the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center F-15B/Flight Test Fixture (FTF). Instrumentation on the sensor panel includes a boundary-layer rake, temperature sensors, static pressure taps, and a Preston tube. Space is also available for skin-friction gages or other near-wall flow sensors. Pretest analysis of previous F-15B/FTF flight data has identified flight conditions suitable for evaluating skin-friction gages. At subsonic Mach numbers, the boundary layer over the sensor panel closely approximates the two-dimensional (2D), law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layer, and skin-friction estimates from the Preston tube and the rake (using the Clauser plot method) can be used to evaluate skin-friction gages. At supersonic Mach numbers, the boundary layer over the sensor panel becomes complex, and other means of measuring skin friction are needed to evaluate the accuracy of new skin-friction gages. Results from the flight test of a new rubber-damped skin-friction gage confirm that at subsonic Mach numbers, nearly 2D, law-of-the-wall turbulent boundary layers exist over the sensor panel. Sensor panel data also show that this new skin-friction gage prototype does not work in flight.

  12. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubesin, Morris W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments at several levels of statistical turbulence modeling applicable to aerodynamics are briefly surveyed. Emphasis is on examples of model improvements for transonic, two-dimensional flows. Experience with the development of these improved models is cited to suggest methods of accelerating the modeling process necessary to keep abreast of the rapid movement of computational fluid dynamics into the computation of complex three-dimensional flows.

  13. Adiabatic molecular-dynamics-simulation-method studies of kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Sokoloff, J. B.

    2005-06-01

    An adiabatic molecular-dynamics method is developed and used to study the Muser-Robbins model for dry friction (i.e., nonzero kinetic friction in the slow sliding speed limit). In this model, dry friction between two crystalline surfaces rotated with respect to each other is due to mobile molecules (i.e., dirt particles) adsorbed at the interface. Our adiabatic method allows us to quickly locate interface potential-well minima, which become unstable during sliding of the surfaces. Since dissipation due to friction in the slow sliding speed limit results from mobile molecules dropping out of such unstable wells, our method provides a way to calculate dry friction, which agrees extremely well with results found by conventional molecular dynamics for the same system, but our method is more than a factor of 10 faster.

  14. Frictional effect of ultrasonic-vibration on upsetting.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jung-Chung; Tsai, Yu-Chung; Hung, Chinghua

    2007-06-01

    The ultrasonic-vibration ring compression test and finite element analysis were performed on aluminum alloy specimens to explore the frictional effect of superimposing ultrasonic-vibration during upsetting. The extrapolated compression test was first adopted to obtain the frictionless material properties for finite element analysis. Experimental results of extrapolated compression test also indicate that ultrasonic-vibration can reduce the compressive force when friction is eliminated and can increase the temperatures of a material at the same time. The following results of the hot extrapolated compression test and the hot ring compression test reveal that increasing temperature by ultrasonic-vibration may reduce the flow stress and increase the interfacial friction. Finally, finite element analysis was conducted to derive the friction calibration curves and to evaluate the friction factor.

  15. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  16. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elperin, T.; Kleeorin, N.; Liberman, M.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-11-01

    We study turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures in a developed turbulence. In our previous study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 69 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.80.69] using a path-integral approach for a delta-correlated in a time random velocity field, we demonstrated a strong modification of turbulent transport in fluid flows with chemical reactions or phase transitions. In the present study we use the spectral τ approximation that is valid for large Reynolds and Peclet numbers and show that turbulent diffusion of the reacting species can be strongly depleted by a large factor that is the ratio of turbulent and chemical times (turbulent Damköhler number). We have demonstrated that the derived theoretical dependence of a turbulent diffusion coefficient versus the turbulent Damköhler number is in good agreement with that obtained previously in the numerical modeling of a reactive front propagating in a turbulent flow and described by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov-Fisher equation. We have found that turbulent cross-effects, e.g., turbulent mutual diffusion of gaseous admixtures and turbulent Dufour effect of the chemically reacting gaseous admixtures, are less sensitive to the values of stoichiometric coefficients. The mechanisms of the turbulent cross-effects differ from the molecular cross-effects known in irreversible thermodynamics. In a fully developed turbulence and at large Peclet numbers the turbulent cross-effects are much larger than the molecular ones. The obtained results are applicable also to heterogeneous phase transitions.

  17. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  18. Friction-reducing device

    SciTech Connect

    Dollison, W.W.

    1990-04-24

    This patent describes a sucker rod coupling adapted to reduce friction within production tubing in a well bore. It comprises: a substantially cylindrical body member and roller assemblies; the body member comprising means at each end thereof for attaching the coupling to a sucker rod, and axially and circumferentially spaced recesses, each recess containing a roller guide connected to the body, and each recess being further adapted to receive and support a roller assembly around the roller guide in such manner that the roller assembly can revolve around the roller guide; the roller assemblies each comprising rollers rotatably mounted on and linked by a chain, the rollers being adapted to reduce frictional contact between the body member and the tubing by rotating between the roller guide and the tubing while the chain revolves around the roller guide.

  19. Multiscaling in superfluid turbulence: A shell-model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    We examine the multiscaling behavior of the normal- and superfluid-velocity structure functions in three-dimensional superfluid turbulence by using a shell model for the three-dimensional (3D) Hall-Vinen-Bekharevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) equations. Our 3D-HVBK shell model is based on the Gledzer-Okhitani-Yamada shell model. We examine the dependence of the multiscaling exponents on the normal-fluid fraction and the mutual-friction coefficients. Our extensive study of the 3D-HVBK shell model shows that the multiscaling behavior of the velocity structure functions in superfluid turbulence is more complicated than it is in fluid turbulence.

  20. Friction in rail guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of friction is included in the present equations describing the performance of an inductively driven rail gun. These equations, which have their basis in an empirical formulation, are applied to results from two different experiments. Only an approximate physical description of the problem is attempted, in view of the complexity of details in the interaction among forces of this magnitude over time periods of the order of milisecs.

  1. High Speed Ice Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  2. Zonostrophic Turbulence in Two-layer Quasi-geotrophic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, J.; Jansen, M.; Vallis, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Zonostrophic turbulence was discovered in the one-layer shallow water model forced by random stirring and has since been related to Jovian atmosphere for the appearance of very strong and steady zonal jets. This study shows that such zonostrophic turbulence can also exist in a two-layer QG model driven by baroclinic instability. The kinetic energy spectrum shows a clear transition from the inertial inverse cascade regime with energy spectrum slope -5/3 at small scales to the zonostrophic regime with slope -5 at the largest scales. The turbulent regime is characterized by two non-dimensional numbers criticality and non-dimensional surface friction. The zonostrophic regime is reached and is most clear in the corner of low friction and low criticality. A new dependency of eddy diffusivity on surface friction is founded when surface friction is low enough, that eddy diffusivity decreases with surface friction regardless of criticality. The zonal jets are found to be strong mixing barriers, especially in the upper layer, and therefore potential vorticity (PV) and tracer staircases are formed. Time-space spectrum shows that the strong zonal jet traps waves within the critical latitudes so that the waves do not break. The longest waves are trapped as edge waves, and the shorter waves are trapped by Rossby wave reflection. Both are a result of the PV gradient created by the jet core.

  3. A computational technique for turbulent flow of wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Tom B

    2005-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique applied to the turbulent flow of wastewater sludge in horizontal, smooth-wall, circular pipes is presented. The technique uses the Crank-Nicolson finite difference method in conjunction with the variable secant method, an algorithm for determining the pressure gradient of the flow. A simple algebraic turbulence model is used. A Bingham-plastic rheological model is used to describe the shear stress/shear rate relationship for the wastewater sludge. The method computes velocity gradient and head loss, given a fixed volumetric flow, pipe size, and solids concentration. Solids concentrations ranging from 3 to 10% (by weight) and nominal pipe sizes from 0.15 m (6 in.) to 0.36 m (14 in.) are studied. Comparison of the CFD results for water to established values serves to validate the numerical method. The head loss results are presented in terms of a head loss ratio, R(hl), which is the ratio of sludge head loss to water head loss. An empirical equation relating R(hl) to pipe velocity and solids concentration, derived from the results of the CFD calculations, is presented. The results are compared with published values of Rhl for solids concentrations of 3 and 6%. A new expression for the Fanning friction factor for wastewater sludge flow is also presented.

  4. Bioinspired orientation-dependent friction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Longjian; Iturri, Jagoba; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; del Campo, Aránzazu

    2014-09-23

    Spatular terminals on the toe pads of a gecko play an important role in directional adhesion and friction required for reversible attachment. Inspired by the toe pad design of a gecko, we study friction of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars terminated with asymmetric (spatular-shaped) overhangs. Friction forces in the direction of and against the spatular end were evaluated and compared to friction forces on symmetric T-shaped pillars and pillars without overhangs. The shape of friction curves and the values of friction forces on spatula-terminated pillars were orientation-dependent. Kinetic friction forces were enhanced when shearing against the spatular end, while static friction was stronger in the direction toward the spatular end. The overall friction force was higher in the direction against the spatula end. The maximum value was limited by the mechanical stability of the overhangs during shear. The aspect ratio of the pillar had a strong influence on the magnitude of the friction force, and its contribution surpassed and masked that of the spatular tip for aspect ratios of >2.

  5. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith; Seemawute, Panida; Wongcharee, Khwanchit

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  6. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  7. Experimental test of a missing spectral link in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pinaki; Kellay, Hamid; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, Walter; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Gioia, Gustavo

    2012-11-01

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent α, a property of the velocity fluctuations in a flow. We use a soap-film channel wherein for the first time the value of α can be switched between 3 and 5/3, the two theoretically possible values in soap-film flows. Remarkably, the new theory holds in both soap-film flows and ordinary pipe flows, even though these types of flow are governed by different equations. We conclude that even where the governing equations are unknown and α can take anomalous values (as in sediment-laden rivers and polymer-doped oil pipelines), the frictional drag might be estimated from simple measurements of α.

  8. A survey of the turbulent drag reduction using passive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. S.

    1984-07-01

    Turbulent skin friction drag reduction using large eddy break-up devices (LEBU) and riblets is reviewed. Drag reductions of turbulent boundary layers are observed from riblets whose height and width range from 10 to 100 and 10 to 200 viscous lengths, respectively; the maximum reduction is obtained from riblets with cusped peaks and semicircular valleys of 15 viscous lengths in height and width. Drag reduction of turbulent boundary layers using riblets is due to the local increase of the effective kinematic viscosity in the buffer layer caused by forcing the fluid to flow across the ridges of riblets. An optimum configuration of LEBU consists of 2 thin flat plates with lengths, heights, and spacing being 1, 0.8, and 5 to 8 boundary layer thicknesses, respectively. Turbulent drag reduction using LEBU is due to the passive and dynamic effect of the momentum deficit region of the wake created by the devices suppressing turbulent energy production.

  9. Wave breaking turbulence in the ocean surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. M.; Gemmrich, J.; Schwendeman, M.; Zippel, S.; Moghimi, S.; Rogers, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of turbulent dissipation rate beneath ocean waves measured from a wave following, Lagrangian, reference frame. We find that the strong turbulence associated with wave breaking is isolated to a small region (nominally less than one meter) beneath the surface. However, this strong turbulence is advected vertically by the orbital motions of the dominant waves, and thus, in an Eulerian reference frame, the strong turbulence penetrates below the wave trough level. We also test several scalings for the turbulent dissipation rates caused by wave breaking, and we conclude that the conventional scaling by the cube of the wind speed (or wind friction velocity) is biased, particularly in high winds. A formulation using a transfer velocity associated with the short waves and the wind stress is more successful in scaling the observations.

  10. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  11. On the correlation of heat transfer in turbulent boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.J.; Hollingsworth, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent flow of a fluid bounded by a heated surface is a wonderfully complex yet derisively mundane phenomenon. Despite its commonness in natural and man-made environments, the authors struggle to accurately predict its behavior in many simple situations. A complexity encountered in a number of flows is the presence of free-stream turbulence. A turbulent free-stream typically yields increased surface friction and heat transfer. Turbulent boundary layers with turbulent free-streams are encountered in gas-turbine engines, rocket nozzles, electronic-cooling passages, geophysical flows, and numerous other dynamic systems. Here, turbulent boundary layers were subjected to grid-generated free-stream turbulence to study the effects of length scale and intensity on heat transfer. The research focused on correlating heat transfer without the use of conventional boundary-layer Reynolds numbers. The boundary-layers studied ranged from 400 to 2,700 in momentum-thickness Reynolds number and from 450 to 1,900 in enthalpy-thickness Reynolds number. Free-stream turbulence intensities varied from 0.1 to 8.0%. The turbulent-to-viscous length-scale ratios presented are the smallest found in the heat-transfer literature; the ratios spanned from 100 to 1000. The turbulent-to-thermal ratios (using enthalpy thickness as the thermal scale) are also the smallest reported; the ratios ranged from 3.2 to 12.3. A length-scale dependence was identified in a Stanton number based on a near-wall streamwise velocity fluctuation. A new near-wall Stanton number was introduced; this parameter was regarded as a constant in a two-region boundary-layer model. The new model correlated heat-transfer to within 7%.

  12. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  13. Friction laws for lubricated nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzio, R.; Boragno, C.; Valbusa, U.

    2006-09-01

    We have used friction force microscopy to probe friction laws for nanoasperities sliding on atomically flat substrates under controlled atmosphere and liquid environment, respectively. A power law relates friction force and normal load in dry air, whereas a linear relationship, i.e., Amontons' law, is observed for junctions fully immersed in model lubricants, namely, octamethylciclotetrasiloxane and squalane. Lubricated contacts display a remarkable friction reduction, with liquid and substrate specific friction coefficients. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulations suggests that load-bearing boundary layers at junction entrance cause the appearance of Amontons' law and impart atomic-scale character to the sliding process; continuum friction models are on the contrary of limited predictive power when applied to lubrication effects. An attempt is done to define general working conditions leading to the manifestation of nanoscale lubricity due to adsorbed boundary layers.

  14. Solid friction between soft filaments.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew; Hilitski, Feodor; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-06-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes's drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the properties of fibrous composite materials.

  15. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  16. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow inside tube with inserted helical coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharafeldeen, M. A.; Berbish, N. S.; Moawed, M. A.; Ali, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer and pressure drop were experimentally investigated in a coiled wire inserted tube in turbulent flow regime in the range of Reynolds number of 14,400 ≤ Re ≤ 42,900. The present work aims to extend the experimental data available on wire coil inserts to cover wire diameter ratio of 0.044 ≤ e/d ≤ 0.133 and coil pitch ratio of 1 ≤ p/d ≤ 5. Uniform heat flux was applied to the external surface of the tube and air was selected as fluid. The effects of Reynolds number and wire diameter and coil pitch ratios on the Nusselt number and friction factor were studied. The enhancement efficiency and performance criteria ranges are of (46.9-82.6 %) and (100.1-128 %) within the investigated range of the different parameters, respectively. Correlations are obtained for the average Nusselt number and friction factor utilizing the present measurements within the investigated range of geometrical parameters and Re. The maximum deviation between correlated and experimental values for Nusselt number and friction factor are ±5 and ±6 %, respectively.

  17. The Friction of Piston Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischbein, Hans W

    1945-01-01

    The coefficient of friction between piston ring and cylinder liner was measured in relation to gliding acceleration, pressure, temperature, quantity of oil and quality of oil. Comparing former lubrication-technical tests, conclusions were drawn as to the state of friction. The coefficients of friction as figured out according to the hydrodynamic theory were compared with those measured by tests. Special tests were made on "oiliness." The highest permissible pressure was measured and the ratio of pressure discussed.

  18. Measurement of friction between pulley and flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    An, K N; Berglund, L; Uchiyama, S; Coert, J H

    1993-01-01

    When tendon excursion takes place through the pulley, friction and drag are encountered at the interface. Repetitive exposure to such friction and attrition of the tendon has been considered one of the important factors causing cumulative trauma and leading to disorders such as tendinitis and tenosynovitis. In this study, development of an experimental method to evaluate friction and drag between the pulley and tendon under different loading conditions and joint configurations is considered. Verification of the model under an ideal situation of sutures across a mechanical pulley was performed.

  19. Heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kays, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper contains a summarization of five years work on an investigation on heat transfer to the transpired turbulent boundary layer. Experimental results are presented for friction coefficient and Stanton number over a wide range of blowing and suction for the case of constant free-stream velocity, holding certain blowing parameters constant. The problem of the accelerated turbulent boundary layer with transpiration is considered, experimental data are presented and discussed, and theoretical models for solution of the momentum equation under these conditions are presented. Data on turbulent Prandtl number are presented so that solutions to the energy equation may be obtained. Some examples of boundary layer heat transfer and friction coefficient predictions are presented using one of the models discussed, employing a finite difference solution method.

  20. Friction phenomena and their impact on the shear behaviour of granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhr, Bettina; Six, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    In the discrete element simulation of granular materials, the modelling of contacts is crucial for the prediction of the macroscopic material behaviour. From the tribological point of view, friction at contacts needs to be modelled carefully, as it depends on several factors, e.g. contact normal load or temperature to name only two. In discrete element method (DEM) simulations the usage of Coulomb's law of friction is state of the art in modelling particle-particle contacts. Usually in Coulomb's law, for all contacts only one constant coefficient of friction is used, which needs to reflect all tribological effects. Thus, whenever one of the influence factors of friction varies over a wide range, it can be expected that the usage of only one constant coefficient of friction in Coulomb's law is an oversimplification of reality. For certain materials, e.g. steel, it is known that a dependency of the coefficient of friction on the contact normal load exists. A more tribological tangential contact law is implemented in DEM, where the interparticle friction coefficient depends on the averaged normal stress in the contact. Simulations of direct shear tests are conducted, using steel spheres of different size distributions. The strong influence of interparticle friction on the bulk friction is shown via a variation of the constant interparticle friction coefficient. Simulations with constant and stress-dependent interparticle friction are compared. For the stress-dependent interparticle friction, a normal stress dependency of the bulk friction is seen. In the literature, measurements of different granular materials and small normal loads also show a stress dependency of the bulk friction coefficient. With increasing applied normal stress, the bulk friction coefficient reduces both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  1. Turbulent motion of mass flows. Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglit, Margarita; Yakubenko, Alexander; Yakubenko, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    New mathematical models for unsteady turbulent mass flows, e.g., dense snow avalanches and landslides, are presented. Such models are important since most of large scale flows are turbulent. In addition to turbulence, the two other important points are taken into account: the entrainment of the underlying material by the flow and the nonlinear rheology of moving material. The majority of existing models are based on the depth-averaged equations and the turbulent character of the flow is accounted by inclusion of drag proportional to the velocity squared. In this paper full (not depth-averaged) equations are used. It is assumed that basal entrainment takes place if the bed friction equals the shear strength of the underlying layer (Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011). The turbulent characteristics of the flow are calculated using a three-parameter differential model (Lushchik et al., 1978). The rheological properties of moving material are modeled by one of the three types of equations: 1) Newtonian fluid with high viscosity, 2) power-law fluid and 3) Bingham fluid. Unsteady turbulent flows down long homogeneous slope are considered. The flow dynamical parameters and entrainment rate behavior in time as well as their dependence on properties of moving and underlying materials are studied numerically. REFERENCES M.E. Eglit and A.E. Yakubenko, 2014. Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., 108, 139-148 Margarita E. Eglit and Alexander E. Yakubenko, 2016. The effect of bed material entrainment and non-Newtonian rheology on dynamics of turbulent slope flows. Fluid Dynamics, 51(3) Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), 143-147 Lushchik, V.G., Paveliev, A.A. , and Yakubenko, A.E., 1978. Three-parameter model of shear turbulence. Fluid Dynamics, 13, (3), 350-362

  2. Improved Skin Friction Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.; Bachalo, W. D.; Houser, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    An improved system for measuring aerodynamic skin friction which uses a dual-laser-beam oil-film interferometer was developed. Improvements in the optical hardware provided equal signal characteristics for each beam and reduced the cost and complexity of the system by replacing polarization rotation by a mirrored prism for separation of the two signals. An automated, objective, data-reduction procedure was implemented to eliminate tedious manual manipulation of the interferometry data records. The present system was intended for use in two-dimensional, incompressible flows over a smooth, level surface without pressure gradient, but the improvements discussed are not limited to this application.

  3. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirk, K L; Kuklo, T; Klemme, W

    2000-11-01

    Overuse knee injuries are common, but ITBFS is often overlooked as a cause of lateral knee pain in an active population. Iliotibial band friction syndrome is an overuse injury usually seen in long distance runners, cyclists, and military personnel. The exact incidence of the syndrome has been estimated to range from 1.6%-52% depending on the population studied. The diagnosis is often made from a thorough history and clinical examination with an infrequent need for additional studies. Treatment is mostly conservative consisting of rest and anti-inflammatory agents, with only the refractory cases requiring surgical resection of the impinging portion of the ITB.

  4. Friction loss in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In order to design proper ductwork for a local exhaust system, airflow characteristics were investigated in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A linear decrease in static pressure was observed downstream at points from the opening of the VU pipes (JIS K 6741) located at distances greater than 10 times the pipe diameter, for velocities ranging between 10.18-36.91 m/s. Roughness inside pipes with small diameters was found to be 0.0042-0.0056 mm and the friction factor was calculated on the basis of Colebrook's equation for an airflow transition zone. An extended friction chart was then constructed on the basis of the roughness value and the friction factor. This chart can be applied when designing a local exhaust system with the ducts of diameters ranging from 40 to 900 mm. The friction loss of the PVC pipe was found to be approximately 2/3 of that of a galvanized steel pipe. PMID:8768669

  5. Friction loss in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In order to design proper ductwork for a local exhaust system, airflow characteristics were investigated in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A linear decrease in static pressure was observed downstream at points from the opening of the VU pipes (JIS K 6741) located at distances greater than 10 times the pipe diameter, for velocities ranging between 10.18-36.91 m/s. Roughness inside pipes with small diameters was found to be 0.0042-0.0056 mm and the friction factor was calculated on the basis of Colebrook's equation for an airflow transition zone. An extended friction chart was then constructed on the basis of the roughness value and the friction factor. This chart can be applied when designing a local exhaust system with the ducts of diameters ranging from 40 to 900 mm. The friction loss of the PVC pipe was found to be approximately 2/3 of that of a galvanized steel pipe.

  6. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, G.; Ciaravola, V.; Furno, A.; Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s-1. We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci ‘laws’ of friction.

  7. General theory of frictional heating with application to rubber friction.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, G; Ciaravola, V; Furno, A; Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2015-05-01

    The energy dissipation in the contact regions between solids in sliding contact can result in high local temperatures which may strongly effect friction and wear. This is the case for rubber sliding on road surfaces at speeds above 1 mm s(-1). We derive equations which describe the frictional heating for solids with arbitrary thermal properties. The theory is applied to rubber friction on road surfaces and we take into account that the frictional energy is partly produced inside the rubber due to the internal friction of rubber and in a thin (nanometer) interfacial layer at the rubber-road contact region. The heat transfer between the rubber and the road surface is described by a heat transfer coefficient which depends on the sliding speed. Numerical results are presented and compared to experimental data. We find that frictional heating results in a kinetic friction force which depends on the orientation of the sliding block, thus violating one of the two basic Leonardo da Vinci 'laws' of friction.

  8. Turbulence, Chondrules, and Planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey; Hogan, Robert C.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Paque, Julie M.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown both numerically and experimentally that 3-D turbulence concentrates aerodynamically size-selected particles by orders of magnitude. In a previous review chapter, in "Chondrules and the protoplanetary disk" we illustrated the initial predictions of Turbulent Concentration (TC) as applied to the solar nebula. We predicted the particle size which will be most effectively concentrated by turbulence; it is the particle which has a gas drag stopping time equal to the overturn time of the smallest (Kolmogorov scale) eddy. The primary uncertainty is the level of nebula turbulence, or Reynolds number Re, which can be expressed in terms of the standard nebula eddy viscosity parameter alpha = Re(nu)(sub m)/cH, where nu(sub m) is molecular viscosity, c is sound speed, and H is vertical scale height. Several studies, and observed lifetimes of circumstellar disks, have suggested that the level of nebula turbulence can be described by alpha = 10(exp -2) - 10(exp -4). There is some recent concern about how energy is provided to maintain this turbulence, but the issue remains open. We adopt a canonical minimum mass nebula with a range of alpha > 0. We originally showed that chondrule-sized particles are selected for concentration in the terrestrial planet region if alpha = 10(exp -3) - 10(exp -4). In addition, Paque and Cuzzi found that the size distribution of chondrules is an excellent match for theoretical predictions. One then asks by what concentration factor C these particles can be concentrated; our early numerical results indicated an increase of C with alpha, and were supported by simple scaling arguments, but the extrapolation range was quite large and the predictions (C 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) not unlikely) uncertain. The work presented here, which makes use of our recent demonstration that the particle density field is a multifractal with flow-independent properties provides a far more secure ground for such predictions. We also indicate how fine

  9. Skin-friction drag analysis from the forced convection modeling in simplified underwater swimming.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Mai, T H; Lodini, A

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with skin-friction drag analysis in underwater swimming. Although lower than profile drag, skin-friction drag remains significant and is the second and only other contribution to total drag in the case of underwater swimming. The question arises whether varying the thermal gradient between the underwater swimmer and the pool water may modify the surface shear stress distribution and the resulting skin-friction drag acting on a swimmer's body. As far as the authors are aware, such a question has not previously been addressed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of this thermal gradient by using the integral formalism applied to the forced convection theory. From a simplified model in a range of pool temperatures (20-30 degrees C) it was demonstrated that, whatever the swimming speeds, a 5.3% reduction in the skin-friction drag would occur with increasing average boundary-layer temperature provided that the flow remained laminar. However, as the majority of the flow is actually turbulent, a turbulent flow analysis leads to the major conclusion that friction drag is a function of underwater speed, leading to a possible 1.5% reduction for fast swimming speeds above 1m/s. Furthermore, simple correlations between the surface shear stress and resulting skin-friction drag are derived in terms of the boundary-layer temperature, which may be readily used in underwater swimming situations.

  10. Analysis of land surface parameters and turbulence characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinjun; Xu, Xiangde; Liu, Huizhi; Li, Yueqing; Li, Yaohui; Hu, Zeyong; Gao, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yaoming; Sun, Jihua; Lenschow, Donald H.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Zhou, Mingyu; Bian, Xindi; Zhao, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Based on the results from 11 flux sites during the third Tibetan Plateau (TP) Experiment (TIPEX III), land surface parameters and the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer over the TP and surrounding region are analyzed. Monin-Obukhov similarity theory has been used to calculate the aerodynamic roughness length z0m and the excess resistance to heat transfer kB- 1 = ln(z0m/z0h), and the factors that cause variations of z0m and kB- 1 are investigated. The main drivers for the diurnal variations of surface albedo (α) at different sites are solar elevation, solar radiation, and soil moisture. The eddy correlation method is utilized to inversely calculate bulk transfer coefficients for momentum (CD) and heat (CH) at different sites. The relationships between CD and CH and the wind speed at 10 m follow a power law for unstable stratification. For stable stratification, both CD and CH increase with increasing wind speed when wind speed is less than 5 m/s. Diurnal variations of turbulent fluxes are compared at different sites, and the relationships between turbulent fluxes and other variables are analyzed. Wind speed variance normalized by the friction velocity (σu/u*, σv/u*, σw/u*) for neutral stratification (Cu1, Cv1, Cw1), and temperature and humidity variance normalized by a temperature and humidity scale (σT/T*, σq/q*) under free convection (z/L < -0.1) (CT, Cq) are fitted with similarity relations. The differences in similarity constants (Cu1, Cv1, Cw1, CT, Cq) at different sites are discussed. For stable stratification, cases are divided into weakly stable conditions and intermittent turbulence, and the critical values for these two states are determined. Shear and buoyancy terms in the turbulence kinetic energy equation for different stratifications are analyzed.

  11. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  12. Observations of the space-time structure of flow, turbulence, and stress over orbital-scale ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Jenna; Hay, Alex E.; Zedel, Len; Cheel, Richard

    2014-03-01

    The spatial and temporal structure of flow, turbulence, and stress over equilibrium orbital-scale sand ripples are investigated at turbulence-resolving scales with a wide-band coherent Doppler profiler (MFDop) and an oscillating tray apparatus. The oscillation period and horizontal excursion were 10 s and 0.5 m. A single trial was also executed at 0.6 m excursion. Ripple wavelength and amplitude were 25 and 2.2 cm. Ensemble-averaged velocity profiles were acquired with 3 mm vertical resolution at 42 Hz. The spatial pattern of flow as a function of oscillation phase was determined by combining the phase-averaged velocity measurements from trials with the MFDop at different positions relative to a particular ripple crest. The MFDop measurements are used to investigate the coevolution of the lee vortex, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stress, and turbulence production as a function of phase. Shear stress is determined from the vertically integrated vorticity equation and the double-averaged momentum equations. Friction factors obtained from the two methods are comparable and range from 0.1 to 0.2.

  13. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  14. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  15. Experimental study of plane turbulent wakes in a shallow water layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daoyi; Jirka, Gerhard H.

    1995-07-01

    Shallow two-dimensional turbulent wake flows have been studied experimentally on a large water table. In the experiments, the ambient Reynolds number Re h = UaH/ ν, in which Ua is the depth-averaged ambient velocity, H the water depth, and ν the kinematic viscosity, is large, well above a lower critical value of the order of 500 for open-channel flows so that the ambient base flow is fully turbulent. Different types of blunt bodies extending over the full depth are inserted in that base flow, including cylinders and flat solid and porous plates oriented transversely to the ambient flow. In all cases, the transverse body dimension D greatly exceeds the water depthy, D/H ≫ 1 . With that condition, the wake Reynolds number Re d = UaD/ ν is very large, greater than 10 4. The shallow near-wake characteristics of plane wakes from blunt bodies extending over the full water depth have been found to fall into one of three classes: (i) the vortex street (VS) type with an oscillating vortex shedding mechanism, (ii) the unsteady bubble (UB) wake type with flow instabilities growing downstream of a recirculating bubble attached to the body, and (iii) the steady bubble (SB) wake type with an attached bubble followed by a turbulent wake that contains no growing instabilities. When Re h > 1500, the flow classification is uniquely dependent on a shallow wake parameter, S = c fD/H in which cf is a quadratic law friction coefficient. For circular cylindrical bodies the VS-UB transition is characterized by a critical value, Sca ≈ 0.2, and the UB-SB transition by Scc ≈ 0.5. Solid plates, oriented transversely, differ by a factor of 1.25. The shallow far-wake behavior has been investigated with a special variable porosity wake device that reduces the wake velocity deficit and completely suppresses the VS instabilities in the near-field. Thus, only UB and SB wake types are found in that case. Furthermore, the shallow plane wake is obsserved to "stabilize" for large downstream

  16. Effects of Turbulence on the Critical Conditions of Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabanta, Quintin; Murphy, Jeremiah Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is an important factor to consider in the supernova problem; computer simulations show that turbulence reduces the critical conditions necessary for a successful explosion. We propose a global turbulence model that captures the effects of previous simulations, and we use this turbulence model to derive the reduced critical conditions. Enthalpy flux, turbulent dissipation, and Reynolds stress are all potentially impactful components in reducing the threshold for explosion. To examine the weight of these effects, we isolate each element's contribution and compare their respective magnitudes to the neutrino heating. By exploring these reduced critical curves, we hope to further understand how turbulence aids explosion.

  17. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  18. Frictional action at lower limb/prosthetic socket interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Turner-Smith, A R; Roberts, V C; Tanner, A

    1996-04-01

    The frictional action at stump/socket interface is discussed by a simplified model and finite element model analyses and clinical pressure measurements. The friction applied to the stump skin produces stresses within tissue and these stresses may damage the tissues and affect their normal functions. The combination of normal and shear stresses is considered to be a critical factor leading to amputee's discomfort and tissue damage. However, friction at the stump/socket interface has a beneficial action. A simplified residual limb model and a finite element model using real geometry have been developed to analyse the support action of friction. Both results show that the friction plays a critical role both in supporting the load of the amputee's body during the support phase of the gait cycle and in preventing the prosthesis from slipping off the limb during swing phase. Pressure at the below-knee socket during walking were measured with conditions of different friction. The results reveal that a larger pressures was produced at the lubricated interface than at the normal interface. A proper choice of coefficient of friction will balance the requirements of relief of load stress and reduction of slip with the general ability to support loads.

  19. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  20. Reduction of friction stress of ethylene glycol by attached hydrogen ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjin; Zhang, Chenhui; Deng, Mingming; Luo, Jianbin

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, it is shown that the friction stress of ethylene glycol can decrease by an order of magnitude to achieve superlubricity if there are hydrogen ions attached on the friction surfaces. An ultra-low friction coefficient (μ = 0.004) of ethylene glycol between Si3N4 and SiO2 can be obtained with the effect of hydrogen ions. Experimental result indicates that the hydrogen ions adsorbed on the friction surfaces forming a hydration layer and the ethylene glycol in the contact region forming an elastohydrodynamic film are the two indispensable factors for the reduction of friction stress. The mechanism of superlubricity is attributed to the extremely low shear strength of formation of elastohydrodynamic film on the hydration layer. This finding may introduce a new approach to reduce friction coefficient of liquid by attaching hydrogen ions on friction surfaces. PMID:25428584

  1. Elastic model of dry friction

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E.

    2013-09-15

    Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

  2. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  3. Bioinspired surfaces for turbulent drag reduction.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin B; Gose, James W; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss how superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) can provide friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. Whereas biomimetic SHSs are known to reduce drag in laminar flow, turbulence adds many new challenges. We first provide an overview on designing SHSs, and how these surfaces can cause slip in the laminar regime. We then discuss recent studies evaluating drag on SHSs in turbulent flow, both computationally and experimentally. The effects of streamwise and spanwise slip for canonical, structured surfaces are well characterized by direct numerical simulations, and several experimental studies have validated these results. However, the complex and hierarchical textures of scalable SHSs that can be applied over large areas generate additional complications. Many studies on such surfaces have measured no drag reduction, or even a drag increase in turbulent flow. We discuss how surface wettability, roughness effects and some newly found scaling laws can help explain these varied results. Overall, we discuss how, to effectively reduce drag in turbulent flow, an SHS should have: preferentially streamwise-aligned features to enhance favourable slip, a capillary resistance of the order of megapascals, and a roughness no larger than 0.5, when non-dimensionalized by the viscous length scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354731

  4. Bi-directional, buried-wire skin-friction gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, H.; Peake, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    A compact, nonobtrusive, bi-directional, skin-friction gage was developed to measure the mean shear stress beneath a three-dimensional boundary layer. The gage works by measuring the heat flux from two orthogonal wires embedded in the surface. Such a gage was constructed and its characteristics were determined for different angles of yaw in a calibration experiment in subsonic flow with a Preston tube used as a standard. Sample gages were then used in a fully three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer on a circular cone at high relative incidence, where there were regimes of favorable and adverse pressure gradients and three-dimensional separation. Both the direction and magnitude of skin friction were then obtained on the cone surface.

  5. Skin Friction and Transition Location Measurement on Supersonic Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Goodsell, Aga M.; Olsen, Lawrence E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Flow visualization techniques were used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative skin friction and transition location data in wind tunnel tests performed on two supersonic transport models at Mach 2.40. Oil-film interferometry was useful for verifying boundary layer transition, but careful monitoring of model surface temperatures and systematic examination of the effects of tunnel start-up and shutdown transients will be required to achieve high levels of accuracy for skin friction measurements. A more common technique, use of a subliming solid to reveal transition location, was employed to correct drag measurements to a standard condition of all-turbulent flow on the wing. These corrected data were then analyzed to determine the additional correction required to account for the effect of the boundary layer trip devices.

  6. Determination of basic friction angle using various laboratory tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The basic friction angle of rock is an important factor of joint shear strength and is included within most shear strength criteria. It can be measured by direct shear test, triaxial compression test and tilt test. Tilt test is mostly used because it is the simplest method. However, basic friction angles measured using tilt test for same rock type or for one sample are widely distributed and often do not show normal distribution. In this research, the basic friction angles for the Hangdeung granite form Korea and Berea sandstone from USA are measured accurately using direct shear test and triaxial compression test. Then basic friction angles are again measured using tilt tests with various conditions and are compared with those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test to determine the optimum condition of tilt test. Three types of sliding planes, such as planes cut by saw and planes polished by #100 and #600 grinding powders, are prepared. When planes are polished by #100 grinding powder, the basic friction angles measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test are very consistent and show narrow ranges. However, basic friction angles show wide ranges when planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder. The basic friction angle measured using tilt test are very close to those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test when plane is polished by #100 grinding powder. When planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder, basic friction angles measured using tilt test are slightly different. This indicates that tilt test with plane polished by #100 grinding powder can yield an accurate basic friction angle. In addition, the accurate values are obtained not only when planes are polished again after 10 times of tilt test, but values are averaged by more 30 times of tests.

  7. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  8. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  9. Skin-Friction Measurements in a 3-D, Supersonic Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wideman, J. K.; Brown, J. L.; Miles, J. B.; Ozcan, O.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental documentation of a three-dimensional shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction in a nominal Mach 3 cylinder, aligned with the free-stream flow, and 20 deg. half-angle conical flare offset 1.27 cm from the cylinder centerline. Surface oil flow, laser light sheet illumination, and schlieren were used to document the flow topology. The data includes surface-pressure and skin-friction measurements. A laser interferometric skin friction data. Included in the skin-friction data are measurements within separated regions and three-dimensional measurements in highly-swept regions. The skin-friction data will be particularly valuable in turbulence modeling and computational fluid dynamics validation.

  10. Modeling rain-driven overland flow: Empirical versus analytical friction terms in the shallow water approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, G.; Hu, J.; Delestre, O.; Darboux, F.; Lagrée, P.-Y.; Popinet, S.; Fullana, J. M.; Josserand, C.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulating overland flow fed by rainfall is a common issue in watershed surface hydrology. Modelers have to choose among various friction models when defining their simulation framework. The purpose of this work is to compare the simulation quality for the Manning, Darcy-Weisbach, and Poiseuille friction models on the simple case of a constant rain on a thin experimental flume. Results show that the usual friction law of Manning is not suitable for this type of flow. The Poiseuille friction model gave the best results both on the flux at the outlet and the velocity and depth profile along the flume. The Darcy-Weisbach model shows good results for laminar flow. Additional testing should be carried out for turbulent cases.

  11. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  12. Eliminating friction with friction: 2D Janssen effect in a friction-driven system.

    PubMed

    Karim, M Yasinul; Corwin, Eric I

    2014-05-01

    The Janssen effect is a unique property of confined granular materials experiencing gravitational compaction in which the pressure at the bottom saturates with an increasing filling height due to frictional interactions with side walls. In this Letter, we replace gravitational compaction with frictional compaction. We study friction-compacted 2D granular materials confined within fixed boundaries on a horizontal conveyor belt. We find that even with high-friction side walls the Janssen effect completely vanishes. Our results demonstrate that gravity-compacted granular systems are inherently different from friction-compacted systems in at least one important way: vibrations induced by sliding friction with the driving surface relax away tangential forces on the walls. Remarkably, we find that the Janssen effect can be recovered by replacing the straight side walls with a sawtooth pattern. The mechanical force introduced by varying the sawtooth angle θ can be viewed as equivalent to a tunable friction force. By construction, this mechanical friction force cannot be relaxed away by vibrations in the system. PMID:24856724

  13. Mars - Wind friction speeds for particle movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Leach, R.; White, B.; Iversen, J.; Pollack, J.

    1976-01-01

    Wind friction threshold speeds for particle movement were determined in a low pressure boundary layer wind tunnel at an atmospheric pressure of 5.3 mb. The results imply that for comparable pressures on Mars, the minimum wind friction threshold speed is about 2.5 m/sec, which would require free-stream winds of 50 to 135 m/sec, depending on the character of the surface and the atmospheric conditions. The corresponding wind speeds at the height of the Viking lander meteorology instrument would be about a factor of two less than the free-stream wind speed. The particle size most easily moved by winds on Mars is about 160 microns; particles both larger and smaller than this (at least down to about 5 microns) require stronger winds to initiate movement.

  14. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going

  15. Logarithmic laws for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    So, R.M.C.; Zhang, H.S.; Gatski, T.B.; Speziale, C.G.

    1994-11-01

    Dimensional similarity arguments proposed by Millikan are used with the Morkovin hypothesis to deduce logarithmic laws for compressible turbulent boundary layers as an alternative to the traditional van Driest analysis. It is shown that an overlap exists between the wall layer and the defect layer, and this leads to logarithmic behavior in the overlap region. The von Karman constant is found to depend parametrically on the Mach number based on the friction velocity, the dimensionless total heat flux, and the specific heat ratio. Even though it remains constant at approximately 0.41 for a freestream Mach number range of 0 to 4.544 with adiabatic wall boundary conditions, it rises sharply as the Mach number increases significantly beyond 4.544. The intercept of the logarithmic law of the wall is found to depend on the Mach number based on the friction velocity, the dimensionless total heat flux, the Prandtl number evaluated at the wall, and the specific heat ratio. On the other hand, the intercept of the logarithmic defect law is parametric in the pressure gradient parameter and all of the aforementioned dimensionless variables except the Prandtl number. A skin friction law is also deduced for compressible boundary layers. The skin friction coefficient is shown to depend on the momentum thickness Reynolds number, the wall temperature ratio, and all of the other parameters already mentioned. 26 refs.

  16. A simplified oil-film skin-friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    The oil-film method of skin friction measurement, which does not require calibration, nevertheless entails that interferometric measurements of the oil film be obtained. The oil-film method is presently simplified by eliminating interferometry and its requisite polished surface, by taking direct and dynamic measurements of the oil-film slope with a small position-sensing photodiode. This technique has undergone verification in incompressible turbulent and laminar flows in flat-plate boundary layers and pipe flows; the meter is judged to be inexpensive, simple, and robust.

  17. Specific impulse loss due to friction and dissipation in the nozzle of a liquid propellant rocket engine with film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, V. G.; Sizov, V. I.; Sternin, L. E.; Yakubenko, A. E.

    1993-07-01

    A method and algorithms for computing a compressible turbulent boundary layer in the nozzles of liquid propellant rocket engines with film cooling are developed which make it possible to determine losses of the specific impulse due to friction as well as heat fluxes and other flow characteristics. The calculations are based on the numerical solution of gasdynamic equations in the boundary layer approximation using a three-parameter turbulence model. The conditions for minimum specific impulse loss are determined.

  18. Analytic prediction for planar turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    Analytic predictions of mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise ( x) development of related integral quantities are presented for flows in channel and turbulent boundary layer (TBL), based on a symmetry analysis of eddy length and total stress. Specific predictions include the relations for momentum Reynolds number ( Re θ) with friction Re τ and streamwise Re x : Re θ ≈ 3.27 Re τ, and Re x / Re θ = 4.94 [(ln Re θ + 1.88)2 + 1]; the streamwise development of the friction velocity u τ: U e / u τ ≈ 2.22ln Re x + 2.86 - 3.83ln(ln Re x ), and of the boundary layer thickness δ e : x/δ e ≈ 7.27ln Re x -5.18-12.52ln(ln Re x ), which are fully validated by recent reliable data.

  19. The frictional response of patterned soft polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Charles J.

    2008-10-01

    Friction plays an intricate role in our everyday lives, it is therefore critical to understand the underlying features of friction to better help control and manipulate the response anywhere two surfaces in contact move past each other by a sliding motion. Here we present results targeting a thorough understanding of soft material friction and how it can be manipulated with patterns. We found that the naturally occurring length scale or periodicity (lambda) of frictionally induced patterns, Schallamach waves, could be described using two materials properties (critical energy release rate Gc and complex modulus (E*), i.e. lambdainfinity Gc /E*). Following this, we evaluated the effect of a single defect at a sliding interface. Sliding over a defect can be used to model the sliding from one feature to another in a patterned surface. Defects decreased the sliding frictional force by as much as 80% sliding and this decrease was attributed to changes in tangential stiffness of the sliding interface. The frictional response of surface wrinkles, where multiple edges or defects are acting in concert, was also evaluated. Wrinkles were shown to decrease friction (F) and changes in contact area (A) could not describe this decrease. A tangential stiffness correction factor (fx) and changes in the critical energy release rate were used to describe this deviation (F infinity Gc *A*fx/ℓ, where ℓ is a materials defined length scale of dissipation). This scaling can be used to describe the friction of any topographically patterned surface including the Gecko's foot, where the feature size is smaller than ℓ and thus replaces ℓ, increasing the friction compared to a flat surface. Also, mechanically-induced surface defects were used to align osmotically driven surface wrinkles by creating stress discontinuities that convert the global biaxial stress state to local uniaxial stresses. Defect spacing was used to control the alignment process at the surface of the wrinkled rigid

  20. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  1. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  2. Fault Wear and Friction Evolution: Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boneh, Y.; Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    -body' structure that acts to lubricate the fault (Reches & Lockner, 2010). The steady-state stage is characterized by (1) relatively low wear-rate (approximately 10% of running-in wear-rate) and (2) quasi-constant friction coefficient. These observations suggest only small changes in the gouge layer in term of thickness (100 to 200 microns) and strength in this final stage. The present study indicates that (1) wear by plowing and asperity failure initiate early, during the first few millimeters of slip; and (2) wear and associated gouge formation appear as the controlling factors of friction evolution and fault weakening.

  3. a Study of Turbulent Wakes with and Without the Presence of Free Stream Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardebili, Mahmoud Khosro

    1993-01-01

    The objective was to investigate symmetric and asymmetric turbulent wakes subjected to free stream turbulence. The wake environment was generated experimentally by using a modified airfoil. Symmetric wake was simulated by merging of two similar boundary layers on two sides of the model into wake. Asymmetric wake was simulated by merging of dissimilar boundary layers on the two sides of the model. Free stream turbulence was generated by placing grids upstream of the model. The mean velocity was obtained with the aid of pressure measurement, and the turbulence quantities were obtained by using hot-wire anemometry. In order to assess the ability of K-varepsilon and Reynolds stress models to predict turbulent wake under varying free stream conditions, the wake governing equations for the closure models were numerically solved by a second order accurate, parabolic, forward marching finite difference method. The mean velocity and its flow properties of symmetric and asymmetric wakes were affected by the presence of free stream turbulence. The recovery rate increased while shape factor decreased with higher level and larger length scale of the free stream turbulence. The displacement thickness and half-wake width became larger under moderate free stream turbulence, and decreased with higher free stream turbulence. The free stream turbulence affected the turbulence structure of the wake. Increase in the level and length scale of the free stream turbulence increased the level of turbulence quantities in the wake. It affected outer layer of wake, while the inner core of the wake essentially remained unaffected. The K-varepsilon model and Reynolds stress model of turbulence closure resulted in acceptable prediction of mean velocity throughout the wake. However in far wake the turbulence quantities predicted with the K-varepsilon model are closer to the experimental data than predictions with Reynolds Stress model. The turbulence quantities of wake were predicted with maximum

  4. Effects of Different Ligature Materials on Friction in Sliding Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Khamatkar, Aparna; Sonawane, Sushma; Narkhade, Sameer; Gadhiya, Nitin; Bagade, Abhijit; Soni, Vivek; Betigiri, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Background: During orthodontic tooth movement friction occurs at the bracket wire interface. Out of the total force applied to the tooth movement, some of it is dissipated as friction, and the remainder is transferred to the supporting structures of the tooth to mediate tooth movement. However many factors affect friction, and method of arch wire ligation being an important contributing factor. Hence, this study was carried out to evaluate the effects of different ligature materials on friction in sliding mechanics and to compare the effect of environment (dry and wet) on friction produced in sliding mechanics. Materials and Methods: The evaluation of friction between the bracket and the archwire consisted of a simulated half arch fixed appliance with archwire ligated in a vertical position. Four 0.022” maxillary stainless steel premolar brackets having a - 0° torque and 0° angulation were aligned with a 0.019” × 0.025” stainless steel arch wire onto a rigid Plexiglass sheet. The movable test bracket was fitted with a 10 mm long, 0.045” thick stainless steel power arm on the bonding surface. Testing was performed on a Hounsfield material testing machine. A total of 100 g weight was suspended from the power arm and the load needed to move the bracket over the distance of not <4 mm across the central span was recorded separately. Fifteen representative readings were taken with one reading per test sample. Results: The results showed that the mean frictional force of different groups in dry and wet state was statistically significantly different. The mean frictional force in a dry state was statistically significantly higher than wet state in elastomeric group. Conclusion: The type of ligation material and environment significantly affected the degree of friction generated during sliding mechanics. Teflon coated stainless steel ligatures produced the least friction among the materials tested in both dry and wet conditions and there was no significant effect

  5. Recent turbulent drag reduction research at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Three areas are discussed: oscillatory longitudinal curvature, large eddy breakup devices, and small longitudinal surface striations. The first two concepts produced sizable local turbulent skin friction reductions, but further research is required to optimize the effect, reduce parasitic device drag, and provide a net increase in vehicle performance. The surface striations, due to large wetted area increased for a given planform, have not yet yielded a planform-averaged skin friction reduction. Heat transfer data indicated such surfaces may have useful application in heat exchangers.

  6. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  7. Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

  8. TURBULENT SHEAR ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2013-04-10

    We consider particle acceleration by large-scale incompressible turbulence with a length scale larger than the particle mean free path. We derive an ensemble-averaged transport equation of energetic charged particles from an extended transport equation that contains the shear acceleration. The ensemble-averaged transport equation describes particle acceleration by incompressible turbulence (turbulent shear acceleration). We find that for Kolmogorov turbulence, the turbulent shear acceleration becomes important on small scales. Moreover, using Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm that the ensemble-averaged transport equation describes the turbulent shear acceleration.

  9. Flowing biofilms as a transport mechanism for biomass through porous media under laminar and turbulent conditions in a laboratory reactor system.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, P; Dodds, I; De Beer, D; Scott, H Lappin; Boyle, J D

    2005-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be important in influencing biofilm morphology and causing biofilms to flow over surfaces in flow cell experiments. However, it is not known whether similar effects may occur in porous media. Generally, it is assumed that the primary transport mechanism for biomass in porous media is through convection, as suspended particulates (cells and flocs) carried by fluid flowing through the interstices. However, the flow of biofilms over the surfaces of soils and sediment particles, may represent an important flux of biomass, and subsequently affect both biological activity and permeability. Mixed species bacterial biofilms were grown in glass flow cells packed with 1 mm diameter glass beads, under laminar or turbulent flow (porous media Reynolds number = 20 and 200 respectively). The morphology and dynamic behavior reflected those of biofilms grown in the open flow cells. The laminar biofilm was relatively uniform and after 23 d had inundated the majority of the pore spaces. Under turbulent flow the biofilm accumulated primarily in protected regions at contact points between the beads and formed streamers that trailed from the leeward face. Both biofilms caused a 2 to 3-fold increase in friction factor and in both cases there were sudden reductions in friction factor followed by rapid recovery, suggesting periodic sloughing and regrowth events. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that under both laminar and turbulent conditions biofilms flowed over the surface of the porous media. In some instances ripple structures formed. The velocity of biofilm flow was on the order of 10 mum h(-1) in the turbulent flow cell and 1.0 mum h(-1) in the laminar flow cell.

  10. Flowing biofilms as a transport mechanism for biomass through porous media under laminar and turbulent conditions in a laboratory reactor system.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, P; Dodds, I; De Beer, D; Scott, H Lappin; Boyle, J D

    2005-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be important in influencing biofilm morphology and causing biofilms to flow over surfaces in flow cell experiments. However, it is not known whether similar effects may occur in porous media. Generally, it is assumed that the primary transport mechanism for biomass in porous media is through convection, as suspended particulates (cells and flocs) carried by fluid flowing through the interstices. However, the flow of biofilms over the surfaces of soils and sediment particles, may represent an important flux of biomass, and subsequently affect both biological activity and permeability. Mixed species bacterial biofilms were grown in glass flow cells packed with 1 mm diameter glass beads, under laminar or turbulent flow (porous media Reynolds number = 20 and 200 respectively). The morphology and dynamic behavior reflected those of biofilms grown in the open flow cells. The laminar biofilm was relatively uniform and after 23 d had inundated the majority of the pore spaces. Under turbulent flow the biofilm accumulated primarily in protected regions at contact points between the beads and formed streamers that trailed from the leeward face. Both biofilms caused a 2 to 3-fold increase in friction factor and in both cases there were sudden reductions in friction factor followed by rapid recovery, suggesting periodic sloughing and regrowth events. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that under both laminar and turbulent conditions biofilms flowed over the surface of the porous media. In some instances ripple structures formed. The velocity of biofilm flow was on the order of 10 mum h(-1) in the turbulent flow cell and 1.0 mum h(-1) in the laminar flow cell. PMID:16371336

  11. Coherent structure formation in turbulent thermal superfluids.

    PubMed

    Kivotides, Demosthenes

    2006-05-01

    By means of numerical calculations, we show that in turbulent thermal superfluids the normal fluid induces coherent bundles of quantized line vortices in the superfluid. These filamentary structures are formed in between the normal fluid vortices, acquiring eventually comparable circulation. They are self-stretched and evolve according to self-regulating dynamics. Their spectrum mimics the normal fluid spectrum with the mutual friction force exciting the large scales and damping the small scales. Strongly interacting triads of them merge sporadically into stronger, braided vortex filaments, inducing strong fluctuations in the system's energetics. A theoretical account of the system's statistical mechanics is proposed. PMID:16712309

  12. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  13. Role of critical points of the skin friction field in formation of plumes in thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Kolchinskaya, Anastasiya; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics in the thin boundary layers of temperature and velocity is the key to a deeper understanding of turbulent transport of heat and momentum in thermal convection. The velocity gradient at the hot and cold plates of a Rayleigh-Bénard convection cell forms the two-dimensional skin friction field and is related to the formation of thermal plumes in the respective boundary layers. Our analysis is based on a direct numerical simulation of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ =1 and focused on the critical points of the skin friction field. We identify triplets of critical points, which are composed of two unstable nodes and a saddle between them, as the characteristic building block of the skin friction field. Isolated triplets as well as networks of triplets are detected. The majority of the ridges of linelike thermal plumes coincide with the unstable manifolds of the saddles. From a dynamical Lagrangian perspective, thermal plumes are formed together with an attractive hyperbolic Lagrangian coherent structure of the skin friction field. We also discuss the differences from the skin friction field in turbulent channel flows from the perspective of the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem for two-dimensional vector fields.

  14. Size Scaling of Static Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-01

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as fm+Δf/Aγ for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of fm, controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  15. Rubber friction: comparison of theory with experiment.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J; Dieluweit, S; Tada, T

    2011-12-01

    We have measured the friction force acting on a rubber block slid on a concrete surface. We used both unfilled and filled (with carbon black) styrene butadiene (SB) rubber and have varied the temperature from -10 °C to 100 °C and the sliding velocity from 1 μm/s to 1000 μm/s. We find that the experimental data at different temperatures can be shifted into a smooth master-curve, using the temperature-frequency shifting factors obtained from measurements of the bulk viscoelastic modulus. The experimental data has been analyzed using a theory which takes into account the contributions to the friction from both the substrate asperity-induced viscoelastic deformations of the rubber, and from shearing the area of real contact. For filled SB rubber the frictional shear stress σ(f) in the area of real contact results mainly from the energy dissipation at the opening crack on the exit side of the rubber-asperity contact regions. For unfilled rubber we instead attribute σ(f) to shearing of a thin rubber smear film, which is deposited on the concrete surface during run in. We observe very different rubber wear processes for filled and unfilled SB rubber, which is consistent with the different frictional processes. Thus, the wear of filled SB rubber results in micrometer-sized rubber particles which accumulate as dry dust, which is easily removed by blowing air on the concrete surface. This wear process seams to occur at a steady rate. For unfilled rubber a smear film forms on the concrete surface, which cannot be removed even using a high-pressure air stream. In this case the wear rate appears to slow down after some run in time period.

  16. Radiation friction versus ponderomotive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, A. M.; Elkina, N. V.; Gelfer, E. G.; Narozhny, N. B.; Ruhl, H.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of ponderomotive potential is upgraded to a regime in which radiation friction becomes dominant. The radiation friction manifests itself in long-term capturing of the particles released at the focus and impenetrability of the focus from the exterior. We apply time scale separation to the Landau-Lifshitz equation splitting the particle motion into quivering and slow drift of a guiding center. The drift equation is deduced by averaging over fast motion.

  17. Tire/runway friction interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of NASA Langley's tire/runway pavement interface studies. The National Tire Modeling Program, evaluation of new tire and landing gear designs, tire wear and friction tests, and tire hydroplaning studies are examined. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility is described along with some ground friction measuring vehicles. The major goals and scope of several joint FAA/NASA programs are identified together with current status and plans.

  18. A One-Dimensional Global-Scaling Erosive Burning Model Informed by Blowing Wall Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibbey, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    A derivation of turbulent flow parameters, combined with data from erosive burning test motors and blowing wall tests results in erosive burning model candidates useful in one-dimensional internal ballistics analysis capable of scaling across wide ranges of motor size. The real-time burn rate data comes from three test campaigns of subscale segmented solid rocket motors tested at two facilities. The flow theory admits the important effect of the blowing wall on the turbulent friction coefficient by using blowing wall data to determine the blowing wall friction coefficient. The erosive burning behavior of full-scale motors is now predicted more closely than with other recent models.

  19. Numerical experiments of variable property turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan; Boersma, Bendiks; Pecnik, Rene

    2014-11-01

    We perform numerical experiments of turbulent channel flows with varying density and viscosity to investigate the validity of semi-local scaling as proposed by Huang, Coleman and Bradshaw (1995, J. Fluid Mech). Direct numerical simulations of the low Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations are used, whereby the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at the walls is set to constant. A pseudo-spectral discretization in the periodic directions and a 6th order compact finite difference in wall normal direction is used. The friction Reynolds number based on half channel height and wall friction velocity is Reτ = 395 . Different relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are studied. A variable property case has been identified with turbulent statistics that are quasi-similar to constant property turbulence. This case corresponds to the condition when the semi-local scaling is equal to the classical scaling. For cases wherein the semi-local scaling differs from classical scaling in the channel core, we show that the near-wall turbulence deviates towards a state of increased/decreased anisotropy as compared to constant property turbulence. The above results show not only the validity but also the usefulness of the semi-local scaling.

  20. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  1. Nanotribology fundamentals: Predicting the viscous coefficient of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Tonya S.

    In this work, I have used the Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) to study nanoscale friction of monolayer adsorbates on (111) metals. The friction of these systems is viscous friction, defined as Ff = etanu = ( mt )nu. Here, eta is the viscous coefficient of friction, nu is the velocity of the adsorbate, m is adsorbate mass, and tau is the slip time, which is the time required for the film's speed to fall to 1/e of its original value. The main focus of this dissertation is to determine the factors that control eta, the viscous coefficient of friction. I have examined three different parameters in order to determine their effect on eta. An equation for predicting the viscous coefficient of friction has been proposed: eta = etasubs + aU2o . Here, etasubs is the damping of adsorbate sliding energy within the substrate, a is a constant depending on mainly temperature and adsorbate film coverage, and Uo is the atomic-scale surface corrugation. I have examined the sliding friction of n-octane on Cu(111) vs. Pb(11I) surfaces, which have gamma = 0.45 meV and gamma = 0.26 meV, respectively. I have observed that the slip time for a monolayer of n-octane/Cu(111) is 0.94 ns +/- 0.36 ns, and the slip time of noctane/Pb(111) is 0.59 ns +/- 0.13 ns. I therefore observe no direct evidence of a link between the damping of perpendicular FT modes and sliding friction. It is still possible, however, that the damping of the parallel FT phonon mode affects sliding friction. Finally, I studied the slippage of monolayer methanol films at room temperature on rotating, rigid, and slowly ratcheting C60 substrates, to examine the effect that the molecular rotation of the substrate surface has on the sliding friction of an adsorbate. I found that at all coverages, the slip time for methanol on rigid and slowly ratcheting C60 was longer (hence lower friction) than the slip time for methanol on rotating C 60, defying the ball bearing analogy. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Effects of transverse oscillatory waves on turbulent boundary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matulevich, Jonathan; Jacobs, Harold R.

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the interaction of unsteady (oscillatory) flows with the growth of a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate have primarily dealt with an oscillatory component in the primary flow direction. Past studies of the 2-D flow have shown little or no increase in the time averaged heat transfer. The present paper deals with a steady axial and an oscillatory transverse flow. It is shown that for such flows the temporal variation for both the turbulent skin friction and heat transfer are such as to yield increased time averaged values.

  3. Friction-induced skin injuries-are they pressure ulcers? An updated NPUAP white paper.

    PubMed

    Brienza, David; Antokal, Steven; Herbe, Laura; Logan, Susan; Maguire, Jeanine; Van Ranst, Jennifer; Siddiqui, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Friction injuries are often misdiagnosed as pressure ulcers. The reason for the misdiagnosis may be a misinterpretation of classic pressure ulcer literature that reported friction increased the susceptibility of the skin to pressure damage. This analysis assesses the classic literature that led to the inclusion of friction as a causative factor in the development of pressure ulcers in light of more recent research on the effects of shear. The analysis in this article suggests that friction can contribute to pressure ulcers by creating shear strain in deeper tissues, but friction does not appear to contribute to pressure ulcers in the superficial layers of the skin. Injuries to the superficial layers of the skin caused by friction are not pressure ulcers and should not be classified or treated as such.

  4. The influence of high temperatures on the tribological properties of automotive friction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Luke

    Temperatures of over 800C can be generated at the frictional interface within the brake systems of large vehicles, such high temperatures result in severe wear at the frictional interface, and can also lead to a very dangerous condition known as brake fade, characterised by a sharp fall in the coefficient of friction between the pad and disc, resulting in a catastrophic loss of braking efficiency. Common friction materials are very specialised composites often containing up to 15 components bound together within a phenolic resin matrix. The high temperature behaviour of the various constituents of friction materials were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis, focusing in particular on the thermal decomposition of the phenolic resin matrix material, where it has been firmly established that the thermal decomposition products of phenolic resin are the primary cause of brake fade. This has lead to the development of a novel approach for reducing fade in conventional resin based friction materials, involving a partial carbonisation to 400C. The high temperature wear characteristics of both modified and conventional friction materials were examined using standard dynamometer tests, as well as a 'continuous drag' type test machine, equipped with a heating facility. During this study a number of factors were identified as the main influences on the overall wear behaviour of friction materials. These included test temperature, sample test history, and the various effects of friction films, which were the subject of a detailed analysis. The formation of friction films was found to be an important facet of a successful friction material, producing a reduction in wear at the frictional interface. Films were examined and analysed using EDX, SEM, and X-ray diffraction techniques, which revealed the presence of a high proportion of magnetite (Fe3O4), containing iron which originated from the disc surface. It was established that the incorporation of iron in friction

  5. Gravito-turbulent disks in three dimensions: Turbulent velocities versus depth

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-07-01

    Characterizing turbulence in protoplanetary disks is crucial for understanding how they accrete and spawn planets. Recent measurements of spectral line broadening promise to diagnose turbulence, with different lines probing different depths. We use three-dimensional local hydrodynamic simulations of cooling, self-gravitating disks to resolve how motions driven by 'gravito-turbulence' vary with height. We find that gravito-turbulence is practically as vigorous at altitude as at depth. Even though gas at altitude is much too rarefied to be itself self-gravitating, it is strongly forced by self-gravitating overdensities at the midplane. The long-range nature of gravity means that turbulent velocities are nearly uniform vertically, increasing by just a factor of two from midplane to surface, even as the density ranges over nearly three orders of magnitude. The insensitivity of gravito-turbulence to height contrasts with the behavior of disks afflicted by the magnetorotational instability (MRI); in the latter case, non-circular velocities increase by at least a factor of 15 from midplane to surface, with various non-ideal effects only magnifying this factor. The distinct vertical profiles of gravito-turbulence versus MRI turbulence may be used in conjunction with measurements of non-thermal linewidths at various depths to identify the source of transport in protoplanetary disks.

  6. Experimental Research Into Generation of Acoustic Emission Signals in the Process of Friction of Hadfield Steel Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Filippov, A. V.; Novitskaia, O. S.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Sizova, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental research into dry sliding friction of Hadfield steel single crystals involving registration of acoustic emission are presented in the paper. The images of friction surfaces of Hadfield steel single crystals and wear grooves of the counterbody surface made after completion of three serial experiments conducted under similar conditions and friction regimes are given. The relation of the acoustic emission waveform envelope to the changing friction factor is revealed. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of acoustic emission signal frames are determined on the base of Fast Fourier Transform and Short Time Fourier Transform during the run-in stage of tribounits and in the process of stable friction.

  7. Frictional Heterogeneities Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Tesei, T.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact as a) a significant number of earthquakes nucleate within or propagate through these rocks, and b) half of the known petroleum reserves occur within carbonate reservoirs, which likely contain faults that experience fluid pressure fluctuations. Field studies on carbonate-bearing faults that are exhumed analogues of currently active structures of the seismogenic crust, show that fault rock types are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: localization associated with cataclasis, thermal decomposition and plastic deformation commonly affect fault rocks in massive limestone, whereas distributed deformation, pressure-solution and frictional sliding along phyllosilicates are observed in marly rocks. In addition, hydraulic fractures, indicating cyclic fluid pressure build-ups during the fault activity, are widespread. Standard double direct friction experiments on fault rocks from massive limestones show high friction, velocity neutral/weakening behaviour and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, on the contrary, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones are characterized by low friction, significant velocity strengthening behavior and no healing. We are currently running friction experiments on large rock samples (20x20 cm) in order to reproduce and characterize the interaction of fault rock frictional heterogeneities observed in the field. In addition we have been performing experiments at near lithostatic fluid pressure in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel to test the Rate and State friction stability under these conditions. Our combination of structural observations and mechanical data have been revealing the processes and structures that are at the base of the broad spectrum of fault slip behaviors recently documented by high-resolution geodetic and seismological data.

  8. Dynamical friction in pairs of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prugniel, Philippe; Combes, Francoise

    1990-01-01

    The authors present numerical experiments on dynamical friction in pairs of elliptical galaxies of unequal mass. They confirm that the self-gravity of the response is not important and show the drastic effect of the deformability of the companion which reduces the decay time by more than a factor of 2. Almost the same amount of orbital energy is dissipated within the satellite as within the large galaxy. Finally, the authors discuss the importance of distant encounters for the dynamical evolution of systems of galaxies.

  9. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  10. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  11. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  12. Turbulent Mixing and Flow Resistance over Dunes and Scours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Arfaie, A.; Burns, A. D.; Eggenhuisen, J. T.; Ingham, D. B.; McCaffrey, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Flows in both submarine and fluvial channels are subject to lower boundary roughness. Lower boundary roughness occurs as frictional roughness suffered by the flow as it moves over the bed (skin friction) or drag suffered by the flow as it moves past a large obstacle (form drag). Critically, to overcome such roughness the flow must expend (lose) energy and momentum. However, whilst overcoming bed roughness the degree of turbulent mixing in the flow may be enhanced increasing the potential energy of the flow. This is of key importance to density driven flows as the balance between kinetic energy lost and potential energy gained (through turbulent diffusion of suspended particulate material) may critically affect the criterion for autosuspension. Moreover, this effect of lower boundary roughness may go as far as helping to explain why, even on shallow slopes, channelized submarine density currents can run out over ultra long distances. Such effects are also important in fluvial systems, where they will be responsible for maximizing or minimizing sediment capacity and competence in different flow environments. Numerical simulations are performed at a high Reynolds number (O (106)) for a series of crestal length to height ratio (c/h) at a fixed width to height ratio (w/h). Here, we present key findings of shear flow over a range of idealized bedform shapes. We show how the total basal shear stress is split into skin friction and form drag and identify how the respective magnitudes vary as a function of bedform shape and scale. Moreover we demonstrate how said bedforms affect the balance of energy lost (frictional) and energy gained (turbulent mixing). Overall, results demonstrate a slow reduction in turbulent mixing and flow resistance with decreasing bedform side slope angle. This suggests that both capacity and competence of the flow may be reduced through decrease in of the potential energy of the flow as a result of change in slope angles.

  13. Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A. ); Henein, N.A. . Center for Automotive Research)

    1992-05-01

    The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

  14. Versatile Friction Stir Welding/Friction Plug Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A proposed system of tooling, machinery, and control equipment would be capable of performing any of several friction stir welding (FSW) and friction plug welding (FPW) operations. These operations would include the following: Basic FSW; FSW with automated manipulation of the length of the pin tool in real time [the so-called auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability]; Self-reacting FSW (SRFSW); SR-FSW with APT capability and/or real-time adjustment of the distance between the front and back shoulders; and Friction plug welding (FPW) [more specifically, friction push plug welding] or friction pull plug welding (FPPW) to close out the keyhole of, or to repair, an FSW or SR-FSW weld. Prior FSW and FPW systems have been capable of performing one or two of these operations, but none has thus far been capable of performing all of them. The proposed system would include a common tool that would have APT capability for both basic FSW and SR-FSW. Such a tool was described in Tool for Two Types of Friction Stir Welding (MFS- 31647-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 10 (October 2006), page 70. Going beyond what was reported in the cited previous article, the common tool could be used in conjunction with a plug welding head to perform FPW or FPPW. Alternatively, the plug welding head could be integrated, along with the common tool, into a FSW head that would be capable of all of the aforementioned FSW and FPW operations. Any FSW or FPW operation could be performed under any combination of position and/or force control.

  15. Mesh Size Control of Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitenis, Angela; Uruena, Juan Manuel; Schulze, Kyle D.; Cooper, Andrew C.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Sawyer, W. Gregory

    Soft, permeable sliding interfaces in aqueous environments are ubiquitous in nature but their ability to maintain high lubricity in a poor lubricant (water) has not been well understood. Hydrogels are excellent materials for fundamental soft matter and biotribology studies due to their high water content. While mesh size controls the material and transport properties of a hydrogel, its effects on friction were only recently explored. Polyacrylamide hydrogels slid in a Gemini (self-mated) interface produced low friction under low speeds, low pressures, macroscopic contact areas, and room temperature aqueous environments. The friction coefficients at these interfaces are lowest at low speeds and are speed-independent. This behavior is due to thermal fluctuations at the interface separating the surfaces, with water shearing in this region being the main source of dissipation. We found that mesh size had an inverse correlation with friction. We further investigated a transition from this behavior at higher speeds, and found that the transition speed correlated with the mesh size and relaxation time of the polymer network. Very soft and correspondingly large mesh size Gemini hydrogels show superlubricity under specific conditions with friction being less than 0.005.

  16. Slow rupture of frictional interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2012-02-01

    The failure of frictional interfaces and the spatiotemporal structures that accompany it are central to a wide range of geophysical, physical and engineering systems. Recent geophysical and laboratory observations indicated that interfacial failure can be mediated by slow slip rupture phenomena which are distinct from ordinary, earthquake-like, fast rupture. These discoveries have influenced the way we think about frictional motion, yet the nature and properties of slow rupture are not completely understood. We show that slow rupture is an intrinsic and robust property of simple non-monotonic rate-and-state friction laws. It is associated with a new velocity scale cmin, determined by the friction law, below which steady state rupture cannot propagate. We further show that rupture can occur in a continuum of states, spanning a wide range of velocities from cmin to elastic wave-speeds, and predict different properties for slow rupture and ordinary fast rupture. Our results are qualitatively consistent with recent high-resolution laboratory experiments and may provide a theoretical framework for understanding slow rupture phenomena along frictional interfaces.

  17. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  18. Advanced friction simulation of standardized friction tests: a numerical and experimental demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, J.; Wiebenga, J. H.; Hörning, M.; Dietrich, F.; Dane, C.

    2016-08-01

    For the characterization of friction conditions under sheet metal forming process conditions, different friction test set-ups are being used in industry. However, different friction tests and test set-ups are known to result in scattering friction results. In this work, the TriboForm software is utilized to numerically model the frictional behavior. The simulated coefficients of friction are experimentally validated using friction results from a standardized strip drawing friction test set-up. The experimental and simulation results of the friction behavior show a good overall agreement. This demonstrates that the TriboForm software enables simulating friction conditions for varying tribology conditions, i.e. resulting in a generally applicable approach for friction characterization under industrial sheet metal forming process conditions.

  19. Friction of total hip replacements with different bearings and loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire; Williams, Sophie; Jin, Zhongmin; Isaac, Graham; Fisher, John

    2007-05-01

    Metal-on-ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) total hip replacements have been the most popular and clinically successful implants to date. However, it is well documented that the wear debris from these prostheses contributes to osteolysis and ultimate failure of the prosthesis, hence alternative materials have been sought. A range of 28 mm diameter bearings were investigated using a hip friction simulator, including conventional material combinations such as metal-on-UHWMPE, ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), and metal-on-metal (MoM), as well as novel ceramic-on-metal (CoM) pairings. Studies were performed under different swing-phase load and lubricant conditions. The friction factors were lowest in the ceramic bearings, with the CoC bearing having the lowest friction factor in all conditions. CoM bearings also had low friction factors compared with MoM, and the trends were similar to CoC bearings for all test conditions. Increasing swing phase load was shown to cause an increase in friction factor in all tests. Increased serum concentration resulted in increased friction factor in all material combinations, except MoM, where increased serum concentration produced a significant reduction in friction factor.

  20. THOR Turbulence Electron Analyser: TEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Moore, Tom; Owen, Chris; Pollock, Craig; Wicks, Rob; Samara, Marilia; Rae, Jonny; Hancock, Barry; Kataria, Dhiren; Rust, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Turbulence Electron Analyser (TEA) will measure the plasma electron populations in the mission's Regions of Interest. It will collect a 3D electron velocity distribution with cadences as short as 5 ms. The instrument will be capable of measuring energies up to 30 keV. TEA consists of multiple electrostatic analyser heads arranged so as to measure electrons arriving from look directions covering the full sky, i.e. 4 pi solid angle. The baseline concept is similar to the successful FPI-DES instrument currently operating on the MMS mission. TEA is intended to have a similar angular resolution, but a larger geometric factor. In comparison to earlier missions, TEA improves on the measurement cadence. For example, MMS FPI-DES routinely operates at 30 ms cadence. The objective of measuring distributions at rates as fast as 5 ms is driven by the mission's scientific requirements to resolve electron gyroscale size structures, where plasma heating and fluctuation dissipation is predicted to occur. TEA will therefore be capable of making measurements of the evolution of distribution functions across thin (a few km) current sheets travelling past the spacecraft at up to 600 km/s, of the Power Spectral Density of fluctuations of electron moments and of distributions fast enough to match frequencies with waves expected to be dissipating turbulence (e.g. with 100 Hz whistler waves).

  1. Mixing and bottom friction: parametrization and application to the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, A.-C.; Dumas, F.; Ardhuin, F.; Blanke, B.; Lepesqueur, J.

    2012-04-01

    Wave breaking has been observed to impact the bottom boundary layer in surf zones, with potential impacts on bottom friction. Observations in the inner surf zone have also shown a tendency to an underestimation of the wave-induced set-up when using usual model parameterizations. The present study investigates the possible impact of wave breaking on bottom friction and set-up using a recently proposed parameterization of the wave-induced turbulent kinetic energy in the vertical mixing parameterization of the wave-averaged flow. This parametrization proposed by Mellor (2002) allows us to take account the oscillations of the bottom boundary layer with the wave phases thanks to some additional turbulent source terms. First, the behavior of this parameterization, is investigated by comparing phase-resolving and phase-averaged solutions. The hydrodynamical model MARS (Lazure et Dumas, 2008) is used for this, using a modified k-epsilon model to take account the Mellor (2002) parametrization. It is shown that the phase averaged solution strongly overestimates the turbulent kinetic energy, which is similar to the situation of the air flow over waves (Miles 1996). The waves inhibits the turbulence and the wave-averaged parametrization is not able to reproduce correctly this phenomenom. Cases with wave breaking at the surface are simulated in order to study the influence of surface wave breaking on the bottom boundary layer. This parametrization is applied in the surf zone for two differents cases, one for a planar beach and one other for a barred beach with rip currents. The coupled model MARS-WAVEWATCH III is used for this (Bennis et al, 2011) and for a realistic planar beach, the mixing parameterization has only a limited impact on the bottom friction and the wave set-up, unless the bottom roughness is greatly enhanced in very shallow water, or for a spatially varying roughness. The use of the mixing parametrization requires an adjustement of the bottom roughness to fit

  2. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  3. Education in an Age of Social Turbulence (A Roundtable)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The latest scheduled Sorokin Readings on "Global Social Turbulence and Russia," a topic whose relevance has been confirmed by events of the past 10 years, were held on 6-7 December at Moscow State University. One key factor that keeps such turbulence in check is the education level as a factor of a high standard of living. The array of problems in…

  4. Frictional Properties of Single Crystalline and Quasicrystalline Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellman, Andrew

    2000-03-01

    undergo plastic deformation when brought into contact and yet it is possible for these ultra-thin layers of adsorbed molecules to reduce friction and lubricate the interface. There are a number of measurements which show that friction and adhesion between crystalline materials can be anisotropic in the sense that they depend on the relative crystallographic orientations of the two surfaces. For the most part these have been made between surfaces in elastic contact and the understanding of the source of the anisotropy is based on the commensurability of the overlapping crystal surface lattices. In the case of metal surfaces which undergo plastic deformation when brought into contact it is not so clear that the commensurability of the surface lattices is the determining factor in friction anisotropy. Three sets of experiments have been performed in which pairs of Ni(100) surfaces have been brought onto contact and sheared with different orientations of the surface lattices. In the first experiment the Ni(100) surfaces were clean. In the second they were modified by adsorption of 1/2 monolayer of sulfur atoms ordered into a c(2x2) lattice. In this case the two surface lattices are rotated by 45o with respect to the original Ni(100) lattice. Finally, in the third set of experiments the surfaces were modified by adsorption of 2 monolayers of ethanol. Adsorbed ethanol forms an overlayer with no long range order. The basic point of these surface modifications is that they either rotate or eliminate the surface lattice periodicity while leaving the bulk lattices of the Ni(100) crystals in the same relative orientations. In all three cases friction anisotropy is observed as the two bulk crystal lattices are rotated with respect to one another. The interesting thing is that a minimum in the friction is observed when the two are rotated by 45^o with respect to one another. The fact that this is observed for all three modifications of the surface lattice suggests that it is the

  5. Tribological behavior of a friction couple functioning with selective mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Experimental researches on different lubricated friction couples, have confirmed that it is useful to investigate thermodynamic processes which are unstable in lubricant and on the friction couples surfaces in the first stage of the friction process. This presupposes that, in operating conditions, physical-chemical processes which are favourable to friction, such as: polymerization, formation of colloids, formation of other active substances at the contact surfaces and of other compounds with low resistance to shear take place. Friction in such conditions takes place with selective mass transfer, and it is used there where the friction of the mixed and adherence layers is not safe enough, or the durability of the friction couples is not assured. The selective mass transfer allows the transfer of some elements of the materials in contact from one surface to the other, covering them with a thin, superficial layer, with superior properties at minimal friction and wear. The aim of this paper is to analyse the physical-chemical factors and the proper processes for achieving the selective mass transfer for the couple steel/bronze, which in optimal conditions, forms a thin layer of copper on the contact surfaces areas. Also, it presents some studies and researches concerning the tribological behaviour of the surfaces of a friction couple with linear contact (roll/roll) which operates with selective mass transfer, tested on Amsler tribometer.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A.; Alves, J. L.

    2011-05-04

    In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  7. Wall induced turbulence distortions of optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Ove K. S.; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2009-09-01

    Optical measurements and tests of optical instruments are often performed through an opened window or from the roof of an elevated building. This can also be a common situation for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. Wind friction in combination with solar heating of the wall and the ground will create increased turbulence in a boundary layer close to the wall. For an outgoing laser beam this thin region of strong turbulence causes beam wander, beam broadening and beam break-up. For imaging and detection systems angle of arrival fluctuations and image blurring may result. In an attempt to estimate the strength of the atmospheric turbulence in the layer at the wall the refractive index structure constant (Cn2) was measured with an ultra sonic anemometer as a function of distance from the wall. The measurements were performed at the lower part of a window that was open just enough to give space for the anemometer. The window was placed 10 m above ground in a 12 m high building, with brick wall below the window and wooden panel above the window. Measurements of the turbulence as a function of distance from the wall were performed during different times of the day to study the influence of sun heating of the wall. The measured average Cn2 shows an exponentially decreasing function of distance from the wall. The exponential decay of Cn2 depends on the time of the day. The highest measured value of Cn2 was approximately 3x10-11 m-2/3 near the wall. The influence of wall turbulence is discussed with respect to its influence on laser beam propagation.

  8. Scaling properties of turbulence driven shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Holland, C.; Xu, M.; Muller, S. H.; Yu, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    The characteristics and scaling properties of the turbulence driven shear flow are investigated in a cylindrical laboratory plasma device. For a given plasma pressure, the density fluctuation amplitude and radial particle flux increase with the applied magnetic field. Strong flow shear is found to coexist at high magnetic fields (>700 G) with approx10 kHz drift wave turbulence, but not at low magnetic fields (<700 G). The absolute value of the divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress at the shear layer is shown to increase with the magnetic field as well. For a fixed magnetic field, the shear flow is found to decrease as the discharge gas pressure is increased. The density fluctuation amplitude and divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress also decrease with the plasma pressure. For both situations the cross phase between the radial and azimuthal components of the velocity is found to be a key factor to determine variations in the turbulent Reynolds stress at different magnetic fields and discharge pressures. The results show that the generation of the shear flow is related to the development of specific frequency components of the drift wave turbulence for a variety of plasma conditions. The linear stability analysis shows that the observed variation in the turbulence and shear flow with magnetic field is also consistent with a critical gradient behavior.

  9. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  10. Mechanics of Turbulence of Multicomponent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Kolesnichenko, Aleksander V.

    2002-02-01

    Turbulence in multicomponent reacting gas mixtures is an important mechanism underlying numerous natural phenomena closely related to the study of our space environment. This book develops a new mathematical approach for modelling multicomponent gas turbulence that adequately describes the combined processes of dynamics and heat and mass transfer when chemical kinetics and turbulent mixing are equally important. The developed models include the evolutionary transfer equations for the single-point second correlation moments of turbulent fluctuations of thermohydrodynamical parameters. The phenomenological approach to the closure problem in hydrodynamic equations of mean motion at the level of the first order moments is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and enables defining relationships in a more general form as compared to those conventionally deduced using the mixing path concept. Based on the developed approach, turbulent exchange factors for a planetary upper atmosphere are evaluated, and a turbulent model of a protoplanetary accretion gas-dust disk involving heat and mass transfer and coagulation is also considered. As compared to previously published books on the problem of turbulence, this book deals, for the first time, with the complicated models of reacting gas mixtures. It is intended for graduate and postgraduate students in the fields of fluid gas dynamics, astrophysics, space physics, planetary sciences, and aeronomy, and especially for those dealing with computer modelling of the processes in such natural media. The book may also be of interest to specialists in the relevant fields of ecology, engineering, and material processing.

  11. Skin Friction Measurements by a Dual-Laser-Beam Interferometer Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.; Higuchi, H.

    1981-01-01

    A portable dual-laser-beam interferometer that nonintrusively measures skin friction by monitoring the thickness change of an oil film subject to shear stress is described. The method is an advance over past versions in that the troublesome and error-introducing need to measure the distance to the oil leading edge and the starting time for the oil flow has been eliminated. The validity of the method was verified by measuring oil viscosity in the laboratory, and then using those results to measure skin friction beneath the turbulent boundary layer in a low speed wind tunnel. The dual-laser-beam skin friction measurements are compared with Preston tube measurements, with mean velocity profile data in a "law-of-the-well" coordinate system, and with computations based on turbulent boundary-layer theory. Excellent agreement is found in all cases. (This validation and the aforementioned improvements appear to make the present form of the instrument usable to measure skin friction reliably and nonintrusively in a wide range of flow situations in which previous methods are not practical.)

  12. Skin friction measurements by a new nonintrusive double-laser-beam oil viscosity balance technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.; Higuchi, H.

    1980-01-01

    A portable dual-laser-beam interferometer that nonintrusively measures skin friction by monitoring the thickness change of an oil film subject to shear stress is described. The method is an advance over past versions in that the troublesome and error-introducing need to measure the distance to the oil leading edge and the starting time for the oil flow has been eliminated. The validity of the method was verified by measuring oil viscosity in the laboratory, and then using those results to measure skin friction beneath the turbulent boundary layer in a low-speed wind tunnel. The dual-laser-beam skin friction measurements are compared with Preston tube measurements, with mean velocity profile data in a 'law-of-the-wall' coordinate system, and with computations based on turbulent boundary-layer theory. Excellent agreement is found in all cases. This validation and the aforementioned improvements appear to make the present form of the instrument usable to measure skin friction reliably and nonintrusively in a wide range of flow situations in which previous methods are not practical.

  13. Reducing Sliding Friction with Liquid-Impregnated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mohammad; Collier, C. Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid-impregnated surfaces are fabricated by infusing a lubricating liquid into the micro/nano roughness of a textured substrate, such that the surface is slippery for any deposited liquid immiscible with the lubricant. To date, liquid-impregnated surfaces have almost exclusively focused on repelling liquids by minimizing the contact angle hysteresis. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-impregnated surfaces are also capable of reducing sliding friction for solid objects. Ordered arrays of silicon micropillars were infused with lubricating liquids varying in viscosity by two orders of magnitude. Five test surfaces were used: two different micropillared surfaces with and without liquid infusion and a smooth, dry control surface. The static and kinetic coefficients of friction were measured using a polished aluminum cube as the sliding object. Compared to the smooth control surface, the sliding friction was reduced by at least a factor of two on the liquid-impregnated surfaces.

  14. Investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on a hypersonic aircraft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetlutsky, V. N.; Houtman, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm for calculation of a spatial compressible turbulent boundary layer on the surface of a pointed body is developed. The algorithm is based on the numerical solution of three-dimensional equations and algebraic models of turbulence. The flow around a hypersonic aircraft model is calculated, and the resultant Stanton numbers are compared with experimental data. The influence of the Mach number, the angle of attack, and the Reynolds number on the boundary-layer parameters is studied. It is shown that the change in the location of the transition zone has a weak effect on the skin-friction coefficient in the region of developed turbulent flow.

  15. Joint Winter Runway Friction Program Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Wambold, James C.; Henry, John J.; Andresen, Arild; Bastian, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The major program objectives are: (1) harmonize ground vehicle friction measurements to report consistent friction value or index for similar contaminated runway conditions, for example, compacted snow, and (2) establish reliable correlation between ground vehicle friction measurements and aircraft braking performance. Accomplishing these objectives would give airport operators better procedures for evaluating runway friction and maintaining acceptable operating conditions, providing pilots information to base go/no go decisions, and would contribute to reducing traction-related aircraft accidents.

  16. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  17. Showing Area Matters: A Work of Friction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Domelen, David

    2010-01-01

    Typically, we teach the simplified friction equation of the form F[subscript s] = [mu][subscript s]N for static friction, where F[subscript s] is the maximum static friction, [mu][subscript s] is the coefficient of static friction, and "N" is the normal force pressing the surfaces together. However, this is a bit too simplified, and doesn't work…

  18. Coupling between roughness and freestream acceleration in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    To explain various rough-wall flow responses to different types of free-stream conditions previously observed, we carried out a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with freestream acceleration. Unlike the equilibrium (self-similar) accelerating scenario, where a strong acceleration leads to complete laminarization and lower friction, in the present non-equilibrium case the friction coefficient increases with acceleration, due to the faster near-wall acceleration than that of the freestream. At the same time, roughness reduces the near-wall time scale of the turbulence, preventing the acceleration from linearly stretching the near-wall eddies and freezing the turbulence intensity as in the smooth case. In addition, acceleration leads to similar decrease of mean-velocity logarithmic slope on rough and smooth walls; this allows a clear definition of the roughness function in a local sense. Interestingly, this roughness function correlates with the roughness Reynolds number in the same way as in self-similar or non-accelerating flows. This study may also help develop benchmark cases for evaluating rough-wall treatments for industrial turbulence models.

  19. Turbulence structures associated with fire-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, C. B.; Seto, D.; Heilman, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires radically modify the atmospheric boundary layer by emitting large sensible and latent heat fluxes. These fluxes drive fire-atmosphere interactions at multiple scales resulting in fire-induced circulations in and around the fire front. During the fire front passage, FFP, turbulence kinetic energy increases due to increased heating and wind shear that develops in response to both free convection and fire-induced winds. New field observations from multiple fire experiments have shown that turbulence spectral energy increases during the FFP as a result of small eddies being shed from the fire front and that that normalized velocity spectra using the friction velocity collapse into a narrow band in the inertial subrange, suggesting that Monin-Obukhov scaling is a valid scaling parameter that can be used for wildfire prediction systems. Additionally, during FFP the mean profiles of winds and sensible heat flux change compared to ambient conditions due to the fire-atmosphere interactions. These profiles are also different during different environmental conditions such as grass fires in open field and fires within a forest canopy. This presentation will discuss new turbulence observations from the FireFlux II field experiment conducted in 2013 which indicate that during FFP there are also an increases in horizontal mean winds, friction velocity, horizontal and vertical velocity variances and a decrease in anisotropy in turbulence kinetic energy and are similar to lower intensity fires.

  20. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  1. Study of strong turbulence effects for optical wireless links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Meric, Hasim; Kunter, Fulya

    2012-10-01

    Strong turbulence measurements that are taken using real time optical wireless experimental setups are valuable when studying the effects of turbulence regimes on a propagating optical beam. In any kind of FSO system, for us to know the strength of the turbulence thus the refractive index structure constant, is beneficial for having an optimum bandwidth of communication. Even if the FSO Link is placed very well-high-above the ground just to have weak enough turbulence effects, there can be severe atmospheric conditions that can change the turbulence regime. Having a successful theory that will cover all regimes will give us the chance of directly processing the image in existing or using an additional hardware thus deciding on the optimum bandwidth of the communication line at firsthand. For this purpose, Strong Turbulence data has been collected using an outdoor optical wireless setup placed about 85 centimeters above the ground with an acceptable declination and a path length of about 250 meters inducing strong turbulence to the propagating beam. Variations of turbulence strength estimation methods as well as frame image analysis techniques are then been applied to the experimental data in order to study the effects of different parameters on the result. Such strong turbulence data is compared with existing weak and intermediate turbulence data. Aperture Averaging Factor for different turbulence regimes is also investigated.

  2. Turbine blade friction damping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominic, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A lumped parameter method, implemented on a VAX 11/780 computer shows that the primary parameters affecting the performance of the friction damper of the first stage turbine of the SSME high pressure fuel pump are: the damper-blade coefficient of friction; the normal force applied to the friction interface; the amplitude of the periodic forcing function; the relative phase angle of the forcing functions for adjacent blades bridged by a damper (effectively, the engine order of the forcing function); and the amount of hysteretic damping that acts to limit the vibration amplitude of the blade in its resonance modes. The low order flexural resonance vibration modes of HPFTP blades without dampers, with production dampers, and with two types of lightweight experimental dampers were evaluated in high speed spin pit tests. Results agree with those of the analytical study in that blades fitted with production friction dampers experienced the airfoil-alone flexural resonance mode, while those without dampers or with lighter weight dampers did not. No blades fitted with dampers experienced the whole blade flexural resonance mode during high speed tests, while those without dampers did.

  3. Deformation During Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Henry J.

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process that exhibits characteristics similar to traditional metal cutting processes. The plastic deformation that occurs during friction stir welding is due to the superposition of three flow fields: a primary rotation of a radially symmetric solid plug of metal surrounding the pin tool, a secondary uniform translation, and a tertiary ring vortex flow (smoke rings) surrounding the tool. If the metal sticks to the tool, the plug surface extends down into the metal from the outer edge of the tool shoulder, decreases in diameter like a funnel, and closes up beneath the pin. Since its invention, ten years have gone by and still very little is known about the physics of the friction stir welding process. In this experiment, an H13 steel weld tool (shoulder diameter, 0.797 in; pin diameter, 0.312 in; and pin length, 0.2506 in) was used to weld three 0.255 in thick plates. The deformation behavior during friction stir welding was investigated by metallographically preparing a plan view sections of the weldment and taking Vickers hardness test in the key-hole region.

  4. Dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arca-Sedda, M.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we treat the problem of the dynamical friction decay of a massive object moving in an elliptical galaxy with a cuspidal inner distribution of the mass density. We present results obtained by both self-consistent, direct summation, N-body simulations, as well as by a new semi-analytical treatment of dynamical friction valid in such cuspy central regions of galaxies. A comparison of these results indicates that the proposed semi-analytical approximation is the only reliable one in cuspy galactic central regions, where the standard Chandrasekhar's local approximation fails and also gives estimates of decay times that are correct at 1% with respect to those given by N-body simulations. The efficiency of dynamical friction in cuspy galaxies is found definitively higher than in core galaxies, especially on more radially elongated satellite orbits. As another relevant result, we find a proportionality of the dynamical friction decay time to the –0.67 power of the satellite mass, M, shallower than the standardly adopted M {sup –1} dependence.

  5. Improved Coulomb-Friction Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    Equal damping provided on forward and reverse strokes. Improved damper has springs and wedge rings symmetrically placed on both ends of piston wedge, so friction force same in both directions of travel. Unlike conventional automotive shock absorbers, they resemble on outside, both versions require no viscous liquid and operate over wide temperature range.

  6. Effects of Mach Number and Wall-Temperature Ratio on Turbulent Heat Transfer at Mach Numbers from 3 to 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tendeland, Thorval

    1959-01-01

    Heat-transfer data were evaluated from temperature time histories measured on a cooled cylindrical model with a cone-shaped nose and with turbulent flow at Mach numbers 3.00, 3.44, 4.08, 4.56, and 5.04. The experimental data were compared with calculated values using a modified Reynold's analogy between skin-friction and heat-transfer. Theoretical skin- friction coefficients were calculated using the method of Van Driest the method of Sommer and Short. The heat-transfer data obtained from the model were found to correlate when the 'T' method of Sommer and Short was used. The increase in turbulent heat-transfer rate with a reduction in wall to freestream temperature ratio was of the same order of magnitude as has been found for the turbulent skin-friction coefficient.

  7. Coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flow using anisotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Sakurai, Teluo; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We examine the role of coherent vorticity in a turbulent channel flow. DNS data computed at friction-velocity based Reynolds number 320 is analyzed. The vorticity is decomposed using three-dimensional anisotropic orthogonal wavelets. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to extract the coherent vorticity, corresponding to few strong wavelet coefficients. It retains the vortex tubes of the turbulent flow. Turbulent statistics, e.g., energy, enstrophy and energy spectra, are close to those of the total flow. The nonlinear energy budgets are also found to be well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., a noise-like background flow.

  8. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Choi, Kwing-So

    2011-12-01

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  9. Turbulent drag reduction over air- and liquid- impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Brian J.; Van Buren, Tyler; Fu, Matthew K.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Results on turbulent skin friction reduction over air- and liquid-impregnated surfaces are presented for aqueous Taylor-Couette flow. The surfaces are fabricated by mechanically texturing the inner cylinder and chemically modifying the features to make them either non-wetting with respect to water (air-infused, or superhydrophobic case), or wetting with respect to an oil that is immiscible with water (liquid-infused case). The drag reduction, which remains fairly constant over the Reynolds number range tested (100 ≤ Reτ ≤ 140), is approximately 10% for the superhydrophobic surface and 14% for the best liquid-infused surface. Our results suggest that liquid-infused surfaces may enable robust drag reduction in high Reynolds number turbulent flows without the shortcomings associated with conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, namely, failure under conditions of high hydrodynamic pressure and turbulent flow fluctuations.

  10. Mechanically Robust Superhydrophobic Surfaces for Turbulent Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Kevin; Boban, Mathew; Xia, Charlotte; Tuteja, Anish

    2014-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) resist wetting by keeping a thin air layer within their texture. Such surfaces have been shown to reduce skin friction during laminar and transitional flows. However, turbulent boundary layer flows exhibit high shear stresses that damage the fragile microstructure of most SHS, and it is yet unclear to what extent these surfaces can reduce drag. Moreover, the increasing pressure fluctuations and decreasing wall unit length experienced during turbulent flow makes designing mechanically robust SHS with the correct roughness scales a challenge. In this work we evaluate many different SHS in terms of their hydrophobicity, mechanical durability and roughness. Whereas even commercially available SHS lose their superhydrophobic properties after slight mechanical abrasion, our novel coatings survive up to 200x longer. Moreover, we evaluate how the roughness of such surfaces changes with mechanical abrasion, and we design SHS with the correct roughness to display optimal drag reduction in turbulent boundary layer flows. Funding from ONR.

  11. Comparison of friction and lubrication of different hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis and subsequent loosening of replacement hip joints is polyethylene wear debris. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. Various workers have assessed the lubrication modes of different joints by measuring the friction at the bearing surfaces, using different lubricants. Measurements of friction factors of a series of hip prostheses were undertaken using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) fluids, silicone fluids, synovial fluid and different concentrations of bovine serum as the lubricant. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing CMC fluids or silicone fluids as the lubricant. Mixed lubrication was found to occur in the metal-on-metal (CoCrMo/CoCrMo) joints with all lubricants at a viscosity within the physiological range. This was also the case for the metal-on-plastic (CoCrMo/ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) joints. The ceramic-on-ceramic (Al2O3/Al2O3) joints, however, exhibited full fluid film lubrication with the synthetic lubricants but mixed lubrication with the biological lubricants. Employing a biological fluid as the lubricant affected the friction to varying degrees when compared with the synthetic lubricants. In the case of the ceramic-on-ceramic joints it acted to increase the friction factor tenfold; however, for the metal-on-metal joints, biological fluids gave slightly lower friction than the synthetic lubricants did. This suggests that, when measuring friction and wear of artificial joints, a standard lubricant should be used.

  12. The evaluation of a turbulent loads characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an on-line turbulent load characterization system that has been designed to acquire loading spectra from turbines of the same design operating in several different environments and from different turbine designs operating in the same environment. This System simultaneously measures the rainflow-counted alternating and mean loading spectra and the hub-height turbulent mean shearing stress and atmospheric stability associated with the turbulent inflow. We discuss the theory behind the measurement configuration and the results of proof-of-concept testing recently performed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) using a Bergey EXCEL-S 10-kW wind turbine. The on-line approach to characterizing the load spectra and the inflow turbulent scaling parameter produces results that are consistent with other measurements. The on-line approximation of the turbulent shear stress or friction velocity u* also is considered adequate. The system can be used to characterize turbulence loads during turbine deployment in a wide variety of environments. Using the WISPER protocol, we found that a wide-range, variable-speed turbine will accumulate a larger number of stress cycles in the low-cycle, high-amplitude (LCHA) region when compared with a constant speed rotor under similar inflow conditions.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  14. Early turbulence in von Karman swirling flow of polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnishev, Yuri; Steinberg, Victor

    2015-01-01

    We present quantitative experimental results on the transition to early turbulence in von Karman swirling flow of water- and water-sugar-based polymer solutions compared to the transition to turbulence in their Newtonian solvents by measurements of solely global quantities as torque Γ(t) and pressure p(t) with large statistics as a function of Re. For the first time the transition values of Re_c\\textit{turb} to fully developed turbulence and turbulent drag reduction regime Re_c\\textit{TDR} are obtained as functions of elasticity El by using the solvents with different viscosities and polymer concentrations ϕ. Two scaling regions for fundamental turbulent characteristics are identified and they correspond to the turbulent and TDR regimes. Both Re_c\\textit{turb} and Re_c\\textit{TDR} are found via the dependence of the friction coefficient Cf and Cp, defined through scaled average torque \\barΓ and rms pressure fluctuations p\\textit{rms} , respectively, on Re for different El and ϕ and via the limits of the two scaling regions.

  15. Symmetry-based theory for mean velocities in the flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2014-11-01

    A major difference from channel and pipe flow in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer -ZPG-TBL is the streamwise development of the mean velocity components. We report a symmetry-based theory for ZPG-TBL, which yields a complete prediction for both the streamwise and vertical mean velocities, i.e. U (x , y) and V (x , y) . A significant result is the identification of a bulk flow constantκb, which achieves a highly accurate description of U above y + ~ 150; for a set of DNS data (Schlatter et al. 2010); the relative error is bounded within 0.1%. It is found that κb has a non-trivial streamwise development, and asymptote to 0.45 for large Re's the latter is consistent with the true Karman constant recently discovered for channel and pipe flows. The theory assumes a fractional scaling for the total stress, which yields, for the first time, an analytical prediction for V, Reynolds stress profile, friction coefficient and shape factor in ZPG-TBL, in good agreement with both DNS and experimental data. In conclusion, a complete analytical theory is viable for both laminar (i.e. Blasius) and turbulent boundary layers.

  16. Friction of ice on ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulson, Erland M.; Fortt, Andrew L.

    2012-12-01

    New measurements have been made of the friction coefficient of freshwater polycrystalline ice sliding slowly (5 × 10-8 to 1 × 10-3 m s-1) upon itself at temperatures from 98 to 263 K under low normal stresses (≤98 kPa). Sliding obeys Coulomb's law: the shear stress is directly proportional to the normal stress across the interface, while cohesion offers little contribution to frictional resistance. The coefficient of kinetic friction of smooth surfaces varies from μk = 0.15 to 0.76 and, at elevated temperatures (≥223 K), exhibits both velocity strengthening at lower velocities (<10-5 to 10-4 m s-1) and velocity weakening at higher velocities. Strengthening and weakening are attributed to creep deformation of asperities and localized melting, respectively. At intermediate temperatures of 173 and 133 K, the kinetic coefficient appears to not exhibit significant dependence upon velocity. However, at the low temperature of 98 K the coefficient of kinetic friction exhibits moderate velocity strengthening at both the lowest and the highest velocities but velocity independence over the range of intermediate velocities. No effect was detected of either grain size or texture. Over the range of roughness 0.4 × 10-6 m ≤ Ra ≤ 12 × 10-6 m, a moderate effect was detected, where μk ∝ Ra0.08. Slide-hold-slide experiments revealed that the coefficient of static friction increases by an amount that scales logarithmically with holding time. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to shearing across "tiger stripe" faults within the icy crust of Saturn's Enceladus, sliding of the arctic sea ice cover and brittle compressive failure of cold ice.

  17. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  18. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eeltink, D.; Berti, N.; Marchiando, N.; Hermelin, S.; Gateau, J.; Brunetti, M.; Wolf, J. P.; Kasparian, J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This positive effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments, suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  19. Comparison between kinetic-ballooning-mode-driven turbulence and ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Maeyama, S. Nakata, M.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Idomura, Y.

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic turbulence driven by kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) in high-β plasma is investigated based on the local gyrokinetic model. Analysis of turbulent fluxes, norms, and phases of fluctuations shows that KBM turbulence gives narrower spectra and smaller phase factors than those in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG)-driven turbulence. This leads to the smaller transport fluxes in KBM turbulence than those in ITG turbulence even when they have similar linear growth rates. From the analysis of the entropy balance relation, it is found that the entropy transfer from ions to electrons through the field-particle interactions mainly drives electron perturbations, which creates radial twisted modes by rapid parallel motions of electrons in a sheared magnetic geometry. The nonlinear coupling between the dominant unstable mode and its twisted modes is important for the saturation of KBM turbulence, in contrast to the importance of zonal flow shearing in ITG turbulence. The coupling depends on the flux-tube domain with the one-poloidal-turn parallel length and on the torus periodicity constraint.

  20. Inhomogeneous turbulence in magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is expected to play an essential role in enhancing magnetic reconnection. Turbulence associated with magnetic reconnection is highly inhomogeneous: it is generated by inhomogeneities of the field configuration such as the velocity shear, temperature gradient, density stratification, magnetic shear, etc. This self-generated turbulence affects the reconnection through the turbulent transport. In this reconnection--turbulence interaction, localization of turbulent transport due to dynamic balance between several turbulence effects plays an essential role. For investigating inhomogeneous turbulence in a strongly nonlinear regime, closure or turbulence modeling approaches provide a powerful tool. A turbulence modeling approach for the magnetic reconnection is introduced. In the model, the mean-field equations with turbulence effects incorporated are solved simultaneously with the equations of turbulent statistical quantities that represent spatiotemporal properties of turbulence under the effect of large-scale field inhomogeneities. Numerical simulations of this Reynolds-averaged turbulence model showed that self-generated turbulence enhances magnetic reconnection. It was pointed out that reconnection states may be divided into three category depending on the turbulence level: (i) laminar reconnection; (ii) turbulent reconnection, and (iii) turbulent diffusion. Recent developments in this direction are also briefly introduced, which includes the magnetic Prandtl number dependence, spectral evolution, and guide-field effects. Also relationship of this fully nonlinear turbulence approach with other important approaches such as plasmoid instability reconnection will be discussed.

  1. Wind shear and turbulence around airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, W. S.; Williamson, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    A two part study was conducted to determine the feasibility of predicting the conditions under which wind/turbulence environments hazardous to aviation operations exist. The computer model used to solve the velocity temperature, and turbulence distributions in the atmospheric boundary layer is described, and the results of a parameteric analysis to determine the expected range of wind shear and turbulence to be encountered in the vicinity of airports are given. The second part describes the delineation of an ensemble of aircraft accidents in which low level wind shear and/or turbulence appeared to be causative factors. This set of accidents, encompassing a wide range of meteorological conditions, should prove useful in developing techniques for reconstructing hazardous wind environments for aircraft safety investigation purposes.

  2. Pressure and Friction Injuries in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Shawn; Seiverling, Elizabeth; Silvis, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Pressure and friction injuries are common throughout the lifespan. A detailed history of the onset and progression of friction and pressure injuries is key to aiding clinicians in determining the underlying mechanism behind the development of the injury. Modifying or removing the forces that are creating pressure or friction is the key to both prevention and healing of these injuries. Proper care of pressure and friction injuries to the skin is important to prevent the development of infection. Patient education on positioning and ergonomics can help to prevent recurrence of pressure and friction injuries.

  3. Piston ring designs for reduced friction

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.H.; Newman, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    To reduce parasitic losses, a project was initiated to design, develop and bring to production a piston ring set which reduces engine friction while maintaining ring performance. In this paper, theoretical considerations affecting piston ring friction, and their implication in ring design, are discussed. An estimate of friction reduction and fuel economy improvement which can be achieved is calculated. Features of the resulting designs are reviewed, and friction, dynamometer, and vehicle test results are presented. Future ring design changes for reduced friction are reviewed.

  4. Friction properties of novel PVP/PVA blend hydrogels as artificial cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruyin; Xiong, Dangsheng; Miao, Feng; Zhang, Jinfeng; Peng, Yan

    2010-06-01

    In this work, novel polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/polyvinylalcohol (PVA) blend hydrogels were prepared by repeated freezing-thawing cycles. The factors that influenced friction properties of blend hydrogels, such as PVP content, contact load, sliding speed, and lubrication condition, were mainly studied by sliding with stainless steel ball. The results showed that friction coefficients of the PVP/PVA blend hydrogels were definitely dependent on such influence factors. The friction system consisting of blend hydrogel and stainless steel ball nearly exhibited a mixed lubrication regime especially under bovine serum lubrication, and it can be proposed as a promising method to reduce wear of the prosthesis.

  5. Turbulent heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of dilute water based Al2O3-Cu hybrid nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Venkitaraj, K P; Hameed, M Shahul; Sarangan, J

    2014-03-01

    A study on fully developed turbulent convective heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of Al2O3-Cu/water hybrid nanofluid flowing through a uniformly heated circular tube is presented in this paper. For this, Al2O3-Cu nanocomposite powder was synthesized in a thermo chemical route using hydrogen reduction technique and dispersed the hybrid nano powder in deionised water to form a stable hybrid nanofluid of 0.1% volume concentration. The prepared powder was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to confirm the chemical composition, determine the particle size and study the surface morphology. Stability of the nanofluid was ensured by pH and zeta potential measurements. The average heat transfer enhancement for Al2O3-Cu/water hybrid nanofluid is 8.02% when compared to pure water. The experimental results also showed that 0.1% Al2O3-Cu/water hybrid nanofluids have slightly higher friction factor compared to 0.1% Al2O3/water nanofluid. The empirical correlations proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor were well agreed with the experimental data.

  6. Frictional constraints on crustal faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Cocco, M.

    1996-01-01

    We consider how variations in fault frictional properties affect the phenomenology of earthquake faulting. In particular, we propose that lateral variations in fault friction produce the marked heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes. We model these variations using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening behavior into two fields: the strong seismic field is very velocity weakening and the weak seismic field is slightly velocity weakening. Similarly, we differentiate velocity-strengthening behavior into two fields: the compliant field is slightly velocity strengthening and the viscous field is very velocity strengthening. The strong seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two "intermediate" fields, weak seismic and compliant, have frictional velocity dependences that are close to velocity neutral: these fields modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the weak seismic and compliant regions slip aseismically, while the strong seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak seismic areas exhibit most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks but can also creep seismically. This "mixed" frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution of the critical slip distance. The model also provides a mechanism for rupture arrest: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into unloaded complaint or weak seismic areas, producing broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur on both the weak seismic and compliant areas around a fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the

  7. A Model for Static and Dry Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Christopher

    2005-03-01

    It will be shown that the Muser-Robbins (MR) model, consisting of mobile molecules trapped between two incommensurate crystalline solids, exhibits many of the qualitative features of friction between macroscopic solids, such as the result that the static friction is greater than the kinetic friction, stick-slip motion and a force of static friction which increases as a function of the time that the two solids are in contact and stationary. At zero temperature, the kinetic friction is highly sensitive to the direction of sliding, but this sensitivity decreases markedly as the temperature rises. At low temperatures (with the surfaces stationary for a relatively long time), the model gives a static friction approximately 3 times larger than the kinetic friction for sufficiently slow velocities, but this ratio decreases steadily as the temperature is increased.

  8. Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Diamond, P. H.

    2012-08-15

    We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

  9. Effective medium theory for drag-reducing micro-patterned surfaces in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiato, Ilenia

    2014-11-01

    Many studies in the last decade have revealed that patterns at the microscale can reduce skin drag. Yet, the mechanisms and parameters that control drag reduction, e.g. Reynolds number and pattern geometry, are still unclear. We propose an effective medium representation of the micro-features, that treats the latter as a porous medium, and provides a framework to model turbulent flow over patterned surfaces. Our key result is a closed-form expression for the skin friction coefficient in terms of frictional Reynolds (or Karman) number in turbulent regime, the viscosity ratio between the fluid in and above the features, and their geometrical properties. We apply the proposed model to turbulent flows over superhydrophobic ridged surfaces. The model predictions agree with laboratory experiments for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3000 to 10000.

  10. MHD turbulent processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    Three areas of study in MHD turbulence are considered. These are the turbulent relaxation of the toroidal Z pinch, density fluctuations in MHD fluids, and MHD cellular automata. A Boolean computer game that updates a cellular representation in parallel and that has macroscopic averages converging to solutions of the two-dimensional MHD equations is discussed.

  11. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps—separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints. PMID:23359687

  12. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-02-12

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps--separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints.

  13. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: Direct simulation from laminar through gradual transition to fully developed turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J.; Baltzer, Jon R.

    2015-06-15

    We report that the precise dynamics of breakdown in pipe transition is a century-old unresolved problem in fluid mechanics. We demonstrate that the abruptness and mysteriousness attributed to the Osborne Reynolds pipe transition can be partially resolved with a spatially developing direct simulation that carries weakly but finitely perturbed laminar inflow through gradual rather than abrupt transition arriving at the fully developed turbulent state. Our results with this approach show during transition the energy norms of such inlet perturbations grow exponentially rather than algebraically with axial distance. When inlet disturbance is located in the core region, helical vortex filaments evolvemore » into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow when they descend to the surface from the core produces small-scale hairpin packets, which leads to breakdown. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, certain quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, and develops into a large-scale hairpin vortex. Small-scale hairpin packets emerge near the tip region of the large-scale hairpin vortex, and subsequently grow into a turbulent spot, which is itself a local concentration of small-scale hairpin vortices. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition, suggesting the possibility of a partial unification. Under parabolic base flow the friction factor overshoots Moody’s correlation. Plug base flow requires stronger inlet disturbance for transition. Finally, accuracy of the results is demonstrated by comparing with analytical solutions before breakdown, and with fully developed turbulence measurements after the completion of transition.« less

  14. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: Direct simulation from laminar through gradual transition to fully developed turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J.; Baltzer, Jon R.

    2015-06-15

    We report that the precise dynamics of breakdown in pipe transition is a century-old unresolved problem in fluid mechanics. We demonstrate that the abruptness and mysteriousness attributed to the Osborne Reynolds pipe transition can be partially resolved with a spatially developing direct simulation that carries weakly but finitely perturbed laminar inflow through gradual rather than abrupt transition arriving at the fully developed turbulent state. Our results with this approach show during transition the energy norms of such inlet perturbations grow exponentially rather than algebraically with axial distance. When inlet disturbance is located in the core region, helical vortex filaments evolve into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow when they descend to the surface from the core produces small-scale hairpin packets, which leads to breakdown. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, certain quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, and develops into a large-scale hairpin vortex. Small-scale hairpin packets emerge near the tip region of the large-scale hairpin vortex, and subsequently grow into a turbulent spot, which is itself a local concentration of small-scale hairpin vortices. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition, suggesting the possibility of a partial unification. Under parabolic base flow the friction factor overshoots Moody’s correlation. Plug base flow requires stronger inlet disturbance for transition. Finally, accuracy of the results is demonstrated by comparing with analytical solutions before breakdown, and with fully developed turbulence measurements after the completion of transition.

  15. Osborne Reynolds pipe flow: Direct simulation from laminar through gradual transition to fully developed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Adrian, Ronald J; Baltzer, Jon R

    2015-06-30

    The precise dynamics of breakdown in pipe transition is a century-old unresolved problem in fluid mechanics. We demonstrate that the abruptness and mysteriousness attributed to the Osborne Reynolds pipe transition can be partially resolved with a spatially developing direct simulation that carries weakly but finitely perturbed laminar inflow through gradual rather than abrupt transition arriving at the fully developed turbulent state. Our results with this approach show during transition the energy norms of such inlet perturbations grow exponentially rather than algebraically with axial distance. When inlet disturbance is located in the core region, helical vortex filaments evolve into large-scale reverse hairpin vortices. The interaction of these reverse hairpins among themselves or with the near-wall flow when they descend to the surface from the core produces small-scale hairpin packets, which leads to breakdown. When inlet disturbance is near the wall, certain quasi-spanwise structure is stretched into a Lambda vortex, and develops into a large-scale hairpin vortex. Small-scale hairpin packets emerge near the tip region of the large-scale hairpin vortex, and subsequently grow into a turbulent spot, which is itself a local concentration of small-scale hairpin vortices. This vortex dynamics is broadly analogous to that in the boundary layer bypass transition and in the secondary instability and breakdown stage of natural transition, suggesting the possibility of a partial unification. Under parabolic base flow the friction factor overshoots Moody's correlation. Plug base flow requires stronger inlet disturbance for transition. Accuracy of the results is demonstrated by comparing with analytical solutions before breakdown, and with fully developed turbulence measurements after the completion of transition.

  16. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  17. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting

    PubMed Central

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or “pseudotachylytes.” It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics. PMID:26124123

  18. Fault rheology beyond frictional melting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Yan; Hirose, Takehiro; Kendrick, Jackie E; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-07-28

    During earthquakes, comminution and frictional heating both contribute to the dissipation of stored energy. With sufficient dissipative heating, melting processes can ensue, yielding the production of frictional melts or "pseudotachylytes." It is commonly assumed that the Newtonian viscosities of such melts control subsequent fault slip resistance. Rock melts, however, are viscoelastic bodies, and, at high strain rates, they exhibit evidence of a glass transition. Here, we present the results of high-velocity friction experiments on a well-characterized melt that demonstrate how slip in melt-bearing faults can be governed by brittle fragmentation phenomena encountered at the glass transition. Slip analysis using models that incorporate viscoelastic responses indicates that even in the presence of melt, slip persists in the solid state until sufficient heat is generated to reduce the viscosity and allow remobilization in the liquid state. Where a rock is present next to the melt, we note that wear of the crystalline wall rock by liquid fragmentation and agglutination also contributes to the brittle component of these experimentally generated pseudotachylytes. We conclude that in the case of pseudotachylyte generation during an earthquake, slip even beyond the onset of frictional melting is not controlled merely by viscosity but rather by an interplay of viscoelastic forces around the glass transition, which involves a response in the brittle/solid regime of these rock melts. We warn of the inadequacy of simple Newtonian viscous analyses and call for the application of more realistic rheological interpretation of pseudotachylyte-bearing fault systems in the evaluation and prediction of their slip dynamics.

  19. Friction Stir Process Mapping Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooney, Alex; Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn; Smelser, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In FSW (friction stir welding), the weld process performance for a given weld joint configuration and tool setup is summarized on a 2-D plot of RPM vs. IPM. A process envelope is drawn within the map to identify the range of acceptable welds. The sweet spot is selected as the nominal weld schedule. The nominal weld schedule is characterized in the expected manufacturing environment. The nominal weld schedule in conjunction with process control ensures a consistent and predictable weld performance.

  20. Structural and phase transformations in Hadfield steel upon frictional loading in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2016-08-01

    Structural transformations that occur in 110G13 steel (Hadfield) upon sliding friction in liquid nitrogen (-196°C) have been investigated by metallographic, electron-microscopic, and X-ray diffraction methods. The frictional action was performed through the reciprocating sliding of a cylindrical indenter of quenched 110G13 steel over a plate of the studied steel. A like friction pair was immersed into a bath with liquid nitrogen. It has been shown that the Hadfield steel quenched from 1100°C under the given temperature conditions of frictional loading retains the austenitic structure completely. The frictional action forms in a surface layer up to 10 μm thick the nanocrystalline structure with austenite grains 10-50 nm in size and a hardness 6 GPa. Upon subsequent low-temperature friction, the tempering of steel at 400°C (3 h) and at 600°C (5 min and 5 h) brings about the formation of a large amount (tens of vol %) of ɛ (hcp) martensite in steel. The formation of this phase under friction is supposedly a consequence of the reduction in the stacking fault energy of Hadfield steel, which is achieved due to the combined action of the following factors: low-temperature cooling, a decrease in the carbon content in the austenite upon tempering, and the presence of high compressive stresses in the friction-contact zone.

  1. Market Assessment of Forward-Looking Turbulence Sensing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffmann, Paul; Sousa-Poza, Andres

    2001-01-01

    In recognition of the importance of turbulence mitigation as a tool to improve aviation safety, NASA's Aviation Safety Program developed a Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Sub-element. The objective of this effort is to develop highly reliable turbulence detection technologies for commercial transport aircraft to sense dangerous turbulence with sufficient time warning so that defensive measures can be implemented and prevent passenger and crew injuries. Current research involves three forward sensing products to improve the cockpit awareness of possible turbulence hazards. X-band radar enhancements will improve the capabilities of current weather radar to detect turbulence associated with convective activity. LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) is a laser-based technology that is capable of detecting turbulence in clear air. Finally, a possible Radar-LIDAR hybrid sensor is envisioned to detect the full range of convective and clear air turbulence. To support decisions relating to the development of these three forward-looking turbulence sensor technologies, the objective of this study was defined as examination of cost and implementation metrics. Tasks performed included the identification of cost factors and certification issues, the development and application of an implementation model, and the development of cost budget/targets for installing the turbulence sensor and associated software devices into the commercial transport fleet.

  2. Direct drag measurements in a turbulent flat-plate boundary layer with turbulence manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, T. B.; Bechert, D. W.; Gerich, D. A.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of turbulence manipulators on the turbulent boundary layer above a flat plate has been investigated. These turbulence manipulators are often referred to as Large Eddy Break Up (LEBU) devices. The basic idea is that thin blades or airfoils are inserted into the turbulent flow in order to reduce the fluctuating vertical velocity component v' above the flat plate. In this way, the turbulent momentum transfer and with it the wall shear stress downstream of the manipulator should be decreased. In our experiments, for comparison, a merely drag-producing wire also was inserted into the boundary layer. In particular, the trade-off between the drag of the turbulence manipulator and the drag reduction due to the shear-stress reduction on the flat plate downstream of the manipulator has been considered. The measurements were carried out with very accurate force balances for both the manipulator drag and the shear stress on the flat plate. As it turns out, no net drag reduction is found for a fairly large set of configurations. A single thin blade as a manipulator performed best, i.e., it was closest to break-even. However, a further improvement is unlikely, because the device drag of the thin blade elements used here has already been reduced to only that due to laminar skin friction, and is thus the minimum possible drag. Airfoils performed slightly worse, because their device drag was higher. A purely drag-producing wire device performed disastrously. The wire device, which consisted of a wire with another thin wire wound around it to suppress coherent vortex shedding and vibration, was designed to have (and did have) the same drag as the airfoil manipulator with which it was compared. The comparison showed that airfoil and blade manipulators recovered 75 90% of their device drag through a shear-stress reduction downstream, whereas the wire device recovered only about 25 30% of its device drag. Conventional LEBU manipulators with airfoils or thin blades produce

  3. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance. PMID:20366193

  4. Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S C; Nicol, R M

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum--with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approximately 2 in power--provides a test of this invariance.

  5. Generalized Similarity in Finite Range Solar Wind Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Nicol, R. M.

    2009-12-11

    Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. The ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide in situ observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterizes this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum - with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of approx2 in power - provides a test of this invariance.

  6. Semi-local scaling and turbulence modulation in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan W. R.; Boersma, Bendiks J.; Pecnik, Rene

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the effect of temperature dependent density and viscosity on turbulence in channel flows. First, a mathematical framework is developed to support the validity of the semi-local scaling as proposed based on heuristic arguments by Huang, Coleman, and Bradshaw ["Compressible turbulent channel flows: DNS results and modelling," J. Fluid Mech. 305, 185-218 (1995)]. Second, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent channel flows with different constitutive relations for density and viscosity are performed to assess and validate the semi-local scaling for turbulent statistics. The DNS database is obtained by solving the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, we quantify the modulation of turbulence due to changes in fluid properties. In the simulations, the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at both channel walls is fixed, such that the friction Reynolds number based on wall quantities is Reτ = 395 for all cases investigated. We show that for a case with variable density ρ and viscosity μ, but constant semi-local Reynolds number R eτ ∗ ≡ √{ ( ρ ¯ / ρ w ) } / ( μ ¯ / μ w ) R e τ (where bar and subscript w, denote Reynolds averaging and averaged wall quantity, respectively), across the whole channel height, the turbulent statistics exhibit quasi-similarity with constant property turbulent flows. For cases where R eτ ∗ ≠ R e τ across the channel, we found that quasi-similarity is maintained for cases with similar R eτ ∗ distributions, even if their individual mean density and viscosity profiles substantially differ. With a decrease of R eτ ∗ towards the channel center ( R eτ ∗ < R e τ ), we show that the anisotropy increases and the pre-multiplied stream-wise spectra reveal that this increase is associated with strengthening of the large scale streaks in the buffer layer. The opposite effect is observed when R eτ ∗ increases towards the channel

  7. Turbulence structures in wind turbine wake: Effects of atmospheric stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2014-11-01

    Turbulence structure in the wake behind full-scale horizontal-axis WT under the influence of realistic atmospheric turbulent flow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of turbine wake. Turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the WT, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer. NSF CBET Energy for Sustainability.

  8. Investigations of the evolution of turbulent gas explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, H.; Steen, H.

    1986-10-01

    The explosion in turbulent stochiometric propane-air mixtures was investigated as a contribution to the safety evaluation of explosions. The effect of the turbulence parameters (average fluctuation velocity u' and average vortex ball diameter L) on the damage-effect-determining flame velocity were studied. Tests show that L is determined by the size of the turbulence field and by the geometry at the boundaries. An almost linear increase of vt as a function of u' (at fixed L) is found for the experimentally accessible turbulence intensities. Contrary to simple model expectations, a significant increase of vt as a function of L (at fixed u') is also found. Therefore, u' as well as L have to be considered in the safety evaluation. Tests show that the maximum explosion pressure increase is not only determined by the turbulence state of the mixture, but also by apparatus factors such as container size and geometry as well as the type of turbulence excitation.

  9. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6 (Bi et al. Nature (2011)). Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to use particles made of gelatin to reduce the friction coefficient to the order of 0.01. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant DMR1206351, NASA Grant NNX15AD38G and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Effect of friction on shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Bares, Jonathan; Dijksman, Joshua; Ren, Jie; Zheng, Hu; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Shear jamming of granular materials was first found for systems of frictional disks, with a static friction coefficient μ ~ 0 . 6. Jamming by shear is obtained by starting from a zero-stress state with a packing fraction ϕ between ϕJ (isotropic jamming) and a lowest ϕS for shear jamming. This phenomenon is associated with strong anisotropy in stress and the contact network in the form of force chains, which are stabilized and/or enhanced by the presence of friction. Whether shear jamming occurs for frictionless particles is under debate. The issue we address experimentally is how changing friction affects shear jamming. By applying a homogeneous simple shear, we study the effect of friction by using photoelastic disks either wrapped with Teflon to reduce friction or with fine teeth on the edge to increase friction. Shear jamming is still observed; however, the difference ϕJ -ϕS is smaller with lower friction. We also observe larger fluctuations due to initial configurations both at the lowest and the highest friction systems studied. Ongoing work is to characterize response from different friction systems under shear with information at local scale. We acknowledge support from NSF-DMR1206351, NASA NNX15AD38G and W.M. Keck Foundation.

  11. Turbulent statistics and flow structures in spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Jie; Xia, Zhenhua; Cai, Qingdong; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-09-01

    A series of direct numerical simulations of spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows at a Reynolds number of 1300 with rotation numbers Ro between 0 and 0.9 is carried out to investigate the effects of anticyclonic rotation on turbulent statistics and flow structures. Several typical turbulent statistics are presented, including the mean shear rate at the centerline, the wall-friction Reynolds number, and volume-averaged kinetic energies with respect to the secondary flow field, turbulent field, and total fluctuation field. Our results show that the rotation changes these quantities in different manners. Volume-averaged balance equations for kinetic energy are analyzed and it turns out that the interaction term acts as a kinetic energy bridge that transfers energy from the secondary flow to the turbulent fluctuations. Several typical flow regimes are identified based on the correlation functions across the whole channel and flow visualizations. The two-dimensional roll cells are observed at weak rotation Ro=0.01 , where alternant clustering of vortices appears. Three-dimensional roll cells emerge around Ro≈0.02 , where the clustering of vortices shows the meandering and bifurcating behavior. For moderate rotation 0.07 ≲Ro≲0.36 , well-organized structures are observed, where the herringbonelike vortices are clustered between streaks from the top view of three-dimensional flow visualization and form annuluses. More importantly, the vortices are rather confined to one side of the walls when Ro≤0.02 and are inclined from the bottom to upper walls when Ro≥0.07 .

  12. Turbulence statistics in turbulent spots in a transitional boundary layer subject to free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehill, Brendan; Ed J. Walsh Collaboration; Philipp Schlatter, Luca Brandt Collaboration; Tamer A. Zaki Collaboration; Donald M. McEligot Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    Within the boundary layer transition region turbulent spots emerge and grow to form the fully-turbulent boundary layer. This paper examines the turbulent statistics within turbulent spots in a transitional boundary layer subject to free-stream turbulence intensity of 4 . 7 % . Conditionally sampled DNS results, where the laminar and turbulent contributions to the transition region are separated, are used to obtain the relevant statistics. Conditional sampling of the data provides some improvement over the more classical time-space-averaged data reduction techniques, through providing more insight into the true turbulent statistics within turbulent spots. The statistics are compared to the lowest fully-turbulent DNS available in the literature to identify how the turbulent spots develop and form the fully-turbulent state. Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

  13. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  14. Generalized anisotropic turbulence spectra and applications in the optical waves' propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2015-11-16

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have shown that the atmospheric turbulence exhibits both anisotropic and non-Kolmogorov properties. In this work, two theoretical atmosphere refractive-index fluctuations spectral models are derived for optical waves propagating through anisotropic non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence. They consider simultaneously the finite turbulence inner and outer scales and the asymmetric property of turbulence eddies in the orthogonal xy-plane throughout the path. Two anisotropy factors which parameterize the asymmetry of turbulence eddies in both horizontal and vertical directions are introduced in the orthogonal xy-plane, so that the circular symmetry assumption of turbulence eddies in the xy-plane is no longer required. Deviations from the classic 11/3 power law behavior in the spectrum model are also allowed by assuming power law value variations between 3 and 4. Based on the derived anisotropic spectral model and the Rytov approximation theory, expressions for the variance of angle of arrival (AOA) fluctuations are derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through weak anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived spectral models and the variance of AOA fluctuations.

  15. Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rod

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on turbulence detection and mitigation technologies in weather accident prevention. The topics include: 1) Organization; 2) Scope of Turbulence Effort; 3) Background; 4) Turbulence Detection and Mitigation Program Metrics; 5) Approach; 6) Turbulence Team Relationships; 7) WBS Structure; 8) Deliverables; 9) TDAM Changes; 10) FY-01 Results/Accomplishments; 11) Out-year Plans; and 12) Element Status.

  16. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  17. Periodically kicked turbulence

    PubMed

    Lohse

    2000-10-01

    Periodically kicked turbulence is theoretically analyzed within a mean-field theory. For large enough kicking strength A and kicking frequency f the Reynolds number grows exponentially and then runs into some saturation. The saturation level Re(sat) can be calculated analytically; different regimes can be observed. For large enough Re we find Re(sat) approximately Af, but intermittency can modify this scaling law. We suggest an experimental realization of periodically kicked turbulence to study the different regimes we theoretically predict and thus to better understand the effect of forcing on fully developed turbulence. PMID:11089041

  18. Friction Forces during Sliding of Various Brackets for Malaligned Teeth: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Balsamo, Antonio; Serpico, Vitaliano; Chiatante, Francesco; Pappalettere, Carmine; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To measure the friction force generated during sliding mechanics with conventional, self-ligating (Damon 3 mx, Smart Clip, and Time 3) and low-friction (Synergy) brackets using different archwire diameters and ligating systems in the presence of apical and buccal malalignments of the canine. Methods. An experimental setup reproducing the right buccal segment of the maxillary arch was designed to measure the friction force generated at the bracket/wire and wire/ligature interfaces of different brackets. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of friction force: (i) degree of malalignment, (ii) diameter of the orthodontic wire, and (iii) bracket/ligature combination. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the bracket/ligature combinations analyzed. Results. ANOVA showed that all the above factors affect the friction force values. The friction force released during sliding mechanics with conventional brackets is about 5-6times higher than that released with the other investigated brackets. A quasilinear increase of the frictional forces was observed for increasing amounts of apical and buccal malalignments. Conclusion. The Synergy bracket with silicone ligature placed around the inner tie-wings appears to yield the best performance. PMID:23533364

  19. Laminar, turbulent, and inertial shear-thickening regimes in channel flow of neutrally buoyant particle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lashgari, Iman; Picano, Francesco; Breugem, Wim-Paul; Brandt, Luca

    2014-12-19

    The aim of this Letter is to characterize the flow regimes of suspensions of finite-size rigid particles in a viscous fluid at finite inertia. We explore the system behavior as a function of the particle volume fraction and the Reynolds number (the ratio of flow and particle inertia to viscous forces). Unlike single-phase flows, where a clear distinction exists between the laminar and the turbulent states, three different regimes can be identified in the presence of a particulate phase, with smooth transitions between them. At low volume fractions, the flow becomes turbulent when increasing the Reynolds number, transitioning from the laminar regime dominated by viscous forces to the turbulent regime characterized by enhanced momentum transport by turbulent eddies. At larger volume fractions, we identify a new regime characterized by an even larger increase of the wall friction. The wall friction increases with the Reynolds number (inertial effects) while the turbulent transport is weakly affected, as in a state of intense inertial shear thickening. This state may prevent the transition to a fully turbulent regime at arbitrary high speed of the flow.

  20. Evaluation of CFD Turbulent Heating Prediction Techniques and Comparison With Hypersonic Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilley, Arthur D.; McClinton, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Results from a study to assess the accuracy of turbulent heating and skin friction prediction techniques for hypersonic applications are presented. The study uses the original and a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a space marching code. Grid converged turbulent predictions using the wall damping formulation (original model) and local damping formulation (modified model) are compared with experimental data for several flat plates. The wall damping and local damping results are similar for hot wall conditions, but differ significantly for cold walls, i.e., T(sub w) / T(sub t) < 0.3, with the wall damping heating and skin friction 10-30% above the local damping results. Furthermore, the local damping predictions have reasonable or good agreement with the experimental heating data for all cases. The impact of the two formulations on the van Driest damping function and the turbulent eddy viscosity distribution for a cold wall case indicate the importance of including temperature gradient effects. Grid requirements for accurate turbulent heating predictions are also studied. These results indicate that a cell Reynolds number of 1 is required for grid converged heating predictions, but coarser grids with a y(sup +) less than 2 are adequate for design of hypersonic vehicles. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the local damping formulation be used with the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith turbulence models in design and analysis of Hyper-X and future hypersonic vehicles.

  1. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  2. SRM propellant, friction/ESD testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Following the Pershing 2 incident in 1985 and the Peacekeeper ignition during core removal in 1987, it was found that propellant can be much more sensitive to Electrostatic Discharges (ESD) than ever before realized. As a result of the Peacekeeper motor near miss incident, a friction machine was designed and fabricated, and used to determine friction hazards during core removal. Friction testing with and electrical charge being applied across the friction plates resulted in propellant ignitions at low friction pressures and extremely low ESD levels. The objective of this test series was to determine the sensitivity of solid rocket propellant to combined friction pressure and electrostatic stimuli and to compare the sensitivity of the SRM propellant to Peacekeeper propellant. The tests are fully discussed, summarized and conclusions drawn.

  3. Friction Anisotropy with Respect to Topographic Orientation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties. PMID:23248751

  4. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  5. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  6. Friction anisotropy with respect to topographic orientation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chengjiao; Wang, Q Jane

    2012-01-01

    Friction characteristics with respect to surface topographic orientation were investigated using surfaces of different materials and fabricated with grooves of different scales. Scratching friction tests were conducted using a nano-indentation-scratching system with the tip motion parallel or perpendicular to the groove orientation. Similar friction anisotropy trends were observed for all the surfaces studied, which are (1) under a light load and for surfaces with narrow grooves, the tip motion parallel to the grooves offers higher friction coefficients than does that perpendicular to them, (2) otherwise, equal or lower friction coefficients are found under this motion. The influences of groove size relative to the diameter of the mating tip (as a representative asperity), surface contact stiffness, contact area, and the characteristic stiction length are discussed. The appearance of this friction anisotropy is independent of material; however, the boundary and the point of trend transition depend on material properties.

  7. Static friction between rigid fractal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Huang, Pengyu; Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Flores-Johnson, E. A.; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Gan, Yixiang; Shen, Luming

    2015-09-01

    Using spheropolygon-based simulations and contact slope analysis, we investigate the effects of surface topography and atomic scale friction on the macroscopically observed friction between rigid blocks with fractal surface structures. From our mathematical derivation, the angle of macroscopic friction is the result of the sum of the angle of atomic friction and the slope angle between the contact surfaces. The latter is obtained from the determination of all possible contact slopes between the two surface profiles through an alternative signature function. Our theory is validated through numerical simulations of spheropolygons with fractal Koch surfaces and is applied to the description of frictional properties of Weierstrass-Mandelbrot surfaces. The agreement between simulations and theory suggests that for interpreting macroscopic frictional behavior, the descriptors of surface morphology should be defined from the signature function rather than from the slopes of the contacting surfaces.

  8. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  9. Modelling cohesive, frictional and viscoplastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alehossein, Habib; Qin, Zongyi

    2016-06-01

    Most materials in mining and civil engineering construction are not only viscoplastic, but also cohesive frictional. Fresh concrete, fly ash and mining slurries are all granular-frictional-visco-plastic fluids, although solid concrete is normally considered as a cohesive frictional material. Presented here is both a formulation of the pipe and disc flow rates as a function of pressure and pressure gradient and the CFD application to fresh concrete flow in L-Box tests.

  10. Investigation of squeal noise under positive friction characteristics condition provided by friction modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaogang; Meehan, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Field application of friction modifiers on the top of rail has been shown to effectively curb squeal and reduce lateral forces, but performance can be variable, according to other relevant research. Up to now, most investigations of friction modifiers were conducted in the field, where it is difficult to control or measure important parameters such as angle of attack, rolling speed, adhesion ratio etc. In the present investigation, the effect of different friction modifiers on the occurrence of squeal was investigated on a rolling contact two disk test rig. In particular, friction-creep curves and squeal sound pressure levels were measured under different rolling speeds and friction modifiers. The results show friction modifiers can eliminate or reduce the negative slope of friction-creep curves, but squeal noise still exists. Theoretical modelling of instantaneous creep behaviours reveals a possible reason why wheel squeal still exists after the application of friction modifiers.

  11. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  12. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong (K = {nuover U_sp{infty} {2}}{dUinftyover dx} as high as 9times 10^{ -6}) acceleration. The high FSTI experiments are the main focus of the work. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. The high FSTI boundary layers undergo transition from a strongly disturbed non-turbulent state to a fully-turbulent state. Due to the stabilizing effect of strong acceleration, the transition zones are of extended length in spite of the high FSTI. Transitional values of skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers drop below flat-plate, low FSTI, turbulent flow correlations, but remain well above laminar flow values. Mean velocity and temperature profiles exhibit clear changes in shape as the flow passes through transition. Turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. Turbulent transport is strongly suppressed below values in unaccelerated turbulent boundary layers. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Octant analysis shows a fundamental difference between transitional and fully-turbulent boundary layers. Transitional boundary layers are characterized by incomplete mixing compared to fully-turbulent boundary layers. Similar octant analysis results are observed in both low and high FSTI cases. Spectral analysis suggests that the non-turbulent zone of the high FSTI flow is dominated by large scale

  13. Thermo-fluid-dynamics of turbulent boundary layer over a moving continuous flat sheet in a parallel free stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Bushra; Noor Afzal Team; Bushra Afzal Team

    2014-11-01

    The momentum and thermal turbulent boundary layers over a continuous moving sheet subjected to a free stream have been analyzed in two layers (inner wall and outer wake) theory at large Reynolds number. The present work is based on open Reynolds equations of momentum and heat transfer without any closure model say, like eddy viscosity or mixing length etc. The matching of inner and outer layers has been carried out by Izakson-Millikan-Kolmogorov hypothesis. The matching for velocity and temperature profiles yields the logarithmic laws and power laws in overlap region of inner and outer layers, along with friction factor and heat transfer laws. The uniformly valid solution for velocity, Reynolds shear stress, temperature and thermal Reynolds heat flux have been proposed by introducing the outer wake functions due to momentum and thermal boundary layers. The comparison with experimental data for velocity profile, temperature profile, skin friction and heat transfer are presented. In outer non-linear layers, the lowest order momentum and thermal boundary layer equations have also been analyses by using eddy viscosity closure model, and results are compared with experimental data. Retired Professor, Embassy Hotel, Rasal Ganj, Aligarh 202001 India.

  14. How to teach friction: Experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, Ugo; Borghi, Lidia; De Ambrosis, Anna; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    Students generally have difficulty understanding friction and its associated phenomena. High school and introductory college-level physics courses usually do not give the topic the attention it deserves. We have designed a sequence for teaching about friction between solids based on a didactic reconstruction of the relevant physics, as well as research findings about student conceptions. The sequence begins with demonstrations that illustrate different types of friction. Experiments are subsequently performed to motivate students to obtain quantitative relations in the form of phenomenological laws. To help students understand the mechanisms producing friction, models illustrating the processes taking place on the surface of bodies in contact are proposed.

  15. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    PubMed

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions.

  16. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  17. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  18. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  19. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  20. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of friction and wear in hip simulators.

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Garvin, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    We propose and have evaluated a method to measure hip friction during wear testing on a popular multi-station hip simulator. A 6-degree-of-freedom load cell underneath the specimen sensed forces and torques during implant wear testing of simulated walking. This included internal-external and adduction-abduction rotations which are often neglected during friction testing on pendulum-type machines. Robust mathematical analysis and data processing provided friction estimates in three simultaneous orthogonal rotations, over extended multi-million cycle wear tests. We tested various bearing couples including metal-on-plastic, ceramic-on-plastic, and metal-on-metal material couples. In one test series, new and intentionally scratched CoCrMo 40-mm-diameter femoral heads were tested against conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, highly cross-linked, and highly cross-linked with vitamin E versions. The scratching significantly increased friction and doubled the wear of all groups. Before scratching, friction levels for the aforementioned plastic groups were 0.056 ± 0.0060, 0.062 ± 0.0080, and 0.070 ± 0.0045, respectively, but after scratching increased to 0.088 ± 0.018, 0.076 ± 0.0066, and 0.082 ± 0.0049, respectively, all statistically significant increases (p = 0.00059, 0.00005, 0.0115, respectively). In another test series of 44-mm femoral head diameter hips, metal-on-plastic hips with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene showed the lowest friction at 0.045 ± 0.0085, followed by highly cross-linked with 0.046 ± 0.0035 (not significantly different). In a ceramic-on-plastic design with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, higher friction 0.079 ± 0.0070 was measured likely due to that ceramic surface being rougher than usual. Metal-on-metal hips were compared without and with a TiN coating, resulting in 0.049 ± 0.014 and 0.097 ± 0.020 friction factors, respectively

  2. Simultaneous measurement of friction and wear in hip simulators.

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Garvin, Kevin L

    2016-05-01

    We propose and have evaluated a method to measure hip friction during wear testing on a popular multi-station hip simulator. A 6-degree-of-freedom load cell underneath the specimen sensed forces and torques during implant wear testing of simulated walking. This included internal-external and adduction-abduction rotations which are often neglected during friction testing on pendulum-type machines. Robust mathematical analysis and data processing provided friction estimates in three simultaneous orthogonal rotations, over extended multi-million cycle wear tests. We tested various bearing couples including metal-on-plastic, ceramic-on-plastic, and metal-on-metal material couples. In one test series, new and intentionally scratched CoCrMo 40-mm-diameter femoral heads were tested against conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, highly cross-linked, and highly cross-linked with vitamin E versions. The scratching significantly increased friction and doubled the wear of all groups. Before scratching, friction levels for the aforementioned plastic groups were 0.056 ± 0.0060, 0.062 ± 0.0080, and 0.070 ± 0.0045, respectively, but after scratching increased to 0.088 ± 0.018, 0.076 ± 0.0066, and 0.082 ± 0.0049, respectively, all statistically significant increases (p = 0.00059, 0.00005, 0.0115, respectively). In another test series of 44-mm femoral head diameter hips, metal-on-plastic hips with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene showed the lowest friction at 0.045 ± 0.0085, followed by highly cross-linked with 0.046 ± 0.0035 (not significantly different). In a ceramic-on-plastic design with conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, higher friction 0.079 ± 0.0070 was measured likely due to that ceramic surface being rougher than usual. Metal-on-metal hips were compared without and with a TiN coating, resulting in 0.049 ± 0.014 and 0.097 ± 0.020 friction factors, respectively

  3. Emission of sound from axisymmetric turbulence convected by a mean flow with application to jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Rosenbaum, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    A model, based on Lighthill's theory, for predicting aerodynamic noise from a turbulent shear flow is developed. This model is a generalization of the one developed by Ribner. Unlike Ribner's model, it does not require that the turbulent correlations factor into space and time-dependent parts. It replaces his assumption of isotropic. turbulence by the more realistic one of axisymmetric turbulence. The implications of the model for jet noise are discussed.

  4. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  5. Slodar Turbulence Monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. W.; Butterley, T.; Osborn, J.

    2009-09-01

    SLODAR turbulence monitors have been installed and operated at the Cerro Paranal, Mauna Kea and SAAO Sutherland observatories. The instruments, developed at Durham University, provide real-time measurements of the atmospheric turbulence strength, altitude and velocity, for site characterization and for real-time support of adaptive optics for astronomy. We present sample results and compare contemporaneous data obtained with SLODAR, MASS and DIMM monitors at the ESO Paranal observatory.

  6. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murrow, Harold N.

    1987-01-01

    Various types of atmospheric turbulence measurements are addressed for the purpose of stimulating discussion relative to available data. An outline of these various types of measurements are discussed. Some specific results of detailed characterization studies made at NASA Langley are emphasized. The most recent reports on statistics of turbulence encounters for various types of aircraft operations are summarized. Special severe encounter studies and reference to remote sensing are also included. Wind shear is considered to be a special topic and is not covered.

  7. Skin friction measurement in complex flows using thin oil film techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Grant NAG2-261 was initiated to support a program of research to study complex flows that occur in flight and laboratory experiments by building, testing and optimizing an on-board technique for direct measurement of surface shear stress using thin oil film techniques. The program of research has proceeded under the supervision of the NASA Ames Research Center and with further cooperation from the NASA Ames-Dryden and NASA Langley Research Centers. In accordance with the original statement of work, the following research milestones were accomplished: (1) design and testing of an internally mounted one-directional skin friction meter to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept; (2) design and construction of a compact instrument capable of measuring skin friction in two directions; (3) study of transitional and fully turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with and without longitudinal pressure gradients utilizing the compact two-directional skin friction meter; (4) study of the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer and a shock wave generated by a compression corner using the two-directional meter; and (5) flight qualification of the compact meter and accompanying electronic and pneumatic systems, preliminary installation into flight test fixture.

  8. Development of FDR-AF (Frictional Drag Reduction Anti-Fouling) Marine Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan; GCRC-SOP Team

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a novel skin-friction reducing marine paint has been developed by mixing fine powder of PEO(PolyEthyleneOxide) with SPC (Self-Polishing Copolymer) AF (Anti-Fouling) paint. The PEO is well known as one of drag reducing agent to exhibit Toms effect, the attenuation of turbulent flows by long chain polymer molecules in the near wall region. The frictional drag reduction has been implemented by injecting such polymer solutions to liquid flows. However, the injection holes have been a significant obstacle to marine application. The present PEO-containing marine paint is proposed as an alternative to realize Toms effect without any hole on the ship surface. The erosion mechanism of SPC paint resin and the subsequent dissolution of PEO enable the controlled release of PEO solution from the coating. Various tests such as towing tank drag measurement of flat plate and turbulence measurement in circulating water tunnel demonstrated over 10% frictional drag reduction compared with conventional AF paint. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) through GCRC-SOP(No. 2011-0030013).

  9. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  10. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in the throttle of the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarunichev, V. A.; Orlova, E. E.; Lemekhov, Yu. V.; Shpanskii, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    This work in devoted to numerical calculation of turbulent flow in a labyrinth-type throttle. A system of such throttles is installed at the inlet to the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber and serves for setting up the required pressure difference and coolant flow rate. MBIR is a multipurpose fourthgeneration fast-neutron research reactor intended for investigating new kinds of nuclear fuel, structural materials, and coolants. The aim of this work is to develop a verified procedure for carrying out 3D calculation of the throttle using CFD modeling techniques. The investigations on determining the throttle hydraulic friction coefficient were carried out in the range of Reynolds numbers Re = 52000-136000. The reactor coolant (liquid sodium) was modeled by tap water. The calculations were carried out using high-Reynolds-number turbulence models with the near-wall functions k-ɛ and RNG k-ɛ, where k is the turbulent pulsation kinetic energy and ɛ is the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate. The obtained results have shown that the calculated value of hydraulic friction coefficient differs from its experimental value by no more than 10%. The developed procedure can be applied in determining the hydraulic friction coefficient of a modified labyrinth throttle design. The use of such calculation will make it possible to predict an experiment with the preset accuracy.

  12. Probability distribution functions in turbulent convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandar, S.; Sirovich, L.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an extensive investigation of probability distribution functions (pdfs) for Rayleigh-Benard convection, in hard turbulence regime, are presented. It is shown that the pdfs exhibit a high degree of internal universality. In certain cases this universality is established within two Kolmogorov scales of a boundary. A discussion of the factors leading to the universality is presented.

  13. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  14. Frictional behavior of large displacement experimental faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Blanpied, M.L.; Weeks, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The coefficient of friction and velocity dependence of friction of initially bare surfaces and 1-mm-thick simulated fault gouges (400 mm at 25??C and 25 MPa normal stress. Steady state negative friction velocity dependence and a steady state fault zone microstructure are achieved after ???18 mm displacement, and an approximately constant strength is reached after a few tens of millimeters of sliding on initially bare surfaces. Simulated fault gouges show a large but systematic variation of friction, velocity dependence of friction, dilatancy, and degree of localization with displacement. At short displacement (<10 mm), simulated gouge is strong, velocity strengthening and changes in sliding velocity are accompanied by relatively large changes in dilatancy rate. With continued displacement, simulated gouges become progressively weaker and less velocity strengthening, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate decreases, and deformation becomes localized into a narrow basal shear which at its most localized is observed to be velocity weakening. With subsequent displacement, the fault restrengthens, returns to velocity strengthening, or to velocity neutral, the velocity dependence of dilatancy rate becomes larger, and deformation becomes distributed. Correlation of friction, velocity dependence of friction and of dilatancy rate, and degree of localization at all displacements in simulated gouge suggest that all quantities are interrelated. The observations do not distinguish the independent variables but suggest that the degree of localization is controlled by the fault strength, not by the friction velocity dependence. The friction velocity dependence and velocity dependence of dilatancy rate can be used as qualitative measures of the degree of localization in simulated gouge, in agreement with previous studies. Theory equating the friction velocity dependence of simulated gouge to the sum of the friction velocity dependence of bare surfaces and the velocity

  15. Quantum turbulence in superfluids with wall-clamped normal component.

    PubMed

    Eltsov, Vladimir; Hänninen, Risto; Krusius, Matti

    2014-03-25

    In Fermi superfluids, such as superfluid (3)He, the viscous normal component can be considered to be stationary with respect to the container. The normal component interacts with the superfluid component via mutual friction, which damps the motion of quantized vortex lines and eventually couples the superfluid component to the container. With decreasing temperature and mutual friction, the internal dynamics of the superfluid component becomes more important compared with the damping and coupling effects from the normal component. As a result profound changes in superfluid dynamics are observed: the temperature-dependent transition from laminar to turbulent vortex motion and the decoupling from the reference frame of the container at even lower temperatures. PMID:24704879

  16. Kozai Cycles and Tidal Friction

    SciTech Connect

    L, K; P.P., E

    2009-07-17

    Several studies in the last three years indicate that close binaries, i.e. those with periods of {approx}< 3 d, are very commonly found to have a third body in attendance. We argue that this proves that the third body is necessary in order to make the inner period so short, and further argue that the only reasonable explanation is that the third body causes shrinkage of the inner period, from perhaps a week or more to the current short period, by means of the combination of Kozai cycles and tidal friction (KCTF). In addition, once KCTF has produced a rather close binary, magnetic braking also combined with tidal friction (MBTF) can decrease the inner orbit further, to the formation of a contact binary or even a merged single star. Some of the products of KCTF that have been suggested, either by others or by us, are W UMa binaries, Blue Stragglers, X-ray active BY Dra stars, and short-period Algols. We also argue that some components of wide binaries are actually merged remnants of former close inner pairs. This may include such objects as rapidly rotating dwarfs (AB Dor, BO Mic) and some (but not all) Be stars.

  17. Comparison of Frictional Heating Models

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Nicholas R; Blau, Peter Julian

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

  18. Glassy dynamics of Brownian particles with velocity-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Anoosheh; Sperl, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We consider a two-dimensional model system of Brownian particles in which slow particles are accelerated while fast particles are damped. The motion of the individual particles is described by a Langevin equation with Rayleigh-Helmholtz velocity-dependent friction. In the case of noninteracting particles, the time evolution equations lead to a non-Gaussian velocity distribution. The velocity-dependent friction allows negative values of the friction or energy intakes by slow particles, which we consider active motion, and also causes breaking of the fluctuation dissipation relation. Defining the effective temperature proportional to the second moment of velocity, it is shown that for a constant effective temperature the higher the noise strength, the lower the number of active particles in the system. Using the Mori-Zwanzig formalism and the mode-coupling approximation, the equations of motion for the density autocorrelation function are derived. The equations are solved using the equilibrium structure factors. The integration-through-transients approach is used to derive a relation between the structure factor in the stationary state considering the interacting forces, and the conventional equilibrium static structure factor.

  19. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.

  20. Modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model and its application in moderate-to-strong anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linyan; Xue, Bindang; Zhou, Fugen

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectral model is derived based on the extended Rytov approximation theory for the theoretical investigations of optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. The anisotropic factor which parameterizes the asymmetry of turbulence cells or eddies in the horizontal and vertical directions is introduced. The general spectral power law in the range of 3-4 is also considered compared with the conventional classic value of 11/3 for Kolmogorov turbulence. Based on the modified anisotropic turbulence refractive-index fluctuations spectrum, the analytic expressions of the irradiance scintillation index are also derived for optical plane and spherical waves propagating through moderate-to-strong anisotropic non-Kolmogorov turbulence. They are applicable in a wide range of turbulence strengths and can reduce correctly to the previously published results in the special cases of weak anisotropic turbulence and moderate-to-strong isotropic turbulence. Calculations are performed to analyze the derived models.

  1. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F. C.; Brockett, C.; Williams, S.; Udofia, I.; Fisher, J.; Jin, Z. M.

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  2. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-01

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  3. High-velocity frictional strength across the Tohoku-Oki megathrust determined from surface drilling torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujiie, Kohtaro; Inoue, Tomoya; Ishiwata, Junya

    2016-03-01

    High-velocity frictional strength is one of the primary factors controlling earthquake faulting. The Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project drilled through the shallow plate boundary fault, where displacement was ~50 m during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To determine downhole frictional strength, we analyzed the surface drilling torque data acquired at rotation rates equivalent to seismic slip rates (0.8-1.3 m/s). The results show a clear contrast in high-velocity frictional strength across the plate boundary fault: the apparent friction coefficient of frontal prism sediments (hemipelagic mudstones) in the hanging wall is 0.1-0.3, while that of the underthrust sediments (mudstone, laminar pelagic claystone, and chert) in the footwall increases to 0.2-0.4. The apparent friction coefficient of the smectite-rich pelagic clay in the plate boundary fault is 0.08-0.19, which is consistent with that determined from high-velocity (1.1-1.3 m/s) friction experiments. This suggests that surface drilling torque is useful in obtaining downhole frictional strength.

  4. Influence of epidermal hydration on the friction of human skin against textiles.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, L-C; Strässle, V; Lenz, A; Spencer, N D; Derler, S

    2008-11-01

    Friction and shear forces, as well as moisture between the human skin and textiles are critical factors in the formation of skin injuries such as blisters, abrasions and decubitus. This study investigated how epidermal hydration affects the friction between skin and textiles.The friction between the inner forearm and a hospital fabric was measured in the natural skin condition and in different hydration states using a force plate. Eleven males and eleven females rubbed their forearm against the textile on the force plate using defined normal loads and friction movements. Skin hydration and viscoelasticity were assessed by corneometry and the suction chamber method, respectively.In each individual, a highly positive linear correlation was found between skin moisture and friction coefficient (COF). No correlation was observed between moisture and elasticity, as well as between elasticity and friction. Skin viscoelasticity was comparable for women and men. The friction of female skin showed significantly higher moisture sensitivity. COFs increased typically by 43% (women) and 26% (men) when skin hydration varied between very dry and normally moist skin. The COFs between skin and completely wet fabric were more than twofold higher than the values for natural skin rubbed on a dry textile surface.Increasing skin hydration seems to cause gender-specific changes in the mechanical properties and/or surface topography of human skin, leading to skin softening and increased real contact area and adhesion.

  5. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  6. High Reynolds number analysis of flat plate and separated afterbody flow using non-linear turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, John R.

    1996-01-01

    The ability of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes method, PAB3D, to simulate the effect of Reynolds number variation using non-linear explicit algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence modeling was assessed. Subsonic flat plate boundary-layer flow parameters such as normalized velocity distributions, local and average skin friction, and shape factor were compared with DNS calculations and classical theory at various local Reynolds numbers up to 180 million. Additionally, surface pressure coefficient distributions and integrated drag predictions on an axisymmetric nozzle afterbody were compared with experimental data from 10 to 130 million Reynolds number. The high Reynolds data was obtained from the NASA Langley 0.3m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. There was generally good agreement of surface static pressure coefficients between the CFD and measurement. The change in pressure coefficient distributions with varying Reynolds number was similar to the experimental data trends, though slightly over-predicting the effect. The computational sensitivity of viscous modeling and turbulence modeling are shown. Integrated afterbody pressure drag was typically slightly lower than the experimental data. The change in afterbody pressure drag with Reynolds number was small both experimentally and computationally, even though the shape of the distribution was somewhat modified with Reynolds number.

  7. Environmental effects on friction and wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural diamond flat, diamond film, and low and high density diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in contact with pin specimens of natural diamond and silicon nitride (Si3N4) both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. The results indicated that for natural diamond pin contacts the diamond films and the natural diamond flat were not susceptible to moisture but that moisture could increase both the coefficient of friction and the wear factors of the DLC films. The coefficients of friction and wear factors of the diamond films were generally similar to those of the natural diamond flat both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. In dry nitrogen the coefficients of friction of the high density DLC films in contact with pin specimens of both diamond and Si3N4 were generally low (about 0.02) and similar to those of the natural diamond flat and the diamond films. The wear factors of the materials in contact with both natural diamond and Si3N4 were generally in the ascending order of natural diamond flat, diamond film, high density DLC film, and low density DLC film. The moisture in the environment increased the coefficients of friction for Si3N4 pins in contact with all the materials. This increase in friction is due to the silicon oxide film produced on the surface of Si3N4 pins in humid air.

  8. Analysis of a turbulent boundary layer over a moving ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roper, A. T.; Gentry, G. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Four methods of predicting the integral and friction parameters for a turbulent boundary layer over a moving ground plane were evaluated by using test information obtained in 76.2- by 50.8-centimeter tunnel. The tunnel was operated in the open sidewall configuration. These methods are (1) relative integral parameter method, (2) modified power law method, (3) relative power law method, and (4) modified law of the wall method. The modified law of the wall method predicts a more rapid decrease in skin friction with an increase in the ratio of belt velocity to free steam velocity than do methods (1) and (3).

  9. Effects of fluid inertia and turbulence on force coefficients for squeeze film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, L. S.; Vance, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of fluid inertia and turbulence on the force coefficients of squeeze film dampers are investigated analytically. Both the convective and the temporal terms are included in the analysis of inertia effects. The analysis of turbulence is based on friction coefficients currently found in the literature for Poiseuille flow. The effect of fluid inertia on the magnitude of the radial direct inertia coefficient (i.e., to produce an apparent added mass at small eccentricity ratios, due to the temporal terms) is found to be completely reversed at large eccentricity ratios. The reversal is due entirely to the inclusion of the convective inertia terms in the analysis. Turbulence is found to produce a large effect on the direct damping coefficient at high eccentricity ratios. For the long or sealed squeeze film damper at high eccentricity ratios, the damping prediction with turbulence included is an order of magnitude higher than the laminar solution.

  10. Induced velocities of grains embedded in a turbulent gas. [test particle theory application to protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voelk, H. J.; Morfill, G.; Roeser, S.; Jones, F. C.

    1978-01-01

    A theory is presented for the dynamics of dust particles in an incompressible turbulent fluid. Grain-gas coupling occurs through friction forces that are proportional to the mean grain velocity relative to the gas. This test particle theory is applied to the case of Kolmogoroff spectrum in a protostellar cloud. The mean turbulence induced grain velocity and the mean turbulent relative velocity of two grains are calculated. Whereas the former should determine the dust scale height, grain-grain collisions are influenced by the latter. For a reasonable strength of turbulence, the mean induced relative velocity of two particles turns out to be at least as large as the corresponding terminal velocity difference during gravitational settling.

  11. Internally architectured materials with directionally asymmetric friction

    PubMed Central

    Bafekrpour, Ehsan; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Molotnikov, Andrey; Estrin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Internally Architectured Materials (IAMs) that exhibit different friction forces for sliding in the opposite directions are proposed. This is achieved by translating deformation normal to the sliding plane into a tangential force in a manner that is akin to a toothbrush with inclined bristles. Friction asymmetry is attained by employing a layered material or a structure with parallel ‘ribs’ inclined to the direction of sliding. A theory of directionally asymmetric friction is presented, along with prototype IAMs designed, fabricated and tested. The friction anisotropy (the ξ-coefficient) is characterised by the ratio of the friction forces for two opposite directions of sliding. It is further demonstrated that IAM can possess very high levels of friction anisotropy, with ξ of the order of 10. Further increase in ξ is attained by modifying the shape of the ribs to provide them with directionally dependent bending stiffness. Prototype IAMs produced by 3D printing exhibit truly giant friction asymmetry, with ξ in excess of 20. A novel mechanical rectifier, which can convert oscillatory movement into unidirectional movement by virtue of directionally asymmetric friction, is proposed. Possible applications include locomotion in a constrained environment and energy harvesting from oscillatory noise and vibrations. PMID:26040634

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  13. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet…

  14. Studying the Frictional Force Directions via Bristles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasitpong, S.; Chitaree, R.; Rakkapao, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present simple apparatus designed to help Thai high school students visualize the directions of frictional forces. Bristles of toothbrushes, paintbrushes and scrubbing brushes are used to demonstrate the frictional forces acting in a variety of situations. These demonstrations, when followed by discussion of free-body diagrams, were found to be…

  15. ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison

    DOE PAGES

    Warner, Kirstin F.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Brown, Geoffrey W.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Phillips, Jason J.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Reyes, Jose A.; Hsu, Peter C.; Reynolds, John G.

    2014-12-29

    Here, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here is a comparison of the Alleghany Ballistic Laboratory (ABL) friction data and Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (BAM) friction data for 19 HEM and military standard explosives.

  16. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  17. Rolling Friction on a Wheeled Laboratory Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model is developed that predicts the coefficient of rolling friction for an undriven laboratory cart on a track that is approximately independent of the mass loaded onto the cart and of the angle of inclination of the track. The model includes both deformation of the wheels/track and frictional torque at the axles/bearings. The concept of…

  18. On a model of frictional sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrin, Y.; Bréchet, Y.

    1996-10-01

    A model of frictional sliding with an N-shaped curve for the sliding velocity dependence of the coefficient of friction is considered. This type of friction law is shown to be related to dynamic i.e., velocity dependent ‘ageing’ of asperity junctions. Mechanisms of ‘ageing’ for ductile (Bowden-Tabor) and brittle (Byerlee) materials, though different in nature, lead to qualitatively similar N-shaped velocity dependencies of the coefficient of friction. Estimates for the velocities limiting the range of negative velocity sensitivity of the coefficient of friction are obtained for the ductile case and—albeit with a lesser degree of reliability—for the brittle one. It is shown by linear stability analysis that discontinuous sliding (stick-slip) is associated with the descending portion of the N-shaped curve. An instability criterion is obtained. An expression for the period of the attendant relaxation oscillations of the sliding velocity is given in terms of the calculated velocity dependence of the coefficient of friction. It is suggested that the micromechanically motivated friction law proposed should be used in models of earthquakes due to discontinuous frictional sliding on a crustal fault.

  19. Recent advances in turbulence prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    Turbulence in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere (8-14 kilometers in altitude) is a well-known aviation hazard; it is the major cause of injuries and occasional fatalities to passengers and crew members on commercial aircraft. Jet streams, thunderstorms, flow over mountains, and even the passage of other aircraft cause turbulence. However, the lack of precise observational data (which is still mainly from pilots reporting turbulence) and a clear understanding of the processes that cause turbulence make it difficult to accurately forecast aviation-scale turbulence. Hence, upper troposphere and lower stratosphere turbulence forecasting is an area of active research.

  20. Tidal Friction in the Earth and Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.

    2006-12-01

    "Tidal Friction" is a classic subject in geophysics, with ties to some of the great scientists of the Victorian era. The subject has been reinvigorated over the past decade by space geodesy, and particularly by the Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter mission. In fact, the topic has now taken on some significance in oceanography, with potential implications for problems of mixing, thermocline maintenance, and the thermohaline circulation. Likewise, tidal measurements have become sufficiently precise to reveal new information about the solid earth. In this respect, the tidal force is an invaluable "probe" of the earth, at frequencies well outside the seismic band. This talk will "follow the energy" of tides while noting some important geophysical implications at each stage. In the present earth-moon-sun configuration, energy for tides is extracted from the earth's rotation. Ancient eclipses bear witness to this, and the discrepancy between Babylonian (and other) observations and tidal predictions yields unique information about the mantle and the overlying fluid envelope. Complementary information comes from tidal anelasticity estimates, which are now available at frequencies ranging from semidiurnal to fortnightly, monthly, and 18.6 years. These data, when combined with various kinds of gravity measurements, are relevant to the present-day sea-level problem. Solid-earth tidal dissipation represents less than 5% of the system total. As has long been realized, the largest energy sink is the ocean. About 70% of the oceanic dissipation occurs in shallow seas (the traditional sink) and 30% in the deep ocean, generally near rugged bottom topography. The latter represents a substantial amount of power, roughly 1 gigawatt, available for generation of internal tides and other baroclinic motions. Experiments like HOME are helping unravel the links between barotropic tides, internal tides, turbulence, and mixing. The latter opens possible linkages to climate, and recent work

  1. Numerical analysis of entropy generation in a turbulent diffusion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouras, F.; Khaldi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic irreversibilities generated by the combustion process are evaluated and analyzed numerically. The numerical simulation is performed for a reference case study for which experimental data are available in the literature: diffusion flame properties in a common burner configuration are studied by the Fluent software with the standard k-ɛ turbulence model and two-step chemical reaction. The study quantifies the contribution of each mechanism to entropy generation, i.e., friction, heat conduction, species diffusion, and chemical reaction. The chemical reaction and heat conduction are found to be the major sources of entropy production. Preheating of air reduces thermodynamic irreversibilities within the combustor.

  2. Direct simulation of the turbulent boundary layer on a plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    A numerical method for the integration of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for compressible fluid as applied to direct numerical simulation is proposed. By way of example, the boundary layer on a plate is simulated. The computations were carried out for Reθ = 1500. The computational grid consisted of a half billion nodes. The flow region includes the laminar, transitional, and turbulent zones. The numerically obtained distributions of average velocity, friction, and pulsations are compared with experimental data and available numerical solutions.

  3. Behavior of turbulent boundary layers on curved convex walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidbauer, Hans

    1936-01-01

    The system of linear differential equations which indicated the approach of separation and the so-called "boundary-layer thickness" by Gruschwitz is extended in this report to include the case where the friction layer is subject to centrifugal forces. Evaluation of the data yields a strong functional dependence of the momentum change and wall drag on the boundary-layer thickness radius of curvature ratio for the wall. It is further shown that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at somewhat higher Reynolds Numbers at the convex wall than at the flat plate, due to the stabilizing effect of the centrifugal forces.

  4. Frictional microscopy of polymers and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotomin, S. V.; Ezhov, A. A.; Sollogoub, C.; Yarikov, D.

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical and frictional properties of polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate and nanocomposites with montmorillonite were studied by using the microindentation technique and frictional microscopy. The micromechanical tests revealed a decrease in the modulus and microhardness of the composite compared with those of a neat polystyrene, with a minimum of their values at 1-3 wt.% of the filler, but a local maximum of the tensile modulus of the filled polymer arose and increased at the same filler concentration. The frictional microscopy revealed anisotropy of the friction coefficient of the nanocomposite and to its noticeable dependence on the content of the filler. The maximum value of the friction coefficient was also reached at 1-3 wt.% of the filler and corresponds to the greatest degree of interplanar distance in the layered silicate and to minimum microhardness and elastic modulus of the composite surface.

  5. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Carpick, R.W.; Sasaki, D.Y.

    1999-05-11

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties.

  6. Friction forces on phase transition fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Mégevand, Ariel

    2013-07-01

    In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

  7. Integrated friction measurements in hip wear simulations: short-term results.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, M; Affatato, S; Tiberi, L; Carmignato, S; Viceconti, M

    2010-01-01

    Hip joint wear simulators are used extensively to simulate the dynamic behaviour of the human hip joint and, through the wear rate, gain a concrete indicator about the overall wear performance of different coupled bearings. Present knowledge of the dynamic behaviour of important concurrent indicators, such as the coefficient of friction, could prove helpful for the continuing improvement in applied biomaterials. A limited number of commercial or custom-made simulators have been designed specifically for friction studies but always separately from wear tests; thus, analysis of these two important parameters has remained unconnected. As a result, a new friction sensor has been designed, built, and integrated in a commercial biaxial rocking motion hip simulator. The aim of this study is to verify the feasibility of an experimental set-up in which the dynamic measurement of the friction factor could effectively be implemented in a standard wear test without compromising its general accuracy and repeatability. A short wear test was run with the new set-up for 1 x 10(6) cycles. In particular, three soft-bearings (metal-on-polyethylene, phi = 28 mm) were tested; during the whole test, axial load and frictional torque about the vertical loading axis were synchronously recorded in order to calculate the friction factor. Additional analyses were performed on the specimens, before and after the test, in order to verify the accuracy of the wear test. The average friction factor was 0.110 +/- 0.025. The friction sensors showed good accuracy and repeatability throughout. This innovative set-up was able to reproduce stable and reliable measurements. The results obtained encourage further investigations of this set-up for long-term assessment and using different combinations of materials.

  8. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  9. Turbulence and Stochastic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celani, Antonio; Mazzino, Andrea; Pumir, Alain

    sec:08-1In 1931 the monograph Analytical Methods in Probability Theory appeared, in which A.N. Kolmogorov laid the foundations for the modern theory of Markov processes [1]. According to Gnedenko: "In the history of probability theory it is difficult to find other works that changed the established points of view and basic trends in research work in such a decisive way". Ten years later, his article on fully developed turbulence provided the framework within which most, if not all, of the subsequent theoretical investigations have been conducted [2] (see e.g. the review by Biferale et al. in this volume [3]. Remarkably, the greatest advances made in the last few years towards a thorough understanding of turbulence developed from the successful marriage between the theory of stochastic processes and the phenomenology of turbulent transport of scalar fields. In this article we will summarize these recent developments which expose the direct link between the intermittency of transported fields and the statistical properties of particle trajectories advected by the turbulent flow (see also [4], and, for a more thorough review, [5]. We also discuss the perspectives of the Lagrangian approach beyond passive scalars, especially for the modeling of hydrodynamic turbulence.

  10. High Reynolds number decay of turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschoof, Ruben A.; Huisman, Sander G.; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-11-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number turbulence in a Taylor-Couette facility for pure inner cylinder rotation. The rotation of the inner cylinder (Rei = 2 ×106) is suddenly decelerated as fast as possible, thus removing the energy input within seconds. Local velocity measurements show that the decay in this wall-bounded inhomogeneous flow is faster than observed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent flows, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the inner and outer cylinder surfaces. We found that the decay over time can be described with the differential equation Re . (t) =cf (Re)Re2 , where the effects of the walls are included through the friction coefficient. A self-similar behavior of the azimuthal velocity is found: its normalized velocity profile as a function of the radius collapses over time during the decay process.

  11. Comparing turbulence models for flow through a rigid glottal model.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jungsoo; Frankel, Steven H

    2008-03-01

    Flow through a rigid model of the human vocal tract featuring a divergent glottis was numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach. A number of different turbulence models, available in a widely used commercial computational fluid dynamics code, were tested to determine their ability to capture various flow features recently observed in laboratory experiments and large eddy simulation studies. The study reveals that results from unsteady simulations employing the k-omega shear stress transport model were in much better agreement with previous measurements and predictions with regard to the ability to predict glottal jet skewing due to the Coanda effect and the intraglottal pressure distribution or related skin friction coefficient, than either steady or unsteady simulations using the Spalart-Allmaras model or any other two-equation turbulence model investigated in this study. PMID:18345812

  12. Multiscale analysis of turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie

    2004-11-01

    It is well known that the turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow has both shear driven and pressure driven mechanisms. The pure pressure driven Poiseuille flow and the pure shear driven Couette flow are just the two extremes of Couette-Poiseuille flow. Here the mean momentum balance equation of the fully developed turbulent Couette-Poiseuille flow is studied using a new multiscale analysis. The analysis reveals a close relation between the structure of Couette-Poiseuille flow and the hierarchy structures of boundary layer identified by Fife et al. (2004). The skin friction coefficient of Couette-Poiseuille flow is presented in a new way based on the analysis, showing the close relation between Poiseuille, Couette and Couette-Poiseuille flows. The maximum Reynolds shear stresses locations and values, the shape of the Reynolds shear stress, and the relation between the zero Reynolds shear stress location and the maximum velocity location are also presented.

  13. Frictional constitutive properties and related microstructures of albite, muscovite, biotite and talc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Valerie Jean

    Rock friction studies were conducted using a rotary shear, room temperature gas apparatus. The frictional behavior and constitutive parameters that model that behavior were determined and linked with specific microstructures. The velocity dependence of friction determines the stability of sliding in the laboratory and is found to correlate with changes in localization of strain. Material composition, velocity of sliding and initial conditions such as surface roughness were all found to affect the constitutive behavior. The work involves experiments on initially bare surfaces of albite, albite gouge and mica and talc gouges. The experimental results for frictional sliding on bare surfaces of albite show two distinct behaviors, one with lower friction that is slightly velocity negative and the other with higher friction that is more velocity negative. These two behaviors represent different styles of deformation, with the lower friction mechanism representing deformation on inclined Coulomb shear planes of fine-grained gouge generated during wear of the surface and the higher friction mechanism representing deformation on shears oriented parallel to the macroscopic shear plane. Microstructures of all materials are compared to frictional constitutive behavior. In both feldspar and mica gouge experiments, localization along boundary parallel shears correlates with negative velocity dependence, and is associated with a lower strength. Uniform distribution of strain within the gouge zone is associated with stable sliding for both micas and feldspar. At large displacements, talc and muscovite have a positive velocity dependence and slide stably, whereas biotite has a negative velocity dependence. Biotite becomes velocity strengthening at low velocities, similar to the transition to 'flow' behavior seen for serpentinites. Changes in velocity dependence with displacement are also seen in albite gouge. Two experimental factors affect this variability in behavior: the

  14. Macrostructure of Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aloor, S.; Nowak, B.; Vargas, R.; McClure, J. C.; Murr, L. E.; Nunes, A. C.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper will discuss two of the well know large scale features of friction stir welds: the "onion rings" seen in transverse sections, and the striations on the surface of the work piece. It will be shown that the surface features (sometimes called "tool marks") are the result of irregularities on the rotating shoulder of the pin tool and disappear when the shoulder is polished. The "onion ring" structure seen in transverse cross sections is formed by parts of the "carousel", the zone of material adjacent to and rotating with the pin tool, that are shed off in each rotation. The relation between the carousel and the "ring vortex", a rotational flow extending both in and out of the carousel and resembling a smoke-ring with the hole centered on the pin tool, will be discussed.

  15. Reflection type skin friction meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R. (Inventor); Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A housing block is provided having an upper surface conforming to the test surface of a model or aircraft. An oil film is supplied upstream of a transparent wedge window located in this upper surface by an oil pump system located external to the housing block. A light source located within the housing block supplies a light beam which passes through this transparent window and is reflected back through the transparent window by the upper surface of the oil film to a photo-sensitive position sensor located within the housing. This position sensor allows the slope history of the oil film caused by and aerodynamic flow to be determined. The skin friction is determined from this slope history. Internally located mirrors augment and sensitize the reflected beam as necessary before reaching the position sensor. In addition, a filter may be provided before this sensor to filter the beam.

  16. Friction Stir Welding and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Clarke, Kester D.; Krajewski, Paul E.

    2015-05-01

    With nearly twenty years of international research and collaboration in friction stir welding (FSW) and processing industrial applications have spread into nearly every feasible market. Currently applications exist in aerospace, railway, automotive, personal computers, technology, marine, cutlery, construction, as well as several other markets. Implementation of FSW has demonstrated diverse opportunities ranging from enabling new materials to reducing the production costs of current welding technologies by enabling condensed packaging solutions for traditional fabrication and assembly. TMS has sponsored focused instruction and communication in this technology area for more than fifteen years, with leadership from the Shaping and Forming Committee, which organizes a biannual symposium each odd year at the annual meeting. A focused publication produced from each of these symposia now comprises eight volumes detailing the primary research and development activities in this area over the last two decades. The articles assembled herein focus on both recent developments and technology reviews of several key markets from international experts in this area.

  17. Frictional wave dissipation on a remarkably rough reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Rogers, Justin S.; Koweek, David; Dunbar, Robert B.

    2015-05-01

    We present a week of observations of wave dissipation on the south forereef of Palmyra Atoll. Using wave measurements made in 6.2 m and 11.2 m of water offshore of the surf zone, we computed energy fluxes and near-bottom velocity. Equating the divergence of the shoreward energy flux to its dissipation by bottom friction and parameterizating dissipation in terms of the root-mean-square velocity cubed, we find that the wave friction factor, fw, for this reef is 1.80 ± 0.07, nearly an order of magnitude larger than values previously found for reefs. We attribute this remarkably high value of fw to the complex canopy structure of the reef, which we believe may be characteristic of healthy reefs. This suggests that healthy reefs with high coral cover may provide greater coastal protection than do degraded reefs with low coral cover.

  18. Rolling friction and energy dissipation in a spinning disc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Daolin; Liu, Caishan; Zhao, Zhen; Zhang, Hongjian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of both experimental and theoretical investigations for the dynamics of a steel disc spinning on a horizontal rough surface. With a pair of high-speed cameras, a stereoscopic vision method is adopted to perform omnidirectional measurements for the temporal evolution of the disc's motion. The experiment data allow us to detail the dynamics of the disc, and consequently to quantify its energy. From our experimental observations, it is confirmed that rolling friction is a primary factor responsible for the dissipation of the energy. Furthermore, a mathematical model, in which the rolling friction is characterized by a resistance torque proportional to the square of precession rate, is also proposed. By employing the model, we perform qualitative analysis and numerical simulations. Both of them provide results that precisely agree with our experimental findings. PMID:25197246

  19. Implementation of tactile feedback by modifying the perceived friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biet, M.; Giraud, F.; Lemaire-Semail, B.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes implementation and initial evaluation of variable friction displays. We first analyse a device that comprises a stator of an ultrasonic motor supplied by only one channel. In this way, the stator does not induce any rotative movement but creates a slippery feeling on the stator's surface. Considering the range of frequency and amplitude needed to obtain this phenomenon, we interpret it as the squeeze film effect, which may be the dominant factor causing an impression of lubrication. This effect is thus able to decrease the friction coefficient between the fingertip and the stator as a function of the vibration amplitude. Moreover, if we add a position sensor, we can create a textured surface by generating alternatively sliding and braking sensations by tuning the vibration amplitude of the wave. Then, based on the principle of the first device, another device is proposed in order to enable a free exploration of the surface, according to ergonomic requirements.

  20. Effect of friction in wedging of elastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the contact problem for an elastic wedge of arbitrary angle is considered. It is assumed that the external load is applied to the medium through a rigid wedge and the coefficient of friction between the loading wedge and the elastic solid is constant. The problem is reduced to a singular integral equation of the second kind with the contact pressure as the unknown function. An effective numerical solution of the integral equation is described and the results of three examples are presented. The comparison of these results with those obtained from the frictionless wedge problem indicates that generally friction has the tendency of reducing the peak values of the stress intensity factors calculated at the wedge apex and at the end points of the contact area.